WorldWideScience

Sample records for radar velocity imaging

  1. Tracking moving radar targets with parallel, velocity-tuned filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Douglas L.; Harmony, David W.; Bielek, Timothy P.; Hollowell, Jeff A.; Murray, Margaret S.; Martinez, Ana

    2013-04-30

    Radar data associated with radar illumination of a movable target is processed to monitor motion of the target. A plurality of filter operations are performed in parallel on the radar data so that each filter operation produces target image information. The filter operations are defined to have respectively corresponding velocity ranges that differ from one another. The target image information produced by one of the filter operations represents the target more accurately than the target image information produced by the remainder of the filter operations when a current velocity of the target is within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation. In response to the current velocity of the target being within the velocity range associated with the one filter operation, motion of the target is tracked based on the target image information produced by the one filter operation.

  2. Radar velocity determination using direction of arrival measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.; Naething, Richard M.; Horndt, Volker

    2017-12-19

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing direction of arrival (DOA) data to determine various flight parameters for an aircraft A plurality of radar images (e.g., SAR images) can be analyzed to identify a plurality of pixels in the radar images relating to one or more ground targets. In an embodiment, the plurality of pixels can be selected based upon the pixels exceeding a SNR threshold. The DOA data in conjunction with a measurable Doppler frequency for each pixel can be obtained. Multi-aperture technology enables derivation of an independent measure of DOA to each pixel based on interferometric analysis. This independent measure of DOA enables decoupling of the aircraft velocity from the DOA in a range-Doppler map, thereby enabling determination of a radar velocity. The determined aircraft velocity can be utilized to update an onboard INS, and to keep it aligned, without the need for additional velocity-measuring instrumentation.

  3. Estimating Radar Velocity using Direction of Arrival Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horndt, Volker [General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Bickel, Douglas Lloyd [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naething, Richard M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements, as with a monopulse antenna, can be compared against Doppler measurements in a Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) image to determine an aircraft's forward velocity as well as its crab angle, to assist the aircraft's navigation as well as improving high - performance SAR image formation and spatial calibration.

  4. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  5. Material Property Estimation for Direct Detection of DNAPL using Integrated Ground-Penetrating Radar Velocity, Imaging and Attribute Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John H. Bradford; Stephen Holbrook; Scott B. Smithson

    2004-12-09

    The focus of this project is direct detection of DNAPL's specifically chlorinated solvents, via material property estimation from multi-fold surface ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. We combine state-of-the-art GPR processing methodology with quantitative attribute analysis and material property estimation to determine the location and extent of residual and/or pooled DNAPL in both the vadose and saturated zones. An important byproduct of our research is state-of-the-art imaging which allows us to pinpoint attribute anomalies, characterize stratigraphy, identify fracture zones, and locate buried objects.

  6. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Stephen M.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.

    2004-01-01

    There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality) on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and...

  7. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, Stephen M.; Pegram, Geoffrey G. S.

    2004-01-01

    There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality) on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast...

  8. On the measurement of vertical velocity by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the measurement of atmospheric vertical motion utilizing the MST radar technique. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is briefly discussed as a function of scale. Vertical velocity measurement by MST radars is then considered from within the context of the expected magnitudes to be observed. Examples are drawn from published vertical velocity observations.

  9. Imaging with Synthetic Aperture Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Massonnet, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Describing a field that has been transformed by the recent availability of data from a new generation of space and airborne systems, the authors offer a synthetic geometrical approach to the description of synthetic aperture radar, one that addresses physicists, radar specialists, as well as experts in image processing.  

  10. HF Radar Bistatic Measurement of Surface Current Velocities: Drifter Comparisons and Radar Consistency Checks

    OpenAIRE

    Lipa, Belinda; Whelan, Chad; Rector, Bill; Nyden, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    We describe the operation of a bistatic HF radar network and outline analysis methods for the derivation of the elliptical velocity components from the radar echo spectra. Bistatic operation is illustrated by application to a bistatic pair: Both remote systems receive backscattered echo, with one remote system in addition receiving bistatic echoes transmitted by the other. The pair produces elliptical velocity components in addition to two sets of radials. Results are compared with drifter me...

  11. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Wesson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and are nearest neighbour techniques of two sub-types: Individual Target and Border Tracing. The contaminated data is estimated through Kriging, considered the optimal technique for the spatial interpolation of Gaussian data, where the 'screening effect' that occurs with the Kriging weighting distribution around target points is exploited to ensure computational efficiency. Matrix rank reduction techniques in combination with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD are also suggested for finding an efficient solution to the Kriging Equations which can cope with near singular systems. Rainfall estimation at ground level from radar rainfall volume scan data is of interest and importance in earth bound applications such as hydrology and agriculture. As an extension of the above, Ordinary Kriging is applied to three-dimensional radar rainfall data to estimate rainfall rate at ground level. Keywords: ground clutter, data infilling, Ordinary Kriging, nearest neighbours, Singular Value Decomposition, border tracing, computation time, ground level rainfall estimation

  12. Radar foundations for imaging and advanced concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Through courses internally taught at IDA, Dr. Roger Sullivan has devised a book that brings readers fully up to speed on the most essential quantitave aspects of general radar in order to introduce study of the most exciting and relevant applications to radar imaging and advanced concepts: Synthetic Aperture Radar (4 chapters), Space-time Adaptive Processing, moving target indication (MTI), bistatic radar, low probability of intercept (LPI) radar, weather radar, and ground-penetrating radar. Whether you're a radar novice or experienced professional, this is an essential refer

  13. Intercomparison of radar meteor velocity corrections using different ionization coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E. R.; Wu, Y.-J.; Chau, J.; Hsu, R.-R.

    2017-06-01

    Sensitive long-wavelength radar observations of absolute velocity never previously published from Jicamarca are brought to bear on the long-standing problem of radar detection of slow-moving meteors. Attention is devoted to evaluating the ionization coefficient β(V) in the critically important velocity range of 11-20 km/s in recent laboratory measurements of Thomas et al. (2016). Theoretical predictions for β(V) based on the laboratory data, on Jones (1997), on Janches et al. (2014), and on Verniani and Hawkins (1964) are used to correct the incoming meteor velocities measured with the sensitive Jicamarca high-power, large-aperture radar operating at 6 m wavelength. All corrected distributions are consistent with the predictions of the Nesvorný model in showing pronounced monotonic increases down to the escape velocity (11 km/s). Such distributions may be essential to explaining the pronounced ledge in nighttime electron density and the rapid disappearance of electrons in meteor trails in the altitude range of 80-85 km.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryIncoming meteors from space cannot be detected with radars unless the medium around the meteor is strongly ionized. In this study, the distribution of meteor velocities that are detected by the sensitive Jicamarca radar is corrected following theoretical models for the ionization coefficient, a measure of what fraction of the ablated meteor atoms are ionized. The results show that when the distribution of velocities is corrected, one is left with a large population of meteors that are entering the Earth's atmosphere close to the escape speed for the solar system which is 11 km/s.

  14. Doppler effects on velocity spectra observed by MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, A. O.; Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, wind data from mesophere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars have been used to study the spectra of gravity waves in the atmosphere (Scheffler and Liu, 1985; VanZandt et al., 1985). Since MST radar measures the line-of-sight Doppler velocities, it senses the components of the wave-associated velocities along its beam directions. These components are related through the polarization relations which depend on the frequency and wave number of the wave. Therfore, the radar-observed velocity spectrum will be different from the original gravity-wave spectrum. Their relationship depends on the frequency and wave number of the wave as well as the propagation geometry. This relation can be used to interpret the observed data. It can also be used to test the assumption of gravity-wave spectrum (Scheffler and Liu, 1985). In deriving this relation, the background atmosphere has been assumed to be motionless. Obviously, the Doppler shift due to the background wind will change the shape of the gravity-wave power spectrum as well as its relation with the radar-observed spectrum. Here, researcher's investigate these changes.

  15. Space Radar Image of Bahia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a color composite image of southern Bahia, Brazil, centered at 15.22 degree south latitude and 39.07 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 38th orbit of Earth on October 2, 1994. The image covers an area centered over the Una Biological Reserve, one the largest protected areas in northeastern Brazil. The 7,000-hectare reserve is administered by the Brazilian Institute for the Environment and is part of the larger Atlantic coastal forest, a narrow band of rain forest extending along the eastern coast of Brazil. The Atlantic coastal forest of southern Bahia is one of the world's most threatened and diverse ecosystems. Due to widespread settlement, only 2 to 5 percent of the original forest cover remains. Yet the region still contains an astounding variety of plants and animals, including a large number of endemic species. More than half of the region's tree species and 80 percent of its animal species are indigenous and found nowhere else on Earth. The Una Reserve is also the only federally protected habitat for the golden-headed lion tamarin, the yellow-breasted capuchin monkey and many other endangered species. In the past few years, scientists from Brazilian and international conservation organizations have coordinated efforts to study the biological diversity of this region and to develop practical and economically viable options for preserving the remaining primary forests in southern Bahia. The shuttle imaging radar is used in this study to identify various land uses and vegetation types, including remaining patches of primary forest, cabruca forest (cacao planted in the understory of the native forest), secondary forest, pasture and coastal mangrove. Standard remote-sensing technology that relies on light reflected from the forest canopy cannot accurately distinguish between cabruca and undisturbed forest. Optical remote sensing is also

  16. Space Radar Image of Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and its surroundings, centered at 51.17 north latitude and 30.15 west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 16th orbit on October 1, 1994. The area is located on the northern border of the Ukraine Republic and was produced by using the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) polarization. The differences in the intensity are due to differences in vegetation cover, with brighter areas being indicative of more vegetation. These data were acquired as part of a collaboration between NASA and the National Space Agency of Ukraine in Remote Sensing and Earth Sciences. NASA has included several sites provided by the Ukrainian space agency as targets of opportunity during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The Ukrainian space agency also plans to conduct airborne surveys of these sites during the mission. The Chernobyl nuclear power plant is located toward the top of the image near the Pripyat River. The 12-kilometer (7.44-mile)-long cooling pond is easily distinguishable as an elongated dark shape in the center near the top of the image. The reactor complex is visible as the bright area to the extreme left of the cooling pond and the city of Chernobyl is the bright area just below the cooling pond next to the Pripyat River. The large dark area in the bottom right of the image is the Kiev Reservoir just north of Kiev. Also visible is the Dnieper River, which feeds into the Kiev Reservoir from the top of the image. The Soviet government evacuated 116,000 people within 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) of the Chernobyl reactor after the explosion and fire on April 26, 1986. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight

  17. Image Registration Methode in Radar Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chelbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a methodology for the determination of the registration of an Interferometric Synthetic radar (InSAR pair images with half pixel precision. Using the two superposed radar images Single Look complexes (SLC [1-4], we developed an iterative process to superpose these two images according to their correlation coefficient with a high coherence area. This work concerns the exploitation of ERS Tandem pair of radar images SLC of the Algiers area acquired on 03 January and 04 January 1994. The former is taken as a master image and the latter as a slave image.

  18. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    over the full region of interest and a real time image at a frame rate of 20 Hz can be displayed. Real time videos have been obtained from both our research systems and from commercial BK Medical scanners. The vector velocity images reveal the full complexity of the human blood flow. It is easy to see...... direction and the correct velocity magnitude for any orientation of the vessels. At complex geometries like bifurcations, branching and for valves the approach reveals how the velocity changes magnitude and direction over the cardiac cycle. Vector velocity reveals a wealth of new information that now...... is accessible to the ultrasound community. The displaying and studying of this information is challenging as complex flow changes rapidly over the cardiac cycle....

  19. Shuttle Imaging Radar Survey Mission C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) was part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30 September - 11...

  20. Spaceborne Imaging Radar C-band: 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C (SIR-C) is part of an imaging radar system that was flown on board two Space Shuttle flights (9 - 20 April, 1994 and 30 September - 11...

  1. Space radar image of Ubar optical/radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This pair of images from space shows a portion of the southern Empty Quarter of the Arabian Peninsula in the country of Oman. On the left is a radar image of the region around the site of the fabled Lost City of Ubar, discovered in 1992 with the aid of remote sensing data. On the right is an enhanced optical image taken by the shuttle astronauts. Ubar existed from about 2800 BC to about 300 AD. and was a remote desert outpost where caravans were assembled for the transport of frankincense across the desert. The actual site of the fortress of the Lost City of Ubar, currently under excavation, is too small to show in either image. However, tracks leading to the site, and surrounding tracks, show as prominent, but diffuse, reddish streaks in the radar image. Although used in modern times, field investigations show many of these tracks were in use in ancient times as well. Mapping of these tracks on regional remote sensing images provided by the Landsat satellite was a key to recognizing the site as Ubar. The prominent magenta colored area is a region of large sand dunes. The green areas are limestone rocks, which form a rocky desert floor. A major wadi, or dry stream bed, runs across the scene and appears as a white line. The radar images, and ongoing field investigations, will help shed light on an early civilization about which little in known. The radar image was taken by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) and is centered at 18 degrees North latitude and 53 degrees East longitude. The image covers an area about 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United

  2. Resolution function of nonsinusoidal radar signals. I - Range-velocity resolution with rectangular pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nasser J.

    1990-05-01

    A generalization of a previously published ambiguity function that applies to radar known as large-relative-bandwidth radar, carrier-free radar, impulse radar, or nonsinusoidal radar is discussed. This radar has recently attracted attention because of its ability to penetrate absorbing materials used in the stealth technology. Another good application is the detection of moving targets with a small radar cross section by a look-down radar, which calls for a thumbtack ambiguity function. Since a small radar cross section in this application is typically due to the small size of the target that is coated with absorbing material, the antistealth feature of the nonsinusoidal radar is implicitly being used. The principle is presented of a resolution function (tentatively called the range-velocity or the range-Doppler resolution function) based on processing a nonsinusoidal signal consisting of N characters with a time separation TD and each character consisting of a sequence of L binary pulses of duration T. It is shown that range-velocity resolution functions approaching the ideal thumbtack function are easy to obtain. The blind speeds of the pulse-Doppler radar with sinusoidal carrier do not inherently occur, and all velocities are observed as true velocities rather than as velocities modulo the first blind speed (velocity ambiguity).

  3. Through-the-wall radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness G

    2011-01-01

    Wall Attenuation and Dispersion, A. Hussein Muqaibel, M.A. Alsunaidi, Nuruddeen M. Iya, and A. Safaai-JaziAntenna Elements, Arrays, and Systems for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, A. Hoorfar and A. FathyBeamforming for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, G. Alli and D. DiFilippoImage and Localization of Behind-the-Wall Targets Using Collocated and Distributed Apertures, Y.D. Zhang and A. HuntConventional and Emerging Waveforms for Detection and Imaging of Targets behind Walls, F. Ahmad and R.M. NarayananInverse Scattering Approaches in Through-the-Wall Imaging, K. Sarabandi, M. Thiel, M. Dehmollai

  4. HF Radar Observation of Velocity Fields Induced by Tsunami Waves in the Kii Channel, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    日向, 博文; 藤, 良太郎; 藤井, 智史; 藤田, 裕一; 花土, 弘; 片岡, 智哉; 水谷, 雅裕; 高橋, 智幸

    2012-01-01

    High frequency ocean surface radar observation reveals the velocity fields of propagating tsunami waves and subsequent 30-40 minute period natural oscillation in the Kii Channel, Japan induced by the March 11, 2011 moment magnitude 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. Technical issues of the ocean surface radar sysytem concerning the detection of tsunami waves and natural oscillation velocities are also discussed.

  5. Space Radar Image of Central Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the central part of the island of Sumatra in Indonesia that shows how the tropical rainforest typical of this country is being impacted by human activity. Native forest appears in green in this image, while prominent pink areas represent places where the native forest has been cleared. The large rectangular areas have been cleared for palm oil plantations. The bright pink zones are areas that have been cleared since 1989, while the dark pink zones are areas that were cleared before 1989. These radar data were processed as part of an effort to assist oil and gas companies working in the area to assess the environmental impact of both their drilling operations and the activities of the local population. Radar images are useful in these areas because heavy cloud cover and the persistent smoke and haze associated with deforestation have prevented usable visible-light imagery from being acquired since 1989. The dark shapes in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image are a chain of lakes in flat coastal marshes. This image was acquired in October 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. Environmental changes can be easily documented by comparing this image with visible-light data that were acquired in previous years by the Landsat satellite. The image is centered at 0.9 degrees north latitude and 101.3 degrees east longitude. The area shown is 50 kilometers by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is L-band vertically transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  6. Space Radar Image of Mineral Resources, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image of a mineral-rich region in southern China is being used by geologists to identify potential new areas for mineral exploration. The area shown is the vicinity of the city of Zhao Qing, the light blue area along the banks of the River Xi Jiang in the lower left. This is in the southern Chinese province of Guangdong, about 75 kilometers (46 miles) west of Guangzhou (Canton). The largest gold mine in southern China is located in the far upper left of the image along a brightly reflective mountain ridge. Using the radar image as a guide, geologists are tracing the extension of the ridge structure to the east (right) to identify possible mining areas. Radar imaging is especially useful for this purpose because of its sensitivity to subtle topographic structure, even in areas such as these, which have a dense vegetation cover. The Xi Jiang area is one of the most productive mining regions in China, with deposits of tungsten, lead, zinc and gold. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttleEndeavour on April 17, 1994. The image is centered at 37.2 degreesnorth latitude and 112.5 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The image shows an area 60 kilometers by 38 kilometers (37.2 miles by 23.6 miles) The colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is L-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earthprogram.

  7. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W [Albuquerque, NM; Jordan, Jay D [Albuquerque, NM; Kim, Theodore J [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  8. Space Radar Image of Star City, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the Star City cosmonaut training center, east of Moscow, Russia. Four American astronauts are training here for future long-duration flights aboard the Russian Mir space station. These joint flights are giving NASA and the Russian Space Agency experience necessary for the construction of the international Alpha space station, beginning in late 1997. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR), on its 62nd orbit on October 3, 1994. This Star City image is centered at 55.55 degrees north latitude and 38.0 degrees east longitude. The area shown is approximately 32 kilometers by 49 kilometers (20 miles by 30 miles). North is to the top in this image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The image was produced using three channels of SIR-C radar data: red indicates L-band (23 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and received); green indicates L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue indicates C-band (6 cm wavelength, horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In general, dark pink areas are agricultural; pink and light blue areas are urban communities; black areas represent lakes and rivers; dark blue areas are cleared forest; and light green areas are forested. The prominent black runways just right of center are Shchelkovo Airfield, about 4 km long. The textured pale blue-green area east and southeast of Shchelkovo Airfield is forest. Just east of the runways is a thin railroad line running southeast; the Star City compound lies just east of the small bend in the rail line. Star City contains the living quarters and training facilities for Russian cosmonauts and their families. Moscow's inner loop road is visible at the lower left edge of the image. The Kremlin is just off the left edge, on the banks of the meandering Moskva River. The Klyazma River snakes to the southeast from the reservoir in the upper left (shown in bright red

  9. Investigation of hopped frequency waveforms for range and velocity measurements of radar targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kathree, U

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radar, High Range Resolution (HRR) profiles are often used to improve target tracking accuracy in range and to allow the radar system to produce an image of an object using techniques such as inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR...

  10. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  11. Space radar image of New Orleans, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This image of the area surrounding the city of New Orleans, Louisiana in the southeastern United States demonstrates the ability of multi-frequency imaging radar to distinguish different types of land cover. The dark area in the center is Lake Pontchartrain. The thin line running across the lake is a causeway connecting New Orleans to the city of Mandeville. Lake Borgne is the dark area in the lower right of the image. The Mississippi River appears as a dark, wavy line in the lower left. The white dots on the Mississippi are ships. The French Quarter is the brownish square near the left center of the image. Lakefront Airport, a field used mostly for general aviation, is the bright spot near the center, jutting out into Lake Pontchartrain. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) during orbit 39 of space shuttle Endeavour on October 2, 1994. The area is located at 30.10 degrees north latitude and 89.1 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 100 kilometers (60 miles) by 50 kilometers (30 miles). The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and received); blue represents the L-band (vertically transmitted and received). The green areas are primarily vegetation consisting of swamp land and swamp forest (bayou) growing on sandy soil, while the pink areas are associated with reflections from buildings in urban and suburban areas. Different tones and colors in the vegetation areas will be studied by scientists to see how effective imaging radar data is in discriminating between different types of wetlands. Accurate maps of coastal wetland areas are important to ecologists studying wild fowl and the coastal environment.

  12. A comparison of velocity measurements from the CUTLASS Finland radar and the EISCAT UHF system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    Full Text Available The CUTLASS Finland radar, which comprises an integral part of the SuperDARN system of HF coherent radars, provides near continuous observations of high-latitude plasma irregularities within a field-of-view which extends over some four million square kilometres. Within the Finland radar field-of-view lie both the EISCAT mainland and EISCAT Svalbard incoherent scatter radar facilities. Since the CUTLASS Finland radar commenced operation, in February 1995, the mainland EISCAT UHF radar has been run in common programme 1 and 2 modes for a total duration exceeding 1000 h. Simultaneous and spatially coincident returns from these two radars over this period provide the basis for a comparison of irregularity drift velocity and F-region ion velocity. Initial comparison is limited to velocities from four intervals of simultaneous radar returns; intervals are selected such that they exhibit a variety of velocity signatures including that characteristic of the convection reversal and a rapidly fluctuating velocity feature. Subsequent comparison is on a statistical basis. The velocities measured by the two systems demonstrate reasonable correspondence over the velocity regime encountered during the simultaneous occurrence of coherent and incoherent scatter; differences between the EISCAT UHF measurements of F-region ion drift and the irregularity drift velocities from the Finland radar are explained in terms of a number of contributing factors including contamination of the latter by E-region echoes, a factor which is investigated further, and the potentially deleterious effect of discrepant volume and time sampling intervals.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma convection

  13. Bistatic Forward Scattering Radar Detection and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Forward Scattering Radar (FSR is a special type of bistatic radar that can implement image detection, imaging, and identification using the forward scattering signals provided by the moving targets that cross the baseline between the transmitter and receiver. Because the forward scattering effect has a vital significance in increasing the targets’ Radar Cross Section (RCS, FSR is quite advantageous for use in counter stealth detection. This paper first introduces the front line technology used in forward scattering RCS, FSR detection, and Shadow Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (SISAR imaging and key problems such as the statistical characteristics of forward scattering clutter, accurate parameter estimation, and multitarget discrimination are then analyzed. Subsequently, the current research progress in FSR detection and SISAR imaging are described in detail, including the theories and experiments. In addition, with reference to the BeiDou navigation satellite, the results of forward scattering experiments in civil aircraft detection are shown. Finally, this paper considers future developments in FSR target detection and imaging and presents a new, promising technique for stealth target detection.

  14. Space Radar Image of Manaus, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    These two images were created using data from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). On the left is a false-color image of Manaus, Brazil acquired April 12, 1994, onboard space shuttle Endeavour. In the center of this image is the Solimoes River just west of Manaus before it combines with the Rio Negro to form the Amazon River. The scene is around 8 by 8 kilometers (5 by 5 miles) with north toward the top. The radar image was produced in L-band where red areas correspond to high backscatter at HH polarization, while green areas exhibit high backscatter at HV polarization. Blue areas show low backscatter at VV polarization. The image on the right is a classification map showing the extent of flooding beneath the forest canopy. The classification map was developed by SIR-C/X-SAR science team members at the University of California,Santa Barbara. The map uses the L-HH, L-HV, and L-VV images to classify the radar image into six categories: Red flooded forest Green unflooded tropical rain forest Blue open water, Amazon river Yellow unflooded fields, some floating grasses Gray flooded shrubs Black floating and flooded grasses Data like these help scientists evaluate flood damage on a global scale. Floods are highly episodic and much of the area inundated is often tree-covered. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those

  15. Radar Image, Color as Height , Salalah, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This radar image includes the city of Salalah, the second largest city in Oman. It illustrates how topography determines local climate and, in turn, where people live. This area on the southern coast of the Arabian Peninsula is characterized by a narrow coastal plain (bottom) facing southward into the Arabian Sea, backed by the steep escarpment of the Qara Mountains. The backslope of the Qara Mountains slopes gently into the vast desert of the Empty Quarter (at top). This area is subject to strong monsoonal storms from the Arabian Sea during the summer, when the mountains are enveloped in a sort of perpetual fog. The moisture from the monsoon enables agriculture on the Salalah plain, and also provides moisture for Frankincense trees growing on the desert (north) side of the mountains. In ancient times, incense derived from the sap of the Frankincense tree was the basis for an extremely lucrative trade. Radar and topographic data are used by historians and archaeologists to discover ancient trade routes and other significant ruins.This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from green at the lowest elevations to brown at the highest elevations. This image contains about 1070 meters (3500 feet) of total relief. White speckles on the face of some of the mountains are holes in the data caused by steep terrain. These will be filled using coverage from an intersecting pass.The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), launched on February 11,2000, uses the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. The mission is designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot

  16. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  17. A systematic test of surface velocity radar (SVR) to improve flood discharge prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolezzi, G.; Zamler, D.; Laronne, J. B.; Salvaro, M.; Piazza, F.; Le Coz, J.; Welber, M.; Dramais, G.

    2011-12-01

    Measurement of streamflow at flood stage is normally prohibitive and is therefore not a standard task performed by hydrographic offices. Streamflow estimation at high stages is commonly achieved through transformation of gauged water levels to discharge through rating curves. These stage-discharge relationships often suffer from large errors especially above the highest gauged discharge values corresponding to morphologically formative conditions. Non-contact methods based on radar Doppler technology have recently emerged as promising options because they can remotely measure the surface water velocity without requiring contact of instruments with the stream. They have been used for more than a decade, notably in Japan, but they are expensive and are fixed with the radar beam directed to a small portion of the free surface width. The aim of our study is to test a portable, cheap, easy-to-apply radar-based technique (SVR: Surface Velocity Radar). We illustrate the outcomes of a systematic series of field campaigns performed in Israel, Italy and France with concomitant standard (mechanical and electromagnetic current meter) and modern (ADCP, LSPIV image analysis) techniques with cooperating regional authorities. The SVR has been deployed from bridges and/or channel banks on 5 different streams: the single-thread Adige and the braided Tagliamento rivers (NE Italy) the single-thread Arc-en-Maurienne River during reservoir flushing (French Alps) and the ephemeral, flashflood Wadi Eshtemoa and a small perennial stream at Ein-Fesh'ha springs (Israel). This has allowed to span a relatively broad range of discharge (1 to ~ 600 m3/s), flow velocity (0.5 to ~ 3.5 m/s) and ratio between bed roughness height to flow depth (~ 0.01 to ~ 0.5) while measuring both under steady and rapidly varying flow conditions. The key outcomes of the field campaigns are: (i) wherever a bridge is available and cross-sectional topography can be measured before and/or after a flood, comparable

  18. Compressive sensing for high resolution radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Hoogeboom, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present some preliminary results on the application of Compressive Sensing (CS) to high resolution radar imaging. CS is a recently developed theory which allows reconstruction of sparse signals with a number of measurements much lower than what is required by the Shannon sampling

  19. Digital image transformation and rectification of spacecraft and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of digital processing techniques to spacecraft television pictures and radar images is discussed. The use of digital rectification to produce contour maps from spacecraft pictures is described; images with azimuth and elevation angles are converted into point-perspective frame pictures. The digital correction of the slant angle of radar images to ground scale is examined. The development of orthophoto and stereoscopic shaded relief maps from digital terrain and digital image data is analyzed. Digital image transformations and rectifications are utilized on Viking Orbiter and Lander pictures of Mars.

  20. Chaos Through-Wall Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Wang, Bingjie; Zhang, Jianguo; Liu, Li; Li, Ying; Wang, Yuncai; Wang, Anbang

    2017-12-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a chaos through-wall imaging radar using ultra-wideband chaotic-pulse-position modulation (CPPM) microwave signal. The CPPM signal based on logistic map with 1-ns pulse width and 1-GHz bandwidth is implemented by a field programmable gate array (FPGA) and then up-converted as the radar transmitting signal. Two-dimensional image of human objects behind obstacles is obtained by correlation method and back projection algorithm. Our experiments successfully perform through-wall imaging for single and multiple human objects through 20-cm thick wall. The down-range resolution of the proposed radar is 15 cm. Furthermore, the anti-jamming properties of the proposed radar in CPPM jamming, linear frequency-modulated jamming, and Gaussian noise jamming environments are demonstrated by electromagnetic simulations using the finite-difference time-domain. The simulation results show the CPPM microwave signal possesses excellent jamming immunity to the noise and radio frequency interference, which makes it perform superbly in multiradar environments.

  1. Space Radar Image of Raco Biomass Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This biomass map of the Raco, Michigan, area was produced from data acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard space shuttle Endeavour. Biomass is the amount of plant material on an area of Earth's surface. Radar can directly sense the quantity and organizational structure of the woody biomass in the forest. Science team members at the University of Michigan used the radar data to estimate the standing biomass for this Raco site in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Detailed surveys of 70 forest stands will be used to assess the accuracy of these techniques. The seasonal growth of terrestrial plants, and forests in particular, leads to the temporary storage of large amounts of carbon, which could directly affect changes in global climate. In order to accurately predict future global change, scientists need detailed information about current distribution of vegetation types and the amount of biomass present around the globe. Optical techniques to determine net biomass are frustrated by chronic cloud-cover. Imaging radar can penetrate through cloud-cover with negligible signal losses. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German

  2. Quality characterization of reflectivity and radial velocity observed by Indian Doppler weather radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarjyothi, Kasimahanthi; Dutta, Devajyoti; Devarajan, Preveen Kumar; George, John P.; Rajagopal, Ekkattil N.

    2017-07-01

    Static and dynamic quality index (QI) maps are generated as the base products of Doppler weather radar (DWR). The quality characterization of radar reflectivity and radial velocity in terms of their QI is presented for the operational DWRs in India. A static composite QI has been generated using the maximum method. These static maps enable the detection of a low QI region in advance for the Indian radars. The QI of reflectivity is above 0.5 in all regions except in the regions of blockage, high attenuation due to rain, and beam broadening, whereas the QI of radial velocity is good for values >0.8 except for the ambiguous region and the region affected by nonmeteorological echoes. This shall help in the quick preprocessing of radar observations, since the regions of low QI can be masked. A sample case of gridded radar rainfall is presented by employing the QI scheme.

  3. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  4. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  5. Radar Imaging for Urban Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    animate objects, like the limbs in human gait are characterized by MD motion. Translational motions, producing constant velocity or accelerating...differentiating animate from inanimate targets. An indoor rotating fan with three plastic blades was used as the target for the real-data collection experiment. In...The human’s phantom consists of 23 different tissue types, each with its own dielectric properties. The model is optimized for numerical

  6. Space Radar Image of Sydney, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image is dominated by the metropolitan area of Australia's largest city, Sydney. Sydney Harbour, with numerous coves and inlets, is seen in the upper center of the image, and the roughly circular Botany Bay is shown in the lower right. The downtown business district of Sydney appears as a bright white area just above the center of the image. The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a white line adjacent to the downtown district. The well-known Sydney Opera House is the small, white dot to the right of the bridge. Urban areas appear yellow, blue and brown. The purple areas are undeveloped areas and park lands. Manly, the famous surfing beach, is shown in yellow at the top center of the image. Runways from the Sydney Airport are the dark features that extend into Botany Bay in the lower right. Botany Bay is the site where Captain James Cook first landed his ship, Endeavour, in 1770. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on April 20, 1994, onboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The area shown is 33 kilometers by 38kilometers (20 miles by 23 miles) and is centered at 33.9 degrees south latitude, 151.2 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequenciesand polarizations as follows: red is L-band, vertically transmittedand horizontally received; green is C-band, vertically transmitted and horizontally received; and blue is C-band, vertically transmittedand received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italianand United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. #####

  7. Towards nonlinear wave reconstruction and prediction from synthetic radar images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijaya, Andreas Parama

    2016-01-01

    The use of remotely wave sensing by a marine radar is increasingly needed to provide wave information for the sake of safety and operational effectiveness in many offshore activities. Reconstruction of radar images needs to be carried out since radar images are a poor representation of the sea

  8. Space Radar Image of Kiluchevskoi, Volcano, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the area of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the blue triangular peak in the center of the image, towards the left edge of the bright red area that delineates bare snow cover. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 88th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 75 kilometers by 100 kilometers (46 miles by 62 miles) that is centered at 56.07 degrees north latitude and 160.84 degrees east longitude. North is toward the bottom of the image. The radar illumination is from the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the recent activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). In addition to Kliuchevskoi, two other active volcanoes are visible in the image. Bezymianny, the circular crater above and to the right of Kliuchevskoi, contains a slowly growing lava dome. Tolbachik is the large volcano with a dark summit crater near the upper right edge of the red snow covered area. The Kamchatka River runs from right to left across the bottom of the image. The current eruption of Kliuchevskoi included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 15,000 meters (50,000 feet). Melting snow mixed with volcanic ash triggered mud flows on the

  9. Digital signal processing techniques and applications in radar image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bu-Chin

    2008-01-01

    A self-contained approach to DSP techniques and applications in radar imagingThe processing of radar images, in general, consists of three major fields: Digital Signal Processing (DSP); antenna and radar operation; and algorithms used to process the radar images. This book brings together material from these different areas to allow readers to gain a thorough understanding of how radar images are processed.The book is divided into three main parts and covers:* DSP principles and signal characteristics in both analog and digital domains, advanced signal sampling, and

  10. Artifacts in Radar Imaging of Moving Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    2004. [2] P. Z. Peebles , Radar Principles . New York, NY: Wiley Inter-Science, 1998. [3] Center for Remote Imaging, Sensing and Processing...STAP for SAR,‖ in Applications for Space-Time Adaptive Processing. Stevenage, United Kingdom: The Institution of Electrical Engineers , 2004, pp. 73... Electrical and Control Engineering , 2010, pp. 1855-1858 [24] I. Stojanovic, W. C. Karl and M. Cetin, ―Compressed sensing of mono-static and multi

  11. Space Radar Image of San Rafael Glacier, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA radar instrument has been successfully used to measure some of the fastest moving and most inaccessible glaciers in the world -- in Chile's huge, remote Patagonia ice fields -- demonstrating a technique that could produce more accurate predictions of glacial response to climate change and corresponding sea level changes. This image, produced with interferometric measurements made by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flown on the Space Shuttle last fall, has provided the first detailed measurements of the mass and motion of the San Rafael Glacier. Very few measurements have been made of the Patagonian ice fields, which are the world's largest mid-latitude ice masses and account for more than 60 percent of the Southern Hemisphere's glacial area outside of Antarctica. These features make the area essential for climatologists attempting to understand the response of glaciers on a global scale to changes in climate, but the region's inaccessibility and inhospitable climate have made it nearly impossible for scientists to study its glacial topography, meteorology and changes over time. Currently, topographic data exist for only a few glaciers while no data exist for the vast interior of the ice fields. Velocity has been measured on only five of the more than 100 glaciers, and the data consist of only a few single-point measurements. The interferometry performed by the SIR-C/X-SAR was used to generate both a digital elevation model of the glaciers and a map of their ice motion on a pixel-per-pixel basis at very high resolution for the first time. The data were acquired from nearly the same position in space on October 9, 10 and 11, 1994, at L-band frequency (24-cm wavelength), vertically transmitted and received polarization, as the Space Shuttle Endeavor flew over several Patagonian outlet glaciers of the San Rafael Laguna. The area shown in these two images is 50 kilometers by 30 kilometers (30 miles by 18 miles) in

  12. Space Radar Image of Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mt. Vesuvius, one of the best known volcanoes in the world primarily for the eruption that buried the Roman city of Pompeii, is shown in the center of this radar image. The central cone of Vesuvius is the dark purple feature in the center of the volcano. This cone is surrounded on the northern and eastern sides by the old crater rim, called Mt. Somma. Recent lava flows are the pale yellow areas on the southern and western sides of the cone. Vesuvius is part of a large volcanic zone which includes the Phalagrean Fields, the cluster of craters seen along the left side of the image. The Bay of Naples, on the left side of the image, is separated from the Gulf of Salerno, in the lower left, by the Sorrento Peninsula. Dense urban settlement can be seen around the volcano. The city of Naples is above and to the left of Vesuvius; the seaport of the city can be seen in the top of the bay. Pompeii is located just below the volcano on this image. The rapid eruption in 79 A.D. buried the victims and buildings of Pompeii under several meters of debris and killed more than 2,000 people. Due to the violent eruptive style and proximity to populated areas, Vesuvius has been named by the international scientific community as one of fifteen Decade Volcanoes which are being intensively studied during the 1990s. The image is centered at 40.83 degrees North latitude, 14.53 degrees East longitude. It shows an area 100 kilometers by 55 kilometers (62 miles by 34 miles.) This image was acquired on April 15, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth.

  13. Use of imaging radar for geology and archeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, M.

    1981-01-01

    Imaging radar is shown to be a useful sensor for geological analysis as a standal one sensor in clouded regions or as a complementary data source with visible NIR systems. Radar image tone is a function of the radar system parameters (imaging geometry, frequency, polarization) and a function of the target (local slope, electrical properties, and surface roughness). Substantial topographic texture enhancement can be achieved for large scale features by using specular returns associated with steep-incidence radars or shadows associated with grazing-incidence systems. Texture enhancement also allows radar to image lineaments and archeological features, such as canals and causeways. Future multispectral radars may achieve better discrimination of subresolution structures. Seasat radar images of several geographic locations are provided.

  14. Space Radar Image of Altona, Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an X-band seasonal image of the Altona test site in Manitoba, Canada, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) south of Winnipeg. The image is centered at approximately 49 degrees north latitude and 97.5 degrees west longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 11, 1994, during the first flight of the radar system, and on October 2, 1994, during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The image channels have the following color assignments: red represents data acquired on April 11, 1994; green represents data acquired on October 2, 1994; blue represents the ratio of the two data sets. The test site is located in the Red River Basin and is characterized by rich farmland where a variety of crops are grown, including wheat, barley, canola, corn, sunflowers and sugar beets. This SIR-C/X-SAR research site is applying radar remote sensing to study the characteristics of vegetation and soil moisture. The seasonal comparison between the April and October 1994 data show the dramatic differences between surface conditions on the two dates. At the time of the April acquisition, almost all agricultural fields were bare and soil moisture levels were high. In October, however, soils were drier and while most crops had been harvested, some standing vegetation was still present. The areas which are cyan in color are dark in April and bright in October. These represent fields of standing biomass (amount of vegetation in a specified area) and the differences in brightness within these cyan fields represent differences in vegetation type. The very bright fields in October represent standing broadleaf crops such as corn, which had not yet been harvested. Other standing vegetation which has less biomass, such as hay and grain fields, are less bright. The magenta indicates bare soil surfaces which were wetter (brighter) in April than in October. The variations in brightness of

  15. Space Radar Image of Kliuchevskoi Volcano, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Kliuchevskoi volcano, Kamchatka, Russia, which began to erupt on September 30, 1994. Kliuchevskoi is the bright white peak surrounded by red slopes in the lower left portion of the image. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 25th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 30 kilometers by 60 kilometers (18.5 miles by 37 miles) that is centered at 56.18 degrees north latitude and 160.78 degrees east longitude. North is toward the top of the image. The Kamchatka volcanoes are among the most active volcanoes in the world. The volcanic zone sits above a tectonic plate boundary, where the Pacific plate is sinking beneath the northeast edge of the Eurasian plate. The Endeavour crew obtained dramatic video and photographic images of this region during the eruption, which will assist scientists in analyzing the dynamics of the current activity. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). The Kamchatka River runs from left to right across the image. An older, dormant volcanic region appears in green on the north side of the river. The current eruption included massive ejections of gas, vapor and ash, which reached altitudes of 20,000 meters (65,000 feet). New lava flows are visible on the flanks of Kliuchevskoi, appearing yellow/green in the image, superimposed on the red surfaces in the lower center. Melting snow triggered mudflows on the north flank of the volcano, which may threaten agricultural zones and other settlements in the valley to the north. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars

  16. Space Radar Image of Oetzal, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This image is a false-color composite of Oetzal, Austria located in the Central Alps centered at 46.8 degrees north latitude, 10.70 degrees east longitude, at the border between Switzerland (top), Italy (left) and Austria (right and bottom). The area shown is 50 kilometers (30 miles) south of Innsbruck, Austria. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 14th orbit. Oetztal is a SIR-C/X-SAR hydrology supersite. Approximately one quarter of this image is covered by glaciers, the largest of which, Gepatschferner, is visible as a triangular yellow patch in the center of the scene. The summits of the main peaks reach elevations between 3,500 and 3,768 meters (11,500 and 12,362 feet) above sea level. The tongues of the glaciers are descending from elevated plateaus down into narrow valleys which were formed during the last ice age. This color image was produced in C-band using multi-polarization information (red=CHV, green=CVV,blue=CVV/CHV). The blue areas are lakes (Gepatsch dam at center right; Lake Muta at top right) and glacier ice. The yellow areas are slopes facing the radar and areas of dry snow. Purple corresponds to slopes facing away from the radar. Yellow in the valley bottom corresponds to tree covered areas. There is 30 to 50 centimeters (12 to 20 inches) of dry, fresh snow on the glaciers, and about 10 centimeters (4 inches) in the valley at the city of Vent, Austria (center). At these data were taken, the weather was cold, with snow and thick fog. The entire area would appear white to an optical sensor because it is all covered under a winter snowpack. Researchers are interested in Oetztal because knowing how glaciers shrink and grow over time is an important indication of climatic change. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth (MTPE). The radars illuminate Earth with

  17. Space Radar Image of Taal Volcano, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of Taal volcano, near Manila on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. The black area in the center is Taal Lake, which nearly fills the 30-kilometer-diameter (18-mile) caldera. The caldera rim consists of deeply eroded hills and cliffs. The large island in Taal Lake, which itself contains a crater lake, is known as Volcano Island. The bright yellow patch on the southwest side of the island marks the site of an explosion crater that formed during a deadly eruption of Taal in 1965. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 78th orbit on October 5, 1994. The image shows an area approximately 56 kilometers by 112 kilometers (34 miles by 68 miles) that is centered at 14.0 degrees north latitude and 121.0 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right of the image. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Since 1572, Taal has erupted at least 34 times. Since early 1991, the volcano has been restless, with swarms of earthquakes, new steaming areas, ground fracturing, and increases in water temperature of the lake. Volcanologists and other local authorities are carefully monitoring Taal to understand if the current activity may foretell an eruption. Taal is one of 15 'Decade Volcanoes' that have been identified by the volcanology community as presenting large potential hazards to population centers. The bright area in the upper right of the image is the densely populated city of Manila, only 50 kilometers (30 miles) north of the central crater. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth

  18. SPace Radar Image of Mt. Pinatubo, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a false color L-band and C-band image of the area around Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines, centered at about 15 degrees north latitude, 120.5 degrees east longitude. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on orbit 78 on April 13, 1994. The false-color composite is made by displaying the L-band HH return in red, the L-band HV return in green and the C-band HV return in blue. The area shown is approximately 45 by 68 kilometers (28 by 42 miles). The main volcanic crater on Mount Pinatubo produced by the June 1991 eruptions, and the steep slopes on the upper flanks of the volcano, are easily seen in this image. The red color on the high slopes show the rougher ash deposited during the 1991 eruption. The dark drainages are the smooth mudflows which continue to flood the river valleys after heavy rain. Radar images such as this one can be used to identify the areas flooded by mudflows, which are difficult to distinguish visually, and to assess the rate at which the erosion and deposition continues. A key aspect of the second SIR-C/X-SAR mission in August 1994 will be to collect a second image of Pinatubo during the summer monsoon season -- new mudflows will have occurred -- and to evaluate the short-term changes. The 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines is well known for its near-global effects on the atmosphere and climate due to the large amount of sulfur dioxide that was injected into the upper atmosphere. What is less widely known is that even today the volcano continues to be a major hazard to the people who have returned to the area around the volcano. Dangerous mudflows (called 'lahars') are often generated by heavy rains, and these can still sweep down river valleys and wash out roads and villages, or bury low lying areas in several meters of mud and volcanic debris. These mudflows will continue to be a severe hazard around Pinatubo for

  19. Integrating Radar Image Data with Google Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Bruce D.; Gibas, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A public Web site has been developed as a method for displaying the multitude of radar imagery collected by NASA s Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) instrument during its 16-year mission. Utilizing NASA s internal AIRSAR site, the new Web site features more sophisticated visualization tools that enable the general public to have access to these images. The site was originally maintained at NASA on six computers: one that held the Oracle database, two that took care of the software for the interactive map, and three that were for the Web site itself. Several tasks were involved in moving this complicated setup to just one computer. First, the AIRSAR database was migrated from Oracle to MySQL. Then the back-end of the AIRSAR Web site was updated in order to access the MySQL database. To do this, a few of the scripts needed to be modified; specifically three Perl scripts that query that database. The database connections were then updated from Oracle to MySQL, numerous syntax errors were corrected, and a query was implemented that replaced one of the stored Oracle procedures. Lastly, the interactive map was designed, implemented, and tested so that users could easily browse and access the radar imagery through the Google Maps interface.

  20. Space Radar Image of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These two radar images show the majestic Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, the oldest national park in the United States and home to the world's most spectacular geysers and hot springs. The region supports large populations of grizzly bears, elk and bison. In 1988, the park was burned by one of the most widespread fires to occur in the northern Rocky Mountains in the last 50 years. Surveys indicated that 793,880 acres of land burned. Of that, 41 percent was burned forest, with tree canopies totally consumed by the fire; 35 percent was a combination of unburned, scorched and blackened trees; 13 percent was surface burn under an unburned canopy; 6 percent was non-forest burn; and 5 percent was undifferentiated burn. Six years later, the burned areas are still clearly visible in these false-color radar images obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. The image at the left was obtained using the L-band radar channel, horizontally received and vertically transmitted, on the shuttle's 39th orbit on October 2, 1994. The area shown is 45 kilometers by 71 kilometers (28 miles by 44 miles) in size and centered at 44.6 degrees north latitude, 110.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top of the image (to the right). Most trees in this area are lodge pole pines at different stages of fire succession. Yellowstone Lake appears as a large dark feature at the bottom of the scene. At right is a map of the forest crown, showing its biomass, or amount of vegetation, which includes foliage and branches. The map was created by inverting SIR-C data and using in situ estimates of crown biomass gathered by the Yellowstone National Biological Survey. The map is displayed on a color scale from blue (rivers and lakes with no biomass) to brown (non-forest areas with crown biomass of less than 4 tons per hectare) to light brown (areas of canopy burn with biomass of between 4 and 12 tons per hectare). Yellow

  1. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south-north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments, the steady-state vertical velocity component required to balance the annual ablation rate is 5-10 m a(-1...... tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle...

  2. Velocity estimation of high-speed target for step frequency radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruiqi; Lin, Caiyong; Bao, Qinglong; Chen, Zengping

    2016-04-01

    Aiming to precisely estimate the velocity of high-speed targets for step frequency (SF) radar, a positive-positive-negative SF waveform consisting of two continuous positive SF pulse trains and a negative one is designed, and a velocity estimation method is proposed based on two-dimensional time-domain cross correlation (2-D TDCC). Making full use of the characteristics of the designed waveform, the coarse velocity estimation is achieved by 2-D TDCC of positive-positive SF pulse trains and then the Radon transform is applied to solve velocity ambiguity for high-speed targets. After velocity compensation for positive-negative SF pulse trains, the velocity residual is estimated precisely by 2-D TDCC. Simulation results show that the proposed method exhibits good performance for estimation accuracy, stability performance, computational complexity, and data rate by comparisons.

  3. An assimilation test of Doppler radar reflectivity and radial velocity from different height layers in improving the WRF rainfall forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiyang; Liu, Jia; Yan, Denghua; Li, Chuanzhe; Chu, Zhigang; Yu, Fuliang

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological forecasts require high-resolution and accurate rainfall information, which is one of the most difficult variables to be captured by the mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems. Radar data assimilation is an effective method for improving rainfall forecasts by correcting the initial and lateral boundary conditions of the NWP system. The aim of this study is to explore an efficient way of utilizing the Doppler radar observations for data assimilation, which is implemented by exploring the effect of assimilating radar data from different height layers on the improvement of the NWP rainfall accuracy. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used for numerical rainfall forecast in the Zijingguan catchment located in the ;Jing-Jin-Ji; (Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei) Region of Northern China, and the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3-DVar) technique is adopted to assimilate the radar data. Radar reflectivity and radial velocity are assimilated separately and jointly. Each type of radar data is divided into seven data sets according to the height layers: (1) 2000 m, and (7) all layers. The results show that radar reflectivity assimilation leads to better results than radial velocity assimilation. The accuracy of the forecasted rainfall deteriorates with the rise of the height of the assimilated radar reflectivity. The same results can be found when assimilating radar reflectivity and radial velocity at the same time. The conclusions of this study provide a reference for efficient assimilation of the radar data in improving the NWP rainfall products.

  4. Determination of the significant wave height from shadowing in synthetic radar images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijaya, Andreas Parama; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.

    2016-01-01

    Radar imagery is nowadays used to observe ocean waves despite the fact that radar images contain invisible areas because of the shadowing effect in the radar mechanism. Moreover, the radar images show the radar intensity which is not directly related to the wave height. This paper deals with the

  5. Evaluation of gridded scanning ARM cloud radar reflectivity observations and vertical doppler velocity retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, K.; Tatarevic, A.; Jo, I.; Kollias, P.

    2014-04-01

    The scanning Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) cloud radars (SACRs) provide continuous atmospheric observations aspiring to capture the 3-D cloud-scale structure. Sampling clouds in 3-D is challenging due to their temporal-spatial scales, the need to sample the sky at high elevations and cloud radar limitations. Thus, a suggested scan strategy is to repetitively slice the atmosphere from horizon to horizon as clouds advect over the radar (Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator - CW-RHI). Here, the processing and gridding of the SACR CW-RHI scans are presented. First, the SACR sample observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains and Cape Cod sites are post-processed (detection mask, gaseous attenuation correction, insect filtering and velocity de-aliasing). The resulting radial Doppler moment fields are then mapped to Cartesian coordinates with time as one of the dimensions. Next the Cartesian-gridded Doppler velocity fields are decomposed into the horizontal wind velocity contribution and the vertical Doppler velocity component. For validation purposes, all gridded and retrieved fields are compared to collocated zenith-pointing ARM cloud radar measurements. We consider that the SACR sensitivity loss with range, the cloud type observed and the research purpose should be considered in determining the gridded domain size. Our results also demonstrate that the gridded SACR observations resolve the main features of low and high stratiform clouds. It is established that the CW-RHI observations complemented with processing techniques could lead to robust 3-D cloud dynamical representations up to 25-30 degrees off zenith. The proposed gridded products are expected to advance our understanding of 3-D cloud morphology, dynamics and anisotropy and lead to more realistic 3-D radiative transfer calculations.

  6. Improved Doppler Velocity Dealiasing for Radar Data Assimilation and Storm-Scale Vortex Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Doppler velocity dealiasing technique based on alias-robust VAD and variational (AR-Var analyses developed at the National Severe Storms Laboratory for radar data quality control and assimilation is further improved in its two-step procedures: the reference check in the first step and the continuity check in the second step. In the first step, the alias-robust variational analysis is modified adaptively and used in place of the alias-robust velocity-azimuth display (VAD analysis for all scan modes (rather than solely the WSR-88D volume coverage pattern 31 with the Nyquist velocity vN reduced below 12 m s−1 and the TDWR Mod80 with vN reduced below 15 m s−1, so more raw data can pass the stringent threshold conditions used by the reference check in the first step. This improves the dealiased data coverage without false dealiasing to better satisfy the high data quality standard required by radar data assimilation. In the second step, new procedures are designed and added to the continuity check to increase the dealiased data coverage over storm-scale areas threatened by intense mesocyclones and their generated tornados. The performances of the improved dealiasing technique versus the existing techniques are exemplified by the results obtained for tornadic storms scanned by the operational KTLX radar in Oklahoma.

  7. 3D Imaging Millimeter Wave Circular Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyuan Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new millimeter wave 3D imaging radar is proposed. The user just needs to move the radar along a circular track, and high resolution 3D imaging can be generated. The proposed radar uses the movement of itself to synthesize a large aperture in both the azimuth and elevation directions. It can utilize inverse Radon transform to resolve 3D imaging. To improve the sensing result, the compressed sensing approach is further investigated. The simulation and experimental result further illustrated the design. Because a single transceiver circuit is needed, a light, affordable and high resolution 3D mmWave imaging radar is illustrated in the paper.

  8. Radar speed gun true velocity measurements of sports-balls in flight: application to tennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Spectators of ball-games often seem to be fascinated by the speed of delivery of the ball. They appear to be less interested in or even oblivious to the mechanism and accuracy of the measurement or where in the flight path of the ball the measurement is actually made. Radar speed guns using the Doppler effect are often employed for such speed measurements. It is well known that such guns virtually always measure the line-of-sight or radial velocity of the ball and as such will return a reading less than or equal to the true speed of the ball. In this paper, using only basic physics principles we investigate such measurements, in particular those associated with the service stroke in tennis. For the service trajectories employed here, a single radar gun located in line with the centre-line of the court in fact under-estimates the speed of a wide serve by about 3.4% at the point of delivery, and by about 14.3% on impact with the court. However, we demonstrate that both the magnitude and direction of the true velocity of the ball throughout its entire flight path may be obtained, at least in principle, by the use of four suitably placed radar speed guns. These four guns must be able to measure the ‘range’ to the ball, enabling its position in flight to be determined, and three of them must be able to measure the radial velocity of the ball. Restrictions on the locations of the speed guns are discussed. Such restrictions are quite liberal, although there are certain configurations of the radar gun positions which cannot be used. Importantly, with the one proviso that no speed gun can be directly in the path of the ball (not only for the obvious reasons), we find that if the speed of the ball can be determined for one point in the trajectory, it can also be determined for all points. The accuracy of the range and radial velocity measurements required to give meaningful results for the true velocity are also briefly discussed. It is found that the accuracy required

  9. Spectral Properties of Homogeneous and Nonhomogeneous Radar Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    1987-01-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional, nonstationary white noisemodel for the complex radar backscatter, the spectral properties ofa one-look synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system is derived. It isshown that the power spectrum of the complex SAR image is sceneindependent. It is also shown...... that the spectrum of the intensityimage is in general related to the radar scene spectrum by a linearintegral equation, a Fredholm's integral equation of the third kind.Under simplifying assumptions, a closed-form equation giving theradar scene spectrum as a function of the SAR image spectrum canbe derived....

  10. An adaptive filter for smoothing noisy radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Stiles, J. A.; Shanmugam, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.; Smith, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    A spatial domain adaptive Wiener filter for smoothing radar images corrupted by multiplicative noise is presented. The filter is optimum in a minimum mean squared error sense, computationally efficient, and preserves edges in the image better than other filters. The proposed algorithm can also be used for processing optical images with illumination variations that have a multiplicative effect.

  11. Effects of volume averaging on the line spectra of vertical velocity from multiple-Doppler radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Chen, T.; Wyngaard, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculations of the ratio of the true one-dimensional spectrum of vertical velocity and that measured with multiple-Doppler radar beams are presented. It was assumed that the effects of pulse volume averaging and objective analysis routines is replacement of a point measurement with a volume integral. A u and v estimate was assumed to be feasible when orthogonal radars are not available. Also, the target fluid was configured as having an infinite vertical dimension, zero vertical velocity at the top and bottom, and having homogeneous and isotropic turbulence with a Kolmogorov energy spectrum. The ratio obtained indicated that equal resolutions among radars yields a monotonically decreasing, wavenumber-dependent response function. A gain of 0.95 was demonstrated in an experimental situation with 40 levels. Possible errors introduced when using unequal resolution radars were discussed. Finally, it was found that, for some flows, the extent of attenuation depends on the number of vertical levels resolvable by the radars.

  12. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms–1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms–1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms–1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms–1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm–1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  13. Shuttle Imaging Radar-C mission operations - Technology test bed for Earth Observing System synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, J. P.; Collins, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    The mission operations for the Space Radar Lab (SRL), particularly in the areas of real-time replanning and science activity coordination, are presented. The two main components of SRL are the Shuttle Imaging Radar-C and the X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar. The Earth Observing System SAR will be a multispectral, multipolarization radar satellite that will provide information over an entire decade, permitting scientists to monitor large-scale changes in the earth's environment over a long period of time.

  14. Absolute calibration of Doppler coherence imaging velocity images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, C. M.; Allen, S. L.; Meyer, W. H.; Howard, J.

    2017-08-01

    A new technique has been developed for absolutely calibrating a Doppler Coherence Imaging Spectroscopy interferometer for measuring plasma ion and neutral velocities. An optical model of the interferometer is used to generate zero-velocity reference images for the plasma spectral line of interest from a calibration source some spectral distance away. Validation of this technique using a tunable diode laser demonstrated an accuracy better than 0.2 km/s over an extrapolation range of 3.5 nm; a two order of magnitude improvement over linear approaches. While a well-characterized and very stable interferometer is required, this technique opens up the possibility of calibrated velocity measurements in difficult viewing geometries and for complex spectral line-shapes.

  15. Space Radar Image of West Texas - SAR scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This radar image of the Midland/Odessa region of West Texas, demonstrates an experimental technique, called ScanSAR, that allows scientists to rapidly image large areas of the Earth's surface. The large image covers an area 245 kilometers by 225 kilometers (152 miles by 139 miles). It was obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. The smaller inset image is a standard SIR-C image showing a portion of the same area, 100 kilometers by 57 kilometers (62 miles by 35 miles) and was taken during the first flight of SIR-C on April 14, 1994. The bright spots on the right side of the image are the cities of Odessa (left) and Midland (right), Texas. The Pecos River runs from the top center to the bottom center of the image. Along the left side of the image are, from top to bottom, parts of the Guadalupe, Davis and Santiago Mountains. North is toward the upper right. Unlike conventional radar imaging, in which a radar continuously illuminates a single ground swath as the space shuttle passes over the terrain, a Scansar radar illuminates several adjacent ground swaths almost simultaneously, by 'scanning' the radar beam across a large area in a rapid sequence. The adjacent swaths, typically about 50 km (31 miles) wide, are then merged during ground processing to produce a single large scene. Illumination for this L-band scene is from the top of the image. The beams were scanned from the top of the scene to the bottom, as the shuttle flew from left to right. This scene was acquired in about 30 seconds. A normal SIR-C image is acquired in about 13 seconds. The ScanSAR mode will likely be used on future radar sensors to construct regional and possibly global radar images and topographic maps. The ScanSAR processor is being designed for 1996 implementation at NASA's Alaska SAR Facility, located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and will produce digital images from the

  16. A Texture Analysis of 3D Radar Images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deiana, D.; Yarovoy, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a texture feature coding method to be applied to high-resolution 3D radar images in order to improve target detection is developed. An automatic method for image segmentation based on texture features is proposed. The method has been able to automatically detect weak targets which

  17. Inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging principles, algorithms and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen , Victor C

    2014-01-01

    Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging: Principles, Algorithms and Applications is based on the latest research on ISAR imaging of moving targets and non-cooperative target recognition (NCTR). With a focus on the advances and applications, this book will provide readers with a working knowledge on various algorithms of ISAR imaging of targets and implementation with MATLAB. These MATLAB algorithms will prove useful in order to visualize and manipulate some simulated ISAR images.

  18. Radar image sequence analysis of inhomogeneous water surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Joerg; Senet, Christian M.; Dankert, Heiko; Hatten, Helge; Ziemer, Friedwart

    1999-10-01

    The radar backscatter from the ocean surface, called sea clutter, is modulated by the surface wave field. A method was developed to estimate the near-surface current, the water depth and calibrated surface wave spectra from nautical radar image sequences. The algorithm is based on the three- dimensional Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the spatio- temporal sea clutter pattern in the wavenumber-frequency domain. The dispersion relation is used to define a filter to separate the spectral signal of the imaged waves from the background noise component caused by speckle noise. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) contains information about the significant wave height. The method has been proved to be reliable for the analysis of homogeneous water surfaces in offshore installations. Radar images are inhomogeneous because of the dependency of the image transfer function (ITF) on the azimuth angle between the wave propagation and the antenna viewing direction. The inhomogeneity of radar imaging is analyzed using image sequences of a homogeneous deep-water surface sampled by a ship-borne radar. Changing water depths in shallow-water regions induce horizontal gradients of the tidal current. Wave refraction occurs due to the spatial variability of the current and water depth. These areas cannot be investigated with the standard method. A new method, based on local wavenumber estimation with the multiple-signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm, is outlined. The MUSIC algorithm provides superior wavenumber resolution on local spatial scales. First results, retrieved from a radar image sequence taken from an installation at a coastal site, are presented.

  19. Passive Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging Using Commercial OFDM Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    imaging area. 24 Falcone and Colone recently presented passive radar work using the 802.11 OFDM WiFi signal [31]. The study demonstrates the practical...φR is 4.3 degrees at both aperture ends. The array is radiated with the generic OFDM pulse. The OFDM symbols use 112 Figure 67. PFA SAR image using a...OFDM WiFi -based passive bistatic radar”. Radar Conference, 2010 IEEE, 516–521. 2010. [32] Flood, J.E. Telecommunication Networks, 2ed. The

  20. Measurements at 94 GHz with an imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellgren, J.; Stenstrom, G.; Sume, A.

    1983-10-01

    As part of its mm-wave program the Swedish National Defence Research Institute in Linkoping has developed an imaging combined radar/radiometer system at 94 GHz to investigate the emission, absorption, and reflection properties of matter at this frequency, and to develop data handling and presentation techniques for various purposes. Radar measurements made with the 94-GHz radar with 50-ns pulse length and 0.5-deg beam width are presented. Snow-covered terrain with trees and open ground was observed from a tower between 4 and 54 deg depression angles. The normalized radar cross section has been determined for each angular resolution cell with a 70 x 50 deg section of the terrain, and is presented in image form. Various image representation types have been examined, including color coding which uses range and intensity information to give a perception of the scenery close to the visual one, and which offers the possibility of seeing strong radar reflectors. It is found that the average backscatter from snow in the observed case was stronger than for trees, and its spatial distribution exhibited some deviation from log-normal for parallel transmit and receive polarizations.

  1. Postprocessing of velocity distributions in real-time ultrasonic color velocity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaris, R J; Hoeks, A P

    1994-10-01

    A robust processing scheme is proposed that improves the presentation of 2-dimensional velocity distributions in real-time ultrasonic color velocity images. Essentially, the algorithm is a modification of a first order recursive filter, processing each velocity signal in the spatial distribution separately from the others. It restores the sudden holes and notches in the velocity profiles that occur whenever the observed blood velocity is incidentally close to zero. At the same time, unlike conventional persistence filters, it does not influence any of the true velocity information that is measured. The result is a consistent sequence of color velocity images with smooth transitions between the borders of the consecutive velocity profiles and with an improved definition of the regions containing blood.

  2. A model for radar images and its application to adaptive digital filtering of multiplicative noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V S; Stiles, J A; Shanmugan, K S; Holtzman, J C

    1982-02-01

    Standard image processing techniques which are used to enhance noncoherent optically produced images are not applicable to radar images due to the coherent nature of the radar imaging process. A model for the radar imaging process is derived in this paper and a method for smoothing noisy radar images is also presented. The imaging model shows that the radar image is corrupted by multiplicative noise. The model leads to the functional form of an optimum (minimum MSE) filter for smoothing radar images. By using locally estimated parameter values the filter is made adaptive so that it provides minimum MSE estimates inside homogeneous areas of an image while preserving the edge structure. It is shown that the filter can be easily implemented in the spatial domain and is computationally efficient. The performance of the adaptive filter is compared (qualitatively and quantitatively) with several standard filters using real and simulated radar images.

  3. [Radar as imaging tool in ecology and conservation biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyjasiak, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Migrations and dispersal are among the most important ecological processes that shape ecosystems and influence our economy, health and safety. Movements of birds, bats and insects occur in a large spatial scale - regional, continental, or intercontinental. However, studies of these phenomena using classic methods are usually local. Breakthrough came with the development of radar technology, which enabled researchers to study animal movements in the atmosphere in a large spatial and temporal scale. The aim of this article was to present the radar imaging methods used in the research of aerial movements of birds, bats and insects. The types of radars used in research are described, and examples of the use of radar in basic research and in conservation biology are discussed. Radar visualizations are used in studies on the effect of meteorological conditions on bird migration, on spatial and temporal dynamics of movements of birds, bats and insects, and on the mechanism of orientation of migrating birds and insects. In conservation biology research radars are used in the monitoring of endangered species of birds and bats, to monitor bird activity at airports, as well as in assessing the impact of high constructions on flying birds and bats.

  4. Space Radar Image Isla Isabela in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional view of Isabela, one of the Galapagos Islands located off the western coast of Ecuador, South America. This view was constructed by overlaying a Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) image on a digital elevation map produced by TOPSAR, a prototype airborne interferometric radar which produces simultaneous image and elevation data. The vertical scale in this image is exaggerated by a factor of 1.87. The SIR-C/X-SAR image was taken on the 40th orbit of space shuttle Endeavour. The image is centered at about 0.5 degree south latitude and 91 degrees west longitude and covers an area of 75 by 60 kilometers (47 by 37 miles). The radar incidence angle at the center of the image is about 20 degrees. The western Galapagos Islands, which lie about 1,200 kilometers (750 miles)west of Ecuador in the eastern Pacific, have six active volcanoes similar to the volcanoes found in Hawaii and reflect the volcanic processes that occur where the ocean floor is created. Since the time of Charles Darwin's visit to the area in 1835, there have been more than 60 recorded eruptions on these volcanoes. This SIR-C/X-SAR image of Alcedo and Sierra Negra volcanoes shows the rougher lava flows as bright features, while ash deposits and smooth pahoehoe lava flows appear dark. Vertical exaggeration of relief is a common tool scientists use to detect relationships between structure (for example, faults, and fractures) and topography. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data

  5. CUTLASS HF radar observations of high-velocity E-region echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Uspensky

    Full Text Available A short event of high-velocity E-region echo observations by the Pykkvibaer HF radar is analysed to study echo parameters and the echo relation to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability. The echoes were detected in several beams aligned closely to the magnetic L-shell direction. Two echo groups were identified: one group corresponded to the classical type 1 echoes with velocities close to the nominal ion-acoustic speed of 400 ms1 , while the other group had significantly larger velocities, of the order of 700 ms1 . The mutual relationship between the echo power, Doppler velocity, spectral width and elevation angles for these two groups was studied. Plotting of echo parameters versus slant range showed that all ~700 ms1 echoes originated from larger heights and distances of 500–700 km, while all ~400 ms1 echoes came from lower heights and from farther distances; 700–1000 km. We argue that both observed groups of echoes occurred due to the Farley-Buneman plasma instability excited by strong ( ~70 mVm1 and uniformly distributed electric fields. We show that the echo velocities for the two groups were different because the echoes were received from different heights. Such a separation of echo heights occurred due to the differing amounts of ionospheric refraction at short and large ranges. Thus, the ionospheric refraction and related altitude modulation of ionospheric parameters are the most important factors to consider, when various characteristics of E-region decametre irregularities are derived from HF radar measurements.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; polar ionosphere

  6. A ultrawideband leaky slot antenna for microwave radar imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaddagiri, K.; Monni, S.; Neto, A.; Nennie, F.; Rossum, W. van

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel ultra wide band (UWB) leaky slot antenna. The antenna has a wide impedance bandwidth from 3 to 14 GHz and it is suitable for radar applications requiring high resolution, phase center stability and good pulse preservation, such as medical imaging and ground penetrating

  7. Preliminary inter-model comparison of the Agulhas current with direct range doppler velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Backeberg, Bjorn C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available is of great importance. In this paper we compare direct surface velocity estimates from Envisat's Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar with surface velocity fields obtained from two different ocean numerical models. In particular, we focus on the models...

  8. Featured Image: The Cosmic Velocity Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    You may have heard of the cosmic web, a network of filaments, clusters and voids that describes the three-dimensional distribution of matter in our universe. But have you ever considered the idea of a cosmic velocity web? In a new study led by Daniel Pomarde (IRFU CEA-Saclay, France), a team of scientists has built a detailed 3D view of the flows in our universe, showing in particular motions along filaments and in collapsing knots. In the image above (click for the full view), surfaces of knots (red) are embedded within surfaces of filaments (grey). The rainbow lines show the flow motion, revealing acceleration (redder tones) toward knots and retardation (bluer tones) beyond them. You can learn more about Pomarde and collaborators work and see their unusual and intriguing visualizationsin the video they produced, below. Check out the original paper for more information.CitationDaniel Pomarde et al 2017 ApJ 845 55. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa7f78

  9. Space Radar Image of Manaus region of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These L-band images of the Manaus region of Brazil were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. The left image was acquired on April 12, 1994, and the middle image was acquired on October 3, 1994. The area shown is approximately 8 kilometers by 40 kilometers (5 miles by 25 miles). The two large rivers in this image, the Rio Negro (top) and the Rio Solimoes (bottom), combine at Manaus (west of the image) to form the Amazon River. The image is centered at about 3 degrees south latitude and 61 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top left of the images. The differences in brightness between the images reflect changes in the scattering of the radar channel. In this case, the changes are indicative of flooding. A flooded forest has a higher backscatter at L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) than an unflooded river. The extent of the flooding is much greater in the April image than in the October image, and corresponds to the annual, 10-meter (33-foot) rise and fall of the Amazon River. A third image at right shows the change in the April and October images and was created by determining which areas had significant decreases in the intensity of radar returns. These areas, which appear blue on the third image at right, show the dramatic decrease in the extent of flooded forest, as the level of the Amazon River falls. The flooded forest is a vital habitat for fish and floating meadows are an important source of atmospheric methane. This demonstrates the capability of SIR-C/X-SAR to study important environmental changes that are impossible to see with optical sensors over regions such as the Amazon, where frequent cloud cover and dense forest canopies obscure monitoring of floods. Field studies by boat, on foot and in low-flying aircraft by the University of California at Santa Barbara, in collaboration with Brazil's Instituto Nacional de Pesguisas Estaciais, during

  10. Space Radar Image of Kilauea, Hawaii in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a three-dimensional perspective view of a false-color image of the eastern part of the Big Island of Hawaii. It was produced using all three radar frequencies -- X-band, C-band and L-band -- from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) flying on the space shuttle Endeavour, overlaid on a U.S. Geological Survey digital elevation map. Visible in the center of the image in blue are the summit crater (Kilauea Caldera) which contains the smaller Halemaumau Crater, and the line of collapse craters below them that form the Chain of Craters Road. The image was acquired on April 12, 1994 during orbit 52 of the space shuttle. The area shown is approximately 34 by 57 kilometers (21 by 35 miles) with the top of the image pointing toward northwest. The image is centered at about 155.25 degrees west longitude and 19.5 degrees north latitude. The false colors are created by displaying three radar channels of different frequency. Red areas correspond to high backscatter at L-HV polarization, while green areas exhibit high backscatter at C-HV polarization. Finally, blue shows high return at X-VV polarization. Using this color scheme, the rain forest appears bright on the image, while the green areas correspond to lower vegetation. The lava flows have different colors depending on their types and are easily recognizable due to their shapes. The flows at the top of the image originated from the Mauna Loa volcano. Kilauea volcano has been almost continuously active for more than the last 11 years. Field teams that were on the ground specifically to support these radar observations report that there was vigorous surface activity about 400 meters (one-quartermile) inland from the coast. A moving lava flow about 200 meters (650 feet) in length was observed at the time of the shuttle overflight, raising the possibility that subsequent images taken during this mission will show changes in the landscape. Currently, most of the lava that is

  11. Space Radar Image of Craters of the Moon, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Ancient lava flows dating back 2,000 to 15,000 years are shown in light green and red on the left side of this space radar image of the Craters of the Moon National Monument area in Idaho. The volcanic cones that produced these lava flows are the dark points shown within the light green area. Craters of the Moon National Monument is part of the Snake River Plain volcanic province. Geologists believe this area was formed as the North American tectonic plate moved across a 'hot spot' which now lies beneath Yellowstone National Park. The irregular patches, shown in red, green and purple in the lower half of the image are lava flows of different ages and surface roughnesses. One of these lava flows is surrounded by agricultural fields, the blue and purple geometric features, in the right center of the image. The town of Arco, Idaho is the bright yellow area on the right side of the agricultural area. The peaks along the top of the image are the White Knob Mountains. The Big Lost River flows out of the canyon at the top right of the image. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on October 5, 1994. This image is centered at 43.58 degrees north latitude, 113.42 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 33 kilometers by 48 kilometers 20.5 miles by 30 miles). Colors are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is the L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is the L-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received; blue is the C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  12. Space Radar Image of Rabaul Volcano, New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is a radar image of the Rabaul volcano on the island of New Britain, Papua, New Guinea taken almost a month after its September 19, 1994, eruption that killed five people and covered the town of Rabaul and nearby villages with up to 75 centimeters (30 inches) of ash. More than 53,000 people have been displaced by the eruption. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 173rd orbit on October 11, 1994. This image is centered at 4.2 degrees south latitude and 152.2 degrees east longitude in the southwest Pacific Ocean. The area shown is approximately 21 kilometers by 25 kilometers (13 miles by 15.5 miles). North is toward the upper right. The colors in this image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Most of the Rabaul volcano is underwater and the caldera (crater) creates Blanche Bay, the semi-circular body of water that occupies most of the center of the image. Volcanic vents within the caldera are visible in the image and include Vulcan, on a peninsula on the west side of the bay, and Rabalanakaia and Tavurvur (the circular purple feature near the mouth of the bay) on the east side. Both Vulcan and Tavurvur were active during the 1994 eruption. Ash deposits appear red-orange on the image, and are most prominent on the south flanks of Vulcan and north and northwest of Tavurvur. A faint blue patch in the water in the center of the image is a large raft of floating pumice fragments that were ejected from Vulcan during the eruption and clog the inner bay. Visible on the east side of the bay are the grid-like patterns of the streets of Rabaul and an airstrip, which appears as a dark northwest-trending band at the right-center of

  13. Radar image processing for rock-type discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, R. G.; Daily, M.

    1982-01-01

    Image processing and enhancement techniques for improving the geologic utility of digital satellite radar images are reviewed. Preprocessing techniques such as mean and variance correction on a range or azimuth line by line basis to provide uniformly illuminated swaths, median value filtering for four-look imagery to eliminate speckle, and geometric rectification using a priori elevation data. Examples are presented of application of preprocessing methods to Seasat and Landsat data, and Seasat SAR imagery was coregistered with Landsat imagery to form composite scenes. A polynomial was developed to distort the radar picture to fit the Landsat image of a 90 x 90 km sq grid, using Landsat color ratios with Seasat intensities. Subsequent linear discrimination analysis was employed to discriminate rock types from known areas. Seasat additions to the Landsat data improved rock identification by 7%.

  14. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal

  15. Scanning array radar system for bridge subsurface imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chieh-Ping; Ren, Yu-Jiun; Yu, Tzu Yang

    2012-04-01

    Early damage detection of bridge has been an important issue for modern civil engineering technique. Existing bridge inspection techniques used by State Department of Transportation (DOT) and County DOT include visual inspection, mechanical sounding, rebound hammer, cover meter, electrical potential measurements, and ultrasonics; other NDE techniques include ground penetrating radar (GPR), radiography, and some experimental types of sensors. Radar technology like GPR has been widely used for the bridge structure detection with a good penetration depth using microwave energy. The system to be presented in this paper is a different type of microwave sensing technology. It is focus on the subsurface detection and trying to find out detail information at subsurface (10 cm) with high resolution radar imaging from a flexible standoff distance. Our radar operating frequency is from 8-12 GHz, which is different from most of the current GPR systems. Scanning array antenna system is designed for adjustable beamwidth, preferable scanning area, and low sidelobe level. From the theoretical analysis and experimental results, it is found that the proposed technique can successfully capture the presence of the near-surface anomaly. This system is part of our Multi- Modal Remote Sensing System (MRSS) and provides good imaging correlations with other MRSS sensors.

  16. Radar image and data fusion for natural hazards characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Jixian; Zhang, Yonghong

    2010-01-01

    Fusion of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images through interferometric, polarimetric and tomographic processing provides an all - weather imaging capability to characterise and monitor various natural hazards. This article outlines interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) processing and products and their utility for natural hazards characterisation, provides an overview of the techniques and applications related to fusion of SAR/InSAR images with optical and other images and highlights the emerging SAR fusion technologies. In addition to providing precise land - surface digital elevation maps, SAR - derived imaging products can map millimetre - scale elevation changes driven by volcanic, seismic and hydrogeologic processes, by landslides and wildfires and other natural hazards. With products derived from the fusion of SAR and other images, scientists can monitor the progress of flooding, estimate water storage changes in wetlands for improved hydrological modelling predictions and assessments of future flood impacts and map vegetation structure on a global scale and monitor its changes due to such processes as fire, volcanic eruption and deforestation. With the availability of SAR images in near real - time from multiple satellites in the near future, the fusion of SAR images with other images and data is playing an increasingly important role in understanding and forecasting natural hazards.

  17. SRTM Radar Image with Color as Height: Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the area around the January 26, 2001, earthquake in western India, the deadliest in the country's history with some 20,000 fatalities. The epicenter of the magnitude 7.6 earthquake was just to the left of the center of the image. The Gulf of Kachchh (or Kutch) is the black area running from the lower left corner towards the center of the image. The city of Bhuj is in the yellow-toned area among the brown hills left of the image center and is the historical capital of the Kachchh region. Bhuj and many other towns and cities nearby were almost completely destroyed by the shaking of the earthquake. These hills reach up to 500 meters (1,500 feet) elevation. The city of Ahmedabad, capital of Gujarat state, is the radar-bright area next to the right side of the image. Several buildings in Ahmedabad were also destroyed by the earthquake. The dark blue areas around the center of the image and extending to the left side are low-lying salt flats called the Rann of Kachchh with the Little Rann just to the right of the image center. The bumpy area north of the Rann (green and yellow colors) is a large area of sand dunes in Pakistan. A branch of the Indus River used to flow through the area on the left side of this image, but it was diverted by a previous large earthquake that struck this area in 1819.The annotated version of the image includes a 'beachball' that shows the location and slip direction of the January 26, 2001, earthquake from the Harvard Quick CMT catalog: http://www.seismology.harvard.edu/CMTsearch.html. [figure removed for brevity, see original site] This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to brown and white at the highest elevations. This image is a mosaic of four SRTM swaths.This image was acquired by

  18. Oceanic eddies in synthetic aperture radar images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Melting ice is a tracer in this case. Shear cyclonic elements at the south- ern and eastern parts of the eddy periphery are well seen in both images. In a time of 3 days between the images the eddy shape and spatial ori- entation were not changed, however displacement of shear elements at its periphery in the direc-.

  19. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Discharge estimation at a river site depends on local hydraulic conditions identified by recording water levels. In fact, stage monitoring is straightforward and relatively inexpensive compared with the cost necessary to carry out flow velocity measurements which are, however, limited to low flows and constrained by the accessibility of the site. In this context the mean flow velocity is hard to estimate for high flow, affecting de-facto the reliability of discharge assessment for extreme events. On the other hand, the surface flow velocity can be easily monitored by using radar sensors allowing to achieve a good estimate of discharge by exploiting the entropy theory applied to rivers hydraulic (Chiu,1987). Recently, a growing interest towards the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UVA), henceforth drone, for topographic applications is observed and considering their capability drones may be of a considerable interest for the hydrological monitoring and in particular for streamflow measurements. With this aim, for the first time, a miniaturized Doppler radar sensor, operating at 24 GHz, will be mounted on a drone to measure the surface flow velocity in rivers. The sensor is constituted by a single-board circuit (i.e. is a fully planar circuits - no waveguides) with the antenna on one side and the front-end electronic on the other side (Alimenti et al., 2007). The antenna has a half-power beam width of less than 10 degrees in the elevation plane and a gain of 13 dBi. The radar is equipped with a monolithic oscillator and transmits a power of about 4 mW at 24 GHz. The sensor is mounted with an inclination of 45 degrees with respect to the drone flying plane and such an angle is considered in recovering the surface speed of the water. The drone is a quadricopter that has more than 30 min, flying time before recharging the battery. Furthermore its flying plan can be scheduled with a suitable software and is executed thanks to the on-board sensors (GPS, accelerometers

  20. Range imaging observations of PMSE using the EISCAT VHF radar: Phase calibration and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Fernandez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel phase calibration technique for use with the multiple-frequency Range IMaging (RIM technique is introduced based on genetic algorithms. The method is used on data collected with the European Incoherent SCATter (EISCAT VHF radar during a 2002 experiment with the goal of characterizing the vertical structure of Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE over northern Norway. For typical Doppler measurements, the initial phases of the transmitter and receiver are not required to be the same. The EISCAT receiver systems exploit this fact, allowing a multi-static configuration. However, the RIM method relies on the small phase differences between closely spaced frequencies. As a result, the high-resolution images produced by the RIM method can be significantly degraded if not properly calibrated. Using an enhanced numerical radar simulator, in which data from multiple sampling volumes are simultaneously generated, the proposed calibration method is validated. Subsequently, the method is applied to preliminary data from the EISCAT radar, providing first results of RIM images of PMSE. Data using conventional analysis techniques, and confirmed by RIM, reveal an often-observed double-layer structure with higher stability in the lower layer. Moreover, vertical velocity oscillations exhibit a clear correlation with the apparent motion of the layers shown in the echo power plots.

  1. Improved measurements of mean sea surface velocity in the Nordic Seas from synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wergeland Hansen, Morten; Johnsen, Harald; Engen, Geir; Øie Nilsen, Jan Even

    2017-04-01

    The warm and saline surface Atlantic Water (AW) flowing into the Nordic Seas across the Greenland-Scotland ridge transports heat into the Arctic, maintaining the ice-free oceans and regulating sea-ice extent. The AW influences the region's relatively mild climate and is the northern branch of the global thermohaline overturning circulation. Heat loss in the Norwegian Sea is key for both heat transport and deep water formation. In general, the ocean currents in the Nordic Seas and the North Atlantic Ocean is a complex system of topographically steered barotropic and baroclinic currents of which the wind stress and its variability is a driver of major importance. The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) Doppler centroid shift has been demonstrated to contain geophysical information about sea surface wind, waves and current at an accuracy of 5 Hz and pixel spacing of 3.5 - 9 × 8 km2. This corresponds to a horizontal surface velocity of about 20 cm/s at 35° incidence angle. The ESA Prodex ISAR project aims to implement new and improved SAR Doppler shift processing routines to enable reprocessing of the wide swath acquisitions available from the Envisat ASAR archive (2002-2012) at higher resolution and better accuracy than previously obtained, allowing combined use with Sentinel-1 and Radarsat-2 retrievals to build timeseries of the sea surface velocity in the Nordic Seas. Estimation of the geophysical Doppler shift from new SAR Doppler centroid shift retrievals will be demonstrated, addressing key issues relating to geometric (satellite orbit and attitude) and electronic (antenna mis-pointing) contributions and corrections. Geophysical Doppler shift retrievals from one month of data in January 2010 and the inverted surface velocity in the Nordic Seas are then addressed and compared to other direct and indirect estimates of the upper ocean current, in particular those obtained in the ESA GlobCurrent project.

  2. EISCAT_3D: the European three-dimensional imaging radar for atmospheric and geospace research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulich, Thomas; Aikio, Anita; McCrea, Ian; Turunen, Esa

    The EISCAT Scientific Association operates three incoherent scatter radars in Tromsø (Norway) and on Svalbard. The UHF radar, which operates at 930 MHz, is the only tristatic incoherent scatter radar in the world. The transmitter is located in Tromsø and additional receiver sites are in Kiruna (Sweden) and Sodankylü (Finland). However, due to interferences with mobile a communication, tristatic operation will come to an end in due time. In the future, EISCAT will build the next generation incoherent scatter radar, which will provide comprehensive 3D monitoring of the atmosphere and ionosphere above Northern Fenno-Scandinavia. The EISCAT 3D radar system will consist of multiple phased arrays, using the latest digital signal processing to achieve ten times higher temporal and spatial resolution than the present radars. The European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) selected EISCAT 3D for the Roadmap 2008 for Large-Scale European Research Infrastructures for the next 20-30 years. The facility will be constructed as a modular system by 2015. EISCAT 3D will be a volumetric radar capable of imaging an extended spatial area with simul-taneous full-vector drift velocities, having continuous operation modes, short baseline interfer-ometry capability for imaging sub-beamwidth scales, real-time data access for applications and extensive data archiving facilities. The design of the antenna arrays will be modular at different scales allowing for mass-production of the components. Some arrays will be very large, in the scale of 32,000 individual antenna elements. The receiver arrays will be located at 50-150 km distance from the illuminators, and some smaller arrays closer by to support continuous interferometric observations. The total system will comprise 100,000 elements. The actual radar sites have to be carefully chosen. This new large-scale European research infrastructure has applications in a wide range of Eu-ropean research areas including Earth

  3. Terahertz Radar Imaging Based on Time-domain Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ming-gui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study uses time domain terahertz radar system to discuss systematic imaging studies on the scaled models based on the improved Back-Projection (BP algorithm. We image the scaled models with different shapes and are able to distinguish spatial gaps as small as 6 mm. The Theoretical calculation predicts that the lateral resolution and the axial resolution can be as high as 0.125 mm. Center enhancement and background rings caused by the algorithm in the imaging results are also qualitatively analyzed and are proposed methods to overcome this problem.

  4. A comparison of spotlight synthetic aperture radar image formation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knittle, C.D.; Doren, N.E.; Jakowatz, C.V.

    1996-10-01

    Spotlight synthetic aperture radar images can be formed from the complex phase history data using two main techniques: (1) polar-to-cartesian interpolation followed by two-dimensional inverse Fourier transform (2DFFT), and (2) convolution backprojection (CBP). CBP has been widely used to reconstruct medical images in computer aided tomography, and only recently has been applied to form synthetic aperture radar imagery. It is alleged that CBP yields higher quality images because (1) all the Fourier data are used and (2) the polar formatted data is used directly to form a 2D Cartesian image and therefore 2D interpolation is not required. This report compares the quality of images formed by CBP and several modified versions of the 2DFFT method. We show from an image quality point of view that CBP is equivalent to first windowing the phase history data and then interpolating to an exscribed rectangle. From a mathematical perspective, we should expect this conclusion since the same Fourier data are used to form the SAR image. We next address the issue of parallel implementation of each algorithm. We dispute previous claims that CBP is more readily parallelizable than the 2DFFT method. Our conclusions are supported by comparing execution times between massively parallel implementations of both algorithms, showing that both experience similar decreases in computation time, but that CBP takes significantly longer to form an image.

  5. Space Radar Image of the Lost City of Ubar

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a radar image of the region around the site of the lost city of Ubar in southern Oman, on the Arabian Peninsula. The ancient city was discovered in 1992 with the aid of remote sensing data. Archeologists believe Ubar existed from about 2800 B.C. to about 300 A.D. and was a remote desert outpost where caravans were assembled for the transport of frankincense across the desert. This image was acquired on orbit 65 of space shuttle Endeavour on April 13, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The SIR-C image shown is centered at 18.4 degrees north latitude and 53.6 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area about 50 by 100 kilometers (31 miles by 62 miles). The image is constructed from three of the available SIR-C channels and displays L-band, HH (horizontal transmit and receive) data as red, C-band HH as blue, and L-band HV (horizontal transmit, vertical receive) as green. The prominent magenta colored area is a region of large sand dunes, which are bright reflectors at both L-and C-band. The prominent green areas (L-HV) are rough limestone rocks, which form a rocky desert floor. A major wadi, or dry stream bed, runs across the middle of the image and is shown largely in white due to strong radar scattering in all channels displayed (L and C HH, L-HV). The actual site of the fortress of the lost city of Ubar, currently under excavation, is near the Wadi close to the center of the image. The fortress is too small to be detected in this image. However, tracks leading to the site, and surrounding tracks, appear as prominent, but diffuse, reddish streaks. These tracks have been used in modern times, but field investigations show many of these tracks were in use in ancient times as well. Mapping of these tracks on regional remote sensing images was a key to recognizing the site as Ubar in 1992. This image, and ongoing field investigations, will help shed light on a little known early civilization. Spaceborne

  6. Antarctic Wave Dynamics Mystery Discovered by Lidar, Radar and Imager

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Cao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the McMurdo Fe lidar campaign, largeamplitude (~±30 K, long-period (4 to 9 h waves with upward energy propagating signatures are frequently observed in the MLT temperatures. Despite its frequent appearance, such type of wave was neither widely observed nor well understood in the past. At McMurdo (77.8°S, 166.7°E, the simultaneous observations of such waves using lidar, radar and airglow imager can provide 3-D intrinsic wave-propagation properties, which are greatly needed for understanding their sources and potential impacts. This study presents the first coincident observation of these 4–9 h waves by lidar, radar and airglow imager in the Antarctic mesopause region.

  7. SAR image registration in absolute coordinates using GPS carrier phase position and velocity information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgett, S.; Meindl, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Aided Navigation and Remote Sensing Systems

    1994-09-01

    It is useful in a variety of military and commercial application to accurately register the position of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery in absolute coordinates. The two basic SAR measurements, range and doppler, can be used to solve for the position of the SAR image. Imprecise knowledge of the SAR collection platform`s position and velocity vectors introduce errors in the range and doppler measurements and can cause the apparent location of the SAR image on the ground to be in error by tens of meters. Recent advances in carrier phase GPS techniques can provide an accurate description of the collection vehicle`s trajectory during the image formation process. In this paper, highly accurate carrier phase GPS trajectory information is used in conjunction with SAR imagery to demonstrate a technique for accurate registration of SAR images in WGS-84 coordinates. Flight test data will be presented that demonstrates SAR image registration errors of less than 4 meters.

  8. High Resolution 3D Radar Imaging of Comet Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E. I.; Gim, Y.; Belton, M.; Brophy, J.; Weissman, P. R.; Heggy, E.

    2012-12-01

    Knowing the interiors of comets and other primitive bodies is fundamental to our understanding of how planets formed. We have developed a Discovery-class mission formulation, Comet Radar Explorer (CORE), based on the use of previously flown planetary radar sounding techniques, with the goal of obtaining high resolution 3D images of the interior of a small primitive body. We focus on the Jupiter-Family Comets (JFCs) as these are among the most primitive bodies reachable by spacecraft. Scattered in from far beyond Neptune, they are ultimate targets of a cryogenic sample return mission according to the Decadal Survey. Other suitable targets include primitive NEOs, Main Belt Comets, and Jupiter Trojans. The approach is optimal for small icy bodies ~3-20 km diameter with spin periods faster than about 12 hours, since (a) navigation is relatively easy, (b) radar penetration is global for decameter wavelengths, and (c) repeated overlapping ground tracks are obtained. The science mission can be as short as ~1 month for a fast-rotating JFC. Bodies smaller than ~1 km can be globally imaged, but the navigation solutions are less accurate and the relative resolution is coarse. Larger comets are more interesting, but radar signal is unlikely to be reflected from depths greater than ~10 km. So, JFCs are excellent targets for a variety of reasons. We furthermore focus on the use of Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) to rendezvous shortly after the comet's perihelion. This approach leaves us with ample power for science operations under dormant conditions beyond ~2-3 AU. This leads to a natural mission approach of distant observation, followed by closer inspection, terminated by a dedicated radar mapping orbit. Radar reflections are obtained from a polar orbit about the icy nucleus, which spins underneath. Echoes are obtained from a sounder operating at dual frequencies 5 and 15 MHz, with 1 and 10 MHz bandwidths respectively. The dense network of echoes is used to obtain global 3D

  9. Space Radar Image of Central African Gorilla Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This is a false-color radar image of Central Africa, showing the Virunga Volcano chain along the borders of Rwanda, Zaire and Uganda. This area is home to the endangered mountain gorillas. This C-band L-band image was acquired on April 12, 1994, on orbit 58 of space shuttle Endeavour by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). The area is centered at about 1.75 degrees south latitude and 29.5 degrees east longitude. The image covers an area 58 kilometers by 178 kilometers (48 miles by 178 miles). The false-color composite is created by displaying the L-band HH return in red, the L-band HV return in green and the C-band HH return in blue. The dark area in the bottom of the image is Lake Kivu, which forms the border between Zaire (to the left) and Rwanda (to the right). The airport at Goma, Zaire is shown as a dark line just above the lake in the bottom left corner of the image. Volcanic flows from the 1977 eruption of Mt. Nyiragongo are shown just north of the airport. Mt. Nyiragongo is not visible in this image because it is located just to the left of the image swath. Very fluid lava flows from the 1977 eruption killed 70 people. Mt. Nyiragongo is currently erupting (August 1994) and will be a target of observation during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR. The large volcano in the center of the image is Mt. Karisimbi (4,500 meters or 14,800 feet). This radar image highlights subtle differences in the vegetation and volcanic flows of the region. The faint lines shown in the purple regions are believed to be the result of agriculture terracing by the people who live in the region. The vegetation types are an important factor in the habitat of the endangered mountain gorillas. Researchers at Rutgers University in New Jersey and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund in London will use this data to produce vegetation maps of the area to aid in their study of the remaining 650 gorillas in the region. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet

  10. Oceanic eddies in synthetic aperture radar images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and in bays, spin-off eddies and mushroom-like structures (vortex dipoles) are given and discussed. It is shown that a common feature for most of the eddies detected in the SAR images is a broad spectrum of spatial scales, spiral shape and shear nature. It is concluded that the spaceborne SARs give valuable information ...

  11. Three-dimensional radar imaging techniques and systems for near-field applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-12

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed three-dimensional holographic (synthetic aperture) radar imaging techniques and systems for a wide variety of near-field applications. These applications include radar cross-section (RCS) imaging, personnel screening, standoff concealed weapon detection, concealed threat detection, through-barrier imaging, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and non-destructive evaluation (NDE). Sequentially-switched linear arrays are used for many of these systems to enable high-speed data acquisition and 3-D imaging. In this paper, the techniques and systems will be described along with imaging results that demonstrate the utility of near-field 3-D radar imaging for these compelling applications.

  12. Space Radar Image of Colima Volcano, Jalisco, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This is an image of the Colima volcano in Jalisco, Mexico, a vigorously active volcano that erupted as recently as July 1994. The eruption partially destroyed a lava dome at the summit and deposited a new layer of ash on the volcano's southern slopes. Surrounding communities face a continuing threat of ash falls and volcanic mudflows from the volcano, which has been designated one of 15 high-risk volcanoes for scientific study during the next decade. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 24th orbit on October 1, 1994. The image is centered at 19.4 degrees north latitude, 103.7 degrees west longitude. The area shown is approximately 35.7 kilometers by 37.5 kilometers (22 miles by 23 miles). This single-frequency, multi-polarized SIR-C image shows: red as L-band horizontally transmitted and received; green as L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; and blue as the ratio of the two channels. The summit area appears orange and the recent deposits fill the valleys along the south and southwest slopes. Observations from space are helping scientists understand the behavior of dangerous volcanoes and will be used to mitigate the effects of future eruptions on surrounding populations. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: the L-band (24 cm), the C-band (6 cm) and the X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature

  13. Space Radar Image of Mount Pinatubo Volcano, Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These are color composite radar images showing the area around Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines. The images were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 14, 1994 (left image) and October 5,1994 (right image). The images are centered at about 15 degrees north latitude and 120.5 degrees east longitude. Both images were obtained with the same viewing geometry. The color composites were made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) in green; and the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) in blue. The area shown is approximately 40 kilometers by 65 kilometers (25 miles by 40 miles). The main volcanic crater on Mount Pinatubo produced by the June 1991 eruptions and the steep slopes on the upper flanks of the volcano are easily seen in these images. Red on the high slopes shows the distribution of the ash deposited during the 1991 eruption, which appears red because of the low cross-polarized radar returns at C and L bands. The dark drainages radiating away from the summit are the smooth mudflows, which even three years after the eruptions continue to flood the river valleys after heavy rain. Comparing the two images shows that significant changes have occurred in the intervening five months along the Pasig-Potrero rivers (the dark area in the lower right of the images). Mudflows, called 'lahars,' that occurred during the 1994 monsoon season filled the river valleys, allowing the lahars to spread over the surrounding countryside. Three weeks before the second image was obtained, devastating lahars more than doubled the area affected in the Pasig-Potrero rivers, which is clearly visible as the increase in dark area on the lower right of the images. Migration of deposition to the east (right) has affected many communities. Newly affected areas included the community

  14. Measurement of velocity and velocity derivatives based on pattern tracking in 3D LIF images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deusch, S.; Merava, H.; Rys, P. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Technol., Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Chem. Eng.; Dracos, T. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Untergasse 14, 8126 Zumikon (Switzerland)

    2000-10-01

    Pattern tracking in consecutive 3D LIF images based on least squares matching (LSM) of grey levels has been developed recently for velocity and velocity gradient measurements. The shortcomings of this method are clearly shown. The present article presents an improvement on this method by introducing a local multi-patch (LMP) technique through the LSM approach. The method is validated using the flow field of a turbulent channel flow obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and a synthetic image with grey-level patterns. The results show that LMP matching allows the determination of the velocity and the velocity gradient fields with high accuracy including the second derivatives. Measurements of a round non-buoyant jet are presented which demonstrate the good performance of the method when applied under laboratory conditions. This method can also be applied on two-dimensional images provided that the flow is strictly two-dimensional. (orig.)

  15. Measurement of velocity and velocity derivatives based on pattern tracking in 3D LIF images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusch, S.; Merava, H.; Dracos, T.; Rys, P.

    Pattern tracking in consecutive 3D LIF images based on least squares matching (LSM) of grey levels has been developed recently for velocity and velocity gradient measurements. The shortcomings of this method are clearly shown. The present article presents an improvement on this method by introducing a local multi-patch (LMP) technique through the LSM approach. The method is validated using the flow field of a turbulent channel flow obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and a synthetic image with grey-level patterns. The results show that LMP matching allows the determination of the velocity and the velocity gradient fields with high accuracy including the second derivatives. Measurements of a round non-buoyant jet are presented which demonstrate the good performance of the method when applied under laboratory conditions. This method can also be applied on two-dimensional images provided that the flow is strictly two-dimensional.

  16. The SUMO Ship Detector Algorithm for Satellite Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm Greidanus

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Search for Unidentified Maritime Objects (SUMO is an algorithm for ship detection in satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. It has been developed over the course of more than 15 years, using a large amount of SAR images from almost all available SAR satellites operating in L-, C- and X-band. As validated by benchmark tests, it performs very well on a wide range of SAR image modes (from Spotlight to ScanSAR and resolutions (from 1–100 m and for all types and sizes of ships, within the physical limits imposed by the radar imaging. This paper describes, in detail, the algorithmic approach in all of the steps of the ship detection: land masking, clutter estimation, detection thresholding, target clustering, ship attribute estimation and false alarm suppression. SUMO is a pixel-based CFAR (Constant False Alarm Rate detector for multi-look radar images. It assumes a K distribution for the sea clutter, corrected however for deviations of the actual sea clutter from this distribution, implementing a fast and robust method for the clutter background estimation. The clustering of detected pixels into targets (ships uses several thresholds to deal with the typically irregular distribution of the radar backscatter over a ship. In a multi-polarization image, the different channels are fused. Azimuth ambiguities, a common source of false alarms in ship detection, are removed. A reliability indicator is computed for each target. In post-processing, using the results of a series of images, additional false alarms from recurrent (fixed targets including range ambiguities are also removed. SUMO can run in semi-automatic mode, where an operator can verify each detected target. It can also run in fully automatic mode, where batches of over 10,000 images have successfully been processed in less than two hours. The number of satellite SAR systems keeps increasing, as does their application to maritime surveillance. The open data policy of the EU

  17. An imaging interferometry capability for the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grydeland

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric imaging (aperture synthesis imaging is a technique used by radio astronomers to achieve angular resolution that far surpasses what is possible with a single large aperture. A similar technique has been used for radar imaging studies of equatorial ionospheric phenomena at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We present plans for adding an interferometric imaging capability to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, a capability which will contribute significantly to several areas of active research, including naturally and artificially enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and their detailed relation in space and time to optical phenomena, polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE, and meteor studies. Interferometry using the two antennas of the ESR has demonstrated the existence of extremely narrow, field-aligned scattering structures, but having only a single baseline is a severe limitation for such studies. Building additional IS-class antennas at the ESR is not a trivial task. However, the very high scattering levels in enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and PMSE means that a passive receiver antenna of more modest gain should still be capable of detecting these echoes. In this paper we present simulations of what an imaging interferometer will be capable of observing for different antenna configurations and brightness distributions, under ideal conditions, using two different image inversion algorithms. We also discuss different antenna and receiver technologies.

  18. An imaging interferometry capability for the EISCAT Svalbard Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grydeland

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferometric imaging (aperture synthesis imaging is a technique used by radio astronomers to achieve angular resolution that far surpasses what is possible with a single large aperture. A similar technique has been used for radar imaging studies of equatorial ionospheric phenomena at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We present plans for adding an interferometric imaging capability to the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR, a capability which will contribute significantly to several areas of active research, including naturally and artificially enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and their detailed relation in space and time to optical phenomena, polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE, and meteor studies.

    Interferometry using the two antennas of the ESR has demonstrated the existence of extremely narrow, field-aligned scattering structures, but having only a single baseline is a severe limitation for such studies. Building additional IS-class antennas at the ESR is not a trivial task. However, the very high scattering levels in enhanced ion-acoustic echoes and PMSE means that a passive receiver antenna of more modest gain should still be capable of detecting these echoes.

    In this paper we present simulations of what an imaging interferometer will be capable of observing for different antenna configurations and brightness distributions, under ideal conditions, using two different image inversion algorithms. We also discuss different antenna and receiver technologies.

  19. Louis Essen and the Velocity of Light: From Wartime Radar to Unit of Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essen, Ray

    2010-03-01

    Louis Essen (1908-1997), working at the National Physical Laboratory in Teddington, England, was the first scientist to realize that the value for the velocity of light used widely during World War II was incorrect. In 1947 he published his first determination of it, which was 16 kilometers per second higher than the accepted value, causing a great deal of controversy in the scientific community. His new value was not accepted for several years, until it was shown that it improved the precision of range-finding by radar. Essen’s result has remained as the internationally accepted value despite a number of attempts to improve on it. I discuss Essen’s work and also examine other optical and nonoptical determinations that were made in the United States, and their limits of accuracy. I also identify the reasons why it took so long for Essen’s new value to be accepted, and how it led to changes in the definition of the units of length and time.

  20. Image processing for hazard recognition in on-board weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Wallace E. (Inventor); Rand, Timothy W. (Inventor); Uckun, Serdar (Inventor); Ruokangas, Corinne C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of providing weather radar images to a user includes obtaining radar image data corresponding to a weather radar image to be displayed. The radar image data is image processed to identify a feature of the weather radar image which is potentially indicative of a hazardous weather condition. The weather radar image is displayed to the user along with a notification of the existence of the feature which is potentially indicative of the hazardous weather condition. Notification can take the form of textual information regarding the feature, including feature type and proximity information. Notification can also take the form of visually highlighting the feature, for example by forming a visual border around the feature. Other forms of notification can also be used.

  1. Apodized RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-02-01

    Fine resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems necessarily require wide bandwidths that often overlap spectrum utilized by other wireless services. These other emitters pose a source of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) to the SAR echo signals that degrades SAR image quality. Filtering, or excising, the offending spectral contaminants will mitigate the interference, but at a cost of often degrading the SAR image in other ways, notably by raising offensive sidelobe levels. This report proposes borrowing an idea from nonlinear sidelobe apodization techniques to suppress interference without the attendant increase in sidelobe levels. The simple post-processing technique is termed Apodized RFI Filtering (ARF).

  2. Logarithmic Laplacian Prior Based Bayesian Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanghui Zhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging (ISAR algorithm based on a new sparse prior, known as the logarithmic Laplacian prior. The newly proposed logarithmic Laplacian prior has a narrower main lobe with higher tail values than the Laplacian prior, which helps to achieve performance improvement on sparse representation. The logarithmic Laplacian prior is used for ISAR imaging within the Bayesian framework to achieve better focused radar image. In the proposed method of ISAR imaging, the phase errors are jointly estimated based on the minimum entropy criterion to accomplish autofocusing. The maximum a posterior (MAP estimation and the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE are utilized to estimate the model parameters to avoid manually tuning process. Additionally, the fast Fourier Transform (FFT and Hadamard product are used to minimize the required computational efficiency. Experimental results based on both simulated and measured data validate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional sparse ISAR imaging algorithms in terms of resolution improvement and noise suppression.

  3. Systematic retrieval of ejecta velocities and gas fluxes at Etna volcano using L-Band Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouhier, Mathieu; Donnadieu, Franck

    2011-11-01

    Strombolian-type volcanic activity is characterized by a series of gas bubbles bursting at the top of a magma column and leading to the ejection of lava clots and gas emission at the surface. The quantitative analysis of physical parameters (e.g., velocity, size, and mass fluxes) controlling the emission dynamics of these volcanic products is very important for the understanding of eruption source mechanisms but remains difficult to obtain in a systematic fashion. Ground-based Doppler radar is found to be a very effective tool for measuring ejecta velocities at a high acquisition rate and close to the emission source. We present here a series of measurements carried out at Mt. Etna's Southeast crater, using an L-band volcanological Doppler radar, during the 4 July 2001 Strombolian eruptions. Doppler radar data are supplemented by the analysis of video snapshots recorded simultaneously. We provide here a set of physical parameters systematically retrieved from 247 Strombolian explosions spanning 15 min and occurring during the paroxysm of the eruption from 21:30 to 21:45 UT. The time-average values give a maximum particle velocity of V_{{}}^p = {94}.{7}± {24} {{m/s}} , a bulk lava jet velocity of {V_{{{{PW - rad}}}}} = {37}.{6}± {1}.{9} {{m/s}} , and an initial gas velocity at the source vent of V_0^g = {118}.{4}± {36} {{m/s}} . The time-averaged particle diameter is found to be about {D_{{{{PW - rad}}}}} = {4}.{2}± {2}.{1} {{cm}} . The volume and mass gas fluxes are estimated from time-averaged source gas velocities over the sequence duration at Q_v^g = {3} - {11} × {1}{0^{{3}}}{{{m}}^{{3}}}{{/s}} and Q_m^g = 0.{5} - {2} × {1}{0^{{3}}}{{kg/s}} , respectively.

  4. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    correlating RF lines from two successive emissions n and n + 1, and then average over a number of lines. In the new approach images n and n + N, n + 1 and n + N + 1 are cross correlated, where N is the number of emissions for one image. These images experience the same phase distortion due to motion...... from the measurements for the same setup exhibit a larger bias -11%, but the standard deviation is comparable to the simulations (sigma similar to 2.5%)....

  5. Velocity map imaging in time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouard, M; Campbell, E K; Johnsen, A J; Vallance, C; Yuen, W H; Nomerotski, A

    2008-12-01

    A new variation on time of flight mass spectrometry is presented, which uses a fast framing charge coupled device camera to velocity map image multiple product masses in a single acquisition. The technique is demonstrated on two photofragmentation processes, those of CS(2) and CH(3)S(2)CH(3) (dimethyldisulfide) at a photolysis wavelength of 193 nm. In both cases, several mass fragments are imaged simultaneously, and speed distributions and anisotropy parameters are extracted that are comparable to those obtained by imaging each fragment separately in conventional velocity map imaging studies.

  6. Iterative Self-Dual Reconstruction on Radar Image Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Charles; Medeiros, Fatima; Ushizima, Daniela; Bezerra, Francisco; Marques, Regis; Mascarenhas, Nelson

    2010-05-21

    Imaging systems as ultrasound, sonar, laser and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are subjected to speckle noise during image acquisition. Before analyzing these images, it is often necessary to remove the speckle noise using filters. We combine properties of two mathematical morphology filters with speckle statistics to propose a signal-dependent noise filter to multiplicative noise. We describe a multiscale scheme that preserves sharp edges while it smooths homogeneous areas, by combining local statistics with two mathematical morphology filters: the alternating sequential and the self-dual reconstruction algorithms. The experimental results show that the proposed approach is less sensitive to varying window sizes when applied to simulated and real SAR images in comparison with standard filters.

  7. Radar Image with Color as Height, Hariharalaya, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Hariharalaya, the ancient 9th Century A.D. capitol of the Khmer in Cambodia, is shown in the upper center portion of this NASA Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) image. The image was acquired during the 1996 PACRIM mission with AIRSAR operating in the TOPSAR mode. At the center of the image is the terraced sandstone temple mountain of the King Indravarman, the Bakong. The smaller enclosed rectangular feature just to the north is Preah Ko. Further to the south are more rectangular features, temples and water reservoirs attributed to other kings in the earlier part of the 9th Century A.D. and maybe even earlier. Just visible at the top on the image is a long linear feature that forms the southern border of the immense water reservoir, at the center of which is the Lolei temple. The city was the first capitol of the Khmer after the 802 A.D. ceremony consecrating the king as 'Devaraja'. This usually translated as 'god who was king' or 'king who was god'. In the next century, the center of power shifted to the northwest, to the area known today as Angkor.Thus this early capital is unique both in being the first after the historical 'founding' of the Khmer Empire, and for being inhabited for a relatively short time. Although kings returned from Angkor in the 11th and 12th Centuries A.D. to build the temple known as the Lolei and to construct the tower in the center of Bakong, the city of Hariharalaya remained on the perimeter of royal power. It was revered, however, as part of a longstanding and important custom of ancestral veneration. This manifested itself in a complex set of rituals honoring one's forebears--also ensuring legitimacy for one's claim to the throne. So behind this seemingly simple patterning of rectangles on the radar image lies many layers of history, ritual and meaning for the Khmer people, past and present.Image dimensions are approximately 6 by 4.8 kilometers (3.7 by 3 miles) with a pixel spacing of 5 meters (16.4 feet). North is at top

  8. Radar image enhancement and simulation as an aid to interpretation and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Stiles, J. A.; Holtzman, J. C.; Dellwig, L. F.; Held, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    Greatly increased activity in the field of radar image applications in the coming years demands that techniques of radar image analysis, enhancement, and simulation be developed now. Since the statistical nature of radar imagery differs from that of photographic imagery, one finds that the required digital image processing algorithms (e.g., for improved viewing and feature extraction) differ from those currently existing. This paper addresses these problems and discusses work at the Remote Sensing Laboratory in image simulation and processing, especially for systems comparable to the formerly operational SEASAT synthetic aperture radar.

  9. Agile beam laser radar using computational imaging for robotic perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael A.; Stann, Barry L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a new concept that applies computational imaging techniques to laser radar for robotic perception. We observe that nearly all contemporary laser radars for robotic (i.e., autonomous) applications use pixel basis scanning where there is a one-to-one correspondence between world coordinates and the measurements directly produced by the instrument. In such systems this is accomplished through beam scanning and/or the imaging properties of focal-plane optics. While these pixel-basis measurements yield point clouds suitable for straightforward human interpretation, the purpose of robotic perception is the extraction of meaningful features from a scene, making human interpretability and its attendant constraints mostly unnecessary. The imposing size, weight, power and cost of contemporary systems is problematic, and relief from factors that increase these metrics is important to the practicality of robotic systems. We present a system concept free from pixel basis sampling constraints that promotes efficient and adaptable sensing modes. The cornerstone of our approach is agile and arbitrary beam formation that, when combined with a generalized mathematical framework for imaging, is suited to the particular challenges and opportunities of robotic perception systems. Our hardware concept looks toward future systems with optical device technology closely resembling modern electronically-scanned-array radar that may be years away from practicality. We present the design concept and results from a prototype system constructed and tested in a laboratory environment using a combination of developed hardware and surrogate devices for beam formation. The technological status and prognosis for key components in the system is discussed.

  10. Determining Tidal Phase Differences from X-Band Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kieran; Bell, Paul; Brown, Jennifer; Plater, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Introduction Previous work by Bell et. al. (2016) has developed a method using X-band marine radar to measure intertidal bathymetry, using the waterline as a level over a spring-neap tidal cycle. This has been used in the Dee Estuary to give a good representation of the bathymetry in the area. However, there are some sources of inaccuracy in the method, as a uniform spatial tidal signal is assumed over the entire domain. Motivation The method used by Bell et. al. (2016) applies a spatially uniform tidal signal to the entire domain. This fails to account for fine-scale variations in water level and tidal phase. While methods are being developed to account for small-scale water level variations using high resolution modelling, a method to determine tidal phase variations directly from the radar intensity images could be advantageous operationally. Methods The tidal phase has been computed using two different methods, with hourly averaged images from 2008. In the first method, the cross-correlation between each raw pixel time series and a tidal signal at a number of lags is calculated, and the lag with the highest correlation to the pixel series is recorded. For the second method, the same method of correlation is used on signals generated by tracking movement of buoys, which show up strongly in the radar image as they move on their moorings with the tidal currents. There is a broad agreement between the two methods, but validation is needed to determine the relative accuracy. The phase has also been calculated using a Fourier decomposition, and agrees broadly with the above methods. Work also needs to be done to separate areas where the recorded phase is due to tidal current (mostly subtidal areas) or due to elevation (mostly the wetting/drying signal in intertidal areas), by classifying radar intensities by the phases and amplitudes of the tides. Filtering out signal variations due to wind strength and attenuation of the radar signal will also be applied. Validation

  11. Imaging blood’s velocity using synthetic aperture ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Li, Ye

    2012-01-01

    The blood velocity vector can be estimated using synthetic aperture techniques in medical ultrasound by using short emission sequences. The whole image region is insonified and the flow can be tracked in all directions continuously. This is a major advantage compared to commercial systems, since...... the separation between blood and tissue is greatly eased by this, and the estimates can be averaged over long time than in traditional systems. Vector velocity imaging can, thus, be made and attain an order of magnitude higher precision than in current commercial systems and at higher frame rates. It is also...... possible to visualize very slow moving flow. The paper will present methods for making such imaging....

  12. Vector Velocity Imaging Using Cross-Correlation and Virtual Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    . Using the RASMUS experimental ultrasound scanner, measurements have been carried out in a water tank using a 7~MHz transducer. A 6~mm tube contained the flow and a Danfoss, MAG~3000, magnetic flow meter measured the volume flow. The tube has a parabolic flow profile with a peak velocity of 0.29~m...... estimations of the vector velocities of a larger region by combining the estimations along several scan lines. In combination with a B-mode image, the vector velocities are displayed as an image of the investigated region with a color indicating the magnitude, and arrows showing the direction of the flow....../s. During the experiments fixed beam-to-flow angles at $\\{60^{\\circ}, 75^{\\circ}, 90^{\\circ}\\}$ have been applied. The images are obtained using a pulse repetition frequency of 15~kHz, and the images contain 33~lines with 60~emissions for each line. Corresponding to the three fixed beam-to-flow angles...

  13. Imaging observations of nighttime mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities by an MU radar ultra-multi-channel system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saito

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs were studied by using the middle-and-upper atmosphere (MU radar ultra-multi-channel system with the radar imaging technique. On 12 June 2006, F-region FAI echoes with a period of about one hour were observed intermittently. These echoes were found to be embedded in medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs observed as variations of total electron content (TEC. The echoes drifting away from (toward the radar were observed in the depletion (enhancement phase of the MSTID. The Doppler velocity of the echoes is consistent with the range rates in the the range-time-intensity (RTI maps. Fine scale structures with a spatial scale of 10 km or less were found by the radar imaging analysis. Those structures with positive Doppler velocities (moving away from the radar appeared to drift north- (up- westward, and those with negative Doppler velocities south- (down- eastward approximately along the wavefronts of the MSTID. FAIs with positive Doppler velocities filling TEC depletion regions were observed.

  14. Space Radar Image of Jerusalem and the Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This space radar image shows the area surrounding the Dead Sea along the West Bank between Israel and Jordan. This region is of major cultural and historical importance to millions of Muslims, Jews and Christians who consider it the Holy Land. The yellow area at the top of the image is the city of Jericho. A portion of the Dead Sea is shown as the large black area at the top right side of the image. The Jordan River is the white line at the top of the image which flows into the Dead Sea. Jerusalem, which lies in the Judaean Hill Country, is the bright, yellowish area shown along the left center of the image. Just below and to the right of Jerusalem is the town of Bethlehem. The city of Hebron is the white, yellowish area near the bottom of the image. The area around Jerusalem has a history of more than 2,000 years of settlement and scientists are hoping to use these data to unveil more about this region's past. The Jordan River Valley is part of an active fault and rift system that extends from southern Turkey and connects with the east African rift zone. This fault system has produced major earthquakes throughout history and some scientists theorize that an earthquake may have caused the fall of Jericho's walls. The Dead Sea basin is formed by active earthquake faulting and contains the lowest place on the Earth's surface at about 400 meters (1,300 feet) below sea level. It was in caves along the northern shore of the Dead Sea that the Dead Sea Scrolls were found in 1947. The blue and green areas are generally regions of undeveloped hills and the dark green areas are the smooth lowlands of the Jordan River valley. This image is 73 kilometers by 45 kilometers (45 miles by 28 miles) and is centered at 31.7 degrees north latitude, 35.4 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and vertically received; green is L-band, horizontally

  15. Coherent radar imaging: Signal processing and statistical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Ronald F.

    1997-11-01

    The recently developed technique for imaging radar scattering irregularities has opened a great scientific potential for ionospheric and atmospheric coherent radars. These images are obtained by processing the diffraction pattern of the backscattered electromagnetic field at a finite number of sampling points on the ground. In this paper, we review the mathematical relationship between the statistical covariance of these samples, (? ?†), and that of the radiating object field to be imaged, (??†), in a self-contained and comprehensive way. It is shown that these matrices are related in a linear way by (??†) = aM(FF†)M†a*, where M is a discrete Fourier transform operator and a is a matrix operator representing the discrete and limited sampling of the field. The image, or brightness distribution, is the diagonal of (FF†). The equation can be linearly inverted only in special cases. In most cases, inversion algorithms which make use of a priori information or maximum entropy constraints must be used. A naive (biased) "image" can be estimated in a manner analogous to an optical camera by simply applying an inverse DFT operator to the sampled field ? and evaluating the average power of the elements of the resulting vector ?. Such a transformation can be obtained either digitally or in an analog way. For the latter we can use a Butler matrix consisting of properly interconnected transmission lines. The case of radar targets in the near field is included as a new contribution. This case involves an additional matrix operator b, which is an analog of an optical lens used to compensate for the curvature of the phase fronts of the backscattered field. This "focusing" can be done after the statistics have been obtained. The formalism is derived for brightness distributions representing total powers. However, the derived expressions have been extended to include "color" images for each of the frequency components of the sampled time series. The frequency filtering

  16. Optical-radar imaging of scale models for studies in asteroid astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, A. K.; Hudson, R. S.; Psaltis, D.

    1995-01-01

    During the past five years, delay-Doppler radar has become the primary technique for studying the structure of Earth-crossing asteroids. None of these objects has yet been visited by spacecraft, so ground-truth test cases are lacking. A laboratory system is described that provides optical-radar images at 0.1-mm resolution. These data are analogous to the highest-resolution asteroid radar images currently available and provided realistic test cases for developing signal-processing techniques. ...

  17. Classification of rainfall radar images using the scattering transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, Mathieu; Andrieu, Hervé; Emmanuel, Isabelle; Busquets, Gerard; Loubrié, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    The classification of rainfall fields has mainly focused on the split between convective and stratiform rainfall fields. In the present case study, the wavelet-based scattering transform is used to classify rainfall events observed by a weather radar. This very recent method has, to the best of the authors' knowledge, not yet been applied for such a purpose. This method considers the spatial properties of rainfall radar images. This case study regroups 34 rainfall periods recorded over the Nantes region (western France) during 23 days in both 2009 and 2012. These periods display different characteristics in terms of duration and type of rainfall field. A reference configuration of the scattering transform has been evaluated and compared to various configurations in order to approximate the application conditions most appropriate to this case study. This evaluation is performed by a leave-one-out cross validation. A global accuracy of 93.5% of well classified images is obtained in the reference conditions which is an encouraging result. The temporal sampling of the rainfall fields is an important aspect of the classification process.

  18. Instrument calibration architecture of Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, T.; Bhan, R.; Putrevu, D.; Mehrotra, P.; Nandy, P. S.; Shukla, S. D.; Rao, C. V. N.; Dave, D. B.; Desai, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT-1) payload system is configured to perform self-calibration of transmit and receive paths before and after imaging sessions through a special instrument calibration technique. Instrument calibration architecture of RISAT-1 supported ground verification and validation of payload including active array antenna. During on-ground validation of 126 beams of active array antenna which needed precise calibration of boresight pointing, a unique method called "collimation coefficient error estimation" was utilized. This method of antenna calibration was supported by special hardware and software calibration architecture of RISAT-1. This paper concentrates on RISAT-1 hardware and software architecture which supports in-orbit and on-ground instrument calibration. Efforts are also put here to highlight use of special calibration scheme of RISAT-1 instrument to evaluate system response during ground verification and validation.

  19. Frame frequency prediction for Risley-prism-based imaging laser radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yafei; Zhou, Yuan; Hei, Mo; Fan, Dapeng

    2014-06-01

    A dual-wedge scanner has potential applications in laser imaging radar. To realize fast scanning imaging without a blind region, the rotation rates of the wedges have to be controlled to perform beam scanning along appropriate track paths. The first-order paraxial approximation method is employed to investigate the 2D scan patterns and path density for different angular frequency ratios of the wedges rotating steadily in the same and opposite directions. The frame rate of no-blind-region scanning imaging is estimated in terms of the imaging coverage requirement. The internal relations between the rotation rates, the instantaneous field of view (IFOV), and the imaging velocity are revealed. The results show that the spiral scanning trace, resulting from co-rotating wedges, is dense in the center and sparse at the edge of the scanning field. The reverse results can be obtained for the rosette scanning trace, resulting from counter-rotating wedges. The denser the scanning trace is, the longer the scan period is. The faster the wedges rotate and the wider the IFOV is, the higher the frame rate is. When the ratio of the width of IFOV to the angular radius of the scanning field is 0.15, the frame rate of no-blind-region spiral scanning imaging can be up to 18 fps for wedge rotation rate of 12000  r/min, and that for rosette scanning imaging can be up to 20 fps.

  20. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0154389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  1. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0141105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  2. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145743)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  3. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  4. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  5. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0148078)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  6. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2015 (NCEI Accession 0129913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  7. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131908)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  8. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during February 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131074)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  9. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during March 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  10. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0151726)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  11. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131956)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  12. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0144286)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  13. Bispectral methods of signal processing applications in radar, telecommunications and digital image restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Totsky, Alexander V; Kravchenko, Victor F

    2015-01-01

    By studying applications in radar, telecommunications and digital image restoration, this monograph discusses signal processing techniques based on bispectral methods. Improved robustness against different forms of noise as well as preservation of phase information render this method a valuable alternative to common power-spectrum analysis used in radar object recognition, digital wireless communications, and jitter removal in images.

  14. Model velocities assessment and HF radar data assimilation in the Ibiza Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Lasheras, Jaime; Mourre, Baptiste; Reyes, Emma; Marmain, Julien; Orfila, Alejandro; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2017-04-01

    High Frequency Radar (HFR) provides continuous and high-resolution surface current measurements over wide coastal areas, enabling the observation of dynamic processes at the atmosphere-ocean interface, where a lot of momentum and heat exchange takes place, which is still not fully understood. Furthermore, HFR data provide critical information to improve numerical model predictions through data assimilation. However, the routine assimilation of HFR surface current data in operational models is still a challenge from both the methodological and computational points of view. Since 2012, SOCIB, the Balearic Islands Coastal Observing and Forecasting System, operates two coastal HFR sites with the purpose of monitoring the surface currents of the Ibiza Channel (Western Mediterranean Sea). It is an area characterized by important meridional flow exchanges with significant impacts on ecosystems. The circulation in the Ibiza Channel results from the complex interaction of different water masses under strong topographic constraints. This makes the area very challenging from the point of view of numerical modeling. Indeed, models are generally found to represent erroneous flows across this section. In this work, we perform the first steps to evaluate the potential of HFR data to improve the model circulation in the Ibiza Channel area with data assimilation. A multimodel Ensemble Optimal Interpolation scheme has been coupled to the SOCIB Western Mediterranean Operational Model (WMOP) to assimilate multiplatform observations, including the HFR surface velocities. WMOP is a 2-km resolution configuration of the ROMS model using CMEMS numerical products as initial and boundary conditions and high-resolution surface forcing from the Spanish Meteorological Agency. To evaluate whether the model properly captures the main dynamical features observed in the Ibiza Channel (which is a prerequisite for a successful data assimilation), comparison of spatial empirical orthogonal function

  15. Phase calibration approaches for radar interferometry and imaging configurations: equatorial spread F results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Chau

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, more and more radar systems with multiple-receiver antennas are being used to study the atmospheric and ionospheric irregularities with either interferometric and/or imaging configurations. In such systems, one of the major challenges is to know the phase offsets between the different receiver channels. Such phases are intrinsic to the system and are due to different cable lengths, filters, attenuators, amplifiers, antenna impedance, etc. Moreover, such phases change as function of time, on different time scales, depending on the specific installation. In this work, we present three approaches using natural targets (radio stars, meteor-head and meteor trail echoes that allow either an absolute or relative phase calibration. In addition, we present the results of using an artificial source (radio beacon for a continuous calibration that complements the previous approaches. These approaches are robust and good alternatives to other approaches, e.g. self-calibration techniques using known data features, or for multiple-receiver configurations constantly changing their receiving elements. In order to show the good performance of the proposed phase calibration techniques, we present new radar imaging results of equatorial spread F (ESF irregularities. Finally we introduce a new way to represent range-time intensity (RTI maps color coded with the Doppler information. Such modified map allows the identification and interpretation of geophysical phenomena, previously hidden in conventional RTI maps, e.g. the time and altitude of occurrence of ESF irregularities pinching off from the bottomside and their respective Doppler velocity.

  16. UWB Short-Pulse Radar: Combining Trilateration and Back Projection for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daho, O. B.; Khamlichi, J.; Ménard, M.; Gaugue, A.

    In this chapter, we propose a novel way to combine back projection and trilateration algorithms for through-the-wall imaging using an ultra-wideband (UWB) short-pulse radar system. The combination of the two algorithms increases the detection-localization performance. To accomplish this improvement, the multi-target localization problem of trilateration is addressed by the calculation of the root-mean-square error with regard to the estimated position and those of all possible target positions. The radar system's entire processing pipeline is described, with a focus on the imaging block. The data were acquired using a multistatic radar system with a 3.2 GHz bandwidth. Simulations and experiments indicate that our combined method outperforms other methods. Simulation and experimental results are shown, compared, and discussed.

  17. Determining titan's spin state from cassini radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, B.W.; Kirk, R.L.; Lorenz, R.D.; Hensley, S.; Lee, E.; Ostro, S.J.; Allison, M.D.; Callahan, P.S.; Gim, Y.; Iess, L.; Del Marmo, P.P.; Hamilton, G.; Johnson, W.T.K.; West, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    For some 19 areas of Titan's surface, the Cassini RADAR instrument has obtained synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images during two different flybys. The time interval between flybys varies from several weeks to two years. We have used the apparent misregistration (by 10-30 km) of features between separate flybys to construct a refined model of Titan's spin state, estimating six parameters: north pole right ascension and declination, spin rate, and these quantities' first time derivatives We determine a pole location with right ascension of 39.48 degrees and declination of 83.43 degrees corresponding to a 0.3 degree obliquity. We determine the spin rate to be 22.5781 deg day -1 or 0.001 deg day-1 faster than the synchronous spin rate. Our estimated corrections to the pole and spin rate exceed their corresponding standard errors by factors of 80 and 8, respectively. We also found that the rate of change in the pole right ascension is -30 deg century-1, ten times faster than right ascension rate of change for the orbit normal. The spin rate is increasing at a rate of 0.05 deg day -1 per century. We observed no significant change in pole declination over the period for which we have data. Applying our pole correction reduces the feature misregistration from tens of km to 3 km. Applying the spin rate and derivative corrections further reduces the misregistration to 1.2 km. ?? 2008. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding earthquakes: The key role of radar images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atzori, Simone, E-mail: simone.atzori@ingv.it [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    The investigation of the fault rupture underlying earthquakes greatly improved thanks to the spread of radar images. Following pioneer applications in the eighties, Interferometry from Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) gained a prominent role in geodesy. Its capability to measure millimetric deformations for wide areas and the increased data availability from the early nineties, made InSAR a diffused and accepted analysis tool in tectonics, though several factors contribute to reduce the data quality. With the introduction of analytical or numerical modeling, InSAR maps are used to infer the source of an earthquake by means of data inversion. Newly developed algorithms, known as InSAR time-series, allowed to further improve the data accuracy and completeness, strengthening the InSAR contribution even in the study of the inter- and post-seismic phases. In this work we describe the rationale at the base of the whole processing, showing its application to the New Zealand 2010–2011 seismic sequence.

  19. Combined imaging and velocity estimation by Joint Migration Inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, X.R.

    2015-01-01

    Seismic imaging projects aim to reveal the structure of the earths crust from seismic data. These projects typically include three separate processing steps, being: • attenuation of multiple reflections in the seismic data. • estimating seismic wave propagation velocities from the seismic data. •

  20. Using Centimetric Visible Imagery Obtained from an UAV Quadrotor for Classification of Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gademer, A.; Petitpas, B.; Beaudoin, L.; Roux, M.; Tanzi, T.; Riera, B.; Rudant, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Interpreting remote sensing images, and SAR images in particular, is often a challenging task. The aim of this article is to explore how visible centimetre information taken from an Unmanned Vehicle System (UAS) could help in interpretation of radar images. After nearly two decades of operational use, it is very common to work with radar images like the ERS ones. Obtaining visible centimetre images on a particular scene is a more complicated task. To face this difficulty, we have developed a small scale UAV dedicated to low altitude aerial remote sensing. From the stereo pair acquired, we have computed dense disparity maps and deduced some roughness parameters. As there is a direct link between the soil roughness, the soil moisture and the radar backscattering, we think that theses measures can have a high added-valued to interpret generic radar images and even the amplitude and coherence images obtained during the interferometric treatment.

  1. Wideband 3D imaging radar using Archimedean spiral antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, William W.; Lacko, Peter R.; Ralston, James M.; Dieguez, Elvis

    2003-09-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar has been applied for several years to the problem of detecting both anti-personnel and anti-tank landmines. Most of the evaluation effort has focused on obtaining the end-to-end performance metrics (e.g. Pd and pfa ) of complete detection systems. This is the third in a series of papers in which we focus on the specific performance of one critical component of GPR systems: the antenna subsystem. In this paper, we examine several free-space characteristics of Planning Systems Inc. Archimedean Spiral Antennas. Specifically, we (1) investigate a spurious signal response observed with a large metal plate reflecting target, (2) determine gain and phase properties of these antennas, (3) calculate the antennas' impulse response, and (4) image several targets to validate our approach.

  2. Matching of dissimilar radar images using Marr-Hildreth zero crossings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconnell, Ross M.

    1987-01-01

    Two alternatives to the classical method for finding corresponding points in opposite-side synthetic aperture radar imagery are presented. These new methods focus on matching the shapes of large-scale features in the images rather than on correlating high-frequency pixel gray values. One of the methods may be of use in matching radar images to optical images. The large-scale features are extracted using the Marr-Hildreth operator.

  3. Applications of compressed sensing to coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Although meteoroids fragmentation has been observed and studied in the optical meteor community since the 1950s, no definitive fragmentation mechanisms for the relatively small meteoroids (mass .10.4 kg) have been proposed. This is in part due to the lack of observations to constrain physical mechanisms of the fragmentation process. While it is challenging to record fragmentation in faint optical meteors, observing meteors using HPLA (High-Power, Large- Aperture) radars can yield considerable information especially when employing coherent radar imaging (CRI). CRI can potentially resolve the fragmentation process in three spatial dimensions by monitoring the evolution of the plasma in the meteor head-echo, flare-echo, and trail-echo regions. On the other hand, the emerging field of compressed sensing (CS) provides a novel paradigm for signal acquisition and processing. Furthermore, it has been, and continues to be, applied with great success in radar systems, offering various benefits such as better resolution compared to traditional techniques, reduced resource requirements, and so forth. In this dissertation, we examine how CS can be incorporated to improve the performance of CRI using HPLA radars. We propose a single CS-based formalism that enables the threedimensions (3D).the range, Doppler frequency, and cross range (represented by the direction cosines) domain.coherent imaging. We show that the CS-based CRI can not only reduce the system costs and decrease the needed number of baselines by spatial sparse sampling, which can be much less than the number required by Nyquist-Shannon sampling criterion, but also achieve high resolution for target detection. We implement the CS-based CRI for meteor studies with observations conducted at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) in Peru. We present the unprecedented resolved details of meteoroids fragmentation, including both along and transverse to the trajectory spreading of the developing plasma, apparently caused by

  4. Mapping submarine sand waves with multiband imaging radar - 2. Experimental results and model comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelzang, J.; Wensink, G.J.; Calkoen, C.J.; Kooij, M.W.A. van der

    1997-01-01

    On August 16, 1989, and on July 12, 1991, experiments were performed to study the mapping of submarine sand waves with the airborne imaging radar, a polarimetric (and, in 1991, interferometric) airborne P, L, and C band synthetic aperture radar system. The experiments took place in an area 30 km off

  5. RADARSAT-2 Polarimetric Radar Imaging for Lake Ice Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F.; Kang, K.; Duguay, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in lake ice dates and duration are useful indicators for assessing long-term climate trends and variability in northern countries. Lake ice cover observations are also a valuable data source for predictions with numerical ice and weather forecasting models. In recent years, satellite remote sensing has assumed a greater role in providing observations of lake ice cover extent for both modeling and climate monitoring purposes. Polarimetric radar imaging has become a promising tool for lake ice mapping at high latitudes where meteorological conditions and polar darkness severely limit observations from optical sensors. In this study, we assessed and characterized the physical scattering mechanisms of lake ice from fully polarimetric RADARSAT-2 datasets obtained over Great Bear Lake, Canada, with the intent of classifying open water and different ice types during the freeze-up and break-up periods. Model-based and eigen-based decompositions were employed to construct the coherency matrix into deterministic scattering mechanisms. These procedures as well as basic polarimetric parameters were integrated into modified convolutional neural networks (CNN). The CNN were modified via introduction of a Markov random field into the higher iterative layers of networks for acquiring updated priors and classifying ice and open water areas over the lake. We show that the selected polarimetric parameters can help with interpretation of radar-ice/water interactions and can be used successfully for water-ice segmentation, including different ice types. As more satellite SAR sensors are being launched or planned, such as the Sentinel-1a/b series and the upcoming RADARSAT Constellation Mission, the rapid volume growth of data and their analysis require the development of robust automated algorithms. The approach developed in this study was therefore designed with the intent of moving towards fully automated mapping of lake ice for consideration by ice services.

  6. Quantitative comparisons of radar image, scatterometer, and surface roughness data from Pisgah Crater, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, T. G.; Engheta, N.

    1983-01-01

    The relationships between radar image brightness and backscatter coefficient, between the backscatter coefficient and surface roughness, and between surface roughness and geology, must be established in order to satisfy criteria for the quantitative use of radar images. Attention is presently given to the merits of calibrated radar images and scatterometers as sources of the backscatter coefficient, theories that yield the coefficient on the basis of known surface roughness (and vice versa), and the geologic interpretation of surface roughness and backscatter signatures. These considerations are discussed in the case of the Pisgah Crater and lava field in the Mojave Desert of California.

  7. The influence of sensor and flight parameters on texture in radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Texture is known to be important in the analysis of radar images for geologic applications. It has previously been shown that texture features derived from the grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) can be used to separate large scale texture in radar images. Here the influence of sensor parameters, specifically the spatial and radiometric resolution and flight parameters, i.e., the orientation of the surface structure relative to the sensor, on the ability to classify texture based on the GLCM features is investigated. It was found that changing these sensor and flight parameters greatly affects the usefulness of the GLCM for classifying texture on radar images.

  8. 3D measurements in the polar mesosphere using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, M.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Stober, G.; Latteck, R.

    2012-12-01

    Radars provide the opportunity of continuous measurements in the interesting area of the polar mesosphere. Usually the spatial resolution of measurements by pulsed VHF radars is limited by the radar beam width, transmitting pulse length, and sampling time. Due to these technical restrictions the typical small-scale structures in the mesosphere often cannot be resolved. Furthermore the quality of the estimation of dynamic atmosphere parameters is reduced if the position and direction of scatter returns cannot determined exactly. Radar interferometry methods have been developed to reduce these limitations. The coherent radar imaging method gives a high resolving image of the scatter structure insight the radar beam volume. In recent years the VHF radar MAARSY was installed in Andenes/Norway (69°N). This new radar was designed to allow improved three-dimensional observations in the atmosphere. It consists of 433 Yagis and allows a minimum beam width of about 4 degree. The beam direction can be changed pulse-by-pulse freely in azimuth angle and practicable up to 40 degree in zenith angle. The pulse length can be varied from a couple of km down to 50 m. Up to 16 receiving channels of spaced antennas can be used. In this presentation we show the detection of the angles-of-arrival of radar echoes and the correction of the wind measurements. We demonstrate the improvement of measurement results by using coherent radar imaging. The differences to the results of conventional methods depend on the beam width, range resolution, antenna distances, and beam tilting. We show that the application of interferometry is necessary to improve considerably the quality of 3D-measurement results. Furthermore we demonstrate the synthesis of high resolved images to get a real 3D image of the mesosphere.

  9. Statement of capabilities: Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology applied to mine detection and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gavel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-03-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in demining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower Impulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes LLNL`s unique capabilities and technologies that can be applied to the demining problem.

  10. Simultaneous Range-Velocity Processing and SNR Analysis of AFIT’s Random Noise Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    First, and above all else, I give thanks and praise to the one from whom all blessings are given. Thank you, God , for continually giving generously to...target’s radial velocity is constant over the measurement window Ttx. Lievsay [18] created a bank of reference signals, analogous to Doppler filter...where ⌈⋅⌉ represents the integer ceiling of the computed value. Velocity resolution is directly tied to the highest frequency of the signal, fℎ and

  11. Studies of Velocity Fluctuations in the Lower Atmosphere Using the MU Radar. Part 1. Azimuthal Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    max mna relative it north.q,’ is not plotted "lihen a, - 0.2. 1 hCSe q uantities are runninge ascr-P.s oxver I h plotted ec CN 4 min. �l. Cos cos x...1atioo4hrc1eghs Scheler . A. 0.. and C. H. L~iu, 1988: T he effects of Doppler shift on (an . P/i’ . 8. 141-I481.the gravity wase spectra ohs-ned b%. MST radar

  12. FrFT-CSWSF: Estimating cross-range velocities of ground moving targets using multistatic synthetic aperture radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chenlei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Estimating cross-range velocity is a challenging task for space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR, which is important for ground moving target indication (GMTI. Because the velocity of a target is very small compared with that of the satellite, it is difficult to correctly estimate it using a conventional monostatic platform algorithm. To overcome this problem, a novel method employing multistatic SAR is presented in this letter. The proposed hybrid method, which is based on an extended space-time model (ESTIM of the azimuth signal, has two steps: first, a set of finite impulse response (FIR filter banks based on a fractional Fourier transform (FrFT is used to separate multiple targets within a range gate; second, a cross-correlation spectrum weighted subspace fitting (CSWSF algorithm is applied to each of the separated signals in order to estimate their respective parameters. As verified through computer simulation with the constellations of Cartwheel, Pendulum and Helix, this proposed time-frequency-subspace method effectively improves the estimation precision of the cross-range velocities of multiple targets.

  13. Radar Imaging of Building Interiors using Sparse Reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Wit, J.J.M. de; Tan, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    At TNO an innovative concept to obtain inside building awareness with stand-off, through-the-wall radar has been developed: SAPPHIRE. The system concept exploits particular phase behavior in the 3D radar data to extract dominant scatterers inside a building. These scatterers can be reconstructed

  14. Coded aperture subreflector array for high resolution radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jonathan J.; Herrault, Florian; Kona, Keerti; Virbila, Gabriel; McGuire, Chuck; Wetzel, Mike; Fung, Helen; Prophet, Eric

    2017-05-01

    HRL Laboratories has been developing a new approach for high resolution radar imaging on stationary platforms. High angular resolution is achieved by operating at 235 GHz and using a scalable tile phased array architecture that has the potential to realize thousands of elements at an affordable cost. HRL utilizes aperture coding techniques to minimize the size and complexity of the RF electronics needed for beamforming, and wafer level fabrication and integration allow tiles containing 1024 elements to be manufactured with reasonable costs. This paper describes the results of an initial feasibility study for HRL's Coded Aperture Subreflector Array (CASA) approach for a 1024 element micromachined antenna array with integrated single-bit phase shifters. Two candidate electronic device technologies were evaluated over the 170 - 260 GHz range, GaN HEMT transistors and GaAs Schottky diodes. Array structures utilizing silicon micromachining and die bonding were evaluated for etch and alignment accuracy. Finally, the overall array efficiency was estimated to be about 37% (not including spillover losses) using full wave array simulations and measured device performance, which is a reasonable value at 235 GHz. Based on the measured data we selected GaN HEMT devices operated passively with 0V drain bias due to their extremely low DC power dissipation.

  15. The study of fresh-water lake ice using multiplexed imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Bryan M.; Larson, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    The study of ice in the upper Great Lakes, both from the operational and the scientific points of view, is receiving continued attention. Quantitative and qualitative field work is being conducted to provide the needed background for accurate interpretation of remotely sensed data. The data under discussion in this paper were obtained by a side-looking multiplexed airborne radar (SLAR) supplemented with ground-truth data.Because of its ability to penetrate adverse weather, radar is an especially important instrument for monitoring ice in the upper Great Lakes. It has previously been shown that imaging radars can provide maps of ice cover in these areas. However, questions concerning both the nature of the surfaces reflecting radar energy and the interpretation of the radar imagery continually arise.Our analysis of ice in Whitefish Bay (Lake Superior) indicates that the combination of the ice/water interlace and the ice/air interface is the major contributor to the radar backscatter as seen on the imagery At these frequencies the ice has a very low relative dielectric permittivity (radar backscatter with data on the meteorological and sea-state history of the area, together with some basic ground truth, better estimates of the ice thickness may be provided. In addition, certain ice features (e.g. ridges, ice-foot formation, areas of brash ice) may be identified with reasonable confidence. There is a continued need for additional ground work to verify the validity of imaging radars for these types of interpretations.

  16. Recent advances in blood flow vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Udesen, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    A number of methods for ultrasound vector velocity imaging are presented in the paper. The transverse oscillation (TO) method can estimate the velocity transverse to the ultrasound beam by introducing a lateral oscillation in the received ultrasound field. The approach has been thoroughly...... investigated using both simulations, flow rig measurements, and in-vivo validation against MR scans. The TO method obtains a relative accuracy of 10% for a fully transverse flow in both simulations and flow rig experiments. In-vivo studies performed on 11 healthy volunteers comparing the TO method...... with magnetic resonance phase contrast angiography (MRA) revealed a correlation between the stroke volume estimated by TO and MRA of 0.91 (pflow in e.g. bifurcations and around valves have...

  17. Transverse Oscillations for Phased Array Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-01-01

    of superficial blood vessels. To broaden the usability of the method, it should be expanded to a phased array geometry enabling vector velocity imaging of the heart. Therefore, the scan depth has to be increased to 10-15 cm. This paper presents suitable pulse echo fields (PEF). Two lines are beamformed...... in receive to obtain lateral spatial in-phase and quadrature components. The relative mean bias and standard deviation of the lateral velocity component are computed as performance measures. For the PEF, the coefficient of variance, CV, of the spectral frequencies, and the energy ratio, ER, of leakage...... into negative frequencies are used as metrics to assess estimator performance. At 10 cm’s depth for an initial setup, the relative mean bias and standard deviation are 9.1% and 9.5%, respectively. At a depth of 15 cm, the values are 20% and 13%, respectively. The PEF metric ER can be used to assess the bias...

  18. Using Phased Array for Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Haugaard, Per; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    be expanded to phased arrays enabling vector velocity imaging of the heart. Therefore, the performance of the TO estimator has to be evaluated for depths up to 10-15 cm. Methods The TO method is based on creating a double oscillating field. Flow phantoms were simulated with a transverse (90º) parabolic flow...... realizations. Results With a F-number of 10 in transmit and receive peaks (spaced 96 elements apart) shaped as Hanning functions, parabolic velocity profiles were be observed for all cases. At depths of 10, 12, and 15 cm, the following results were obtained in pairs of σr & Br: 6.5% & 2.6%, 7.5% & 3.8%, and 8...

  19. Advective surface velocity in the north west Pacific derived from NOAA AVHRR images

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Akiyama, M.; Okada, Y.; Sugimori, Y.

    Using sequential AVHRR images in November 1983, nearsurface advective velocities are derived in the region Kuroshio south of Japan. For deriving the velocities two methods are used. One is the Method of Cross Correlation (MCC), using image pair...

  20. Detecting Weather Radar Clutter by Information Fusion With Satellite Images and Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    A method for detecting clutter in weather radar images by information fusion is presented. Radar data, satellite images, and output from a numerical weather prediction model are combined and the radar echoes are classified using supervised classification. The presented method uses indirect...... information on precipitation in the atmosphere from Meteosat-8 multispectral images and near-surface temperature estimates from the DMI-HIRLAM-S05 numerical weather prediction model. Alternatively, an operational nowcasting product called 'Precipitating Clouds' based on Meteosat-8 input is used. A scale......-space ensemble method is used for classification and the clutter detection method is illustrated on a case of severe sea clutter contaminated radar data. Detection accuracies above 90 % are achieved and using an ensemble classification method the error rate is reduced by 40 %....

  1. Three-dimensional ground penetrating radar imaging using multi-frequency diffraction tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, J.E.; Johansson, E.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    In this talk we present results from a three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithm for impulse radar operating in monostatic pule-echo mode. The application of interest to us is the nondestructive evaluation of civil structures such as bridge decks. We use a multi-frequency diffraction tomography imaging technique in which coherent backward propagations of the received reflected wavefield form a spatial image of the scattering interfaces within the region of interest. This imaging technique provides high-resolution range and azimuthal visualization of the subsurface region. We incorporate the ability to image in planarly layered conductive media and apply the algorithm to experimental data from an offset radar system in which the radar antenna is not directly coupled to the surface of the region. We present a rendering in three-dimensions of the resulting image data which provides high-detail visualization.

  2. Synthetic aperture radar image processing techniques for damage detection of FRP-concrete systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzuyang

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic imaging enables researchers and engineers to assess the surface and subsurface condition of concrete structures using radar and microwave sensors. Among existing radar imaging methods, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging offers flexible resolution for various purposes in condition assessment. In this paper, two novel SAR image processing techniques are reported for the subsurface condition assessment of FRP(fiber reinforced polymer)-strengthened concrete systems; mathematical morphology (MM) and the K-R-I transform. Glass FRP (GFRP) and carbon CFRP (CFRP) strengthened concrete cylinders are used as examples. From our experimental results, it is found that both techniques are capable of quantifying SAR images for condition assessment. It is also found that Euler's number and the coefficient of correlation of K-R-I curves of SAR images can be used for monitoring subsurface changes in FRP-concrete systems.

  3. Glacier Surface Velocity Measurements from Radar Interferometry and the Principle of Mass Conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Presents a relation between the three glacier surface velocity components, the surface flux-divergence, glacier thickness and bottom melt and displacement. The relation can be used as an extension to the surface parallel flow assumption often used with interferometric synthetic aperture measureme...

  4. Estimating blood flow velocity in angiographic image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Clemens M.; Serowy, Steffen; Janiga, Gábor; Rose, Georg; Tönnies, Klaus D.

    2011-03-01

    We propose a system to estimate blood flow velocity in angiographic image data for patient-specific blood flow simulations. Angiographies are acquired routinely for diagnosis and before treatment of vascular diseases. Projective blood flow is measured in digital subtraction X-ray angiography (2D-DSA) images by tracking contrast agent propagation. Spatial information is added by re-projecting 2D centerline pixels to the reconstructed 3D X-ray rotation angiography (3D-RA) data of the same subject. Ambiguities caused by occluding vessels from the virtual viewpoint of the acquired 2D-DSA image are resolved by a graph-based approach. The blood flow velocity can be used as boundary condition for exact blood flow simulations that can help physicians to understand hemodynamics of the vasculature. Our focus is to analyze cerebral angiographic data. We performed several experiments with phantom and patient data that proved the accuracy and the functionality of our method. We evaluated experimentally the projective flow estimation method and the re-projection method. We measured mean deviations to the ground truth between 11 % and 15.7 % for phantom data. We also showed the ability of our method to produce plausible results with patient-data.

  5. A Mobile System for Measuring Water Surface Velocities Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Large-Scale Particle Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement technologies for velocity of river flow are divided into intrusive and nonintrusive methods. Intrusive method requires infield operations. The measuring process of intrusive methods are time consuming, and likely to cause damages of operator and instrument. Nonintrusive methods require fewer operators and can reduce instrument damages from directly attaching to the flow. Nonintrusive measurements may use radar or image velocimetry to measure the velocities at the surface of water flow. The image velocimetry, such as large scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) accesses not only the point velocity but the flow velocities in an area simultaneously. Flow properties of an area hold the promise of providing spatially information of flow fields. This study attempts to construct a mobile system UAV-LSPIV by using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with LSPIV to measure flows in fields. The mobile system consists of a six-rotor UAV helicopter, a Sony nex5T camera, a gimbal, an image transfer device, a ground station and a remote control device. The activate gimbal helps maintain the camera lens orthogonal to the water surface and reduce the extent of images being distorted. The image transfer device can monitor the captured image instantly. The operator controls the UAV by remote control device through ground station and can achieve the flying data such as flying height and GPS coordinate of UAV. The mobile system was then applied to field experiments. The deviation of velocities measured by UAV-LSPIV of field experiments and handhold Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is under 8%. The results of the field experiments suggests that the application of UAV-LSPIV can be effectively applied to surface flow studies.

  6. Imaging of surface wave phase velocities from array phase observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valerie

    2010-05-01

    While temporary deployments some 10 years ago were largely based on short-period seismometers, the availability of broadband instruments in instrument pools increased strongly in recent years and as such modern temporary deployments for passive seismological recordings often consist to a large extent, if not exclusively, of broadband instruments. This opens for new analysis approaches as the broadband seismic wavefield is obtained at a relatively high spatial sampling relative to the wavelength. In an attempt to infer surface wave phase velocity anomalies beneath Southern Norway based on data from a temporary network of 41 broadband instruments, we present a new approach to overcome the limitations of two-station phase measurements (on the great circle with the source) and instead exploit the two-dimensional nature of the wavefield by taking into account phase measurements at all stations of the array from a single event. This is based on the assumption that the wavefield is at least piecewise linear within the study region. By triangulation of the network region and linear estimation of the phase gradient in each triangle we get without further a priori assumptions a coarse image of the phase velocity variations within our network. The image can be significantly refined for a single event recording by stacking multiple images based on arbitrary subsets of the available data. Phase velocity anomalies measured from single event recordings can be biased and blurred by non-plane arriving wavefield, reflections and diffractions of heterogeneities. Therefore, by averaging over velocity fields from different events with varying backazimuths, artefacts are reduced and the recovered image significantly improved. Another way to improve the recovered structures is to take into account the spatial variation of the amplitude field. However, while the phase between two neighboring stations may be (at least close to) linear, the amplitude may not, hence estimation of the second

  7. Coincidence velocity map imaging using a single detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Arthur; Sándor, Péter; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate a single-detector velocity map imaging setup which is capable of rapidly switching between coincidence and non-coincidence measurements. By rapidly switching the extraction voltages on the electrostatic lenses, both electrons and ions can be collected in coincidence with a single detector. Using a fast camera as the 2D detector avoids the saturation problem associated with traditional delay line detectors and allows for easy transitions between coincidence and non-coincidence data collection modes. This is a major advantage in setting up a low-cost and versatile coincidence apparatus. We present both coincidence and non-coincidence measurements of strong field atomic and molecular ionization.

  8. Vertical rise velocity of equatorial plasma bubbles estimated from Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) observations and HIRB model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulasi Ram, S.; Ajith, K. K.; Yokoyama, T.; Yamamoto, M.; Niranjan, K.

    2017-06-01

    The vertical rise velocity (Vr) and maximum altitude (Hm) of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs) were estimated using the two-dimensional fan sector maps of 47 MHz Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR), Kototabang, during May 2010 to April 2013. A total of 86 EPBs were observed out of which 68 were postsunset EPBs and remaining 18 EPBs were observed around midnight hours. The vertical rise velocities of the EPBs observed around the midnight hours are significantly smaller ( 26-128 m/s) compared to those observed in postsunset hours ( 45-265 m/s). Further, the vertical growth of the EPBs around midnight hours ceases at relatively lower altitudes, whereas the majority of EPBs at postsunset hours found to have grown beyond the maximum detectable altitude of the EAR. The three-dimensional numerical high-resolution bubble (HIRB) model with varying background conditions are employed to investigate the possible factors that control the vertical rise velocity and maximum attainable altitudes of EPBs. The estimated rise velocities from EAR observations at both postsunset and midnight hours are, in general, consistent with the nonlinear evolution of EPBs from the HIRB model. The smaller vertical rise velocities (Vr) and lower maximum altitudes (Hm) of EPBs during midnight hours are discussed in terms of weak polarization electric fields within the bubble due to weaker background electric fields and reduced background ion density levels.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryEquatorial plasma bubbles are plasma density irregularities in the ionosphere. The radio waves passing through these irregular density structures undergo severe degradation/scintillation that could cause severe disruption of satellite-based communication and augmentation systems such as GPS navigation. These bubbles develop at geomagnetic equator, grow vertically, and elongate along the field lines to latitudes away from the equator. The knowledge on bubble rise velocities and their maximum attainable

  9. Estimating the Effective Permittivity for Reconstructing Accurate Microwave-Radar Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Benjamin R; Okoniewski, Michal; Fear, Elise C

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a method for estimating the optimal effective permittivity for reconstructing microwave-radar images. Using knowledge of how microwave-radar images are formed, we identify characteristics that are typical of good images, and define a fitness function to measure the relative image quality. We build a polynomial interpolant of the fitness function in order to identify the most likely permittivity values of the tissue. To make the estimation process more efficient, the polynomial interpolant is constructed using a locally and dimensionally adaptive sampling method that is a novel combination of stochastic collocation and polynomial chaos. Examples, using a series of simulated, experimental and patient data collected using the Tissue Sensing Adaptive Radar system, which is under development at the University of Calgary, are presented. These examples show how, using our method, accurate images can be reconstructed starting with only a broad estimate of the permittivity range.

  10. Estimating the Effective Permittivity for Reconstructing Accurate Microwave-Radar Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Lavoie

    Full Text Available We present preliminary results from a method for estimating the optimal effective permittivity for reconstructing microwave-radar images. Using knowledge of how microwave-radar images are formed, we identify characteristics that are typical of good images, and define a fitness function to measure the relative image quality. We build a polynomial interpolant of the fitness function in order to identify the most likely permittivity values of the tissue. To make the estimation process more efficient, the polynomial interpolant is constructed using a locally and dimensionally adaptive sampling method that is a novel combination of stochastic collocation and polynomial chaos. Examples, using a series of simulated, experimental and patient data collected using the Tissue Sensing Adaptive Radar system, which is under development at the University of Calgary, are presented. These examples show how, using our method, accurate images can be reconstructed starting with only a broad estimate of the permittivity range.

  11. Transferring the attoclock technique to velocity map imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Weger, Matthias; Ludwig, André; Gallmann, Lukas; Keller, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Attosecond angular streaking measurements have revealed deep insights into the timing of tunnel ionization processes of atoms in intense laser fields. So far experiments of this type have been performed only with a cold-target recoil-ion momentum spectrometer (COLTRIMS). Here, we present a way to apply attosecond angular streaking experiments to a velocity map imaging spectrometer (VMIS) with few-cycle pulses at a repetition rate of 10 kHz and a high ionization yield per pulse. Three-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions from strong-field ionization of helium with an elliptically polarized, sub-10-fs pulse were retrieved by tomographic reconstruction from the momentum space electron images and used for the analysis in the polarization plane.

  12. Rainbow particle imaging velocimetry for dense 3D fluid velocity imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-07-21

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. In this work we tackle this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a

  13. Computational Burden Resulting from Image Recognition of High Resolution Radar Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Fernández-Recio, Raúl; Bravo, Ignacio; Gardel, Alfredo; Lázaro, José L.; Rufo, Elena

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for high resolution radar image generation and automatic target recognition emphasizing the computational cost involved in the process. In order to obtain focused inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images certain signal processing algorithms must be applied to the information sensed by the radar. From actual data collected by radar the stages and algorithms needed to obtain ISAR images are revised, including high resolution range profile generation, motion compensation and ISAR formation. Target recognition is achieved by comparing the generated set of actual ISAR images with a database of ISAR images generated by electromagnetic software. High resolution radar image generation and target recognition processes are burdensome and time consuming, so to determine the most suitable implementation platform the analysis of the computational complexity is of great interest. To this end and since target identification must be completed in real time, computational burden of both processes the generation and comparison with a database is explained separately. Conclusions are drawn about implementation platforms and calculation efficiency in order to reduce time consumption in a possible future implementation. PMID:23609804

  14. Computational burden resulting from image recognition of high resolution radar sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Fernández-Recio, Raúl; Bravo, Ignacio; Gardel, Alfredo; Lázaro, José L; Rufo, Elena

    2013-04-22

    This paper presents a methodology for high resolution radar image generation and automatic target recognition emphasizing the computational cost involved in the process. In order to obtain focused inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) images certain signal processing algorithms must be applied to the information sensed by the radar. From actual data collected by radar the stages and algorithms needed to obtain ISAR images are revised, including high resolution range profile generation, motion compensation and ISAR formation. Target recognition is achieved by comparing the generated set of actual ISAR images with a database of ISAR images generated by electromagnetic software. High resolution radar image generation and target recognition processes are burdensome and time consuming, so to determine the most suitable implementation platform the analysis of the computational complexity is of great interest. To this end and since target identification must be completed in real time, computational burden of both processes the generation and comparison with a database is explained separately. Conclusions are drawn about implementation platforms and calculation efficiency in order to reduce time consumption in a possible future implementation.

  15. A Method for Retrieving Vertical Air Velocities in Convective Clouds over the Tibetan Plateau from TIPEX-III Cloud Radar Doppler Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafeng Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the summertime, convective cells occur frequently over the Tibetan Plateau (TP because of the large dynamic and thermal effects of the landmass. Measurements of vertical air velocity in convective cloud are useful for advancing our understanding of the dynamic and microphysical mechanisms of clouds and can be used to improve the parameterization of current numerical models. This paper presents a technique for retrieving high-resolution vertical air velocities in convective clouds over the TP through the use of Doppler spectra from vertically pointing Ka-band cloud radar. The method was based on the development of a “small-particle-traced” idea and its associated data processing, and it used three modes of radar. Spectral broadening corrections, uncertainty estimations, and results merging were used to ensure accurate results. Qualitative analysis of two typical convective cases showed that the retrievals were reliable and agreed with the expected results inferred from other radar measurements. A quantitative retrieval of vertical air motion from a ground-based optical disdrometer was used to compare with the radar-derived result. This comparison illustrated that, while the data trends from the two methods of retrieval were in agreement while identifying the updrafts and downdrafts, the cloud radar had a much higher resolution and was able to reveal the small-scale variations in vertical air motion.

  16. Annual Report on Radar Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hao, Ling

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific progress on the research grant "Radar Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction, and Motion Compensation Using Joint Time-Frequency Techniques" during the period 15...

  17. Multifrequency radar imaging of ash plumes: an experiment at Stromboli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Delanoë, Julien; Vinson, Jean-Paul; Peyrin, Frédéric; Hervier, Claude; Caudoux, Christophe; Van Baelen, Joël; Latchimy, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash emissions in the atmosphere are hazardous to aviation while ash fallout affects people and human activities and may cause damage to infrastructures and economic losses. In the framework of the French Government Laboratory of Excellence ClerVolc initiative, an experiment was carried out on Stromboli volcano (Italy), between 28 September and 4 October 2015. The aim was to retrieve various physical properties of the ash plumes, especially the mass loading parameters which are critical for the modelling of ash dispersal. We used a complementary set of cutting edge techniques recording in different bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The innovative instrument setup consisted in three radars, hyperspectral thermal infrared and dual-band UV cameras, a mini DOAS-Flyspec and a multigas sensor. A drone equipped with differential GPS was flown near the ash plumes with several sensors including SO2, CO2 and particle counter. We mainly focus on radar measurements of over 200 ash plumes and present some preliminary comparisons at three frequencies. The BASTA Doppler radar at 95 GHz, originally designed for atmospheric studies, was deployed at about 2.2 km in slant distance from the eruptive craters. It was configured to observe volumes above one of the active craters with a spatio-temporal resolution of 12.5 m and 1 s. From the same location, a 1.2 GHz volcano Doppler radar (VOLDORAD) was recording the signature of ballistics and small lapilli at 0.15 s in 60 m-deep volumes. In addition, a commercial 24 GHz micro rain Doppler radar (MRR) simultaneously recorded activity from the Rochette station, at 400 to 650 m from the active craters with a sampling rate of 10 s and a resolution of 25 m. The latter was pointing almost perpendicularly to the other radar beams. Reflectivity factors were measured inside the ash plume above the source vent by the BASTA radar (3 mm wavelength) spanning -9 to +21 dBZ. Fallout could sometimes be tracked during several minutes within

  18. Basics of Polar-Format algorithm for processing Synthetic Aperture Radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a background to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation using the Polar Format (PFA) processing algorithm. This is meant to be an aid to those tasked to implement real-time image formation using the Polar Format processing algorithm.

  19. Wavefront curvature limitations and compensation to polar format processing for synthetic aperture radar images.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-01-01

    Limitations on focused scene size for the Polar Format Algorithm (PFA) for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image formation are derived. A post processing filtering technique for compensating the spatially variant blurring in the image is examined. Modifications to this technique to enhance its robustness are proposed.

  20. FPGA Implementation of Back Projection Algorithm for Radar Imaging (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    RADAR 201397 Fig. 2. a) 2D SAR spatial mode b) B scan of point target A. Back Projection Algorithm The fundamental aspect of back projection is that it...46634 82% Number of bonded IOBs 305 680 44% Number of BlockRAM/FIFO 176 228 77% Number of BUFG/BUFGCTRLs 2 32 6% Number of DCM ADVs 1 12 8% Number of

  1. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuenschel, E. [Mirage Systems, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the development of a system known as 3-D SISAR. This system consists of a ground penetrating radar with software algorithms designed for the detection, location, and identification of buried objects in the underground hazardous waste environments at DOE storage sites.

  2. Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging of Buried Metallic Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, A. Burak; Meincke, Peter

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade there has been considerable research on ground penetrating radar (GPR) tomography for detecting objects such as pipes, cables, mines and barrels buried under the surface of the Earth. While the earlier researches were all based on the assumption of a homogeneous background...

  3. Contribution of radar images for grassland management identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusseux, P.; Gong, X.; Corpetti, T.; Hubert-Moy, L.; Corgne, S.

    2012-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the identification of grassland management using both optical and radar data. In that context, grazing, mowing and a mix of these two managements are commonly used by the farmers on grassland fields. These practices and their intensity of use have different environmental impact. Thus, the objectives of this study are, firstly, to identify grassland management practices using a time series of optical and radar imagery at high spatial resolution and, secondly, to evaluate the contribution of radar data to improve identification of farming practices on grasslands. Because of cloud coverage and revisit frequency of satellite, the number of available optical data is limited during the vegetation period. Thus, radar data can be considered as an ideal complement. The present study is based on the use of SPOT, Landsat and RADARSAT-2 data, acquired in 2010 during the growing period. After a pre-processing step, several vegetation indices, biophysical variables, backscattering coefficients and polarimetric discriminators were computed on the data set. Then, with the help of some statistics, the most discriminating variables have been identified and used to classify grassland fields. In addition, to take into account the temporal variation of variables, dedicated indexes as first and second order derivatives were used. Classification process was based on training samples resulting from field campaigns and computed according six methods: Decision Trees, K-Nearest Neighbor, Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, the Naive Bayes Classifier and Linear Discriminant Analysis. Results show that combined use of optical and radar remote sensing data is not more efficient for grassland management identification.

  4. Design and Implementation of a FPGA and DSP Based MIMO Radar Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The work presented in this paper is aimed at the implementation of a real-time multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO imaging radar used for area surveillance. In this radar, the equivalent virtual array method and time-division technique are applied to make 16 virtual elements synthesized from the MIMO antenna array. The chirp signal generater is based on a combination of direct digital synthesizer (DDS and phase locked loop (PLL. A signal conditioning circuit is used to deal with the coupling effect within the array. The signal processing platform is based on an efficient field programmable gates array (FPGA and digital signal processor (DSP pipeline where a robust beamforming imaging algorithm is running on. The radar system was evaluated through a real field experiment. Imaging capability and real-time performance shown in the results demonstrate the practical feasibility of the implementation.

  5. Analyse multiechelle d'images radar: Application au filtrage, a la classification et a la fusion d'images radar et optique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, Samuel

    Les images radar sont perturbees par un bruit multiplicatif (chatoiement) reduisant sensiblement la resolution radiometrique des cibles homogenes etendues. Le but de cette these est d'etudier l'apport de l'analyse multiechelle, plus particulierement de la transformee en ondelettes, dans le probleme de la reduction du chatoiement et de la classification non dirigee des images radar. Dans le cadre de la transformee en ondelettes stationnaire, garantissant l'invariance par translation de la representation, les techniques usuelles de filtrage adaptatif sont etendues au domaine multiechelle. Nous proposons de prendre en compte les specificites statistiques de l'image radar (modele multiplicatif, loi K) afin de separer les coefficients d'ondelettes engendres par le bruit seul de ceux engendres par les structures significatives de l'image. Le systeme de distribution de Pearson est applique afin de modeliser la distribution de probabilites des coefficients d'ondelettes. Lorsque l'intensite observee obeit a une loi K, le systeme de Pearson conduit a une loi de type IV (loi Beta complexe). Le type IV de Pearson est mis en oeuvre dans une ponderation de type MAP (Maximum A Posteriori). L'influence de la correlation du chatoiement sur les moments d'ordre superieur est ensuite evaluee quantitativement a partir d'une modelisation MA ("Moving Average") de l'image radar correlee. Les resultats obtenus sur un ensemble d'images artificielles montrent que l'approche multiechelle permet d'atteindre un meilleur compromis entre preservation des details et lissage des regions homogenes par rapport aux methodes de filtrage traditionnelles. En classification, la representation multiechelle permet de faire fluctuer le compromis precision spatiale/incertitude radiometrique. La theorie des croyances fournit un cadre theorique afin de manipuler les notions d'incertitude et d'imprecision. Nous proposons de combiner directement les decisions multiechelles par la regle de Dempster en integrant l

  6. Waveform-Diverse Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Radar Imaging Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kyle B.

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar is an emerging set of technologies designed to extend the capabilities of multi-channel radar systems. While conventional radar architectures emphasize the use of antenna array beamforming to maximize real-time power on target, MIMO radar systems instead attempt to preserve some degree of independence between their received signals and to exploit this expanded matrix of target measurements in the signal-processing domain. Specifically the use of sparse “virtual” antenna arrays may allow MIMO radars to achieve gains over traditional multi-channel systems by post-processing diverse received signals to implement both transmit and receive beamforming at all points of interest within a given scene. MIMO architectures have been widely examined for use in radar target detection, but these systems may yet be ideally suited to real and synthetic aperture radar imaging applications where their proposed benefits include improved resolutions, expanded area coverage, novel modes of operation, and a reduction in hardware size, weight, and cost. While MIMO radar's theoretical benefits have been well established in the literature, its practical limitations have not received great attention thus far. The effective use of MIMO radar techniques requires a diversity of signals, and to date almost all MIMO system demonstrations have made use of time-staggered transmission to satisfy this requirement. Doing so is reliable but can be prohibitively slow. Waveform-diverse systems have been proposed as an alternative in which multiple, independent waveforms are broadcast simultaneously over a common bandwidth and separated on receive using signal processing. Operating in this way is much faster than its time-diverse equivalent, but finding a set of suitable waveforms for this technique has proven to be a difficult problem. In light of this, many have questioned the practicality of MIMO radar imaging and whether or not its theoretical benefits

  7. On the homogeneity of the wave field in coastal areas as determined from ERS-2 and RADARSAT synthetic aperture radar images of the ocean surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Ocampo-Torres

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial variations of the wave field in coastal waters were determined from images obtained by synthetic aperture radar (SAR on board the European satellites ERS-1 and 2. The capabilities of RADARSAT SAR to provide useful information for evaluating the wave field variation in nearshore waters are explored. Besides the different polarization between ERS and RADARSAT SARs, range to velocity ratios, signal to noise ratios and the acquisition swath are important issues to take into consideration in comparing the performance of the radar systems. In situ data from a coastal region in the north-west of Baja California are used to validate some of the remote observations and to provide relevant ground truth. Particular aspects of wave phenomena in finite depth waters such as refraction, diffraction and groupiness are considered. An appropriate method for analysing the radar images is applied to describe wave features as they originate from a non-homogeneous process. Wave field characteristics and their spatial variations as resolved by RADARSAT SAR are relevant variables for applications such as beach erosion and coastal management. Inclusion of specific modules to retrieve this type of information should be considered for operational software packages for the use and application of ocean surface data from SAR images. The differences of the two radar systems did not affect their capabilities to observe the wave field in coastal regions.

  8. Rainbow Particle Imaging Velocimetry for Dense 3D Fluid Velocity Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Xiong, Jinhui

    2017-04-11

    Despite significant recent progress, dense, time-resolved imaging of complex, non-stationary 3D flow velocities remains an elusive goal. In this work we tackle this problem by extending an established 2D method, Particle Imaging Velocimetry, to three dimensions by encoding depth into color. The encoding is achieved by illuminating the flow volume with a continuum of light planes (a “rainbow”), such that each depth corresponds to a specific wavelength of light. A diffractive component in the camera optics ensures that all planes are in focus simultaneously. For reconstruction, we derive an image formation model for recovering stationary 3D particle positions. 3D velocity estimation is achieved with a variant of 3D optical flow that accounts for both physical constraints as well as the rainbow image formation model. We evaluate our method with both simulations and an experimental prototype setup.

  9. A comparative study of ionospheric irregularity drift velocity derived from a GNSS receiver array and Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar measurements during high-latitude ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Morton, Yu T.

    2017-06-01

    The conventional ionospheric scintillation-based, spaced-receiver technique uses Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signal intensity measurements. It is not suitable, however, for high-latitude regions where phase scintillations occur much more often than amplitude scintillations. This paper demonstrates that GNSS signal carrier phase scintillations observed from a spaced-receiver array can be used to infer horizontal ionospheric drift velocities via time domain correlation. Drift velocities measured by the colocated Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar are cross compared against the estimated results from the GNSS receiver array. A comparative study is conducted based on two case studies on 20 and 31 December 2015, both accompanied by intense geomagnetic storms. Overall, the comparison results show statistical agreement between the GNSS receiver array estimation and incoherent scatter radar measurements.

  10. Arecibo and Goldstone radar images of near-Earth Asteroid (469896) 2005 WC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Kenneth J.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, Marina; Ostro, Steven J.; Jao, Joseph S.; Giorgini, Jon D.; Slade, Martin A.; Jurgens, Raymond F.; Nolan, Michael C.; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.

    2018-01-01

    We report radar observations of near-Earth asteroid (469896) 2005 WC1 that were obtained at Arecibo (2380 MHz, 13 cm) and Goldstone (8560 MHz, 3.5 cm) on 2005 December 14-15 during the asteroid's approach within 0.020 au The asteroid was a strong radar target. Delay-Doppler images with resolutions as fine as 15 m/pixel were obtained with 2 samples per baud giving a correlated pixel resolution of 7.5 m. The radar images reveal an angular object with 100 m-scale surface facets, radar-dark regions, and an estimated diameter of 400 ± 50 m. The rotation of the facets in the images gives a rotation period of ∼2.6 h that is consistent with the estimated period of 2.582 h ± 0.002 h from optical lightcurves reported by Miles (private communication). 2005 WC1 has a circular polarization ratio of 1.12 ± 0.05 that is one of the highest values known, suggesting a structurally-complex near-surface at centimeter to decimeter spatial scales. It is the first asteroid known with an extremely high circular polarization ratio, relatively low optical albedo, and high radar albedo.

  11. Photonics-based broadband radar for high-resolution and real-time inverse synthetic aperture imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangzheng; Guo, Qingshui; Wang, Ziqian; Zhou, Pei; Zhang, Guoqiang; Sun, Jun; Pan, Shilong

    2017-07-10

    A photonics-based radar with generation and de-chirp processing of broadband linear frequency modulated continuous-wave (LFMCW) signal in optical domain is proposed for high-resolution and real-time inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging. In the proposed system, a broadband LFMCW signal is generated by a photonic frequency quadrupler based on a single integrated electro-optical modulator, and the echoes reflected from the targets are de-chirped to a low frequency signal by a microwave photonic frequency mixer. The proposed radar can operate at a high frequency with a large bandwidth, and thus achieve an ultra-high range resolution for ISAR imaging. Thanks to the wideband photonic de-chirp technique, the radar receiver could apply low-speed analog-to-digital conversion and mature digital signal processing, which makes real-time ISAR imaging possible. A K-band photonics-based radar with an instantaneous bandwidth of 8 GHz (18-26 GHz) is established and its performance for ISAR imaging is experimentally investigated. Results show that a recorded two-dimensional imaging resolution of ~2 cm × ~2 cm is achieved with a sampling rate of 100 MSa/s in the receiver. Besides, fast ISAR imaging with 100 frames per second is verified. The proposed radar is an effective solution to overcome the limitations on operation bandwidth and processing speed of current radar imaging technologies, which may enable applications where high-resolution and real-time radar imaging is required.

  12. Simulations of Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar for the EISCAT_3D Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Belyey, V.

    2012-12-01

    EISCAT_3D is a project to build the next generation of incoherent scatter radars endowed with multiple 3-dimensional capabilities that will replace the current EISCAT radars in Northern Scandinavia. Aperture Synthesis Imaging Radar (ASIR) is one of the technologies adopted by the EISCAT_3D project to endow it with imaging capabilities in 3-dimensions that includes sub-beam resolution. Complemented by pulse compression, it will provide 3-dimensional images of certain types of incoherent scatter radar targets resolved to about 100 metres at 100 km range, depending on the signal-to-noise ratio. This ability will open new research opportunities to map small structures associated with non-homogeneous, unstable processes such as aurora, summer and winter polar radar echoes (PMSE and PMWE), Natural Enhanced Ion Acoustic Lines (NEIALs), structures excited by HF ionospheric heating, meteors, space debris, and others. To demonstrate the feasibility of the antenna configurations and the imaging inversion algorithms a simulation of synthetic incoherent scattering data has been performed. The simulation algorithm incorporates the ability to control the background plasma parameters with non-homogeneous, non-stationary components over an extended 3-dimensional space. Control over the positions of a number of separated receiving antennas, their signal-to-noise-ratios and arriving phases allows realistic simulation of a multi-baseline interferometric imaging radar system. The resulting simulated data is fed into various inversion algorithms. This simulation package is a powerful tool to evaluate various antenna configurations and inversion algorithms. Results applied to realistic design alternatives of EISCAT_3D will be described.

  13. A Multi-Frequency Wide-Swath Spaceborne Cloud and Precipitation Imaging Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lihua; Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gary; McLinden, Matthew; Venkatesh, Vijay; Coon, Michael; Perrine, Martin; Park, Richard; Cooley, Michael; Stenger, Pete; hide

    2016-01-01

    Microwave and millimeter-wave radars have proven their effectiveness in cloud and precipitation observations. The NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey (DS) Aerosol, Cloud and Ecosystems (ACE) mission calls for a dual-frequency cloud radar (W band 94 GHz and Ka-band 35 GHz) for global measurements of cloud microphysical properties. Recently, there have been discussions of utilizing a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) radar for a combined ACE and Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) follow-on mission that has evolved into the Cloud and Precipitation Process Mission (CaPPM) concept. In this presentation we will give an overview of the technology development efforts at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and at Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems (NGES) through projects funded by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO) Instrument Incubator Program (IIP). Our primary objective of this research is to advance the key enabling technologies for a tri-frequency (KuKaW-band) shared-aperture spaceborne imaging radar to provide unprecedented, simultaneous multi-frequency measurements that will enhance understanding of the effects of clouds and precipitation and their interaction on Earth climate change. Research effort has been focused on concept design and trade studies of the tri-frequency radar; investigating architectures that provide tri-band shared-aperture capability; advancing the development of the Ka band active electronically scanned array (AESA) transmitreceive (TR) module, and development of the advanced radar backend electronics.

  14. A coherent through-wall MIMO phased array imaging radar based on time-duplexed switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qingchao; Chetty, Kevin; Brennan, Paul; Lok, Lai Bun; Ritchie, Matthiew; Woodbridge, Karl

    2017-05-01

    Through-the-Wall (TW) radar sensors are gaining increasing interest for security, surveillance and search and rescue applications. Additionally, the integration of Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output (MIMO) techniques with phased array radar is allowing higher performance at lower cost. In this paper we present a 4-by-4 TW MIMO phased array imaging radar operating at 2.4 GHz with 200 MHz bandwidth. To achieve high imaging resolution in a cost-effective manner, the 4 Tx and 4 Rx elements are used to synthesize a uniform linear array (ULA) of 16 virtual elements. Furthermore, the transmitter is based on a single-channel 4-element time-multiplexed switched array. In transmission, the radar utilizes frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) waveforms that undergo de-ramping on receive to allow digitization at relatively low sampling rates, which then simplifies the imaging process. This architecture has been designed for the short-range TW scenarios envisaged, and permits sufficient time to switch between antenna elements. The paper first outlines the system characteristics before describing the key signal processing and imaging algorithms which are based on traditional Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) processing. These techniques are implemented in LabVIEW software. Finally, we report results from an experimental campaign that investigated the imaging capabilities of the system and demonstrated the detection of personnel targets. Moreover, we show that multiple targets within a room with greater than approximately 1 meter separation can be distinguished from one another.

  15. Feature discrimination and detection probability in synthetic aperture radar imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipes, R. G.; Butman, S. A.

    1977-01-01

    Images obtained using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems can only represent the intensities of resolution cells in the scene of interest probabilistically since radar receiver noise and Rayleigh scattering of the transmitted radiation are always present. Consequently, when features to be identified differ only by their contribution to the mean power of the radar return, discrimination can be treated by detection theory. In this paper, we develop a 'sufficient statistic' for discriminating between competing features and compare it with some suboptimal methods frequently used. Discrimination is measured by probability of detection error and depends on number of samples or 'looks', signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and ratio of mean power returns from the competing features. Our results show discrimination and image quality rapidly saturate with SNR (very small improvement for SNR not less than 10 dB) but continue to improve with increasing number of looks.

  16. Ground-penetrating imaging radar development for bridge deck and road bed inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warhus, J.P.; Mast, J.E.; Nelson, S.D.; Johansson, E.M.

    1993-05-01

    Ground-penetrating imaging radar (GPIR) is proposed for large-area inspection of concrete and concrete/asphalt composite bridge decks and roadways. This technique combines ground-penetrating radar (GPR) with unique image reconstruction algorithms developed for identification and characterization of subsurface flaws and structural features. New data acquisition hardware and image reconstruction techniques, under development at LLNL, offer the possibility for reliable and efficient, high-resolution subsurface imaging through the use of improved ultra-wideband transmitters, antennas, and arrays, and enhanced image- and signal-processing software. A field test of a limited-capability prototype system is planned for FY-93, as is completion of a conceptual design for a practical inspection system. A follow-on program for FY-94 would focus on development and demonstration of an advanced bridge inspection system prototype based on the conceptual design completed during FY-93.

  17. High frame-rate blood vector velocity imaging using plane waves: simulations and preliminary experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, J.; Gran, F.; Hansen, K.L.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color images of blood velocity are limited by a relatively low frame-rate and are restricted to give velocity estimates along the ultrasound beam direction only. To circumvent these limitations, the method presented in this paper uses 3 techniques: 1...... carotid artery of a healthy male was scanned with a scan sequence that satisfies the limits set by the Food and Drug Administration. Vector velocity images were obtained with a frame-rate of 100 Hz where 40 speckle images are used for each vector velocity image. It was found that the blood flow...

  18. High Frame-Rate Blood Vector Velocity Imaging Using Plane Waves: Simulations and Preliminary Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2008-01-01

    Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color images of blood velocity are limited by a relatively low frame-rate and are restricted to give velocity estimates along the ultrasound beam direction only. To circumvent these limitations, the method presented in this paper uses 3 techniques: 1...... carotid artery of a healthy male was scanned with a scan sequence that satisfies the limits set by the Food and Drug Administration. Vector velocity images were obtained with a frame-rate of 100 Hz where 40 speckle images are used for each vector velocity image. It was found that the blood flow...

  19. The proposed flatland radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  20. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during December 2015 (NCEI Accession 0141107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  1. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  2. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139553)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  3. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during May 2016 (NCEI Accession 0154390)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  4. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during June 2016 (NCEI Accession 0155984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  5. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during May 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138488)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  6. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during January 2016 (NCEI Accession 0144289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  7. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during February 2016 (NCEI Accession 0145802)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  8. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during June 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  9. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138948)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  10. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  11. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during April 2016 (NCEI Accession 0151734)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  12. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  13. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138671)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  14. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during February 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  15. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during April 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138389)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  16. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during January 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  17. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during March 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138305)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  18. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during March 2016 (NCEI Accession 0148080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  19. Surface ocean velocities obtained by HF radar from stations located along coastal waters of Antarctica, Hawaii, North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico and western US during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138776)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The archival package contains ocean surface radial velocities collected from High frequency (HF) radar stations. NDBC, which with SIO assembles data from the IOOS HF...

  20. Ground penetrating radar images of selected fluvial deposits in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghe, J. van den; Overmeeren, R.A. van

    1999-01-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys have been carried out in order to characterise reflection patterns and to assess the method's potential for imaging palaeofluvial sediments in the Mass-Rhine former confluence area in the southern Netherlands. The results show that the deposits of meandering,

  1. Analyse des images satellitales radar RSO-ERS et optique ETM+ de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analyse des images satellitales radar RSO-ERS et optique ETM+ de Landsat 7 comme outils de prospection minière : application aux localités de Tiébissou et de Tienko en Côte d'Ivoire (Afrique de l'Ouest)

  2. Imaging and EISCAT radar measurements of an auroral prebreakup event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    Full Text Available The results of coordinated EISCAT and TV-camera observations of a prebreakup event on 15 November 1993 have been considered. The variations of the luminosity of two parallel auroral arcs, plasma depletion on the poleward edge of one of these arcs as well as electron and ion temperatures in front of a westward travelling surge were studied. It was found that a short-lived brightening of a weak zenith arc before an auroral breakup was accompanied by fading of an equatorial arc and, vice versa. A plasma depletion in the E region was detected by the EISCAT radar on the poleward edge of the zenith arc just before the auroral breakup. The plasma depletion was associated with an enhancement of ion (at the altitudes of 150–200 km and electron (in E region temperatures. During its occurrence, the electric field in the E-region was extremely large (~150 mV/m. A significant increase in ion temperature was also observed 1 min before the arrival of a westward travelling surge (WTS at the radar zenith. This was interpreted as the existence of an extended area of enhanced electric field ahead of the WTS.

  3. Peak velocity measurements in tortuous arteries with phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging: the effect of multidirectional velocity encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Tilman; Bieri, Oliver; Pansini, Michele; Stippich, Christoph; Santini, Francesco

    2014-04-01

    Blood flow velocity measurement with phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is widely applied in clinical routine imaging. Usually, velocity and volumetric flow measurements are performed using unidirectional encoding of the through-plane velocity with a 2-dimensional (2D) acquisition. Single-slice acquisitions and measurements with unidirectional encoding, however, may lead to significant errors, especially in tortuous vessels, but might benefit from higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). To evaluate the impact of volumetric acquisition and multidirectional velocity encoding, blood velocity measurements were performed at 3 locations in the distal internal carotid artery with a 3-dimensional, 3-directional time-resolved phase contrast (PC) sequence (4-dimensional [4D]) and a 2D acquisition with 3-directional (2D-3dir) and through-plane velocity encoding (2D-tp) derived from the same sequence. Twenty carotid arteries of 10 healthy volunteers (24-37 years) were evaluated. For each volunteer, 1 4D acquisition and 3 2D 3-directional PC measurements were placed according to a time-of-flight angiography. Unidirectionally encoded through-plane velocities were derived from the multidirectionally encoded 2D scan by discarding the in-plane components. Regions of interest were identified on the slab after postprocessing and visualization for the 4D data set as well as directly on the digital imaging and communications in medicine images for the 2D measurement. Blood flow velocity, volumetric flow, and SNRs were measured at carotid segments C4, C5, and C7 on both sides obtaining 20 values per vessel location. The quantities were tested for significant differences between each modality at all 3 locations with paired t tests. At the segments C5 and C7, the highest peak velocities (PVs) were measured with the 4D sequence, followed by 2D-3dir and 2D tp. The PV differences between the sequences were significant (P measured with 2D-tp. The mean PV value of the 4D sequence

  4. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  5. An information theory characterization of radar images and a new definition for radiometric resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, V. S.; Shanmugan, K. S.; Holtzman, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The noise properties of the radar image formation process are used in the present modeling of a communication channel in which the desired target properties are the information transmitted, and the final image represents the received signal. The average information rate over this communication channel is calculated together with appropriate bounds and approximations, and is found to be small on a per-sample basis. As a result, many samples must be averaged to allow for the discrimination, or classification, of several levels of target reflectivity. These information rate properties are consistent with known results concerning target detection and image quality in speckle, and the rate is applicable to the definition of radar image radiometric resolution. Radiometric resolution is functionally related to the degree of noncoherent averaging performed by the sensor.

  6. IFP V4.0:a polar-reformatting image formation processor for synthetic aperture radar.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2005-09-01

    IFP V4.0 is the fourth generation of an extraordinarily powerful and flexible image formation processor for spotlight mode synthetic aperture radar. It has been successfully utilized in processing phase histories from numerous radars and has been instrumental in the development of many new capabilities for spotlight mode SAR. This document provides a brief history of the development of IFP, a full exposition of the signal processing steps involved, and a short user's manual for the software implementing this latest iteration.

  7. Segmentation of multifrequency polarimetric radar images to facilitate the inference of geophysical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, C F.; Dubois, P. C.; Van Zyl, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    An unsupervised clustering algorithm is used to segment multifrequency polarimetric radar data from the NASA/JPL airborne SAR (synthetic aperture radar). Twenty-two parameters are evaluated for their discriminatory capability for each pixel of an image. A clustering analysis is then performed using different subsets of these parameters. This analysis relies on data taken as part of an intensive field experiment during the summer of 1988 in the vicinity of the Pisgah lava flow in the Mojave Desert in southern California. As part of the experiment, extensive ground truth was acquired, including dielectric constant and topography measurements. Segmentation results show good agreement with these measurements.

  8. 3D high-resolution radar imaging of small body interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Paul; Asphaug, Erik

    2017-10-01

    Answering fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of small planetary bodies hinges on our ability to image their interior structure in detail and at high resolution (Asphaug, 2009). We often infer internal structure from surface observations, e.g. that comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is a primordial agglomeration of cometesimals (Massironi et al., 2015). However, the interior structure is not easily accessible without systematic imaging using, e.g., radar transmission and reflection data, as suggested by the CONSERT experiment on Rosetta. Interior imaging depends on observations from multiple viewpoints, as in medical tomography.We discuss radar imaging using methodology adapted from terrestrial exploration seismology (Sava et al., 2015). We primarily focus on full wavefield methods that facilitate high quality imaging of small body interiors characterized by complex structure and large contrasts of physical properties. We consider the case of a monostatic system (co-located transmitters and receivers) operated at two frequency bands, centered around 5 and 15 MHz, from a spacecraft in slow polar orbit around a spinning comet nucleus. Assuming that the spin period is significantly (e.g. 5x) faster than the orbital period, this configuration allows repeated views from multiple directions (Safaeinili et al., 2002)Using realistic numerical experiments, we argue that (1) the comet/asteroid imaging problem is intrinsically 3D and conventional SAR methodology does not satisfy imaging, sampling and resolution requirements; (2) imaging at different frequency bands can provide information about internal surfaces (through migration) and internal volumes (through tomography); (3) interior imaging can be accomplished progressively as data are being acquired through successive orbits around the studied object; (4) imaging resolution can go beyond the apparent radar frequency band by deconvolution of the point-spread-function characterizing the imaging system; and (5

  9. Devonian lacustrine shore zone architecture imaged with ground penetrating radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrews, Steven D.; Moreau, Julien; Archer, Stuart

    Lake margin sedimentary systems have been the subject of only limited study. The orbitally controlled cyclic lacustrine successions of the Middle Old Red Sandstone of Northern Scotland contain repeated developments of shore zone sandstones and thus provides an ideal location for the study...... of these units. The cycles are on average 15 m thick and comprise deep lake, perennial lake, playa and shore zone facies (2 to 3.5 m in thickness). High resolution sedimentary logging and the construction of photo-panels were combined with high resolution GPR profiling (250 MHz). To ensure close ties between....... Loading and discrete channel forms are recognised in thin-bedded sandstones within the lower portion of the lake shore zone successions. Radar profiles provide evidence that these units are sharp-based and contain some erosional features. Up-section the sandstone beds appear to become amalgamated forming...

  10. Fourier analysis of cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities: MR imaging study. The Scandinavian Flow Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Ståhlberg, F; Stubgaard, M

    1990-01-01

    images. The phase information in the resultant image was converted to flow velocity with a calibration curve with the slope 26.5 radian.m-1.sec. The velocity versus time function was Fourier transformed and a continuous curve was fitted to the measured data with use of the first three harmonics...

  11. Progress on Ultra-Wideband (UWB Multi-Antenna radar imaging for MIGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yedlin Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress on the development of the multi-channel, ground penetrating radar imaging system is presented from hardware and software perspectives. A new exponentially tapered slot antenna, with an operating bandwidth from 100 MHz to 1.5 GHz was fabricated and tested using the eight-port vector network analyzer, designed by Rhode and Schwarz Incorporated for this imaging project. An eight element antenna array mounted on two carts with automatic motor drive, was designed for optimal common midpoint (CMP data acquisition. Data acquisition scenarios were tested using the acoustic version of the NORSAR2D seismic ray-tracing software. This package enables the synthesis and analysis of multi-channel, multi-offset data acquisitions comprising more than a hundred thousand traces. Preliminary processing is in good agreement with published bistatic ground-penetrating radar images obtained in the tunnels of the Low-noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB at Rustrel, France.

  12. Large space antenna technology applied to radar-imaging, rain-rate measurements, and ocean wind sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. K.; Gogineni, S.

    1985-01-01

    During the last decade, the utility of spaceborne microwave remote sensing systems for ocean windspeed measurement, ocean wave imaging and sea ice studies was demonstrated. Development of large space antennas offers some interesting possibilities for rain rate measurements, ocean and ice studies, and radar imaging. The joint use of active and passive sensors using the 15 m antenna for ocean, ice, and soil moisture studies; rain rate measurements; and radar imaging is considered. Verification of the frequency agile rain radar concept with Shuttle offers the possibility of much needed rain rate statistics over the ocean.

  13. Radar Determination of Fault Slip and Location in Partially Decorrelated Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jay; Glasscoe, Margaret; Donnellan, Andrea; Stough, Timothy; Pierce, Marlon; Wang, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Faced with the challenge of thousands of frames of radar interferometric images, automated feature extraction promises to spur data understanding and highlight geophysically active land regions for further study. We have developed techniques for automatically determining surface fault slip and location using deformation images from the NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR), which is similar to satellite-based SAR but has more mission flexibility and higher resolution (pixels are approximately 7 m). This radar interferometry provides a highly sensitive method, clearly indicating faults slipping at levels of 10 mm or less. But interferometric images are subject to decorrelation between revisit times, creating spots of bad data in the image. Our method begins with freely available data products from the UAVSAR mission, chiefly unwrapped interferograms, coherence images, and flight metadata. The computer vision techniques we use assume no data gaps or holes; so a preliminary step detects and removes spots of bad data and fills these holes by interpolation and blurring. Detected and partially validated surface fractures from earthquake main shocks, aftershocks, and aseismic-induced slip are shown for faults in California, including El Mayor-Cucapah (M7.2, 2010), the Ocotillo aftershock (M5.7, 2010), and South Napa (M6.0, 2014). Aseismic slip is detected on the San Andreas Fault from the El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake, in regions of highly patterned partial decorrelation. Validation is performed by comparing slip estimates from two interferograms with published ground truth measurements.

  14. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during October 2015 (NCEI Accession 0138228)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  15. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during September 2015 (NCEI Accession 0137285)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  16. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during July 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156399)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  17. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during July 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  18. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during November 2015 (NCEI Accession 0139551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  19. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during August 2015 (NCEI Accession 0131989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  20. Near-real-time surface ocean velocities derived from HF radar stations located along coastal waters of North Slope Alaska, Puerto Rico/Virgin Islands, eastern US/Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii and western US during August 2016 (NCEI Accession 0156623)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archival package contains near-real-time ocean surface velocities, also known as total vector velocities, derived from HF radar stations. The velocities are...

  1. Velocity Tomography Imaging Method with Variable Grid spacing/Interval

    OpenAIRE

    Guangnan, Huang; Yang, Liu; Tryggvason, Ari; Guangyi, Hu; Tingen, Fan; Jianhua, Dong

    2013-01-01

    In variable grid spacing tomography the underground velocity distribution is parameterized with model cells of different sizes. This method can simultaneously take into account the spatially varying resolution inherent in most datasets. E.g., due to experimental design or logistic constraints, the shallow and deep subsurface velocity distribution may be very differently determined by the available data. The variable grid spacing tomography and regular grid spacing tomography are similar in mo...

  2. Ultrawideband Impulse Radar Through-the-Wall Imaging with Compressive Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenji Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive Sensing (CS provides a new perspective for addressing radar applications requiring large amount of measurements and long data acquisition time; both issues are inherent in through-the-wall radar imaging (TWRI. Most CS techniques applied to TWRI consider stepped-frequency radar platforms. In this paper, the impulse radar two-dimensional (2D TWRI problem is cast within the framework of CS and solved by the sparse constraint optimization performed on time-domain samples. Instead of the direct sampling of the time domain signal at the Nyquist rate, the Random Modulation Preintegration architecture is employed for the CS projection measurement, which significantly reduces the amount of measurement data for TWRI. Numerical results for point-like and spatially extended targets show that high-quality reliable TWRI based on the CS imaging approach can be achieved with a number of data points with an order of magnitude less than that required by conventional beamforming using the entire data volume.

  3. Enhanced Radar Imaging in Uncertain Environment: A Descriptive Experiment Design Regularization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Shkvarko

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A new robust technique for high-resolution reconstructive imaging is developed as required for enhanced remote sensing (RS with imaging array radar or/and synthetic aperture radar (SAR operating in an uncertain RS environment. The operational scenario uncertainties are associated with the unknown statistics of perturbations of the signal formation operator (SFO in turbulent medium, imperfect array calibration, finite dimensionality of measurements, uncontrolled antenna vibrations, and random carrier trajectory deviations in the case of SAR. We propose new descriptive experiment design regularization (DEDR approach to treat the uncertain radar image enhancement/reconstruction problems. The proposed DEDR incorporates into the minimum risk (MR nonparametric estimation strategy the experiment design-motivated operational constraints algorithmically coupled with the worst-case statistical performance (WCSP optimization-based regularization. The MR objective functional is constrained by the WCSP information, and the robust DEDR image reconstruction operator applicable to the scenarios with the low-rank uncertain estimated data correlation matrices is found. We report and discuss some simulation results related to enhancement of the uncertain SAR imagery indicative of the significantly increased performance efficiency gained with the developed approach.

  4. Investigation of ground target detection methods in fully polarimetric wide angle synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laggan, Wayne B.

    1995-03-01

    Target detection is a high priority of the Air Force for the purpose of reconnaissance and bombardment. This research investigates and develops methods to distinguish ground targets from clutter (i.e. foliage, landscape etc.) in Wide Angle Synthetic Aperture Radar (WASAR) images. WASAR uses multiple aspect angle SAR images of the same target scene. The WASAR data was generated from a pre-release software package (XPATCH-ES) provided by the sponsor (WL-AARA). A statistical analysis and feature extraction is performed on the XPATCH-ES data. Polarimetric and wide angle covariance matrices are estimated and analyzed. From an analysis of the wide angle covariance matrix it is shown that natural clutter has in general a uniform radar return for changing aspect angles, whereas the radar return for a target varies. Based on this analysis, two new wide angle algorithms, the WASAR Whitening Filter and the Adaptive WASAR Whitening Filter (AWWF) are developed. The target detection performance of polarimetric and multi aspect angle image combining algorithms are quantified using Receiver Operating Characteristic curves and target to clutter ratios. It is shown that wide angle processing provides superior target detection performance over polarimetric processing. Combinations of wide angle and polarimetric algorithms were used to achieve a 13.7 dB processing gain in target to clutter ratio when compared to unprocessed images of the target scene. This represents a significant improvement in target detection capabilities.

  5. Electromagnetic Vortex-Based Radar Imaging Using a Single Receiving Antenna: Theory and Experimental Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tiezhu; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yongqiang; Qin, Yuliang

    2017-03-19

    Radar imaging based on electromagnetic vortex can achieve azimuth resolution without relative motion. The present paper investigates this imaging technique with the use of a single receiving antenna through theoretical analysis and experimental results. Compared with the use of multiple receiving antennas, the echoes from a single receiver cannot be used directly for image reconstruction using Fourier method. The reason is revealed by using the point spread function. An additional phase is compensated for each mode before imaging process based on the array parameters and the elevation of the targets. A proof-of-concept imaging system based on a circular phased array is created, and imaging experiments of corner-reflector targets are performed in an anechoic chamber. The azimuthal image is reconstructed by the use of Fourier transform and spectral estimation methods. The azimuth resolution of the two methods is analyzed and compared through experimental data. The experimental results verify the principle of azimuth resolution and the proposed phase compensation method.

  6. Measurement of viscous flow velocity and flow visualization using two magnetic resonance imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiko, A. V.; Akulov, A. E.; Chupakhin, A. P.; Cherevko, A. A.; Denisenko, N. S.; Savelov, A. A.; Stankevich, Yu. A.; Khe, A. K.; Yanchenko, A. A.; Tulupov, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The accuracies of measuring the velocity field using clinical and research magnetic resonance imagers are compared. The flow velocity of a fluid simulating blood in a carotid artery model connected to a programmable pump was measured. Using phase-contrast magnetic resonance tomography, the velocity distributions in the carotid artery model were obtained and compared with the analytical solution for viscous liquid flow in a cylindrical tube (Poiseuille flow). It is found that the accuracy of the velocity measurement does not depend on the field induction and spatial resolution of the imagers.

  7. Survey of Study on Internal Waves Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Jin-song

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Internal Waves (IWs detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR image has received considerable attentions in the area of marine remote sensing and has already become one of the most important marine applications of SAR. Typical research results at home and abroad are reviewed. Three areas of researches are introduced and summarized, including parameter inversion method of IWs, the effect of different SAR parameter and wind field conditions on IWs imaging, the 2-dimentional SAR imaging simulation of IWs.

  8. Velocity estimation using recursive ultrasound imaging and spatially encoded signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    time using orthogonal spatial encoding signals. The method was applied on data recorded by an experimental system. The estimates of the blood velocity for both methods had a bias less than 3% and a standard deviation around 2% making them a feasible approach for blood velocity estimations...... estimates can therefore be used for compensation of the motion artifacts in the data acquired in the next emission. Two different transmit strategies are investigated in this paper: (a) using a single defocused active aperture in transmit, and (b) emitting with all active transmit sub-apertures at the same...

  9. The design and development of two-failure tolerant mechanisms for the Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-B) antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presas, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The performance requirements, design constraints, and design qualification status of the mechanisms necessary to restrain, deploy, and stow the Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR) B antenna experiment on the Shuttle Orbiters are described.

  10. Airborne radar imaging of subaqueous channel evolution in Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, John B.; Ayoub, Francois; Jones, Cathleen E.; Lamb, Michael P.; Holt, Benjamin; Wagner, R. Wayne; Coffey, Thomas S.; Chadwick, J. Austin; Mohrig, David

    2016-05-01

    Shallow coastal regions are among the fastest evolving landscapes but are notoriously difficult to measure with high spatiotemporal resolution. Using Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) data, we demonstrate that high signal-to-noise L band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can reveal subaqueous channel networks at the distal ends of river deltas. Using 27 UAVSAR images collected between 2009 and 2015 from the Wax Lake Delta in coastal Louisiana, USA, we show that under normal tidal conditions, planform geometry of the distributary channel network is frequently resolved in the UAVSAR images, including ~700 m of seaward network extension over 5 years for one channel. UAVSAR also reveals regions of subaerial and subaqueous vegetation, streaklines of biogenic surfactants, and what appear to be small distributary channels aliased by the survey grid, all illustrating the value of fine resolution, low noise, L band SAR for mapping the nearshore subaqueous delta channel network.

  11. Ultra-wideband Radar Methods and Techniques of Medical Sensing and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, C N; Chang, J T; Romero, C E; Watson, J; Pearce, F J; Levin, N

    2005-10-07

    Ultra-wideband radar holds great promise for a variety of medical applications. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using ultra-wideband sensors for detection of internal injuries, monitoring of respiratory and cardiac functions, and continuous non-contact imaging of the human body. Sensors are low-power, portable, and do not require physical contact with the patient. They are ideal for use by emergency responders to make rapid diagnosis and triage decisions. In the hospital, vital signs monitoring and imaging application could improve patient outcomes. In this paper we present an overview of ultra-wideband radar technology, discuss key design tradeoffs, and give examples of ongoing research in applying ultra-wideband technology to the medical field.

  12. Real-time FPGA-based radar imaging for smart mobility systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponara, Sergio; Neri, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents an X-band FMCW (Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave) Radar Imaging system, called X-FRI, for surveillance in smart mobility applications. X-FRI allows for detecting the presence of targets (e.g. obstacles in a railway crossing or urban road crossing, or ships in a small harbor), as well as their speed and their position. With respect to alternative solutions based on LIDAR or camera systems, X-FRI operates in real-time also in bad lighting and weather conditions, night and day. The radio-frequency transceiver is realized through COTS (Commercial Off The Shelf) components on a single-board. An FPGA-based baseband platform allows for real-time Radar image processing.

  13. A frequency domain radar interferometric imaging (FII) technique based on high-resolution methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.; Helal, D.; Crochet, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work, we propose a frequency-domain interferometric imaging (FII) technique for a better knowledge of the vertical distribution of the atmospheric scatterers detected by MST radars. This is an extension of the dual frequency-domain interferometry (FDI) technique to multiple frequencies. Its objective is to reduce the ambiguity (resulting from the use of only two adjacent frequencies), inherent with the FDI technique. Different methods, commonly used in antenna array processing, are first described within the context of application to the FII technique. These methods are the Fourier-based imaging, the Capon's and the singular value decomposition method used with the MUSIC algorithm. Some preliminary simulations and tests performed on data collected with the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar (Shigaraki, Japan) are also presented. This work is a first step in the developments of the FII technique which seems to be very promising.

  14. BOREAS AFM-6 NOAA/ETL 35 GHz Cloud/Turbulence Radar GIF Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 35-GHz cloud-sensing radar in the Northern Study Area (NSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 16 Jul 1994 to 08 Aug 1994. This data set contains a time series of GIF images that show the structure of the lower atmosphere. The NOAA/ETL 35-GHz cloud/turbulence radar GIF images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  15. Iceberg drifting and distribution in the Vilkitsky Strait studied by detailed satellite radar and optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucheiko, A. A.; Ivanov, A. Yu.; Davydov, A. A.; Antonyuk, A. Yu.

    2016-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the detection and identification of icebergs in the Russian Arctic Seas from the use of high- and medium-resolution radar and optical images from EROS-B, Radarsat-1, Radarsat-2, SPOT-4 and SPOT-5 Earth observation satellites. In July-September of 2011-2013, the SCANEX Research and Development Center, the Federal State Unitary Enterprise Atomflot, and other partner organizations provided operational satellite monitoring of icebergs in the Kara Sea and the Laptev Sea. More than 130 highly detailed optical and radar images were received and processed. The Vilkitsky Strait—one of the narrowest and most dangerous places within the Northern Sea Route—was chosen as an experimental polygon. As a result, iceberg location in the strait during the 2011-2013 navigation periods was analyzed, as were the iceberg size, area, drift direction, and height.

  16. Radar Imaging of Spheres in 3D using MUSIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D H; Berryman, J G

    2003-01-21

    We have shown that multiple spheres can be imaged by linear and planar EM arrays using only one component of polarization. The imaging approach involves calculating the SVD of the scattering response matrix, selecting a subset of singular values that represents noise, and evaluating the MUSIC functional. The noise threshold applied to the spectrum of singular values for optimal performance is typically around 1%. The resulting signal subspace includes more than one singular value per sphere. The presence of reflections from the ground improves height localization, even for a linear array parallel to the ground. However, the interference between direct and reflected energy modulates the field, creating periodic nulls that can obscure targets in typical images. These nulls are largely eliminated by normalizing the MUSIC functional with the broadside beam pattern of the array. The resulting images show excellent localization for 1 and 2 spheres. The performance for the 3 sphere configurations are complicated by shadowing effects and the greater range of the 3rd sphere in case 2. Two of the three spheres are easily located by MUSIC but the third is difficult to distinguish from other local maxima of the complex imaging functional. Improvement is seen when the linear array is replace with a planar array, which increases the effective aperture height. Further analysis of the singular values and their relationship to modes of scattering from the spheres, as well as better ways to exploit polarization, should improve performance. Work along these lines is currently being pursued by the authors.

  17. Method for providing a polarization filter for processing synthetic aperture radar image data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Pascale C. (Inventor); vanZyl, Jakob J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polarization filter can maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of a polarimetric SAR and help discriminate between targets or enhance image features, e.g., enhance contract between different types of target. The method disclosed is based on the Stokes matrix/Stokes vector representation, so the targets of interest can be extended targets, and the method can also be applied to the case of bistatic polarimetric radars.

  18. An Algorithm for Surface Current Retrieval from X-band Marine Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengxi Shen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel current inversion algorithm from X-band marine radar images is proposed. The routine, for which deep water is assumed, begins with 3-D FFT of the radar image sequence, followed by the extraction of the dispersion shell from the 3-D image spectrum. Next, the dispersion shell is converted to a polar current shell (PCS using a polar coordinate transformation. After removing outliers along each radial direction of the PCS, a robust sinusoidal curve fitting is applied to the data points along each circumferential direction of the PCS. The angle corresponding to the maximum of the estimated sinusoid function is determined to be the current direction, and the amplitude of this sinusoidal function is the current speed. For validation, the algorithm is tested against both simulated radar images and field data collected by a vertically-polarized X-band system and ground-truthed with measurements from an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP. From the field data, it is observed that when the current speed is less than 0.5 m/s, the root mean square differences between the radar-derived and the ADCP-measured current speed and direction are 7.3 cm/s and 32.7°, respectively. The results indicate that the proposed procedure, unlike most existing current inversion schemes, is not susceptible to high current speeds and circumvents the need to consider aliasing. Meanwhile, the relatively low computational cost makes it an excellent choice in practical marine applications.

  19. Wide area coverage radar imaging satellite for earth applications. [surveillance and mapping of ice on Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, G. H.; Ramler, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of a radar imaging satellite for earth applications. A side-looking synthetic-aperture radar was considered and the feasibility of obtaining a wide area coverage to reduce the time required to image a given area was investigated. Two basic approaches were examined; low altitude sun-synchronous orbits using a multibeam/multifrequency radar system and equatorial orbits up to near-synchronous altitude using a single beam system. Surveillance and mapping of ice on the Great Lakes was used as a typical application to focus the study effort.

  20. Shaded Relief and Radar Image with Color as Height, Madrid, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The white, mottled area in the right-center of this image from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is Madrid, the capital of Spain. Located on the Meseta Central, a vast plateau covering about 40 percent of the country, this city of 3 million is very near the exact geographic center of the Iberian Peninsula. The Meseta is rimmed by mountains and slopes gently to the west and to the series of rivers that form the boundary with Portugal. The plateau is mostly covered with dry grasslands, olive groves and forested hills.Madrid is situated in the middle of the Meseta, and at an elevation of 646 meters (2,119 feet) above sea level is the highest capital city in Europe. To the northwest of Madrid, and visible in the upper left of the image, is the Sistema Central mountain chain that forms the 'dorsal spine' of the Meseta and divides it into northern and southern subregions. Rising to about 2,500 meters (8,200 feet), these mountains display some glacial features and are snow-capped for most of the year. Offering almost year-round winter sports, the mountains are also important to the climate of Madrid.Three visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height and radar image intensity. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the northwest-southeast direction. North-facing slopes appear bright and south-facing slopes appear dark. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow and brown to white at the highest elevations. The shade image was combined with the radar intensity image in the flat areas.Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to

  1. Radar correlated imaging for extended target by the combination of negative exponential restraint and total variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Tingting; Wang, Lianlian; Lu, Guanghua

    2017-07-01

    Radar correlated imaging (RCI) introduces the optical correlated imaging technology to traditional microwave imaging, which has raised widespread concern recently. Conventional RCI methods neglect the structural information of complex extended target, which makes the quality of recovery result not really perfect, thus a novel combination of negative exponential restraint and total variation (NER-TV) algorithm for extended target imaging is proposed in this paper. The sparsity is measured by a sequential order one negative exponential function, then the 2D total variation technique is introduced to design a novel optimization problem for extended target imaging. And the proven alternating direction method of multipliers is applied to solve the new problem. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm could realize high resolution imaging efficiently for extended target.

  2. An MF/HF radio array for radio and radar imaging of the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isham, Brett; Gustavsson, Bjorn; Belyey, Vasyl; Bullett, Terrence

    2016-07-01

    The Aguadilla Radio Array will be installed at the Interamerican University Aguadilla Campus, located in northwestern Puerto Rico. The array is intended for broad-band medium and high-frequency (MF/HF, roughly 2 to 25 MHz) radio and bistatic radar observations of the ionosphere. The main array consists of 20 antenna elements, arranged in a semi-random pattern providing a good distribution of baseline vectors, with 6-meter minimum spacing to eliminate spacial aliasing. A relocatable 6-element array is also being developed, in which each element consists of a crossed pair of active electric dipoles and all associated electronics for phase-coherent radio measurements. A primary scientific goal of the array is to create images of the region of ionospheric radio emissions stimulated by the new Arecibo Observatory high-power high-frequency radio transmitter. A second primary goal is the study of ionospheric structure and dynamics via coherent radar imaging of the ionosphere in collaboration with the University of Colorado / NOAA Versatile Interferometric Pulsed Ionospheric Radar (VIPIR), located at the USGS San Juan Observatory in Cayey, Puerto Rico. In addition to ionospheric research in collaboration with the Cayey and Arecibo Observatories, the goals of the project include the development of radio sounding, polarization, interferometry, and imaging techniques, and training of students at the university and high school levels.

  3. A Narrow Band Imaging Technique for Passive Radar (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-09

    present results that include the 2D image of two point targets separated by just 0.6 m illuminated using a pure tone signal in an anechoic chamber ...were conducted in the anechoic chamber of the ElectroScience Laboratory at the Ohio State University. The experiments were first setup to test the

  4. Frequency Diversity for Improving Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Boston MA, 1995. 13. Cerutti-Maori, D., W. Burger , J. H. G. Ender, and A. R. Brenner. “Experimental Results of Ground Moving Target Detection Achieved...Signal Processing”. IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Magazine, 22(9), September 2007. 44. Rosenberg, Luke and Doug Gray. “Multichannel SAR Imaging

  5. Characterization of space-time rainfall patterns over Switzerland based on high-resolution radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Lionel; Mariethoz, Gregoire; Vrac, Mathieu

    2017-04-01

    Rainfall is generated by diverse and complex processes that produce rain fields with a large variability of patterns. High-resolution measurements of rainfall, provided for instance by networks of terrestrial weather radars, allow observing the spatial variability of rainfall patterns and its temporal evolution. The characterization of these space-time rainfall patterns is important for both the understanding of rain generation processes and the study of environmental impacts of rainfall on hydrology, erosion or plants growth, among others. Here we propose to study rainfall patterns using image processing methods on high-resolution radar images (1km x 1km x 1min) over Switzerland. The time series of radar images is first segmented in rain events. Then, the spatial structure of each rain event is characterized by computing statistics over several geometrical indices extracted from radar images, by adapting to the context of mid-latitude rainfalls the indices proposed by Aghakouchak, Nasrollahi et al. (2011) and Zick and Matyas (2016) for tropical rainfall characterization. Finally, the dynamics of rainfall patterns is characterized by estimating rain advection through image correlation, and by quantifying the temporal morphing of spatial patterns in a Lagrangian reference frame, where radar images are re-projected to cancel out rain advection. Two years of data (2015 - 2016) are used to investigate the variability of rainfall patterns over Switzerland. Typical values of the indicators measuring rainfall patterns and their dynamics are extracted for different areas, namely the Jura Mountain, the Swiss Plateau and the Alps. These measures of rainfall variability could be subsequently used to parameterize local weather generators or to investigate the relationships between rainfall patterns and atmospheric synoptic conditions. References: Aghakouchak, A., N. Nasrollahi, J. Li, B. Imam and S. Sorooshian (2011). "Geometrical Characterization of Precipitation Patterns

  6. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  7. Investigation on Beamspace Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbo Mo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO technique can improve the high-resolution wide-swath imaging capacity of synthetic aperture radar (SAR systems. Beamspace MIMO-SAR utilizes multiple subpulses transmitted with different time delays by different transmit beams to obtain more spatial diversities based on the relationship between the time delay and the elevation angle in the side-looking radar imaging geometry. This paper presents a beamspace MIMO-SAR imaging approach, which takes advantage of real time digital beamforming (DBF with null steering in elevation and azimuth multichannel raw data reconstruction. Echoes corresponding to different subpulses in the same subswath are separated by DBF with null steering onboard, while echoes received and stored by different azimuth channels are reconstructed by multiple Doppler reconstruction filters on the ground. Afterwards, the resulting MIMO-SAR raw data could be equivalent to the raw data of the single-channel burst mode, and classical burst mode imaging algorithms could be adopted to obtain final focused SAR images. Simulation results validate the proposed imaging approach.

  8. High resolution through-the-wall radar image based on beamspace eigenstructure subspace methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo-Sun; Amin, Moeness G.

    2008-04-01

    Through-the-wall imaging (TWI) is a challenging problem, even if the wall parameters and characteristics are known to the system operator. Proper target classification and correct imaging interpretation require the application of high resolution techniques using limited array size. In inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR), signal subspace methods such as Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) are used to obtain high resolution imaging. In this paper, we adopt signal subspace methods and apply them to the 2-D spectrum obtained from the delay-andsum beamforming image. This is in contrast to ISAR, where raw data, in frequency and angle, is directly used to form the estimate of the covariance matrix and array response vector. Using beams rather than raw data has two main advantages, namely, it improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and can correctly image typical indoor extended targets, such as tables and cabinets, as well as point targets. The paper presents both simulated and experimental results using synthesized and real data. It compares the performance of beam-space MUSIC and Capon beamformer. The experimental data is collected at the test facility in the Radar Imaging Laboratory, Villanova University.

  9. Applying NASA Imaging Radar Datasets to Investigate the Geomorphology of the Amazon's Planalto

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, K. C.; Campbell, K.; Islam, R.; Alexander, P. M.; Cracraft, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Amazon basin is a biodiversity rich biome and plays a significant role into shaping Earth's climate, ocean and atmospheric gases. Understanding the history of the formation of this basin is essential to our understanding of the region's biodiversity and its response to climate change. During March 2013, the NASA/JPL L-band polarimetric airborne imaging radar, UAVSAR, conducted airborne studies over regions of South America including portions of the western Amazon basin. We utilize UAVSAR imagery acquired during that time over the Planalto, in the Madre de Dios region of southeastern Peru in an assessment of the underlying geomorphology, its relationship to the current distribution of vegetation, and its relationship to geologic processes through deep time. We employ UAVSAR data collections to assess the utility of these high quality imaging radar data for use in identifying geomorphologic features and vegetation communities within the context of improving the understanding of evolutionary processes, and their utility in aiding interpretation of datasets from Earth-orbiting satellites to support a basin-wide characterization across the Amazon. We derive maps of landcover and river branching structure from UAVSAR imagery. We compare these maps to those derived using imaging radar datasets from the Japanese Space Agency's ALOS PALSAR and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). Results provide an understanding of the underlying geomorphology of the Amazon planalto as well as its relationship to geologic processes and will support interpretation of the evolutionary history of the Amazon Basin. Portions of this work have been carried out within the framework of the ALOS Kyoto & Carbon Initiative. PALSAR data were provided by JAXA/EORC and the Alaska Satellite Facility.This work is carried out with support from the NASA Biodiversity Program and the NSF DIMENSIONS of Biodiversity Program.

  10. Improved eigensubspace-based approach for radio frequency interference filtering of synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunhui; Li, Fei; Li, Ning; Zheng, Huifang; Wang, Robert; Wang, Xiangyu

    2017-04-01

    The radio frequency interference (RFI) has an adverse effect on the useful signals, which can degrade the image quality seriously. An improved eigensubspace-based approach for RFI filtering of synthetic aperture radar images is developed. In the preprocessing stage of the proposed approach, the data sets that need subsequent processing can be selected in both frequency and time domain. Then, the data can be processed by the traditional eigensubspace-based approach. Compared with the traditional eigensubspace-based approach, our approach can work more efficiently and effectively.

  11. Research on signal processing techniques for a chirped amplitude modulation imaging laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Haiwei

    2010-11-01

    Due to some significant advantages such as high space resolution, three-dimensional imagery (including intensity image and range image) acquiring, and so on, an imaging laser radar is helpful to improve the correct recognition ratio being as a sensor in a target recognition system. A chirped amplitude modulation imaging ladar is based on the frequency modulation/continuous wave (FM/cw) technique. The target range is calculated by measuring the frequency difference between projected and returned laser signal. The design of a signal processing system for a FM/cw imaging ladar is introduced in this paper, which includes an acquiring block, a memory block, a communication block, and a FFT processor. The performance of this system is analyzed in detail in this paper.

  12. 3D imaging by fast deconvolution algorithm in short-range UWB radar for concealed weapon detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelyev, T.; Yarovoy, A.

    2013-01-01

    A fast imaging algorithm for real-time use in short-range (ultra-wideband) radar with synthetic or real-array aperture is proposed. The reflected field is presented here as a convolution of the target reflectivity and point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. To obtain a focused 3D image,

  13. High Resolution Turntable Radar Imaging via Two Dimensional Deconvolution with Matrix Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xinfei; Xia, Jie; Yin, Zhiping; Chen, Weidong

    2017-03-08

    Resolution is the bottleneck for the application of radar imaging, which is limited by the bandwidth for the range dimension and synthetic aperture for the cross-range dimension. The demand for high azimuth resolution inevitably results in a large amount of cross-range samplings, which always need a large number of transmit-receive channels or a long observation time. Compressive sensing (CS)-based methods could be used to reduce the samples, but suffer from the difficulty of designing the measurement matrix, and they are not robust enough in practical application. In this paper, based on the two-dimensional (2D) convolution model of the echo after matched filter (MF), we propose a novel 2D deconvolution algorithm for turntable radar to improve the radar imaging resolution. Additionally, in order to reduce the cross-range samples, we introduce a new matrix completion (MC) algorithm based on the hyperbolic tangent constraint to improve the performance of MC with undersampled data. Besides, we present a new way of echo matrix reconstruction for the situation that only partial cross-range data are observed and some columns of the echo matrix are missing. The new matrix has a better low rank property and needs just one operation of MC for all of the missing elements compared to the existing ways. Numerical simulations and experiments are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Phase and group velocity tracing analysis of projected wave packet motion along oblique radar beams – qualitative analysis of QP echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Kuo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The wave packets of atmospheric gravity waves were numerically generated, with a given characteristic wave period, horizontal wave length and projection mean wind along the horizontal wave vector. Their projection phase and group velocities along the oblique radar beam (vpr and vgr, with different zenith angle θ and azimuth angle φ, were analyzed by the method of phase- and group-velocity tracing. The results were consistent with the theoretical calculations derived by the dispersion relation, reconfirming the accuracy of the method of analysis. The RTI plot of the numerical wave packets were similar to the striation patterns of the QP echoes from the FAI irregularity region. We propose that the striation range rate of the QP echo is equal to the radial phase velocity vpr, and the slope of the energy line across the neighboring striations is equal to the radial group velocity vgr of the wave packet; the horizontal distance between two neighboring striations is equal to the characteristic wave period τ. Then, one can inversely calculate all the properties of the gravity wave responsible for the appearance of the QP echoes. We found that the possibility of some QP echoes being generated by the gravity waves originated from lower altitudes cannot be ruled out.

  15. Wave Height Estimation from Shipborne X-Band Nautical Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinlong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A shadowing-analysis-based algorithm is modified to estimate significant wave height from shipborne X-band nautical radar images. Shadowed areas are first extracted from the image through edge detection. Smith’s function fit is then applied to illumination ratios to derive the root mean square (RMS surface slope. From the RMS surface slope and the mean wave period, the significant wave height is estimated. A data quality control process is implemented to exclude rain-contaminated and low-backscatter images. A smoothing scheme is applied to the gray scale intensity histogram of edge pixels to improve the accuracy of the shadow threshold determination. Rather than a single full shadow image, a time sequence of shadow image subareas surrounding the upwind direction is used to calculate the average RMS surface slope. It has been found that the wave height retrieved from the modified algorithm is underestimated under rain and storm conditions and overestimated for cases with low wind speed. The modified method produces promising results by comparing radar-derived wave heights with buoy data, and the RMS difference is found be 0.59 m.

  16. Intelligent multisensor concept for image-guided 3D object measurement with scanning laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Juergen

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an intelligent multisensor concept for measuring 3D objects using an image guided laser radar scanner. The field of application are all kinds of industrial inspection and surveillance tasks where it is necessary to detect, measure and recognize 3D objects in distances up to 10 m with high flexibility. Such applications might be the surveillance of security areas or container storages as well as navigation and collision avoidance of autonomous guided vehicles. The multisensor system consists of a standard CCD matrix camera and a 1D laser radar ranger which is mounted to a 2D mirror scanner. With this sensor combination it is possible to acquire gray scale intensity data as well as absolute 3D information. To improve the system performance and flexibility, the intensity data of the scene captured by the camera can be used to focus the measurement of the 3D sensor to relevant areas. The camera guidance of the laser scanner is useful because the acquisition of spatial information is relatively slow compared to the image sensor's ability to snap an image frame in 40 ms. Relevant areas in a scene are located by detecting edges of objects utilizing various image processing algorithms. The complete sensor system is controlled by three microprocessors carrying out the 3D data acquisition, the image processing tasks and the multisensor integration. The paper deals with the details of the multisensor concept. It describes the process of sensor guidance and 3D measurement and presents some practical results of our research.

  17. Defining the Velocity Field of Root Cells in Arabidopsis Seedlings Using Open Source Image Processing Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Amy E.; Higgins, Brad R.; Guy, Tracy; Durham Brooks, Tessa; Wentworth, Christopher D.

    2011-11-01

    The velocity field for cells in a growing root is a function of a cell's position with respect to the root apex and time. For many species of plant this function has the same general sigmoid shape described by a modified logistics curve. In this investigation we obtain microscopic images of Arabidopsis seedling roots over a 20 minute period of time, measure the velocity field for root cells using an application developed with the open source mathematics application Octave, and test whether the velocity field can be described by the modified logistics function. We find support for describing the velocity field by the modified logistics function.

  18. From Matched Spatial Filtering towards the Fused Statistical Descriptive Regularization Method for Enhanced Radar Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkvarko, Yuriy

    2006-12-01

    We address a new approach to solve the ill-posed nonlinear inverse problem of high-resolution numerical reconstruction of the spatial spectrum pattern (SSP) of the backscattered wavefield sources distributed over the remotely sensed scene. An array or synthesized array radar (SAR) that employs digital data signal processing is considered. By exploiting the idea of combining the statistical minimum risk estimation paradigm with numerical descriptive regularization techniques, we address a new fused statistical descriptive regularization (SDR) strategy for enhanced radar imaging. Pursuing such an approach, we establish a family of the SDR-related SSP estimators, that encompass a manifold of existing beamforming techniques ranging from traditional matched filter to robust and adaptive spatial filtering, and minimum variance methods.

  19. Investigation of horizontal structures at mesospheric altitudes using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Schult, C.; Zecha, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) in Northern Norway (69.30°N, 16.04°E) was used to perform interferometric observations of Polar Mesosperic Summer Echoes (PMSE) in June 2012. Coherent Radar Imaging (CRI) using Capon's method was applied allowing a high spatial resolution. The algorithm was validated by simulation and trajectories of meteor head echoes. Both data sets show a good correspondence with the algorithm. Using this algorithm, the aspect sensitivity of PMSE was analysed in a case study, making use of the capability of CRI to resolve the pattern within the beam volume. No correction of the beam pattern was made yet. It was found in this case study, that no large variations in the scattering width and the scattering center occured apart from a very short period of time at the upper edge of the PMSE.

  20. From Matched Spatial Filtering towards the Fused Statistical Descriptive Regularization Method for Enhanced Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shkvarko Yuriy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a new approach to solve the ill-posed nonlinear inverse problem of high-resolution numerical reconstruction of the spatial spectrum pattern (SSP of the backscattered wavefield sources distributed over the remotely sensed scene. An array or synthesized array radar (SAR that employs digital data signal processing is considered. By exploiting the idea of combining the statistical minimum risk estimation paradigm with numerical descriptive regularization techniques, we address a new fused statistical descriptive regularization (SDR strategy for enhanced radar imaging. Pursuing such an approach, we establish a family of the SDR-related SSP estimators, that encompass a manifold of existing beamforming techniques ranging from traditional matched filter to robust and adaptive spatial filtering, and minimum variance methods.

  1. A mechanical diagnosis of the ice flow around Dome C: Elmer/Ice 3D simulations constrained by measured surface velocities and radar isochrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Olivier; Cavitte, Marie; Frezzotti, Massimo; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Parrenin, Frédéric; Ritz, Catherine; Vittuari, Luca; Young, Duncan

    2017-04-01

    The Dome C region has been densely surveyed and studied for the last decades, in particular to describe the shape of the ice surface, the bedrock relief, the surface velocity, the age and fabric structure of the ice, and its vertical temperature profile. No comprehensive ice flow modelling constrained by all of these field data has been done so far in this region. In particular, the Dome C has recently been targetted as an oldest-ice area, so that we intend to take advantage of a 2016 airborne radar survey that revealed the deep radar isochrones south-west of Dome C, and provides unprecendented constraints for the ice flow description. The Stokes equations are solved with the Elmer/Ice finite element solver, on a 80x110 km2 3D domain, for three different values of the Glen exponent n (1, 3 and 4.5), and for different fabric profiles. The goal of this study is threefold. First, as the range of stress types (longitudinal, transverse, and vertical compression-only) are well covered around Dome C, the observed surface velocities should efficiently constrain the possible values of the rheological parameters (Glen exponent and fluidity), and the basal sliding. Then, we apply an anisotropic flow law to correctly model the age structure, observed on the top 4/5th of the ice thickness, so that we induce mechanically-correct ages for the basal layers. Finally, once the ice mechanics is obtained, we compare the modelled vertical velocity profiles with 1D synthetic profiles, to assess the validity conditions of 1D modelling approaches, which are much more flexible tools for ensemble simulations or inversions.

  2. Filtering and segmentation of the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, E.; Bampasidis, G.; Solomonidou, A.; Coustenis, A.; Hirtzig, M.

    2011-10-01

    A filtering technique is applied to obtain the restored synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays "real" structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. Our method, the TSPR (total sum preserving regularization) filter, is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images optimized by a synchronous local iterative method. The despeckle filter can be used as intermediate stage for the extraction of meaningful regions that correspond to structural units in the scene or distinguish objects of interest like lakes, drainage networks, equatorial dunes or impact craters, where different textures appear.

  3. A comparison of traffic estimates of nocturnal flying animals using radar, thermal imaging, and acoustic recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Kyle G; Shriver, W Gregory; Buler, Jeffrey J

    2015-03-01

    There are several remote-sensing tools readily available for the study of nocturnally flying animals (e.g., migrating birds), each possessing unique measurement biases. We used three tools (weather surveillance radar, thermal infrared camera, and acoustic recorder) to measure temporal and spatial patterns of nocturnal traffic estimates of flying animals during the spring and fall of 2011 and 2012 in Lewes, Delaware, USA. Our objective was to compare measures among different technologies to better understand their animal detection biases. For radar and thermal imaging, the greatest observed traffic rate tended to occur at, or shortly after, evening twilight, whereas for the acoustic recorder, peak bird flight-calling activity was observed just prior to morning twilight. Comparing traffic rates during the night for all seasons, we found that mean nightly correlations between acoustics and the other two tools were weakly correlated (thermal infrared camera and acoustics, r = 0.004 ± 0.04 SE, n = 100 nights; radar and acoustics, r = 0.14 ± 0.04 SE, n = 101 nights), but highly variable on an individual nightly basis (range = -0.84 to 0.92, range = -0.73 to 0.94). The mean nightly correlations between traffic rates estimated by radar and by thermal infrared camera during the night were more strongly positively correlated (r = 0.39 ± 0.04 SE, n = 125 nights), but also were highly variable for individual nights (range = -0.76 to 0.98). Through comparison with radar data among numerous height intervals, we determined that flying animal height above the ground influenced thermal imaging positively and flight call detections negatively. Moreover, thermal imaging detections decreased with the presence of cloud cover and increased with mean ground flight speed of animals, whereas acoustic detections showed no relationship with cloud cover presence but did decrease with increased flight speed. We found sampling methods to be positively correlated when comparing mean nightly

  4. Phase Error Correction for Approximated Observation-Based Compressed Sensing Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Defocus of the reconstructed image of synthetic aperture radar (SAR occurs in the presence of the phase error. In this work, a phase error correction method is proposed for compressed sensing (CS radar imaging based on approximated observation. The proposed method has better image focusing ability with much less memory cost, compared to the conventional approaches, due to the inherent low memory requirement of the approximated observation operator. The one-dimensional (1D phase error correction for approximated observation-based CS-SAR imaging is first carried out and it can be conveniently applied to the cases of random-frequency waveform and linear frequency modulated (LFM waveform without any a priori knowledge. The approximated observation operators are obtained by calculating the inverse of Omega-K and chirp scaling algorithms for random-frequency and LFM waveforms, respectively. Furthermore, the 1D phase error model is modified by incorporating a priori knowledge and then a weighted 1D phase error model is proposed, which is capable of correcting two-dimensional (2D phase error in some cases, where the estimation can be simplified to a 1D problem. Simulation and experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed method in the presence of 1D phase error or weighted 1D phase error.

  5. Study on coding strategies for radar coded-aperture imaging in terahertz band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo; Luo, Chenggao; Deng, Bin; Qin, Yuliang; Wang, Hongqiang

    2017-09-01

    Motivated by the principle of coded-aperture imaging and microwave radar coincidence imaging (RCI), terahertz radar coded-aperture imaging (RCAI) is proposed to obtain high-resolution, forward-looking, and staring imaging. The terahertz RCAI method resolves target scatterers using the correlation processing of the modulated echoes and the reference signal matrix. This process is similar to the basic principle of RCI. To investigate the coding strategies of terahertz RCAI, this study derives three signal models describing operation with the coded aperture placed separately in the transmitting terminal and the receiving terminal and in both of them simultaneously. Furthermore, coding strategies are categorized according to coded-aperture placement and encoded signal, including amplitude modulation and phase modulation. In addition, qualitative and quantitative analysis methods are introduced to describe the resolving ability of terahertz RCAI. Numerical simulations are performed to analyze and compare the performance on different coding strategies. These analyses can provide constructive guidelines for the design of terahertz RCAI systems.

  6. Improved aortic pulse wave velocity assessment from multislice two-directional in-plane velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, Jos J M; de Roos, Albert; Grotenhuis, Heynric B; Steendijk, Paul; Hendriksen, Dennis; van den Boogaard, Pieter J; van der Geest, Rob J; Bax, Jeroen J; Jukema, J Wouter; Reiber, Johan H C

    2010-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) assessment by in-plane velocity-encoded magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In 14 patients selected for cardiac catheterization on suspicion of coronary artery disease and 15 healthy volunteers, PWV was assessed with multislice two-directional in-plane velocity-encoded MRI (PWV(i.p.)) and compared with conventionally assessed PWV from multisite one-directional through-plane velocity-encoded MRI (PWV(t.p.)). In patients, PWV was also obtained from intraarterially acquired pressure-time curves (PWV(pressure)), which is considered the gold standard reference method. In volunteers, PWV(i.p.) and PWV(t.p.) were obtained in duplicate in the same examination to test reproducibility. In patients, PWV(i.p.) showed stronger correlation and similar variation with PWV(pressure) than PWV(t.p.) (Pearson correlation r = 0.75 vs. r = 0.58, and coefficient of variation [COV] = 10% vs. COV = 12%, respectively). In volunteers, repeated PWV(i.p.) assessment showed stronger correlation and less variation than repeated PWV(t.p.) (proximal aorta: r = 0.97 and COV = 10% vs. r = 0.69 and COV = 17%; distal aorta: r = 0.94 and COV = 12% vs. r = 0.90 and COV = 16%; total aorta: r = 0.97 and COV = 7% vs. r = 0.90 and COV = 13%). PWV(i.p.) is an improvement over conventional PWV(t.p.) by showing higher agreement as compared to the gold standard (PWV(pressure)) and higher reproducibility for repeated MRI assessment. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Martian CAT scan: Three-dimensional imaging of Planum Boreum with Shallow Radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzig, N. E.; Foss, F. J., II; Campbell, B. A.; Phillips, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    We present a preliminary three-dimensional (3-D) subsurface volume created from Shallow Radar (SHARAD) observations of Planum Boreum, the 3-km-high mound of icy layered deposits in the north polar region of Mars. Our goal is to achieve a better understanding of the nature and timing of the layered deposits and their relationship to climatological cycles by enabling the mapping of subsurface radar returns in regions presently obfuscated by highly variable surface topography and complex subsurface structures. In the medical field, computed axial tomography (CAT scan) involves taking a series of 2-D X-ray images around an axis of rotation and applying geometric processing to generate a 3-D image of a body's interior. Similarly, SHARAD has taken over 2500 2-D radar images (radargrams) on passes of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) across the north polar region of Mars, and we have used a subset of those radargrams to develop a means of generating 3-D images of the polar layered deposits. While the sets of radargrams over both polar regions have been very fruitful scientifically (e.g., Putzig et al., 2009, Icarus 204, 443-457; Holt et al., 2010, Nature 465, 450-453; Phillips et al., 2011, Science 332, 838-841), examination of 3-D subsurface structures has been restricted to identifying and tracing those structures on the radargrams and then "connecting the dots" by interpolation. Identification and tracing of structures is limited to the trajectories of MRO's nadir track and is hampered by "clutter," or signals returned from off-nadir surface or subsurface features that often interfere with signals returned from nadir. Clutter becomes a severe impediment to structure interpretation in areas of high topographic variability, such as the trough-rich regions of Planum Boreum. Given a sufficient number of observations from a range of lateral offsets, radar signals from nadir and off-nadir can be distinguished within a 3-D volume, and off-nadir clutter can be repositioned

  8. Velocity estimation using synthetic aperture imaging [blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2001-01-01

    Presented an approach for synthetic aperture blood flow ultrasound imaging. Estimates with a low bias and standard deviation can be obtained with as few as eight emissions. The performance of the new estimator is verified using both simulations and measurements. The results demonstrate that a ful...

  9. Geostatistical inference using crosshole ground-penetrating radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looms, Majken C; Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Cordua, Knud Skou

    2010-01-01

    , the moisture content will reflect the variation of the physical properties of the subsurface, which determine the flow patterns in the unsaturated zone. Deterministic least-squares inversion of crosshole groundpenetrating-radar GPR traveltimes result in smooth, minimumvariance estimates of the subsurface radar...... wave velocity structure, which may diminish the utility of these images for geostatistical inference. We have used a linearized stochastic inversion technique to infer the geostatistical properties of the subsurface radar wave velocity distribution using crosshole GPR traveltimes directly. Expanding...

  10. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.

    Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  11. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  12. Geometric considerations of polar mesospheric summer echoes in tilted beams using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System in Northern Norway (69.30° N, 16.04° E). The radar is able to resolve PMSE at high spatial and temporal resolution and to perform pulse-to-pulse beam steering. In this experiment, 81 oblique beam directions were used with off-zenith angles up to 25°. For each beam pointing direction and range gate, coherent radar imaging was applied to determine the mean backscatter location. The location of the mean scatterer in the beam volume was calculated by the deviation from the nominal off-zenith angle of the brightest pixel. It shows that in tilted beams with an off-zenith angle greater than 5°, structures appear at the altitudinal edges of the PMSE layer. Our results indicate that the mean influence of the location of the maximum depends on the tilt of the beam and on the observed area of the PMSE layer. At the upper/lower edge of the PMSE layer, the mean backscatter has a greater/smaller off-zenith angle than the nominal off-zenith angle. This effect intensifies with greater off-zenith beam pointing direction, so the beam filling factor plays an important role in the observation of PMSE layers for oblique beams.

  13. Digital processing considerations for extraction of ocean wave image spectra from raw synthetic aperture radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahaie, I. J.; Dias, A. R.; Darling, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The digital processing requirements of several algorithms for extracting the spectrum of a detected synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image from the raw SAR data are described and compared. The most efficient algorithms for image spectrum extraction from raw SAR data appear to be those containing an intermediate image formation step. It is shown that a recently developed compact formulation of the image spectrum in terms of the raw data is computationally inefficient when evaluated directly, in comparison with the classical method where matched-filter image formation is an intermediate result. It is also shown that a proposed indirect procedure for digitally implementing the same compact formulation is somewhat more efficient than the classical matched-filtering approach. However, this indirect procedure includes the image formation process as part of the total algorithm. Indeed, the computational savings afforded by the indirect implementation are identical to those obtained in SAR image formation processing when the matched-filtering algorithm is replaced by the well-known 'dechirp-Fourier transform' technique. Furthermore, corrections to account for slant-to-ground range conversion, spherical earth, etc., are often best implemented in the image domain, making intermediate image formation a valuable processing feature.

  14. Simulating Precursor Radial Velocity Surveys for Future Exoplanet Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Patrick; Plavchan, Peter; Crepp, Justin; Dulz, Shannon; Stark, Chris; Kane, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Future direct imaging missions such as WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR aim to catalog and characterize Earth-analogs around nearby stars. The observing strategy and science yield and are strongly dependent on the frequency of Earth-like planets, and precursor knowledge of which stars specifically host suitable planetary systems. Ground-based radial velocity surveys can potentially identify targets and optimal observations times at a fraction of the cost of blind direct imaging surveys. We present the first phases of simulations of such a survey. We consider multiple telescopes, including their locations, weather conditions, observation time limitations, and instrument sensitivities. Multiple target selection optimization algorithms are considered. We calculate realistic radial velocity uncertainties based upon the known stellar properties of nearby direct imaging targets including effective temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity. We next inject and recover the masses and orbital parameters of real and simulated planets, estimating the effectiveness of a precursor radial velocity survey for direct imaging yield optimization.

  15. Searching for Water Ice at the Lunar North Pole Using High-Resolution Images and Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Robinson, M. S.; Speyerer, E. J.; Denevi, B. W.

    2017-01-01

    Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) at the lunar poles are potential reservoirs of frozen volatiles, and are therefore high-priority exploration targets. PSRs trap water and other volatiles because their annual maximum temperatures (40-100K) are lower than the sublimation temperatures of these species (i.e. H2O approx.104K). Previous studies using various remote sensing techniques have not been able to definitively characterize the distribution or abundance of ice in lunar PSRs. The purpose of this study is to search for signs of ice in PSRs using two complimentary remote sensing techniques: radar and visible images.

  16. Change Detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar Images Using a Multiscale-Driven Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaniyi A. Ajadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the significant progress that was achieved throughout the recent years, to this day, automatic change detection and classification from synthetic aperture radar (SAR images remains a difficult task. This is, in large part, due to (a the high level of speckle noise that is inherent to SAR data; (b the complex scattering response of SAR even for rather homogeneous targets; (c the low temporal sampling that is often achieved with SAR systems, since sequential images do not always have the same radar geometry (incident angle, orbit path, etc.; and (d the typically limited performance of SAR in delineating the exact boundary of changed regions. With this paper we present a promising change detection method that utilizes SAR images and provides solutions for these previously mentioned difficulties. We will show that the presented approach enables automatic and high-performance change detection across a wide range of spatial scales (resolution levels. The developed method follows a three-step approach of (i initial pre-processing; (ii data enhancement/filtering; and (iii wavelet-based, multi-scale change detection. The stand-alone property of our approach is the high flexibility in applying the change detection approach to a wide range of change detection problems. The performance of the developed approach is demonstrated using synthetic data as well as a real-data application to wildfire progression near Fairbanks, Alaska.

  17. Mapping Palaeohydrography in Deserts: Contribution from Space-Borne Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Paillou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR has the capability to image subsurface features down to several meters in arid regions. A first demonstration of this capability was performed in the Egyptian desert during the early eighties, thanks to the first Shuttle Imaging Radar mission. Global coverage provided by recent SARs, such as the Japanese ALOS/PALSAR sensor, allowed the mapping of vast ancient hydrographic systems in Northern Africa. We present a summary of palaeohydrography results obtained using PALSAR data over large deserts such as the Sahara and the Gobi. An ancient river system was discovered in eastern Lybia, connecting in the past the Kufrah oasis to the Mediterranean Sea, and the terminal part of the Tamanrasett river was mapped in western Mauritania, ending with a large submarine canyon. In southern Mongolia, PALSAR images combined with topography analysis allowed the mapping of the ancient Ulaan Nuur lake. We finally show the potentials of future low frequency SAR sensors by comparing L-band (1.25 GHz and P-band (435 MHz airborne SAR acquisitions over a desert site in southern Tunisia.

  18. Evidence of hydrocarbon pollution in soil exploiting satellite optical and radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Galvan-Pineda, J.; Espinosa-Hernandez, A.; Jimenez-Escalona, J. C.; Ramos-Rodriguez, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Oil spills are one of the most important sources of hydrocarbon pollution in soils of areas near centers of extraction, storage or transportation of petroleum products. These spills or leaks can occur arising from deficient maintenance of facilities or accidents. The effects of these spills can spread for kilometers affecting large areas. This has a strong impact on the local ecosystem disturbing the flora and fauna. In costal tourist areas, this type of contaminants represents significant health risks for visitors and therefore, economic losses for the place. For this reason, it is very important to know and identify the areas affected by this type of pollution in order to create action plans for remediation of the ecosystem. Due to the large land extensions that can cover such disasters, satellite images become a valuable tool because of their large spatial coverage. Nowadays, different satellite techniques have been developed to recognize land affected by the presence of hydrocarbons. In the optical spectrum, optical sensing imagery (e.g. Landsat, SPOT, MODIS, etc.) has been widely used. However, these techniques have the intrinsic limitation in scenes with vegetation cover. In contrast, techniques exploiting radar images are still rare. The type of signal that is detected by the radar provides information even in areas with vegetation cover. The radar signal interacts with the vegetation and soil collecting information about the dielectric properties of the soil. This study identifies zones of contaminated soil by using the synergy of optical and radar images. This site of study is located in Paraiso, Tabasco, in Southern Mexico (18°27'N 93°32'W). The region is composed of coastal and tropical forest ecosystems and includes the Port Dos Bocas. The Port Dos Bocas has its points of extractions 130m away from the coast. The annual activities report 10 millions of tons of hydrocarbons transported using around 5500 ships. The methodology presented in this paper

  19. Dual Channel S-Band Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave Through-Wall Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chun Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the development of a dual channel S-Band frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW system for a through-the-wall imaging (TWRI system. Most existing TWRI systems using FMCW were developed for synthetic aperture radar (SAR which has many drawbacks such as the need for several antenna elements and movement of the system. Our implemented TWRI system comprises a transmitting antenna and two receiving antennas, resulting in a significant reduction of the number of antenna elements. Moreover, a proposed algorithm for range-angle-Doppler 3D estimation based on a 3D shift invariant structure is utilized in our implemented dual channel S-band FMCW TWRI system. Indoor and outdoor experiments were conducted to image the scene beyond a wall for water targets and person targets, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that high-quality imaging can be achieved under both experimental scenarios.

  20. A Directional Antenna in a Matching Liquid for Microwave Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed I. Latif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The detailed design equations and antenna parameters for a directional antenna for breast imaging are presented in this paper. The antenna was designed so that it could be immersed in canola oil to achieve efficient coupling of the electromagnetic energy to the breast tissue. Ridges were used in the horn antenna to increase the operating bandwidth. The antenna has an exponentially tapered section for impedance matching. The double-ridged horn antenna has a wideband performance from 1.5 GHz to 5 GHz (3.75 GHz or 110% of impedance bandwidth, which is suitable for breast microwave radar imaging. The fabricated antenna was tested and compared with simulated results, and similar bandwidths were obtained. Experiments were conducted on breast phantoms using these antennas, to detect a simulated breast lesion. The reconstructed image from the experiments shows distinguishable tumor responses indicating promising results for successful breast cancer detection.

  1. Mathematical morphology for automated analysis of remotely sensed objects in radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daida, Jason M.; Vesecky, John F.

    1991-01-01

    A symbiosis of pyramidal segmentation and morphological transmission is described. The pyramidal segmentation portion of the symbiosis has resulted in low (2.6 percent) misclassification error rate for a one-look simulation. Other simulations indicate lower error rates (1.8 percent for a four-look image). The morphological transformation portion has resulted in meaningful partitions with a minimal loss of fractal boundary information. An unpublished version of Thicken, suitable for watersheds transformations of fractal objects, is also presented. It is demonstrated that the proposed symbiosis works with SAR (synthetic aperture radar) images: in this case, a four-look Seasat image of sea ice. It is concluded that the symbiotic forms of both segmentation and morphological transformation seem well suited for unsupervised geophysical analysis.

  2. A laser radar experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, Martin R.; Blanchard, Christine

    1990-09-01

    An experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using a laser radar for long-range target acquisition and tracking is discussed. A CO2 laser was used to collect range Doppler images, while a medium-power argon ion laser was employed for angular tracking. Laser-radar operation is outlined with emphasis on isotopic laser radars. Laser-radar imaging is covered, and a laser-radar range equation is given. Experimental laser-radar transmitter, receiver, and telescope are described. A 35-foot long surface-to-air missile and payload were tracked in the experiment, with the laser radar acquiring the targets as they reached 480 km in altitude, 750 km from the radar site. The 4-ft-diameter aperture laser-radar telescope provided the resolution and range accuracy equivalent to that of a 120-ft microwave radar antenna.

  3. Condition assessment of corroded steel rebar in free space using synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingemi, Christopher M.; Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Litt, Swinderjit; Yu, Tzuyang

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging of construction materials offers civil engineers an opportunity to better assess the condition of aging civil infrastructures such as reinforced concrete (RC) structures. Corrosion of steel rebar in RC structures is a major problem responsible for their premature failure and unexpected collapse. In this paper, SAR imaging is applied to the quantitative assessment of corroded steel rebar in free space as the first step toward the use of SAR imaging for subsurface sensing of aging RC structures. A 10 GHz stripmap SAR system was used inside an anechoic chamber. The bandwidth of the radar system was 1.5 GHz. Steel rebar specimens were artificially corroded to different levels by regularly applying a mist of 5% NaCl solution for different durations of time in order to simulate the condition of natural corrosion. Two sizes (No. 3 and No. 4) of steel rebar were used in this research. Different orientations of steel rebar were considered. Corrosion level was determined by measuring the mass loss of corroded steel rebar specimens. From our results, feasibility of SAR images for the condition assessment of corroded steel rebar was experimentally demonstrated. It was found that the presence of surface rust on corroded steel rebar reduces the amplitude in SAR images. The SAR image of corroded steel rebar also exhibited a distribution of SAR amplitudes different from the one of intact steel rebar. In addition, it was also found that there is an optimal range for the condition assessment of corroded steel rebar in free space. In our experiment, the optimal range was determined to be 30.4 cm.

  4. Fast Blood Vector Velocity Imaging: Simulations and Preliminary In Vivo Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udesen, Jesper; Gran, Fredrik; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    2007-01-01

    with a 5.5 MHz linear array transducer scanning a flow phantom. This was done first with the Field II ultrasound simulation program. Standard deviation and bias of the velocity estimates were evaluated when six parameters were changed around an initial point. The conclusions drawn from the simulations were......I Background: Conventional ultrasound methods for acquiring color flow images of the blood velocity are limited by a relatively low frame rate and are restricted to only give velocity estimates along the ultrasound beam direction. To circumvent these limitations, we propose a method where the frame...... rate can be significantly increased, and the full 2-D vector velocity of the blood can be estimated. II Method: The method presented in this paper uses three techniques: 1) The ultrasound is not focused during the transmit of the ultrasound signals, and a full speckle image of the blood can be acquired...

  5. Full-field velocity imaging of red blood cells in capillaries with spatiotemporal demodulation autocorrelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingyi; Zeng, Yaguang; Dong, Nannan; Liao, Riwei; Yang, Guojian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a full-field optical method for the label-free and quantitative mapping of the velocities of red blood cells (RBCs) in capillaries. It integrates spatiotemporal demodulation and an autocorrelation algorithm, and measures RBC velocity according to the ratio of RBC length to lag time. Conventionally, RBC length is assumed to be a constant and lag time is taken as a variable, while our method treats both of them as variables. We use temporal demodulation and the Butterworth spatial filter to separate RBC signal from background signal, based on which we obtain the RBC length by image segmentation and lag time by autocorrelation analysis. The RBC velocity calculated now is more accurate. The validity of our method is verified by an in vivo experiment on a mouse ear. Owing to its higher image signal-to-noise ratio, our method can be used for mapping RBC velocity in the turbid tissue case.

  6. Blood flow velocity imaging of malignant melanoma by micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, H.; Andoh, T.; Akiguchi, S.; Shirakawa, H.; Kobayashi, D.; Kuraishi, Y.; Hachiga, T.

    2010-09-01

    We have developed a laser Doppler velocimeter to measure blood flow, the micromultipoint laser Doppler velocimeter (μ-MLDV). This equipment can measure absolute velocity and, based on this, can display the course of blood vessels. In this study, we attempted to perform blood flow velocity imaging of malignant melanoma transplanted to the mouse ear. We found that blood flow velocity of the formed blood vessels originating in the melanoma was much greater than that of the capillary vessels in normal skin. Furthermore, the form of the tumor was clearly visible from the blood flow velocity image. These experimental results suggest that μ-MLDV has potential as a diagnostic method for distinguishing benign nevi from malignant melanomas.

  7. Image registration using stationary velocity fields parameterized by norm-minimizing Wendland kernel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Sommer, Stefan Horst; Sørensen, Lauge

    Interpolating kernels are crucial to solving a stationary velocity field (SVF) based image registration problem. This is because, velocity fields need to be computed in non-integer locations during integration. The regularity in the solution to the SVF registration problem is controlled by the re...... that Wendland SVF based measures separate (Alzheimer's disease v/s normal controls) better than both B-Spline SVFs (pamygdala) and B-Spline freeform deformation (pamygdala and cortical gray matter)....

  8. Dynamical critical scaling of electric field fluctuations in the greater cusp and magnetotail implied by HF radar observations of F-region Doppler velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Akasofu's solar wind ε parameter describes the coupling of solar wind energy to the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Analysis of fluctuations in ε using model independent scaling techniques including the peaks of probability density functions (PDFs and generalised structure function (GSF analysis show the fluctuations were self-affine (mono-fractal, single exponent scaling over 9 octaves of time scale from ~46 s to ~9.1 h. However, the peak scaling exponent α0 was a function of the fluctuation bin size, so caution is required when comparing the exponents for different data sets sampled in different ways. The same generic scaling techniques revealed the organisation and functional form of concurrent fluctuations in azimuthal magnetospheric electric fields implied by SuperDARN HF radar measurements of line-of-sight Doppler velocity, vLOS, made in the high-latitude austral ionosphere. The PDFs of vLOS fluctuation were calculated for time scales between 1 min and 256 min, and were sorted into noon sector results obtained with the Halley radar, and midnight sector results obtained with the TIGER radar. The PDFs were further sorted according to the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field, as well as ionospheric regions of high and low Doppler spectral width. High spectral widths tend to occur at higher latitude, mostly on open field lines but also on closed field lines just equatorward of the open-closed boundary, whereas low spectral widths are concentrated on closed field lines deeper inside the magnetosphere. The vLOS fluctuations were most self-affine (i.e. like the solar wind ε parameter on the high spectral width field lines in the noon sector ionosphere (i.e. the greater cusp, but suggested multi-fractal behaviour on closed field lines in the midnight sector (i.e. the central plasma sheet. Long tails in the PDFs imply that "microbursts" in ionospheric convection

  9. Electromagnetic Vortex-Based Radar Imaging Using a Single Receiving Antenna: Theory and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiezhu Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Radar imaging based on electromagnetic vortex can achieve azimuth resolution without relative motion. The present paper investigates this imaging technique with the use of a single receiving antenna through theoretical analysis and experimental results. Compared with the use of multiple receiving antennas, the echoes from a single receiver cannot be used directly for image reconstruction using Fourier method. The reason is revealed by using the point spread function. An additional phase is compensated for each mode before imaging process based on the array parameters and the elevation of the targets. A proof-of-concept imaging system based on a circular phased array is created, and imaging experiments of corner-reflector targets are performed in an anechoic chamber. The azimuthal image is reconstructed by the use of Fourier transform and spectral estimation methods. The azimuth resolution of the two methods is analyzed and compared through experimental data. The experimental results verify the principle of azimuth resolution and the proposed phase compensation method.

  10. Wave-equation Migration Velocity Analysis Using Plane-wave Common Image Gathers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-06-01

    Wave-equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) based on subsurface-offset, angle domain or time-lag common image gathers (CIGs) requires significant computational and memory resources because it computes higher dimensional migration images in the extended image domain. To mitigate this problem, a WEMVA method using plane-wave CIGs is presented. Plane-wave CIGs reduce the computational cost and memory storage because they are directly calculated from prestack plane-wave migration, and the number of plane waves is often much smaller than the number of shots. In the case of an inaccurate migration velocity, the moveout of plane-wave CIGs is automatically picked by a semblance analysis method, which is then linked to the migration velocity update by a connective function. Numerical tests on two synthetic datasets and a field dataset validate the efficiency and effectiveness of this method.

  11. A Large Aperture UWB Antenna Array for Real Beam Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hsiang Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of four-element ultra-wideband (UWB comb taper slot antenna array with 18 cm element spacing for real beam radar imaging is described. The four-element UWB array system with optimum element spacing is analyzed by energy pattern. A wideband double ridge horn antenna is used as the transmitting antenna, the developed large aperture UWB array is used as the receiving antenna. The transmitting antenna and the receiving antenna are combined with impulse time domain measurement system to achieve real beam radar imaging. The receiving impulse signals at various positions are processed by the time delay and sum algorithm. The examples of several aluminum cans have been verified in the resolution and compared with using the UWB array as a receive antenna and the double ridge horn as a transmit antenna in the test setup. The crossrange resolution of UWB antenna array is better than wideband double ridge horn antenna because the beam width of UWB array is narrower.

  12. Imaging radar observations of Farley Buneman waves during the JOULE II experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Hysell

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Vector electric fields and associated E×B drifts measured by a sounding rocket in the auroral zone during the NASA JOULE II experiment in January 2007, are compared with coherent scatter spectra measured by a 30 MHz radar imager in a common volume. Radar imaging permits precise collocation of the spectra with the background electric field. The Doppler shifts and spectral widths appear to be governed by the cosine and sine of the convection flow angle, respectively, and also proportional to the presumptive ion acoustic speed. The neutral wind also contributes to the Doppler shifts. These findings are consistent with those from the JOULE I experiment and also with recent numerical simulations of Farley Buneman waves and instabilities carried out by Oppenheim et al. (2008. Simple linear analysis of the waves offers some insights into the spectral moments. A formula relating the spectral width to the flow angle, ion acoustic speed, and other ionospheric parameters is derived.

  13. Realization of strong backscattering homogeneous regions with known backscattering coefficient in synthetic aperture radar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xin; Wang, Kaizhi; Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Xingzhao

    2017-01-01

    The strong backscattering homogeneous region, i.e., a uniform region with a high and constant backscattering coefficient, is important for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image quality assessment and SAR radiometric calibration, which, however, is difficult to realize in practice with a known backscattering coefficient. We realize a strong backscattering homogeneous region with a known backscattering coefficient in SAR images by utilizing designed metal grids. First, we propose a manmade grid-structure target and realize it with aluminum in practice, which is named the metal grid. Then, the backscattering coefficient of the designed metal grid is simulated in the computer simulation technology (CST) microwave studio and measured by a radar cross-section (RCS) measurement instrument in a microwave anechoic chamber. Both CST simulation results and RCS measurement results confirm the strong backscattering property of the designed target. In addition, by utilizing the designed target, we realize a test field consisting of several strong backscattering homogeneous regions with different sizes at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. The spaceborne experiments have been carried out by the TerraSAR-X sensor over the test field in two flight campaigns in X-band with VV polarization. Experimental results demonstrate the strong backscattering property and homogeneity of the realized regions.

  14. Automatic Focusing for a 675 GHz Imaging Radar with Target Standoff Distances from 14 to 34 Meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Adrian; Cooper, Ken B.; Dengler, Robert J.; Llombart, Nuria; Siegel, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper dicusses the issue of limited focal depth for high-resolution imaging radar operating over a wide range of standoff distances. We describe a technique for automatically focusing a THz imaging radar system using translational optics combined with range estimation based on a reduced chirp bandwidth setting. The demonstarted focusing algorithm estimates the correct focal depth for desired targets in the field of view at unknown standoffs and in the presence of clutter to provide good imagery at 14 to 30 meters of standoff.

  15. Two-Stage Multi-Task Representation Learning for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Target Images Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Yijian; Tan, Zhiying; Li, Dong; Liu, Shujun; Wang, Tao; Li, Yongming

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a two-stage multi-task learning representation method for the classification of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) target images. The first stage of the proposed approach uses multi-features joint sparse representation learning, modeled as a ℓ 2 , 1 -norm regularized multi-task sparse learning problem, to find an effective subset of training samples. Then, a new dictionary is constructed based on the training subset. The second stage of the method is to perform target images classification based on the new dictionary, utilizing multi-task collaborative representation. The proposed algorithm not only exploits the discrimination ability of multiple features but also greatly reduces the interference of atoms that are irrelevant to the test sample, thus effectively improving classification performance. Conducted with the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) public SAR database, experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective and superior to many state-of-the-art methods.

  16. Application of Support Vector Machines for Estimating Wall Parameters in Through-Wall Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Mei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In through-wall radar imaging (TWRI, ambiguities in wall characteristics including the thickness and the relative permittivity will distort the image and shift the imaged target position. To quickly and accurately estimate the wall parameters, an approach based on a support vector machine (SVM is proposed. In TWRI problem, the nonlinearity is embodied in the relationship between backscatter data and the wall parameters, which can be obtained through the SVM training process. Measurement results reveal that once the training phase is completed, the technique only needs no more than one second to estimate wall parameters with acceptable errors. Then through-wall images are reconstructed using a back-projection (BP algorithm by a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD simulation. Noiseless and noisy measurements are discussed; the simulation results demonstrate that noisy contamination has little influence on the imaging quality. Furthermore, the feasibility and the validity are tested by a more realistic situation. The results show that high-quality and focused images are obtained regardless of the errors in the wall parameter estimates.

  17. A Fast Level Set Method for Synthetic Aperture Radar Ocean Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Huang, Bo; Li, Hongga

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of high noise imagery like Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images is still one of the most challenging tasks in image processing. While level set, a novel approach based on the analysis of the motion of an interface, can be used to address this challenge, the cell-based iterations may make the process of image segmentation remarkably slow, especially for large-size images. For this reason fast level set algorithms such as narrow band and fast marching have been attempted. Built upon these, this paper presents an improved fast level set method for SAR ocean image segmentation. This competent method is dependent on both the intensity driven speed and curvature flow that result in a stable and smooth boundary. Notably, it is optimized to track moving interfaces for keeping up with the point-wise boundary propagation using a single list and a method of fast up-wind scheme iteration. The list facilitates efficient insertion and deletion of pixels on the propagation front. Meanwhile, the local up-wind scheme is used to update the motion of the curvature front instead of solving partial differential equations. Experiments have been carried out on extraction of surface slick features from ERS-2 SAR images to substantiate the efficacy of the proposed fast level set method. PMID:22399940

  18. Multi-offset ground-penetrating radar imaging of a lab-scale infiltration test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Mangel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A lab scale infiltration experiment was conducted in a sand tank to evaluate the use of time-lapse multi-offset ground-penetrating radar (GPR data for monitoring dynamic hydrologic events in the vadose zone. Sets of 21 GPR traces at offsets between 0.44–0.9 m were recorded every 30 s during a 3 h infiltration experiment to produce a data cube that can be viewed as multi-offset gathers at unique times or common offset images, tracking changes in arrivals through time. Specifically, we investigated whether this data can be used to estimate changes in average soil water content during wetting and drying and to track the migration of the wetting front during an infiltration event. For the first problem we found that normal-moveout (NMO analysis of the GPR reflection from the bottom of the sand layer provided water content estimates ranging between 0.10–0.30 volumetric water content, which underestimated the value determined by depth averaging a vertical array of six moisture probes by 0.03–0.05 volumetric water content. Relative errors in the estimated depth to the bottom of the 0.6 m thick sand layer were typically on the order of 2%, though increased as high as 25% as the wetting front approached the bottom of the tank. NMO analysis of the wetting front reflection during the infiltration event generally underestimated the depth of the front with discrepancies between GPR and moisture probe estimates approaching 0.15 m. The analysis also resulted in underestimates of water content in the wetted zone on the order of 0.06 volumetric water content and a wetting front velocity equal to about half the rate inferred from the probe measurements. In a parallel modeling effort we found that HYDRUS-1D also underestimates the observed average tank water content determined from the probes by approximately 0.01–0.03 volumetric water content, despite the fact that the model was calibrated to the probe data. This error suggests that the assumed conceptual

  19. Effect of Velocity and Time-Step on the Continuity of a Discrete Moving Sound Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshikazu Seki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a basic study into 3-D audio display systems, this paper reports the conditions of moving sound image velocity and time-step where a discrete moving sound image is perceived as continuous motion. In this study, the discrete moving sound image was presented through headphones and ran along the ear-axis. The experiments tested the continuity of a discrete moving sound image using various conditions of velocity (0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, and 4 m/s and time-step (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10, 0.12, and 0.14 s. As a result, the following were required in order to present the discrete moving sound image as continuous movement. (1 The 3-D audio display system was required to complete the sound image presentation process, including head tracking and HRTF simulation, in a time shorter than 0.02 s, in order to present sound image movement at all velocities. (2 A processing time longer than 0.1 s was not acceptable. (3 If the 3-D audio display system only presented very slow movement (less than about 0.5 m/s, processing times ranging from 0.04 s to 0.06 s were still acceptable.

  20. Comparison of pulsed wave and color Doppler myocardial velocity imaging in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, G; Killich, M; Hartmann, K

    2010-01-01

    Tissue velocity imaging (TVI) is increasingly used in small animal cardiology. Tissue velocity of the myocardial wall can be measured by pulsed wave (PW) or color Doppler (CD) imaging methods. Currently, the same reference ranges are used for PW TVI and CD TVI methods. However, if and how both methods correlate, and whether they can be used interchangeably, have not been assessed in small animals. To compare the results of PW TVI and CD TVI measurements. Seventy-one healthy dogs. Longitudinal myocardial velocity profiles were recorded from the 4-chamber left apical view. Peak maximal systolic (S), early (E), and late diastolic (A) velocities were measured off-line in a blinded fashion in the septal and lateral left ventricular wall by PW TVI and CD TVI. Differences between peak PW TVI and CD TVI waves were analyzed by a paired t-test. Regression analysis and Bland-Altman difference plots also were used to assess agreement between methods. There was a significant correlation between PW TVI and CD TVI (P waves measured by PW TVI were significantly higher than the CD TVI values (P < .001). Peak systolic and diastolic PW velocities were approximately 2.20 cm/s higher than corresponding mean CD TVI velocities. PW TVI measurements are significantly higher compared with CD TVI measurements. Theses differences are clinically relevant. These methods should not be used interchangeably, and different reference ranges for PW TVI and CD TVI should be used.

  1. Advanced Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Imaging Radar (InSAR) for Dune Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havivi, Shiran; Amir, Doron; Schvartzman, Ilan; August, Yitzhak; Mamman, Shimrit; Rotman, Stanely R.; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    Aeolian morphologies are formed in the presence of sufficient wind energy and available lose particles. These processes occur naturally or are further enhanced or reduced by human intervention. The dimensions of change are dependent primarily on the wind energy and surface properties. Since the 1970s, remote sensing imagery, both optical and radar, have been used for documentation and interpretation of the geomorphologic changes of sand dunes. Remote sensing studies of aeolian morphologies is mostly useful to document major changes, yet, subtle changes, occurring in a period of days or months in scales of centimeters, are very difficult to detect in imagery. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is an imaging technique for measuring Earth's surface topography and deformation. InSAR images are produced by measuring the radar phase difference between two separated antennas that view the same surface area. Classical InSAR is based on high coherence between two or more images. The output (interferogram) can show subtle changes with an accuracy of several millimeters to centimeters. Very little work has been done on measuring or identifying the changes in dunes using InSAR methods. The reason is that dunes tend to be less coherent than firm, stable, surfaces. This work aims to demonstrate how interferometric decorrelation can be used for identifying dune instability. We hypothesize and demonstrate that the loss of radar coherence over time on dunes can be used as an indication of the dune's instability. When SAR images are acquired at sufficiently close intervals one can measure the time it takes to lose coherence and associate this time with geomorphic stability. To achieve our goals, the coherence change detection method was used, in order to identify dune stability or instability and the dune activity level. The Nitzanim-Ashdod coastal dunes along the Mediterranean, 40 km south of Tel-Aviv, Israel, were chosen as a case study. The dunes in this area are of

  2. New Approaches For Asteroid Spin State and Shape Modeling From Delay-Doppler Radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissi, Chedy; Lamee, Mehdi; Mosiane, Olorato; Vassallo, Corinne; Busch, Michael W.; Greenberg, Adam; Benner, Lance A. M.; Naidu, Shantanu P.; Duong, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Delay-Doppler radar imaging is a powerful technique to characterize the trajectories, shapes, and spin states of near-Earth asteroids; and has yielded detailed models of dozens of objects. Reconstructing objects' shapes and spins from delay-Doppler data is a computationally intensive inversion problem. Since the 1990s, delay-Doppler data has been analyzed using the SHAPE software. SHAPE performs sequential single-parameter fitting, and requires considerable computer runtime and human intervention (Hudson 1993, Magri et al. 2007). Recently, multiple-parameter fitting algorithms have been shown to more efficiently invert delay-Doppler datasets (Greenberg & Margot 2015) - decreasing runtime while improving accuracy. However, extensive human oversight of the shape modeling process is still required. We have explored two new techniques to better automate delay-Doppler shape modeling: Bayesian optimization and a machine-learning neural network.One of the most time-intensive steps of the shape modeling process is to perform a grid search to constrain the target's spin state. We have implemented a Bayesian optimization routine that uses SHAPE to autonomously search the space of spin-state parameters. To test the efficacy of this technique, we compared it to results with human-guided SHAPE for asteroids 1992 UY4, 2000 RS11, and 2008 EV5. Bayesian optimization yielded similar spin state constraints within a factor of 3 less computer runtime.The shape modeling process could be further accelerated using a deep neural network to replace iterative fitting. We have implemented a neural network with a variational autoencoder (VAE), using a subset of known asteroid shapes and a large set of synthetic radar images as inputs to train the network. Conditioning the VAE in this manner allows the user to give the network a set of radar images and get a 3D shape model as an output. Additional development will be required to train a network to reliably render shapes from delay

  3. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples and Plane-wave Migration Velocity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-08-28

    Seismic imaging is a technique that uses seismic echoes to map and detect underground geological structures. The conventional seismic image has the resolution limit of λ/2, where λ is the wavelength associated with the seismic waves propagating in the subsurface. To exceed this resolution limit, this thesis develops a new imaging method using resonant multiples, which produces superresolution images with twice or even more the spatial resolution compared to the conventional primary reflection image. A resonant multiple is defined as a seismic reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypath. This reverberated raypath is the reason for superresolution imaging because it increases the differences in reflection times associated with subtle changes in the spatial location of the reflector. For the practical implementation of superresolution imaging, I develop a post-stack migration technique that first enhances the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of resonant multiples by a moveout-correction stacking method, and then migrates the post-stacked resonant multiples with the associated Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration formula. I show with synthetic and field data examples that the first-order resonant multiple image has about twice the spatial resolution compared to the primary reflection image. Besides resolution, the correct estimate of the subsurface velocity is crucial for determining the correct depth of reflectors. Towards this goal, wave-equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) is an image-domain method which inverts for the velocity model that maximizes the similarity of common image gathers (CIGs). Conventional WEMVA based on subsurface-offset, angle domain or time-lag CIGs requires significant computational and memory resources because it computes higher dimensional migration images in the extended image domain. To mitigate this problem, I present a new WEMVA method using plane-wave CIGs. Plane-wave CIGs reduce the

  4. Multimass velocity-map imaging with the Pixel Imaging Mass Spectrometry (PImMS) sensor: an ultra-fast event-triggered camera for particle imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew T; Crooks, Jamie P; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Lee, Jason W L; John, Jaya John; Wilman, Edward S; Hill, Laura; Halford, Edward; Slater, Craig S; Winter, Benjamin; Yuen, Wei Hao; Gardiner, Sara H; Lipciuc, M Laura; Brouard, Mark; Nomerotski, Andrei; Vallance, Claire

    2012-11-15

    We present the first multimass velocity-map imaging data acquired using a new ultrafast camera designed for time-resolved particle imaging. The PImMS (Pixel Imaging Mass Spectrometry) sensor allows particle events to be imaged with time resolution as high as 25 ns over data acquisition times of more than 100 μs. In photofragment imaging studies, this allows velocity-map images to be acquired for multiple fragment masses on each time-of-flight cycle. We describe the sensor architecture and present bench-testing data and multimass velocity-map images for photofragments formed in the UV photolysis of two test molecules: Br(2) and N,N-dimethylformamide.

  5. Impact of velocity distribution assumption on simplified laser speckle imaging equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, Julio C; Ramos-García, Ruben; Guizar-Iturbide, Ileana; Martínez-Niconoff, Gabriel; Choi, Bernard

    2008-03-03

    Since blood flow is tightly coupled to the health status of biological tissue, several instruments have been developed to monitor blood flow and perfusion dynamics. One such instrument is laser speckle imaging. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of two velocity distribution assumptions (Lorentzian- and Gaussian-based) to calculate speckle flow index (SFI) values. When the normalized autocorrelation function for the Lorentzian and Gaussian velocity distributions satisfy the same definition of correlation time, then the same velocity range is predicted for low speckle contrast (0 < C < 0.6) and predict different flow velocity range for high contrast. Our derived equations form the basis for simplified calculations of SFI values.

  6. Velocity dependence of image speckles produced by a moving diffuser under dynamic speckle illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takashi; Asakura, Toshimitsu

    1990-06-01

    The velocity dependence has been investigated experimentally for the image speckles produced by a moving diffuse object under illumination of a dynamic speckle pattern. The boiling motion of the illuminating speckle pattern has little influence on the resultant speckle intensity fluctuations at the image plane if it is detected through a lens having a large pupil. In this case, the time-correlation length of speckle intensity fluctuations is inversely proportional to the object velocity. For the case where a translating speckle pattern illuminates the diffuser, its motion strongly affects the autocorrelation function of resultant speckle intensity fluctuations. The relationship between the pupil size of the imaging lens and the temporal behavior of image speckles is also considered.

  7. Velocity map imaging of HBr photodissociation in large rare gas clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, J; Kocisek, J; Poterya, V; Votava, O; Pysanenko, A; Lipciuc, M L; Kitsopoulos, T N; Fárník, M

    2011-04-21

    We have implemented the velocity map imaging technique to study clustering in the pulsed supersonic expansions of hydrogen bromide in helium, argon, and xenon. The expansions are characterized by direct imaging of the beam velocity distributions. We have investigated the cluster generation by means of UV photodissociation and photoionization of HBr molecules. Two distinct features appear in the hydrogen atom photofragment images in the clustering regime: (i) photofragments with near zero kinetic energies and (ii) "hot" photofragments originating from vibrationally excited HBr molecules. The origin of both features is attributed to the fragment caging by the cluster. We discuss the nature of the formed clusters based on the change of the photofragment images with the expansion parameters and on the photoionization mass spectra and conclude that single HBr molecule encompassed with rare gas "snowball" is consistent with the experimental observations.

  8. Wave Height Estimation from Shadowing Based on the Acquired X-Band Marine Radar Images in Coastal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Wei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the retrieving significant wave height from X-band marine radar images based on shadow statistics is investigated, since the retrieving accuracy can not be seriously affected by environmental factors and the method has the advantage of without any external reference to calibrate. However, the accuracy of the significant wave height estimated from the radar image acquired at the near-shore area is not ideal. To solve this problem, the effect of water depth is considered in the theoretical derivation of estimated wave height based on the sea surface slope. And then, an improved retrieving algorithm which is suitable for both in deep water area and shallow water area is developed. In addition, the radar data are sparsely processed in advance in order to achieve high quality edge image for the requirement of shadow statistic algorithm, since the high resolution radar images will lead to angle-blurred for the image edge detection and time-consuming in the estimation of sea surface slope. The data acquired from Pingtan Test Base in Fujian Province were used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. The experimental results demonstrate that the improved method which takes into account the water depth is more efficient and effective and has better performance for retrieving significant wave height in the shallow water area, compared to the in situ buoy data as the ground truth and that of the existing shadow statistic method.

  9. Sparse ground-penetrating radar imaging method for off-the-grid target problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Ali Cafer; Teke, Oguzhan; Arikan, Orhan

    2013-04-01

    Spatial sparsity of the target space in subsurface or through-the-wall imaging applications has been successfully used within the compressive-sensing framework to decrease the data acquisition load in practical systems, while also generating high-resolution images. The developed techniques in this area mainly discretize the continuous target space into grid points and generate a dictionary of model data that is used in image-reconstructing optimization problems. However, for targets that do not coincide with the computation grid, imaging performance degrades considerably. This phenomenon is known as the off-grid problem. This paper presents a novel sparse ground-penetrating radar imaging method that is robust for off-grid targets. The proposed technique is an iterative orthogonal matching pursuit-based method that uses gradient-based steepest ascent-type iterations to locate the off-grid target. Simulations show that robust results with much smaller reconstruction errors are obtained for multiple off-grid targets compared to standard sparse reconstruction techniques.

  10. Millimeter-wave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data Imaging Based on Terrain Surface Projection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shun-jun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-wave Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR has smaller size, lower weight, and higher resolution compared with other bands. Thus, it has become a hot research topic. However, owing to its shorter wavelength, millimeter-wave InSAR data processing requires high-precision measurements of platform motion. For nonideal trajectories, traditional methods face difficulties in echo imaging and interferogram extraction. In addition, existing methods mainly produce SAR images based on plane projection. When the terrain changes abruptly, these methods may cause strong interferometric phase unwrapping and geometric distortion in SAR images. To overcome the abovementioned disadvantages of conventional methods in millimeter-wave InSAR imaging, an approach based on terrain surface projection is proposed. The echoes of different antennas are projected on the same terrain surface space for data imaging and interferogram extraction. In addition, the relation between terrain elevation and interferometric phase is derived. Simulations and experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed method; furthermore, the proposed approach improves the precision of interferometric phase extraction in complex motion conditions, while minimizing geometric distortion and phase wrapping in rough terrain, which is more conducive to terrain description and elevation inversion.

  11. A despeckle filter for the Cassini synthetic aperture radar images of Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsolis, Emmanuel; Bampasidis, Georgios; Solomonidou, Anezina; Coustenis, Athena

    2012-02-01

    Cassini synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn, reveal surface features with shapes ranging from quasi-circular to more complex ones, interpreted as liquid hydrocarbon deposits assembled in the form of lakes or seas. One of the major problems hampering the derivation of meaningful texture information from SAR imagery is the speckle noise. It overlays real structures and causes gray value variations even in homogeneous parts of the image. We propose a filtering technique which can be applied to obtain restored SAR images. Our technique is based on probabilistic methods and regards an image as a random element drawn from a prespecified set of possible images. The despeckle filter can be used as an intermediate step for the extraction of regions of interest, corresponding to structured units in a given area or distinct objects of interest, such as lake-like features on Titan. This tool can therefore be used, among other, to study seasonal surficial changes of Titan's polar regions. In this study we also present a segmentation technique that allows us to separate the lakes from the local background.

  12. Intra-eruption Geologic Map from an X-band Radar Image During the May 18, 1980 Eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, C. W.; Elston, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The use of side-looking airborne radar images for geologic interpretations has increased with the Vesuvian exploration projects. Interpretation of images without ground truth relies on examples in terrestrial environments for which geologic data are available.

  13. New Developments in Vector Velocity Imaging using the Transverse Oscillation Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring

    2013-01-01

    Vector velocity imaging using the Transverse Oscillation (TO) approach has recently been FDA approved for linear array transducers on a commercial platform. It can now be used clinically for studying the complex flow at e.g. bifurcations, valves, and the heart in real time. Several clinical...

  14. Real-Time GPU Implementation of Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradway, David; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this wor...

  15. A statistical method for velocity detection in moving powder beds using image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsz, Tofan A.; Tran, Thanh N.; van der Hoeven, Martijn; Hooijmaijers, Ricardo; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Vromans, Herman; Maarschalk, Kees van der Voort

    An existing method to measure particle velocity is particle image velocimetry which requires presence of tracer materials. This method of contrast enhancement is not always applicable in an industrial setting. Therefore a method to assess the movement of small, structures has been introduced, called

  16. A Dual Polarization, Active, Microstrip Antenna for an Orbital Imaging Radar System Operating at L-Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kenneth C.; Huang, John

    2000-01-01

    A highly successful Earth orbiting synthetic antenna aperture radar (SAR) system, known as the SIR-C mission, was carried into orbit in 1994 on a U.S. Shuttle (Space Transportation System) mission. The radar system was mounted in the cargo bay with no need to fold, or in any other way reduce the size of the antennas for launch. Weight and size were not limited for the L-Band, C-Band, and X-Band radar systems of the SIR-C radar imaging mission; the set of antennas weighed 10,500 kg, the L-Band antenna having the major share of the weight. This paper treats designing an L-Band antenna functionally similar to that used for SIR-C, but at a fraction of the cost and at a weight in the order of 250 kg. Further, the antenna must be folded to fit into the small payload shroud of low cost booster rocket systems. Over 31 square meters of antenna area is required. This low weight, foldable, electronic scanning antenna is for the proposed LightSAR radar system which is to be placed in Earth orbit on a small, dedicated space craft at the lowest possible cost for an efficient L- Band radar imaging system. This LightSAR spacecraft radar is to be continuously available for at least five operational years, and have the ability to map or repeat-map any area on earth within a few days of any request. A microstrip patch array, with microstrip transmission lines heavily employed in the aperture and in the corporate feed network, was chosen as the low cost approach for this active dual-polarization, 80 MHz (6.4%) bandwidth antenna design.

  17. A "circularisation" method to repair deformations and determine the centre of velocity map images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Gibson, Stephen T.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2017-07-01

    A problem besetting the analysis of velocity map images, particularly those of photoelectrons, is the presence of distortions that cause the features in the image to deviate from circularity, leading to a loss of resolution in the spectrum extracted. A method is presented to repair such distortions based on fitting the angular behaviour of each of the ring structures to a trigonometric expansion. The repair function allows the intensity at any value of radius and angle to be mapped to a new position that removes the distortion and returns the features to circular. While the method relies on the analysis of the structure in an image, it could also be applied to determine the "repair function" using a calibration image (or series of images) for the experiment. Once the image has been circularised it can be processed by any of the approaches that have been developed for that purpose. The analysis also enables the image centre to be determined with high accuracy. The fitting method utilises an inverse Abel transformation of the image in polar coordinates as a means to reshape the image into a series of spectral features in order to determine the radial position of features at each angle. Although the velocity distribution is not in general spherically symmetric and so this is not a mathematically correct means to extract the velocity distribution, the feature positions are accurately reproduced in the resulting spectrum while the intensity and anisotropy parameters can be remarkably close to those obtained using the proper inverse Abel transformation of the image.

  18. Modified multiple measurement vectors model for squinted synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yichang; Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yong-An; Sun, Li

    2017-05-01

    Inspired by the theoretical advances of compressed sensing, lots of sparsity-aware methods have been proposed for squinted synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging based on the single-measurement vector (SMV) model. Compared with SMV, the multiple measurement vectors (MMV) model has been demonstrated to have better reconstruction performance. In fact, echo received by SAR at different azimuth positions can be viewed as MMVs. However, the MMV model cannot be directly used in squinted SAR imaging, because MMV requires multiple sparse vectors of the common sparse structures, while the high-resolution range profiles (HRRPs) obtained by squinted SAR at different azimuth positions have different sparse structures due to range migration effect. A squinted SAR imaging method is proposed based on MMV. First, a modified MMV model that considers range migration is built to realize sparse representation of echo. Additionally, an improved orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is developed to reconstruct HRRPs. Finally, a high-resolution two-dimensional image result can be easily achieved via traditional azimuth match filtering. Experimental results based on both simulated and real data demonstrate that the proposed MMV-based method can provide better computational efficiency and antinoise ability compared to the SMV-based method.

  19. Registration error of the liver CT using deformable image registration of MIM Maestro and Velocity AI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Nitta, Kazunori; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Numajiri, Haruko; Oshiro, Yoshiko; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Mizumoto, Masashi; Aihara, Teruhito; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2017-05-04

    Understanding the irradiated area and dose correctly is important for the reirradiation of organs that deform after irradiation, such as the liver. We investigated the spatial registration error using the deformable image registration (DIR) software products MIM Maestro (MIM) and Velocity AI (Velocity). Image registration of pretreatment computed tomography (CT) and posttreatment CT was performed in 24 patients with liver tumors. All the patients received proton beam therapy, and the follow-up period was 4-14 (median: 10) months. We performed DIR of the pretreatment CT and compared it with that of the posttreatment CT by calculating the dislocation of metallic markers (implanted close to the tumors). The fiducial registration error was comparable in both products: 0.4-32.9 (9.3 ± 9.9) mm for MIM and 0.5-38.6 (11.0 ± 10.0) mm for Velocity, and correlated with the tumor diameter for MIM (r = 0.69, P = 0.002) and for Velocity (r = 0.68, P = 0.0003). Regarding the enhancement effect, the fiducial registration error was 1.0-24.9 (7.4 ± 7.7) mm for MIM and 0.3-29.6 (8.9 ± 7.2) mm for Velocity, which is shorter than that of plain CT (P = 0.04, for both). The DIR performance of both MIM and Velocity is comparable with regard to the liver. The fiducial registration error of DIR depends on the tumor diameter. Furthermore, contrast-enhanced CT improves the accuracy of both MIM and Velocity. H28-102; July 14, 2016 approved.

  20. Investigation of image enhancement techniques for the development of a self-contained airborne radar navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatak, A. V.; Karmali, M. S.

    1983-01-01

    This study was devoted to an investigation of the feasibility of applying advanced image processing techniques to enhance radar image characteristics that are pertinent to the pilot's navigation and guidance task. Millimeter (95 GHz) wave radar images for the overwater (i.e., offshore oil rigs) and overland (Heliport) scenario were used as a data base. The purpose of the study was to determine the applicability of image enhancement and scene analysis algorithms to detect and improve target characteristics (i.e., manmade objects such as buildings, parking lots, cars, roads, helicopters, towers, landing pads, etc.) that would be helpful to the pilot in determining his own position/orientation with respect to the outside world and assist him in the navigation task. Results of this study show that significant improvements in the raw radar image may be obtained using two dimensional image processing algorithms. In the overwater case, it is possible to remove the ocean clutter by thresholding the image data, and furthermore to extract the target boundary as well as the tower and catwalk locations using noise cleaning (e.g., median filter) and edge detection (e.g., Sobel operator) algorithms.

  1. Analysis of equatorial plasma bubble zonal drift velocities in the Pacific sector by imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yao

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Using 1024 nights of data from 2002–2005 taken by the Cornell Narrow Field Imager (CNFI, we examine equatorial plasma bubble (EPB zonal drift velocity characteristics. CNFI is located at the Maui Space Surveillance Site on the Haleakala Volcano (geographic: 20.71° N, 203.83° E; geomagnetic: 21.03° N, 271.84° E on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The imager is set up to view in a magnetic field-aligned geometry in order to maximize its resolution. We calculate the zonal drift velocities using two methods: a correlation routine and an EPB west-wall intensity gradient tracking routine. These two methods yield sizeable differences in the evenings, suggesting strong pre-local midnight EPB development. An analysis of the drift velocities is also performed based on the three influencing factors of season, geomagnetic activity, and solar activity. In general, our data match published trends and drift characteristics from past studies. However, we find that the drift magnitudes are much lower than results from other imagers at similar latitude sectors but at different longitude sectors, suggesting that zonal drift velocities have a longitudinal dependence.

  2. Ultra-Wideband Indoor Channel Modelling Using Ray-Tracing Software for through-the-Wall Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Lièbe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new software for design of through-the-wall imaging radars. The first part describes the evolution of a ray tracing simulator, originally designed for propagation of narrowband signals, and then for ultra-wideband signals. This simulator allows to obtain temporal channel response to a wide-band emitter (3 GHz to 10 GHz. An experimental method is also described to identify the propagation paths. Simulation results are compared to propagation experiments under the same conditions. Different configurations are tested and then discussed. Finally, a configuration of through-the-wall imaging radar is proposed, with different antennas patterns and different targets. Simulated images will be helpful for understanding the experiment obtained images.

  3. Integrative velocity model building for imaging a geothermal reservoir in southern Tuscany, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Lena; Loch, Felix; Ciuffi, Simonetta; Buske, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Deep geothermal reservoirs are generally characterized by high temperatures and pressures, sometimes located in hard rock environments and even close to a super-critical state. For characterization of such a deep super-critical geothermal reservoir, the imaging of the subsurface at the highest possible resolution is required to reduce the uncertainties in exploration prior to the drilling phase. Several seismic surveys were carried out for characterization of a possible drilling target within a deep super-critical geothermal reservoir in Tuscany (project DESCRAMBLE). Seismic data were acquired in the form of 2D seismic reflection surveys as well as Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), the latter complemented by simultaneous recording of the source signals by a surface network covering an area of approximately 6 km x 6 km around the drill site. The investigation area itself is characterized by a complex geology with strong velocity contrasts, near-surface inhomogeneities and fracture zones. At first, the processing of the recorded seismic wavefields aimed at the determination of a seismic velocity model by a multidisciplinary approach. The application of conventional methods is limited due to the low resolution of the stacking velocities, significant lateral velocity changes and strong influence of noise. We performed first-arrival traveltime tomography and derived borehole velocities to tackle the complexity of the geology. Below the bottom of the borehole, results from laboratory measurements of rock samples from deeper neighboring wells were integrated into the velocity model. This approach limits the ambiguity, which depends on the existence and distribution of the neighboring wells in the investigation area. The results contribute to a robust migration velocity model used for an uncertainty depth analysis at the target horizon. In a next step, the influence of the velocity model on imaging is tested within an advanced seismic imaging workflow for several 2D

  4. Estimating of turbulent velocity fluctuations in boundary layer with pressure gradient by Smoke Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Goltsman, A. E.; Saushin, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The results of the experimental estimating of the velocity profiles and turbulent pulsations in the boundary layer for adverse and favorable pressure gradients are presented. The profiles of characteristics based on the dynamics of two-component instantaneous velocity vector fields measured by the field optical method of Smoke Image Velocimetry are estimated. The measurements are performed with a large spatial and temporal resolution, the measurement results are relevant for estimating the terms of the conservation equation of turbulent energy in the boundary layer and for improving semiempirical turbulence models.

  5. Estimating of higher order velocity moments and their derivatives in boundary layer by Smoke Image Velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, N. I.; Goltsman, A. E.; Salekhova, I. G.; Saushin, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The results of an experimental evaluation of the third-order moments profiles of velocity fluctuations and their partial derivatives in a zero pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer are presented. Profiles of characteristics are estimated on the basis of the dynamics of two-component instantaneous velocity vector fields measured by the optical method Smoke Image Velocimetry (SIV). Comparison SIV-measurements with the results of measurements by a thermoanemometer and DNS data with similar Reθ and Reτ showed good agreement between the profiles of +, +, ∂+/∂y+ и ∂+/∂y+ obtained by SIV and DNS.

  6. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after transla...

  7. A comprehensive statistical investigation of schlieren image velocimetry (SIV) using high-velocity helium jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayan; Qiao, Li

    2017-03-01

    A detailed statistical assessment of seedless velocity measurement using Schlieren Image Velocimetry (SIV) was explored using open source Robust Phase Correlation (RPC) algorithm. A well-known flow field, an axisymmetric turbulent helium jet, was analyzed near and intermediate region (0≤ x/d≤ 20) for two different Reynolds numbers, Re d = 11,000 and Re d = 22,000 using schlieren with horizontal knife-edge, schlieren with vertical knife-edge and shadowgraph technique, and the resulted velocity fields from SIV techniques were compared to traditional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements. A novel, inexpensive, easy to setup two-camera SIV technique had been demonstrated to measure high-velocity turbulent jet, with jet exit velocities 304 m/s (Mach = 0.3) and 611 m/s (Mach = 0.6), respectively. Several image restoration and enhancement techniques were tested to improve signal to noise ratio (SNR) in schlieren and shadowgraph images. Processing and post-processing parameters for SIV techniques were examined in detail. A quantitative comparison between self-seeded SIV techniques and traditional PIV had been made using correlation statistics. While the resulted flow field from schlieren with horizontal knife-edge and shadowgraph showed excellent agreement with PIV measurements, schlieren with vertical knife-edge performed poorly. The performance of spatial cross-correlations at different jet locations using SIV techniques and PIV was evaluated. Turbulence quantities like turbulence intensity, mean velocity fields, Reynolds shear stress influenced spatial correlations and correlation plane SNR heavily. Several performance metrics such as primary peak ratio (PPR), peak to correlation energy (PCE), the probability distribution of signal and noise were used to compare capability and potential of different SIV techniques.

  8. Strip velocity measurements for gated x-ray imagers using short pulse lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P. W.; Cardenas, M.; Griffin, M.; Mead, A.; Silbernagel, C. T.; Bell, P.; Haque, S.

    2013-09-01

    Strip velocity measurements of gated X-ray imagers are presented using an ultra-short pulse laser. Obtaining time- resolved X-ray images of inertial confinement fusion shots presents a difficult challenge. One diagnostic developed to address this challenge is the gated X-ray imagers. The gated X-ray detectors (GXDs) developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory use a microchannel plate (MCP) coated with a gold strip line, which serves as a photocathode. GXDs are used with an array of pinholes, which image onto various parts of the GXD image plane. As the pulse sweeps over the strip lines, it creates a time history of the event with consecutive images. In order to accurately interpret the timing of the images obtained using the GXDs, it is necessary to measure the propagation of the pulse over the strip line. The strip velocity was measured using a short pulse laser with a pulse duration of approximately 1-2 ps. The 200nm light from the laser is used to illuminate the GXD MCP. The laser pulse is split and a retroreflective mirror is used to delay one of the legs. By adjusting the distance to the mirror, one leg is temporally delayed compared to the reference leg. The retroreflective setup is calibrated using a streak camera with a 1 ns full sweep. Resolution of 0.5 mm is accomplished to achieve a temporal resolution of ~5 ps on the GXD strip line.

  9. Subsurface Imaging by UWB Radar: Application to Humanitarian Demining in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Motoyuki

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has been widely used applications which include detection of subsurface facilities, concrete inspection and archaeology. Among these applications, humanitarian demining is still difficult task. Since 2002, we have developed a new hand-held land mine detection dual-sensor ALIS. ALIS is equipped with a metal detector and a GPR, and it has a sensor tracking system, which can record the GPR and Metal detector signal with its location. ALIS can process the data and is used for image re-construction by migration processing. ALIS is the only one mine detection system in the world which can visualize the GPR image by hand scanning. We found that the migration processing can reduce the clutter and gives us clear images of buried mines. After several tests of ALIS in mine affected courtiers, operation of ALIS in mine fields in Cambodia started in summer 2009. Two sets of ALIS have been operated in Cambodia and more than 77 antipersonnel mines have been detected and 137,000m2 farmland was cleaned.

  10. Radar Coincidence Imaging for Off-Grid Target Using Frequency-Hopping Waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar coincidence imaging (RCI is a high-resolution staring imaging technique without the limitation of the target relative motion. To achieve better imaging performance, sparse reconstruction is commonly used. While its performance is based on the assumption that the scatterers are located at the prediscretized grid-cell centers, otherwise, off-grid emerges and the performance of RCI degrades significantly. In this paper, RCI using frequency-hopping (FH waveforms is considered. The off-grid effects are analyzed, and the corresponding constrained Cramér-Rao bound (CCRB is derived based on the mean square error (MSE of the “oracle” estimator. For off-grid RCI, the process is composed of two stages: grid matching and off-grid error (OGE calibration, where two-dimension (2D band-excluded locally optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (BLOOMP and alternating iteration minimization (AIM algorithms are proposed, respectively. Unlike traditional sparse recovery methods, BLOOMP realizes the recovery in the refinement grids by overwhelming the shortages of coherent dictionary and is robust to noise and OGE. AIM calibration algorithm adaptively adjusts the OGE and, meanwhile, seeks the optimal target reconstruction result.

  11. Off-grid compressive sensing through-the-wall radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shugao; Liu, Fengshan

    2014-05-01

    Compressive sensing techniques have been widely used to decrease the data acquisition time while generating high-resolution images due to the sparsity of the target space in through-the-wall radar imaging application. The CS-based imaging techniques mainly discretize the continuous target space into grid points and generate a dictionary of model data to form an optimization problem. The choice of the grid for generating the sparsity inducing basis or dictionary is a central point of CS and sparse approximation. However, good sparse recovery performance is based on the assumption that the targets are positioned at the pre-discretized grid locations; otherwise, the performance would significantly degrade. In this paper, the first-order approximation to estimate the targets' off-grid shifts and the joint sparse recovery method are used for reducing the effect of the grid to locate the off-grid target. Numerical examples demonstrate the robust results with lower localization errors using the joint sparse recovery method are obtained for off-grid targets compared to standard sparse reconstruction techniques.

  12. Combined Use of Multi-Temporal Optical and Radar Satellite Images for Grassland Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Dusseux

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the ability of optical images, SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar images and the combination of both types of data to discriminate between grasslands and crops in agricultural areas where cloud cover is very high most of the time, which restricts the use of visible and near-infrared satellite data. We compared the performances of variables extracted from four optical and five SAR satellite images with high/very high spatial resolutions acquired during the growing season. A vegetation index, namely the NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and two biophysical variables, the LAI (Leaf Area Index and the fCOVER (fraction of Vegetation Cover were computed using optical time series and polarization (HH, VV, HV, VH. The polarization ratio and polarimetric decomposition (Freeman–Durden and Cloude–Pottier were calculated using SAR time series. Then, variables derived from optical, SAR and both types of remotely-sensed data were successively classified using the Support Vector Machine (SVM technique. The results show that the classification accuracy of SAR variables is higher than those using optical data (0.98 compared to 0.81. They also highlight that the combination of optical and SAR time series data is of prime interest to discriminate grasslands from crops, allowing an improved classification accuracy.

  13. On the convergence of the phase gradient autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging is a class of coherent range and Doppler signal processing techniques applied to remote sensing. The aperture is synthesized by recording and processing coherent signals at known positions along the flight path. Demands for greater image resolution put an extreme burden on requirements for inertial measurement units that are used to maintain accurate pulse-to-pulse position information. The recently developed Phase Gradient Autofocus algorithm relieves this burden by taking a data-driven digital signal processing approach to estimating the range-invariant phase aberrations due to either uncompensated motions of the SAR platform or to atmospheric turbulence. Although the performance of this four-step algorithm has been demonstrated, its convergence has not been modeled mathematically. A new sensitivity study of algorithm performance is a necessary step towards this model. Insights that are significant to the application of this algorithm to both SAR and to other coherent imaging applications are developed. New details on algorithm implementation identify an easily avoided biased phase estimate. A new algorithm for defining support of the point spread function is proposed, which promises to reduce the number of iterations required even for rural scenes with low signal-to-clutter ratios.

  14. VHF volume-imaging radar observation of aspect-sensitive scatterers tilted in mountain waves above a convective boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin stable atmospheric layers cause VHF radars to receive increased echo power from near zenith. Layers can be tilted from horizontal, for instance by gravity waves, and the direction of VHF "glinting" is measurable by spatial domain interferometry or many-beam Doppler beam swinging (DBS. This paper uses the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, Shigaraki, Japan as a volume-imaging radar with 64-beam DBS, to show tilting of layers and air flow in mountain waves. Tilt of aspect-sensitive echo power from horizontal is nearly parallel to air flow, as assumed in earlier measurements of mountain-wave alignment. Vertical-wind measurements are self-consistent from different beam zenith angles, despite the combined effects of aspect sensitivity and horizontal-wind gradients.

  15. Comparison of ultrasound B-mode, strain imaging, acoustic radiation force impulse displacement and shear wave velocity imaging using real time clinical breast images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Raghavan, Bagyam

    2016-04-01

    It has been observed that many pathological process increase the elastic modulus of soft tissue compared to normal. In order to image tissue stiffness using ultrasound, a mechanical compression is applied to tissues of interest and local tissue deformation is measured. Based on the mechanical excitation, ultrasound stiffness imaging methods are classified as compression or strain imaging which is based on external compression and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging which is based on force generated by focused ultrasound. When ultrasound is focused on tissue, shear wave is generated in lateral direction and shear wave velocity is proportional to stiffness of tissues. The work presented in this paper investigates strain elastography and ARFI imaging in clinical cancer diagnostics using real time patient data. Ultrasound B-mode imaging, strain imaging, ARFI displacement and ARFI shear wave velocity imaging were conducted on 50 patients (31 Benign and 23 malignant categories) using Siemens S2000 machine. True modulus contrast values were calculated from the measured shear wave velocities. For ultrasound B-mode, ARFI displacement imaging and strain imaging, observed image contrast and Contrast to Noise Ratio were calculated for benign and malignant cancers. Observed contrast values were compared based on the true modulus contrast values calculated from shear wave velocity imaging. In addition to that, student unpaired t-test was conducted for all the four techniques and box plots are presented. Results show that, strain imaging is better for malignant cancers whereas ARFI imaging is superior than strain imaging and B-mode for benign lesions representations.

  16. Assimilation of Wave Imaging Radar Observations for Real-time Wave-by-Wave Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Alexandra [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Haller, Merrick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Civil & Construction Engineering; Walker, David [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lynett, Pat [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This project addressed Topic 3: “Wave Measurement Instrumentation for Feed Forward Controls” under the FOA number DE-FOA-0000971. The overall goal of the program was to develop a phase-resolving wave forecasting technique for application to the active control of Wave Energy Conversion (WEC) devices. We have developed an approach that couples a wave imaging marine radar with a phase-resolving linear wave model for real-time wave field reconstruction and forward propagation of the wave field in space and time. The scope of the project was to develop and assess the performance of this novel forecasting system. Specific project goals were as follows: Develop and verify a fast, GPU-based (Graphical Processing Unit) wave propagation model suitable for phase-resolved computation of nearshore wave transformation over variable bathymetry; Compare the accuracy and speed of performance of the wave model against a deep water model in their ability to predict wave field transformation in the intermediate water depths (50 to 70 m) typical of planned WEC sites; Develop and implement a variational assimilation algorithm that can ingest wave imaging radar observations and estimate the time-varying wave conditions offshore of the domain of interest such that the observed wave field is best reconstructed throughout the domain and then use this to produce model forecasts for a given WEC location; Collect wave-resolving marine radar data, along with relevant in situ wave data, at a suitable wave energy test site, apply the algorithm to the field data, assess performance, and identify any necessary improvements; and Develop a production cost estimate that addresses the affordability of the wave forecasting technology and include in the Final Report. The developed forecasting algorithm (“Wavecast”) was evaluated for both speed and accuracy against a substantial synthetic dataset. Early in the project, performance tests definitively demonstrated that the system was capable of

  17. Development Of Polarimetric Decomposition Techniques For Indian Forest Resource Assessment Using Radar Imaging Satellite (Risat-1) Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, J.

    2015-12-01

    The focus of this work is to examine polarimetric decomposition techniques primarily focussed on Pauli decomposition and Sphere Di-Plane Helix (SDH) decomposition for forest resource assessment. The data processing methods adopted are Pre-processing (Geometric correction and Radiometric calibration), Speckle Reduction, Image Decomposition and Image Classification. Initially to classify forest regions, unsupervised classification was applied to determine different unknown classes. It was observed K-means clustering method gave better results in comparison with ISO Data method.Using the algorithm developed for Radar Tools, the code for decomposition and classification techniques were applied in Interactive Data Language (IDL) and was applied to RISAT-1 image of Mysore-Mandya region of Karnataka, India. This region is chosen for studying forest vegetation and consists of agricultural lands, water and hilly regions. Polarimetric SAR data possess a high potential for classification of earth surface.After applying the decomposition techniques, classification was done by selecting region of interests andpost-classification the over-all accuracy was observed to be higher in the SDH decomposed image, as it operates on individual pixels on a coherent basis and utilises the complete intrinsic coherent nature of polarimetric SAR data. Thereby, making SDH decomposition particularly suited for analysis of high-resolution SAR data. The Pauli Decomposition represents all the polarimetric information in a single SAR image however interpretation of the resulting image is difficult. The SDH decomposition technique seems to produce better results and interpretation as compared to Pauli Decomposition however more quantification and further analysis are being done in this area of research. The comparison of Polarimetric decomposition techniques and evolutionary classification techniques will be the scope of this work.

  18. Integration of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and 2-D Resistivity Imaging methods for soil investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nabila; Nordiana, M. M.; Azwin, I. N.; Taqiuddin, Z. M.; Maslinda, Umi; Hisham, Hazrul; Nur Amalina, M. K. A.; Afiq Saharudin, Muhamad; Nordiana, A. N.

    2017-04-01

    Rock lithology influences the electrical properties representing soils or rocks. Electrical conductivity value can be measured using geophysical methods like Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and 2-D resistivity imaging. The objective of this survey is to integrate GPR, 2-D resistivity imaging and borehole log based on the conductivity value with soil description and N-value from borehole. Borehole is conducted in the middle of the survey line at a distance of 20 m. GPR method used 250 MHz frequency antenna. The result was filtered using Band Pass, Time Varying Gain and DC removal. 2-D resistivity imaging used two arrays; Wenner-Schlumberger and pole-dipole with total distance of 40 m and 1 m minimum electrode spacing using ABEM SAS4000. The results of both arrays are represented in the form of inversion models. Electrical conductivity values for GPR are calculated based on the conductivity values obtained by 2-D resistivity imaging. The conductivity values calculated from GPR are in good agreement with the values from 2-D resistivity imaging method. Electrical conductivity for the top soil is 0.7 - 3.0 mS/m with no soil description and N-value due to imprecise sample of the loose soil condition. The results showed that soil composed of loose silty gravel with some sand at the depth of 1.81 - 2.99 m has higher value of conductivity (0.4 - 3.0 mS/m) while soil dominated by very stiff sandy silt with some rock fragment (gravel) at the depth of 3 - 3.5 m has lower conductivity values of 0.4 mS/m to 0.7 mS/m. Soil having low electrical conductivity is probably due to the stiff condition (minimum water content) confirmed by greater N-value. Integration of geophysical methods and geotechnical method is a success and the geophysical parameters can be used in understanding soil condition.

  19. Electromechanical wave imaging and electromechanical wave velocity estimation in a large animal model of myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costet, Alexandre; Melki, Lea; Sayseng, Vincent; Hamid, Nadira; Nakanishi, Koki; Wan, Elaine; Hahn, Rebecca; Homma, Shunichi; Konofagou, Elisa

    2017-12-01

    Echocardiography is often used in the clinic for detection and characterization of myocardial infarction. Electromechanical wave imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive ultrasound-based imaging technique based on time-domain incremental motion and strain estimation that can evaluate changes in contractility in the heart. In this study, electromechanical activation is assessed in infarcted heart to determine whether EWI is capable of detecting and monitoring infarct formation. Additionally, methods for estimating electromechanical wave (EW) velocity are presented, and changes in the EW propagation velocity after infarct formation are studied. Five (n  =  5) adult mongrels were used in this study. Successful infarct formation was achieved in three animals by ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery. Dogs were survived for a few days after LAD ligation and monitored daily with EWI. At the end of the survival period, dogs were sacrificed and TTC (tetrazolium chloride) staining confirmed the formation and location of the infarct. In all three dogs, as soon as day 1 EWI was capable of detecting late-activated and non-activated regions, which grew over the next few days. On final day images, the extent of these regions corresponded to the location of infarct as confirmed by staining. EW velocities in border zones of infarct were significantly lower post-infarct formation when compared to baseline, whereas velocities in healthy tissues were not. These results indicate that EWI and EW velocity might help with the detection of infarcts and their border zones, which may be useful for characterizing arrhythmogenic substrate.

  20. Satellite Angular Velocity Estimation Based on Star Images and Optical Flow Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarmine Fasano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  1. Satellite angular velocity estimation based on star images and optical flow techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Accardo, Domenico; Grassi, Michele

    2013-09-25

    An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  2. Agreement among three examiners of colour Doppler imaging retrobulbar blood flow velocity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Founti, Panayiota; Harris, Alon; Papadopoulou, Domniki; Emmanouilidis, Petros; Siesky, Brent; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Salonikiou, Angeliki; Pappas, Theofanis; Topouzis, Fotis

    2011-12-01

    To assess the agreement among three masked examiners on central retinal artery (CRA) and ophthalmic artery (OA) blood flow velocity measurements performed with colour Doppler imaging (CDI) in healthy volunteers. The study included 30 eyes of 15 healthy volunteers. Prior to the study, all examiners underwent intensive CDI training by an expert to facilitate uniformity in performing measurements according to a specific protocol. Following the eligibility visit, three masked examiners performed CDI measurements assessing the CRA and OA in both eyes of all subjects. All CDI images were analysed by a masked grader. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated for peak systolic velocity (PSV) and end diastolic velocity (EDV) in the CRA and OA among the examiners. p-values 0.9, both in the CRA and the OA. All p-values calculated for ICCs were statistically significant. Expert training and execution of a specific protocol for CDI of ocular blood flow velocity measurements provide highly reproducible results in healthy volunteers. This is important for long-term studies assessing ocular hemodynamics, where multiple examiners may be involved. © 2011 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2011 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  3. Rapid Assessment of Earthquakes with Radar and Optical Geodetic Imaging and Finite Fault Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, E. J.; Sladen, A.; Simons, M.; Rosen, P. A.; Yun, S.; Li, Z.; Avouac, J.; Leprince, S.

    2010-12-01

    Earthquake responders need to know where the earthquake has caused damage and what is the likely intensity of damage. The earliest information comes from global and regional seismic networks, which provide the magnitude and locations of the main earthquake hypocenter and moment tensor centroid and also the locations of aftershocks. Location accuracy depends on the availability of seismic data close to the earthquake source. Finite fault models of the earthquake slip can be derived from analysis of seismic waveforms alone, but the results can have large errors in the location of the fault ruptures and spatial distribution of slip, which are critical for estimating the distribution of shaking and damage. Geodetic measurements of ground displacements with GPS, LiDAR, or radar and optical imagery provide key spatial constraints on the location of the fault ruptures and distribution of slip. Here we describe the analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and sub-pixel correlation (or pixel offset tracking) of radar and optical imagery to measure ground coseismic displacements for recent large earthquakes, and lessons learned for rapid assessment of future events. These geodetic imaging techniques have been applied to the 2010 Leogane, Haiti; 2010 Maule, Chile; 2010 Baja California, Mexico; 2008 Wenchuan, China; 2007 Tocopilla, Chile; 2007 Pisco, Peru; 2005 Kashmir; and 2003 Bam, Iran earthquakes, using data from ESA Envisat ASAR, JAXA ALOS PALSAR, NASA Terra ASTER and CNES SPOT5 satellite instruments and the NASA/JPL UAVSAR airborne system. For these events, the geodetic data provided unique information on the location of the fault or faults that ruptured and the distribution of slip that was not available from the seismic data and allowed the creation of accurate finite fault source models. In many of these cases, the fault ruptures were on previously unknown faults or faults not believed to be at high risk of earthquakes, so the area and degree of

  4. Power spectrum and blood flow velocity images obtained by dual-beam backscatter laser Doppler velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroki; Yasue, Youichi; Hachiga, Tadashi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Akiguchi, Shunsuke; Kuraishi, Yasushi; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2014-07-01

    We developed a micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimeter (μ-MLDV) for noninvasive in-vivo measurements of blood flow and we presented the results of demonstrations performed on experimental animals. In this paper, we investigate the validity of power spectrum analysis for determining the flow velocity and the minimum power of the semiconductor laser in the μ-MLDV. Although average velocity is generally estimated from a peak position ( f peak) in the power spectrum, the power spectrum of blood flow included an additional component in the high-frequency region. The conventional method for determining the average velocity of flows of transparent artificial fluids, which involves determining the average velocity from f peak, is unsuitable for in-vivo measurements of blood flow. The laser power was reduced from 140 to 30mW since 30mW was the minimum power at which images of blood flow velocity in microvessels could be obtained. About 30mW (power density of 15mW/mm2) is the maximum power which can be irradiated to humans. Further reduction in the laser power is necessary before this technique can be applied to humans.

  5. Synthetic range profiling, ISAR imaging of sea vessels and feature extraction, using a multimode radar to classify targets: initial results from field trials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available -based classification of small to medium sized sea vessels in littoral condition. The experimental multimode radar is based on an experimental tracking radar that was modified to generate SRP and ISAR images in both search and tracking modes. The architecture...

  6. Ground Penetrating Radar at Alcatraz Island: Imaging Civil-War Era Fortifications Beneath the Recreation Yard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; de Smet, T. S.; Warden, R.; Komas, T.; Hagin, J.

    2013-12-01

    As part of a cultural resources assessment and historical preservation project supported by the U.S. National Park Service, GPR surveys using 200 MHz antennas, with ~3.0 m depth of penetration and ~0.1 m lateral and vertical resolution, were conducted by our team in June 2012 over the recreation yard and parade ground at historic Alcatraz Island in order to image the underlying buried Civil War-era fortifications. The recreation yard at the Alcatraz high-security federal penitentiary served as a secure outdoor facility where the prisoners could take exercise. The facility, enclosed by a high perimeter wall and sentry walk, included basketball courts, a baseball diamond, and bleacher-style seating. The site previously consisted of coastal batteries built by the U.S. Army in the early to mid 1850's. As the need for harbor defense diminished, the island was converted into a military prison during the 1860's. In 1933, the military prison was transferred to federal control leading to the establishment of the high-security penitentiary. The rec yard was constructed in 1908-1913 directly over existing earthen fortifications, namely a trio of embankments known as 'traverses I, J, and K.' These mounds of earth, connected by tunnels, were in turn built over concrete and brick magazines. The processed GPR sections show good correlations between radar reflection events and the locations of the buried fortification structures derived from historical map analysis. A 3-D data cube was constructed and two of the cut-away perspective views show that traverse K, in particular, has a strong radar signature.

  7. Using high-resolution radar images to determine vegetation cover for soil erosion assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiel, D; Herrmann, S; Jadczyszyn, J

    2013-07-30

    Healthy soils are crucial for human well-being. Because soils are threatened worldwide, politicians recognize the need for soil protection. For example, the European Commission has launched the Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection, which requests the European member states to identify high risk areas for soil degradation. Most states use the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) to assess soil erosion risk at the national scale. The USLE includes different factors, one of them is the vegetation cover and management factor (C factor). Modern satellite-based radar sensors now provide highly accurate vegetation cover data, enabling opportunities to improve the accuracy of the C factor. The presented study proves the suitability for C factor determination based on a multi-temporal classification of high-resolution radar images. Further USLE factors were derived from existing data sources (meteorological data, soil maps, digital elevation model) to conduct an USLE-based soil erosion assessment. The resulting map illustrates a qualitative assessment for soil erosion risk within a plot of about 7*12 km in an agricultural region in Poland that is very susceptible to soil erosion processes. A high erosion risk of more than 10 tonnes per ha and year was assessed to occur on 13.6% (646 ha) of the agricultural areas within the investigated plot. Further 7.8% (372 ha) of agricultural land is threaten by a medium risk of 5-10 tonnes per ha and year. Such a spatial information about areas of high or medium soil erosion risk are crucial for the development of strategies for the protection of soils. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A fast autofocus algorithm for synthetic aperture radar processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    1992-01-01

    High-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging requires the motion of the radar platform to be known very accurately. Otherwise, phase errors are induced in the processing of the raw SAR data, and bad focusing results. In particular, a constant error in the measured along-track velocity...... or the cross-track acceleration leads to a phase error that varies quadratically over the synthetic aperture. The process of estimating this quadratic phase error directly from the radar data is termed autofocus. A novel autofocus algorithm with a computational complexity which is at least an order...

  9. GPM Ground Validation Cloud Radar System (CRS) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Cloud Radar System (CRS) OLYMPEX dataset provides radar reflectivity and Doppler velocity data collected during the Olympic Mountain...

  10. A mini-photofragment translational spectrometer with ion velocity map imaging using low voltage acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenke; Jiang, Pan; Lin, Dan; Chi, Xiaoping; Cheng, Min; Du, Yikui; Zhu, Qihe

    2018-01-01

    A mini time-sliced ion velocity map imaging photofragment translational spectrometer using low voltage acceleration has been constructed. The innovation of this apparatus adopts a relative low voltage (30-150 V) to substitute the traditional high voltage (650-4000 V) to accelerate and focus the fragment ions. The overall length of the flight path is merely 12 cm. There are many advantages for this instrument, such as compact structure, less interference, and easy to operate and control. Low voltage acceleration gives a longer turn-around time to the photofragment ions forming a thicker Newton sphere, which provides sufficient time for slicing. Ion trajectory simulation has been performed for determining the structure dimensions and the operating voltages. The photodissociation and multiphoton ionization of O2 at 224.999 nm is used to calibrate the ion images and examine the overall performance of the new spectrometer. The velocity resolution (Δν/ν) of this spectrometer from O2 photodissociation is about 0.8%, which is better than most previous results using high acceleration voltage. For the case of CF3I dissociation at 277.38 nm, many CF3 vibrational states have been resolved, and the anisotropy parameter has been measured. The application of low voltage acceleration has shown its advantages on the ion velocity map imaging (VMI) apparatus. The miniaturization of the VMI instruments can be realized on the premise of high resolution.

  11. Application of ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and image analysis in monitoring of the sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete which undergoes a thermal treatment before and during its life-service can be applied in plants operating at high temperature and as thermal insulation. Sintering occurs within a concrete structure in such conditions. Progression of sintering process can be monitored by the change of the porosity parameters determined with a nondestructive test method - ultrasonic pulse velocity and computer program for image analysis. The experiment has been performed on the samples of corundum and bauxite concrete composites. The apparent porosity of the samples thermally treated at 110, 800, 1000, 1300 and 1500ºC was primary investigated with a standard laboratory procedure. Sintering parameters were calculated from the creep testing. The loss of strength and material degradation occurred in concrete when it was subjected to the increased temperature and a compressive load. Mechanical properties indicate and monitor changes within microstructure. The level of surface deterioration after the thermal treatment was determined using Image Pro Plus program. Mechanical strength was estimated using ultrasonic pulse velocity testing. Nondestructive ultrasonic measurement was used as a qualitative description of the porosity change in specimens which is the result of the sintering process. The ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and image analysis proved to be reliable methods for monitoring of microstructural change during the thermal treatment and service life of refractory concrete.

  12. Observations of a Cold Front at High Spatiotemporal Resolution Using an X-Band Phased Array Imaging Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mahre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While the vertical structure of cold fronts has been studied using various methods, previous research has shown that traditional methods of observing meteorological phenomena (such as pencil-beam radars in PPI/volumetric mode are not well-suited for resolving small-scale cold front phenomena, due to relatively low spatiotemporal resolution. Additionally, non-simultaneous elevation sampling within a vertical cross-section can lead to errors in analysis, as differential vertical advection cannot be distinguished from temporal evolution. In this study, a cold front from 19 September 2015 is analyzed using the Atmospheric Imaging Radar (AIR. The AIR transmits a 20-degree fan beam in elevation, and digital beamforming is used on receive to generate simultaneous receive beams. This mobile, X-band, phased-array radar offers temporal sampling on the order of 1 s (while in RHI mode, range sampling of 30 m (37.5 m native resolution, and continuous, arbitrarily oversampled data in the vertical dimension. Here, 0.5-degree sampling is used in elevation (1-degree native resolution. This study is the first in which a cold front has been studied via imaging radar. The ability of the AIR to obtain simultaneous RHIs at high temporal sampling rates without mechanical steering allows for analysis of features such as Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and feeder flow.

  13. Assessing the potential for measuring Europa's tidal Love number h2 using radar sounder and topographic imager data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrügge, G.; Schroeder, D. M.; Haynes, M. S.; Hussmann, H.; Grima, C.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2018-01-01

    The tidal Love number h2 is a key geophysical measurement for the characterization of Europa's interior, especially of its outer ice shell if a subsurface ocean is present. We performed numerical simulations to assess the potential for estimating h2 using altimetric measurements with a combination of radar sounding and stereo imaging data. The measurement principle exploits both delay and Doppler information in the radar surface return in combination with topography from a digital terrain model (DTM). The resulting radar range measurements at cross-over locations can be used in combination with radio science Doppler data for an improved trajectory solution and for estimating the h2 Love number. Our simulation results suggest that the absolute accuracy of h2 from the joint analysis of REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding: Ocean to Near-surface) surface return and EIS (Europa Imaging System) DTM data will be in the range of 0.04-0.17 assuming full radio link coverage. The error is controlled by the SNR budget and DTM quality, both dependent on the surface properties of Europa. We estimate that this would unambiguously confirm (or reject) the global ocean hypothesis and, in combination with a nominal radio-science based measurement of the tidal Love number k2, constrain the thickness of Europa's outer ice shell to up to ±15 km.

  14. Multi-Channel Deconvolution for Forward-Looking Phase Array Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Xia

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The cross-range resolution of forward-looking phase array radar (PAR is limited by the effective antenna beamwidth since the azimuth echo is the convolution of antenna pattern and targets’ backscattering coefficients. Therefore, deconvolution algorithms are proposed to improve the imaging resolution under the limited antenna beamwidth. However, as a typical inverse problem, deconvolution is essentially a highly ill-posed problem which is sensitive to noise and cannot ensure a reliable and robust estimation. In this paper, multi-channel deconvolution is proposed for improving the performance of deconvolution, which intends to considerably alleviate the ill-posed problem of single-channel deconvolution. To depict the performance improvement obtained by multi-channel more effectively, evaluation parameters are generalized to characterize the angular spectrum of antenna pattern or singular value distribution of observation matrix, which are conducted to compare different deconvolution systems. Here we present two multi-channel deconvolution algorithms which improve upon the traditional deconvolution algorithms via combining with multi-channel technique. Extensive simulations and experimental results based on real data are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed imaging methods.

  15. DETECTION OF BUILT-UP AREAS USING POLARIMETRIC SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADAR DATA AND HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bordbari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (POLSAR is an advantageous data for information extraction about objects and structures by using the wave scattering and polarization properties. Hyperspectral remote sensing exploits the fact that all materials reflect, absorb, and emit electromagnetic energy, at specific wavelengths, in distinctive patterns related to their molecular composition. As a result of their fine spectral resolution, Hyperspectral image (HIS sensors provide a significant amount of information about the physical and chemical composition of the materials occupying the pixel surface. In target detection applications, the main objective is to search the pixels of an HSI data cube for the presence of a specific material (target. In this research, a hierarchical constrained energy minimization (hCEM method using 5 different adjusting parameters has been used for target detection from hyperspectral data. Furthermore, to detect the built-up areas from POLSAR data, building objects discriminated from surrounding natural media presented on the scene using Freeman polarimetric target decomposition (PTD and the correlation coefficient between co-pol and cross-pol channels. Also, target detection method has been implemented based on the different polarization basis for using the more information. Finally a majority voting method has been used for fusing the target maps. The polarimetric image C-band SAR data acquired by Radarsat-2, over San Francisco Bay area was used for the evaluation of the proposed method.

  16. Full Waveform Analysis for Long-Range 3D Imaging Laser Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallace AndrewM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of 3D imaging systems based on laser radar (ladar offers significant advantages in defense and security applications. In particular, it is possible to retrieve 3D shape information directly from the scene and separate a target from background or foreground clutter by extracting a narrow depth range from the field of view by range gating, either in the sensor or by postprocessing. We discuss and demonstrate the applicability of full-waveform ladar to produce multilayer 3D imagery, in which each pixel produces a complex temporal response that describes the scene structure. Such complexity caused by multiple and distributed reflection arises in many relevant scenarios, for example in viewing partially occluded targets, through semitransparent materials (e.g., windows and through distributed reflective media such as foliage. We demonstrate our methodology on 3D image data acquired by a scanning time-of-flight system, developed in our own laboratories, which uses the time-correlated single-photon counting technique.

  17. Detection of Built-Up Areas Using Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Data and Hyperspectral Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordbari, R.; Maghsoudi, Y.; Salehi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (POLSAR) is an advantageous data for information extraction about objects and structures by using the wave scattering and polarization properties. Hyperspectral remote sensing exploits the fact that all materials reflect, absorb, and emit electromagnetic energy, at specific wavelengths, in distinctive patterns related to their molecular composition. As a result of their fine spectral resolution, Hyperspectral image (HIS) sensors provide a significant amount of information about the physical and chemical composition of the materials occupying the pixel surface. In target detection applications, the main objective is to search the pixels of an HSI data cube for the presence of a specific material (target). In this research, a hierarchical constrained energy minimization (hCEM) method using 5 different adjusting parameters has been used for target detection from hyperspectral data. Furthermore, to detect the built-up areas from POLSAR data, building objects discriminated from surrounding natural media presented on the scene using Freeman polarimetric target decomposition (PTD) and the correlation coefficient between co-pol and cross-pol channels. Also, target detection method has been implemented based on the different polarization basis for using the more information. Finally a majority voting method has been used for fusing the target maps. The polarimetric image C-band SAR data acquired by Radarsat-2, over San Francisco Bay area was used for the evaluation of the proposed method.

  18. A Review on Migration Methods in B-Scan Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Özdemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though ground penetrating radar has been well studied and applied by many researchers for the last couple of decades, the focusing problem in the measured GPR images is still a challenging task. Although there are many methods offered by different scientists, there is not any complete migration/focusing method that works perfectly for all scenarios. This paper reviews the popular migration methods of the B-scan GPR imaging that have been widely accepted and applied by various researchers. The brief formulation and the algorithm steps for the hyperbolic summation, the Kirchhoff migration, the back-projection focusing, the phase-shift migration, and the ω-k migration are presented. The main aim of the paper is to evaluate and compare the migration algorithms over different focusing methods such that the reader can decide which algorithm to use for a particular application of GPR. Both the simulated and the measured examples that are used for the performance comparison of the presented algorithms are provided. Other emerging migration methods are also pointed out.

  19. Two-Stage Multi-Task Representation Learning for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR Target Images Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzheng Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a two-stage multi-task learning representation method for the classification of synthetic aperture radar (SAR target images. The first stage of the proposed approach uses multi-features joint sparse representation learning, modeled as a ℓ 2 , 1 -norm regularized multi-task sparse learning problem, to find an effective subset of training samples. Then, a new dictionary is constructed based on the training subset. The second stage of the method is to perform target images classification based on the new dictionary, utilizing multi-task collaborative representation. The proposed algorithm not only exploits the discrimination ability of multiple features but also greatly reduces the interference of atoms that are irrelevant to the test sample, thus effectively improving classification performance. Conducted with the Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR public SAR database, experimental results show that the proposed approach is effective and superior to many state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Radar imaging mechanism of marine sand waves at very low grazing angle illumination caused by unique hydrodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Ingo; Herbers, Dagmar

    2006-10-01

    The investigations carried out between 2002 and 2004 during six field experiments within the Operational Radar and Optical Mapping in monitoring hydrodynamic, morphodynamic and environmental parameters for coastal management (OROMA) project aimed to improve the effectiveness of new remote sensing monitoring technologies such as shipborne imaging radars in coastal waters. The coastal monitoring radar of the GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht, Germany, is based on a Kelvin Hughes RSR 1000 X band (9.42 GHz) vertical (VV) polarized river radar and was mounted on board the research vessel Ludwig Prandtl during the experiments in the Lister Tief, a tidal inlet of the German Bight in the North Sea. The important progress realized in this investigation is the availability of calibrated X band radar data. Another central point of the study is to demonstrate the applicability of the quasi-specular scattering theory in combination with the weak hydrodynamic interaction theory for the radar imaging mechanism of the seabed. Radar data have been taken at very low grazing angles ≤2.6° of flood and ebb tide-oriented sand wave signatures at the sea surface during ebb tidal current phases. Current speeds perpendicular to the sand wave crest ≤0.6 m s-1 have been measured at wind speeds ≤4.5 m s-1 and water depths ≤25 m. The difference between the maximum measured and simulated normalized radar cross section (NRCS) modulation of the ebb tide-oriented sand wave is 27%. For the flood tide-oriented sand wave, a difference of 21% has been calculated. The difference between the minimum measured and simulated NRCS modulation of the ebb tide-oriented sand wave is 10%, and for the flood tide-oriented sand wave, a value of 43% has been derived. Phases of measured and simulated NRCS modulations correspond to asymmetric sand wave slopes. The results of the simulated NRCS modulation show the qualitative trend but do not always quantitatively match the measured NRCS modulation profiles

  1. Measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments by the "correlated ion and neutral time of flight" method combined with "velocity-map imaging"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthias, F.; Feketeová, L.; Della Negra, R.; Dupasquier, T.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Märk, T. D.

    2017-08-01

    In the challenging field of imaging molecular dynamics, a novel method has been developed and implemented that allows the measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments produced in collision induced dissociation experiments on an event-by-event basis. This has been made possible by combining a correlated ion and neutral time of flight method with a velocity map imaging technique. This new method relies on a multiparametric correlated detection of the neutral and charged fragments from collision induced dissociation on one single detector. Its implementation on the DIAM device (Device for irradiation of biomolecular clusters) (Dispositif d'Irradiation d'Agrégats bioMoléculaires) allowed us to measure the velocity distribution of water molecules evaporated from collision induced dissociation of mass- and energy-selected protonated water clusters.

  2. Coherent backscatter radar imaging in Brazil: large-scale waves in the bottomside F-region at the onset of equatorial spread F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Rodrigues

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The 30 MHz coherent backscatter radar located at the equatorial observatory in São Luís, Brazil (2.59° S, 44.21° W, −2.35° dip lat has been upgraded to perform coherent backscatter radar imaging. The wide field-of-view of this radar makes it well suited for radar imaging studies of ionospheric irregularities. Radar imaging observations were made in support to the spread F Experiment (SpreadFEx campaign. This paper describes the system and imaging technique and presents results from a bottom-type layer that preceded fully-developed radar plumes on 25 October 2005. The radar imaging technique was able to resolve decakilometric structures within the bottom-type layer. These structures indicate the presence of large-scale waves (~35 km in the bottomside F-region with phases that are alternately stable and unstable to wind-driven gradient drift instabilities. The observations suggest that these waves can also cause the initial perturbation necessary to initiate the Generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability leading to spread F. The electrodynamic conditions and the scale length of the bottom-type layer structures suggest that the waves were generated by the collisional shear instability. These results indicate that monitoring bottom-type layers may provide helpful diagnostics for spread F forecasting.

  3. CRF-PEPICO: Double velocity map imaging photoelectron photoion coincidence spectroscopy for reaction kinetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztáray, Bálint; Voronova, Krisztina; Torma, Krisztián G.; Covert, Kyle J.; Bodi, Andras; Hemberger, Patrick; Gerber, Thomas; Osborn, David L.

    2017-07-01

    Photoelectron photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy could become a powerful tool for the time-resolved study of multi-channel gas phase chemical reactions. Toward this goal, we have designed and tested electron and ion optics that form the core of a new PEPICO spectrometer, utilizing simultaneous velocity map imaging for both cations and electrons, while also achieving good cation mass resolution through space focusing. These optics are combined with a side-sampled, slow-flow chemical reactor for photolytic initiation of gas-phase chemical reactions. Together with a recent advance that dramatically increases the dynamic range in PEPICO spectroscopy [D. L. Osborn et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 164202 (2016)], the design described here demonstrates a complete prototype spectrometer and reactor interface to carry out time-resolved experiments. Combining dual velocity map imaging with cation space focusing yields tightly focused photoion images for translationally cold neutrals, while offering good mass resolution for thermal samples as well. The flexible optics design incorporates linear electric fields in the ionization region, surrounded by dual curved electric fields for velocity map imaging of ions and electrons. Furthermore, the design allows for a long extraction stage, which makes this the first PEPICO experiment to combine ion imaging with the unimolecular dissociation rate constant measurements of cations to detect and account for kinetic shifts. Four examples are shown to illustrate some capabilities of this new design. We recorded the threshold photoelectron spectrum of the propargyl and the iodomethyl radicals. While the former agrees well with a literature threshold photoelectron spectrum, we have succeeded in resolving the previously unobserved vibrational structure in the latter. We have also measured the bimolecular rate constant of the CH2I + O2 reaction and observed its product, the smallest Criegee intermediate, CH2OO. Finally, the second

  4. Finite slice analysis (FINA) of sliced and velocity mapped images on a Cartesian grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. O. F.; Amarasinghe, C.; Foley, C. D.; Rombes, N.; Gao, Z.; Vogels, S. N.; van de Meerakker, S. Y. T.; Suits, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    Although time-sliced imaging yields improved signal-to-noise and resolution compared with unsliced velocity mapped ion images, for finite slice widths as encountered in real experiments there is a loss of resolution and recovered intensities for the slow fragments. Recently, we reported a new approach that permits correction of these effects for an arbitrarily sliced distribution of a 3D charged particle cloud. This finite slice analysis (FinA) method utilizes basis functions that model the out-of-plane contribution of a given velocity component to the image for sequential subtraction in a spherical polar coordinate system. However, the original approach suffers from a slow processing time due to the weighting procedure needed to accurately model the out-of-plane projection of an anisotropic angular distribution. To overcome this issue we present a variant of the method in which the FinA approach is performed in a cylindrical coordinate system (Cartesian in the image plane) rather than a spherical polar coordinate system. Dubbed C-FinA, we show how this method is applied in much the same manner. We compare this variant to the polar FinA method and find that the processing time (of a 510 × 510 pixel image) in its most extreme case improves by a factor of 100. We also show that although the resulting velocity resolution is not quite as high as the polar version, this new approach shows superior resolution for fine structure in the differential cross sections. We demonstrate the method on a range of experimental and synthetic data at different effective slice widths.

  5. Enhancing PIV image and fractal descriptor for velocity and shear stresses propagation around a circular pier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Keshavarzi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the fractal dimensions of velocity fluctuations and the Reynolds shear stresses propagation for flow around a circular bridge pier are presented. In the study reported herein, the fractal dimension of velocity fluctuations (u′, v′, w′ and the Reynolds shear stresses (u′v′ and u′w′ of flow around a bridge pier were computed using a Fractal Interpolation Function (FIF algorithm. The velocity fluctuations of flow along a horizontal plane above the bed were measured using Acoustic Doppler Velocity meter (ADV and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV. The PIV is a powerful technique which enables us to attain high resolution spatial and temporal information of turbulent flow using instantaneous time snapshots. In this study, PIV was used for detection of high resolution fractal scaling around a bridge pier. The results showed that the fractal dimension of flow fluctuated significantly in the longitudinal and transverse directions in the vicinity of the pier. It was also found that the fractal dimension of velocity fluctuations and shear stresses increased rapidly at vicinity of pier at downstream whereas it remained approximately unchanged far downstream of the pier. The higher value of fractal dimension was found at a distance equal to one times of the pier diameter in the back of the pier. Furthermore, the average fractal dimension for the streamwise and transverse velocity fluctuations decreased from the centreline to the side wall of the flume. Finally, the results from ADV measurement were consistent with the result from PIV, therefore, the ADV enables to detect turbulent characteristics of flow around a circular bridge pier.

  6. Object-oriented classification using quasi-synchronous multispectral images (optical and radar) over agricultural surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais Sicre, Claire; Baup, Frederic; Fieuzal, Remy

    2015-04-01

    In the context of climate change (with consequences on temperature and precipitation patterns), persons involved in agricultural management have the imperative to combine: sufficient productivity (as a response of the increment of the necessary foods) and durability of the resources (in order to restrain waste of water, fertilizer or environmental damages). To this end, a detailed knowledge of land use will improve the management of food and water, while preserving the ecosystems. Among the wide range of available monitoring tools, numerous studies demonstrated the interest of satellite images for agricultural mapping. Recently, the launch of several radar and optical sensors offer new perspectives for the multi-wavelength crop monitoring (Terrasar-X, Radarsat-2, Sentinel-1, Landsat-8…) allowing surface survey whatever the cloud conditions. Previous studies have demonstrated the interest of using multi-temporal approaches for crop classification, requiring several images for suitable classification results. Unfortunately, these approaches are limited (due to the satellite orbit cycle) and require waiting several days, week or month before offering an accurate land use map. The objective of this study is to compare the accuracy of object-oriented classification (random forest algorithm combined with vector layer coming from segmentation) to map winter crop (barley, rapeseed, grasslands and wheat) and soil states (bare soils with different surface roughness) using quasi-synchronous images. Satellite data are composed of multi-frequency and multi-polarization (HH, VV, HV and VH) images acquired near the 14th of April, 2010, over a studied area (90km²) located close to Toulouse in France. This is a region of alluvial plains and hills, which are mostly mixed farming and governed by a temperate climate. Remote sensing images are provided by Formosat-2 (04/18), Radarsat-2 (C-band, 04/15), Terrasar-X (X-band, 04/14) and ALOS (L-band, 04/14). Ground data are collected

  7. Assessment of dyssynchronous wall motion during acute myocardial ischemia using velocity vector imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kasumi; Asanuma, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Asuka; Uranishi, Ayumi; Ishikura, Fuminobu; Beppu, Shintaro

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of velocity vector imaging (VVI) for detecting acute myocardial ischemia and whether VVI can accurately demonstrate the spatial extent of ischemic risk area. Using a tracking algorithm, VVI can display velocity vectors of regional wall motion overlaid onto the B-mode image and allows the quantitative assessment of myocardial mechanics. However, its efficacy for diagnosing myocardial ischemia has not been evaluated. In 18 dogs with flow-limiting stenosis and/or total occlusion of the coronary artery, peak systolic radial velocity (V(SYS)), radial velocity at mitral valve opening (V(MVO)), peak systolic radial strain, and the percent change in wall thickening (%WT) were measured in the normal and risk areas and compared to those at baseline. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting the stenosis and occlusion were analyzed in each parameter. The area of inward velocity vectors at mitral valve opening (MVO) detected by VVI was compared to the risk area derived from real-time myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Twelve image clips were randomly selected from the baseline, stenosis, and occlusions to determine the intra- and inter-observer agreement for the VVI parameters. The left circumflex coronary flow was reduced by 44.3 +/- 9.0% during stenosis and completely interrupted during occlusion. During coronary artery occlusion, inward motion at MVO was observed in the risk area. Percent WT, peak systolic radial strain, V(SYS), and V(MVO) changed significantly from values at baseline. During stenosis, %WT, peak systolic radial strain, and V(SYS) did not differ from those at baseline; however, V(MVO) was significantly increased (-0.12 +/- 0.60 cm/s vs. -0.96 +/- 0.55 cm/s, p = 0.015). Sensitivity and specificity of V(MVO) for detecting ischemia were superior to those of other parameters. The spatial extent of inward velocity vectors at MVO correlated well with that of the risk area derived from MCE

  8. Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science Lecture: Thermophotonic and Photoacoustic Radar Imaging Methods for Biomedical and Dental Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelis, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    In the first part of this presentation I will introduce thermophotonic radar imaging principles and techniques using chirped or binary-phase-coded modulation, methods which can break through the maximum detection depth/depth resolution limitations of conventional photothermal waves. Using matched-filter principles, a methodology enabling parabolic diffusion-wave energy fields to exhibit energy localization akin to propagating hyperbolic wave-fields has been developed. It allows for deconvolution of individual responses of superposed axially discrete sources, opening a new field: depth-resolved thermal coherence tomography. Several examples from dental enamel caries diagnostic imaging to metal subsurface defect thermographic imaging will be discussed. The second part will introduce the field of photoacoustic radar (or sonar) biomedical imaging. I will report the development of a novel biomedical imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection and processing coupled with a beamforming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Utilization of specific chirped modulation waveforms (``waveform engineering'') achieves dramatic signal-to-noise-ratio increase and improved axial resolution over pulsed laser photoacoustics. The talk will conclude with aspects of instrumental sensitivity of the PA Radar to optical contrast using cancerous breast tissue-mimicking phantoms, super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast enhancement agents and in-vivo tissue samples.

  9. High-resolution nondestructive testing of multilayer dielectric materials using wideband microwave synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hee; James, Robin; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-04-01

    Fiber Reinforced Polymer or Plastic (FRP) composites have been rapidly increasing in the aerospace, automotive and marine industry, and civil engineering, because these composites show superior characteristics such as outstanding strength and stiffness, low weight, as well as anti-corrosion and easy production. Generally, the advancement of materials calls for correspondingly advanced methods and technologies for inspection and failure detection during production or maintenance, especially in the area of nondestructive testing (NDT). Among numerous inspection techniques, microwave sensing methods can be effectively used for NDT of FRP composites. FRP composite materials can be produced using various structures and materials, and various defects or flaws occur due to environmental conditions encountered during operation. However, reliable, low-cost, and easy-to-operate NDT methods have not been developed and tested. FRP composites are usually produced as multilayered structures consisting of fiber plate, matrix and core. Therefore, typical defects appearing in FRP composites are disbondings, delaminations, object inclusions, and certain kinds of barely visible impact damages. In this paper, we propose a microwave NDT method, based on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging algorithms, for stand-off imaging of internal delaminations. When a microwave signal is incident on a multilayer dielectric material, the reflected signal provides a good response to interfaces and transverse cracks. An electromagnetic wave model is introduced to delineate interface widths or defect depths from the reflected waves. For the purpose of numerical analysis and simulation, multilayered composite samples with various artificial defects are assumed, and their SAR images are obtained and analyzed using a variety of high-resolution wideband waveforms.

  10. Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of 3D Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Imaging of the Interior of Primitive Solar System Bodies: Comets and Asteroids Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To probe the interior of a comet, we are going to employ Radar Reflection Imager (RRI) Instrument on an orbiting platform. While orbiting around the comet at a safe...

  11. A Dielectric-Filled Waveguide Antenna Element for 3D Imaging Radar in High Temperature and Excessive Dust Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional information of the burden surface in high temperature and excessive dust industrial conditions has been previously hard to obtain. This paper presents a novel microstrip-fed dielectric-filled waveguide antenna element which is resistant to dust and high temperatures. A novel microstrip-to-dielectric-loaded waveguide transition was developed. A cylinder and cuboid composite structure was employed at the terminal of the antenna element, which improved the return loss performance and reduced the size. The proposed antenna element was easily integrated into a T-shape multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO imaging radar system and tested in both the laboratory environment and real blast furnace environment. The measurement results show that the proposed antenna element works very well in industrial 3D imaging radar.

  12. Reconstruction and deterministic prediction of ocean waves from synthetic radar images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijaya, Andreas Parama

    2017-01-01

    A marine X-band radar is a device that scans the surrounding ocean waves up to distances of some 2 km. A rotating antenna emits electromagnetic beams that are reflected at the water surface and partly received by the antenna and stored as intensity plots every radar rotation time. The coverage of a

  13. Ship heading and velocity analysis by wake detection in SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Maria Daniela; D'Errico, Marco; Rufino, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of ship-route estimation, a wake detection method is developed and applied to COSMO/SkyMed and TerraSAR-X Stripmap SAR images over the Gulf of Naples, Italy. In order to mitigate the intrinsic limitations of the threshold logic, the algorithm identifies the wake features according to the hydrodynamic theory. A post-detection validation phase is performed to classify the features as real wake structures by means of merit indexes defined in the intensity domain. After wake reconstruction, ship heading is evaluated on the basis of turbulent wake direction and ship velocity is estimated by both techniques of azimuth shift and Kelvin pattern wavelength. The method is tested over 34 ship wakes identified by visual inspection in both HH and VV images at different incidence angles. For all wakes, no missed detections are reported and at least the turbulent and one narrow-V wakes are correctly identified, with ship heading successfully estimated. Also, the azimuth shift method is applied to estimate velocity for the 10 ships having route with sufficient angular separation from the satellite ground track. In one case ship velocity is successfully estimated with both methods, showing agreement within 14%.

  14. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  15. A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried perfect electric conductors within the physical optics approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, Burak; Meincke, Peter

    2004-01-01

    A forward model for ground penetrating radar imaging of buried 3-D perfect electric conductors is addressed within the framework of diffraction tomography. The similarity of the present forward model derived within the physical optics approximation with that derived within the first Born...... approximation in an earlier investigation highlights analytically the reasons lying under the success of the Born models in identifying perfect electric conductors....

  16. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.G.; Davis, S.J.; Kessler, W.J.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. (Physical Sciences, Inc., Andover, MA (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties. 13 refs.

  17. Imaging earth's interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, R.J.

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth's mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  18. Imaging earth`s interior: Tomographic inversions for mantle P-wave velocity structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulliam, Robert Jay [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-07-01

    A formalism is developed for the tomographic inversion of seismic travel time residuals. The travel time equations are solved both simultaneously, for velocity model terms and corrections to the source locations, and progressively, for each set of terms in succession. The methods differ primarily in their treatment of source mislocation terms. Additionally, the system of equations is solved directly, neglecting source terms. The efficacy of the algorithms is explored with synthetic data as we perform simulations of the general procedure used to produce tomographic images of Earth`s mantle from global earthquake data. The patterns of seismic heterogeneity in the mantle that would be returned reliably by a tomographic inversion are investigated. We construct synthetic data sets based on real ray sampling of the mantle by introducing spherical harmonic patterns of velocity heterogeneity and perform inversions of the synthetic data.

  19. Three-dimensional subsurface imaging synthetic aperture radar (3D SISAR). Final report, September 22, 1993--September 22, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The concept developed under this applied research and development contract is a novel Ground Penetrating Radar system capable of remotely detecting, analyzing, and mapping buried waste containers from a mobile platform. From the testing and analysis performed to date, the 3-D SISAR has achieved the detection, accurate location, and three-dimensional imaging of buried test objects from a stand-off geometry. Tests have demonstrated that underground objects have been located to within 0.1 meter of their actual position. This work validates that the key elements of the approach are performing as anticipated. The stand-off synthetic aperture radar (SAR) methodology has been demonstrated to be a feasible approach as a remote sensing technique. The radar sensor constructed under this project is providing adequate quality data for imaging, and the matched filters have been demonstrated to provide enhanced target detection. Additional work is on-going in the area of underground propagation and scattering phenomena to provide enhanced depth performance, as the current imaging results have been limited to a few feet of depth underground.

  20. Non-Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Nanoparticle Migration and Water Velocity Inside Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, V. R.; Shukla, M.; Vallatos, A.; Riley, M. S.; Tellam, J. H.; Holmes, W. M.

    2015-12-01

    Manufactured nanoparticles (NPs) are already utilized in a diverse array of applications, including cosmetics, optics, medical technology, textiles and catalysts. Problematically, once in the natural environment, NPs can have a wide range of toxic effects. To protect groundwater from detrimental NPs we must be able to predict nanoparticle movement within the aquifer. The often complex transport behavior of nanoparticles ensures the development of NP transport models is not a simple task. To enhance our understanding of NP transport processes, we utilize novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which enables us to look inside the rock and image the movement of nanoparticles within. For this, we use nanoparticles that are paramagnetic, making them visible to the MRI and enabling us to collect spatially resolved data from which we can develop more robust transport models. In this work, a core of Bentheimer sandstone (3 x 7 cm) was saturated with water and imaged inside a 7Tesla Bruker Biospec MRI. Firstly the porosity of the core was mapped using a MSME MRI sequence. Prior to imaging NP transport, the velocity of water (in absence on nanoparticles) was mapped using an APGSTE-RARE sequence. Nano-magnetite nanoparticles were then pumped into the core and their transport through the core was imaged using a RARE sequence. These images were calibrated using T2 parameter maps to provide fully quantitative maps of nanoparticle concentration at regular time intervals throughout the column (T2 being the spin-spin relaxation time of 1H nuclei). This work demonstrated we are able to spatially resolve porosity, water velocity and nanoparticle movement, inside rock, using a single technique (MRI). Significantly, this provides us with a unique and powerful dataset from which we are now developing new models of nanoparticle transport.

  1. Application of Deep Networks to Oil Spill Detection Using Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guandong Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR remote sensing provides an outstanding tool in oil spill detection and classification, for its advantages in distinguishing mineral oil and biogenic lookalikes. Various features can be extracted from polarimetric SAR data. The large number and correlated nature of polarimetric SAR features make the selection and optimization of these features impact on the performance of oil spill classification algorithms. In this paper, deep learning algorithms such as the stacked autoencoder (SAE and deep belief network (DBN are applied to optimize the polarimetric feature sets and reduce the feature dimension through layer-wise unsupervised pre-training. An experiment was conducted on RADARSAT-2 quad-polarimetric SAR image acquired during the Norwegian oil-on-water exercise of 2011, in which verified mineral, emulsions, and biogenic slicks were analyzed. The results show that oil spill classification achieved by deep networks outperformed both support vector machine (SVM and traditional artificial neural networks (ANN with similar parameter settings, especially when the number of training data samples is limited.

  2. a Semi-Rigorous Sensor Model for Precision Geometric Processing of Mini-Rf Bistatic Radar Images of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, R. L.; Barrett, J. M.; Wahl, D. E.; Erteza, I.; Jackowatz, C. V.; Yocky, D. A.; Turner, S.; Bussey, D. B. J.; Paterson, G. W.

    2016-06-01

    The spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instruments known as Mini-RF were designed to image shadowed areas of the lunar poles and assay the presence of ice deposits by quantitative polarimetry. We have developed radargrammetric processing techniques to enhance the value of these observations by removing spacecraft ephemeris errors and distortions caused by topographic parallax so the polarimetry can be compared with other data sets. Here we report on the extension of this capability from monostatic imaging (signal transmitted and received on the same spacecraft) to bistatic (transmission from Earth and reception on the spacecraft) which provides a unique opportunity to measure radar scattering at nonzero phase angles. In either case our radargrammetric sensor models first reconstruct the observed range and Doppler frequency from recorded image coordinates, then determine the ground location with a corrected trajectory on a more detailed topographic surface. The essential difference for bistatic radar is that range and Doppler shift depend on the transmitter as well as receiver trajectory. Incidental differences include the preparation of the images in a different (map projected) coordinate system and use of "squint" (i.e., imaging at nonzero rather than zero Doppler shift) to achieve the desired phase angle. Our approach to the problem is to reconstruct the time-of-observation, range, and Doppler shift of the image pixel by pixel in terms of rigorous geometric optics, then fit these functions with low-order polynomials accurate to a small fraction of a pixel. Range and Doppler estimated by using these polynomials can then be georeferenced rigorously on a new surface with an updated trajectory. This "semi-rigorous" approach (based on rigorous physics but involving fitting functions) speeds the calculation and avoids the need to manage both the original and adjusted trajectory data. We demonstrate the improvement in registration of the bistatic images for

  3. Convex array vector velocity imaging using transverse oscillation and its optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2015-12-01

    A method for obtaining vector flow images using the transverse oscillation (TO) approach on a convex array is presented. The paper presents optimization schemes for TO fields and evaluates their performance using simulations and measurements with an experimental scanner. A 3-MHz 192-element convex array probe (pitch 0.33 mm) is used in both simulations and measurements. A parabolic velocity profile is simulated at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The optimization routine changes the lateral oscillation period λ࠭ as a function of depth to yield the best possible estimates based on the energy ratio between positive and negative spatial frequencies in the ultrasound field. The energy ratio is reduced from -17.1 dB to -22.1 dB. Parabolic profiles are estimated on simulated data using 16 emissions. The optimization gives a reduction in standard deviation from 8.81% to 7.4% for 16 emissions, with a reduction in lateral velocity bias from -15.93% to 0.78% at 90° (transverse flow) at a depth of 40 mm. Measurements have been performed using the experimental ultrasound scanner and a convex array transducer. A bias of -0.93% was obtained at 87° for a parabolic velocity profile along with a standard deviation of 6.37%. The livers of two healthy volunteers were scanned using the experimental setup. The in vivo images demonstrate that the method yields realistic estimates with a consistent angle and mean velocity across three heart cycles.

  4. Imaging Main-Ion and Impurity Velocities for Understanding Impurity Transport in the Tokamak Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, Cameron

    2017-10-01

    Imaging of ion velocities throughout the scrape off layer (SOL) combined with 2D and 3D numerical fluid modeling is establishing the roles of frictional coupling, ion-thermal forces, and parallel pressure gradients in determining impurity and momentum transport on open magnetic field lines. Velocity measurements of C2+impurity ions alongside He+ main-ion species enabled the first quantitative measurements of the entrainment of impurity velocities with the main ion species in the divertor and main-chamber SOL. Changing poloidal location of the parallel-B flow stagnation point in H-mode plasmas has been observed as has velocity slowing in both species of up to 10km/s at the mid-plane during detachment. In these cases the direction of the flow relative to the magnetic field direction implies cross-field drift effects are important for determining parallel transport along field lines. UEDGE simulations of these plasmas identify how the ratio of frictional and grad-Ti forces balance to determine bulk impurity transport; the degree of entrainment of impurities is expected to vary throughout the SOL, and as a function of power and density. These 2D measurements have been achieved using two coherence imaging spectroscopy systems on DIII-D calibrated with a tunable diode laser to a velocity accuracy better than 1 km/s. In addition, 3D C2+flow perturbations were observed in the vicinity of large coherent n=1 islands produced by external RMP coils. A poloidally alternating pattern of acceleration and deceleration, correlated to island positions, was observed with local velocity changes up to 10km/s and a length scale of 30-40cm. Comparison with EMC3-EIRENE simulations indicate that these perturbations result from temperature-driven parallel pressure gradients. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC52-07NA27344 and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  5. A New Imaging Tool for Realtime Measurement of Flow Velocity in Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, Athanasios K.; Kaschner, Marius; Cornelius, Jan F.; Kamp, Marcel A.; Tortora, Angelo; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Turowski, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    With modern imaging modalities of the brain a significant number of unruptured aneurysms are detected. However, not every aneurysm is prone to rupture. Because treatment morbidity is about 10% it is crucial to identify unstable aneurysms for which treatment should be discussed. Recently, new imaging tools allow analysis of flow dynamics and wall stability have become available. It seems that they might provide additional data for better risk profiling. In this study we present a new imaging tool for analysis of flow dynamics, which calculates fluid velocity in an aneurysm (Phillips Electronics, N.V.). It may identify regions with high flow and calculate flow reduction after stenting of aneurysms. Contrast is injected with a stable injection speed of 2 mL/sec for 3 sec. Two clinical cases are illustrated. Velocity in aneurysms and areas of instability can be identified and calculated during angiography in real-time. After stenting and flow diverter deployment flow reduction in the internal carotid aneurysm was reduced by 60% and there was a reduction of about 65% in the posterior cerebral artery in the second case we are reporting. The dynamic flow software calculates the flow profile in the aneurysm immediately after contrast injection. It is a real-time, patient specific tool taking into account systole, diastole and flexibility of the vasculature. These factors are an improvement as compared to current models of computational flow dynamics. We think it is a highly efficient, user friendly tool. Further clinical studies are on their way. PMID:28839527

  6. Motor unit action potential conduction velocity estimated from surface electromyographic signals using image processing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fabiano Araujo; Carvalho, João Luiz Azevedo; Miosso, Cristiano Jacques; de Andrade, Marcelino Monteiro; da Rocha, Adson Ferreira

    2015-09-17

    In surface electromyography (surface EMG, or S-EMG), conduction velocity (CV) refers to the velocity at which the motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) propagate along the muscle fibers, during contractions. The CV is related to the type and diameter of the muscle fibers, ion concentration, pH, and firing rate of the motor units (MUs). The CV can be used in the evaluation of contractile properties of MUs, and of muscle fatigue. The most popular methods for CV estimation are those based on maximum likelihood estimation (MLE). This work proposes an algorithm for estimating CV from S-EMG signals, using digital image processing techniques. The proposed approach is demonstrated and evaluated, using both simulated and experimentally-acquired multichannel S-EMG signals. We show that the proposed algorithm is as precise and accurate as the MLE method in typical conditions of noise and CV. The proposed method is not susceptible to errors associated with MUAP propagation direction or inadequate initialization parameters, which are common with the MLE algorithm. Image processing -based approaches may be useful in S-EMG analysis to extract different physiological parameters from multichannel S-EMG signals. Other new methods based on image processing could also be developed to help solving other tasks in EMG analysis, such as estimation of the CV for individual MUs, localization and tracking of innervation zones, and study of MU recruitment strategies.

  7. VELOCITY FIELD COMPUTATION IN VIBRATED GRANULAR MEDIA USING AN OPTICAL FLOW BASED MULTISCALE IMAGE ANALYSIS METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Debayle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An image analysis method has been developed in order to compute the velocity field of a granular medium (sand grains, mean diameter 600 μm submitted to different kinds of mechanical stresses. The differential method based on optical flow conservation consists in describing a dense motion field with vectors associated to each pixel. A multiscale, coarse-to-fine, analytical approach through tailor sized windows yields the best compromise between accuracy and robustness of the results, while enabling an acceptable computation time. The corresponding algorithmis presented and its validation discussed through different tests. The results of the validation tests of the proposed approach show that the method is satisfactory when attributing specific values to parameters in association with the size of the image analysis window. An application in the case of vibrated sand has been studied. An instrumented laboratory device provides sinusoidal vibrations and enables external optical observations of sand motion in 3D transparent boxes. At 50 Hz, by increasing the relative acceleration G, the onset and development of two convective rolls can be observed. An ultra fast camera records the grain avalanches, and several pairs of images are analysed by the proposed method. The vertical velocity profiles are deduced and allow to precisely quantify the dimensions of the fluidized region as a function of G.

  8. A new imaging tool for realtime measurement of flow velocity in intracranial aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios K. Petridis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available With modern imaging modalities of the brain a significant number of unruptured aneurysms are detected. However, not every aneurysm is prone to rupture. Because treatment morbidity is about 10% it is crucial to identify unstable aneurysms for which treatment should be discussed. Recently, new imaging tools allow analysis of flow dynamics and wall stability have become available. It seems that they might provide additional data for better risk profiling. In this study we present a new imaging tool for analysis of flow dynamics, which calculates fluid velocity in an aneurysm (Phillips Electronics, N.V.. It may identify regions with high flow and calculate flow reduction after stenting of aneurysms. Contrast is injected with a stable injection speed of 2 mL/sec for 3 sec. Two clinical cases are illustrated. Velocity in aneurysms and areas of instability can be identified and calculated during angiography in real-time. After stenting and flow diverter deployment flow reduction in the internal carotid aneurysm was reduced by 60% and there was a reduction of about 65% in the posterior cerebral artery in the second case we are reporting. The dynamic flow software calculates the flow profile in the aneurysm immediately after contrast injection. It is a real-time, patient specific tool taking into account systole, diastole and flexibility of the vasculature. These factors are an improvement as compared to current models of computational flow dynamics. We think it is a highly efficient, user friendly tool. Further clinical studies are on their way.

  9. A novel aerodynamic sizing method for pharmaceutical aerosols using image-based analysis of settling velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Sznitman, Josué

    2017-06-01

    This article discusses a novel method to estimate aerodynamic particle size distributions (APSDs) of pharmaceutical aerosols through direct measurement of particle settling velocities using image-based analysis and particle tracking techniques. This simple, optical method provides accurate and fast measurements (approximately 1 minute) with few sources of bias due to specific device design choices or operation conditions. A proof-of-concept for the method is demonstrated by measuring APSDs for widely available commercial dry powder inhalers (DPIs), then comparing the results with previously published data from cascade impactors (CIs) and the Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS).

  10. System and method for investigating sub-surface features and 3D imaging of non-linear property, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Cung Khac; Skelt, Christopher; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Ten Cate, James A.; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Larmat, Carene S.

    2015-06-02

    A system and a method for generating a three-dimensional image of a rock formation, compressional velocity VP, shear velocity VS and velocity ratio VP/VS of a rock formation are provided. A first acoustic signal includes a first plurality of pulses. A second acoustic signal from a second source includes a second plurality of pulses. A detected signal returning to the borehole includes a signal generated by a non-linear mixing process from the first and second acoustic signals in a non-linear mixing zone within an intersection volume. The received signal is processed to extract the signal over noise and/or signals resulting from linear interaction and the three dimensional image of is generated.

  11. Magnetic resonance velocity imaging derived pressure differential using control volume analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis and treatment of hydrocephalus is hindered by a lack of systemic understanding of the interrelationships between pressures and flow of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. Control volume analysis provides a fluid physics approach to quantify and relate pressure and flow information. The objective of this study was to use control volume analysis and magnetic resonance velocity imaging to non-invasively estimate pressure differentials in vitro. Method A flow phantom was constructed and water was the experimental fluid. The phantom was connected to a high-resolution differential pressure sensor and a computer controlled pump producing sinusoidal flow. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements were taken and subsequently analyzed to derive pressure differential waveforms using momentum conservation principles. Independent sensor measurements were obtained for comparison. Results Using magnetic resonance data the momentum balance in the phantom was computed. The measured differential pressure force had amplitude of 14.4 dynes (pressure gradient amplitude 0.30 Pa/cm. A 12.5% normalized root mean square deviation between derived and directly measured pressure differential was obtained. These experiments demonstrate one example of the potential utility of control volume analysis and the concepts involved in its application. Conclusions This study validates a non-invasive measurement technique for relating velocity measurements to pressure differential. These methods may be applied to clinical measurements to estimate pressure differentials in vivo which could not be obtained with current clinical sensors.

  12. Fetal cardiac muscle contractility decreases with gestational age: a color-coded tissue velocity imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmstedt Nina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Present data regarding how the fetal heart works and develops throughout gestation is limited. However, the possibility to analyze the myocardial velocity profile provides new possibilities to gain further knowledge in this area. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate human fetal myocardial characteristics and deformation properties using color-coded tissue velocity imaging (TVI. Methods TVI recordings from 55 healthy fetuses, at 18 to 42 weeks of gestation, were acquired at a frame rate of 201–273 frames/s for offline analysis using software enabling retrieval of the myocardial velocity curve and 2D anatomical information. The measurements were taken from an apical four-chamber view, and the acquired data was correlated using regression analysis. Results Left ventricular length and width increased uniformly with gestational age. Atrioventricular plane displacement and the E’/A’ ratio also increased with gestational age, while a longitudinal shortening was demonstrated. Conclusions Fetal cardiac muscle contractility decreases with gestational age. As numerous fetal- and pregnancy-associated conditions directly influence the pumping function of the fetal heart, we believe that this new insight into the physiology of the human fetal cardiovascular system could contribute to make diagnosis and risk assessment easier and more accurate.

  13. BOREAS AFM-06 NOAA/ETL 35 GHz Cloud/Turbulence Radar GIF Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The BOREAS AFM-06 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 35 GHz cloud-sensing radar...

  14. 2002/2003 IfSAR data for Southern California: Radar Reflectance Image

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata document describes the collection and processing of topographic elevation point data derived from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IfSAR)...

  15. Analysis of polarimetric synthetic aperture radar and passive visible light polarimetric imaging data fusion for remote sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Sanjit

    The recent launch of spaceborne (TerraSAR-X, RADARSAT-2, ALOS-PALSAR, RISAT) and airborne (SIRC, AIRSAR, UAVSAR, PISAR) polarimetric radar sensors, with capability of imaging through day and night in almost all weather conditions, has made polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) image interpretation and analysis an active area of research. PolSAR image classification is sensitive to object orientation and scattering properties. In recent years, significant work has been done in many areas including agriculture, forestry, oceanography, geology, terrain analysis. Visible light passive polarimetric imaging has also emerged as a powerful tool in remote sensing for enhanced information extraction. The intensity image provides information on materials in the scene while polarization measurements capture surface features, roughness, and shading, often uncorrelated with the intensity image. Advantages of visible light polarimetric imaging include high dynamic range of polarimetric signatures and being comparatively straightforward to build and calibrate. This research is about characterization and analysis of the basic scattering mechanisms for information fusion between PolSAR and passive visible light polarimetric imaging. Relationships between these two modes of imaging are established using laboratory measurements and image simulations using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool. A novel low cost laboratory based S-band (2.4GHz) PolSAR instrument is developed that is capable of capturing 4 channel fully polarimetric SAR image data. Simple radar targets are formed and system calibration is performed in terms of radar cross-section. Experimental measurements are done using combination of the PolSAR instrument with visible light polarimetric imager for scenes capturing basic scattering mechanisms for phenomenology studies. The three major scattering mechanisms studied in this research include single, double and multiple bounce. Single

  16. Utilizing ground penetrating radar to image vents and fractures in geothermal ennvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, A. J.; Lynne, B.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures act as vents allowing gases and thermal water to discharge at the surface from deep geothermal reservoirs. Knowledge of these geothermal environments, and the faults they run along, has been limited to deep geophysics and exposures available by surface mapping. The aim of this research is to display the utility of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to image vent and fracture pathways within the context of a more comprehensive study into the applicability of this geophysical tool in mapping the shallow subsurface of geothermal areas. GPR transmits short pulses of high-frequency electromagnetic energy into the ground and detects the reflected signals identifying buried objects or boundary surfaces. GPR has been successfully utilized in many geologic settings, including mapping rock fractures, but our research is the first to utilize this geophysical technique in a range of geothermal environments. Hot spring water discharges through vents often along fractures to form siliceous sinter or carbonate travertine hot spring rocks. These vents may self seal overtime, but the sinter or travertine deposit and their geothermal source at depth can be preserved for thousands of years after hot spring discharge ceases. Subsequently these hot spring rocks can become fractured with potential as a gas-migration pathway. Since this formative hot spring water and ascending gases are associated with a deeper geothermal resource, the directionality of these conduits contributes to our understanding of the deeper reservoir. Our initial research in both the United States and New Zealand showed that GPR was successful in imaging sinter and travertine deposits to depths greater than 7 meters with decimetre resolution. Then GPR transects specifically collected over vents and fractures exposed in sinter outcrop showed that the geophysical records compared well with the geological cross-sections. GPR profiles were then collected over open vents, fractures and areas of steaming ground

  17. Ground Penetrating Radar Successful In Imaging Hot Spring Deposits: A New Geothermal Exploration Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynne, B.; Dougherty, A.

    2010-12-01

    Discharging alkali chloride hot springs are surface expressions of a deeper geothermal reservoir. As the discharging hot spring fluid cools, silica carried in solution precipitates and entombs all components (e.g., microbes) within a hot spring channel. This silica accumulates to form rocks referred to as siliceous sinters. Geothermal reservoirs and sinter deposits remain long after hot spring discharge ceases. Therefore ancient sinters provide a direct link with a deeper potentially exploitable geothermal resource in areas where there are no present-day actively discharging hot springs. High, mid and low-temperature microbes create distinctive environmentally-significant textures resulting in a heterogeneous sinter. The recognition of preserved active sinter textures enables mapping of former high temperature vent to low temperature distal-apron flow pathways. Sinter dates enable tracking of fluid flow to the surface, providing a regional context of fluid movement. Sinters undergo diagenesis that involves a five step opal-A to quartz silica phase modification that is accompanied by a density increase and porosity decrease. However, even quartzose sinters retain porosity values of 5-20 %. Textural variation is preserved over time, with a range in density and porosity values, which in addition to the low conductive/highly resistive silica material make GPR a suitable tool for imaging buried sinters. Previously, geologists have been constrained to only examining sinters in locations where they are partially exposed. Our preliminary results from both New Zealand and the United States of America show Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was successful in extending this sinter research into the shallow subsurface by: (1) imaging through opal-A to quartzose sinter deposits; (2) mapping high to low temperature environments such as vents and distal-apron terracettes; (3) locating the true spatial extent of partially buried sinters; (4) imaging completely buried sinters. The

  18. Velocity-based cardiac contractility personalization from images using derivative-free optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ken C L; Sermesant, Maxime; Rhode, Kawal; Ginks, Matthew; Rinaldi, C Aldo; Razavi, Reza; Delingette, Hervé; Ayache, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Model personalization is a key aspect for biophysical models to impact clinical practice, and cardiac contractility personalization from medical images is a major step in this direction. Existing gradient-based optimization approaches show promising results of identifying the maximum contractility from images, but the contraction and relaxation rates are not accounted for. A main reason is the limited choices of objective functions when their gradients are required. For complicated cardiac models, analytical evaluations of gradients are very difficult if not impossible, and finite difference approximations are computationally expensive and may introduce numerical difficulties. By removing such limitations with derivative-free optimization, we found that a velocity-based objective function can properly identify regional maximum contraction stresses, contraction rates, and relaxation rates simultaneously with intact model complexity. Experiments on synthetic data show that the parameters are better identified using the velocity-based objective function than its position-based counterpart, and the proposed framework is insensitive to initial parameters with the adopted derivative-free optimization algorithm. Experiments on clinical data show that the framework can provide personalized contractility parameters which are consistent with the underlying physiologies of the patients and healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Towards high velocity deformation characterisation of metals and composites using Digital Image Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulieu-Barton J.M.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterisation of materials subject to high velocity deformation is necessary as many materials behave differently under such conditions. It is particularly important for accurate numerical simulation of high strain rate events. High velocity servo-hydraulic test machines have enabled material testing in the strain rate regime from 1 – 500 ε/s. The range is much lower than that experienced under ballistic, shock or impact loads, nevertheless it is a useful starting point for the application of optical techniques. The present study examines the possibility of using high speed cameras to capture images and then extracting deformation data using Digital Image Correlation (DIC from tensile testing in the intermediate strain rate regime available with the test machines. Three different materials, aluminium alloy 1050, S235 steel and glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP were tested at different nominal strain rates ranging from quasi static to 200 ε/s. In all cases DIC was able to analyse data collected up to fracture and in some cases post fracture. The use of highspeed DIC made it possible to capture phenomena such as multiple necking in the aluminium specimens and post compression failure in GFRP specimens.

  20. A multi-plate velocity-map imaging design for high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregel, Steven J.; Thurston, Glen K.; Zhou, Jia; Garand, Etienne

    2017-09-01

    A velocity map imaging (VMI) setup consisting of multiple electrodes with three adjustable voltage parameters, designed for slow electron velocity map imaging applications, is presented. The motivations for this design are discussed in terms of parameters that influence the VMI resolution and functionality. Particularly, this VMI has two tunable potentials used to adjust for optimal focus, yielding good VMI focus across a relatively large energy range. It also allows for larger interaction volumes without significant sacrifice to the resolution via a smaller electric gradient at the interaction region. All the electrodes in this VMI have the same dimensions for practicality and flexibility, allowing for relatively easy modifications to suit different experimental needs. We have coupled this VMI to a cryogenic ion trap mass spectrometer that has a flexible source design. The performance is demonstrated with the photoelectron spectra of S- and CS2 -. The latter has a long vibrational progression in the ground state, and the temperature dependence of the vibronic features is probed by changing the temperature of the ion trap.

  1. High-resolution laser radar for 3D imaging in artwork cataloging, reproduction, and restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Roberto; Fantoni, Roberta; Ferri de Collibus, Mario; Fornetti, Giorgio G.; Guarneri, Massimiliano; Poggi, Claudio

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution Amplitude Modulated Laser Radar (AM-LR) sensor has recently been developed, aimed at accurately reconstructing 3D digital models of real targets, either single objects or complex scenes. The sensor sounding beam can be swept linearly across the object or circularly around it, by placing the object on a controlled rotating platform, enabling to obtain respectively linear and cylindrical range maps. Both amplitude and phase shift of the modulating wave of back-scattered light are collected and processed, providing respectively a shade-free, high resolution, photographic-like picture and accurate range data in the form of a range image. The resolution of range measurements depends mainly on the laser modulation frequency, provided that the power of the backscattered light reaching the detector is at least a few nW (current best performances are ~100 μm). The complete object surface can be reconstructed from the sampled points by using specifically developed software tools. The system has been successfully applied to scan different types of real surfaces (stone, wood, alloys, bones), with relevant applications in different fields, ranging from industrial machining to medical diagnostics, to vision in hostile environments. Examples of artwork reconstructed models (pottery, marble statues) are presented and the relevance of this technology for reverse engineering applied to cultural heritage conservation and restoration are discussed. Final 3D models can be passed to numeric control machines for rapid-prototyping, exported in standard formats for CAD/CAM purposes and made available on the Internet by adopting a virtual museum paradigm, thus possibly enabling specialists to perform remote inspections on high resolution digital reproductions of hardly accessible masterpieces.

  2. Two-beam-coupling correlator for synthetic aperture radar image recognition with power-law scattering centers preenhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Saeed, Bahareh; Woods, Charles L; Kierstead, John; Khoury, Jed

    2008-06-01

    Synthetic radar image recognition is an area of interest for military applications including automatic target recognition, air traffic control, and remote sensing. Here a dynamic range compression two-beam-coupling joint transform correlator for detecting synthetic aperture radar targets is utilized. The joint input image consists of a prepower-law, enhanced scattering center of the input image and a linearly synthesized power-law-enhanced scattering center template. Enhancing the scattering center of both the synthetic template and the input image furnishes the conditions for achieving dynamic range compression correlation in two-beam coupling. Dynamic range compression (a) enhances the signal-to-noise ratio, (b) enhances the high frequencies relative to low frequencies, and (c) converts the noise to high frequency components. This improves the correlation-peak intensity to the mean of the surrounding noise significantly. Dynamic range compression correlation has already been demonstrated to outperform many optimal correlation filters in detecting signals in severe noise environments. The performance is evaluated via established metrics such as peak-to-correlation energy, Horner efficiency, and correlation-peak intensity. The results showed significant improvement as the power increased.

  3. Shear-Velocity Imaging of the Alpine Lithosphere from Ambient Noise: Validation Against Earthquake Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaestle, Emanuel David; Boschi, Lapo; Meier, Thomas; Soomro, Riaz; Rosenberg, Claudio; Bellahsen, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    Seismic ambient noise, i.e. seismic signals generated by the coupling of atmosphere and oceans with the solid Earth, have been used extensively over the last decade to derive velocity models of the subsurface. The so-called ambient- noise method benefits from the increasing number of available seismic stations; central Europe, for instance, is now covered by a set of extremely dense seismic networks. We assemble a new database of ambient-noise-based surface-wave dispersion, and validate it by comparison with the more established two-station method, based on earthquake measurements. In ambient-noise theory, the averaging of cross-correlated signals from a specific station couple over a long time period gives an estimate of the empiric Green's function between the two stations where destructive interference will cancel all uncorrelated source signals. However, the Green's function is reproduced correctly only when the distribution of noise sources is truly random, which is clearly not the case in reality. On the other hand, the two-station method uses surface waves generated by earthquakes whose epicenters are aligned with the station couple of interest. The phase spectra of the cross correlation can then be translated into phase velocities. We compare both methods, in order to confirm the validity of the ambient-noise approach both for Rayleigh and Love waves. The results are generally in good agreement and justify the simplifications made in the theoretical derivations. We invert the observed phase velocities to determine a high-resolution image of the Alpine subsurface; the frequency range of noise signals allows us to constrain the shear-velocity structure of the crust down to mid-lithospheric depth. This study is an extension of earlier efforts by Molinari, Verbeke, Boschi and co-workers. These efforts are the first steps toward the identification of a new, reference model of the European crust, taking advantage of a broad variety of data (e.g., joint inversion

  4. Imaging of active faults with the step continuous wave radar system. In case of Senzan faults in Awaji-island; Step shiki renzokuha chichu radar tansaho ni yoru katsudanso no imaging.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, K.; Hara, H.; Kasai, H.; Ito, M. [Kawasaki Geological Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshioka, T. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Validity of continuous wave radar exploration was verified when the said technique and some other probing methods were investigated at the Senzan Faults in Awaji Island. The signal transmitted by a continuous wave exploration system is a collection of sinusoidal waves different in frequency, and the frequencies are so controlled that they form steps relative to the sweep time. Exploration into great depths is carried out by prolonging the transmission signal sweep time, where high resolution is maintained by use of widened transmission frequency bandwidths. On-site measurements were made using a triplicated multichannel method, and electromagnetic wave propagation velocities required for depth conversion of the reflected cross section were determined in compliance with the wide angle method. On the basis of the analytical cross section using the profiles obtained by continuous radar reflection exploration conducted from the ground surface, interpretation was made of the geological structure. The presence and position and the geological development of the Senzan Faults were identified by the study of discontinuities in reflective structures such as the strata. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. In vitro particle image velocity measurements in a model root canal: flow around a polymer rotary finishing file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Jon D; Smith, Nicholas A; Garces, Daniel; Gao, Luyang; Olsen, F Kris

    2014-03-01

    Root canal irrigation is vital to thorough debridement and disinfection, but the mechanisms that contribute to its effectiveness are complex and uncertain. Traditionally, studies in this area have relied on before-and-after static comparisons to assess effectiveness, but new in situ tools are being developed to provide real-time assessments of irrigation. The aim in this work was to measure a cross section of the velocity field in the fluid flow around a polymer rotary finishing file in a model root canal. Fluorescent microparticles were seeded into an optically accessible acrylic root canal model. A polymer rotary finishing file was activated in a static position. After laser excitation, fluorescence from the microparticles was imaged onto a frame-transfer camera. Two consecutive images were cross-correlated to provide a measurement of a projected, 2-dimensional velocity field. The method reveals that fluid velocities can be much higher than the velocity of the file because of the shape of the file. Furthermore, these high velocities are in the axial direction of the canal rather than only in the direct of motion of the file. Particle image velocimetry indicates that fluid velocities induced by the rotating file can be much larger than the speed of the file. Particle image velocimetry can provide qualitative insight and quantitative measurements that may be useful for validating computational fluid dynamic models and connecting clinical observations to physical explanations in dental research. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Particle sizing of pharmaceutical aerosols via direct imaging of particle settling velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishler, Rami; Verhoeven, Frank; de Kruijf, Wilbur; Sznitman, Josué

    2018-02-15

    We present a novel method for characterizing in near real-time the aerodynamic particle size distributions from pharmaceutical inhalers. The proposed method is based on direct imaging of airborne particles followed by a particle-by-particle measurement of settling velocities using image analysis and particle tracking algorithms. Due to the simplicity of the principle of operation, this method has the potential of circumventing potential biases of current real-time particle analyzers (e.g. Time of Flight analysis), while offering a cost effective solution. The simple device can also be constructed in laboratory settings from off-the-shelf materials for research purposes. To demonstrate the feasibility and robustness of the measurement technique, we have conducted benchmark experiments whereby aerodynamic particle size distributions are obtained from several commercially-available dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Our measurements yield size distributions (i.e. MMAD and GSD) that are closely in line with those obtained from Time of Flight analysis and cascade impactors suggesting that our imaging-based method may embody an attractive methodology for rapid inhaler testing and characterization. In a final step, we discuss some of the ongoing limitations of the current prototype and conceivable routes for improving the technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Changes in left atrial deformation in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Evaluation by vector velocity imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Mahfouz Badran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM represents a generalized myopathic process affecting both ventricular and atrial myocardium. We assessed the global and regional left atrial (LA function and its relation to left ventricular (LV mechanics and clinical status in patients with HCM using Vector Velocity Imaging (VVI. Methods: VVI of the LA and LV was acquired from apical four- and two-chamber views of 108 HCM patients (age 40±19years, 56.5% men and 33 healthy subjects, all had normal LV systolic function. The LA subendocardium was traced to obtain atrial volumes, ejection fraction, velocities, and strain (ɛ/strain rate (SR measurements. Results: Left atrial reservoir (ɛsys,SRsys and conduit (early diastolic SRe function were significantly reduced in HCM compared to controls (P-1.8s-1 was 81% sensitive and 30% specific, SRa>-1.5s-1 was 73% sensitive and 40% specific. By multivariate analysis global LVɛsys and LV septal thickness are independent predictors for LAɛsys, while end systolic diameter is the only independent predictor for SRsys, P<.001. Conclusion: Left atrial reservoir and conduit function as measured by VVI were significantly impaired while contractile function was preserved among HCM patients. Left atrial deformation was greatly influenced by LV mechanics and correlated to severity of phenotype.

  8. Fast, large-scale, particle image velocimetry-based estimations of river surface velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, David W.; Todd Holland, K.; Calantoni, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    A modified high-speed implementation of cross-correlation (CC) based, large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) was used to estimate the surface velocity of a river with video collected from a gray-scale camera. To improve the quality of results in the high-noise low-signal environment, we introduce a temporal correlation averaging (TCA) scheme that merges a small number of correlation surfaces in the time domain. The TCA scheme is combined with a multi-size macroblock (MMB) sampling method that provides correlation scores from four different macroblock sizes. The TCA scheme is also used in conjunction with a signal-level indicator computed on the macroblock. The signal-level indicator is used to reject correlation scores prior to computation and helps to keep noisy results out of the TCA. These modifications were tested by comparing LSPIV calculations to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler measurements. The percent difference of measured velocity between LSPIV with TCA and MMB and without TCA and MMB when compared to the ADCP was reduced by as much as 30%. The low processing cost of our modifications along with an efficient multithread implementation of LSPIV facilitates high speed processing of up to a few thousand vector points at rates that exceed the capture speed of common hardware.

  9. Synergetic Use of Radar and Optical Satellite Images to Support Severe Storm Prediction for Offshore Wind Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusch, S.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.; Lehner, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we show how satellite images taken by space-borne radar sensors can be used to determine mesoscale high resolution wind fields in synergy with optical data. The aim of this study is to analyse severe weather systems, in particular to describe the spatial evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer processes involved in cold air outbreaks. A severe weather event happened in early November 2006 over the North Sea and damaged the research platform FiNO 1. This case of a particularly intense cold air outbreak over the North Sea is investigated using satellite data. Atmospheric boundary layer rolls and open cell convection were observed by the Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR) and the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) instrument, sensors on board the ENVISAT satellite.Cloud patterns parallel as well as perpendicular to the mean wind direction showing a cell structure of about 15 km diameter. Similar patterns were observed in SAR images. These are believed to be surface effects of gust fronts induced by the mesoscale cellular convection and enhanced by the overall northwesterly flow. The phenomenon is explained by downward transport of higher momentum in convective clouds. The satellite data are used to validate numerical model results (LM, HIRLAM). The focus of this paper is on the impact of high variability in wind speed of mesoscale convective cloud patterns, which are not well captured by these numerical models.

  10. Convex Array Vector Velocity Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Its Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Bachmann Nielsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A method for obtaining vector flow images using the transverse oscillation (TO) approach on a convex array is presented. The paper presents optimization schemes for TO fields and evaluates their performance using simulations and measurements with an experimental scanner. A 3-MHz 192-element convex...... array probe (pitch 0.33 mm) is used in both simulations and measurements. A parabolic velocity profile is simulated at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The optimization routine changes the lateral oscillation period λx as a function of depth to yield the best possible estimates based on the energy ratio...... between positive and negative spatial frequencies in the ultrasound field. The energy ratio is reduced from −17.1 dB to −22.1 dB. Parabolic profiles are estimated on simulated data using 16 emissions. The optimization gives a reduction in standard deviation from 8.81% to 7.4% for 16 emissions...

  11. An Experimental Study and Concept Evaluation on Tree-Interior Imaging Radar Using Sinusoidal Template-Based Focusing Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Yılmaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for detecting cavities inside a tree-body is presented with simulation and measured examples. The details of the imaging algorithm that is based on sinusoidal template focusing routine are given. First, the algorithm is tested with the simulation scenario for which perfect reconstruction of the simulated cavity structure together with tree-body is successfully formed in MATLAB programming environment. Then, the algorithm is applied to the measurement data that have been collected from a laboratory set-up. Collected backscattered measurements from the tree-body (with cavity structure are used to generate the image of the scene by the help of our proposed algorithm. The resultant radar images of the measured data collected from the laboratory arrangement have shown the applicability of the developed algorithm for the detection of cavity structures inside tree-bodies.

  12. A technique for multitarget tracking in synthetic aperture radar spotlight imaging mode based on promoted PHD filtering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryasafar, N.; Sadeghzadeh, R. A.; Naser-Moghadasi, M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper investigates a new method based on promoted probability hypothesis density (PHD) filtering to simultaneously track several moving targets in data received by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in spotlight imaging mode. Simultaneous tracking of several targets in the presence of high-density clutters in environment, as the particular capability of the PHD filter, has turned it into a robust approach in SAR to track moving targets. Given the PHD filter function as a sequence of prediction and update steps, it is more reasonable to apply the approach to the data received by the SAR in spotlight imaging mode; however, according to the specified system parameters, such method is not impossible to be implemented using the Stripmap imaging mode. According to simulation results, applying Range Cell Migration Compensation to the raw data received by SAR before tracking operation results in high-quality tracking of moving targets.

  13. Imaging method for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar based on reweighted atomic norm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qian; Han, Kuoye; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Bingchen; Liu, Jianguo; Hong, Wen

    2016-01-01

    We propose an imaging algorithm for downward-looking sparse linear array three-dimensional synthetic aperture radar (DLSLA 3-D SAR) in the circumstance of cross-track sparse and nonuniform array configuration. Considering the off-grid effect and the resolution improvement, the algorithm combines pseudo-polar formatting algorithm, reweighed atomic norm minimization (RANM), and a parametric relaxation-based cyclic approach (RELAX) to improve the imaging performance with a reduced number of array antennas. RANM is employed in the cross-track imaging after pseudo-polar formatting the DLSLA 3-D SAR echo signal, then the reconstructed results are refined by RELAX. By taking advantage of the reweighted scheme, RANM can improve the resolution of the atomic norm minimization, and outperforms discretized compressive sensing schemes that suffer from off-grid effect. The simulated and real data experiments of DLSLA 3-D SAR verify the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  14. Broadband Ground Penetrating Radar with conformal antennas for subsurface imaging from a rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, D. E.; Oden, C. P.; Grimm, R. E.; Ragusa, M.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) allows subsurface imaging to provide geologic context and will be flown on the next two martian rovers (WISDOM on ExoMars and RIMFAX on Mars 2020). The motivation of our research is to minimize the engineering challenges of mounting a GPR antenna to a spacecraft, while maximizing the scientific capabilities of the GPR. The scientific capabilities increase with the bandwidth as it controls the resolution. Furthermore, ultra-wide bandwidth surveys allow certain mineralogies and rock units to be discriminated based on their frequency-dependent EM or scattering properties. We have designed and field-tested a prototype GPR that utilizes bi-static circularly polarized spiral antennas. Each antenna has a physical size of 61 x 61 x 4 cm, therefore two antennas could be mounted to the underbelly of a MSL-class rover. Spiral antennas were chosen because they have an inherent broadband response and provide a better low frequency response compared with similarly sized linearly polarized antennas. A horizontal spiral radiator emits energy both upward and downward directions. After the radiator is mounted to a metal surface (i.e. the underside of a rover), a cavity is formed that causes the upward traveling energy to reverberate and cause unwanted interference. This interference is minimized by 1) using a high metallization ratio on the spiral to reduce cavity emissions, and 2) placing absorbing material inside the cavity. The resulting antennas provide high gain (0 to 8 dBi) from 200 to 1000 MHz. The low frequency response can be improved by increasing the antenna thickness (i.e., cavity depth). In an initial field test, the antennas were combined with impulse GPR electronics that had ~140 dB of dynamic range (not including antennas) and a sand/clay interface 7 feet deep was detected. To utilize the full bandwidth the antennas, a gated Frequency Modulated Continuous Waveform system will be developed - similar to RIMFAX. The goal is to reach a

  15. Three-dimensional velocity imaging of the Kachchh seismic zone, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Prantik; Chadha, R. K.

    2008-06-01

    To understand the causative mechanism of the continued occurrence of earthquakes in Kachchh, Gujarat for the last six years, we estimated high-resolution three-dimensional Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs structures in the aftershock zones of the 2001 Mw7.7 Bhuj and 2006 Mw5.6 Gedi earthquakes. We used 13,862 P- and 13,736 S-wave high-quality arrival times collected from the seismograms of 2303 aftershocks recorded at 5-18 three-component seismograph stations during 2001-06. Seismic images revealed a marked spatial variation in the velocities (from - 20% to + 14% in Vp, from - 12% to 13% in Vs, and from - 12% to 12% increase in Vp/Vs) in the 0-34 km depth range beneath the Bhuj aftershock zone. Relatively more increase in Vp than Vs, resulting in an increase in Vp/Vs in the crust beneath the seismically active causative fault (North Wagad Fault, NWF) zone of 2001 Bhuj mainshock suggests a rigid, mafic crust beneath the region. They also delineate an increase of 8% in Vp and 14% in Vs, and a decrease of 4% in Vp/Vs in the almost vertical rupture zone of the 2006 Gedi earthquake extending up to 12 km depth. This high velocity body associated with the Gedi mainshock is inferred to be a gabbroic intrusive. The Banni region and the Wagad uplift are found to be associated with high velocity intrusive bodies (inferred to be mafic) extending from 5 to 35 km depth, which might have intruded during the rifting in early Jurassic (~ 160 Ma). Aftershock activity is mainly confined to the zones characterized by high Vp, high Vs and low Vp/Vs ratio, which might be representing the strong, competent and brittle parts of the fault zone/intrusive bodies that could accumulate large strain energy for generating aftershocks for more than six years. It is inferred that the crustal stress concentrations associated with the intrusive bodies are contributing significant perturbation to the crustal stress regime to generate the intraplate earthquakes in the Kachchh rift zone. A few patches of slow (Vp and

  16. Improving the detectability and imaging capability of ground penetrating radar using novel antenna concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyadan Koroth, Ajith; Bhattacharya, Amitabha

    2017-04-01

    Antennas are key components of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) instrumentation. A carefully designed antenna can improve the detectability and imaging capability of a GPR to a great extent without changing the other instrumentations. In this work, we propose four different types of antennas for GPR. They are modifications of a conventional bowtie antenna with great improvement in performance parameters. The designed antennas has also been tested in a stepped frequency type GPR and two dimensional scan images of various targets are presented. Bowtie antennas have been traditionally employed in GPR for its wide impedance bandwidth and radiation properties. The researchers proposed resistive loading to improve the bandwidth of the bowtie antenna and for low ringing pulse radiation. But this method was detrimental for antenna gain and efficiency. Bowtie antennas have a very wide impedance bandwidth. But the useful bandwidth of the antenna has been limited by the radiation pattern bandwidth. The boresight gain of bowtie antennas are found to be unstable beyond a 4:1 bandwidth. In this work, these problems have been addressed and maximum usable bandwidth for the bowtie antennas has been achieved. In this work, four antennas have been designed: namely, 1.) RC loaded bowtie antennas, 2.) RC loaded bowtie with metamaterial lens, 3.) Loop loaded bowtie, 4.) Loop loaded bowtie with directors. The designed antennas were characterized for different parameters like impedance bandwidth, radiation pattern and, gain. In antenna 1, a combined resistive-capacitive loading has been applied by periodic slot cut on the arms of the bowtie and pasting a planar graphite sheet over it. Graphite having a less conductance compared to copper acts as resistive loading. This would minimize the losses compared to lumped resistive loading. The antenna had a 10:1 impedance bandwidth and, a 5:1 pattern bandwidth. In antenna 2, a metamaterial lens has been designed to augment the antenna 1, to improve

  17. Seismic images of the upper mantle velocities and structure of European mantle lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomerova, Jaroslava; Munzarova, Helena; Vecsey, Ludek; Babuska, Vladislav

    2014-05-01

    Tomography images of seismic velocities in the Earth mantle represent significant tool for recovering first order structural features. Regional studies, based on dense networks of temporary stations allow us to focus on structure of the continental upper mantle and to study variations of body-wave velocities in greater detail. However, the standard tomography exhibits only isotropic view of the Earth, whose structure is anisotropic in general, as shown by results of various studies exploiting a broad range of methods, types of waves and scales. We present results of our studies of seismic anisotropy in tectonically different provinces that clearly demonstrate the continental mantle lithosphere consists of domains with different fossil fabrics. We detect anisotropic signal both in teleseismic P-wave travel-time deviations and shear-wave splitting and show changes of the anisotropic parameters across seismic arrays, in which stations with similar characteristics form groups. The geographical variations of seismic-wave anisotropy delimit individual, often sharply bounded domains of the mantle lithosphere, each of them having a consistent fabric. The domains can be modelled in 3D by peridotite aggregates with dipping lineation a or foliation (a,c). These findings allow us to interpret the domains as micro-plate fragments retaining fossil fabrics in the mantle lithosphere, reflecting thus an olivine LPO created before the micro-plates assembled. Modelling anisotropic structure of individual domains of the continental mantle lithosphere helps to decipher boundaries of individual blocks building the continental lithosphere and hypothesize on processes of its formation (Plomerova and Babuska, Lithos 2010). Exploiting the long memory of the deep continental lithosphere fabric, we present the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) as a transition between a fossil anisotropy in the mantle lithosphere and an underlying seismic anisotropy related to the present-day flow in

  18. A Huygens Surface Approach to Antenna Implementation in Near-Field Radar Imaging System Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    and b) near-field configuration ...3 Fig. 2 Vivaldi notch antenna used as the receiver element in the SIRE radar system, showing the a) physical...field transfer function of the Vivaldi notch antenna computed by FEKO at boresight, showing a) magnitude and b) unwrapped phase ....5 Fig. 4

  19. Determination of radar MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  20. Non-Linear Land Subsidence In Morelia, Mexico, Imaged Through Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Francesca; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Cabral-Cano, Enrique; Dixon, Timothy H.; Wdowinski, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    Land subsidence affecting the city of Morelia in 2003- 2010 is imaged with 23 ENVISAT scenes. Newly developed subsidence is recognized in the Rio Grande meander area, where thick compressible deposits suffer from accelerated aquifer compaction induced by recent groundwater extractions. Persistent Scatterer (PS) analyses using linear and quadratic deformation models both result in low density of targets, while small- baseline interferograms show good coherence over the whole area. At the location of Prados Verdes II well, located in the center of this subsidence feature, -10 to -15 mm/yr LOS velocities are measured in 2003-2004, accelerating to -30 mm/yr in 2004-2005, -40 to -50 mm/yr in 2006-2007, and -60 to -70 mm/yr in 2008- 2009. Along the vertical direction, cumulative deformation in 2003-2009 at the water well location is estimated at -280 mm. Accelerations as high as -1 to -1.5 mm/yr2 are observed by PS for the time period 2003-2010.

  1. Joint synthetic aperture radar plus ground moving target indicator from single-channel radar using compressive sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Douglas; Hallquist, Aaron; Anderson, Hyrum

    2017-10-17

    The various embodiments presented herein relate to utilizing an operational single-channel radar to collect and process synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and ground moving target indicator (GMTI) imagery from a same set of radar returns. In an embodiment, data is collected by randomly staggering a slow-time pulse repetition interval (PRI) over a SAR aperture such that a number of transmitted pulses in the SAR aperture is preserved with respect to standard SAR, but many of the pulses are spaced very closely enabling movers (e.g., targets) to be resolved, wherein a relative velocity of the movers places them outside of the SAR ground patch. The various embodiments of image reconstruction can be based on compressed sensing inversion from undersampled data, which can be solved efficiently using such techniques as Bregman iteration. The various embodiments enable high-quality SAR reconstruction, and high-quality GMTI reconstruction from the same set of radar returns.

  2. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  3. Satellite Radar Interferometry for Monitoring Ice-Sheet Motion: Application to an Antarctic Ice Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Engelhardt, H.; Kamb, B.; Frolich, R. M.

    1993-01-01

    As a new means of monitoring the flow velocities and grounding-line positions of ice streams, which are indicators of response of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets to climatic change or internal instability, the method of satellite radar interferometry (SRI) is here proposed and applied to the Rutford Ice Stream, Antarctica. The method uses phase comparison of the radar signal obtained for a pair of SAR images taken a few days apart to plot an interferogram which directly displays relative ground motions that have occurred in the time interval between images. The detection limit is about 1.5 mm for vertical motions and about 4 mm for horizontal motions in the radar beam direction. In the Rutford Ice Stream, SRI velocities agree fairly well with earlier ground-truth data over a longitudinal interval of 29 km; the comparison suggests a secular decrease in velocity of about 2 percent from 1978-80 to 1992...

  4. A Comparison Between Compounding Techniques Using Large Beam-Steered Plane Wave Imaging for Blood Vector Velocity Imaging in a Carotid Artery Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saris, Anne E C M; Hansen, Hendrik H G; Fekkes, Stein; Nillesen, Maartje M; Rutten, Marcel C M; de Korte, Chris L

    2016-11-01

    Conventional color Doppler imaging is limited, since it only provides velocity estimates along the ultrasound beam direction for a restricted field of view at a limited frame rate. High-frame-rate speckle tracking, using plane wave transmits, has shown potential for 2-D blood velocity estimation. However, due to the lack of focusing in transmit, image quality gets reduced, which hampers speckle tracking. Although ultrafast imaging facilitates improved clutter filtering, it still remains a major challenge in blood velocity estimation. Signal dropouts and poor velocity estimates are still present for high beam-to-flow angles and low blood flow velocities. In this paper, ultrafast plane wave imaging was combined with multiscale speckle tracking to assess the 2-D blood velocity vector in a common carotid artery (CCA) flow field. A multiangled plane wave imaging sequence was used to compare the performance of displacement compounding, coherent compounding, and compound speckle tracking. Zero-degree plane wave imaging was also evaluated. The performance of the methods was evaluated before and after clutter filtering for the large range of velocities (0-1.5 m/s) that are normally present in a healthy CCA during the cardiac cycle. An extensive simulation study was performed, based on a sophisticated model of the CCA, to investigate and evaluate the performance of the methods at different pulse repetition frequencies and signal-to-noise levels. In vivo data were acquired of a healthy carotid artery bifurcation to support the simulation results. In general, methods utilizing compounding after speckle tracking, i.e., displacement compounding and compound speckle tracking, were least affected by clutter filtering and provided the most robust and accurate estimates for the entire velocity range. Displacement compounding, which uses solely axial information to estimate the velocity vector, provided most accurate velocity estimates, although it required sufficiently high pulse

  5. Caractérisation spatiale de l’aléa inondation à partir d’images satellites RADAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Hostache

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Dans le cadre de la gestion du risque d’inondation, la caractérisation spatiale de l’aléa est une problématique récurrente pour laquelle les techniques de télédétection, en particulier satellitales, peuvent s’avérer très utiles. L’objectif général de notre étude est d’évaluer les apports de l’utilisation de ces données et, en particulier, de développer des méthodes de valorisation des images satellites RADAR d’inondations pour la caractérisation spatiale de l’aléa. A terme, notre étude vise l’aide à la modélisation hydraulique par évaluation de hauteurs et de volumes d’eau. La méthode que nous proposons s’articule en trois étapes principales : 1 cartographie de l’extension des eaux à partir d’images RADAR et extraction des limites informatives, 2 estimation primaire de niveaux d’eau par croisement entre les limites informatives et un MNT, 3 réduction des incertitudes d’estimation des niveaux d’eau par introduction de concepts de cohérence hydraulique.

  6. Radar illusion via metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results.

  7. SU-F-J-85: Evaluation of the Velocity Deformable Image Registration Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polan, D; Kamp, J; Lee, JY; Chapman, C; Green, M; Payal, S; Kessler, M; Brock, K [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To perform validation and commissioning of a commercial deformable image registration (DIR) algorithm (Velocity, Varian Medical Systems) for numerous clinical sites using single and multi-modality images. Methods: In this retrospective study, the DIR algorithm was evaluated for 10 patients in each of the following body sites: head and neck (HN), prostate, liver, and gynecological (GYN). HN DIRs were evaluated from planning (p)CT to re-pCT and pCTs to daily CBCTs using dice similarity coefficients (DSC) of corresponding anatomical structures. Prostate DIRs were evaluated from pCT to CBCTs using DSC and target registration error (TRE) of implanted RF beacons within the prostate. Liver DIRs were evaluated from pMR to pCT using DSC and TRE of vessel bifurcations. GYN DIRs were evaluated between fractionated brachytherapy MRIs using DSC of corresponding anatomical structures. Results: Analysis to date has given average DSCs for HN pCT-to-(re)pCT DIR for the brainstem, cochleas, constrictors, spinal canal, cord, esophagus, larynx, parotids, and submandibular glands as 0.88, 0.65, 0.67, 0.91, 0.77, 0.69, 0.77, 0.87, and 0.71, respectively. Average DSCs for HN pCT-to-CBCT DIR for the constrictors, spinal canal, esophagus, larynx, parotids, and submandibular glands were 0.64, 0.90, 0.62, 0.82, 0.75, and 0.69, respectively. For prostate pCT-to-CBCT DIR the DSC for the bladder, femoral heads, prostate, and rectum were 0.71, 0.82, 0.69, and 0.61, respectively. Average TRE using implanted beacons was 3.35 mm. For liver pCT-to-pMR, the average liver DSC was 0.94 and TRE was 5.26 mm. For GYN MR-to-MR DIR the DSC for the bladder, sigmoid colon, GTV, and rectum were 0.79, 0.58, 0.67, and 0.76, respectively. Conclusion: The Velocity DIR algorithm has been evaluated over a number of anatomical sites. This work functions to document the uncertainties in the DIR in the commissioning process so that these can be accounted for in the development of downstream clinical processes

  8. Correlations between Cassini VIMS spectra and RADAR SAR images: Implications for Titan's surface composition and the character of the Huygens Probe Landing Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderblom, L.A.; Kirk, R.L.; Lunine, J.I.; Anderson, J.A.; Baines, K.H.; Barnes, J.W.; Barrett, J.M.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Elachi, C.; Janssen, M.A.; Jaumann, R.; Karkoschka, E.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Lopes, R.M.; Lorenz, R.D.; McCord, T.B.; Nicholson, P.D.; Radebaugh, J.; Rizk, B.; Sotin, Christophe; Stofan, E.R.; Sucharski, T.L.; Tomasko, M.G.; Wall, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    Titan's vast equatorial fields of RADAR-dark longitudinal dunes seen in Cassini RADAR synthetic aperture images correlate with one of two dark surface units discriminated as "brown" and "blue" in Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) color composites of short-wavelength infrared spectral cubes (RGB as 2.0, 1.6, 1.3 ??m). In such composites bluer materials exhibit higher reflectance at 1.3 ??m and lower at 1.6 and 2.0 ??m. The dark brown unit is highly correlated with the RADAR-dark dunes. The dark brown unit shows less evidence of water ice suggesting that the saltating grains of the dunes are largely composed of hydrocarbons and/or nitriles. In general, the bright units also show less evidence of absorption due to water ice and are inferred to consist of deposits of bright fine precipitating tholin aerosol dust. Some set of chemical/mechanical processes may be converting the bright fine-grained aerosol deposits into the dark saltating hydrocarbon and/or nitrile grains. Alternatively the dark dune materials may be derived from a different type of air aerosol photochemical product than are the bright materials. In our model, both the bright aerosol and dark hydrocarbon dune deposits mantle the VIMS dark blue water ice-rich substrate. We postulate that the bright mantles are effectively invisible (transparent) in RADAR synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images leading to lack of correlation in the RADAR images with optically bright mantling units. RADAR images mostly show only dark dunes and the water ice substrate that varies in roughness, fracturing, and porosity. If the rate of deposition of bright aerosol is 0.001-0.01 ??m/yr, the surface would be coated (to optical instruments) in hundreds-to-thousands of years unless cleansing processes are active. The dark dunes must be mobile on this very short timescale to prevent the accumulation of bright coatings. Huygens landed in a region of the VIMS bright and dark blue materials and about 30 km south of the

  9. Study of Tissue Phantoms, Tissues, and Contrast Agent with the Biophotoacoustic Radar and Comparison to Ultrasound Imaging for Deep Subsurface Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwi, R.; Telenkov, S.; Mandelis, A.; Gu, F.

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the imaging capability of our wide-spectrum frequency-domain photoacoustic (FD-PA) imaging alias "photoacoustic radar" methodology for imaging of soft tissues is explored. A practical application of the mathematical correlation processing method with relatively long (1 ms) frequency-modulated optical excitation is demonstrated for reconstruction of the spatial location of the PA sources. Image comparison with ultrasound (US) modality was investigated to see the complementarity between the two techniques. The obtained results with a phased array probe on tissue phantoms and their comparison to US images demonstrated that the FD-PA technique has strong potential for deep subsurface imaging with excellent contrast and high signal-to-noise ratio. FD-PA images of blood vessels in a human wrist and an in vivo subcutaneous tumor in a rat model are presented. As in other imaging modalities, the employment of contrast agents is desirable to improve the capability of medical diagnostics. Therefore, this study also evaluated and characterized the use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as PA contrast agents.

  10. Domain wall velocity measurement in permalloy nanowires with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism imaging and single shot Kerr microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, T.A., E-mail: t.a.moore@physics.or [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Klaeui, M.; Heyne, L.; Moehrke, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Backes, D.; Rhensius, J. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ruediger, U. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, 78457 Konstanz (Germany); Heyderman, L.J. [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Mentes, T.O.; Nino, M.A.; Locatelli, A. [Sincrotrone Trieste, 34012 Basovizza-Trieste (Italy); Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Cavill, S.; Dhesi, S.S. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    Domain walls (DWs) propagated along nanoscale magnetic wires by current or field pulses could potentially be used for data storage or logic applications, but the understanding of the DW dynamics, particularly under the influence of spin-polarized current, is incomplete. Measuring the velocity can give insights into the physics of the DW motion. Here we demonstrate DW velocity measurements in permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) nanowires (1500 nm width and 20 nm thickness) using the techniques of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy (XMCD-PEEM) to image the magnetic contrast in the nanowires, and single shot Kerr microscopy, which allows for dynamic measurements. The magnetic imaging yields the average velocity as well as information on the DW spin structure, whereas the single shot method highlights the stochastic nature of the DW motion.

  11. Domain wall velocity measurement in permalloy nanowires with X-ray magnetic circular dichroism imaging and single shot Kerr microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T. A.; Kläui, M.; Heyne, L.; Möhrke, P.; Backes, D.; Rhensius, J.; Rüdiger, U.; Heyderman, L. J.; Mentes, T. O.; Niño, M. Á.; Locatelli, A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Cavill, S.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2010-05-01

    Domain walls (DWs) propagated along nanoscale magnetic wires by current or field pulses could potentially be used for data storage or logic applications, but the understanding of the DW dynamics, particularly under the influence of spin-polarized current, is incomplete. Measuring the velocity can give insights into the physics of the DW motion. Here we demonstrate DW velocity measurements in permalloy ( Ni80Fe20) nanowires (1500 nm width and 20 nm thickness) using the techniques of X-ray magnetic circular dichroism photoemission electron microscopy (XMCD-PEEM) to image the magnetic contrast in the nanowires, and single shot Kerr microscopy, which allows for dynamic measurements. The magnetic imaging yields the average velocity as well as information on the DW spin structure, whereas the single shot method highlights the stochastic nature of the DW motion.

  12. Study of flow field of burning particles in a pyrotechnic flame based on particle image and particle velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, R.; Xu, H. Q.; Li, Y.; Zhu, C. G.

    2014-11-01

    Studying the burning particles in the pyrotechnic flame is important to acquire the decomposition mechanism and spectral radiance of pyrotechnics. The high speed video (HSV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used in this paper to analyze the flow field and velocity of burning particles in the flame of pyrotechnics. The binary image was obtained through gray scale treatment and adaptive threshold segmentation from HSV and PIV data, by which the coordinate of each particle was marked. On the basis, the movement trajectory of each particle during combustion was pursued by the most recent guidelines algorithm of cancroids matching. Through the method proposed in this study, the velocity variation of each particle was obtained, the approximate distribution of particle quantity at each zone was visualized and the mathematical model of pyrotechnic particle velocity flow field was established.

  13. The use of radar for bathymetry assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardoom, J.H.; Greidanus, H.S.F.

    1998-01-01

    The bottom topography in shallow seas can be observed by air- and spaceborne imaging radar. Bathymetric information derived from radar data is limited in accuracy, but radar has a good spatial coverage. The accuracy can be increased by assimilating the radar imagery into existing or insitu gathered

  14. AORTIC PULSE WAVE VELOCITY MEASURED BY PULSE WAVE IMAGING (PWI): A COMPARISON WITH APPLANATION TONOMETRY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vappou, Jonathan; Luo, Jianwen; Okajima, Kazue; Di Tullio, Marco; Konofagou, Elisa

    2011-06-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established indicator of cardiovascular disease outcome. Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) is a surrogate for arterial stiffness that is measured either globally using carotid to femoral applanation tonometry or locally using biomedical imaging methods. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method for both qualitative visualisation of pulse wave propagation and quantitative estimation of arterial stiffness. The objective of this study is to assess the PWI performance in PWV estimation by comparing local abdominal aortic PWV values obtained by PWI to the carotid-femoral PWV measured by applanation tonometry. A total of 18 subjects (age 18-66, 32.5±14.5) with no history of cardiovascular disease were consecutively tested by both PWI and tonometry. The correlation coefficient r between values found by the two methods was found to be equal to 0.68. A linear regression yielded PWVPWI = 1.02* PWVtonometry +0.15. Tukey mean-difference plots indicated that PWVPWI was significantly lower than PWVtonometry (-0.3 m/s) at lower PWV values (PWV≤7 m/s), whereas PWVPWI was significantly higher (+1.4 m/s) than PWVtonometry at higher PWV values (PWV>7 m/s). Despite the regional nature of the PWVPWI measurements, as opposed to the global PWVtonometry measurements, abdominal PWVPWI and carotid-femoral PWVtonometry values were found to be similar, with an average bias equal to 0.25 m/s. Such a bias and its variation with PWV may be partially explained by both physiological variations of PWV along the arterial tree and by the increasing uncertainty of the PWV estimate by PWI as PWV increases.

  15. High-resolution observation of field-aligned irregularities in the ionosphere using multi-frequency range imaging of VHF atmospheric radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jenn-Shyong; Furumoto, Jun-ichi; Su, Ching-Lun; Chu, Yen-Hsyang

    Field-aligned irregularity (FAI) in the ionosphere is a topic of interest to atmospheric radar community. In addition to the field-aligned characteristic, quasi-periodic (QP) appearance of FAI echoes has been observed frequently by very-high-frequency (VHF) atmospheric radar. The occurrence range of QP FAI echoes changes with time, and the slope of range versus time can be positive or negative, depending on occurrence time of the echoes. Several mechanisms responsible for the QP FAI echoes have been proposed, e.g., modulation in altitude by a passing atmospheric gravity wave, semidiurnal neutral-wind variation, and so on. Owing to the finite pulse length of radar in observation, the range resolution of measurement is limited within hundreds of meters. In view of this, the range imaging (RIM) using multiple frequencies has been employed to improve the range resolution of measurement. The multi-frequency technique transmits a set of slightly different frequencies sequentially during each radar pulse, and the radar returns at different transmitting frequencies are received, respectively. With adaptive retrieval algorithms for these radar returns, it is capable of resolving the echo structures at meter scale in the range direction. RIM has been employed in the lower atmosphere successfully. In this study, the performance of RIM for FAI was first carried out with the Middle and Upper atmosphere Radar (46 MHz; 34.85(°) N, 136.10(°) N; Japan) and the Chung-Li VHF radar (52 MHz; 24.9(°) N, 121.1(°) E; Taiwan). Some initial results of high-resolution FAI echoes within the range gate will be shown.

  16. Imaging of Scarce Archaeological Remains Using Microwave Tomographic Depictions of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Soldovieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Romano-British site of Barcombe in East Sussex, England, has suffered heavy postdepositional attrition through reuse of the building materials for the effects of ploughing. A detailed GPR survey of the site was carried out in 2001, with results, achieved by usual radar data processing, published in 2002. The current paper reexamines the GPR data using microwave tomography approach, based on a linear inverse scattering model, and a 3D visualization that permits to improve the definition of the villa plan and reexamine the possibility of detecting earlier prehistoric remains.

  17. Ambient Noise Tomography of Southern California Images Dipping San Andreas-Parallel Structure and Low-Velocity Salton Trough Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, S.; Klemperer, S. L.; Lawrence, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Ambient noise tomography (ANT) images the entire crust but does not depend on the spatial and temporal distribution of events. Our ANT high-resolution 3D velocity model of southern California uses 849 broadband stations, vastly more than previous studies, and four years of data, 1997-1998, 2007, and 2011, chosen to include our own broadband Salton Seismic Imaging Project, a 40-station transect across the Salton Trough, as well as other campaign stations in both Mexico and the U.S.A., and permanent stations. Our shear-wave model has 0.05° x 0.05° lateral and 1 km vertical blocks. We used the Harvard Community Velocity Model (CVM-H) as the initial model for the inversion. We show significant differences relative to the CVM-H model, especially in the lower crust and upper mantle. We observe prominent low-velocity anomalies in the upper mantle under the Salton Buttes and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields, indicating high-temperatures and possibly partial-melt. Similar low-velocity zones have been previously observed along the Gulf of California. We also observe vertical to gradually dipping lateral velocity contrasts in the lower crust under the southern part of the San Andreas Fault. The east to northeast dip may represent crustal fabric sheared by movement of the Pacific plate under the North American plate prior to the initiation of transform motion.

  18. Assessment of longitudinal systolic ventricular dysfunction and asynchrony using velocity vector imaging in children with a single right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Rong; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Chen, Li-Jun; Wang, Shan-Shan; Zhong, Shu-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Assessment of ventricular dysfunction and asynchrony is very important in predicting the outcome for children with a single right ventricle. However, the assessment is inaccurate and subjective because of the unusual ventricular shape. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and clinical value of velocity vector imaging for assessing longitudinal systolic ventricular dysfunction and intraventricular asynchrony in children with a single right ventricle. The study enrolled 36 children with a single right ventricle and 36 age-matched children with a normal heart. Peak systolic velocity, peak displacement, strain, strain rate, time to peak systolic velocity, and time to peak systolic strain were measured via velocity vector imaging using the Siemens Sequoia C512 echocardiography instrument. The maximum positive rate of ventricular pressure change (Max [dp/dt]) was obtained by cardiac catheterization for all the children with a single right ventricle. In the children with a single right ventricle, the maximal temporal differences and the standard deviations of the times to peak systolic velocity and peak systolic strain were higher (P children with a normal heart. Moreover, the strain and strain rate values were significantly lower in all six segments (P children with a single right ventricle.

  19. COST Action TU1208 - Working Group 3 - Electromagnetic modelling, inversion, imaging and data-processing techniques for Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Sesnic, Silvestar; Randazzo, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien; Benedetto, Francesco; Economou, Nikos

    2017-04-01

    opportunity of testing and validating, against reliable data, their electromagnetic-modelling, inversion, imaging and processing algorithms. One of the most interesting dataset comes from the IFSTTAR Geophysical Test Site, in Nantes (France): this is an open-air laboratory including a large and deep area, filled with various materials arranged in horizontal compacted slices, separated by vertical interfaces and water-tighted in surface; several objects as pipes, polystyrene hollows, boulders and masonry are embedded in the field. Data were collected by using nine different GPR systems and at different frequencies ranging from 200 MHz to 1 GHz. Moreover, some sections of this test site were modelled by using gprMax and the commercial software CST Microwave Studio. Hence, both experimental and synthetic data are available. Further interesting datasets were collected on roads, bridges, concrete cells, columns - and more. (v) WG3 contributed to the TU1208 Education Pack, an open educational package conceived to teach GPR in University courses. (vi) WG3 was very active in offering training activities. The following courses were successfully organised: Training School (TS) "Microwave Imaging and Diagnostics" (in cooperation with the European School of Antennas; 1st edition: Madonna di Campiglio, Italy, March 2014, 2nd edition: Taormina, Italy, October 2016); TS "Numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar using gprMax" (Thessaloniki, Greece, November 2015); TS "Electromagnetic Modelling Techniques for Ground Penetrating Radar" (Split, Croatia, November 2016). Moreover, WG3 organized a workshop on "Electromagnetic modelling with the Finite-Difference Time-Domain technique" (Nantes, France, February 2014) and a workshop on "Electromagnetic modelling and inversion techniques for GPR" (Davos, Switzerland, April 2016) within the 2016 European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP). Acknowledgement: The Authors are deeply grateful to COST (European COoperation in Science and

  20. Wall Clutter Mitigation in Through-the-Wall Imaging Radar with Sparse Array Antenna Based on Independent Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For Through-the-Wall Imaging Radar (TWIR, wall clutter is critical for detecting target signals behind a wall. For a system with a sparse antenna array, the lack of observation channels makes it more difficult to separate the target signals and wall clutter. On the basis of fluctuation of the range profile in real transmit/receive channels, this paper proposes to use Independent Component Analysis (ICA on multiple down-range observations of each transmit/receive channel to remove the wall clutter. The simulation and experimental results show that the proposed method effectively separate target and clutter components, even though the signal-to-clutter ratio is only -30 dB.

  1. Evidence for on-going inflation of the Socorro Magma Body, New Mexico, from interferometric synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialko, Yuri; Simons, Mark

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imaging of the central Rio Grande rift (New Mexico, USA) during 1992-1999 reveals a crustal uplift of several centimeters that spatially coincides with the seismologically determined outline of the Socorro magma body, one of the largest currently active magma intrusions in the Earth’s continental crust. Modeling of interferograms shows that the observed deformation may be due to elastic opening of a sill-like intrusion at a rate of a few millimeters per year. Despite an apparent constancy of the geodetically determined uplift rate, thermodynamic arguments suggest that it is unlikely that the Socorro magma body has formed via steady state elastic inflation.

  2. Validation of Doppler ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging velocity measurements by means of a test object

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostayen, J.A. van; Bezemer, R.A.; Wasser, M.N.J.M.; Teirlinck, C.J.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To validate Doppler ultrasound and MRI mean velocity measurements in a test object in which mean velocities are known and can be chosen within a range of 10-100 cm/s in tubes of 4 and 8 mm. This validation was carried out to check the performance of a duplex Doppler ultrasound system that

  3. Velocity vector estimation in synthetic aperture flow and B-mode imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2004-01-01

    A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in a synthetic aperture ultrasound system is described. The approach uses directional beamforming along the flow direction and cross-correlation to determine velocity magnitude. The angle of the flow is determined from the maximum normali...

  4. Photodissociation of Small Molecules and Photoionization of Free Radicals Using the VUV Velocity-Map Imaging Photoion and Photoelectron Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong

    The tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser generated through the two-photon resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing scheme is combined with the newly developed time-slice velocity map imaging photoion method to study the photodissociation of small molecules in the VUV region, and with the velocity map imaging photoelectron method to study the photoionization of free radicals. The photodissociation dynamics of NO in the energy region around 13.5 eV has been investigated. Branching ratios of the three lowest dissociation channels of 12C 16O that produce C(3P) + O(3P), C( 1D) + O(3P) and C(3P) + O(1D) are measured for the first time in the VUV region from 102,500 cm-1 to 110,500 cm-1, valuable information of the dissociation dynamics for this prototype system has been deduced. We demonstrated an experiment that has two independently tunable VUV lasers and a time-slice velocity map imaging setup, this provides us a global way to perform systematic state-selected photodissociation of small molecules via state-selected detection of the atomic products in the VUV region. The velocity map imaging photoelectron method was successfully used to obtain the photoelectron spectrum of the propargyl radical (C3H3) via a single VUV photoionization process. The propargyl radical is generated by the 193 nm laser photodissociation of the precursor C3H3Cl. This is the first time that the velocity map imaging photoelectron method is used to get the photoelectron spectra of free radicals, indicating that it is a powerful technique for studying the photoionization of free radicals which are always hard to be produced with high enough number densities for spectroscopic studies. This dissertation is mainly based on the following peer-reviewed journal articles: 1. Hong Gao, Yang Pan, Lei Yang, Jingang Zhou, C. Y. Ng and William M. Jackson. "Time-slice velocity-map ion imaging studies of the Photodissociation of NO in the vacuum ultraviolet region", the Journal of Chemical Physics, 136, 134302

  5. Fmcw Mmw Radar For Automotive Longitudinal Control

    OpenAIRE

    David, William

    1997-01-01

    This report presents information on millimeter wave (MMW) radar for automotive longitudinal control. It addresses the fundamental capabilities and limitations of millimeter waves for ranging and contrasts their operation with that of conventional microwave radar. The report analyzes pulsed and FMCW radar configurations, and provides detailed treatment of FMCW radar operating at MMW frequency, its advantages and disadvantages as they relate to range and velocity measurements.

  6. Analyzing NEXRAD doppler radar images to assess nightly dispersal patterns and population trends in Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Jason W; Kunz, Thomas H

    2008-07-01

    Operators of early weather-surveillance radars often observed echoes on their displays that did not behave like weather pattern, including expanding ring-like shapes they called angels. These echoes were caused by high-flying insects, migrating birds, and large colonies of bats emerging from roosts to feed. Modern weather-surveillance radar stations in the United States (NEXt-generation RADar or NEXRAD) provide detailed images that clearly show evening bat emergences from large colonies. These images can be used to investigate the flight behavior of groups of bats and population trends in large colonies of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) in south-central Texas which are clearly imaged by local NEXRAD radar stations. In this study, we used radar reflectivity data from the New Braunfels, Texas NEXRAD station to examine relative colony size, direction of movement, speed of dispersion, and altitude gradients of bats from these colonies following evening emergence. Base reflectivity clear-air-mode Level-II images were geo-referenced and compiled in a GIS along with locations of colonies and features on the landscape. Temporal sequences of images were filtered for the activity of bats, and from this, the relative size of bat colonies, and the speed and heading of bat emergences were calculated. Our results indicate cyclical changes in colony size from year to year and that initial headings taken by bats during emergence flights are highly directional. We found that NEXRAD data can be an effective tool for monitoring the nightly behavior and seasonal changes in these large colonies. Understanding the distribution of a large regional bat population on a landscape scale has important implications for agricultural pest management and conservation efforts.

  7. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  8. Quantitative phase-filtered wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar tumor hypoxia imaging toward early cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Soo Sean Choi, Sung; Mandelis, Andreas; Shi, Wei; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2017-09-01

    Overcoming the limitations of conventional linear spectroscopy used in multispectral photoacoustic imaging, wherein a linear relationship is assumed between the absorbed optical energy and the absorption spectra of the chromophore at a specific location, is crucial for obtaining accurate spatially-resolved quantitative functional information by exploiting known chromophore-specific spectral characteristics. This study introduces a non-invasive phase-filtered differential photoacoustic technique, wavelength-modulated differential photoacoustic radar (WM-DPAR) imaging that addresses this issue by eliminating the effect of the unknown wavelength-dependent fluence. It employs two laser wavelengths modulated out-of-phase to significantly suppress background absorption while amplifying the difference between the two photoacoustic signals. This facilitates pre-malignant tumor identification and hypoxia monitoring, as minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration and hemoglobin oxygenation are detectable. The system can be tuned for specific applications such as cancer screening and SO2 quantification by regulating the amplitude ratio and phase shift of the signal. The WM-DPAR imaging of a head and neck carcinoma tumor grown in the thigh of a nude rat demonstrates the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo. The PA appearance of the tumor in relation to tumor vascularity is investigated by immunohistochemistry. Phase-filtered WM-DPAR imaging is also illustrated, maximizing quantitative SO2 imaging fidelity of tissues. Oxygenation levels within a tumor grown in the thigh of a nude rat using the two-wavelength phase-filtered differential PAR method. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Intercontinental Bistatic Radar Test Observation of Asteroid 1998 WT24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righini, S.; Poppi, S.; Montebugnoli, S.; DiMartino, M.; Saba, L.; Delbo, M.; Ostro, S.; Monari, J.; Poloni, M.; Orlati, A.

    2002-01-01

    We describe the first intercontinental planetary radar test performed in Italy observing the near Earth asteroid (NEA) 33342 (1998 WT24) in December 2001 by means of the bistatic configurations Goldstone (California, USA)-Medicina (Italy) and Evpatoria (Ukraine)-Medicina. The experiment goal was to characterize the system for realtime radar follow-up observations of NEAs and artificial orbiting debris, in the framework of a feasibility study which aims at using the Sardinia Radio Telescope, at present under construction, also as a planetary radar facility. We report the preliminary results of the radar observations carried out by the IRA-CNR (Instituto di Radioastronomia - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche) and the OATo (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino) groups, aimed at exploring the scientific potentials of a new space radar program, using the existing facilities in Italy. The planetary radar technique is uniquely capable of investigating geometry and surface properties of various solar system objects, demonstrating advantages over the optical methods in its high spatial resolution and ability to obtain three-dimensional images. A single radar detection allows to obtain extremely accurate orbital elements, improving the instantaneous positional uncertainties by orders of magnitude with respect to an optically determined orbit. Radar is a powerful means to spatially resolve NEAs by measuring the distribution of the echo power in time delay (range) and Doppler frequency (line-of-sight velocity) with extreme precision in each coordinate, as it provides detailed information about the target physical properties like size, shape, rotation, near-surface bulk density and roughness and internal density distribution. The Medicina 32m antenna had been successfully used for the first time as the receiving part of a bistatic configuration during a test experiment (September 2001) held to check the capabilities of the entire data acquisition system. This test was possible

  10. The 2007-8 volcanic eruption on Jebel at Tair island (Red Sea) observed by satellite radar and optical images

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2014-01-31

    We use high-resolution optical images and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to study the September 2007-January 2008 Jebel at Tair eruption. Comparison of pre- and post-eruption optical images reveals several fresh ground fissures, a new scoria cone near the summit, and that 5.9 ± 0.1 km2 of new lava covered about half of the island. Decorrelation in the InSAR images indicates that lava flowed both to the western and to the northeastern part of the island after the start of the eruption, while later lavas were mainly deposited near the summit and onto the north flank of the volcano. From the InSAR data, we also estimate that the average thickness of the lava flows is 3.8 m, resulting in a bulk volume of around 2.2 × 107 m3. We observe no volcano-wide pre- or post-eruption uplift, which suggests that the magma source may be deep. The co-eruption interferograms, on the other hand, reveal local and rather complex deformation. We use these observations to constrain a tensile dislocation model that represents the dike intrusion that fed the eruption. The model results show that the orientation of the dike is perpendicular to the Red Sea rift, implying that the local stresses within the volcanic edifice are decoupled from the regional stress field. © 2014 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  11. Full three-dimensional imaging via ground penetrating radar: assessment in controlled conditions and on field for archaeological prospecting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; di Maio, Francesco; Loperte, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals with an advanced microwave tomographic approach capable of providing full 3D images of buried targets from scattered field data gathered by means of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) systems. The approach is based on an approximated model of the scattering phenomenon and it is capable of accounting for the vectorial nature of the interactions occurring between electromagnetic waves and probed materials. Moreover, the Truncated Singular Value Decomposition inversion scheme is exploited to solve the involved linear inverse scattering problem in a stable and accurate way. The advantages offered by the full 3D inversion algorithm with respect to a commonly adopted strategy, which produces 3D images by interpolating 2D reconstructions, are assessed against GPR data gathered in laboratory controlled conditions. Moreover, to provide an example of the full 3D imaging capabilities in on field conditions, we report on a GPR measurement campaign carried out at Grotte dell'Angelo, Pertosa, (SA), Southern Italy, one of the most famous sites of the Cilento and Vallo di Diano geopark.

  12. A New Display Format Relating Azimuth-Scanning Radar Data and All-Sky Images in 3-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Wesley E.; Seker, Ilgin; Mathews, John D.; Aponte, Nestor

    2010-01-01

    Here we correlate features in a sequence of all-sky images of 630 nm airglow with the three-dimensional (3-D) structure of electron densities in the F region above Arecibo. Pairs of 180 azimuth scans (using the Gregorian and line feeds) of the two-beam incoherent scatter radar (ISR) have been plotted in cone pictorials of the line-of-sight electron densities. The plots include projections of the 630 nm airglow onto the ground using the same spatial scaling as for the ISR data. Selected sequential images from the night of 16-17 June 2004 correlate ionospheric plasma features with scales comparable to the ISR density-cone diameter. The entire set of over 100 images spanning about eight hours is available as a movie. The correlation between the airglow and the electron densities is not unexpected, but the new display format shows the 3-D structures better than separate 2-D plots in latitude and longitude for the airglow and in height and time for the electron densities. Furthermore, the animations help separate the bands of airglow from obscuring clouds and the star field.

  13. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinpeng Zhou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile’s rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  14. Three-Dimensional ISAR Imaging Method for High-Speed Targets in Short-Range Using Impulse Radar Based on SIMO Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinpeng; Wei, Guohua; Wu, Siliang; Wang, Dawei

    2016-03-11

    This paper proposes a three-dimensional inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging method for high-speed targets in short-range using an impulse radar. According to the requirements for high-speed target measurement in short-range, this paper establishes the single-input multiple-output (SIMO) antenna array, and further proposes a missile motion parameter estimation method based on impulse radar. By analyzing the motion geometry relationship of the warhead scattering center after translational compensation, this paper derives the receiving antenna position and the time delay after translational compensation, and thus overcomes the shortcomings of conventional translational compensation methods. By analyzing the motion characteristics of the missile, this paper estimates the missile's rotation angle and the rotation matrix by establishing a new coordinate system. Simulation results validate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  15. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  16. Application of Radar and Optical Images to Create Copernicus High Resolution Layers: Case Studies in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surek, Gyorgy; Nador, Gizella; Friedl, Zoltan; Gyimesi, Balint; Rada, Matyas; Akos Gera, David; Hubik, Iren; Rotterne Kulesar, Aniko; Totok, Cecilia

    2016-08-01

    Injection of SAR imagery based information in the production of Copernicus High Resolution Layers can help to refine information served by optical satellite imagery, together with a-priori knowledge it may overcome the gaps caused by the cloud cover issue. However, this requires a methodological adaptation, given the different nature of SAR as compared to optical data. The methodological adaptation shall allow for an operational implementation, and shall help reducing the elapsed time between available satellite imagery. This requires the analysis of the potential use of SAR based imagery in the COPERNICUS land context, supported with case studies. In this paper the contribution of radar polarimetry for distinguishing land cover categories is evaluated.

  17. Coincidence velocity map imaging using Tpx3Cam, a time stamping optical camera with 1.5 ns timing resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Arthur; van Beuzekom, Martin; Bouwens, Bram; Byelov, Dmitry; Chakaberia, Irakli; Cheng, Chuan; Maddox, Erik; Nomerotski, Andrei; Svihra, Peter; Visser, Jan; Vrba, Vaclav; Weinacht, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate a coincidence velocity map imaging apparatus equipped with a novel time-stamping fast optical camera, Tpx3Cam, whose high sensitivity and nanosecond timing resolution allow for simultaneous position and time-of-flight detection. This single detector design is simple, flexible, and capable of highly differential measurements. We show detailed characterization of the camera and its application in strong field ionization experiments.

  18. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  19. Evaluation of the rockburst potential in longwall coal mining using passive seismic velocity tomography and image subtraction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Navid

    2017-09-01

    Rockburst is a typical dynamic disaster in underground coal mines which its occurrences relate to the mechanical quality of coal seam and surrounding rock mass and also the condition of stress distribution. The main aim of this paper is to study the potential of rockburst in a longwall coal mine by using of passive seismic velocity tomography and image subtraction technique. For this purpose, first by mounting an array of receivers on the surface above the active panel, the mining-induced seismic data as a passive source for several continuous days were recorded. Then, the three-dimensional tomograms using simultaneous iteration reconstruction technique (SIRT) for each day are created and by employing the velocity filtering, the overstressed zones are detected. In addition, the two-dimensional seismic velocity tomograms in coal seam level by slicing the three-dimensional tomograms are obtained. Then the state of stress changes in successive days by applying the image subtraction technique on these two-dimensional tomograms is considered. The results show that the compilation of filtered three-dimensional tomograms and subtracted images is an appropriate approach for detecting the overstressed zones around the panel and subsequent evaluation of rockburst potential. The research conclusion proves that the applied approach in this study in combination with field observations of rock mass status can effectively identify the rockburst-prone areas during the mining operation and help to improve the safety condition.

  20. Ultrawideband Noise Radar Imaging of Impenetrable Cylindrical Objects Using Diffraction Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Jung Shin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrawideband (UWB waveforms achieve excellent spatial resolution for better characterization of targets in tomographic imaging applications compared to narrowband waveforms. In this paper, two-dimensional tomographic images of multiple scattering objects are successfully obtained using the diffraction tomography approach by transmitting multiple independent and identically distributed (iid UWB random noise waveforms. The feasibility of using a random noise waveform for tomography is investigated by formulating a white Gaussian noise (WGN model using spectral estimation. The analytical formulation of object image formation using random noise waveforms is established based on the backward scattering, and several numerical diffraction tomography simulations are performed in the spatial frequency domain to validate the analytical results by reconstructing the tomographic images of scattering objects. The final image of the object based on multiple transmitted noise waveforms is reconstructed by averaging individually formed images which compares very well with the image created using the traditional Gaussian pulse. Pixel difference-based measure is used to analyze and estimate the image quality of the final reconstructed tomographic image under various signal-to-noise ratio (SNR conditions. Also, preliminary experiment setup and measurement results are presented to assess the validation of simulation results.