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Sample records for racing radiators utilizing

  1. Racing to be an indispensable utility

    2003-01-01

    "Every major IT supplier is rushing to be involved in the global computing grid, eager to take advantage of the developments and experience they will gain. Why? Because the race is on to become an IT utility" (1 page).

  2. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Rice, Thomas W.; Adelstein, David J.; Barnett, Gene H.; Mekhail, Tarek M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  3. Report on promotion of utilization of radiation

    1987-01-01

    This report presents results of studies made by the Atomic Energy Commission concerning research and development activities to be carried out in future to promote the utilization of radiation. First, the current state of radiation utilization is described, centering on practical applications, research and development activities (for practical and advanced applications), and international cooperation (with developing and advanced nations). The second part deals with activities required in future to promote practical utilization of radiation, research and development of advanced techniques, and cooperation to be offered to developing countries. Third, specific measures to be carried out for effective radiation utilization are described. For γ-rays and electron beams, which are widely in use at present, there are some economic and social problems remaining to be solved. For advanced utilization of radiation beams, further efforts should be focused on basic research on π-meson and μ-particle beams and their application to canser treatment and nuclear fusion; research on monochromatic neutron beams; application of RI beams to the development of new materials and new analysis techniques, application of epithermal neutron beams to elementary radiography and CT; etc. The utilization, application and development of tracers are also described. (Nogami, K.)

  4. Risks associated with utilization of radiation

    Matsuoka, Satoshi; Kumazawa, Shigeru; Aoki, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Yuji; Takeda, Atsuhiko; Kusama, Tomoko; Inaba, Jiro; Tanaka, Yasumasa.

    1993-01-01

    When mankind decides action, the conveniences and the risks obtained by the action are weighed up. When socially important judgement is done, the logical discussion based on objective data is indispensable. The utilization of radiation spread from industrial circles to general public, accordingly the circumstances changed from the recognition of its risks by professionals to that by general public. The radiation exposure dose of public has increased rapidly by medical treatment. The global radioactivity contamination accompanying nuclear explosion experiment and the Chernobyl accident raised the psychological risk recognition of public. Now, the fear of the potential radioactivity which may be released from nuclear power plants and nuclear fuel cycle facilities expanded. The radiation exposure due to its utilization in recent years is mostly at the level below natural radiation. The acute radiation syndrome by whole body exposure is shown, and the effect is probabilistic. The evaluation of the risks due to radiation in the early effect, the hereditary effect and the delayed effect including canceration is explained. The risks in general human activities, the concept of risks in radiation protection, the effect of Chernobyl accident and the perception of general public on radiation risks are reported. (K.I.)

  5. AERODYNAMIC IMPROVEMENT OF KhADI 33 RACING CAR RADIATOR COMPARTMENT

    A. Avershyn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerodynamic characteristics of radiator compartment of KhADI 33 racing car on the basis of the decision of the interfaced problem of internal and external aerodynamics are numerically investigated. The rational variant of radiator compartment which is characterized by high throughput and low level of non-uniformity of speed field at the input is offered.

  6. Central Nervous System Disease, Education, and Race Impact Radiation Refusal in Pediatric Cancer Patients.

    Patel, Chirayu G; Stavas, Mark; Perkins, Stephanie; Shinohara, Eric T

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the determinants of radiation therapy refusal in pediatric cancer, we used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry to identify 24,421 patients who met the eligibility criteria, diagnosed between 1974 and 2012. Patients had any stage of cancer, were aged 0 to 19, and received radiation therapy or refused radiation therapy when it was recommended. One hundred twenty-eight patients (0.52%) refused radiation therapy when it was recommended. Thirty-two percent of patients who refused radiation therapy ultimately died from their cancer, at a median of 7 months after diagnosis (95% confidence interval, 3-11 mo), as compared with 29.0% of patients who did not refuse radiation therapy died from their cancer, at a median of 17 months after diagnosis (95% confidence interval, 17-18 mo). On multivariable analysis, central nervous system (CNS) site, education, and race were associated with radiation refusal. The odds ratio for radiation refusal for patients with CNS disease was 1.62 (P=0.009) as compared with patients without CNS disease. For patients living in a county with ≥10% residents having less than ninth grade education, the odds ratio for radiation refusal was 1.71 (P=0.008) as compared with patients living in a county with education. Asian, Pacific Islander, Alaska Native, and American Indian races had an odds ratio of 2.12 (P=0.002) for radiation refusal as compared with black or white race. Although the radiation refusal rate in the pediatric cancer population is low, we show that CNS site, education level, and race are associated with a significant difference in radiation refusal.

  7. Closing achievement gaps with a utility-value intervention: Disentangling race and social class.

    Harackiewicz, Judith M; Canning, Elizabeth A; Tibbetts, Yoi; Priniski, Stacy J; Hyde, Janet S

    2016-11-01

    Many college students abandon their goal of completing a degree in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) when confronted with challenging introductory-level science courses. In the U.S., this trend is more pronounced for underrepresented minority (URM) and first-generation (FG) students, and contributes to persisting racial and social-class achievement gaps in higher education. Previous intervention studies have focused exclusively on race or social class, but have not examined how the 2 may be confounded and interact. This research therefore investigates the independent and interactive effects of race and social class as moderators of an intervention designed to promote performance, measured by grade in the course. In a double-blind randomized experiment conducted over 4 semesters of an introductory biology course (N = 1,040), we tested the effectiveness of a utility-value intervention in which students wrote about the personal relevance of course material. The utility-value intervention was successful in reducing the achievement gap for FG-URM students by 61%: the performance gap for FG-URM students, relative to continuing generation (CG)-Majority students, was large in the control condition, .84 grade points (d = .98), and the treatment effect for FG-URM students was .51 grade points (d = 0.55). The UV intervention helped students from all groups find utility value in the course content, and mediation analyses showed that the process of writing about utility value was particularly powerful for FG-URM students. Results highlight the importance of intersectionality in examining the independent and interactive effects of race and social class when evaluating interventions to close achievement gaps and the mechanisms through which they may operate. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Present status of radiation utilization in Thailand

    Chongkum, S.

    1994-01-01

    Present development of radiation utilization in Thailand covers two main areas, i.e. (1) production and utilization of radioisotopes and (2) radiation processing and technology. Radioisotope production from 2 megawatts Thai Research Reactor (TRR1/M1) is being studied, directed toward expanding the varieties of radioisotopes, improvement of quality, and technological development on quantity producing to meet the total national needs. However a large amount of radioisotopes is also imported mainly for industrial and medical applications. Radioisotopes and radiations are utilized in nuclear medicine for diagnosis and therapy from 30 hospitals and institutions. X-ray photographing, X-ray computer tomography and others are typical use for medical examination purposes, while Co-60 gamma rays and electron beam are in used for curing. Since 1972, Thailand has been participated to the IAEA/RCA Industrial Project, through the liaison of the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), and increases the awareness of industry to the economic benefits through the uses of nuclear technology. More than 60 companies are using radioisotopes for gauging, examination purposes and production controls, while these radioisotopes are mostly imported. Nuclear techniques in agriculture are addressed concerns with optimizing fertilizer application, determination soil-water-nitrogen fixation relationships, improving animal health and reproduction, measurement of toxic residues, appropriated food preservation techniques and breeding plant for better yield and disease resistance. The eradication of fruit flies by Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) with gamma rays has been successfully applied in northern and middle part of Thailand. The progress and present status of radiation utilization and processing in Thailand will be introduced. (author)

  9. Prospect of radioisotopes and radiation utilization

    Tabata, Yoneho

    1994-01-01

    Radiation Utilization in Japan has been positioned, together with nuclear power generation, as one of the important cornerstones, and research and development and practical usage of it has been proceeded with steadily in the fields of industry, agriculture, medicine, and so on. In the field of medicine, SPECT and PET facilities, radio-immunoassay, radiotherapy has come widely to practical use. In the field of agriculture and fisheries, improvement of breed, sterile insect technique have been implemented, and eradication of melon fly has been achieved. In the field of industry, it is expected that the practical use of neutron radiography technique and research and development of synthesizing high performance, high function materials are progressed. In the environment preservation area, a pilot test using electron beam to treat the exhaust gases out of coal fired power plants, city garbages combustion facilities, city high way tunnels in order to establish de- sulphur/de-nitrogen technique is carried out. As the international contribution in the field of radiation utilization, the cooperation with developing countries and the cooperation among advanced countries are reported. In this paper, a prospect of radioisotopes and radiation utilization is described. (J.P.N.)

  10. Utilizing Multidimensional Measures of Race in Education Research: The Case of Teacher Perceptions.

    Irizarry, Yasmiyn

    2015-10-01

    Education scholarship on race using quantitative data analysis consists largely of studies on the black-white dichotomy, and more recently, on the experiences of student within conventional racial/ethnic categories (white, Hispanic/Latina/o, Asian, black). Despite substantial shifts in the racial and ethnic composition of American children, studies continue to overlook the diverse racialized experiences for students of Asian and Latina/o descent, the racialization of immigration status, and the educational experiences of Native American students. This study provides one possible strategy for developing multidimensional measures of race using large-scale datasets and demonstrates the utility of multidimensional measures for examining educational inequality, using teacher perceptions of student behavior as a case in point. With data from the first grade wave of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort of 1998-1999, I examine differences in teacher ratings of Externalizing Problem Behaviors and Approaches to Learning across fourteen racialized subgroups at the intersections of race, ethnicity, and immigrant status. Results show substantial subgroup variation in teacher perceptions of problem and learning behaviors, while also highlighting key points of divergence and convergence within conventional racial/ethnic categories.

  11. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2002-01-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use

  12. Utilizing Critical Race Theory to Examine Race/Ethnicity, Racism, and Power in Student Development Theory and Research

    Hernández, Ebelia

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of social forces (racism, privilege, power) to the extent that is required by critical race theory (CRT) results in a paradigm shift in the way that we theorize and research student development, specifically self-authorship. This paradigm shift moves the center of analysis from individual, to the individual in relation to her…

  13. Internet utilization by radiation oncology patients

    Metz, J.M.; Devine, P.; DeNittis, A.; Stambaugh, M.; Jones, H.; Goldwein, J.; Whittington, R.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Studies describing the use of the Internet by radiation oncology patients are lacking. This multi-institutional study of cancer patients presenting to academic (AC), community (CO) and veterans (VA) radiation oncology centers was designed to analyze the use of the Internet, predictive factors for utilization, and barriers to access to the Internet. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire evaluating the use of the Internet was administered to 921 consecutive patients presenting to radiation oncology departments at AC, CO and VA Medical Centers. The study included 436 AC patients (47%), 284 CO patients (31%), and 201 VA patients (22%). A computer was available at home to 427 patients (46%) and 337 patients (37%) had Email access. The mean age of the patient population was 64 years (range=14-93). Males represented 70% of the patient population. The most common diagnoses included prostate cancer (33%), breast cancer (13%), and lung cancer (11%). Results: Overall, 265/921 patients (29%) were using the Internet to find cancer related information. The Internet was used by 42% of AC patients, 25% of CO patients and only 5% of VA patients (p<.0001). A computer was available at home in 62% AC vs. 45% CO vs. 12% VA patients (p<.0001). Patients < 60 years were much more likely to use the Internet than older patients (p<.0001). Most of the Internet users considered the information either very reliable (22%) or somewhat reliable (70%). Most patients were looking for information regarding treatment of their cancer (90%), management of side effects of treatment (74%), alternative/complementary treatments (65%) and clinical trials (51%). Unconventional medical therapies were purchased over the Internet by 12% of computer users. Products or services for the treatment or management of cancer were purchased online by 12% of Internet users. Conclusion: A significant number of cancer patients seen in radiation oncology departments at academic and community medical centers

  14. Standard light source utilizing spontaneous radiation

    Yamamoto, O.; Takenaga, M.; Tsujimoto, Y.

    1975-01-01

    A standard light source is described utilizing spontaneous radiation made by mixing a fluorescent substance LnVO 4 :X (wherein Ln is Y or Gd, and X is Dy or Eu) with a radioactive substance containing a radioactive isotope which is less in the degree of temperature variation of the intensity of emitted light and excellent in stability. Particularly when used in a light-receiving device having photomultiplier tubes, the said light source emits light quite similar to that of a thermoluminescent substance such as CaSO 4 :X (wherein X is Im, Dy, Sm or Mn), LiF or Mg 2 SiO 4 :Tb, and is excellent as a calibration high-stability standard light source for use in the above-mentioned light-receiving device. (auth)

  15. Cosmic radiation algorithm utilizing flight time tables

    Katja Kojo, M.Sc.; Mika Helminen, M.Sc.; Anssi Auvinen, M.D.Ph.D.; Katja Kojo, M.Sc.; Anssi Auvinen, M.D.Ph.D.; Gerhard Leuthold, D.Sc.

    2006-01-01

    Cosmic radiation is considerably higher on cruising altitudes used in aviation than at ground level. Exposure to cosmic radiation may increase cancer risk among pilots and cabin crew. The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has recommended that air crew should be classified as radiation workers. Quantification of cosmic radiation doses is necessary for assessment of potential health effects of such occupational exposure. For Finnair cabin crew (cabin attendants and stewards), flight history is not available for years prior to 1991 and therefore, other sources of information on number and type of flights have to be used. The lack of systematically recorded information is a problem for dose estimation for many other flight companies personnel as well. Several cosmic radiation dose estimations for cabin crew have been performed using different methods (e.g. 2-5), but they have suffered from various shortcomings. Retrospective exposure estimation is not possible with personal portable dosimeters. Methods that employ survey data for occupational dose assessment are prone to non-differential measurement error i.e. the cabin attendants do not remember correctly the number of past flights. Assessment procedures that utilize surrogate measurement methods i.e. the duration of employment, lack precision. The aim of the present study was to develop an assessment method for individual occupational exposure to cosmic radiation based on flight time tables. Our method provides an assessment method that does not require survey data or systematic recording of flight history, and it is rather quick, inexpensive, and possible to carry out in all other flight companies whose past time tables for the past periods exist. Dose assessment methods that employ survey data are prone to random error i.e. the cabin attendants do not remember correctly the number or types of routes that they have flown during the past. Our method avoids this since survey data are not needed

  16. Radiation Shielding Utilizing A High Temperature Superconducting Magnet

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Project objective is to evaluate human radiation protection and architecture utilizing existing superconducting magnet technology while attempting to significantly...

  17. Photodiodes utilization as ionizing radiation detectors

    Khoury, H.J.; Melo, F.A. de

    1987-01-01

    The response of photodiodes to α and γ radiation is studied, using for α spectrometry measures and for γ radiation dosimetry. Therefore, the response of BPY-12 photodiodes as α particle detector is first studied. The results show that the response is linear with the energy of incidence radiation, one resolution 25Kev for energy of 5,4 MeV from 241 Am. For dosimetric measures, the response of SHF-206 photodiodes, when exposed at γ radiation is studied, and the results show taht the response of this detector is linear with the dose ratio, proving its practicability in γ radiation dosimetry. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Research and development of radiation utilizations in 1981 at JAERI

    1981-01-01

    There is the field of radiation utilization such as the application of the effect of radiation on matters and the techniques of measurement and analysis utilizing the properties of radiation, in addition to the use of atomic energy as heat or electric power. The fields of application of radiation utilization are very wide, and are closely related to the health and daily life of people. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has performed the research and development on radiation utilization regarding radiochemistry, the application of irradiation, and the production and industrial utilization of radioisotopes. Also, the research of the radiation resistance of organic materials used for nuclear facilities, the development of organic materials, and the production of tritium have become necessary. In this booklet, the recent results of radiation utilization in the JAERI are summarized. The research and development of ion exchange membranes, organic glasses, the fixation of living body activators and water paints, the techniques of utilizing irradiation, the techniques of radioisotope productions and utilization, and the techniques related to the development of atomic energy are reported. (Kako, I.)

  19. The utilization of radiation sources in Angola

    Lemos, P.C.D.

    2001-01-01

    The report describes the situation that Angola, which joined the IAEA in September 1999, is facing with the lack of an appropriate infrastructure for the control of radiation sources. It emphasizes the country's needs in technical assistance from the IAEA and other Member States for improving its regulatory infrastructure for radiation safety. (author)

  20. Research and development of radiation utilization in 1986 at JAERI

    1986-01-01

    In the peaceful utilization of atomic energy, in addition to the method of utilizing the energy obtained by nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as electric power or heat source, there is the field of utilizing radiation, in which the effect that radiation exerts on substances and the properties of radiation are used for measurement, analysis and others. The fields of utilizing radiation are diverse such as medicine, technology and agriculture, and those directly related to the health and daily life of people are many. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has positively advanced the research and development on radiation utilization, which are related to the utilization of irradiation and the production and use of radioisotopes. The former is carried out in Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, and the latter in the Isotope Division, Tokai Research Establishment. Also, the research and development on the radiation-withstanding properties of organic materials and the production techniques for tritium are advanced, and it is expected to begin the highly advanced scientific and technological research using ion beam. The research and development of polymer materials, the techniques of using irradiation, the production and utilization of radioisotopes and others are reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. Diversity based on race, ethnicity, and sex, of the US radiation oncology physician workforce.

    Chapman, Christina H; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland

    2013-03-15

    To assess the current diversity of the US radiation oncology (RO) physician workforce by race, ethnicity, and sex. Publicly available American Medical Association, American Association of Medical Colleges, and US census registries were used to assess differences by race, ethnicity, and sex for 2010 among RO practicing physicians, academic faculty, residents, and residency applicants. RO resident diversity was compared to medical school graduates and medical oncology (MO) fellows. Significant differences in diversity of RO residents by race, ethnicity, and sex were evaluated between 2003 and 2010 academic years. Females and traditionally underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM), blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders are underrepresented as RO residents (33.3% and 6.9%, respectively), faculty (23.8%, 8.1%), and practicing physicians (25.5%, 7.2%) levels compared with the US population (50.8%, 30.0%; Pworkforce. Given existing cancer disparities, further research and efforts are needed to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse society. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gamma radiation utilization for polymers synthesis

    Santos, L.G. dos; Silva Filho, E.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of styrene monomer were irradiated with gamma rays from a sup(60)Co source, with doses in the range of zero to 32600 Gray (Gy). Viscosity analysis performed by using the method of Stokes showed an increase in the viscosity of the material. This result characterizes the occurrence of polymerization induced by the radiation. (author)

  3. Utilization of radiation in non destructive tests

    Lopes, R.T.; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Junqueira, M.M.; Matos, J.A. de; Castello Branco, L.M.; Barros Junior, J.D.; Borges, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory from COPPE/UFRJ has been developed techniques for using nuclear radiations to obtain images for non-destructive materials testing and medicine. With this objective, some prototypes of transmission computerized tomography systems using parallel beans and fan beans, with computer automation, including the mathematical process of image reprocessing and presentation in videos or printers are constructed [pt

  4. Utilization of polysaccharides by radiation processing

    Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Radiation treatment has been applied for improvement or pasteurization of agro-resources to recycle the resources and to reduce the pollution of environment. By using the radiation effect for pasteurization, upgrading of cellulosic wastes of oil palm to animal feeds and mushroom has been studied under the bilateral research cooperation between JAERI and MINT (Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research). The necessary dose for pasteurization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB), which is a main cellulosic by-product of palm oil industry, was determined as 10 kGy. After pasteurization, the EFB substrate was inoculated with Pleurotus sajor-caju and fermented for 1 month. The digestibility and nutritional value of fermented products were evaluated as ruminant feeds and the mushroom can be produced as by-product. For the improvement of resources, radiation effects on polysaccharides such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to induce the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities. The anti-bacterial activity and elicitor activity of chitosan were induced by irradiation. The induction of phytoalexins was also observed by irradiated pectin but the higher elicitor activity for pisatin was obtained by chitosan than pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa carrageenan irradiated at 100 kGy. Furthermore, some radiation degraded polysaccharides suppressed the damage of environmental stress on plants. (author)

  5. Utilization of polysaccharides by radiation processing

    Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-01-01

    Radiation treatment has been applied for improvement or pasteurization of agro-resources to recycle the resources and to reduce the pollution of environment. By using the radiation effect for pasteurization, upgrading of cellulosic wastes of oil palm to animal feeds and mushroom has been studied under the bilateral research cooperation between JAERI and MINT (Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research). The necessary dose for pasteurization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (EFB), which is a main cellulosic by-product of palm oil industry, was determined as 10 kGy. After pasteurization, the EFB substrate was inoculated with Pleurotus sajor-caju and fermented for 1 month. The digestibility and nutritional value of fermented products were evaluated as ruminant feeds and the mushroom can be produced as by-product. For the improvement of resources, radiation effects on polysaccharides such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated to induce the biological activities. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and induced various kinds of biological activities. The anti-bacterial activity and elicitor activity of chitosan were induced by irradiation. The induction of phytoalexins was also observed by irradiated pectin but the higher elicitor activity for pisatin was obtained by chitosan than pectin. For the plant growth promotion, alginate derived from brown marine algae, chitosan and ligno-cellulosic extracts show a strong activity. carrageenan derived from red marine algae can promote growth of rice and the highest effect was obtained with kappa carrageenan irradiated at 100 kGy. Furthermore, some radiation degraded polysaccharides suppressed the damage of environmental stress on plants. (author)

  6. Fabrication and utilization of semiconductor radiation detectors

    Lemos Junior, Orlando Ferreira

    1969-01-01

    This paper describes the assembly of the equipment for the fabrication of Ge-Li drifted detectors and the technique used in the preparation of a Planar detector of 7 cm 2 x 0,5 cm for the Laboratory of the Linear Accelerator at the University of Sao Paulo, as well as the utilization of a 22 cm 3 coaxial detector for the analysis of fission product gamma rays at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, R J, Brazil. (author)

  7. The Utility of "Race" and "Ethnicity" in the Multidimensional Identities of Asian American Students

    Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In a qualitative study we examined the constructs "race" and "ethnicity" and their relative importance in the multidimensional identities of 52 Asian American undergraduates across 2 universities. Findings suggest these constructs are useful for Asian American students' identity claims and that multiple contextual influences…

  8. Diversity Based on Race, Ethnicity, and Sex, of the US Radiation Oncology Physician Workforce

    Chapman, Christina H.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the current diversity of the US radiation oncology (RO) physician workforce by race, ethnicity, and sex. Methods and Materials: Publicly available American Medical Association, American Association of Medical Colleges, and US census registries were used to assess differences by race, ethnicity, and sex for 2010 among RO practicing physicians, academic faculty, residents, and residency applicants. RO resident diversity was compared to medical school graduates and medical oncology (MO) fellows. Significant differences in diversity of RO residents by race, ethnicity, and sex were evaluated between 2003 and 2010 academic years. Results: Females and traditionally underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM), blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders are underrepresented as RO residents (33.3% and 6.9%, respectively), faculty (23.8%, 8.1%), and practicing physicians (25.5%, 7.2%) levels compared with the US population (50.8%, 30.0%; P<.01). Although females and URMs remain underrepresented at the resident trainee level compared with their proportions as medical school graduates (48.3%, 15.6%) and MO fellows (45.0%, 10.8%; P<.01), females are significantly increased in proportion as RO residents compared with RO practicing physicians (P<.01), whereas representation of individual URM groups as RO residents is no different than current practicing physicians. There is no trend toward increased diversification for female or URM trainees over 8 years, suggesting underrepresentation is not diminishing. Conclusions: Females and URM are underrepresented in the RO physician workforce. Given existing cancer disparities, further research and efforts are needed to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse society

  9. Diversity Based on Race, Ethnicity, and Sex, of the US Radiation Oncology Physician Workforce

    Chapman, Christina H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Deville, Curtiland, E-mail: deville@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the current diversity of the US radiation oncology (RO) physician workforce by race, ethnicity, and sex. Methods and Materials: Publicly available American Medical Association, American Association of Medical Colleges, and US census registries were used to assess differences by race, ethnicity, and sex for 2010 among RO practicing physicians, academic faculty, residents, and residency applicants. RO resident diversity was compared to medical school graduates and medical oncology (MO) fellows. Significant differences in diversity of RO residents by race, ethnicity, and sex were evaluated between 2003 and 2010 academic years. Results: Females and traditionally underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM), blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders are underrepresented as RO residents (33.3% and 6.9%, respectively), faculty (23.8%, 8.1%), and practicing physicians (25.5%, 7.2%) levels compared with the US population (50.8%, 30.0%; P<.01). Although females and URMs remain underrepresented at the resident trainee level compared with their proportions as medical school graduates (48.3%, 15.6%) and MO fellows (45.0%, 10.8%; P<.01), females are significantly increased in proportion as RO residents compared with RO practicing physicians (P<.01), whereas representation of individual URM groups as RO residents is no different than current practicing physicians. There is no trend toward increased diversification for female or URM trainees over 8 years, suggesting underrepresentation is not diminishing. Conclusions: Females and URM are underrepresented in the RO physician workforce. Given existing cancer disparities, further research and efforts are needed to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse society.

  10. Development of radiation utilization for economic growth in China

    Lu Yanxiao

    1994-01-01

    The program of radiation utilization in China was initiated with the development of nuclear industry in the late 1950s. From then on, the establishment of relatively comprehensive nuclear industrial system and a fair number of talent technical personnel have laid the foundation for radiation utilization in industry, agriculture, medicine and so on. Radioisotopes and radiation become one of the most effective means for acquiring data and information and changing material properties in modern techniques. They are, in many respects, unique and cannot replaced by other techniques. In recent years the considerable progress in the development, commercialization and large-scale utilization of radioisotopes and radiation has been creating economic and social benefits for Chinese modernization. The applications in agriculture have mainly embodied in mutation breeding of crops and so on through radiation or in combination with other methods to provide excellent mutant varieties. The important applications in medicine are the medical diagnosis with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and radiopharmaceutical imaging, and cancer therapy with radioisotopes and electron beam. Well-established methods have bee offered for routine clinic applications to help to heal the patients and rescue the lives. The industrial applications are of key importance in economic growth in China. In fact, radiation processing and nucleonic control systems (NCS) for industrial utilization are very useful to technological transformation of Chinese traditional industries. The radiation utilization in industries can be emerging as new high-tech industries. A fuller exploitation of radiation utilization is expected to meet the requirements of high growth of national economy and to bridge the gap between China and the developed countries in the world in nuclear application. (author)

  11. Development of radiation utilization for economic growth in China

    Yanxiao, Lu [China Nuclear Information Center, Beijing, BJ (China)

    1994-01-01

    The program of radiation utilization in China was initiated with the development of nuclear industry in the late 1950s. From then on, the establishment of relatively comprehensive nuclear industrial system and a fair number of talent technical personnel have laid the foundation for radiation utilization in industry, agriculture, medicine and so on. Radioisotopes and radiation become one of the most effective means for acquiring data and information and changing material properties in modern techniques. They are, in many respects, unique and cannot replaced by other techniques. In recent years the considerable progress in the development, commercialization and large-scale utilization of radioisotopes and radiation has been creating economic and social benefits for Chinese modernization. The applications in agriculture have mainly embodied in mutation breeding of crops and so on through radiation or in combination with other methods to provide excellent mutant varieties. The important applications in medicine are the medical diagnosis with radioimmunoassay (RIA) and radiopharmaceutical imaging, and cancer therapy with radioisotopes and electron beam. Well-established methods have bee offered for routine clinic applications to help to heal the patients and rescue the lives. The industrial applications are of key importance in economic growth in China. In fact, radiation processing and nucleonic control systems (NCS) for industrial utilization are very useful to technological transformation of Chinese traditional industries. The radiation utilization in industries can be emerging as new high-tech industries. A fuller exploitation of radiation utilization is expected to meet the requirements of high growth of national economy and to bridge the gap between China and the developed countries in the world in nuclear application. (author).

  12. Present status of research on radiation utilization in 1994 at JAERI. Utilization of irradiation and RI production and utilization

    1994-10-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment is in charge of the utilization of irradiation, and Tokai Research Establishment is in charge of the production and utilization of radioisotopes. As for the utilization of irradiation the development of new polymers, the development of environment preservation technology such as flue gas treatment, and by using various ion beams from four accelerators, the development of the materials used for space environment, nuclear fusion and new functional materials, the research on the radiation application to biotechnology, the development of the production and utilization of new radioisotopes have been carried out. As for the production and utilization of radioisotopes, the development of new products and new utilization techniques, the technology of producing and using a large amount of tritium, and the research on the chemical behavior of tritium have been carried out. The international cooperations have been promoted positively. In this report, the research activities in 1994 are described. (K.I.)

  13. Race-ethnicity and gender differences in VA health care service utilization among U.S. veterans of recent conflicts.

    Koo, Kelly H; Madden, Erin; Maguen, Shira

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare health care utilization patterns by race-ethnicity and gender among veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A retrospective analysis was conducted with records from U.S. service members and veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan who enrolled in health care through the Veterans Health Administration, who received a psychiatric diagnosis, and who had used primary or mental health outpatient care between October 7, 2001, and December 31, 2012 (N=309,050). Racial-ethnic minority groups were first collapsed together and compared with whites and then separated by racial-ethnic group. Gender was also tested as a moderator of utilization. Although rates of mental health outpatient care, primary care, and emergency service utilization were relatively similar for racial-ethnic minority groups and whites, minority groups were admitted to psychiatric inpatient care at lower rates than whites. When veterans were separately categorized by specific racial-ethnic groups, some differences in utilization rates emerged; most notably, only black and Hispanic men were admitted less frequently to psychiatric inpatient care, and male and female Asian/Pacific Islander veterans used emergency services less, than their white counterparts. Gender moderated the association between race-ethnicity and mental health outpatient use, such that American Indian and Hispanic women used mental health outpatient services less than white women, but American Indian and Hispanic men showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, black men were more likely than white men to use mental health outpatient services, but there was no difference between these women. Although service utilization rates between minority groups and whites were similar when minority groups were combined, examination of utilization by racial-ethnic groups and by men and women separately yielded more robust findings.

  14. Analysis of status of radiation/radioisotopes utilization

    Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Na Kyung; Kim, Kon Wuk

    2017-01-01

    The use of radiation and radioisotopes in Korea has been increasing each year, and its impact on economy and industry is expected to be increasing progressively following the development of industrial technology and the expansion of their usage. To establish and supporting policies for industries using radiation and radioisotopes, it is necessary to check the status of related industries accurately, as well as to gather data required to establish plans for industrial development by studying both revenues and economic scale (contributing to revenue). o analyze the status of utilization, surveys were carried out on 6,621 organizations engaged in nuclear operations handling radiation and radioisotopes pursuant to the Nuclear Safety Act as of end 2014, on 33,471 medical institutions using radiation generators for medical and diagnostic purposes pursuant to the Medical Service Act, and on 2,218 organizations using radiation generators for animal diagnostics pursuant to the Veterinary License Act. he overall status of the domestic radiation market including the number of user organizations, that of employees, and the size of distributions (imports, productions, and exports) with which the scale of domestic radiation market can be judged showed a growth trend compared to the previous year, though the number of employees for radiation operation in industrial sector, research sector, education sector, military sector, and power plants (nuclear power plants) and the size of imports was reduced somewhat. t is expected that data acquired through periodic surveys on the status of utilization would be utilized practically in establishing governmental policies related to the promotion of usage of radiation and radioisotopes, and also be utilized widely in cultivating and developing the industry efficiently to invigorate the related industries

  15. Analysis of status of radiation/radioisotopes utilization

    Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Na Kyung; Kim, Kon Wuk [Business Innovation Office, Korean Association for Radiation Application, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The use of radiation and radioisotopes in Korea has been increasing each year, and its impact on economy and industry is expected to be increasing progressively following the development of industrial technology and the expansion of their usage. To establish and supporting policies for industries using radiation and radioisotopes, it is necessary to check the status of related industries accurately, as well as to gather data required to establish plans for industrial development by studying both revenues and economic scale (contributing to revenue). o analyze the status of utilization, surveys were carried out on 6,621 organizations engaged in nuclear operations handling radiation and radioisotopes pursuant to the Nuclear Safety Act as of end 2014, on 33,471 medical institutions using radiation generators for medical and diagnostic purposes pursuant to the Medical Service Act, and on 2,218 organizations using radiation generators for animal diagnostics pursuant to the Veterinary License Act. he overall status of the domestic radiation market including the number of user organizations, that of employees, and the size of distributions (imports, productions, and exports) with which the scale of domestic radiation market can be judged showed a growth trend compared to the previous year, though the number of employees for radiation operation in industrial sector, research sector, education sector, military sector, and power plants (nuclear power plants) and the size of imports was reduced somewhat. t is expected that data acquired through periodic surveys on the status of utilization would be utilized practically in establishing governmental policies related to the promotion of usage of radiation and radioisotopes, and also be utilized widely in cultivating and developing the industry efficiently to invigorate the related industries.

  16. Current situation of RI's and radiation utilization in Japan

    1976-01-01

    Usage of RIs and radiation is now extensive, for the improvement of industrial production techniques and also in medicine and agriculture. The current situation in Japan is described as follows: enterprises using RIs, circulation of RIs, the equipments provided with RIs in private enterprises, commercial RI, and radiation utilization, expenditures and sales related to RIs and radiation in mining and industries, and personnel. The number of places using RIs and radiation totaled about 3,200 (in 1975). The expenditures for RIs and radiation in private enterprises are about 17,500 million yen while sales are 20,800 million yen (both in fiscal 1974). The total number of personnel engaged in RI and radiation works is about 62,000. (Mori, K.)

  17. Case study on utilization of radiation in sludge treatment

    Kawakami, Waichiro

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of radiation to sludge treatment has been studied as a case study of the utilization of radiation to environmental protection by the society for the utilization of radiation in Japan Atomic Industrial Forum Inc., and the result is presented in this paper. The examined radiation sources to sterilize sludge were γ-ray and electron beam, and sludge was irradiated in the forms of slurry or cake. Four treatment conditions by the combination of the radiation sources and the sludge conditions were examined. From the examined results, it was estimated that in the case one (γ-ray and slurry), the output of 25 kW or 1.6 million curie was required for the sludge treatment capacity of 250 tons/day, in the case two (electron beam and slurry), an accelerator of 20 mA or 60 mA was required for the capacity of 250 or 750 tons/day, respectively, in the case three (γ-ray and cake), a radiation source of 0.6 million curie was required for the capacity of 50 tons/day, and in the case four (electron beam and cake), an accelerator of 4 mA or 12 mA was required for the capacity of 50 tons/day or 150 tons/day. (Yoshitake, I.)

  18. Medicare claims indicators of healthcare utilization differences after hospitalization for ischemic stroke: Race, gender, and caregiving effects.

    Roth, David L; Sheehan, Orla C; Huang, Jin; Rhodes, James D; Judd, Suzanne E; Kilgore, Meredith; Kissela, Brett; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Haley, William E

    2016-10-01

    Background Differences in healthcare utilization after stroke may partly explain race or gender differences in stroke outcomes and identify factors that might reduce post-acute stroke care costs. Aim To examine systematic differences in Medicare claims for healthcare utilization after hospitalization for ischemic stroke in a US population-based sample. Methods Claims were examined over a six-month period after hospitalization for 279 ischemic stroke survivors 65 years or older from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. Statistical analyses examined differences in post-acute healthcare utilization, adjusted for pre-stroke utilization, as a function of race (African-American vs. White), gender, age, stroke belt residence, income, Medicaid dual-eligibility, Charlson comorbidity index, and whether the person lived with an available caregiver. Results After adjusting for covariates, women were more likely than men to receive home health care and to use emergency department services during the post-acute care period. These effects were maintained even after further adjustment for acute stroke severity. African-Americans had more home health care visits than Whites among patients who received some home health care. Having a co-residing caregiver was associated with reduced acute hospitalization length of stay and fewer post-acute emergency department and primary care physician visits. Conclusions Underutilization of healthcare after stroke does not appear to explain poorer long-term stroke outcomes for women and African-Americans in this epidemiologically-derived sample. Caregiver availability may contribute to reduced formal care and cost during the post-acute period.

  19. Density meters utilizing ionizing radiation: definitions and test methods

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This standard is applicable to density meters utilizing ionizing radiation, designed for the measurement of the density of liquids, slurries or fluidized solids. The standard applies to transmission-type instruments only. Reference to compliance with this standard shall identify any deviations and the reasons for such deviations. Safety aspects are not included but should fulfill the requirements of all relevant internationally accepted standards

  20. Utilization of SRNL-developed radiation-resistant polymer in high radiation environments

    Skibo, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-27

    The radiation-resistant polymer developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory is adaptable for multiple applications to enhance polymer endurance and effectiveness in radiation environments. SRNL offers to collaborate with TEPCO in evaluation, testing, and utilization of SRNL’s radiation-resistant polymer in the D&D of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Refinement of the scope and associated costs will be conducted in consultation with TECPO.

  1. Yield accumulation in irrigated sugarcane. II. Utilization of intercepted radiation

    Muchow, R.C.; Evensen, C.I.; Osgood, R.V.; Robertson, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Intercepted radiation is a major driving variable of crop production under high-input irrigated conditions. Quantitative information on the utilization of radiation in yield accumulation allows extrapolation beyond the current season and location, and when this information is incorporated into crop growth simulation models, the effect of crop age on the productivity of different cultivars can be examined under different climatic conditions. This paper examines the differential performance of high-yielding sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids) crops in terms of the amount of short-wave solar radiation intercepted (Si) and the efficiency of use of intercepted radiation (RUE) in biomass production. Biomass accumulation during the 12- to 24-mo crop cycle was examined for two experiments conducted in Hawaii, and three experiments conducted in tropical Australia from 1991 to 1993. The analysis showed that (i) RUE was much less for growth after 12 mo than in the first 12 mo; (ii) maximum RUE of sugarcane approaches 2.0 g MJ(-1); (iii) biomass accumulation beyond 12 mo was not related directly to radiation utilization; and (iv) cultivars differed in Si, but differences in RUE could not be unequivocally assessed due to the confounding effect of variable recovery of trash in biomass estimates. It is concluded that stalk death and consequent biomass loss are important factors contributing to yield variation in sugarcane crops growing for 12 to 24 mo, with a yield plateau occurring at variable crop ages during the second year of growth

  2. Economic scale of utilization of radiation in Japan

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Kume, Tamikazu; Makuuchi, Keizo

    2001-01-01

    Economic scale, not benefits, of utilization of radiation in Japan in 1997 was estimated without use of any calculation code. The objects were industrial usage, agricultural application and medical utilization. In the third item, the scale was the expense of medical use in patients of radiation generating apparatuses, of which production was regarded as belonging to the first item. The scale was found to be around 8,569,900,000,000 (8,569.9b) yen, of which 85% was in industry, 1% in agriculture and 14% in medicine, and to be about 1.7% GDP (General Domestic Products). In industry, its 75% was in manufacturing the semi-conductor. Medical use (91% of whole medicine) involved roentgenography (47%), CT (37%), nuclear medicine (12%) and radiotherapy (5%). The scale of radioisotope utilization was 65.4b yen in industry, 0.16b yen in agriculture and 1.1b yen in medicine of which 53% was due to 60 Co. If adding the scale of atomic energy utilization (7,274.2b yen) to above, 15,844.1b yen (3.2% GDP) was the total scale of atomic power utilization. (K.H.)

  3. Development of new materials by utilizing radiation crosslinking

    Ueno, Keiji; Uda, Yujiro; Suzuki, Shizuo

    1989-01-01

    About 30 years have elapsed since the cables by electron beam crosslinking were developed as the first industrial utilization of radiation in Japan. At present about 200 electron beam accelerators are used industrially in Japan, and cable industry ranks at the top, followed by foaming polyethylene and curing, and the preliminary vulcanization of tires. The effect of these irradiations is the reforming of polymers by radiation crosslinking. In cables, the heat resistance and chemical resistance of insulators are improved by radiation crosslinking. By applying radiation crosslinking to polyurethane elastomer, its weakest point, waterproof property, was improved. Moreover, by using this crosslinked polyurethane elastomer for cable coating, the reliability of the sensor cables for brake system was able to be remarkably improved. As another new application of radiation crosslinking process, the improvement of the heat resistance of engineering plasties was examined. The structure of radiation crosslinked urethane elastomer cables, their endurance in hot water and oil, and the life, and the characteristics of sensor cables are reported. Multi-functional monomers, the molecular structure, and the various characteristics of engineering plastics are described. (K.I.)

  4. Utilization of radiations in mutation breeding of tuber crops

    Kukimura, H.

    1981-01-01

    Most of the tuber crops are vegetatively propagated and their spontaneous mutations have been constructively utilized to practical farming. Significance of utilization of mutations to breeding should not be overlooked, since mutation can be articially induced by various mutagenic agents. In tuber crops, ionizing radiations are mostly applied to induce mutations. Radiosensitivity varies with species, genotypes and organs. For the purpose of mutation induction, 10-20 kR of gamma-rays is given to tubers and/or shoots in sweet potato and 2-10 kR in potato. It should be noted that radiation damage is more or less transmissible to later vegetative generations. A useful characters in practical agriculture, following mutations have been obtained so far: skin colour, short stemmed, changes in dry matter content, total sugars content and tuber yield, earlier maturity and sculf resistance in sweet potato. And, skin colour, changes in starch content and stolon length, day-neutral tuberization and cyst-nematode resistance in potato. Apart from mutations, radiation can be utilized for breaking down the incompatibility in sweet potato. Promising mutant clones with probable release in Japan are Kyushu 78 of sweet potato and Koniku 16 and Konkei 55 of potato. (author)

  5. SU-E-T-565: RAdiation Resistance of Cancer CElls Using GEANT4 DNA: RACE

    Perrot, Y; Payno, H; Delage, E; Maigne, L [Clermont Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Aubiere (France); Incerti, S [Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Centres d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, Gradignan (France); Debiton, E; Peyrode, C; Chezal, J; Miot-Noirault, E; Degoul, F [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, Imagerie Moleculaire et Therapie Vectorisee, INSERM U990, Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of the RACE project is to develop a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4-DNA toolkit and measurements of radiation damage on 3D melanoma and chondrosarcoma culture cells coupled with gadolinium nanoparticles. We currently expose the status of the developments regarding simulations. Methods: Monte Carlo studies are driven using the Geant4 toolkit and the Geant4-DNA extension. In order to model the geometry of a cell population, the opensource CPOP++ program is being developed for the geometrical representation of 3D cell populations including a specific cell mesh coupled with a multi-agent system. Each cell includes cytoplasm and nucleus. The correct modeling of the cell population has been validated with confocal microscopy images of spheroids. The Geant4 Livermore physics models are used to simulate the interactions of a 250 keV X-ray beam and the production of secondaries from gadolinium nanoparticles supposed to be fixed on the cell membranes. Geant4-DNA processes are used to simulate the interactions of charged particles with the cells. An atomistic description of the DNA molecule, from PDB (Protein Data Bank) files, is provided by the so-called PDB4DNA Geant4 user application we developed to score energy depositions in DNA base pairs and sugar-phosphate groups. Results: At the microscopic level, our simulations enable assessing microscopic energy distribution in each cell compartment of a realistic 3D cell population. Dose enhancement factors due to the presence of gadolinium nanoparticles can be estimated. At the nanometer scale, direct damages on nuclear DNA are also estimated. Conclusion: We successfully simulated the impact of direct radiations on a realistic 3D cell population model compatible with microdosimetry calculations using the Geant4-DNA toolkit. Upcoming validation and the future integration of the radiochemistry module of Geant4-DNA will propose to correlate clusters of ionizations with in vitro

  6. Utility of an Australasian registry for children undergoing radiation treatment

    Ahern, Verity

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of an Australasian registry ('the Registry') for children undergoing radiation treatment (RT). Children under the age of 16years who received a course of radiation between January 1997 and December 2010 and were enrolled on the Registry form the subjects of this study. A total of 2232 courses of RT were delivered, predominantly with radical intent (87%). Registrations fluctuated over time, but around one-half of children diagnosed with cancer undergo a course of RT. The most prevalent age range at time of RT was 10–15years, and the most common diagnoses were central nervous system tumours (34%) and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (20%). The Registry provides a reflection of the patterns of care of children undergoing RT in Australia and a mechanism for determining the resources necessary to manage children by RT (human, facilities and emerging technologies, such as proton therapy). It lacks the detail to provide information on radiotherapy quality and disease outcomes which should be the subject of separate audit studies. The utility of the Registry has been hampered by its voluntary nature and varying needs for consent. Completion of registry forms is a logical requirement for inclusion in the definition of a subspecialist in paediatric radiation oncology.

  7. Actual conditions of radiation control in radioisotope utilization field

    Kakihara, Koji

    1980-01-01

    It may be said that the actual conditions on radiation safety are being improved in utilizing radioisotopes or radiation in Japan. It depends greatly on the results of the voluntary effort of users and the regulations by the ''radiation injury prevention law'' and its relevant ordinances. However, the actual conditions of the strict observation of the law are much insufficient. According to the results of official inspection in 1978, 60% of whole enterprises concerned and 73% of educational and medical organizations were judged as incomplete. Such tendency should not be left as it is, but it should also be noticed that there are realities that critical accidents or injuries have not occurred even in such conditions as many violations mentioned above. Since the existing law has not been subjected to essential revision in the past two decades, it might be said that the law does not properly fit to the present conditions because the progress of related techniques was made during this period. Meanwhile, difficulties exist in measuring the low level concentration in the use of low energy radioisotopes or tracer experiments such as in the process analysis in factories or in the analysis of the movement of trace constituent in soil. Further, there is a problem on the necessity of securing the chief technicians handling radiation, and there is the contradiction that the chief technicians are useless in normal condition but are powerless in case of accidents. This situation should be improved as soon as possible. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  8. Radiation shielding for the Super Collider West Utility region

    Meinke, R.; Mokhov, N.; Orth, D.; Parker, B.; Plant, D.

    1994-02-01

    Shielding considerations in the 20 x 20-TeV Superconducting Super Collider are strongly correlated with detailed machine specifics in the various accelerator sections. The West Utility, the most complex area of the Collider, concentrates all the major accelerator subsystems in a single area. The beam loss rate and associated radiation levels in this region are anticipated to be quite high, and massive radiation shielding is therefore required to protect personnel, Collider components, and the environment. The challenging task of simultaneously optimizing accelerator design and radiation shielding, both of which are strongly influenced by subsystem design details, requires the integration of several complex simulation codes. To this end we have performed exhaustive hadronic shower simulations with the MARS12 program; detailed accelerator lattice and optics optimization via the SYNCH, MAD, and MAGIC codes; and extensive 3-D configuration modeling of the accelerator tunnel and subsystems geometries. Our technique and the non-trivial results from such a combined approach are presented here. An integrated procedure is found invaluable in developing cost-effective radiation shielding solutions

  9. Present status of industrial utilization of radiation exposure

    Machi, Sueo

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotopes, such as Co-60 and Cs-137, and accelerators for electrically generating radiations are widely used as radiation sources for industrial radiation exposure applications. It is estimated that about 100 electron accelerators are in use in Japan as of 1985 in the industrial and R and D fields while about 300 - 400 accelerators and more than 130 Co-60 irradiation systems have been installed over the world. In the field of materials development, accelerators are currently utilized for production of cross-linked, high-temperature resistant cable cladding, production of heat-shrinkable polymer materials, pre-crosslinking of rubber sheet for tier, production of expanded polyethylene, graft copolymerization for producing diaphragms for battery, electron-beam surface coating, and lithography for semiconductor manufacturing. In the field of environmental protection, accelerators are employed for removal of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides from gas emission, sterilization and composting of sludge, and electron treatment of water. Radiations are also used for sterilization of medical instruments. In addition, high-energy ion beam irradiation has already come into practical use in the field of semiconductor manufacturing and metallic surface treatment. (Nogami, K.)

  10. Post-marathon wearing of Masai Barefoot Technology shoes facilitates recovery from race-induced fatigue: an evaluation utilizing a visual analog scale

    Nakagawa K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Kento Nakagawa, Takashi Obu, Kazuyuki KanosueFaculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Saitama, Japan Purpose: To investigate the potential benefit of post-race wearing of unstable shoes (Masai Barefoot Technology [MBT] on recovery from marathon race–induced fatigue.Patients and methods: Forty-five runners who participated in a full marathon race were divided into three groups: 1 MBT shoes, 2 trail running shoes, and 3 control (CON. Participants ran a full marathon with their own running shoes, and then put on the assigned shoes immediately after the race. They continued to wear the assigned shoes for the ensuing 3 days. The CON group wore their usual shoes. Estimates of post-race fatigue were made by the participants on questionnaires that utilized a visual analog scale. Estimates were made just after the race, as well as for the next 3 days.Results: The subjective fatigue of the MBT group was lower than that of the CON (P<0.05 or trail running shoe groups (P<0.05 on day 3.Conclusion: MBT shoe intervention can promote recovery from the fatigue induced by running a full marathon.Keywords: footwear, VAS, full marathon

  11. Prospective evaluation of radiation-induced skin toxicity in a race/ethnically diverse breast cancer population

    Wright, Jean L.; Takita, Cristiane; Reis, Isildinha M.; Zhao, Wei; Lee, Eunkyung; Nelson, Omar L.; Hu, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated predictors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in a prospective study of a tri-racial/ethnic breast cancer population. We evaluated patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment variables in the first 392 patients in a prospective study assessing radiation-induced skin toxicity. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate potential predictors of skin toxicity. The study consists of 59 non-Hispanic whites (NHW; 15%), 241 Hispanic Whites (HW; 62%), 79 black or African Americans (AA; 20%), and 13 others (3%). Overall, 48% developed grade 0–1 skin toxicity, 49.8% grade 2, and 2.2% grade 3 by the National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) scale. Twenty-one percent developed moist desquamation. In multivariate analysis, higher body mass index (BMI; OR = 2.09; 95%CI = 1.15, 3.82), higher disease stage (OR = 1.82; 95%CI = 1.06, 3.11), ER-positive/PR-negative status (OR = 2.74; 95%CI = 1.26, 5.98), and conventionally fractionated regimens (OR = 3.25; 95%CI = 1.76, 6.01) were significantly associated with higher skin toxicity grade after adjustment for age, race, ethnicity, ER status, and breast volume. BMI specifically predicted for moist desquamation, but not degree of erythema. In this racially and ethnically diverse cohort of breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the intact breast, risk factors including BMI, disease stage, and conventionally fractionated radiation predicted for higher skin toxicity grade, whereas age, race, ethnicity, and breast volume did not. BMI specifically predicted for moist desquamation, suggesting that preventive measures to address this particular outcome should be investigated

  12. Study on the status of radiation/radioisotope utilization during the last 5 years

    Lee, Yun Jong; Park, Tae Jin; Kuk, Il Hiun

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study is derivation of important indices for establishing government policy to promote radiation and radioisotope utilization and for setting up effective strategy o develop related industries, on the basis of utilization data, and deduction of economic scale induced by using radiation and radioisotope, through the analysis of economic contribution by multi-variate model. Uses of radiation and radioisotopes are increasing annually in Korea, and the effect of utilization to economy and industry is continuously enlarged in accordance with technology development and expansion of radiation and radioisotope uses. Indices related to radiation nd radioisotope uses, which are useful for the promotion of utilization and establishment of development strategy, have to be derived and updated every year. Important indices related to radiation and radioisotope utilization are derived through the study. The indices are useful for planning establishing, and revising policies to promote radiation and radioisotope utilization, and re furthermore valuable for public acceptance nuclear energy

  13. Putative adult neurogenesis in two domestic pigeon breeds (Columba livia domestica): racing homer versus utility carneau pigeons.

    Mazengenya, Pedzisai; Bhagwandin, Adhil; Nkomozepi, Pilani; Manger, Paul R; Ihunwo, Amadi O

    2017-07-01

    Generation of neurons in the brains of adult birds has been studied extensively in the telencephalon of song birds and few studies are reported on the distribution of PCNA and DCX in the telencephalon of adult non-song learning birds. We report here on adult neurogenesis throughout the brains of two breeds of adult domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica), the racing homer and utility carneau using endogenous immunohistochemical markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) for proliferating cells and doublecortin (DCX) for immature and migrating neurons. The distribution of PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was very similar in both pigeon breeds with only a few minor differences. In both pigeons, PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was observed in the olfactory bulbs, walls of the lateral ventricle, telencephalic subdivisions of the pallium and subpallium, diencephalon, mesencephalon and cerebellum. Generally, the olfactory bulbs and telencephalon had more PCNA and DCX cells than other regions. Two proliferative hotspots were evident in the dorsal and ventral poles of the lateral ventricles. PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells migrated radially from the walls of the lateral ventricle into the parenchyma. In most telencephalic regions, the density of PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells increased from rostral to caudal, except in the mesopallium where the density decreased from rostral to middle levels and then increased caudally. DCX immunoreactivity was more intense in fibres than in cell bodies and DCX-immunoreactive cells included small granular cells, fusiform bipolar cells, large round and or polygonal multipolar cells. The similarity in the distribution of proliferating cells and new neurons in the telencephalon of the two breeds of pigeons may suggest that adult neurogenesis is a conserved trait as an ecological adaptation irrespective of body size.

  14. Putative adult neurogenesis in two domestic pigeon breeds (Columba livia domestica: racing homer versus utility carneau pigeons

    Pedzisai Mazengenya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation of neurons in the brains of adult birds has been studied extensively in the telencephalon of song birds and few studies are reported on the distribution of PCNA and DCX in the telencephalon of adult non-song learning birds. We report here on adult neurogenesis throughout the brains of two breeds of adult domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica, the racing homer and utility carneau using endogenous immunohistochemical markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA for proliferating cells and doublecortin (DCX for immature and migrating neurons. The distribution of PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was very similar in both pigeon breeds with only a few minor differences. In both pigeons, PCNA and DCX immunoreactivity was observed in the olfactory bulbs, walls of the lateral ventricle, telencephalic subdivisions of the pallium and subpallium, diencephalon, mesencephalon and cerebellum. Generally, the olfactory bulbs and telencephalon had more PCNA and DCX cells than other regions. Two proliferative hotspots were evident in the dorsal and ventral poles of the lateral ventricles. PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells migrated radially from the walls of the lateral ventricle into the parenchyma. In most telencephalic regions, the density of PCNA- and DCX-immunoreactive cells increased from rostral to caudal, except in the mesopallium where the density decreased from rostral to middle levels and then increased caudally. DCX immunoreactivity was more intense in fibres than in cell bodies and DCX-immunoreactive cells included small granular cells, fusiform bipolar cells, large round and or polygonal multipolar cells. The similarity in the distribution of proliferating cells and new neurons in the telencephalon of the two breeds of pigeons may suggest that adult neurogenesis is a conserved trait as an ecological adaptation irrespective of body size.

  15. Utilization of natural polysaccharides by radiation in Korea

    Lee, Young Keun; Young Chang Nho

    2001-01-01

    Radiation can induce a chemical reaction to modify polymer under even solid conditions or in low temperatures. Radiation crosslinking can be easily adjusted and is easily reproducible by controlling the radiation dose. The finished product contains no residues of substances required to initiate the chemical crosslinking which can restrict the application possibilities. In these studies, hydrogels from a mixture of chitosan and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/Poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were made by 'freezing and thawing', or gamma-ray irradiation or two steps of 'freezing and thawing' and gamma-ray irradiation for wound dressing. Mechanical properties such as gelation, water absorptivity, and gel strength were examined to evaluate the hydrogels for wound dressing. The composition of PVA:PVP was 60:40, PVA/PVP: chitosan ratio was in the range 9:1 - 7:3, and the solid concentration of PVA/PVP/chitosan solution was 15wt%. Gamma irradiation doses of 25, 35,50, 60 and 70kGy were exposed to a mixture of PVA/PVP/chitosan to evaluate the effect of irradiation dose on the mechanical properties of hydrogels. Water-soluble chitosan was used in this experiment. The gelation of hydrogels was higher when two steps of 'freezing and thawing' and irradiation were used than when only 'freezing and thawing' was utilized. Gel content was influenced slightly by PVA/PVP: chitosan composition and irradiation dose, but swelling was influenced greatly by them. The swelling percent was much increased as the composition of chitosan in PVA/PVP/chitosan increased. (author)

  16. Radiation Protection and Architecture Utilizing High Temperature Superconducting Magnets

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study will explore the effectiveness of using electromagnets to protect a habitat from radiation through active radiation shielding.Active radiation shielding...

  17. Cloning of low dose radiation induced gene RIG1 by RACE based on non-cloned cDNA library

    Luo Ying; Sui Jianli; Tie Yi; Zhang Yuanping; Zhou Pingkun; Sun Zhixian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To obtain full-length cDNA of radiation induced new gene RIG1 based on its EST fragment. Methods: Based on non-cloned cDNA library, enhanced nested RACE PCR and biotin-avidin labelled probe for magnetic bead purification was used to obtain full-length cDNA of RIG1. Results: About 1 kb of 3' end of RIG1 gene was successfully cloned by this set of methods and cloning of RIG1 5' end is proceeding well. Conclusion: The result is consistent with the design of experiment. This set of protocol is useful for cloning of full-length gene based on EST fragment

  18. Utilization of radiation in industrial, agricultural and medical fields and its perspective

    Shibata, Tokushi

    2008-01-01

    The current status for the utilization of radiation in Japan was given from the view point of the economic scale. The topics which will be developed in near future such as lithography, radiation processing, radiation analysis in the industry, mutation breeding, sterile insect technique, food irradiation in agriculture, and radiation diagnosis, radiation therapy in medical field were presented. The important techniques for the further development of utilization of radiation will be the techniques related to the fabrication of semiconductor, developments of small accelerators and compact neutron generators. (author)

  19. Does race influence survival for esophageal cancers treated on the radiation and chemotherapy arm of RTOG no. 85-01?

    Streeter, O.E.; Martz, K.L.; Gaspar, L.E.; DelRowe, J.D.; Asbell, S.O.; Salter, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In reported retrospective and non-randomized trials for esophageal carcinoma, blacks have a lower survival than whites but the patient population, method, quality and time periods of treatment differ. We reviewed the patient database of the combined modality arm of RTOG-8501 esophageal carcinoma protocol to see if there were differences in overall survival between black and white patients receiving the same standard of care. Materials and Methods: The chemotherapy (CT) consisted of Cisplatin, 75 mg/m 2 during the first day of the first radiation treatment (RT) and then the first day of weeks, 5, 8, and 11. In addition, 5-fluorouracil, 1000 mg/m 2 was given also the first day of radiotherapy and over 4 days and this 4 day cycle was repeated weeks 5, 8, and 11. 50 Gy was given to the esophagus as follows: 2 Gy x 5 days/week x 3 weeks (30 Gy), followed by a local boost of 2 Gy x 5 days/week x 2 weeks (20 Gy). 139 patients were entered into the combined modality arm of RT+CT. Nine patients were not evaluated in the analysis because 7 were deemed ineligible and 2 had incomplete data. This left 130 patients analyzable: 61 were initially randomized to the RT+CT arm and 69 were later registered to this arm when the RT only arm was closed due to poor survival (10% RT only vs 36% RT+CT alive at 2 years). Five additional patients were not included because their racial background was classified as 'other' and six patients were scheduled for, but did not receive any chemotherapy, leaving 119 patients, 37 blacks and 82 whites, evaluated in this report. The following pretreatment characteristics were analyzed using the Cox regression model: Race (black vs white); Histology (squamous vs adenocarcinoma; Age ( 5 cm vs 77% for whites. When analyzing dysphagia, only 3% of blacks had unrestricted diets vs 33% of whites. Nearly half (49%) of blacks could tolerate liquids only, whereas only 30% of whites were liquid-restricted. Only 14% of blacks had less than a 10 lb

  20. Radiation dosimeter utilizing the thermoluminescence of lithium fluoride.

    CAMERON, J R; DANIELS, F; JOHNSON, N; KENNEY, G

    1961-08-04

    A dosimeter, with little wavelength dependence and large useful energy range for electromagnetic radiation, which is simple to use and read, has been developed. It appears to have applications in personnel monitoring as well as radiation research.

  1. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  2. Poly (DADMAC) encapsulation in PES microcapsules utilizing gamma radiation

    Francis, Sanju; Varshney, Lalit; Tirumalesh, Keesari; Sabharwal, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, a method for encapsulation of a polymeric resin using radiation technology is reported. The quaternary ammonium resin, polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) was incorporated in the core of a preformed hollow polyethersulfone microcapsule, using radiation technology, for the extraction of anions from aqueous solutions. The idea was to introduce the monomer into the porous microcapsules and initiate polymerization by radiation to trap the polymer formed inside the capsule. The resultant capsule was able to take up and exchange some anions (F - , Cl - , Br - , NO 3 2- and SO 4 2- ) at relatively low concentrations

  3. Utilization of the examinations with ionizing radiation and pregnance

    Serson, D.; Buchpiguel, C.A.; Scharfstein, M.; Camera, A.J.; Schmilevitch, J.; Oliveira Nunes, J.E. de

    1984-01-01

    The authors reviewed the world literature on the effects of radiation and in this paper alert the clinicians and obstetricians to the use of radiation and the possible damage to the embryo and fetus. A table with absorbed doses in the majority of regular examinations by nuclear medicine and X-ray is presented, including the oppinion of world authorities and explaining how to procede when the use of radiation is unavoidable. They concluded that an indication for abortion must be considered only in cases where a high dose was used. (author) [pt

  4. Anticipated development of radiation safety corresponding to utilization of nuclear technology in Vietnam

    Tran, Toan Ngoc; Le, Thiem Ngoc

    2010-01-01

    In the past, due to the limited application of radiation and radioisotope in the national economic branches, radiation safety was not paid much attention to in Vietnam. However, according to the Strategy for Peaceful Utilization of Atomic Energy up to 2020 approved by the Prime Minister on January 3, 2006 the application of radiation and radioisotopes as well as nuclear power in Vietnam is expected increasing strongly and widely, then radiation safety should be developed correspondingly. This paper presents the history of radiation protection, the current status and prospect of utilization of atomic energy and the anticipated development of the national radiation safety system to meet the demand of utilization of nuclear technology in Vietnam. (author)

  5. A utility perspective on radiation worker access control systems

    Watson, B.A.; Goff, T.E.

    1984-01-01

    Based on an evaluation of the current commercial Radiation Worker Access Control Software Systems, Baltimore Gas and Electric Company has elected to design and develop a site specific access control and accountability system for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant. The vendor provided systems allow for radiation worker access control based on training and external exposure records and authorizations. These systems do not afford internal exposure control until after bioassay measurements or maximum permissible concentration-hours are tabulated. The vendor provided systems allow for data trending for ALARA purposes, but each software package must be modified to meet site specific requirements. Unlike the commercial systems, the Calvert Cliffs Radiological Controls and Accountability System (RCAS) will provide radiation worker exposure control, both internal and external. The RCAS is designed to fulfill the requirements by integrating the existing Radiation Safety, Dosemetry, and Training data bases with a comprehensive radiological surveillance program. Prior to each worker's entry into the Radiological Control Area; his training and qualifications, radiation exposure history and authorization, will be compared with administrative controls, such as radiation work permits, and respiratory protection requirements and the radiological conditions in the work area. The RCAS, a computer based applied health physics access control system is described as it is presently configured for development. The mechanisms for enhancing worker internal and external exposure controls are discussed. Proposed data application to both the Calvert Cliffs ALARA and outage planning programs is included

  6. Utilizing Problem Structure in Optimization of Radiation Therapy

    Carlsson, Fredrik

    2008-04-01

    In this thesis, optimization approaches for intensity-modulated radiation therapy are developed and evaluated with focus on numerical efficiency and treatment delivery aspects. The first two papers deal with strategies for solving fluence map optimization problems efficiently while avoiding solutions with jagged fluence profiles. The last two papers concern optimization of step-and-shoot parameters with emphasis on generating treatment plans that can be delivered efficiently and accurately. In the first paper, the problem dimension of a fluence map optimization problem is reduced through a spectral decomposition of the Hessian of the objective function. The weights of the eigenvectors corresponding to the p largest eigenvalues are introduced as optimization variables, and the impact on the solution of varying p is studied. Including only a few eigenvector weights results in faster initial decrease of the objective value, but with an inferior solution, compared to optimization of the bixel weights. An approach combining eigenvector weights and bixel weights produces improved solutions, but at the expense of the pre-computational time for the spectral decomposition. So-called iterative regularization is performed on fluence map optimization problems in the second paper. The idea is to find regular solutions by utilizing an optimization method that is able to find near-optimal solutions with non-jagged fluence profiles in few iterations. The suitability of a quasi-Newton sequential quadratic programming method is demonstrated by comparing the treatment quality of deliverable step-and-shoot plans, generated through leaf sequencing with a fixed number of segments, for different number of bixel-weight iterations. A conclusion is that over-optimization of the fluence map optimization problem prior to leaf sequencing should be avoided. An approach for dynamically generating multileaf collimator segments using a column generation approach combined with optimization of

  7. Cloning of radiation-induced new gene RS1 expressed in mouse intestinal epithelium by enhanced RACE

    Wang Fengchao; Wang Junping; Su Yongping; Gao Jinsheng; Lou Shufen; Liu Xiaohong; Ren Jiong; Zhang Bo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To obtain full-length cDNA of radiation-induced new gene RS1 expressed in mouse intestinal epithelium. Methods: The tissue expression profile of RS1 was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR to find the target tissue which highly expresses RS1. The total RNA extracted from the corresponding tissue was taken as the template for reverse-transcription. Enhanced RACE PCR was used to clone the full-length cDNA of RS1, including enrichment of the target gene through biotin-labeled probe for magnetic bead purification and nested PCR. Results: About a 2 kb long 3' end was successfully cloned and cloning of the 5' end proceeded well. Conclusion: The result is consistent with our experiment design. The set of combined techniques has been identified with the cloning of full-length cDNA from EST sequence especially when the optimal gene-specific primers are not available or the expression level of target gene is low

  8. Present status and prospects of radioisotopes and radiation utilization in Indonesia

    Baiquni, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present status and prospects of RI and radiation utilization in Indonesia, which developed under the Government's assistance and supervision since the opening of the research reactor in 1965, was reviewed. Utilization of short half-life RI in various fields was described. Utilization in medicine, sterilization of medical supplies, the industrial world and hydrology was detailed. Annual changes in these fields were shown and tables were presented. The status of various types of radiation and RI utilization in Indonesia, which included nuclear analytical techniques in industry and various laboratories in agriculture, industry and biology, was reported. Finally, the plan of construction of a third research reactor was referred to. (Chiba, N.)

  9. Clinical utility of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    Melki, P.S.; Halimi, P.; Wibault, P.; Doyon, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the diagnostic and prognostic value of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy 9CPRM). In this series, MR imaging showed excellent sensitivity (199%) for the demonstration of radiation-induced lesions of the spinal cord. Fifty percent of the cases showed spinal cord hypertrophy (pseudotumoral, 33%; cystic, 17%) occurring within 8 months of the clinical onset of myelopathy. The remaining 50% showed spinal cord atrophy, which occurred more than 8 months following the onset of myelopathy. These medullary lesions were located at least partially in the radiation field but extended beyond its boundaries in 73% of the cases. MR imaging helped to establish disease prognosis: spinal cord hypertrophy was usually associated with neurologic deterioration and fatal outcome within a mean of 11.5 months; in spinal atrophy, neurologic deficit was often static and survival rates were better

  10. Analysis and utilization of plant antioxidative mechanism by radiation

    Lee, Haeng Soon; Kwak, Sang Soo; Kwon, Hye Gyung [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The gamma radiation-induced changes of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT) in callus cultures of cassava (Manihot esculenta) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) were investigated. Both cell lines irradiated with 50 and 70 Gy on 7 days after subculture inhibited significantly the cell growth by 50% and 80% at 14 days after treatment (DAT), respectively. In 70 Gy irradiated with cassava calli SOD and POD specific activities increased by 4 and 2.5 folds at 14 DAT, respectively, whereas CAT activity was not affected. When sweet potato calli were irradiated 10 Gy POD activity showed the highest at 14 DAT, whereas the CAT activity was not affected. In the transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress swpal encoding anionic POD cDNA or swpnl encoding neutral POD cDNA, POD and SOD activities were not significantly increased after {gamma}-radiation treatment, but swpal-plants showed a higher activity than that of swpnl-or non-transgenic plants. Plant growth was severely inhibited showing a well correlation with the dose of radiation. Specially, {gamma}-radiation affected growth of shoot apical meristem. (author). 32 refs., 7 figs.

  11. Utilization of colemanite as a radiation protection material

    Bayulken, Ahmet; Aksut, Cem

    1986-01-01

    In experiments utilizing neutrons, a good shielding is very important. For developing countries, economics of the protection system is also a very important factor. In this work, a new material for protection blocks is investigated. These blocks are fabricated with colemanite powder in a paraffin wax matrix, and their behaviour as a neutron shield are investigated with a Pu-Be neutron source. (author)

  12. Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material

    Miller, S.D.; McDonald, J.C.; Eichner, F.N.; Durham, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material and then optically stimulating the thermoluminescent material by exposure to light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light. 5 figs

  13. Production and utilization of radiation vaccines against helminthic diseases

    1964-01-01

    Helminthic diseases in man and in animals are various and widespread, but to date the only successful vaccines to be developed against helminths are those based on the radiation treatment of infective larvae. A panel of experts met in Vienna in December 1963 to consider how the IAEA might support and encourage developments in this field. The present report gathers together some of the important contributions of the Panel members together with the general conclusions and recommendations. 77 refs, 19 figs, 16 tabs

  14. UTILIZATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS FOR SIMULTANEOUS, MULTIPLE RADIATION DETECTION

    Miller, William H.; Manuel Diaz de Leon

    2003-01-01

    A phoswich radiation detector is comprised of a phosphor sandwich in which several different phosphors are viewed by a common photomultiplier. By selecting the appropriate phosphors, this system can be used to simultaneously measure multiple radiation types (alpha, beta, gamma and/or neutron) with a single detector. Differentiation between the signals from the different phosphors is accomplished using digital pulse shape discrimination techniques. This method has been shown to result in accurate discrimination with highly reliable and versatile digital systems. This system also requires minimal component count (i.e. only the detector and a computer for signal processing). A variety of detectors of this type have been built and tested including: (1) a triple phoswich system for alpha/beta/gamma swipe counting, (2) two well-type detectors for measuring low levels of low energy photons in the presence of a high energy background, (3) a large area detector for measuring beta contamination in the presence of a photon background, (4) another large area detector for measuring low energy photons from radioactive elements such as uranium in the presence of a photon background. An annular geometry, triple phoswich system optimized for measuring alpha/beta/gamma radiation in liquid waste processing streams is currently being designed

  15. UTILIZATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS FOR SIMULTANEOUS, MULTIPLE RADIATION DETECTION

    William H. Miller; Manuel Diaz de Leon

    2003-04-15

    A phoswich radiation detector is comprised of a phosphor sandwich in which several different phosphors are viewed by a common photomultiplier. By selecting the appropriate phosphors, this system can be used to simultaneously measure multiple radiation types (alpha, beta, gamma and/or neutron) with a single detector. Differentiation between the signals from the different phosphors is accomplished using digital pulse shape discrimination techniques. This method has been shown to result in accurate discrimination with highly reliable and versatile digital systems. This system also requires minimal component count (i.e. only the detector and a computer for signal processing). A variety of detectors of this type have been built and tested including: (1) a triple phoswich system for alpha/beta/gamma swipe counting, (2) two well-type detectors for measuring low levels of low energy photons in the presence of a high energy background, (3) a large area detector for measuring beta contamination in the presence of a photon background, (4) another large area detector for measuring low energy photons from radioactive elements such as uranium in the presence of a photon background. An annular geometry, triple phoswich system optimized for measuring alpha/beta/gamma radiation in liquid waste processing streams is currently being designed.

  16. Establishment of comprehensive promotion plan for utilization, research and development of radiation and radioisotopes

    Choi, Young Myung; Kim, H. J.; Ham, C. H.; Yang, M. H.; Chung, W. S.; Park, K. B.; Jin, J. H.; Song, H. S.; Nho, Y. C.; Byun, M. W.; Kim, J. R.; Han, H. S.; Chung, Y. S.; Yun, P. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Seo, K. W.; Chang, S. Y.; Kee, S. R.; Lhu, S. R.; Choi, Y. S.

    1997-05-01

    This study surveys state-of-art radiation/RI industries and research organizations and their activities. The major objective of the survey is to collect useful information on the status of these industries, discuss issues concerning radiation /RI utilization. We, therefore, send questionnaires to field workers engaged in RI industries and research organizations to feedback on real field issues and problems. Considering the specificity and diversity of the radiation / RI area, six sectors are set up for its promotion. Each sector includes status analysis, active promotion measures and implementation plans. Six areas are as follows; 1) systematic developments of radiation /RI utilization technologies covers technology development for industrial applications, technology development for agricultural applications, technology development for medical applications, development of RI and radiation generators, and expansion of infra-structure for enhancement of radiation / RI utilization, and fostering radiation science. 2) activation of radiation / RI indusries 3) rationalization of radiation / RI regulation 4) international cooperation, 5) manpower development 6) finance. (author). 14 refs., 34 tabs., 5 figs

  17. Radiation application for the utilization of microbial resources

    Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Sang Jae

    2007-07-01

    Domestic microbes which had the antifungal, pesticide residue degradable, and heavy metal adsorbent activities were isolated individually. Mutants of their improved functions were induced by radiation. And finally microbial formulae of biocontroller were manufactured and respected to be industrialized promisingly. The effectiveness of the developed microbial formulae were confirmed in pepper, radish, and Chinese cabbage by field experiments for 5 kinds of fungal diseases. This technology is respected to be transferred to the agricultural companies. And a novel venture company could be established by the involved researchers using this technology. As a result, the productivity in environmentally-friendly farm could be improved gradually in the near future

  18. Radiation application for the utilization of microbial resources

    Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Sang Jae [and others

    2007-07-15

    Domestic microbes which had the antifungal, pesticide residue degradable, and heavy metal adsorbent activities were isolated individually. Mutants of their improved functions were induced by radiation. And finally microbial formulae of biocontroller were manufactured and respected to be industrialized promisingly. The effectiveness of the developed microbial formulae were confirmed in pepper, radish, and Chinese cabbage by field experiments for 5 kinds of fungal diseases. This technology is respected to be transferred to the agricultural companies. And a novel venture company could be established by the involved researchers using this technology. As a result, the productivity in environmentally-friendly farm could be improved gradually in the near future.

  19. Utilization of Gamma Radiation for Disinfecting Domestic Wastewater

    Aldehmani, K.; Abokhabta, S.; Rahil, E.; Elammari, M.; Aboudeeb, F.

    2004-01-01

    Wastewater treatment by Gamma radiation is an effective, economic and environmentally friendly as the water produced has the specification to be reused for watering trees, gardens, football fields and golf courses instead of using fresh water that can be saved for drinking purposes as we suffer a severe shortage of fresh water. Sewage water samples were brought from Elhadba Elkhadra wastewater treatment plant which is located in the City of Tripoli. Samples were taken from two places: the inlet of the plant and from the stream coming out from the biological treatment, they are taken in sterile plastic bottles to ensure that cross contamination does not take place. Samples were irradiated at Tajura Research Centre with different doses ranged between 0.5 and 2 kGy with a dose rate of 10 Gy/min. These samples were investigated chemically and microbiologically. A study was carried out on the effect of gamma radiation on pathogenic organisms, and the total suspended solids in the raw and treated samples. Results showed that the doses 2.0 kGy and 1.5 kGy were enough to terminate the total microbial count and Enterobacter ease respectively but only a dose of 1.0 kGy was needed to eliminate total coliform, fecal coliform and spore forming bacteria. There were also higher BOD, pH and E.C. values in raw sewage than the sewage that was subjected to biological treatment which gave a good indication for the efficiency of the biological treatment. (authors)

  20. Economic scale of utilization of radiation in medicine in Japan.

    Yanagisawa, K; Inoue, T; Hayakawa, K; Shiotari, H; Nakamura, Y; Matsuyama, K; Nagasawa, K

    2009-01-01

    Economic scale of radioisotopes (RI) in Japan is studied in the field of medicine, agriculture and a part of industry. (1) RI is used during medical examination with economic scale by 1.7M$ (million dollars) in 1997 and 0.4M$ in 2005. (2) Economic scale of RI utilization in agriculture is 4M$ for R&D, 127M$ for environmental protection and 1M$ for chronology. RI usage in agriculture is increased five times due to needs at environmental technology lasted after the Kyoto protocol. (3) Indirect economic scale of RI ((85)Kr, (147)Pm, (90)Cr) usage in paper fabrication field in Japan for 2006 is 8432M$.

  1. Analysis and utilization of plant antioxidative mechanism by radiation

    Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwon, Seock-Yoon; Shin, Seung-Yung [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In an attempt to analysis the POD isoenzymes (swpa1, swpa2, swpa3, and swpn1) expression in response to gamma-irradiation in sweet potato. In suspension cells POD isoenzymes was highly expressed at 6 h postirradiation, and the transcript levels increased at 0 and 6 h at 50 Gy in plants. POD isoenzymes expression in response to irradiation appears not to be regulated in a different manner in cultured cells and plants. The gamma radiation-induced changes of proteins in tobacco suspension cells were investigated by SDS-PAGE. In tobacco cultured cells gamma irradiation did not significantly change the protein patterns. This indicates that the gamma irradiation-induced protein was not highly expressed or might be overlap with others. In the tobacco transgenic plants simultaneously expressing SOD and/or APX in chloroplast, the specific activities of SOD and APX of gamma-irradiated plants increased according to the dose of gamma-irradiation. These results indicate that antioxidative genes depends on antioxidative isoenzymes differently respond to gamma irradiation in transgenic tobacco plant lines. 35 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  2. Utilization technique of 'radiation management manual in medical field (2012).' What should be learnt from the Fukushima nuclear accident

    Kikuchi, Toru

    2014-01-01

    From the abstract of contents of the 'Radiation management manual in medical field (2012),' the utilization technique of the manual is introduced. Introduced items are as follows: (1) Exposure management; exposure management for radiation medical workers, patients, and citizens in the medical field, and exposure management for radiation workers and citizens involved in the emergency work related to the Fukushima nuclear accident, (2) Health management; health management for radiation medical workers, (3) Radiation education: Education/training for radiation medical workers, and radiation education for health care workers, (4) Accident and emergency measures; emergency actions involved in the radiation accidents and radiation medicine at medical facilities

  3. Current status of utilization of radioisotopes and radiation technology in Malaysia

    Ahmad Tajuddin Ali

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of isotope and radiation technology in Malaysia dates back to the early sixties. However it was confined to the field of medicine. Today, the use of this technology has widen up, covering the agricultural and industrial areas. The increasing use of the technology has prompted the government to establish the Nuclear Energy Unit whose one of its main functions is to ensure the safe application of radioisotopes and radiations. For this purpose, facilities for training, calibration, waste treatment, etc. were provided by this unit to cater the need of radioisotope and radiation users throughout the country. (author)

  4. The situation of computer utilization in radiation therapy in Japan and other countries and problems

    Onai, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    The uses of computers in radiation therapy are various, such as radiation dose calculation, clinical history management, radiotherapeutical instrument automation and biological model. To grasp the situation in this field, a survey by questionnaire was carried out internationally at the time of the 7th International Conference on the Use of Computers in Radiation Therapy held in Kawasaki and Tokyo in September, 1980. The surveyed nations totaled 21 including Japan; the number of facilities answered were 203 in Japan and 111 in other countries, and the period concerned is December, 1979, to September, 1980. The results of the survey are described as follows: areas of use of computers in hospitals, computer utilization in radiation department, computer uses in radiation therapy, and evaluation of radiotherapeutical computer uses and problems. (J.P.N.)

  5. Examination system utilizing ionizing radiation and a flexible, miniature radiation detector probe

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Kross, Brian J.; Zorn, Carl J.; Majewski, Lukasz A.

    1996-01-01

    An optimized examination system and method based on the Reverse Geometry X-Ray.RTM. (RGX.RTM.) radiography technique are presented. The examination system comprises a radiation source, at least one flexible, miniature radiation detector probe positioned in appropriate proximity to the object to be examined and to the radiation source with the object located between the source and the probe, a photodetector device attachable to an end of the miniature radiation probe, and a control unit integrated with a display device connected to the photodetector device. The miniature radiation detector probe comprises a scintillation element, a flexible light guide having a first end optically coupled to the scintillation element and having a second end attachable to the photodetector device, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible light guide. The probe may be portable and insertable, or may be fixed in place within the object to be examined. An enclosed, flexible, liquid light guide is also presented, which comprises a thin-walled flexible tube, a liquid, preferably mineral oil, contained within the tube, a scintillation element located at a first end of the tube, closures located at both ends of the tube, and an opaque, environmentally-resistant sheath surrounding the flexible tube. The examination system and method have applications in non-destructive material testing for voids, cracks, and corrosion, and may be used in areas containing hazardous materials. In addition, the system and method have applications for medical and dental imaging.

  6. Utilization of information communication technology (ICT) - Based training / learning for capacity building in radiation protection framework

    Oluyemi, I.O.D.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection is the science of protecting people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, which includes both particle radiation and high energy electromagnetic radiation. It includes occupational radiation protection, which is the protection of workers; medical radiation protection, which is the protection of patients; and public radiation protection, which is about protection of individual members of the public, and of the population as a whole. ICT has made possible the development of e-learning and several Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) which can support a wide range of capacity building requirements, ranging from under-graduate and post-graduate programmes, continuing professional development courses, right through to short subject specific and research courses, thereby eliminating the problems of conventional forms of training / learning, some of which are: limited access, cost effectiveness and language / cultural barriers. This paper focuses on the utilization of these ICT-based training / learning for capacity building in radiation protection framework and concludes with suggestions on implementation strategies. (author)

  7. Radiations at the physics-biology interface. Utilization of radiations for research

    Douzou, P.

    1997-01-01

    Structural biology, which study the relation between the structure of biomolecules and their function, is at the interface between physics and biology. With the help of large radiation instruments such as X ray diffraction and neutron scattering, important advancements have been accomplished in the understanding of specific biological functions and led to the development of protein engineering (such as directed mutagenesis)

  8. Feasibility study on utilization of vitrified radioactive waste as radiation sources

    Makuuchi, Keizo; Yoshii, Fumio; Hyakutake, Kenichiro

    1995-01-01

    A feasibility study on utilization of vitrified high level radioactive waste (VW) as radiation source has been carried out. Natural rubber latex was radiation vulcanized with VW to demonstrate the feasibility. The dose rate was 0.1 kGy/hr. As a sensitizer, n-butyl acrylate was added. Negligible small activation of natural rubber (NR) latex by neutron from the VW was observed. The residual sensitizer in the irradiated latex and physical properties of film molded from the irradiated latex were the same level with the conventional radiation vulcanization of NR latex with γ-rays from Co-60. Surgical gloves and protective rubber gloves for radioactive contamination were produced from 20 litters of NR latex vulcanized with 2 VWs. The physical properties of both gloves were acceptable. These results suggested that vitrified high level waste can be used as an industrial radiation source. (author)

  9. Utilization of ionizing radiations and radioisotopes in plant breeding and crop improvement in Arab countries

    Abo-Hegazi, A.M.T.

    1983-01-01

    A review for research work in the field of utilizing ionizing radiations and radioisotopes in plant breeding and crop improvement conducted in Arab countries has been summerized and discussed in the light of some economic features of the crop or the plant on national or regional (arab) level. Among the 241 articles in the above mentioned fields reviewed, around 230 articles were conducted in Egypt, 6 in Iraq, 2 in Algeria and 2 in Sudan. Some of the articles dealing with more than one crop and/or more than one type of radiation or radioisotope

  10. Radiation hormesis in plant - Analysis and utilization of plant antioxidative mechanism by radiation

    Lee, Haeng Soon; Kwon, Seok Yoon; Shin, Seung Yung [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    In the tobacco transgenic plants simultaneously expressing SOD and APX in chloroplast, the specific activities of SOD and APX (CA, AM, C/A, A/C) were much higher than in the transgenic plants expressing SOD (CuZnSOD, MnSOD) or APX alone, respectively. Plant growth was severely inhibited showing a well correlation with the dose of gamma-irradiation. In 70 Gy-irradiation, C/A plants showed a slight resistance to gamma radiation. The stAPX gene in tobacco was not as strongly affected by gamma irradiation. After irradiation, the stAPX transcript level decreased at 2 h, then slightly increased at 6 h and the level was maintained until 48 h. Catalase transcripts level decreased at the early time point but at the late time points the level slightly increased. The gamma radiation-induced changes of proteins in tobacco suspension cells were investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. In the gamma-irradiated cells, a few polypeptides of were newly synthesized, increased, and decreased by comparing total proteins from gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated tobacco suspension cells. With the isolation and analysis of these polypeptides, irradiation-induced proteins could be developed. 35 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  11. Scope for utilizing gamma radiation for microbiological control of sewage waste-water in India

    Lewis, N.F.

    1975-01-01

    Conventional methods, including the activated sludge process, the trickling filter process and oxidation pond process, of treating sewage waste in India, do not adequately ensure safe utilization of the secondary effluent for land irrigation purposes. Preliminary findings indicate that gamma radiation in the range of 0.1-0.3 Mrad effectively destroys pathogens in the secondary effluent, thereby making available very large quantities of water for land irrigation and industrial purposes. (author)

  12. Radiation transmission type pipe wall thinning detection device and measuring instruments utilizing ionizing radiation

    Higashi, Yasuhiko

    2009-01-01

    We developed the device to detect thinning of pipe thorough heat insulation in Power Plant, etc, even while the plant is under operation. It is necessary to test many parts of many pipes for pipe wall thinning management, but it is difficult within a limited time of the routine test. This device consists of detector and radiation source, which can detect the pipe (less than 500 mm in external diameter, less than 50 mm in thickness) with 1.6%-reproducibility (in a few-minutes measurement), based on the attenuation rate. Operation is easy and effective without removing the heat insulation. We will expand this thinning detection system, and contribute the safety of the Plant. (author)

  13. Utilization of a photon transport code to investigate radiation therapy treatment planning quantities and techniques

    Palta, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A versatile computer program MORSE, based on neutron and photon transport theory has been utilzed to investigate radiation therapy treatment planning quantities and techniques. A multi-energy group representation of transport equation provides a concise approach in utilizing Monte Carlo numerical techniques to multiple radiation therapy treatment planning problems. Central axis total and scattered dose distributions for homogeneous and inhomogeneous water phantoms are calculated and the correction factor for lung and bone inhomogeneities are also evaluated. Results show that Monte Carlo calculations based on multi-energy group tansport theory predict the depth dose distributions that are in good agreement with available experimental data. Central axis depth dose distributions for a bremsstrahlung spectrum from a linear accelerator is also calculated to exhibit the versatility of the computer program in handling multiple radiation therapy problems. A novel approach is undertaken to study the dosimetric properties of brachytherapy sources

  14. Real-time dosimetry system in catheterisation laboratory: utility as a learning tool in radiation protection

    Pinto Monedero, M.; Rodriguez Cobo, C.; Pifarre Martinez, X.; Ruiz Martin, J.; Barros Candelero, J.M.; Goicolea Ruigomez, J.; Diaz Blaires, G.; Garcia Lunar, I.

    2015-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Workers at the catheter laboratory are among the most exposed to ionising radiation in hospitals. However, it is difficult to be certain of the radiation doses received by the staff, as personal dosemeters are often misused, and thus, the dose history is not reliable. Moreover, the information provided by personal dosemeters corresponds to the monthly accumulated dose, so corrective actions tends to be delayed. The purpose of this work is, on the one hand, to use a real-time dosimetry system to establish the occupational doses per procedure of workers at the catheter laboratories and, on the other hand, to evaluate its utility as a learning tool for radiation protection purposes with the simultaneous video recording of the interventions. (authors)

  15. Feasibility study on utilization of radiation from spent fuel in storage facility

    Wataru, Masumi; Sakamoto, Kazuaki; Saegusa, Toshiari; Sakaya, Tadatsugu; Fujiwara, Hiroaki.

    1997-01-01

    Spent fuels of nuclear power plant are stored safely until reprocessing because they are radioactive in addition to energy resources. It is foreseen that the amount of the stored spent fuel increases in the long term. Therefore, in the government, discussion on the storage away from reactor is in progress as well as one at reactor. Spent fuel emits a radioactive ray for a long time. In the storage facility, radiation is shielded not to have a detrimental influence upon the health and environment. If radioactive ray is incorrectly handled, it is hazardous for the health and the environment. But, it is very useful if it is properly utilized under a careful management. In the industry, radioactive ray by isotopes (e.g. Co-60) is used widely. In a view of the effective utilization of energy, the promotion of the siting, the regional development and the creation of employment opportunities of local inhabitants, it is preferable to make use of radiation from the spent fuel. In this study, feasibility of utilization of radiation energy from the spent fuel in a storage facility was evaluated. (author)

  16. Relay race

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 19th May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on the course, and how to register your team for the relay race, can be found at: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay Some advice for all runners from the medical service can also be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay/RelayPagePictures/MedicalServiceAnnoncement.pdf

  17. Relay race

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 19th May starting at 12·15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on the course, and how to register your team for the relay race, can be found at: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay Some advice for all runners from the medical service can also be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay/RelayPagePictures/MedicalServiceAnnoncement.pdf

  18. Transcending race?

    Wilson, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    Using accounts of militant schoolteachers from a province in the central sierra of Peru, this article attempts to show how and why concepts of race and political commitment among teachers changed at three critical moments in Peruvian history: agrarian reform, mass unionisation, and Maoist...

  19. RELAY RACE

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Well done to all runners, the fans and the organizers of this great race which took place on Thursday 23rd May! You were many to participate in the run or by supporting your colleagues. The Staff Association contributed with its team of runners and also with its information stall where you could meet with your delegates.  

  20. Utilization of radiation protection gear for absorbed dose reduction: an integrative literature review

    Soares, Flavio Augusto Penna; Flor, Rita de Cassia; Pereira, Aline Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the relation between the use of radiation protection gear and the decrease in absorbed dose of ionizing radiation, thereby reinforcing the efficacy of its use by both the patients and occupationally exposed personnel. Materials and Methods: The integrative literature review method was utilized to analyze 21 articles, 2 books, 1 thesis, 1 monograph, 1 computer program, 4 pieces of database research (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica and Departamento de Informatica do Sistema Unico de Saude) and 2 sets of radiological protection guidelines. Results: Theoretically, a reduction of 86% to 99% in the absorbed dose is observed with the use of radiation protection gear. In practice, however, the reduction may achieve 88% in patients submitted to conventional radiology, and 95% in patients submitted to computed tomography. In occupationally exposed individuals, the reduction is around 90% during cardiac catheterization, and 75% during orthopedic surgery. Conclusion: According to findings of several previous pieces of research, the use of radiation protection gear is a low-cost and effective way to reduce absorbed dose both for patients and occupationally exposed individuals. Thus, its use is necessary for the implementation of effective radioprotection programs in radiodiagnosis centers. (author)

  1. Safety and regulatory aspects in the utilization of radiation and radioactive material

    Abdul Majid Hasan

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of the Atomic Energy Licensing Act, 1984 is to regulate and control all activities dealing with atomic energy. For this purpose the Atomic Energy Licensing Board, (AELB) was established and responsibilities for authorizing, enforcing and establishing guidelines of activities to ensure safety for radiation workers, members of public and environment. To achieve these functions AELB will assess the proposed activities, if safe licence will be issued within its conditions. To ensure the licensee comply with the conditions of licence, a team of inspectorate will inspect its operation. AELB also provides guidelines and procedures of radiation protection to the licensee and anyone who intends to involve in utilization of atomic energy. (author)

  2. Studies on the hyperthermic effect of the body on utilization of far infrared radiation

    Ryu, Yong Wun; Cho, Chul Ku; Kim, Kyung Jung [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    This study investigated that strong heat reaction of far infrared radiation material could have the possibility for hyperthermia in patients. Objective was CaSki cell, human uterocervical cancer cell line and they observed descending effect remarkably to compare the effect of cell death by high temperature due to far infrared radiation, platelet numbers of experimental group to compare the control were increased 7 {approx} 17%, and lymphocyte numbers 20 {approx} 40 %. High acidity in tumor tissue due to the concentration of lactic acid, so the effects of far infrared had the result to the possibility to reduce the fatigue stuff. The secretion of endorphin as cerebroneuron substance than epinephrine, sympathetic nerve substance could be reduction of pain in cancer patients because of the effect of far infrared. Above data of experiment, we were found multiple the biological efficacy of far infrared about the possibility of medical utilization. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  3. Studies on the hyperthermic effect of the body on utilization of far infrared radiation

    Ryu, Yong Wun; Cho, Chul Ku; Kim, Kyung Jung

    1996-12-01

    This study investigated that strong heat reaction of far infrared radiation material could have the possibility for hyperthermia in patients. Objective was CaSki cell, human uterocervical cancer cell line and they observed descending effect remarkably to compare the effect of cell death by high temperature due to far infrared radiation, platelet numbers of experimental group to compare the control were increased 7 ∼ 17%, and lymphocyte numbers 20 ∼ 40 %. High acidity in tumor tissue due to the concentration of lactic acid, so the effects of far infrared had the result to the possibility to reduce the fatigue stuff. The secretion of endorphin as cerebroneuron substance than epinephrine, sympathetic nerve substance could be reduction of pain in cancer patients because of the effect of far infrared. Above data of experiment, we were found multiple the biological efficacy of far infrared about the possibility of medical utilization. (author). 10 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  4. Development of radiation resistant structural materials utilizing fission research reactors in Japan (Role of research reactors)

    Shikama, T.; Tanigawa, H.; Nozawa, T.; Muroga, T.; Aoyama, T.; Kawamura, H.; Ishihara, M.; Ito, C.; Kaneda, S.; Mimura, S.

    2009-01-01

    Structural materials for next-generation nuclear power systems should have a good radiation resistance, where the expected accumulation dose will largely exceed 10 dpa. Among several candidate materials, materials of five categories, 1. Austenitic steels, including high nickel alloys, 2. Low activation ferritic martensitic steels, 3. ODS steels (austenitic and ferritic), 4. Vanadium based alloys, 5. Silicon carbide composites (SiC/SiCf). All have been most extensively studied in Japan, in collaboration among industries, national institutes such as Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) and National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and universities. The high nickel base alloys were studied for their low swelling behaviors mainly by the NIMS and the austenitic steels are studied for their reliable engineering data base and their reliable performance in irradiation environments mainly by the JAEA, mainly for their application in the near-term projects such as the ITER and the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors. The most extensive studies are now concentrated on the Low Activation Ferritic Marsensitic steels and ODS steels, for their application in a demonstration fusion reactor and prototype sodium cooled fast reactors. Fundamental studies on radiation effects are carried out, mainly utilizing Japan Materials Testing Rector (JMTR) with its flexible irradiation ability, up to a few dpa. For higher dpa irradiation, a fast test reactor, JOYO is utilized up to several 10s dpa. Some international collaborations such as Japan/USA and Japan/France are effective to utilize reactors abroad, such as High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and sodium cooled high flux fast reactors in France. Silicon carbide based composites are extensively studied by university groups led by Kyoto University and the JAEA. For their performance in heavy irradiation environments, the Japan/USA collaboration plays an important role

  5. When do plant radiations influence community assembly? The importance of historical contingency in the race for niche space.

    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Brandt, Angela J; Smissen, Rob D; Heenan, Peter B; Fukami, Tadashi; Lee, William G

    2015-07-01

    Plant radiations are widespread but their influence on community assembly has rarely been investigated. Theory and some evidence suggest that radiations can allow lineages to monopolize niche space when founding species arrive early into new bioclimatic regions and exploit ecological opportunities. These early radiations may subsequently reduce niche availability and dampen diversification of later arrivals. We tested this hypothesis of time-dependent lineage diversification and community dominance using the alpine flora of New Zealand. We estimated ages of 16 genera from published phylogenies and determined their relative occurrence across climatic and physical gradients in the alpine zone. We used these data to reconstruct occupancy of environmental space through time, integrating palaeoclimatic and palaeogeological changes. Our analysis suggested that earlier-colonizing lineages encountered a greater availability of environmental space, which promoted greater species diversity and occupancy of niche space. Genera that occupied broader niches were subsequently more dominant in local communities. An earlier time of arrival also contributed to greater diversity independently of its influence in accessing niche space. We suggest that plant radiations influence community assembly when they arise early in the occupancy of environmental space, allowing them to exclude later-arriving colonists from ecological communities by niche preemption. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. A new era in nuclear energy science. When will radiation application receive citizenship ranking along with energy utilization

    Tabata, Yoneho; Tagawa, Seiichi; Saito, Naoki; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Japan has been obtaining definite results in these decades in both fields of nuclear power generation (energy utilization) and radiation application thus contributing to a sustainable development of the world. The present special issue of 'Atom Eye' introduces (1) Japanese achievements in cooperative relationships with developing countries in the field of radiation applications, (2) history of research and development of radiation-utilization techniques in Japan, (3) present status of quantum-beam applications in life-science, medial application, and nano-technology, etc, (4) applications of high-intensity neutron source, (5) cancer therapy using high-energy heavy-ion beams, (6) radiation sterilizations, (7) radiation mutations, (8) three interviewer's reports visiting several research institutes of radiation applications in Japan, and introduction of (9) a bencher enterprise and also (10) an accelerator business. (S. Ohno)

  7. Prevention of radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction utilizing a CDK inhibitor in a mouse model.

    Katie L Martin

    Full Text Available Treatment of head and neck cancer with radiation often results in damage to surrounding normal tissues such as salivary glands. Permanent loss of function in the salivary glands often leads patients to discontinue treatment due to incapacitating side effects. It has previously been shown that IGF-1 suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis and enhances G2/M arrest leading to preservation of salivary gland function. In an effort to recapitulate the effects of IGF-1, as well as increase the likelihood of translating these findings to the clinic, the small molecule therapeutic Roscovitine, is being tested. Roscovitine is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that acts to transiently inhibit cell cycle progression and allow for DNA repair in damaged tissues.Treatment with Roscovitine prior to irradiation induced a significant increase in the percentage of cells in the G(2/M phase, as demonstrated by flow cytometry. In contrast, mice treated with radiation exhibit no differences in the percentage of cells in G(2/M when compared to unirradiated controls. Similar to previous studies utilizing IGF-1, pretreatment with Roscovitine leads to a significant up-regulation of p21 expression and a significant decrease in the number of PCNA positive cells. Radiation treatment leads to a significant increase in activated caspase-3 positive salivary acinar cells, which is suppressed by pretreatment with Roscovitine. Administration of Roscovitine prior to targeted head and neck irradiation preserves normal tissue function in mouse parotid salivary glands, both acutely and chronically, as measured by salivary output.These studies suggest that induction of transient G(2/M cell cycle arrest by Roscovitine allows for suppression of apoptosis, thus preserving normal salivary function following targeted head and neck irradiation. This could have an important clinical impact by preventing the negative side effects of radiation therapy in surrounding normal tissues.

  8. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  9. Capture and utilization of solar radiation by the soybean and common bean crops and by weeds

    Santos, Jose Barbosa dos; Procopio, Sergio de Oliveira; Silva, Antonio Alberto da; Costa, Luiz Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Aiming to develop techniques for the establishment of a Weed Integrated Management Program, the performance of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) and of weeds Bidens pilosa L., Euphorbia heterophylla L. (two biotypes), sensitive and resistant to ALS inhibitor - herbicides and [ Desmodium tortuosum (SW.) DC.], was evaluated in relation to their efficiency in capturing and utilizing solar radiation.The following indices were calculated: total dry biomass production rate (Ct), leaf dry biomass production rate (Cf), radiation efficient use (x), net assimilation rate (EA), specific leaf area (SA), leaf area index (L), leaf matter ratio (FW) and leaf area ratio (FA). No difference was observed for all characteristics evaluated among E. heterophylla biotypes. Soybean showed the highest rate of total dry biomass production along its cycle and also the highest leaf area index, indicating its greater capacity in capturing light and providing shade to competitive plants. Especially after flowering, common bean was the most efficient in draining its photoassimilates for leaf formation. Soybean showed greater efficiency in converting radiation intercepted in the biomass. (author)

  10. Assessment and improvement of radiation oncology trainee contouring ability utilizing consensus-based penalty metrics

    Hallock, Abhirami; Read, Nancy; D'Souza, David

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and assess the feasibility of utilizing consensus-based penalty metrics for the purpose of critical structure and organ at risk (OAR) contouring quality assurance and improvement. A Delphi study was conducted to obtain consensus on contouring penalty metrics to assess trainee-generated OAR contours. Voxel-based penalty metric equations were used to score regions of discordance between trainee and expert contour sets. The utility of these penalty metric scores for objective feedback on contouring quality was assessed by using cases prepared for weekly radiation oncology radiation oncology trainee treatment planning rounds. In two Delphi rounds, six radiation oncology specialists reached agreement on clinical importance/impact and organ radiosensitivity as the two primary criteria for the creation of the Critical Structure Inter-comparison of Segmentation (CriSIS) penalty functions. Linear/quadratic penalty scoring functions (for over- and under-contouring) with one of four levels of severity (none, low, moderate and high) were assigned for each of 20 OARs in order to generate a CriSIS score when new OAR contours are compared with reference/expert standards. Six cases (central nervous system, head and neck, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, gynaecological and thoracic) then were used to validate 18 OAR metrics through comparison of trainee and expert contour sets using the consensus derived CriSIS functions. For 14 OARs, there was an improvement in CriSIS score post-educational intervention. The use of consensus-based contouring penalty metrics to provide quantitative information for contouring improvement is feasible.

  11. Post-Mastectomy Radiation Therapy for Invasive Lobular Carcinoma: A Comparative Utilization and Outcomes Study.

    Stecklein, Shane R; Shen, Xinglei; Mitchell, Melissa P

    2016-08-01

    To date, there have been no analyses to assess factors that influence post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) utilization in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC) or to quantify the benefit of PMRT in ILC as compared with invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). We compared histology-specific utilization of PMRT by tumor and patient characteristics and estimated the effect of PMRT on overall and breast cancer-specific survival in ILC and IDC patients meeting American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria for PMRT. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database to identify women diagnosed with ILC or IDC from 2004 to 2009 who underwent mastectomy. We assessed utilization of PMRT by T and N stage, analyzed factors associated with PMRT use, and quantified the histology-specific survival benefit of PMRT using log-rank tests and multivariate Cox regression analysis. We identified 86,098 IDC and 12,703 ILC patients. Within this cohort, 18.7% of IDC patients and 26.1% of ILC met ACR criteria for PMRT. Among patients with a definite indication, PMRT was more commonly employed in ILC than in IDC (59.6% vs. 56.3%; P = .0004). Among patients with a definite indication for PMRT, radiation improved 5-year breast cancer-specific survival from 71.4% to 77.0% for IDC (P cancer-specific survival for ILC patients to a degree comparable with that seen in IDC. Moreover, among ILC and IDC patients who meet ACR criteria, PMRT appears to be significantly underutilized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Utilization of MAX and FAX human phantoms for space radiation exposure calculations using HZETRN

    Qualls, Garry; Slaba, Tony; Clowdsley, Martha; Blattnig, Steve; Walker, Steven; Simonsen, Lisa

    To estimate astronaut health risk due to space radiation, one must have the ability to calculate, for known radiation environments external to the body, particle spectra, LET spectra, dose, dose equivalent, or gray equivalent that are averaged over specific organs or tissue types. This may be accomplished using radiation transport software and computational human body tissue models. Historically, NASA scientists have used the HZETRN software to calculate radiation transport through both vehicle shielding materials and body tissue. The Computerized Anatomical Man (CAM) and the Computerized Anatomical Female (CAF) body models, combined with the CAMERA software, have been used for body tissue self-shielding calculations. The CAM and CAF, which were developed in 1973 and 1992, respectively, model the 50th percentile U.S. Air Force male and female and are constructed using individual quadric surfaces that combine to form thousands of solid regions that represent specific tissues and structures within the body. In order to transport an external radiation environment to a point within one of the body models using HZETRN, a directional distribution of the tissues surrounding that point is needed. The CAMERA software is used to "ray trace" the CAM and CAF models, providing the thickness of each tissue type traversed along each of a large number of rays originating at a dose point. More recently, R. Kramer of the Departmento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco in Brazil and his co-workers developed the Male Adult voXel (MAX) model and the Female Adult voXel (FAX). These voxel-based body models were developed using segmented Computed Tomography (CT) scans of adult cadavers, and the quantities and distributions of various body tissues have been adjusted to match those specified in the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference adult male and female. A new set of tools has been developed to facilitate space radiation exposure

  13. Radiation utilization efficiency and the growth of soybeans exposed to ozone: a comparative analysis

    Leadley, P.W.; Reynolds, J.F.; Flagler, R.; Heagle, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Effects of ozone (O 3 ) on field-planted soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr. ‘Davis’) were examined using a simple crop-growth model that resolves the rate of increase in crop dry weight into the total amount of radiation intercepted by a crop canopy and the efficiency of conversion of this energy into dry matter (ϵ, termed utilization efficiency). The objectives were : (1) to examine the effects of O 3 on light interception and ϵ, and compare these results with a similar study by Unsworth et al. to determine whether the effects of O 3 are consistent from year to year, and (2) to determine whether ϵ is more sensitive to O 3 during reproductive than vegetative growth and whether allocation of aboveground biomass to seed is affected by O 3 . Five O 3 concentrations (seasonal means of 30, 52, 57, 76 and 99 ppb) were maintained in open-top chambers over the growing season. All treatments were irrigated. Leaf, stem and pod weights and leaf area were measured weekly throughout the season. Total incident solar radiation and total radiation transmission through the canopy were measured with tube solarimeters and electronic integrating devices. Increased O 3 concentrations were accompanied by depressed leaf area expansion and earlier leaf senescence, but did not affect total light interception over the entire season. Utilization efficiency (ϵ) was reduced in high O 3 treatments and was the most important factor in the reduction of yield; ϵ for the whole season declined from 0.89 g MJ −1 in the 30-ppb treatment to a low of 0.68 g MJ −1 in the 99-ppb treatment. Efficiencies were higher during reproductive than vegetative growth, but were not more sensitive to O 3 . Seed yield decreased from 450 g m −2 in the 30-ppb treatment to 320 g m −2 in the 99-ppb treatment. Fractional allocation of aboveground dry weight to seed was not affected by O 3 . Reduced ϵ values with increasing O 3 concentrations were consistent with an earlier study by Unsworth et al. however

  14. Prevalence of Protective Shielding Utilization for Radiation Dose Reduction in Adult Patients Undergoing Body Scanning Using Computed Tomography.

    Safiullah, Shoaib; Patel, Roshan; Uribe, Brittany; Spradling, Kyle; Lall, Chandana; Zhang, Lishi; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Clayman, Ralph V; Landman, Jaime

    2017-10-01

    Ionizing radiation is implicated in nearly 2% of malignancies in the United States; radiation shields prevent unnecessary radiation exposure during medical imaging. Contemporary radiation shield utilization for adult patients in the United States is poorly defined. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of protective shielding utilization in adult patients undergoing CT scans in United States' hospitals. An online survey was sent to established radiology departments randomly selected from the 2015 American Hospital Association Guide. Radiology departments conducting adult CT imaging were eligible; among 370 eligible departments, 215 departments accepted the study participation request. Questions focused on shielding practices during CT imaging of the eyes, thyroid, breasts, and gonads. Prevalence data were stratified per hospital location, size, and type. Main outcomes included overall protective shielding utilization, respondents' belief and knowledge regarding radiation safety, and organ-specific shielding prevalence. Sixty-seven of 215 (31%) hospitals completed the survey; 66 (99%) reported familiarity with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle and 56 (84%) affirmed their belief that shielding is beneficial. Only 60% of hospitals employed shielding during CT imaging; among these institutions, shielding varied based on CT study: abdominopelvic CT (13, 33%), head CT (33, 83%), or chest CT (30, 75%). Among surveyed hospitals, 40% do not utilize CT shielding despite the majority acknowledging the ALARA principle and agreeing that shielding is a beneficial practice. Failure to address the low prevalence of protective shielding may lead to poor community health due to increased risk of radiation-related cancers.

  15. Radiation treatment of organic substances which are difficult to decompose for utilizing sewage water again. Radiation decomposition of lignin

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Sawai, Taruko; Tanabe, Hiroko

    1996-01-01

    The sewerage model projects utilizing sewage-treated water and the sewerage model project for the future city executed in Tokyo are described. It is important to obtain the treated water which is suitable to purposes by setting up the target for control and reducing the organic contamination which is difficult to decompose. In fiscal year 1995, as to the decomposing treatment of lignin by radiation, the effect of reducing coloring and the influence when actual flowing-in sewage and treated water coexist were examined. The experimental samples were lignin aqueous solution, synthetic sewage and flowing-in sewage, treated water, and the mixture of treated water and synthetic sewage. The measurement of water quality is explained. The γ ray irradiation with a Co-60 source was carried out. The results of respective samples are reported. When total organic carbon was at the level in flowing-in sewage and treated water, irradiation was effective for eliminating coloring. The soluble organic substances which are difficult to decompose were efficiently decomposed by irradiation. (K.I.)

  16. Tests in breeding of caladium, banana and papaya by utilization of radiation

    Suda, Hirokatsu; Matsubara, Hisao; Hashimoto, Tomoaki; Kawano, Shin.

    1984-01-01

    In the Bonin Islands, the horticulture of subtropical plants including caladium is active. For the plant to be taken home by tourists, however, its height reaching 50 cm is too large. To make it smaller, its deformation by the mutation utilizing radiation has been carried out. For the purpose of breeding, the irradiation of its bulbs with cobalt-60 γ-ray up to 30 Gy is suitable. By the irradiation, the height becomes 1/3 - 1/5 of that of the unirradiated one, the length of its leaves 1/3 - 1/4 and the width 1/2 - 1/4. The mutation appears also in the plants as irradiated, but the stabilized mutation due to irradiation appears mostly in the next year or later. (Mori, K.)

  17. Utilization of Radiation for Industrial Purposes, Environmental Protection and Public Health

    Hilmy, N.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes utilization of gamma-rays, electron beam and X-rays in industry, environment and public health in developed countries and in Indonesia. At Present (1995), 160 of Gamma Irradiations in 45 countries around the world and 280 of Electron Beam Machines mostly in Japan, United States of America and French have been operated to support industrial development. Two Gamma Irradiators and two Electron Beam Machines have been operated by BATAN for research and development and one of Gamma Irradiator is operated for industrial purposes by a private company in Jakarta. To support environmentally sustainable development, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as well as BATAN increase their activities in recycling of liquid and solid waste as well as flue gas by using radiation technology. (author)

  18. Utilization of ultraviolet radiation in effluent disinfestation of domestic waste treatment systems

    Camacho, P.R.R.; Andrade e Silva, L.G. de

    1995-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation disinfection of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Biodigestor (UASB) and UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluents is possible to be reached utilizing a single low pressure mercury lamp arc (15 W nominal power) in a shell tube flow through reactor (1.2 L useful volume). Fecal coliforms, total coliforms and colifages were used as microbiological parameters. For fecal coliforms, about 3 logarithmic units (log. un.) was removed from UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluent and 4 log. un. from UASB effluent with 7 and 30 seconds of hydraulic retention time, respectively. Good empirical correlations were obtained between microbiological parameters and hydraulic retention times. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs

  19. Reducing Anesthesia and Health Care Cost Through Utilization of Child Life Specialists in Pediatric Radiation Oncology

    Scott, Michael T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center and Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Todd, Kimberly E.; Oakley, Heather; Bradley, Julie A.; Rotondo, Ronny L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Klein, Stuart; Mendenhall, Nancy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, Florida (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effectiveness of a certified child life specialist (CCLS) in reducing the frequency of daily anesthesia at our institution, and to quantify the potential health care payer cost savings of CCLS utilization in the United States. Methods and Materials: From 2006 to 2014, 738 children (aged ≤21 years) were treated with radiation therapy at our institution. We retrospectively analyzed the frequency of daily anesthesia before and after hiring a CCLS in 2011 after excluding patients aged 0 to 2 and >12 years. In the analyzed cohort of 425 patients the median age was 7.6 years (range, 3-12.9 years). For the pre-CCLS period the overall median age was 7.5 years; for the post-CCLS period the median age was 7.7 years. An average 6-week course of pediatric anesthesia for radiation therapy costs $50,000 in charges to the payer. The average annual cost to employ one CCLS is approximately $50,000. Results: Before employing a CCLS, 69 of 121 children (57%) aged 3 to 12 years required daily anesthesia, including 33 of 53 children (62.3%) aged 5 to 8 years. After employing a CCLS, 124 of 304 children (40.8%) aged 3 to 12 years required daily anesthesia, including only 34 of 118 children (28.8%) aged 5 to 8 years (P<.0001). With a >16% absolute reduction in anesthesia use after employment of a CCLS, the health care payer cost savings was approaching $50,000 per 6 children aged 3 to 12 years treated annually with radiation therapy in our institution. This reduction resulted in a total of only 6 children aged 3 to 12 years required anesthesia to be treated per year at our center to achieve nearly break-even cost savings to the health care payer if the payer were to subsidize the employment expense of a CCLS. Overall, the CCLS intervention can provide an average annualized health care payer cost savings of “$[(anesthesia cost to payer during radiation therapy course/6) − (CCLS expense to payer/N)]” per child (N) treated with radiation

  20. Reducing Anesthesia and Health Care Cost Through Utilization of Child Life Specialists in Pediatric Radiation Oncology.

    Scott, Michael T; Todd, Kimberly E; Oakley, Heather; Bradley, Julie A; Rotondo, Ronny L; Morris, Christopher G; Klein, Stuart; Mendenhall, Nancy P; Indelicato, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    To analyze the effectiveness of a certified child life specialist (CCLS) in reducing the frequency of daily anesthesia at our institution, and to quantify the potential health care payer cost savings of CCLS utilization in the United States. From 2006 to 2014, 738 children (aged ≤21 years) were treated with radiation therapy at our institution. We retrospectively analyzed the frequency of daily anesthesia before and after hiring a CCLS in 2011 after excluding patients aged 0 to 2 and >12 years. In the analyzed cohort of 425 patients the median age was 7.6 years (range, 3-12.9 years). For the pre-CCLS period the overall median age was 7.5 years; for the post-CCLS period the median age was 7.7 years. An average 6-week course of pediatric anesthesia for radiation therapy costs $50,000 in charges to the payer. The average annual cost to employ one CCLS is approximately $50,000. Before employing a CCLS, 69 of 121 children (57%) aged 3 to 12 years required daily anesthesia, including 33 of 53 children (62.3%) aged 5 to 8 years. After employing a CCLS, 124 of 304 children (40.8%) aged 3 to 12 years required daily anesthesia, including only 34 of 118 children (28.8%) aged 5 to 8 years (P16% absolute reduction in anesthesia use after employment of a CCLS, the health care payer cost savings was approaching $50,000 per 6 children aged 3 to 12 years treated annually with radiation therapy in our institution. This reduction resulted in a total of only 6 children aged 3 to 12 years required anesthesia to be treated per year at our center to achieve nearly break-even cost savings to the health care payer if the payer were to subsidize the employment expense of a CCLS. Overall, the CCLS intervention can provide an average annualized health care payer cost savings of "$[(anesthesia cost to payer during radiation therapy course/6) - (CCLS expense to payer/N)]" per child (N) treated with radiation therapy, where N equals the number of children aged 3 to 12

  1. Reducing Anesthesia and Health Care Cost Through Utilization of Child Life Specialists in Pediatric Radiation Oncology

    Scott, Michael T.; Todd, Kimberly E.; Oakley, Heather; Bradley, Julie A.; Rotondo, Ronny L.; Morris, Christopher G.; Klein, Stuart; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Indelicato, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effectiveness of a certified child life specialist (CCLS) in reducing the frequency of daily anesthesia at our institution, and to quantify the potential health care payer cost savings of CCLS utilization in the United States. Methods and Materials: From 2006 to 2014, 738 children (aged ≤21 years) were treated with radiation therapy at our institution. We retrospectively analyzed the frequency of daily anesthesia before and after hiring a CCLS in 2011 after excluding patients aged 0 to 2 and >12 years. In the analyzed cohort of 425 patients the median age was 7.6 years (range, 3-12.9 years). For the pre-CCLS period the overall median age was 7.5 years; for the post-CCLS period the median age was 7.7 years. An average 6-week course of pediatric anesthesia for radiation therapy costs $50,000 in charges to the payer. The average annual cost to employ one CCLS is approximately $50,000. Results: Before employing a CCLS, 69 of 121 children (57%) aged 3 to 12 years required daily anesthesia, including 33 of 53 children (62.3%) aged 5 to 8 years. After employing a CCLS, 124 of 304 children (40.8%) aged 3 to 12 years required daily anesthesia, including only 34 of 118 children (28.8%) aged 5 to 8 years (P 16% absolute reduction in anesthesia use after employment of a CCLS, the health care payer cost savings was approaching $50,000 per 6 children aged 3 to 12 years treated annually with radiation therapy in our institution. This reduction resulted in a total of only 6 children aged 3 to 12 years required anesthesia to be treated per year at our center to achieve nearly break-even cost savings to the health care payer if the payer were to subsidize the employment expense of a CCLS. Overall, the CCLS intervention can provide an average annualized health care payer cost savings of “$[(anesthesia cost to payer during radiation therapy course/6) − (CCLS expense to payer/N)]” per child (N) treated with radiation therapy, where N

  2. Development and Utilization of Bright Tabletop Sources of Coherent Soft X-Ray Radiation

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    2005-01-01

    This project investigated aspects of the development and utilization of compact XUV sources based on fast capillary discharges and high order harmonic up conversion. These sources are very compact, yet can generate soft x-ray radiation with peak spectral brightness several orders of magnitude larger than a synchrotron beam lines. The work has included the characterization of some of the important parameters that enable the use of these sources in unique applications, such as the degree of spatial coherence and the wavefront characteristics that affect their focusing capabilities. In relation to source development, they have recently completed preliminary work towards exploring the generation of high harmonics in a pre-ionized medium created by a capillary discharge. Since ions are more difficult to ionize than neutral atoms, the use of pre-ionized nonlinear media may lead to the generation of coherent light at > 1 KeV photon energy. Recent application results include the first study of the damage threshold and damage mechanism of XUV mirrors exposed to intense focalized 46.9 nm laser radiation, and the study of the ablation of polymers with soft x-ray laser light

  3. Radiation exposure estimates on production and utilization of recycled items using dismantling waste

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Nakashima, Mikio

    2002-03-01

    Radiation exposure was estimated on production and utilization of recycled items using dismantling wastes by assuming that their usage are restricted to nuclear facilities. The radiation exposure attributed to production of a steel-plate cast iron waste container, a receptacle for slag, and a drum reinforcement was calculated to be in the range of several μSv to several tens of μSv even in recycling contaminated metal waste of which radioactivity concentration of Co-60 is higher than the clearance level by a factor of two figures. It is also elucidated that casting of a multiple casting waste package meets the standards of dose equivalent rate for the transport of a radioactive package and the weight of the package will be able to kept around 20 tons for the convenience of the handling, in case of disposal of metal waste less than 37 MBq/g with the steel-plate cast iron waste container. As the results, from the radiological exposure's point of view, it should be possible to use slightly contaminated metal for recycled items in waste management. (author)

  4. Study of the effect of ionizing radiation for utilization of spent cracking catalysts

    Kondo, Fernando Mantovani

    2014-01-01

    Catalyst is a substance that changes the rate of a reaction. In the petroleum industry the commonly catalysts are used for Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) and Hydrocatalytic Cracking (HCC), which one applied in a specific stage. These catalysts are used to facilitate the molecular chains cracking which will generate a mixture of hydrocarbons. However, the catalyst gradually loses its activity, either by changing its original molecular structure or by its contamination from other petroleum molecules. The application of ionizing radiation (electron beam and gamma rays) over these spent catalysts was studied to contribute with the extraction of metals or rare-earths of high added-value. Tests carried out with FCC catalysts were used the techniques of 60 Co irradiation and electron beam (EB) and had as a subject the extraction of lanthanum (La 2 O 3 ), regeneration and utilization of these catalysts. However, the use of ionizing radiation has not contributed in these processes. Meanwhile with HCC catalysts the irradiation used was electron beam and had as a subject the extraction of molybdenum (MoO 3 ). In temperature around 750°C, these irradiated catalysts of the lower region have an extraction yield twice higher compared to non-irradiated ones, in other words 57.65% and 26.24% respectively. (author)

  5. Rapid Radiations and the Race to Redundancy: An Investigation of the Evolution of Australian Elapid Snake Venoms

    Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Koludarov, Ivan; Ali, Syed A.; Dobson, James; Zdenek, Christina N.; Dashevsky, Daniel; op den Brouw, Bianca; Masci, Paul P.; Nouwens, Amanda; Josh, Peter; Goldenberg, Jonathan; Cipriani, Vittoria; Hay, Chris; Hendrikx, Iwan; Dunstan, Nathan; Allen, Luke; Fry, Bryan G.

    2016-01-01

    Australia is the stronghold of the front-fanged venomous snake family Elapidae. The Australasian elapid snake radiation, which includes approximately 100 terrestrial species in Australia, as well as Melanesian species and all the world’s true sea snakes, may be less than 12 million years old. The incredible phenotypic and ecological diversity of the clade is matched by considerable diversity in venom composition. The clade’s evolutionary youth and dynamic evolution should make it of particular interest to toxinologists, however, the majority of species, which are small, typically inoffensive, and seldom encountered by non-herpetologists, have been almost completely neglected by researchers. The present study investigates the venom composition of 28 species proteomically, revealing several interesting trends in venom composition, and reports, for the first time in elapid snakes, the existence of an ontogenetic shift in the venom composition and activity of brown snakes (Pseudonaja sp.). Trends in venom composition are compared to the snakes’ feeding ecology and the paper concludes with an extended discussion of the selection pressures shaping the evolution of snake venom. PMID:27792190

  6. Relay race

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 24th May at 12:00. This annual event is for teams of six runners covering distances of 1000 m, 800 m, 800 m, 500 m, 500 m and 300 m respectively. Teams may be entered in the Seniors, Veterans, Ladies, Mixed or Open categories. There will also this year be a Nordic Walking event, as part of the Medical Service’s initiative “Move more, eat better!” The registration fee is 10 CHF per runner, and each runner will receive a souvenir prize. There will be a programme of entertainment from 12:00 on the arrival area (the lawn in front of Restaurant 1): 12:00 - 12:45  Music from the Old Bottom Street band 12:15 Start of the race 12:45 - 13h Demonstrations by the Fitness club and Dancing club 13:00 Results and prize giving (including a raffle to win an iPad2 3G offered by the Micro club) 13:20 à 14:00 Music from “What’s next” And many information st...

  7. Chest CT using spectral filtration: radiation dose, image quality, and spectrum of clinical utility

    Braun, Franziska M.; Johnson, Thorsten R.C.; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Meinel, Felix G. [University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-06-01

    To determine the radiation dose, image quality, and clinical utility of non-enhanced chest CT with spectral filtration. We retrospectively analysed 25 non-contrast chest CT examinations acquired with spectral filtration (tin-filtered Sn100 kVp spectrum) compared to 25 examinations acquired without spectral filtration (120 kV). Radiation metrics were compared. Image noise was measured. Contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) and figure-of-merit (FOM) were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for the assessment of various thoracic pathologies was rated by two independent readers. Effective chest diameters were comparable between groups (P = 0.613). In spectral filtration CT, median CTDI{sub vol}, DLP, and size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) were reduced (0.46 vs. 4.3 mGy, 16 vs. 141 mGy*cm, and 0.65 vs. 5.9 mGy, all P < 0.001). Spectral filtration CT had higher image noise (21.3 vs. 13.2 HU, P < 0.001) and lower CNR (47.2 vs. 75.3, P < 0.001), but was more dose-efficient (FOM 10,659 vs. 2,231/mSv, P < 0.001). Diagnostic confidence for parenchymal lung disease and osseous pathologies was lower with spectral filtration CT, but no significant difference was found for pleural pathologies, pulmonary nodules, or pneumonia. Non-contrast chest CT using spectral filtration appears to be sufficient for the assessment of a considerable spectrum of thoracic pathologies, while providing superior dose efficiency, allowing for substantial radiation dose reduction. (orig.)

  8. Radiations

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  9. Analysis of nodal coverage utilizing image guided radiation therapy for primary gynecologic tumor volumes

    Ahmed, Faisal [University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Loma Linda University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Sarkar, Vikren; Gaffney, David K.; Salter, Bill [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-10-01

    evaluating individual IGRT sessions, we found that 6 patients had an estimated minimal nodal CTV dose less than 90% (range: 78 to 99%) of that planned. With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, 2 patients experienced systemic disease progression at an average of 19.6 months. One patient was found to have a local or regional failure with an average follow-up of 42 months. Conclusion: Using only 3 dimensional IGRT corrections in gynecological radiation allows excellent coverage of the primary target volume and good average nodal CTV coverage. If IGRT corrections are based on alignment to the primary tumor volume, and is only able to be corrected in 3 degrees, this can create situations in which nodal volumes may be under dosed. Utilizing multiple IGRT sessions appears to average out dose discrepancies over the course of treatment. The implication of underdosing in a single IGRT session needs further evaluation in future studies. Based on the concern of minimum dose to a nodal target volume, these findings may signal caution when using IGRT and IMRT in gynecological radiation patients. Possible techniques to overcome this situation may include averaging shifts between tumor and nodal volume, use of a treatment couch with 6° of freedom, deformable registration, or adaptive planning.

  10. Thermographic Imaging of the Superficial Temperature in Racing Greyhounds before and after the Race

    Mari Vainionpää

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 47 racing greyhounds were enrolled in this study on two race days (in July and September, resp. at a racetrack. Twelve of the dogs participated in the study on both days. Thermographic images were taken before and after each race. From the images, superficial temperature points of selected sites (tendo calcaneus, musculus gastrocnemius, musculus gracilis, and musculus biceps femoris portio caudalis were taken and used to investigate the differences in superficial temperatures before and after the race. The thermographic images were compared between the right and left legs of a dog, between the raced distances, and between the two race days. The theoretical heat capacity of a racing greyhound was calculated. With regard to all distances raced, the superficial temperatures measured from the musculus gastrocnemius were significantly higher after the race than at baseline. No significant differences were found between the left and right legs of a dog after completing any of the distances. Significant difference was found between the two race days. The heat loss mechanisms of racing greyhounds during the race through forced conduction, radiation, evaporation, and panting can be considered adequate when observing the calculated heat capacity of the dogs.

  11. Thermographic imaging of the superficial temperature in racing greyhounds before and after the race.

    Vainionpää, Mari; Tienhaara, Esa-Pekka; Raekallio, Marja; Junnila, Jouni; Snellman, Marjatta; Vainio, Outi

    2012-01-01

    A total of 47 racing greyhounds were enrolled in this study on two race days (in July and September, resp.) at a racetrack. Twelve of the dogs participated in the study on both days. Thermographic images were taken before and after each race. From the images, superficial temperature points of selected sites (tendo calcaneus, musculus gastrocnemius, musculus gracilis, and musculus biceps femoris portio caudalis) were taken and used to investigate the differences in superficial temperatures before and after the race. The thermographic images were compared between the right and left legs of a dog, between the raced distances, and between the two race days. The theoretical heat capacity of a racing greyhound was calculated. With regard to all distances raced, the superficial temperatures measured from the musculus gastrocnemius were significantly higher after the race than at baseline. No significant differences were found between the left and right legs of a dog after completing any of the distances. Significant difference was found between the two race days. The heat loss mechanisms of racing greyhounds during the race through forced conduction, radiation, evaporation, and panting can be considered adequate when observing the calculated heat capacity of the dogs.

  12. A Prospective, Multicenter Study of Complementary/Alternative Medicine (CAM) Utilization During Definitive Radiation for Breast Cancer

    Moran, Meena S.; Ma Shuangge; Jagsi, Reshma; Yang, Tzu-I Jonathan; Higgins, Susan A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Lloyd, Shane; Peschel, Richard; Gaudreau, Bryant; Rockwell, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Although complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization in breast cancer patients is reported to be high, there are few data on CAM practices in breast patients specifically during radiation. This prospective, multi-institutional study was conducted to define CAM utilization in breast cancer during definitive radiation. Materials/Methods: A validated CAM instrument with a self-skin assessment was administered to 360 Stage 0-III breast cancer patients from 5 centers during the last week of radiation. All data were analyzed to detect significant differences between users/nonusers. Results: CAM usage was reported in 54% of the study cohort (n=194/360). Of CAM users, 71% reported activity-based CAM (eg, Reiki, meditation), 26% topical CAM, and 45% oral CAM. Only 16% received advice/counseling from naturopathic/homeopathic/medical professionals before initiating CAM. CAM use significantly correlated with higher education level (P<.001), inversely correlated with concomitant hormone/radiation therapy use (P=.010), with a trend toward greater use in younger patients (P=.066). On multivariate analysis, level of education (OR: 6.821, 95% CI: 2.307-20.168, P<.001) and hormones/radiation therapy (OR: 0.573, 95% CI: 0.347-0.949, P=.031) independently predicted for CAM use. Significantly lower skin toxicity scores were reported in CAM users vs nonusers, respectively (mild: 34% vs 25%, severe: 17% vs 29%, P=.017). Conclusion: This is the first prospective study to assess CAM practices in breast patients during radiation, with definition of these practices as the first step for future investigation of CAM/radiation interactions. These results should alert radiation oncologists that a large percentage of breast cancer patients use CAM during radiation without disclosure or consideration for potential interactions, and should encourage increased awareness, communication, and documentation of CAM practices in patients undergoing radiation treatment for breast

  13. Utilization of actively-induced, prompt radiation emission for nonproliferation applications

    Blackburn, B.W.; Jones, J.L.; Moss, C.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Hunt, A.W.; Harmon, F.; Watson, S.M.; Johnson, J.T.

    2007-01-01

    The pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technique, which has demonstrated the ability to detect shielded nuclear material, is based on utilizing delayed neutrons and photons between accelerator pulses. While most active interrogation systems have focused on delayed neutron and gamma-ray signatures, there is an increasing need to bring faster detection and acquisition capabilities to field inspection applications. This push for decreased interrogation times, increased sensitivity, and mitigation of false positives requires that detection systems take advantage of all available information. Collaborative research between Idaho National Lab (INL), Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has focused on exploiting actively-induced, prompt radiation signatures from nuclear material within a pulsed photonuclear environment. To date, these prompt emissions have not been effectively exploited due to difficulties in detection and signal processing inherent in the prompt regime as well as an overall poor understanding of the magnitude and yields of these emissions. Exploitation of prompt radiation (defined as during an accelerator pulse/photofission event and/or immediately after (<1 μs)) has the potential to dramatically reduce interrogation times since neutron yields are more than two orders of magnitude greater than delayed emissions. Recent preliminary experiments conducted at the IAC suggest that it is indeed possible to extract prompt neutron information within a pulsed photon environment. Successful exploitation of prompt emissions is critical for the development of an improved robust, high-throughput, low target dose inspection system for detection of shielded nuclear materials

  14. Utilization of Actively-induced, Prompt Radiation Emission for Nonproliferation Applications

    F. W. Blackburn; J. L. Jones; C. E. Moss; J. T. Mihalzco; A. W. Hunt; F. Harmon

    2006-01-01

    The pulsed Photonuclear Assessment (PPA) technique, which has demonstrated the ability to detect shielded nuclear material, is based on utilizing delayed neutrons and photons between accelerator pulses. While most active interrogation systems have focused on delayed neutron and gamma-ray signatures, the current requirements of various agencies necessitate bringing faster detection and acquisition capabilities to field inspection applications. This push for decreased interrogation times, increased sensitivity and mitigation of false positives requires that detection systems take advantage of all available information. Collaborative research between Idaho National Lab (INL), Idaho State University's Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has focused on exploiting actively-induced, prompt radiation signatures from nuclear material within a pulsed photonuclear environment. To date, these prompt emissions have not been effectively exploited due to difficulties in detection and signal processing inherent in the prompt regime as well as an overall poor understanding of the magnitude and yields of these emissions. Exploitation of prompt radiation (defined as during an accelerator pulse/(photo) fission event and/or immediately after (< l ms)) has the potential to dramatically reduce interrogation times since the yields are more than two orders of magnitude greater than delayed emissions. Recent preliminary experiments conducted at the IAC suggest that it is indeed possible to extract prompt neutron information within a pulsed photon environment. Successful exploitation of prompt emissions is critical for the development of an improved robust, high-throughput, low target dose inspection system for detection of shielded nuclear materials

  15. Utilization of vanadium alloys in the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program

    Smith, J.P.; Johnson, W.R.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Trester, P.W.; Smith, D.; Bloom, E.

    1995-10-01

    Vanadium alloys are attractive candidate structural materials for fusion power plants because of their potential for minimum environmental impact due to low neutron activation and rapid activation decay. They also possess favorable material properties for operation in a fusion environment. General Atomics (GA), in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), has developed a plan for the utilization of vanadium alloys as part of the Radiative Divertor (RD) upgrade for the DIII-D tokamak. The plan will be carried out in conjunction with General Atomics and the Materials Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE). This application of a vanadium alloy will provide a meaningful step in the development of advanced materials for fusion power devices by: (1) developing necessary materials processing technology for the fabrication of large vanadium alloy components, and (2) demonstrating the in-service behavior of a vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) in a tokamak environment. The program consists of three phases: first, small vanadium alloy coupon samples will be exposed in DIII-D at positions in the vessel floor and within the pumping plenum region of the existing divertor structure; second, a small vanadium alloy component will be installed in the existing divertor, and third, during the forthcoming Radiative Divertor modification, scheduled for completion in mid-1997, the upper section of the new double-null, slotted divertor will be fabricated from vanadium alloy product forms. This program also includes research and development (R and D) efforts to support fabrication development and to resolve key issues related to environmental effects

  16. Utilization of vanadium alloys in the DIII-D radiative divertor program

    Smith, J.P.; Johnson, W.R.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Trester, P.W.; Smith, D.; Bloom, E.

    1996-01-01

    Vanadium alloys are attractive candidate structural materials for fusion power plants because of their potential for minimum environmental impact due to low neutron activation and rapid activation decay. They also possess favorable material properties for operation in a fusion environment. General Atomics in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a plan for the utilization of vanadium alloys as part of the radiative divertor upgrade for the DIII-D tokamak. The plan will be carried out in conjunction with General Atomics and the Materials Program of the US Department of Energy. This application of a vanadium alloy will provide a meaningful step in the development of advanced materials for fusion power devices by: (1) developing necessary materials processing technology for the fabrication of large vanadium alloy components and (2) demonstrating the in-service behavior of a vanadium alloy (V-4Cr-4Ti) in a tokamak environment. The program consists of three phases: first, small vanadium alloy coupon samples will be exposed in DIII-D at positions in the vessel floor and within the pumping plenum region of the existing divertor structure; second, a small vanadium alloy component will be installed in the existing divertor, and third, during the forthcoming radiative divertor modification, scheduled for completion in mid-1997, the upper section of the new double-null, slotted divertor will be fabricated from vanadium alloy product forms. This program also includes research and development efforts to support fabrication development and to resolve key issues related to environmental effects. (orig.)

  17. The clinical utilization of radiation therapy in Korea between 2009 and 2013

    Kang, Jin Kyu; Kim, Mi Sook; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Kim, Hee Jin; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Paik, Eun Kyung; Cha, Yu Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Hyun Jin [College of Pharmacy and Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the clinical utilization of radiation therapy (RT) in Korea between 2009 and 2013. We analyzed open claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The subjects were patients who had diagnostic codes C00-C97 or D00-D48 according to the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases, with procedure codes indicating RT treatment. The total number of patients who received RT in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013 were 45,571, 49,593, 54,671, 59,172, and 61,485, respectively. Among them, the total numbers of male and female patients were 20,780/24,791 in 2009, 22,711/26,882 in 2010, 24,872/29,799 in 2011, 27,101/32,071 in 2012, and 27,941/33,544 in 2013. The five cancers that were most frequently treated with RT between 2009 and 2012 were breast, lung, colorectal, liver, and uterine cervical cancers. However, the fifth most common cancer treated with RT that replaced uterine cervical cancer in 2013 was prostate cancer. The three leading types of cancer among the male patients were lung, colorectal, and liver cancers, whereas in female patients, they were breast, uterine cervical, and lung cancers. The type of cancer most commonly treated by RT was cancer of the central nervous system in patients aged 20 years or less, breast cancer in patients aged 30–50 years, and lung cancer in patients aged 60 years or more. Data from this study provided the clinical utilization of RT in Korea between 2009 and 2013.

  18. Variations in Medicare Reimbursement in Radiation Oncology: An Analysis of the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data Set

    Vu, Charles C.; Lanni, Thomas B.; Robertson, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to summarize recently published data on Medicare reimbursement to individual radiation oncologists and to identify the causes of variation in Medicare reimbursement in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: The Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File (POSPUF), which details nearly all services provided by radiation oncologists in 2012, was used for this study. The data were filtered and analyzed by physician and by billing code. Statistical analysis was performed to identify differences in reimbursements based on sex, rurality, billing of technical services, or location in a certificate of need (CON) state. Results: There were 4135 radiation oncologists who received a total of $1,499,625,803 in payments from Medicare in 2012. Seventy-five percent of radiation oncologists were male. The median reimbursement was $146,453. The code with the highest total reimbursement was 77418 (radiation treatment delivery intensity modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]). The most commonly billed evaluation and management (E/M) code for new visits was 99205 (49%). The most commonly billed E/M code for established visits was 99213 (54%). Forty percent of providers billed none of their new office visits using 99205 (the highest E/M billing code), whereas 34% of providers billed all of their new office visits using 99205. For the 1510 radiation oncologists (37%) who billed technical services, median Medicare reimbursement was $606,008, compared with $93,921 for all other radiation oncologists (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, technical services billing (P<.001), male sex (P<.001), and rural location (P=.007) were predictive of higher Medicare reimbursement. Conclusions: The billing of technical services, with their high capital and labor overhead requirements, limits any comparison in reimbursement between individual radiation oncologists or between radiation oncologists and other

  19. Variations in Medicare Reimbursement in Radiation Oncology: An Analysis of the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data Set.

    Vu, Charles C; Lanni, Thomas B; Robertson, John M

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to summarize recently published data on Medicare reimbursement to individual radiation oncologists and to identify the causes of variation in Medicare reimbursement in radiation oncology. The Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File (POSPUF), which details nearly all services provided by radiation oncologists in 2012, was used for this study. The data were filtered and analyzed by physician and by billing code. Statistical analysis was performed to identify differences in reimbursements based on sex, rurality, billing of technical services, or location in a certificate of need (CON) state. There were 4135 radiation oncologists who received a total of $1,499,625,803 in payments from Medicare in 2012. Seventy-five percent of radiation oncologists were male. The median reimbursement was $146,453. The code with the highest total reimbursement was 77418 (radiation treatment delivery intensity modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]). The most commonly billed evaluation and management (E/M) code for new visits was 99205 (49%). The most commonly billed E/M code for established visits was 99213 (54%). Forty percent of providers billed none of their new office visits using 99205 (the highest E/M billing code), whereas 34% of providers billed all of their new office visits using 99205. For the 1510 radiation oncologists (37%) who billed technical services, median Medicare reimbursement was $606,008, compared with $93,921 for all other radiation oncologists (Preimbursement. The billing of technical services, with their high capital and labor overhead requirements, limits any comparison in reimbursement between individual radiation oncologists or between radiation oncologists and other specialists. Male sex and rural practice location are independent predictors of higher total Medicare reimbursements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Variations in Medicare Reimbursement in Radiation Oncology: An Analysis of the Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data Set

    Vu, Charles C.; Lanni, Thomas B.; Robertson, John M., E-mail: JRobertson@beaumont.edu

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study were to summarize recently published data on Medicare reimbursement to individual radiation oncologists and to identify the causes of variation in Medicare reimbursement in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: The Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data: Physician and Other Supplier Public Use File (POSPUF), which details nearly all services provided by radiation oncologists in 2012, was used for this study. The data were filtered and analyzed by physician and by billing code. Statistical analysis was performed to identify differences in reimbursements based on sex, rurality, billing of technical services, or location in a certificate of need (CON) state. Results: There were 4135 radiation oncologists who received a total of $1,499,625,803 in payments from Medicare in 2012. Seventy-five percent of radiation oncologists were male. The median reimbursement was $146,453. The code with the highest total reimbursement was 77418 (radiation treatment delivery intensity modulated radiation therapy [IMRT]). The most commonly billed evaluation and management (E/M) code for new visits was 99205 (49%). The most commonly billed E/M code for established visits was 99213 (54%). Forty percent of providers billed none of their new office visits using 99205 (the highest E/M billing code), whereas 34% of providers billed all of their new office visits using 99205. For the 1510 radiation oncologists (37%) who billed technical services, median Medicare reimbursement was $606,008, compared with $93,921 for all other radiation oncologists (P<.001). On multivariate analysis, technical services billing (P<.001), male sex (P<.001), and rural location (P=.007) were predictive of higher Medicare reimbursement. Conclusions: The billing of technical services, with their high capital and labor overhead requirements, limits any comparison in reimbursement between individual radiation oncologists or between radiation oncologists and other

  1. Physician resource utilization in radiation oncology: a model based on management of carcinoma of the prostate

    Kobeissi, Beverly J.; Gupta, Mahendra; Perez, Carlos A.; Dopuch, Nicholas; Michalski, Jeff M.; Antwerp, George van; Gerber, Russell; Wasserman, Todd H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a methodology to estimate the comparative cost of physician time in treating patients with localized prostate cancer, using as an example two-dimensional (2D) vs. three-dimensional (3D) conformal irradiation techniques, and to illustrate how current cost-accounting techniques can be used to quantify the cost of physician time and effort of any treatment. Methods and Materials: Activity-based costing, a recent innovation in accounting, widely recommended for estimating and managing the costs of specific activities, was used to derive physician resource utilization costs (actual cost of the physician services and related support services consumed). Results: Patients treated with 3D conformal irradiation consume about 50% more physician time than patients receiving 2D conventional radiation therapy. The average professional reimbursement for the 3D conformal irradiation is only about 26% more than for the 2D treatment. Substantial variations in cost are found depending on the total available physician working hours. In an academic institution, a physician working 40 hours a week would have to spend an average of about 60% of available time on clinical services to break even on a 2D treatment process and over 74% of available time on clinical work to break even on a 3D treatment process. The same physician working 50 hours a week would have to spend an average of about 48% of available time on 2D clinical services and about 60% of available time on 3D clinical work to break even. Current Medicare reimbursement for 3D treatment falls short of actual costs, even if physicians work 100% of a 50-hour week. Medicare reimbursement for 2D barely allows the department to break even for 2D treatments. Conclusions: Costs based on estimates of resource use can be substantially under- or overestimated. A consistent language (method) is needed to obtain and describe the costs of radiation therapy. The methodology described here can help practitioners and

  2. Utilization of ultraviolet radiation of cold hollow cathode discharge plasma for water disinfection

    Soloshenko, I.O.; Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Khomych, V.O.; Tsiolko, V.V.; Potapchenko, N.G.; Goncharuk, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    We study the possibility to use the ultraviolet radiation of a hollow cathode discharge plasma for water disinfection. We have performed the comparative experiments on the influence of ultraviolet radiation of the mentioned discharge plasma, as well as that of a standard low pressure mercury lamp

  3. Utilizations of intense pulsed neutron source in radiochemistry and radiation chemistry

    Shiokawa, Takanobu; Yoshihara, Kenji; Kaji, Harumi; Kusaka, Yuzuru; Tabata, Yoneho.

    1975-01-01

    Intense pulsed neutron sources is expected to supply more useful and fundamental informations in radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Short-lived intermediate species may be detected and the mechanisms of radiation induced reactions will be elucidated more precisely. Analytical application of pulsed neutrons is also very useful. (auth.)

  4. Bridged Race Population Estimates

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Population estimates from "bridging" the 31 race categories used in Census 2000, as specified in the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) race and ethnicity...

  5. The utilize of gamma radiation on the examination of mechanical properties of polymeric materials

    F. Greškovič

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals about the application area of radiation crosslinking of plastics, which follows after the injection moulding. The main objective of the presented article is the research of influence irradiation dosage on mechanical properties of materials: PP filled by 15 % of mineral filler – talc. Mechanical properties - tensile strength and impact strength by Charpy were examined in dependence on absorbed dose of the gamma rays on various conditions and were compared with non-irradiated samples. Radiation processing involves mainly the use of either electron beams from electron accelerators or gamma radiation from Cobalt-60 sources.

  6. Yacht Race Monitoring

    1981-01-01

    Observer Single-handed Transatlantic Race (OSTAR) participants were aided by a French-American space-based monitoring system which reported the yacht's positions throughout the race, and also served as an emergency locator service. Originating from NASA's Nimbus 6 Satellite, use of this system, called ARGOS made the OSTAR competition the most accurately reported sea race ever conducted. Each boat carried a portable transmitter allowing 88 new sources of oceanographic data available during the race.

  7. Characterization of Outer Space Radiation Induced Changes in Extremophiles Utilizing Deep Space Gateway Opportunities

    Venkateswaran, K.; Wang, C.; Smith, D.; Mason, C.; Landry, K.; Rettberg, P.

    2018-02-01

    Extremophilic microbial survival, adaptation, biological functions, and molecular mechanisms associated with outer space radiation can be tested by exposing them onto Deep Space Gateway hardware (inside/outside) using microbiology and molecular biology techniques.

  8. Protection by lead aprons against diffused radiation by medical x-ray utilization

    Huyskens, C.J.; Franken, Y.; Hummel, W.

    1995-01-01

    A lead apron can reduce the effective dose of radiological workers in medical roentgen applications. The reduction is not only determined by the thickness of the lead, but in particular by the model and fit of the apron. It also depends on the geometry of the radiation field to which the worker is exposed and the tube voltage. Based on model calculations it is determined how much protection against radiation is possible. 6 figs., 1 tab., 5 refs

  9. Salinity effects on radiation utilization characteristics of Kochia (Kochia Scoparia L. Schrad.)

    Jami Al-Ahmadi, M.; Kafi, M.; Nassiri Mahalati, M.

    2008-01-01

    In order to evaluate light extinction coefficient and radiation use efficiency of Kochia scoparia in response to saline stress, a study was performed at Birjand, South Khorasan, using three levels of salinity in irrigation water (1.5, 8.6 and 28.2 dSm-1) with three replications. Several measurements were conducted during growth season to calculate radiation fraction passed through plant canopy, and also leaf area index (LAI) and total dry matter (TDM). Light extinction coefficient calculated with correcting fraction of plant light absorption for whole day, and using dry matter accumulation, radiation use efficiency obtained in each different salinity level. The results showed that light extinction coefficient of Kochia was equal to 0.59 for solar noon and 0.75 for whole day. The radiation absorption of kochia rose as LAI increased, and 95% of radiation was absorbed at LAI equal to 4 to 5. LAI and total dry matter accumulation were highest in moderate salinity level. In general, increase in salinity caused a delay in early season development, and accelerated plant maturity at late season. This caused plant canopies at the highest salinity reached to maximum light absorption later in growth season. Increase of salinity from 1.5 to 8.6 dSm-1 was responsible for little increase in RUE from 2.4 to 2.5 g per MJ absorbed PAR; however, it reduced with further increase in salinity. Thus, it seems that moderate salinity levels stimulate growth and dry matter accumulation of kochia and cause kochia canopy convert the absorbed radiation to dry matter more effectively. Key words: Kochia scoparia, Salinity, Light extension coefficient, Radiation use efficiency, Leaf Area Index

  10. Synthesis and reforming of high molecular-weigth compounds by the utilization of radiation

    Machi, Sueo

    1976-01-01

    Radiation effects on the synthesis are reforming of high molecular-weight compounds are reviewed. The report is divided into four main parts. The first part deals with the characteristics of the radiation processing. The reaction can be started in a wide range of temperature including very low temperature. Catalysts are unnecessary. The reaction velocity is fast, and the reaction in solid phase can be started uniformly. And the quality of products is well controllable. The second part deals with the synthesis of high molecular-weight compounds by radiation polymerization. Radical polymerization and ionizing polymerization, gas phase and liquid phase polymerization, the polymerization and copolymerization of fluorine-containing monomers, and solid phase polymerization and low temperature polymerization are included in this part. Attention is directed to the continuous production system for the radiation polymerization of ethylene developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The third part deals with the reforming of high molecular-weight compounds by radiation graft polymerization. The combination of backbone polymers and monomers for reforming plastics and fibers, the membranes for reverse osmosis, porous membranes, and ion exchange membranes are included. The fourth part deals with the reforming of high molecular-weight compounds by the cross-linking. Polyethylene, PVC, ethyl acrylate copolymer and the like are included. (Iwakiri, K.)

  11. Method and apparatus for surface characterization and process control utilizing radiation from desorbed particles

    Feldman, L.C.; Kraus, J.S.; Tolk, N.H.; Traum, M.M.; Tully, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Emission of characteristic electromagnetic radiation in the infrared, visible, or UV from excited particles, typically ions, molecules, or neutral atoms, desorbed from solid surfaces by an incident beam of low-momentum probe radiation has been observed. Disclosed is a method for characterizing solid surfaces based on the observed effect, with low-momentum probe radiation consisting of electrons or photons. Further disclosed is a method for controlling manufacturing processes that is also based on the observed effect. The latter method can, for instance, be advantageously applied in integrated circuit-, integrated optics-, and magnetic bubble device manufacture. Specific examples of applications of the method are registering of masks, control of a direct-writing processing beam, end-point detection in etching, and control of a processing beam for laser- or electron-beam annealing or ion implantation

  12. Common sense radiation protection in the radiopharmacy: utilization of existing resources

    Baker, W.J.; Beightol, R.W.; Christian, P.E.; Datz, F.L.

    1981-01-01

    Lead delivery containers furnished by commercial manufacturers can be used to build storage containers for radioactive waste, which can reduce background radiation levels in a radiopharmaceutical manufacturing area. Shields from Squibb generators can be cut and joined to make decay pots, syringe and glove receptables, and vial containers. One-quarter inch sheet lead can be held in place by home-made supports to build side shields for drawing stations. The use of these shielding devices and storage containers has decreased the radiation exposure to personnel despite handling multicurie quantities of activity daily

  13. Pathways analysis and radiation-dose estimates for radioactive residues at formerly utilized MED/AEC sites

    Gilbert, T.L.; Chee, P.C.; Knight, M.J.; Peterson, J.M.; Roberts, C.J.; Robinson, J.E.; Tsai, S.Y.H.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1983-03-01

    Methods of analysis are developed for estimating the largest individual radiation dose that could result from residual radioactivity at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. Two unique aspects of the methods are (1) a systematic structuring of the radiation pathways analysis into source terms, source-to-exposure analysis, and exposure-to-dose analysis, and (2) the systematic use of data on the average concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil, food, and the human body in order to assess the validity of model calculations and obtain more realistic values. The methods are applied to a typical FUSRAP site in order to obtain generic source-to-dose (D/S) conversion factors for estimating the radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual from a known concentration of radionuclides in the soil. The D/S factors are used to derive soil guidelines, i.e., the limiting concentrations of radionuclides at a typical FUSRAP site that are unlikely to result in individual dose limits that exceed generally accepted radiation protection standards. The results lead to the conclusion that the soil guidelines should not exceed 17, 75, and 300 pCi/g for Ra-226, U-238, and Th-230, respectively

  14. Pathways analysis and radiation-dose estimates for radioactive residues at formerly utilized MED/AEC sites

    Gilbert, T.L.; Chee, P.C.; Knight, M.J.; Peterson, J.M.; Roberts, C.J.; Robinson, J.E.; Tsai, S.Y.H.; Yuan, Y.C.

    1983-03-01

    Methods of analysis are developed for estimating the largest individual radiation dose that could result from residual radioactivity at sites identified by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy. Two unique aspects of the methods are (1) a systematic structuring of the radiation pathways analysis into source terms, source-to-exposure analysis, and exposure-to-dose analysis, and (2) the systematic use of data on the average concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil, food, and the human body in order to assess the validity of model calculations and obtain more realistic values. The methods are applied to a typical FUSRAP site in order to obtain generic source-to-dose (D/S) conversion factors for estimating the radiation dose to the maximally exposed individual from a known concentration of radionuclides in the soil. The D/S factors are used to derive soil guidelines, i.e., the limiting concentrations of radionuclides at a typical FUSRAP site that are unlikely to result in individual dose limits that exceed generally accepted radiation protection standards. The results lead to the conclusion that the soil guidelines should not exceed 17, 75, and 300 pCi/g for Ra-226, U-238, and Th-230, respectively.

  15. Effect of gamma and ultraviolet radiations in isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae (METSCH) Sorokin, 1883 and its utilization aiming Diatraea saccharalis (FABRICIUS, 1794) control

    Almeida, L.C. de.

    1983-06-01

    The effects of gamma radiation and ultraviolet in isolated of the fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch) Sorokin, and the utilization of this pathogen for the Diatrae saccharalis (Fabr.) control are studied. (L.M.J.) [pt

  16. Smith-Purcell experiment utilizing a field-emitter array cathode: measurements of radiation

    Ishizuka, H.; Kawamura, Y.; Yokoo, K.; Shimawaki, H.; Hosono, A.

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation at wavelengths of 350-750 nm was produced in a tabletop experiment using a field-emitter array (FEA) cathode. The electron gun was 5 cm long, and a 25 mmx25 mm holographic replica grating was placed behind the slit provided in the anode. A regulated DC power supply accelerated electron beams in excess of 10 μA up to 45 keV, while a small Van de Graaff generator accelerated smaller currents to higher energies. The grating had a 0.556 μm period, 30 deg. blaze and a 0.2 μm thick aluminum coating. Spectral characteristics of the radiation were measured both manually and automatically; in the latter case, the spectrometer was driven by a stepping motor to scan the wavelength, and AD-converted signals from a photomultiplier tube were processed by a personal computer. The measurement, made at 80 deg. relative to the electron beam, showed good agreement with theoretical wavelengths of the SP radiation. Diffraction orders were -2 and -3 for beam energies higher than 45 keV, -3 to -5 at 15-25 keV, and -2 to -4 in between. The experiment has thus provided evidence for the practical applicability of FEAs to compact radiation sources

  17. Calibration methodology for instruments utilized in X radiation beams, diagnostic level

    Penha, M. da; Potiens, A.; Caldas, L.V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: mppalbu@ipen.br

    2004-07-01

    Methodologies for the calibration of diagnostic radiology instruments were established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. The methods may be used in the calibration procedures of survey meters used in radiation protection measurements (scattered radiation), instruments used in direct beams (attenuated and non attenuated beams) and quality control instruments. The established qualities are recommended by the international standards IEC 1267 and ISO 4037-3. Two ionization chambers were used as reference systems, one with a volume of 30 cm{sup 3} for radiation protection measurements, and the other with a volume of 1 cm{sup 3} for direct beam measurements. Both are traceable to the German Primary Laboratory of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In the case of calibration of quality control instruments, a non-invasive method using the measurement of the spectrum endpoint was established with a portable gamma and X-ray Intertechnique spectrometer system. The methods were applied to survey meters (radiation protection measurements), ionization chambers (direct beam measurements) and k Vp meters (invasive and non-invasive instruments). (Author)

  18. Calibration methodology for instruments utilized in X radiation beams, diagnostic level

    Penha, M. da; Potiens, A.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    2004-01-01

    Methodologies for the calibration of diagnostic radiology instruments were established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. The methods may be used in the calibration procedures of survey meters used in radiation protection measurements (scattered radiation), instruments used in direct beams (attenuated and non attenuated beams) and quality control instruments. The established qualities are recommended by the international standards IEC 1267 and ISO 4037-3. Two ionization chambers were used as reference systems, one with a volume of 30 cm 3 for radiation protection measurements, and the other with a volume of 1 cm 3 for direct beam measurements. Both are traceable to the German Primary Laboratory of Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). In the case of calibration of quality control instruments, a non-invasive method using the measurement of the spectrum endpoint was established with a portable gamma and X-ray Intertechnique spectrometer system. The methods were applied to survey meters (radiation protection measurements), ionization chambers (direct beam measurements) and k Vp meters (invasive and non-invasive instruments). (Author)

  19. Creation and utilization of a World Wide Web based space radiation effects code: SIREST

    Singleterry, R. C. Jr; Wilson, J. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Tripathi, R. K.; Thibeault, S. A.; Noor, A. K.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badavi, F. F.; Chang, C. K.; Qualls, G. D.; hide

    2001-01-01

    In order for humans and electronics to fully and safely operate in the space environment, codes like HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) must be included in any designer's toolbox for design evaluation with respect to radiation damage. Currently, spacecraft designers do not have easy access to accurate radiation codes like HZETRN to evaluate their design for radiation effects on humans and electronics. Today, the World Wide Web is sophisticated enough to support the entire HZETRN code and all of the associated pre and post processing tools. This package is called SIREST (Space Ionizing Radiation Effects and Shielding Tools). There are many advantages to SIREST. The most important advantage is the instant update capability of the web. Another major advantage is the modularity that the web imposes on the code. Right now, the major disadvantage of SIREST will be its modularity inside the designer's system. This mostly comes from the fact that a consistent interface between the designer and the computer system to evaluate the design is incomplete. This, however, is to be solved in the Intelligent Synthesis Environment (ISE) program currently being funded by NASA.

  20. A novel transition radiation detector utilizing superconducting microspheres for measuring the energy of relativistic high-energy charged particles

    Yuan, Luke C.L.; Chen, C.P.; Huang, C.Y.; Lee, S.C.; Waysand, G.; Perrier, P.; Limagne, D.; Jeudy, V.; Girard, T.

    2000-01-01

    A novel transition radiation detector (TRD) utilizing superheated superconducting microspheres of tin of 22-26, 27-32 and 32-38 μm in diameter, respectively, has been constructed which is capable of measuring accurately the energy of relativistic high-energy charged particles. The test has been conducted in a high-energy electron beam facility at the CERN PS in the energy range of 1-10 GeV showing an energy dependence of the TR X-ray photon produced and hence the value γ=E/mc 2 of the charged particle

  1. Quantifying Health Utilities in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiation Treatment for Liver Metastases for Use in Future Economic Evaluations.

    Warren, B; Munoz-Schuffenegger, P; Chan, K K W; Chu, W; Helou, J; Erler, D; Chung, H

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is increasingly used as an option for those with liver metastases. In order to facilitate future economic impact of health technologies, health utility scores may be used. The EuroQOL-5D-3L (EQ-5D) preference-based healthy utility instrument was used to evaluate the impact of treatment with SBRT on health utility scores. Between August 2013 and October 2014, 31 patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT for liver metastases were enrolled in this study. The EQ-5D instrument was administered at baseline, during and up to 6 months post-SBRT. Mean EQ-5D score at baseline was 0.857, which remained stable across the entire study time period. Transient increases in difficulties with mobility (9.7% reported at baseline to 16.1% on the last day of treatment) and usual activities (3.2% reported at baseline to 34.5% on day two) were found during the course of treatment; these returned to baseline levels subsequently. The mean visual analogue score at baseline was 65.8 and remained unchanged throughout treatment and follow-up. The stability of health utility scores and problems reported by patients undergoing treatment indicate that SBRT for liver metastases does not impart a significant adverse effect on quality of life. These results may be used for future economic evaluation of SBRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A computationally efficient P_1 radiation model for modern combustion systems utilizing pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods

    Krishnamoorthy, Gautham

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The P_1 radiation model was interfaced with high performance linear solvers. • Pre-conditioned conjugate gradient (PC CG) method improved convergence by 50% • PC CG was more than 30 times faster than classical iterative methods. • The time to solution scaled linearly with increase in problem size employing PC CG. • Employing WSGGM with P_1 model compared reasonably well against benchmark data. - Abstract: The iterative convergence of the P_1 radiation model can be slow in optically thin scenarios when employing classical iterative methods. In order to remedy this shortcoming, an in-house P_1 radiation model was interfaced with high performance, scalable, linear solver libraries. Next, the accuracies of P_1 radiation model calculations was assessed by comparing its predictions against discrete ordinates (DO) model calculations for prototypical problems representative of modern combustion systems. Corresponding benchmark results were also included for comparison. Utilizing Pre-Conditioners (PC) to the Conjugate Gradients (CG) method, the convergence time of the P_1 radiation model reduced by a factor of 30 for modest problem sizes and a factor of 70 for larger sized problems when compared against classical Gauss Seidel sweeps. Further, PC provided 50% computational savings compared to employing CG in a standalone mode. The P_1 model calculation times were about 25–30% of the DO model calculation time. The time to solution also scaled linearly with an increase in problem size. The weighted sum of gray gases model employed in this study in conjunction with the P_1 model provided good agreement against benchmark data with L_2 error norms (defined relative to corresponding DO calculations) improving when isotropic intensities were prevalent.

  3. Radon and radon daughter measurements and methods utilized by EPA's Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility

    Phillips, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility (EERF), Office of Radiation Programs, has the responsibility for conducting the Environmental Protection Agency's study of the radiological impact of the phosphate industry. Numerous measurements in structures constructed on land reclaimed from phosphate mining showed that working levels in these structures range from 0.001 to 0.9 WL. Sampling is performed by drawing air through a 0.8 micrometer pore size, 25 mm diameter filter at a flow rate of 10 to 15 liters/minute for from 5 to 20 minutes, depending on the daughter levels anticipated. The detection system consists of a ruggedized silicon surface barrier detector (450 mm 2 -100 micrometer depletion) connected through an appropriate pre-amplifier-amplifier to a 1024-channel multichannel analyzer. Other measurement methods are also discussed

  4. Utilization of a computer using programless language for radiation protection management

    Masuko, Syozi; Kasahara, Shigeru

    1985-01-01

    The practice of radiation management is different for each laboratory both in point of view and in the form of recording. Therefore, the computer program for the radiation management, especially for the management of radioisotopes is required to meet many amendments. In this standpoint, we have developed a ''programless language'' or ''programless software'' and have used in our work for several years. As the result of our experience, we have found that the programless language is quite satisfactory for the management of radioisotopes and that it has an advantage in some aspects over conventional programs. It is thought that this ''programless language'' is effective not only for our own works, but also applicable to other radioisotope laboratories. (author)

  5. Radiation effects on some polymeric materials and their utilization for possible practical applications

    Refaee, A.M.El.A.

    2008-01-01

    The present study divided into two parts. First part focused on the effect of the radiation on some naturally occurring polymers such as chitosan, sodium alginate and carboxymethylcellulose for controlling the degradation process of these polymers. These polymers of low molecular weights can be used as growth promoters for plants in the agriculture field. Second part focused on the radiation grafting of VAc/HEMA binary monomers onto PFA films using gamma irradiation was carried out to synthesize the graft copolymer membranes by direct method. The complexing ability with some selected transition metal ions such as Cu 2+ and Cr 3+ ions was investigated. These graft copolymer membranes can be used in the field of blood biocompatibility and in waste treatment of some heavy metals in the environmental industrial wastes

  6. Radiation effects on some polymeric materials and their utilization for possible practical applications

    Refaee, A M.El.A. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2008-07-01

    The present study divided into two parts. First part focused on the effect of the radiation on some naturally occurring polymers such as chitosan, sodium alginate and carboxymethylcellulose for controlling the degradation process of these polymers. These polymers of low molecular weights can be used as growth promoters for plants in the agriculture field. Second part focused on the radiation grafting of VAc/HEMA binary monomers onto PFA films using gamma irradiation was carried out to synthesize the graft copolymer membranes by direct method. The complexing ability with some selected transition metal ions such as Cu{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} ions was investigated. These graft copolymer membranes can be used in the field of blood biocompatibility and in waste treatment of some heavy metals in the environmental industrial wastes.

  7. Utilization of photoconductive gain in a-Si:H devices for radiation detection

    Lee, H.K.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1995-05-01

    The photoconductive gain mechanism in a-Si:H was investigated in connection with applications to radiation detection. Various device types such as p-i-n, n-i-n and n-i-p-i-n structures were fabricated and tested. Photoconductive gain was measured in two time scales: one for short pulses of visible light ( 2 . Various gain results are discussed in terms of the device structure, applied bias and dark current

  8. Changing the paradigm: a radiation protection model for utilizing active systems in homeland defense applications

    Hertel, Nolan E.; Shannon, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The emerging threat from non-state actors and terrorist organizations openly asserting the use of weapons of mass destruction has led to an increased global emphasis on homeland defense and national security. The threat is real and thus many states are spending large amounts of resources to combat the problem. Issues such as unsecured radioactive sources, illicit movement of nuclear material, the use of radioactive sources in the medical and industrial sectors are just a few of the areas being examined. Countering these threats involves a major paradigm shift in the manner in which radiation is viewed. Radiation-based technologies are playing a key role in this emerging area from the development of new passive detection modalities to the use of active systems for detecting illicit materials. The screening of humans, baggage and cargo present overwhelming challenges. With these developments comes the concern from both governmental agencies and the public as to the safety of such systems. This paper will explore one such modality; the employment of radiation-based illicit material detection systems. The authors will present a review of the international (IAEA) and US regulatory and statutory documents as well as recommendations from scientific bodies such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements. This review coupled with sound scientific data are used to develop a proposed framework for the future employment of active systems for homeland defense applications. Issues considered include the ability to effectively measure and/or predict dose, is the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept appropriate?, how much dose should be allowed relative to national security?, where does the linear-no-threshold hypothesis fit in? The authors use this analysis to develop a model which examines the trade-offs and cost-benefits in using the proposed systems. The major findings of

  9. Smith-Purcell experiment utilizing a field-emitter array cathode measurements of radiation

    Ishizuka, H; Yokoo, K; Shimawaki, H; Hosono, A

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Purcell (SP) radiation at wavelengths of 350-750 nm was produced in a tabletop experiment using a field-emitter array (FEA) cathode. The electron gun was 5 cm long, and a 25 mmx25 mm holographic replica grating was placed behind the slit provided in the anode. A regulated DC power supply accelerated electron beams in excess of 10 mu A up to 45 keV, while a small Van de Graaff generator accelerated smaller currents to higher energies. The grating had a 0.556 mu m period, 30 deg. blaze and a 0.2 mu m thick aluminum coating. Spectral characteristics of the radiation were measured both manually and automatically; in the latter case, the spectrometer was driven by a stepping motor to scan the wavelength, and AD-converted signals from a photomultiplier tube were processed by a personal computer. The measurement, made at 80 deg. relative to the electron beam, showed good agreement with theoretical wavelengths of the SP radiation. Diffraction orders were -2 and -3 for beam energies higher than 45 keV, -3 to -5 ...

  10. The Second Space Race

    Fawkes, S.

    This paper compares and contrasts the characteristics of the first space race, which ran from the late 1950s to the late 1990s, and the second space race that began with the successful space flight of SpaceShipOne in 2004. The first space race was between superpowers seeking to establish geo-political dominance in the Cold War. The second space race will be between competing companies seeking to establish low cost access to space for ordinary people. The first space race achieved its geo- political objectives but did not open up low cost access to space but rather restricted access to a select few, highly trained astronauts and cosmonauts. The second space race, driven by the size and growth of the travel and tourism industry, promises to open up access to space to millions of space tourists.

  11. Affectivity and race

    Vitus, Kathrine; Andreassen, Rikke

    into the experience of racial difference and the unfolding of political discourses on race in various social spheres. Organised around the themes of the politicisation of race through affect, the way that race produces affect and the affective experience of race, this interdisciplinary collection sheds light...... on the role of feelings in the formation of subjectivities, how race and whiteness are affectively circulated in public life and the ways in which emotions contribute to regimes of inclusion and exclusion. As such it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences, with interests in sociology, anthropology......This book presents new empirical studies of social difference in the Nordic welfare states, in order to advance novel theoretical perspectives on the everyday practices and macro-politics of race and gender in multi-ethnic societies. With attention to the specific political and cultural landscapes...

  12. Economic scale of utilization of radiation (2): agriculture. Comparison between Japan and the U.S.A.

    Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Amano, Etsuo [Fukui Prefectural Univ., Research Center for Bioresources Dept., Awara, Fukui (Japan); Nakanishi, Tomoko M. [Tokyo Univ., Graduate School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Chino, Mitsuo [Akita Prefectural Univ., Faculty of Bioresource Sciences, Akita (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    The economic scale of the application of radiation in the field of agriculture in Japan was estimated from public documents to be about 964M$ (million dollars) in 1997. In the food irradiation, an amount of 15,000t of potatoes irradiated per year in Hokkaido was estimated to be worth 16M$. Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) used for combating losses due to the melon fly in the mainly Okinawa region produced as much as 70M$ in benefits. Production of rice using varieties developed by mutation breeding was about 3% of overall production in Japan and the economic scale was 774M$. Radioisotope (RI) utilized in laboratory work, environmental analysis and chronology was accounted to be as high as 24M$. The relative ratios of radiation processing (136M$), mutation breeding (804M$) and RI utilization (24M$) were 14%, 83%, and 3%, respectively. The economic scale surveys in food irradiation and mutation breeding were extended to the United Sates of America (hereinafter abbreviated as U.S.A. or U.S.) for a direct comparison to the situation in Japan. As to maximum estimation, it amounted to be 3.2b$ (billion dollars) for food irradiation and 11.2b$ for mutation breeding. The economic scale for agriculture products within our scope was 14.5b$ for the U.S. and about 0.8b$ for Japan, implying that the former is larger in magnitude by a factor of about 18. (author)

  13. Economic scale of utilization of radiation (2): agriculture. Comparison between Japan and the U.S.A

    Kume, Tamikazu; Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Chino, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    The economic scale of the application of radiation in the field of agriculture in Japan was estimated from public documents to be about 964M$ (million dollars) in 1997. In the food irradiation, an amount of 15,000t of potatoes irradiated per year in Hokkaido was estimated to be worth 16M$. Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) used for combating losses due to the melon fly in the mainly Okinawa region produced as much as 70M$ in benefits. Production of rice using varieties developed by mutation breeding was about 3% of overall production in Japan and the economic scale was 774M$. Radioisotope (RI) utilized in laboratory work, environmental analysis and chronology was accounted to be as high as 24M$. The relative ratios of radiation processing (136M$), mutation breeding (804M$) and RI utilization (24M$) were 14%, 83%, and 3%, respectively. The economic scale surveys in food irradiation and mutation breeding were extended to the United Sates of America (hereinafter abbreviated as U.S.A. or U.S.) for a direct comparison to the situation in Japan. As to maximum estimation, it amounted to be 3.2b$ (billion dollars) for food irradiation and 11.2b$ for mutation breeding. The economic scale for agriculture products within our scope was 14.5b$ for the U.S. and about 0.8b$ for Japan, implying that the former is larger in magnitude by a factor of about 18. (author)

  14. Economic scale of utilization of radiation (I): Industry. Comparison between Japan and the U.S.A

    Tagawa, Seiichi; Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Kamada, Toshimitsu; Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Hosobuchi, Kazunari; Tominaga, Hiroshi; Ooka, Norikazu; Makuuchi, Keizo

    2002-01-01

    Utilization of radiation in the industrial field has been enlarged due to the variety of technologies. In the present paper, the economic scale between the U.S.A. and Japan is compared with selected industrial parameters such as sterilization, semiconductors, radiographic testing (RT) and radial tire production because the very large industrial markets make a whole comparison difficult. The economic scale revealed was about 56b$ (1$=121 yen) for the U.S.A. and 39b$ for Japan. The former is large in magnitude by a factor of 1.4. With respect to the relative ratio versus the GDP, the former was 0.7% and 0.9% for the latter. This implied that utilization of radiation in industry is large in magnitude and is expected to be further developed. Regarding electron beam (EB) accelerators, for example, 648 units were installed in North America and 308 units for Japan during the past 29 years. The large number of the former is attributed to use in curing and heat shrinkable tubes (film). (author)

  15. Race: Deflate or pop?

    Hochman, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Neven Sesardic has recently defended his arguments in favour of racial naturalism-the view that race is a valid biological category-in response to my criticism of his work. While Sesardic claims that a strong version of racial naturalism can survive critique, he has in fact weakened his position considerably. He concedes that conventional racial taxonomy is arbitrary and he no longer identifies 'races' as human subspecies. Sesardic now relies almost entirely on Theodosius Dobzhansky's notion of race-as-population. This weak approach to 'race'-according to which all genetic difference between populations is 'racial' and 'the races' are simply the populations we choose to call races-survived its early critiques. As it is being mobilised to support racial naturalism once more, we need to continue the debate about whether we should weaken the concept of race to mean 'population', or abandon it as a failed biological category. I argue that Sesardic's case for racial naturalism is only supported by his continued mischaracterisation of anti-realism about biological race and his appeal to Dobzhansky's authority. Rather than deflating the meaning of 'race', it should be eliminated from our biological ontology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Early-Stage Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Utilization of Radiation Therapy and Its Impact on Overall Survival

    Parikh, Rahul R., E-mail: rparikh@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center and Mount Sinai St. Luke' s-Roosevelt Hospitals, Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Grossbard, Michael L. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Harrison, Louis B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation therapy (RT) utilization and overall survival (OS) for patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Database, we evaluated clinical features and survival outcomes among patients diagnosed with stage I/II HL from 1998 to 2011. The association between RT use, covariables, and outcome was assessed in a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Propensity score matching was performed to balance observed confounding factors. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Among the 41,943 patients in the National Cancer Database with stage I/II HL, 29,752 patients were analyzed for this study. Radiation therapy use was associated with younger age (≤40 years), favorable insured status, higher socioeconomic status (income, education), and treatment at comprehensive community cancer centers (all P<.05). Five-year OS for patients receiving RT was 94.5%, versus 88.9% for those not receiving RT (P<.01). Radiation therapy use was a significant predictor of OS in the “As-Treated” cohort (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.49-0.58, P<.01) and intention-to-treat analysis (P<.01). After propensity score matching based on clinicopathologic characteristics, RT use remained associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.56, P<.01). Over the study period, RT utilization for this cohort decreased from 55% to 44%, most commonly because it was not part of the planned initial treatment strategy. Conclusions: Consolidation RT was associated with improved OS for patients with early-stage classic HL. We also have identified patient-specific variations in the use of RT that may be targeted to improve patient access to care.

  17. Radiation utilization efficiency, nitrogen uptake and modeling crop growth and yield of rainfed rice under different nitrogen rates

    Gouranga, Kar; Ashwani Kumar; Mohapatra, Sucharita

    2014-01-01

    Optimum utilization of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) along with proper nitrogen (N) management for sustainable rice production is still a promising management recommendation for sustainable rainfed rice cultivation in eastern India. The objective of this investigation was to study radiation utilization efficiency (RUE), N uptake and modeling growth and productivity of wet/rainy season rice (cv. Lalat and Gayatri) under 0, 50, 90, 120 and 150 kg ha -1 N application. Results showed that N rates significantly affected plant biomass, leaf area index (LAI), biological yield (straw and grain yield) and N uptake for both the varieties. The intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR) and spectral reflectance based vegetation indices (IR/R, NDVI) were also different between two varieties and among N rates. Higher rate of N increased the RUE significantly; averaged over years and varieties, mean values of RUE were 1.35, 1.70, 2.01, 2.15 and 2.17 g MJ -1 under 0, 50, 90, 120 and 150 kg N ha -1 , respectively. Though crop growth, yield, N uptake and RUE were higher at 150 kg N ha -1 but the results were at par with 120 kg N ha -1 . Agronomic N use efficiency (ANUE) was also low at 150 kg N ha -1 . The DSSAT v 4.5 model was applied to simulate crop growth, yield and phenology of the crop under different N rates. Model performance was found to be poor at low N rates (0, 50 kg N ha -1 ), but the model performed fairly well at higher N rates (90 kg ha -1 and above). (author)

  18. Estimating surface longwave radiative fluxes from satellites utilizing artificial neural networks

    Nussbaumer, Eric A.; Pinker, Rachel T.

    2012-04-01

    A novel approach for calculating downwelling surface longwave (DSLW) radiation under all sky conditions is presented. The DSLW model (hereafter, DSLW/UMD v2) similarly to its predecessor, DSLW/UMD v1, is driven with a combination of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) level-3 cloud parameters and information from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim model. To compute the clear sky component of DSLW a two layer feed-forward artificial neural network with sigmoid hidden neurons and linear output neurons is implemented; it is trained with simulations derived from runs of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTM). When computing the cloud contribution to DSLW, the cloud base temperature is estimated by using an independent artificial neural network approach of similar architecture as previously mentioned, and parameterizations. The cloud base temperature neural network is trained using spatially and temporally co-located MODIS and CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations. Daily average estimates of DSLW from 2003 to 2009 are compared against ground measurements from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) giving an overall correlation coefficient of 0.98, root mean square error (rmse) of 15.84 W m-2, and a bias of -0.39 W m-2. This is an improvement over an earlier version of the model (DSLW/UMD v1) which for the same time period has an overall correlation coefficient 0.97 rmse of 17.27 W m-2, and bias of 0.73 W m-2.

  19. The Utility of PET/CT in the Planning of External Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Calais, Jeremie; Cao, Minsong; Nickols, Nicholas G

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy are the definitive treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer. A rising level of prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy indicates prostate cancer recurrence, and these patients may still be cured with salvage radiotherapy. To maximize chance for cure, the irradiated volumes should completely encompass the extent of disease. Therefore, accurate estimation of the location of disease is critical for radiotherapy planning in both the definitive and the salvage settings. Current first-line imaging for prostate cancer has limited sensitivity for detection of disease both at initial staging and at biochemical recurrence. Integration of PET into routine evaluation of prostate cancer patients may improve both staging accuracy and radiotherapy planning. 18 F-FDG PET/CT is now routinely used in radiation planning for several cancer types. However, 18 F-FDG PET/CT has low sensitivity for prostate cancer. Additional PET probes evaluated in prostate cancer include 18 F-sodium fluoride, 11 C-acetate, 11 C- or 18 F-choline, 18 F-fluciclovine, and 68 Ga- or 18 F-labeled ligands that bind prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). PSMA ligands appear to be the most sensitive and specific but have not yet received Food and Drug Administration New Drug Application approval for use in the United States. Retrospective and prospective investigations suggest a potential major impact of PET/CT on prostate radiation treatment planning. Prospective trials randomizing patients to routine radiotherapy planning versus PET/CT-aided planning may show meaningful clinical outcomes. Prospective clinical trials evaluating the addition of 18 F-fluciclovine PET/CT for planning of salvage radiotherapy with clinical endpoints are under way. Prospective trials evaluating the clinical impact of PSMA PET/CT on prostate radiation planning are indicated. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. Clinical Utility of 4D FDG-PET/CT Scans in Radiation Treatment Planning

    Aristophanous, Michalis, E-mail: maristophanous@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Berbeco, Ross I.; Killoran, Joseph H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yap, Jeffrey T. [Department of Radiology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Sher, David J.; Allen, Aaron M.; Larson, Elysia; Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The potential role of four-dimensional (4D) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in radiation treatment planning, relative to standard three-dimensional (3D) PET/CT, was examined. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with non-small-cell lung cancer had sequential 3D and 4D [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans in the treatment position prior to radiation therapy. The gross tumor volume and involved lymph nodes were contoured on the PET scan by use of three different techniques: manual contouring by an experienced radiation oncologist using a predetermined protocol; a technique with a constant threshold of standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than 2.5; and an automatic segmentation technique. For each technique, the tumor volume was defined on the 3D scan (VOL3D) and on the 4D scan (VOL4D) by combining the volume defined on each of the five breathing phases individually. The range of tumor motion and the location of each lesion were also recorded, and their influence on the differences observed between VOL3D and VOL4D was investigated. Results: We identified and analyzed 22 distinct lesions, including 9 primary tumors and 13 mediastinal lymph nodes. Mean VOL4D was larger than mean VOL3D with all three techniques, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The range of tumor motion and the location of the tumor affected the magnitude of the difference. For one case, all three tumor definition techniques identified volume of moderate uptake of approximately 1 mL in the hilar region on the 4D scan (SUV maximum, 3.3) but not on the 3D scan (SUV maximum, 2.3). Conclusions: In comparison to 3D PET, 4D PET may better define the full physiologic extent of moving tumors and improve radiation treatment planning for lung tumors. In addition, reduction of blurring from free-breathing images may reveal additional information regarding regional disease.

  1. Utilization of epidemiological data in the development of radiation protection recommendations

    Sinclair, W.K.

    1983-01-01

    Risk estimates are based on epidemiological data and are subject to many uncertainties including the current uncertainty in the dosimetry of the Japanese survivors. However, risk estimates from other sources, excluding the Japanese data, do not lead to greatly different values. Furthermore, risk estimates made over more than a decade by various scientific bodies have differed little. Presumably these estimates represent a good basis for the quantitation of human experience following exposure to ionizing radiation. In considering risk in relation to protection levels the committed risk due to a single or continuous exposure varies in time and accumulates over the entire period of risk. Radiation risks are compared with other occupational and public hazards. The risks associated with current occupational, public and emergency levels and levels for use in space are discussed in relation to other hazards. Current average exposure levels for occupational circumstances do not seem unreasonable but radon exposures for some members of the public may constitute a more important source of exposure

  2. Does race influence survival for esophageal cancer patients treated on the radiation and chemotherapy arm of RTOG no. 85-01?

    Streeter, O.E.; Martz, K.L.; Gaspar, L.E.; Delrowe, J.D.; Asbell, S.O.; Salter, M.M.; Roach, Mack

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In reported retrospective non-randomized trials of treatment of esophageal carcinoma, blacks have a lower survival from esophageal cancer than whites. None of these studies has accounted for the extent of disease, or the methods and quality of treatment. We reviewed the data that included only patients treated on the chemoradiation arm of the RTOG-8501 esophageal carcinoma trial to see if there were differences in overall survival between black and white patients receiving the same standard of care. Methods and Materials: One hundred-nineteen patients, 37 blacks and 82 whites were evaluated who met the criteria for receiving chemoradiation of 5000 cGy and four courses of Cisplatin (75 mg/m 2 ) and Fluorouracil (1000 mg/m 2 for 4 days). Results: Blacks had squamous histology only, with 86% of blacks having weight loss of 10 lbs. or more compared to 56% of whites (p = 0.001). In addition, blacks had larger tumors and more difficulty eating (p = 0.010). Overall, there was no difference in the Kaplan-Meier median survival estimate by race (p = 0.2757). Only when we limited the analysis to the 'squamous histology' subgroup, stratified according to age >70 vs. 70 years) did poorly. Because of the dramatic differences in the age and histology distributions between blacks and whites, this issue could not be resolved in the subset of squamous only who received chemoradiation. Conclusions: The increasing incidence of adenocarcinoma among white patients without a corresponding increase of this histology in blacks reflects a difference in diet and or lifestyle compared to blacks that deserves additional study. When treated aggressively with chemoradiation, race did not appear to be a statistically significant factor for overall survival

  3. Utilization of synchrotron radiation for trace-element analyses in toxicology of metals

    Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Chen, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of SXRF will nicely complement other more widely used analytical techniques for trace elements. The experiments at CHESS showed minimum detectable limits for 1-mm thick organic matrices with monochromated photon beams to be on the order of 160 to 300 ppB for Ni to Sr with minimal structural damage to the material being irradiated. Extrapolations to operating conditions at the NSLS, with a facility designed for XRF, indicate the MDL limits of 10 to 100 ppB should be achievable. The utilization of wavelength dispersive detectors should gain an order of magnitude in sensitivity, but with trade-off of some flexibility in multielemental analyses

  4. Beam instabilities in race track microtrons

    Euteneuer, H.; Herminghaus, H.; Klein, R.

    1982-01-01

    Several limitations of the benefits of the race track microtron (RTM) as an economic cw electron accelerator are discussed. For beam blowup some final results of our investigations for the Mainz Microtron are given. The other two effects presented more generally are beam diffusion by imperfections of the optical elements of a RTM and the deterioration of transverse phase space by synchrotron radiation

  5. Utilization of Dexaltin ointment to radiation stomatitis in patients with cancer of the oral cavity

    Ohhashi, Yasushi; Abe, Masaki; Ueda, Noboru

    1981-01-01

    Dexaltin ointment (sodium polyactylic acid, containing 0.1% dexamethasone) was used to the patients with stomatitis induced by radiotherapy. Fifteen patients with cancer of the oral cavity, aged from 44 to 77, were exposed to 60 Co γ-rays or electron beams, with the irradiation dose of 2400 to 9000 rad. About 60 g of the ointment was pasted for mean period of 6.6 weeks after meals, before sleep, and whenever the patients wanted. Therapeutic effect was observed in every case and in 87% of the case the pain at meals was decreased. The ointment adhered mostly for 1 - 2 hrs and in some cases, more than 3 hrs. No adverse reaction was observed. Therefore it was suggested that Dexaltin was a promising ointment to the radiation stomatitis. (Nakanishi, T.)

  6. Prevalence of mood disorders and utility of the PRIME-MD in patients undergoing radiation therapy

    Leopold, Kenneth A.; Ahles, Tim A.; Walch, Susan; Amdur, Robert J.; Mott, Leila A.; Wiegand-Packard, Linda; Oxman, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a short, structured interview procedure that allows practicing oncologists to quickly and reliably identify mood disorders in their patients, and to estimate the prevalence and types of mood disorders in a radiation therapy patient setting, noting relationships between mood disorders and patient characteristics. Methods: Consecutive, eligible adult patients from the practices of two radiation oncologists were administered the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD) by the treating physician. A subset of these patients was also evaluated with the SCID, administered by trained mental health care personnel. Agreement between the two instruments was examined using the kappa statistic. Prevalence of mood disorders was determined from the PRIME-MD. The significance of relationships between patient characteristics and mood disorders was examined by chi-square and ANOVA analysis, and subsequently by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results: One hundred twenty-two patients were studied. Fifty-three of these were administered the SCID. Agreement between the two instruments was very good (kappa = 0.70). A diagnosis of a depressive or anxiety disorder by the PRIME-MD was made in 59 of the 122 patients (48%, 95% confidence interval = 39%, 58%). Multivariate analysis showed that a diagnosis of a depressive mood disorder was significantly related to pain intensity and prior history of depression. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the validity and feasibility of the PRIME-MD administered by oncologists in making diagnoses of mood disorders. The prevalence of mood disorders in our set of patients undergoing a course of RT was nearly 50%. Future studies should describe the natural history of these disorders, and determine optimal intervention strategies

  7. Method of modifying a vinyl chloride resin by utilizing radiation cross-linking polymerization

    Kagiya, T; Fujimoto, T; Hosoi, F; Tsuneta, K; Atogawa, M

    1970-08-26

    The polyvinyl chloride is improved in its mechanical, thermal and chemical properties, with particular advantages gained in dimensional stability at temperatures higher than the plasticizing temperature. The process comprises irradiating a vinyl chloride resin with ionizing radiations in the presence of a vinyl acetate monomer. In this process, the irradiation of vinyl acetate effects cross-linking and the polymerization of the monomer simultaneously. The vinyl chloride resin may be a copolymer along with another monomer, a polyvinyl chloride derivative, a graft polymer of polyvinyl chloride, a mixture of vinyl chloride with another resin and a graft copolymer of vinyl chloride on another resin in any form. The addition of the vinyl acetate monomer to the vinyl chloride is not limited to any particular procedure. The vinyl acetate monomer may be added to the polyvinyl chloride in a quantity ranging from a trace to 200% by weight. The radiation dose may be 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 9/, but preferably 10/sup 3/ roentgen. In one example, 36 parts by weight of market available vinyl acetate monomer immersed in 100 parts by weight of hard vinyl tube were placed in a stainless reacting vessel. After the replacement of inner air with nitrogen, the vessel was exposed to ..gamma.. beams of 4.8 x 10 roentgen from a Co-60 source. After dipping the exposed samples in boiled tetrahydrofuran for 48 hours, the insoluble substance in the samjle was 78.9% by weight. In addition, after heating at 180/sup 0/C for 30 minutes, the sample did not show any deformation.

  8. Testing the race inequality

    Gondan, Matthias; Heckel, A.

    2008-01-01

    In speeded response tasks with redundant signals, parallel processing of the redundant signals is generally tested using the so-called race inequality. The race inequality states that the distribution of fast responses for a redundant stimulus never exceeds the summed distributions of fast...

  9. Radiation

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  10. Study of Chemical Treatment Combined with Radiation to Prepare Biotic Elicitor for Utilization in Agriculture

    Nguyen Quoc Hien

    2010-01-01

    Chitosan was prepared from shrimp shell (alpha chitosan) and from squid pen (beta chitosan) with degree of deacetylation of about 70%. Degradation of chitosan in flake form by combined treatment with H 2 O 2 and gamma Co-60 radiation was carried out. Results showed that combined treatment was highly effective for degradation of chitosan to obtain low molecular weight of 1-2 × 10 5 . Oligochitosan was prepared by irradiation of chitosan solution of 50g/l (5%, w/v). The dose required for oligochitosan with water soluble content of more than 70% was of 32kGy and 48kGy for beta and alpha chitosan, respectively. Synergic effect of degradation of chitosan in solution with H 2 O 2 and gamma Co-60 radiation was also investigated. The dose to obtain oligochitosan was reduced from 32kGy to 4kGy for beta chitosan and from 48kGy to 8kGy for alpha chitosan. The elicitation and growth promotion effect of oligochiotsan for sugarcane and rice were investigated. Results showed that oligochitosan with water soluble content of 70-80% (Mw~5,000-10,000) exhibited the most effective elicitation and growth promotion for plant. The optimum oligochitosan concentration by spraying was of 30 and 15ppm for sugarcane and rice, respectively. The disease index of Ustilgo scitaminea and Collectotrichum falcatum on sugarcane were reduced to 44.5 and 72.3% compared to control (100%). The productivity of sugarcane was increased about 13% (8tons/ha). The disease index of Pyricularia grisea on rice was reduced to 53.0% for leaf and 34.1% for neck of bloom compared to control (100%). The productivity of rice was increased for 11-26% (0.6-1.4 tons/ha). The obtained results indicated that oligochitosan is promising to use as a biotic elicitor for plant particularly for sugarcane and rice. The procedure for production of oligochitosan elicitor by γ- irradiation method was described. (author)

  11. Radiation damage studies on natural and synthetic rock salt utilizing measurements made during electron irradiation

    Swyler, K.J.; Levy, P.W.

    1977-01-01

    The numerous radiation damage effects which will occur in the rock salt surrounding radioactive waste disposal canisters are being investigated with unique apparatus for making optical and other measurements during 1 to 3 MeV electron irradiation. This equipment, consists of a computer controlled double beam spectrophotometer which simultaneously records 256 point absorption and radioluminescence spectra, in either the 200 to 400 or 400 to 800 nm region, every 40 seconds. Most often the measurements commence as the irradiation is started and continue after it is terminated. This procedure provides information on the kinetics and other details of the damage formation process and, when the irradiation is terminated, on both the transient and stable damage components. The exposure rates may be varied between 10 2 or 10 3 to more than 10 8 rad per hour and the sample temperature maintained between 25 and 800 or 900 0 C. Although this project was started recently, measurements have been made on synthetic NaCl and on natural rock salt from two disposal sites and two mines. Both unstrained and purposely strained samples have been used. Most recently, measurements at temperatures between 25 and 200 0 C have been started. The few measurements completed to date indicate that the damage formation kinetics in natural rock salt are quite different from those observed in synthetic NaCl

  12. Utilization of radiation technique on the saccharification and fermentation of biomass

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Fujimura, T.; Yoshii, F.; Kojima, T.; Tamada, M. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma. Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment)

    1981-01-01

    The application of irradiation technique to the process of saccharification and subsequent fermentation of cellulosic wastes such as chaff and rice straw to obtain ethanol, was investigated. It was found that when waste raw materials were irradiated by ..gamma..-ray or electron beam, they became accessible to the subsequent enzymatic saccharification reaction. Irradiation of 10/sup 7/ to 10/sup 8/ Rad was enough for this effect. Some kind of additives reduced necessary dosage for this pretreatment. Cellulase, Trichoderma reesei which produce cellulase, and yeast were immobilized as biocatalysts for biomass conversion by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomer at low temperature. The immobilized cellulase showed almost the same activity of glucose production as the native cellulase. Continuous saccharification reaction was carried out by using the immobilized cellulase. The immobilized Trichoderma reesei and the immobilized yeast showed almost the same activity as the intact biocatalysts. It was concluded that the continuous saccharification and subsequent fermentation could be carried out effectively by using the immobilized biocatalysts. Spinach chloroplasts were immobilized by the same method as the first step for the conversion of water into hydrogen gas using solar energy. The immobilized chloroplasts kept the O/sub 2/ evolution activity in storage more than 30 days at 4/sup 0/C.

  13. Utility of radiation in the prevention of heterotopic ossification following repair of traumatic acetabular fracture

    Haas, Michael L.; Kennedy, Andrew S.; Copeland, Carol C.; Ames, John W.; Scarboro, Mark; Slawson, Robert G.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a common problem following surgical repair of traumatic acetabular fracture (TAF), potentially causing severe pain and decreased range of motion. This report analyzes the role of radiation therapy for prevention of HO in TAF. Methods and Materials: The charts of all patients who received RT to the hip following TAF repair between July 1988 and January 1998 were reviewed. Sixty-six patients were identified. RT was given in 5 fractions of 2 Gy in 45 patients, 1 fraction of 8 Gy in 17 patients, and other doses in 4 patients. Treatment fields encompassed peri acetabular tissues at highest risk for HO. Time to RT was ≤ 24 hours for 46 patients. Results: Radiographic follow-up at least 6 months following RT was available in 47/66 (71%) patients to permit Brooker classification, revealing 6 cases (13%) of Grade III HO, compared to historical incidence in this population of 50%. No Grade IV HO was found. Mean follow-up was 18 months. Four of the Grade III patients had received 10 Gy/5 fractions, and 2 received 8 Gy/1 fraction. Postoperative wound infection occurred in 6 patients, and osteonecrosis of the femoral head was found in 13. Conclusions: RT following surgical repair of TAF provides effective prophylaxis against formation of clinically significant HO. We recommend a single fraction of 7-8 Gy within 24 hours of surgery to prevent HO formation and minimize patient discomfort

  14. Utilization of radiation technique on the saccharification and fermentation of biomass

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Fujimura, T.; Yoshii, F.; Kojima, T.; Tamada, M.

    1981-01-01

    The application of irradiation technique to the process of saccharification and subsequent fermentation of cellulosic wastes such as chaff and rice straw to obtain ethanol, was investigated. It was found that when waste raw materials were irradiated by γ-ray or electron beam, they became accessible to the subsequent enzymatic saccharification reaction. Irradiation of 10 7 to 10 8 Rad was enough for this effect. Some kind of additives reduced necessary dosage for this pretreatment. Cellulase, Trichoderma reesei which produce cellulase, and yeast were immobilized as biocatalysts for biomass conversion by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomer at low temperature. The immobilized cellulase showed almost the same activity of glucose production as the native cellulase. Continuous saccharification reaction was carried out by using the immobilized cellulase. The immobilized Trichoderma reesei and the immobilized yeast showed almost the same activity as the intact biocatalysts. It was concluded that the continuous saccharification and subsequent fermentation could be carried out effectively by using the immobilized biocatalysts. Spinach chloroplasts were immobilized by the same method as the first step for the conversion of water into hydrogen gas using solar energy. The immobilized chloroplasts kept the O 2 evolution activity in storage more than 30 days at 4 0 C. (author)

  15. Utilization of radiation technique on the saccharification and fermentation of biomass

    Kaetsu, I.; Kumakura, M.; Fujimura, T.; Yoshii, F.; Kojima, T.; Tamada, M.

    The application of irradiation technique to the process of saccharification and subsequent fermentation of cellulosic wastes such as chaff and rice straw to obtain ethanol, was investigated. It was found that when waste raw materials were irradiated by ?-ray or electron beam, they became accessible to the subsequent enzymatic saccharification reaction. Irradiation of 10 7-10 8 Rad was enough for this effect. Some kind of additives reduced necessary dosage for this pretreatment. Cellulase, Trichoderma reesei which produce cellulase, and yeast were immobilized as biocatalysts for biomass conversion by radiation-induced polymerization of glass-forming monomer at low temperature. The immobilized cellulase showed almost same activity of glucose production as the native cellulase. Continuous saccharification reaction was carried out by using the immobilized cellulase. The immobilized Trichoderma reesei and the immobilized yeast showed almost same activity as the intact biocatalysts. It was concluded that the continuous saccharification and subsequent fermentation could be carried out effectively by using the immobilized biocatalysts. Spinach chloroplasts were immobilized by the same method as the first step for the conversion of water into hydrogen gas using solar energy. The immobilized chloroplasts kept the O 2 evolution activity in storage more than 30 days at 4°C. Thermostatility of chloroplasts was also improved greatly by the immobilization.

  16. Day lighting Simulation and Thermoacoustic Laser Development for the Enhanced Utilization of Highly Concentrated Solar Radiation

    Oh, Won Jong

    2011-02-15

    Solar energy has been used in various fields, because it is clean and reliable. The present study explored the use of sunlight in two important areas which make it competitive and also attractive. First, we carried out a series of computer simulations for using sun pipes to introduce sunlight into the interior of a building. The focus was made onto the enhancement of visual environment when natural daylight is delivered to a classroom. While daylighting provides efficient means to harness the sun's abundant energy, it still leaves much room for further exploitation. With the aid of simple optical devices, sunlight could be easily concentrated and utilized. Solar-powered Thermal Acoustic(TA) lasers make one of these applications, which we explored as the other important area of solar utilization. 1) Daylighting simulation A lightless space with the dimension of a typical classroom at Jeju National University was modeled by ECOTECT. Two different cases were simulated and analyzed by RADIANCE. In the first case, a comparative analysis of illuminance was carried out to estimate the basic performance of sun pipe systems. In the other case, different designs of sun pipe systems were analyzed to elicit the most efficient model of operation. Simulations were performed for solar noon which indicates the time (or point) in the sun's path at which the sun is on the local meridian. Results show that indoor visual environment could be greatly enhanced with the application of sun pipe systems. The maximum illuminance took place with the sun pipe system of 1.0m in diameter and 0.5m in height. 2) Thermo-Acoustic Laser(TAL) development A series of experiments were carried out to find the most optimum operating conditions for the maximum SPL(Sound Pressure Level) and frequency of the acoustic waves generated by ThermoAcoustic(TA) lasers. Among various experimental variables, we focused our research on the stack position, stack length, length of the resonance tube and input

  17. Day lighting Simulation and Thermoacoustic Laser Development for the Enhanced Utilization of Highly Concentrated Solar Radiation

    Oh, Won Jong

    2011-02-01

    Solar energy has been used in various fields, because it is clean and reliable. The present study explored the use of sunlight in two important areas which make it competitive and also attractive. First, we carried out a series of computer simulations for using sun pipes to introduce sunlight into the interior of a building. The focus was made onto the enhancement of visual environment when natural daylight is delivered to a classroom. While daylighting provides efficient means to harness the sun's abundant energy, it still leaves much room for further exploitation. With the aid of simple optical devices, sunlight could be easily concentrated and utilized. Solar-powered Thermal Acoustic(TA) lasers make one of these applications, which we explored as the other important area of solar utilization. 1) Daylighting simulation A lightless space with the dimension of a typical classroom at Jeju National University was modeled by ECOTECT. Two different cases were simulated and analyzed by RADIANCE. In the first case, a comparative analysis of illuminance was carried out to estimate the basic performance of sun pipe systems. In the other case, different designs of sun pipe systems were analyzed to elicit the most efficient model of operation. Simulations were performed for solar noon which indicates the time (or point) in the sun's path at which the sun is on the local meridian. Results show that indoor visual environment could be greatly enhanced with the application of sun pipe systems. The maximum illuminance took place with the sun pipe system of 1.0m in diameter and 0.5m in height. 2) Thermo-Acoustic Laser(TAL) development A series of experiments were carried out to find the most optimum operating conditions for the maximum SPL(Sound Pressure Level) and frequency of the acoustic waves generated by ThermoAcoustic(TA) lasers. Among various experimental variables, we focused our research on the stack position, stack length, length of the resonance tube and input power

  18. Silica aerogel radiator for use in the A-RICH system utilized in the Belle II experiment

    Tabata, Makoto, E-mail: makoto@hepburn.s.chiba-u.ac.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Sagamihara (Japan); Department of Physics, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Adachi, Ichiro [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Hamada, Nao [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Hara, Koji [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Iijima, Toru [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Iwata, Shuichi; Kakuno, Hidekazu [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); Kawai, Hideyuki [Department of Physics, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan); Korpar, Samo [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Maribor, Maribor (Slovenia); Experimental High Energy Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Križan, Peter [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Experimental High Energy Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kumita, Tetsuro [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); Nishida, Shohei [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies (IPNS), High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Ogawa, Satoru [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi (Japan); Pestotnik, Rok; Šantelj, Luka; Seljak, Andrej [Experimental High Energy Physics Department, Jožef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sumiyoshi, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji (Japan); and others

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents recent progress in the development and mass production of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter, which will be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector. The proximity-focusing A-RICH system is especially designed to identify charged kaons and pions. The refractive index of the installed aerogel Cherenkov radiators is approximately 1.05, and we aim for a separation capability exceeding 4σ at momenta up to 4 GeV/c. Large-area aerogel tiles (over 18×18×2 cm{sup 3}) were first fabricated in test productions by pin drying in addition to conventional methods. We proposed to fill the large end-cap region (area 3.5 m{sup 2}) with 124 water-jet-trimmed fan-shaped dual-layer-focusing aerogel combinations of different refractive indices (1.045 and 1.055). Guided by the test production results, we decided to manufacture aerogels by the conventional method and are currently proceeding with mass production. In an electron beam test undertaken at the DESY, we confirmed that the K/π separation capability of a prototype A-RICH counter exceeded 4σ at 4 GeV/c. - Highlights: • Aerogel tiling as a RICH radiator in the end cap of Belle II detector is proposed. • Conventional method for producing real-size aerogels is established. • No crack-free, real-size aerogels attained in the test production by pin drying. • Beam test confirms the utility of real-size aerogels made by conventional method. • Mass aerogel production for an actual RICH system started by conventional method.

  19. Race Discourse and the US Confederate Flag

    Holyfield, Lori; Moltz, Matthew Ryan; Bradley, Mindy S.

    2009-01-01

    Research reveals that racial hierarchies and "color-blind" racism is maintained through discourse. The current study utilizes exploratory data from focus groups in a predominantly white southern university in the United States to examine race talk, the Confederate Flag, and the construction of southern white identity. Drawing from…

  20. Investigations on fabricating strategies and utilization of rare earth based multicomponent oxide powders in radiation detection

    Shinde, Seema; Pitale, S.S.; Banthia, S.; Ghosh, M.; Tyagi, M.; Sen, S.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    Materials containing rare earths demonstrate a broad field of applications as high energy radiation detectors, mainly due to their fascinating optical properties. Currently, Ce 3+ -doped rare earth silicates and garnets dominate the scintillator market because they show a high light yield, fast decay time, and high chemical stability. Moreover, the emission wavelength of silicates (410-440 nm) matches the wavelength sensitivity of conventional PMTs while, Si-photo-detector readouts are possible with garnets (emission near 550 nm). The composition, structure and phase of rare earth silicates are rather complex. For example, there are many phases like oxyorthosilicate R 2 SiO 5 , disilicate R 2 Si 2 O 7 , hexagonal R x (SiO 4 ) 6 O 2 oxyapatite etc (where R= Rare earth element). The controlled synthesis of single phase rare earth silicates and garnets nanomaterials is not easy and can only be reached with precisely controlled experimental conditions. In this work, we provide a broad overview of our recent scientific developments linked to a few aspects of synthesizing cerium activated rare earth based silicates and garnet materials, namely Gd 2 SiO 5 :Ce 3+ , Gd 4.67 (SiO 4 ) 3 O, Gd 2 Si 2 O 7 :Ce 3+ and Gd 3 Al x Ga 1-x O 12 :Ce 3+ (where 0≤x≤5) exploiting the advantages of solution combustion, chemical co-precipitation and hydrothermal techniques. A brief summary of results based on synthesis strategy adopted, composition, size shape and corresponding luminescence features of Gd based compounds are tabulated. The room temperature photoluminescence (PL) features of compounds listed. Efforts towards finding new properties and new materials will be continued and several applications, in particular energy-conversion and scintillator detectors, will benefit from these rare earth materials

  1. How gender, age, and geography influence the utilization of radiation therapy in the management of malignant melanoma

    French, John; McGahan, Colleen; Duncan, Graeme; Lengoc, Sonca; Soo, Jenny; Cannon, Jerry

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Comparing radiation therapy utilization rates (RTUR) to those predicted by best evidence is a useful measure of the equity and accessibility of service delivery. In this study the RTUR for melanoma was established for British Columbia, Canada, and compared with the rate suggested by the evidence. Demographic variables, specifically age, gender, and geography that influenced the RTUR were examined with a view to identifying methods of improving underutilization. Methods and Materials: The RTUR in the management of malignant melanoma was taken from British Columbia Cancer registry data for 1986 to 1998. Variations in utilization based on age, gender, health authority, stage of disease, and referral patterns were analyzed. Results: An RTUR of 11% was identified. This was consistent over time. Referral rates decreased between 1986 and 1998. RT is used mostly for later stage disease. Males were more likely to receive RT than females, related to later stage of disease in men. Referral rates decreased, but RTUR for referred cases increased, in health authorities that did not have a cancer center. Conclusions: Use of RT is influenced by age and by stage of disease. Overall RTUR in British Columbia is lower than suggested by best evidence. Referral patterns are influenced by geography. RTUR was higher in males, consistent with a different pattern of disease in males compared with females

  2. Anti-microorganism contamination measures for crude drugs utilizing radiation sterilization

    Kimura, Syojiro

    1998-01-01

    Crude drugs are manufactured by simple processing of natural mineral, animal or plant part materials, and are used in Chinese medicine. Because these components are originated by nature, they tend to have a much higher level of contaminating microorganisms than chemically synthesized compound. Many plant-derived crude drugs contain bacteria; 10 3 -10 5 cells/g and fungi; 10 2 -10 4 spores/g. Some animal-derived crude drugs contain bacteria levels of up to 10 8 cells/g, including dangerous varieties like E. coli or Salmonella. The survival rate and the required dose can be quantified as follows: N/No=e -kD and SD=D 10 x log (No/SAL), respectively. Where, k is the sterilization constant of microorganism, No is the initial count of bacteria, D is the absorbed dose, D 10 is the dose required to decrease the count to 1/10 and SAL is the count limit or sterilization assurance. The D 10 value for general microorganism is approximately 2 kGy for bacteria, 1 kGy for fungi, and 3-4 kGy for spore-forming bacteria. The results of our past studies have shown that the dose of 5-7 kGy is necessary to sterilize general microorganism that are attached to crude drugs. Besides, the D 10 value of specific bacteria ranges from 0.1 to 0.8 kGy, so the above dose should be sufficient for sterilizing the specific microorganism (SAL; 10 -6 ). The stability of crude drugs can be quantified be the following formula, C/Co=e -k'D . Where, C/Co is the residual rate of drug components, and k' is the loss coefficient. The value of k is 1-2, but that of k' is three to four figures smaller. The C/Co ratio of most drug components is more than 0.99 with a dose of 5-7 kGy. Furthermore, radiolysis materials that are decomposed by radiation are similar to compounds that are decomposed by ultraviolet rays or sunlight. 60 Co ray are suitable for sterilizing raw materials. On the other hand, electron beams are used to sterilize a thin layer of pulverized specimens, and can be incorporated into the

  3. Utilization of gamma radiation for the induction of phenotypical variability in hybrid petunia cultivated in vitro

    Miranda Jimenez, Javier I.

    2006-01-01

    Conditions of in vitro culture of two lines of yellow petunia (hybrid petunia) were studied. The effect of two controllers of growth in the establishment was evaluated. It was observed that the lines improved their growth in the absence of BAP (6-benzil amino purine) and with addition of AIA (3-indoleacetic acid) in doses of 0,5 to 2 mg 1 - 1 1 (milligrams by litre). The BAP in the used concentrations (0, 1, 0,2, 0,5 mg 1 -1 ), produced toxic effects to the plantlets growth, presented as hyperhydricity and backwardness. Every line answered better to a different combination of regulators. Therefore, it was defined for the meristems sowing the use of a MS means (Murashige and Skoog, 1962) without regulators for the AMW3A line and a MS means with addition of 2 mg 1 -1 of AIA for the YELLOWAAS line. A radio sensibility curve for the AMW3A line was established. The irradiation process was continued only with the AMW3A line because this is the principal cause of the commercial hybrids that are proving in the country. The mortality increase followed to a lineal model with the increase of the gamma radiation doses was observed. It was established that lethal media doses was of 3 krad. Criteria of surviving and growth of irradiated material was used and it was selected a doses of 2 krad for treatment of a more quantity of plantlets. The growth, with respect to witness, was reduced to half to the four weeks of the irradiation and did not make root. Plantlets with deformation of leafs and chlorophyllous chimeras were observed. The plants that survived to the irradiation process were multiplied and, later, they were acclimatized in greenhouse conditions. An visual analyses of the morphological variations was performed, and the possible phenotypical variation of these plants were determined. Modifications in the form of the plant, the leaf and the flower were found. Nevertheless, the presence of some of these variations in the witness plants suggests that much of the variations

  4. Utilization of technology relevant to radiation and isotope in the archaeological research

    Matsuoka, Nobuaki; Kawamura, Hidehisa

    2005-01-01

    Many kinds of scientific technology have been used in the archaeological research. Especially the methodologies relevant to radiation and isotope have contributed to archaeology, giving a lot of scientific information. Among these methodologies, the radiocarbon dating, proposed by Willard Libby, has the greatest contribution since 1950. In Japan some scientists introduced this dating method immediately after Libby's proposal. As the result, the start of the Jomon period, in which the rope pattern was applied for decoration of earthenware, was reconsidered to be about 10,000 years ago. Yoshimasa Takashima mastered this technique and did the dendrochronological study at University of Washington, Seattle, from 1960 to 1961. After that he started the radiocarbon dating in Kyushu University, Fukuoka. First he employed the proportional gas counter to measure 14 C, requiring the complicated and time-consuming preparation of sample. When he restarted the radio-carbon dating with the authors in 1994 at Kyushu Environmental Evaluation Association (KEEA), he adopted the liquid scintillation counting method combined with the benzene synthesis from sample. Because this method is so convenient, many laboratories have adopted it as the conventional method in Japan. Since 1994, almost 100 samples have been treated every year in KEEA by this method. However this requires considerably much amount of sample, for example 20g in the case of wood. So that, in case of only small amount of sample can be obtained or a valuable sample is subjected to measurement, this method cannot be applicable. To resolve this problem, the accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) has been used widely. In this method the atoms of 14 C are counted directly, getting the high sensitivity and requiring very small amount of sample (order of mg). Recently, in KEEA, the radiocarbon dating using AMS was started under the cooperation with Center for Applied Isotope Studies (CAIS), University of Georgia. Another work of

  5. Nitrogen and plant population change radiation capture and utilization capacity of sunflower in semi-arid environment.

    Awais, Muhammad; Wajid, Aftab; Bashir, Muhammad Usman; Habib-Ur-Rahman, Muhammad; Raza, Muhammad Aown Sammar; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Saleem, Muhammad Farrukh; Hammad, Hafiz Mohkum; Mubeen, Muhammad; Saeed, Umer; Arshad, Muhammad Naveed; Fahad, Shah; Nasim, Wajid

    2017-07-01

    The combination of nitrogen and plant population expresses the spatial distribution of crop plants. The spatial distribution influences canopy structure and development, radiation capture, accumulated intercepted radiation (Sa), radiation use efficiency (RUE), and subsequently dry matter production. We hypothesized that the sunflower crop at higher plant populations and nitrogen (N) rates would achieve early canopy cover, capture more radiant energy, utilize radiation energy more efficiently, and ultimately increase economic yield. To investigate the above hypothesis, we examined the influences of leaf area index (LAI) at different plant populations (83,333, 66,666, and 55,555 plants ha -1 ) and N rates (90, 120, and 150 kg ha -1 ) on radiation interception (Fi), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) accumulation (Sa), total dry matter (TDM), achene yield (AY), and RUE of sunflower. The experimental work was conducted during 2012 and 2013 on sandy loam soil in Punjab, Pakistan. The sunflower crop captured more than 96% of incident radiant energy (mean of all treatments), 98% with a higher plant population (83,333 plants ha -1 ), and 97% with higher N application (150 kg ha -1 ) at the fifth harvest (60 days after sowing) during both study years. The plant population of 83,333 plants ha -1 with 150 kg N ha -1 ominously promoted crop, RUE, and finally productivity of sunflower (AY and TDM). Sunflower canopy (LAI) showed a very close and strong association with Fi (R 2  = 0.99 in both years), PAR (R 2  = 0.74 and 0.79 in 2012 and 2013, respectively), TDM (R 2  = 0.97 in 2012 and 0.91 in 2013), AY (R 2  = 0.95 in both years), RUE for TDM (RUE TDM ) (R 2  = 0.63 and 0.71 in 2012 and 2013, respectively), and RUE for AY (RUE AY ) (R 2  = 0.88 and 0.87 in 2012 and 2013, respectively). Similarly, AY (R 2  = 0.73 in 2012 and 0.79 in 2013) and TDM (R 2  = 0.75 in 2012 and 0.84 in 2013) indicated significant dependence on PAR accumulation of

  6. CERN Relay Race 2009

    2009-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 14th May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. More details on how to register your team for the relay race

  7. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 20 May, starting at 12.15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on the route, and how to register your team for the relay race, can be found at: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay

  8. CERN Relay Race

    2006-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 17 May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Details on how to register your team for the relay race are given on the Staff Association Bulletin web site.

  9. Race, money and medicines.

    Bloche, M Gregg

    2006-01-01

    Taking notice of race is both risky and inevitable, in medicine no less than in other endeavors. On the one hand, race can be a useful stand-in for unstudied genetic and environmental factors that yield differences in disease expression and therapeutic response. Attention to race can make a therapeutic difference, to the point of saving lives. On the other hand, racial distinctions have social meanings that are often pejorative or worse, especially when these distinctions are cast as culturally or biologically fixed. I argue in this essay that we should start with a presumption against racial categories in medicine, but permit their use when it might prolong lives or meaningfully improve health. Use of racial categories should be understood as an interim step; follow-up inquiry into the factors that underlie race-correlated clinical differences is important both to improve the efficacy of clinical care and to prevent race in itself from being misunderstood as a biological determinant. If we pursue such inquiry with vigor, the pernicious effects of racial categories on public understanding can be managed. But perverse market and regulatory incentives create the danger that use of race will be "locked-in," once drugs or other therapies are approved. These incentives should be revisited.

  10. Utilization of Patient-Reported Outcomes to Guide Symptom Management during Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    Malika Danner

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionUtilization of patient-reported outcomes (PROs to guide symptom management during radiation therapy is increasing. This study focuses on the use of the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP as a tool to assess urinary and bowel bother during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and its utility in guiding medical management.MethodsBetween September 2015 and January 2017, 107 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35–36.25 Gy via SBRT in five fractions. PROs were assessed using EPIC-CP 1 h prior to the first fraction and after each subsequent fraction. Symptom management medications were prescribed based on the physician clinical judgment or if patients reported a moderate to big problem. Clinical significance was assessed using a minimally important difference of 1/2 SD from baseline score.ResultsA median baseline EPIC-CP urinary symptom score of 1.5 significantly increased to 3.7 on the day of the final treatment (p < 0.0001. Prior to treatment, 9.3% of men felt that their overall urinary function was a moderate to big problem that increased to 28% by the end of the fifth treatment. A median baseline EPIC-CP bowel symptom score of 0.3 significantly increased to 1.4 on the day of the final treatment (p < 0.0001. Prior to treatment, 1.9% of men felt that their overall bowel function was a moderate to big problem that increased to 3.7% by the end of the fifth treatment. The percentage of patients requiring an increased dose of alpha-antagonist increased to 47% by the end of treatment, and an additional 28% of patients required a short steroid taper to manage moderate to big urinary problems. Similarly, the percentage of patients requiring antidiarrheals reached 12% by the fifth treatment.ConclusionDuring the course of SBRT, an increasing percentage of patients experienced clinically significant symptoms many of which required medical management

  11. Some consideration on the relevance of concepts based on the probability distribution of words reminded by stimulus terms concerning atomic energy and radiation utilization

    Urabe, Itsumasa

    2002-01-01

    The relevance of concepts brought to mind by stimulus terms concerning atomic energy and radiation utilization has been investigated to learn how people understand the present status of nuclear technology. The relevance of concepts was defined as the frequency distribution of words that came to mind immediately after seeing selected terms needed for present-day life as well as for nuclear engineering. An analysis of knowledge structure shows that a concept of atomic energy has a close relation with that of electric power generation; an understanding of nuclear power utilization may be promoted in relation to an understanding of energy and environmental problems because the concepts of energy, atomic energy, electric power generation, and natural environment have closer relations with one another; a concept of radiation has various relations with harmful radiological health effects, but little relation with industrial, agricultural, and other beneficial uses except of nuclear power generation or medical applications. It also became clear from the investigation that studies on natural radiation may be important to promote an understanding of radiation utilization because a concept of the natural environment does not yet relate to that of natural radiation. (author)

  12. Utilization of agro-resources by radiation treatment -production of animal feed and mushroom from oil palm wastes

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Hashimoto, Shoji

    1993-01-01

    The production of animal feeds and mushrooms from oil palm cellulosic wastes by radiation and fermentation has been investigated in order to utilize the agro-resources and to reduce the smoke pollution. The process is as follows: decontamination of microorganisms in fermentation media of empty fruit bunch of oil palm (EBF) by irradiation, inoculation of useful fungi, and subsequently production of proteins and edible mushrooms. The dose of 25 kGy was required for the sterilization of contaminating bacteria whereas the dose of 10 kGy was enough to eliminate the fungi. Among many kinds of fungi tested, C. cinereus and P. sajor-caju were selected as the most suitable microorganism for the fermentation of EFB. The protein content of the product increased to 13% and the crude fiber content decreased to 20% after 30 days of incubation with C. cinereus at 30 o C in solid state fermentation. P. sajor-caju was suitable for the mushroom production on EFB with rice bran. (author)

  13. Utilization of agro-resources by radiation treatment -production of animal feed and mushroom from oil palm wastes

    Kume, Tamikazu; Matsuhashi, Shinpei; Hashimoto, Shoji; Awang, Mat Rasol; Hamdini, Hassan; Saitoh, Hideharu

    1993-10-01

    The production of animal feeds and mushrooms from oil palm cellulosic wasres by radiation and fermentation has been investigated in order to utilize the agro-resources and to reduce the smoke pollution. The process is as follows: decontamination of microorganisms in fermentation media of empty fruit bunch of oil palm (EFB) by irradiation, inoculation of useful fungi, and subsequently production of proteins and edible mushrooms. The dose of 25 kGy was required for the sterilization of contaminating bacteria whereas the dose of 10 kGy was enough to eliminate the fungi. Among many kinds of fungi tested, C. cinereus and P. sajor-caju were selected as the most suitable microorganism for the fermentation of EFB. The protein content of the product increased to 13 % and the crude fiber content decreased to 20% after 30 days of incubation with C. cinereus at 30°C in solid state fermentation. P. sajor-caju was suitable for the mushroom production on EFB with rice bran.

  14. Study of the rice husk ash utilization as filler polypropylene matrix and ionization radiation effect on this composite

    Alfaro, Eduardo de Faria

    2010-01-01

    In the first step of this work, it was evaluated the possibility of using rice husk ash as a filler in polypropylene (PP) making a comparison with talc which is the most used mineral filler in polymers. This comparison was made by using polypropylene with 20% rice husk ash as well as polypropylene with 20% talc measuring their properties. Despite the properties of the PP with 20% rice husk ash decreased compared with the composite of polypropylene with 20% talc it can be said that the rice husk ash can be used as filler for or other utilization less noble of PP . This way it is being given a destination for this residue that it is disposable in the environment contributing to its preservation, moreover reducing the product cost. This work had also as an aim to study the ionizing radiation effect in the properties of these composites. It was used the coupling agent, maleic anhydride , to verify a best sample homogenization. According to the results it can be said that PP is a semicrystalline polymer, and so it has its morphology modified when exposed to the irradiation process. This fact is due to the scission mechanisms of the polymeric chains which it is in compliance to the literature. (author)

  15. The Utility of Lymphocyte Premature Chromosome Condensation Analysis for Biological Dosimetry Following Accidental Overexposure to Ionising Radiation

    Chambrette, V.; Laval, F.; Voisin, P.

    1999-01-01

    Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) appears to have a possible utility for biological dosimetry purposes. The PCC technique may be adapted for cases of suspicion of overexposure where sampling is performed at least one day after an accident. For this purpose, human blood samples were exposed in vitro to 60 Co (0.5 Gy.min -1 ) up to 4 Gy and the PCC technique was performed after 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h of DNA repair at 37 deg. C. Analysis of excess PCC fragments distribution showed an overdispersion and the dose-effect relationship was best characterised by linear regression. Radiation-induced damage was reduced to 32% between the first and the second day of repair and to 42% the following day. Statistical precision of the dose was found to be dependent on the irradiation dose and on the number of cells examined. The necessity to establish dose-response relationships after different periods of DNA repair is demonstrated, and the use of PCC excess fragments yield as a bioindicator should take this fact into account. (author)

  16. The arms race control

    Nemo, J.

    2010-01-01

    Written in 1961, this paper presents the content of a book entitled 'The arms race control' where the author outlined the difference between disarmament and arms control, described the economic and moral role of arms race, the importance of force balance for international security. He wandered whether arms control could ensure this balance and whether nuclear balance meant force balance. Force balance then appears to be a precarious and unsteady component of international security. He commented the challenges of disarmament, recalled some arguments for a nuclear disarmament. Then he discussed what would be an arms control with or without disarmament (either nuclear or conventional)

  17. CERN Relay Race

    2008-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 5 June starting at 12:15 p.m. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on how to register your team for the relay race are given on the Staff Association Bulletin web site. You can access the online registration form at: http://cern.ch/club-running-relay/form.html

  18. CERN Relay Race

    2007-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 23 May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on how to register your team for the relay race are given on the Staff Association Bulletin web site. You can access the online registration form at: http://cern.ch/club-running-relay/form.html

  19. CERN Relay Race

    2011-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 19 May starting at 12-15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details of the course and of how to register your team for the relay race can be found here. Some advice for all runners from the Medical Service can also be found here.   

  20. Teamwork in adventure racing

    Šavrňák, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    Title: Teamwork in Adventure racing Goals: The main goal is to make up the chapter about an ideal teamwork in Adventure racing. And so, to help starting teams but also help experienced teams to learn about their lacks in cooperation and to shift teamwork level above. Method: We used the method of literature retrieval from books, articles and researches. Results: It is very hard task to define ideal teamwork, we would not find same two teams in the world and therefore each team suits something...

  1. Affectivity and race

    on the role of feelings in the formation of subjectivities, how race and whiteness are affectively circulated in public life and the ways in which emotions contribute to regimes of inclusion and exclusion. As such it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences, with interests in sociology, anthropology...... of the Nordic countries, Affectivity and Race draws on a variety of sources, including television programmes, news media, fictional literature, interviews, ethnographic observations, teaching curricula and policy documents, to explore the ways in which ideas about affectivity and emotion afford new insights...

  2. SU-F-T-427: Utilization and Evaluation of Diagnostic CT Imaging with MAR Technique for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Xu, M; Foster, R; Parks, H; Pankuch, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The objective was to utilize and evaluate diagnostic CT-MAR technique for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods: A Toshiba-diagnostic-CT acquisition with SEMAR(Single-energy-MAR)-algorism was performed to make the metal-artifact-reduction (MAR) for patient treatment planning. CT-imaging datasets with and without SEMAR were taken on a Catphan-phantom. Two sets of CT-numbers were calibrated with the relative electron densities (RED). A tissue characterization phantom with Gammex various simulating material rods was used to establish the relationship between known REDs and corresponding CT-numbers. A GE-CT-sim acquisition was taken on the Catphan for comparison. A patient with bilateral hip arthroplasty was scanned in the radiotherapy CT-sim and the diagnostic SEMAR-CT on a flat panel. The derived SEMAR images were used as a primary CT dataset to create contours for the target, critical-structures, and for planning. A deformable registration was performed with VelocityAI to track voxel changes between SEMAR and CT-sim images. The SEMAR-CT images with minimal artifacts and high quality of geometrical and spatial integrity were employed for a treatment plan. Treatment-plans were evaluated based on deformable registration of SEMAR-CT and CT-sim dataset with assigned CT-numbers in the metal artifact regions in Eclipse v11 TPS. Results: The RED and CT-number relationships were consistent for the datasets in CT-sim and CT’s with and without SEMAR. SEMAR datasets with high image quality were used for PTV and organ delineation in the treatment planning process. For dose distribution to the PTV through the DVH analysis, the plan using CT-sim with the assigned CT-number showed a good agreement to those on deformable CT-SEMAR. Conclusion: A diagnostic-CT with MAR-algorithm can be utilized for radiotherapy treatment planning with CT-number calibrated to the RED. Treatment planning comparison and DVH shows a good agreement in the PTV and critical organs between

  3. Shared decision-making: is it time to obtain informed consent before radiologic examinations utilizing ionizing radiation? Legal and ethical implications.

    Berlin, Leonard

    2014-03-01

    Concerns about the possibility of developing cancer due to diagnostic imaging examinations utilizing ionizing radiation exposure are increasing. Research studies of survivors of atomic bomb explosions, nuclear reactor accidents, and other unanticipated exposures to similar radiation have led to varying conclusions regarding the stochastic effects of radiation exposure. That high doses of ionizing radiation cause cancer in humans is generally accepted, but the question of whether diagnostic levels of radiation cause cancer continues to be hotly debated. It cannot be denied that overexposure to ionizing radiation beyond a certain threshold, which has not been exactly determined, does generate cancer. This causes a dilemma: what should patients be informed about the possibility that a CT or similar examination might cause cancer later in life? At present, there is no consensus in the radiology community as to whether informed consent must be obtained from a patient before the patient undergoes a CT or similar examination. The author analyzes whether there is a legal duty mandating radiologists to obtain such informed consent but also, irrespective of the law, whether there an ethical duty that compels radiologists to inform patients of potential adverse effects of ionizing radiation. Over the past decade, there has been a noticeable shift from a benevolent, paternalistic approach to medical care to an autonomy-based, shared-decision-making approach, whereby patient and physician work as partners in determining what is medically best for the patient. Radiologists should discuss the benefits and hazards of imaging with their patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Feasibility and potential utility of multicomponent exhaled breath analysis for predicting development of radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy.

    Moré, Jayaji M; Eclov, Neville C W; Chung, Melody P; Wynne, Jacob F; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Burmeister, Robert; Banos, Peter; Maxim, Peter G; Loo, Billy W; Diehn, Maximilian

    2014-07-01

    In this prospective pilot study, we evaluated the feasibility and potential utility of measuring multiple exhaled gases as biomarkers of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors. Breath analysis was performed for 26 patients receiving SABR for lung tumors. Concentrations of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), carbon monoxide (eCO), nitrous oxide (eN2O), and carbon dioxide (eCO2) were measured before and immediately after each fraction using real-time, infrared laser spectroscopy. RP development (CTCAE grade ≥2) was correlated with baseline gas concentrations, acute changes in gas concentrations after each SABR fraction, and dosimetric parameters. Exhaled breath analysis was successfully completed in 77% of patients. Five of 20 evaluable patients developed RP at a mean of 5.4 months after SABR. Acute changes in eNO and eCO concentrations, defined as percent changes between each pre-fraction and post-fraction measurement, were significantly smaller in RP versus non-RP cases (p = 0.022 and 0.015, respectively). In an exploratory analysis, a combined predictor of baseline eNO greater than 24 parts per billion and acute decrease in eCO less than 5.5% strongly correlated with RP incidence (p =0.0099). Neither eN2O nor eCO2 concentrations were significantly associated with RP development. Although generally higher in patients destined to develop RP, dosimetric parameters were not significantly associated with RP development. The majority of SABR patients in this pilot study were able to complete exhaled breath analysis. Baseline concentrations and acute changes in concentrations of exhaled breath components were associated with RP development after SABR. If our findings are validated, exhaled breath analysis may become a useful approach for noninvasive identification of patients at highest risk for developing RP after SABR.

  5. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Freedland, Stephen J., E-mail: steve.freedland@duke.edu [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Gerber, Leah [Department of Surgery, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Surgery (Urology), Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S. [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Salama, Joseph K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Stone, Steven [Myriad Genetics, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy.

  6. Prognostic Utility of Cell Cycle Progression Score in Men With Prostate Cancer After Primary External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Freedland, Stephen J.; Gerber, Leah; Reid, Julia; Welbourn, William; Tikishvili, Eliso; Park, Jimmy; Younus, Adib; Gutin, Alexander; Sangale, Zaina; Lanchbury, Jerry S.; Salama, Joseph K.; Stone, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic utility of the cell cycle progression (CCP) score, a RNA signature based on the average expression level of 31 CCP genes, for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) in men with prostate cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as their primary curative therapy. Methods and Materials: The CCP score was derived retrospectively from diagnostic biopsy specimens of men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2006 (n=141). All patients were treated with definitive EBRT; approximately half of the cohort was African American. Outcome was time from EBRT to BCR using the Phoenix definition. Median follow-up for patients without BCR was 4.8 years. Association with outcome was evaluated by Cox proportional hazards survival analysis and likelihood ratio tests. Results: Of 141 patients, 19 (13%) had BCR. The median CCP score for patient samples was 0.12. In univariable analysis, CCP score significantly predicted BCR (P=.0017). The hazard ratio for BCR was 2.55 for 1-unit increase in CCP score (equivalent to a doubling of gene expression). In a multivariable analysis that included Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, percent positive cores, and androgen deprivation therapy, the hazard ratio for CCP changed only marginally and remained significant (P=.034), indicating that CCP provides prognostic information that is not provided by standard clinical parameters. With 10-year censoring, the CCP score was associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (P=.013). There was no evidence for interaction between CCP and any clinical variable, including ethnicity. Conclusions: Among men treated with EBRT, the CCP score significantly predicted outcome and provided greater prognostic information than was available with clinical parameters. If validated in a larger cohort, CCP score could identify high-risk men undergoing EBRT who may need more aggressive therapy

  7. 47th Relay Race!

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    On Thursday June 1st at 12.15, Fabiola Gianotti, our Director-General, will fire the starting shot for the 47th Relay Race. This Race is above all a festive CERN event, open for runners and walkers, as well as the people cheering them on throughout the race, and those who wish to participate in the various activities organised between 11.30 and 14.30 out on the lawn in front of Restaurant 1. In order to make this sports event accessible for everyone, our Director-General will allow for flexible lunch hours on the day, applicable for all the members of personnel. An alert for the closure of roads will be send out on the day of the event. The Staff Association and the CERN Running Club thank you in advance for your participation and your continued support throughout the years. This year the CERN Running Club has announced the participation of locally and internationally renowned runners, no less! A bit over a week from the Relay Race of 1st June, the number of teams is going up nicely (already almost 40). Am...

  8. 2013 CERN Road Race

    Klaus Hanke

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 18 September at 6.15 p.m.   The 5.5 km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent and best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found here.

  9. 2013 CERN Road Race

    Klaus Hanke

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 18 September at 18.15.   The 5.5 km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at: htt...

  10. Race Car Rally.

    Anthony, Joan L.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an activity where teams of parents and children work together to solve problems involving matchbox-sized race cars. The teams collect, record, and analyze data; measure distances in metric; and explore concepts related to mass, friction, and force. (PR)

  11. CERN Relay Race

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 19 May between 12.15 and 12.35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding

  12. CERN Relay Race

    2003-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday May 21st between 12h15 and 12h35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding

  13. CERN Relay Race

    2001-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 23 May between 12:20 and 12:35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 15 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please stop until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding.

  14. CERN Relay Race

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 22 May between 12h20 and 12h35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 15 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding.

  15. Race, Ethnicity and Culture

    Ballard, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Prepared for a textbook in sociology, this paper offers a clear set of definitions for the three crucial but much contended concepts of race, ethnicity and culture, and having done so explores how they can be used to make sense of the dynamics of pluralism in contemporary Britain.

  16. Intelligence, Race, and Genetics

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that the overwhelming portion of the literature on intelligence, race, and genetics is based on folk taxonomies rather than scientific analysis. They suggest that because theorists of intelligence disagree as to what it is, any consideration of its relationships to other constructs must be tentative at best. They…

  17. CERN Relay Race

    2009-01-01

    The CERN relay race, now in its 39th year, is already a well-known tradition, but this year the organizers say the event will have even more of a festival feeling. Just off the starting line of the CERN relay race.For the past few years, spectators and runners at the CERN relay race have been able to enjoy a beer while listening to music from the CERN music and jazz clubs. But this year the organizers are aiming for "even more of a festival atmosphere". As David Nisbet, President of the CERN running club and organizer of the relay race, says: "Work is not just about getting your head down and doing the theory, it’s also about enjoying the company of your colleagues." This year, on top of music from the Santa Luis Band and the Canettes Blues Band, there will be demonstrations from the Aikido and softball clubs, a stretching session by the Fitness club, as well as various stalls and of course, the well-earned beer from AGLUP, the B...

  18. Managing new arms races

    Segal, G.

    1992-01-01

    The management of new arms races in the region of Asia-Pacific includes considerations of weapons trade and transfer in the region, with an emphasis on nuclear weapons proliferation. It deals with the problem of controlling the arms trade and the efforts to control conventional weapons and underlines the possible role and influence of Conference on Cooperation and Security in Europe (CSCE)

  19. 2005 CERN Relay Race

    Patrice Loiez

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race takes place each year in May and sees participants from all areas of the CERN staff. The winners in 2005 were The Shabbys with Los Latinos Volantes in second and Charmilles Technologies a close third. To add a touch of colour and levity, the CERN Jazz Club provided music at the finishing line.

  20. Race, Racism, and Darwinism

    Jeynes, William H.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the views of Darwinist evolution on issues regarding race and how this contributed to the spread of racism in the United States. The writings of Charles Darwin and a myriad of his followers are examined, including Herbert Spencer, Francis Galton, and others. The influence of Darwinism in contributing to the growth of…

  1. Race, Emotions, and Socialization.

    Smith, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the connection between emotion and behavior, examining the connection between the construct of emotional intelligence and criminal behavior. Data collected from a group of men and women on probation from prison indicated that people received different socialization with regard to emotions based on gender and race. Results suggest that…

  2. Race walking gait and its influence on race walking economy in world-class race walkers.

    Gomez-Ezeiza, Josu; Torres-Unda, Jon; Tam, Nicholas; Irazusta, Jon; Granados, Cristina; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between biomechanical parameters of the gait cycle and race walking economy in world-class Olympic race walkers. Twenty-One world-class race walkers possessing the Olympic qualifying standard participated in this study. Participants completed an incremental race walking test starting at 10 km·h -1 , where race walking economy (ml·kg -1 ·km -1 ) and spatiotemporal gait variables were analysed at different speeds. 20-km race walking performance was related to race walking economy, being the fastest race walkers those displaying reduced oxygen cost at a given speed (R = 0.760, p < 0.001). Longer ground contact times, shorter flight times, longer midstance sub-phase and shorter propulsive sub-phase during stance were related to a better race walking economy (moderate effect, p < 0.05). According to the results of this study, the fastest race walkers were more economi cal than the lesser performers. Similarly, shorter flight times are associated with a more efficient race walking economy. Coaches and race walkers should avoid modifying their race walking style by increasing flight times, as it may not only impair economy, but also lead to disqualification.

  3. Addressing the Puzzle of Race

    Coleman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Although racial discrimination poses a devastating instrument of oppression, social work texts lack a clear and consistent definition of "race". The solution lies in according race the status of an "actor version" concept, while exploring the origins and variations of race ideas using "scientific observer version" explanations. This distinction…

  4. Performance analysis on utilization of sky radiation cooling energy for space cooling. Part 2; Hosha reikyaku riyo reibo system ni kansuru kenkyu. 2

    Marushima, S; Saito, T [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Studies have been made about a heat accumulation tank type cooling system making use of radiation cooling that is a kind of natural energy. The daily operating cycle of the cooling system is described below. A heat pump air conditioner performs cooling during the daytime and the exhaust heat is stored in a latent heat accumulation tank; the heat is then used for the bath and tapwater in the evening; at night radiation cooling is utilized to remove the heat remnant in the tank for the solidification of the phase change material (PCM); the solidified PCM serves as the cold heat source for the heat pump air conditioner to perform cooling. The new system decelerates urban area warming because it emits the cooler-generated waste heat not into the atmosphere but into space taking advantage of radiation cooling. Again, the cooler-generated waste heat may be utilized for energy saving and power levelling. For the examination of nighttime radiation cooling characteristics, CaCl2-5H2O and Na2HPO4-12H2O were tested as the PCM. Water was used as the heating medium. In the case of a PCM high in latent heat capacity, some work has to be done for insuring sufficient heat exchange for it by, for instance, rendering the flow rate low. The coefficient of performance of the system discussed here is three times higher than that of the air-cooled type heat pump system. 8 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. X-rays utilization

    Rebigan, F.

    1979-03-01

    The modality of X-ray utilization in different activities and economy is given. One presents firstly quantities and units used in radiation dosimetry and other fields. One gives the generation of X-rays, their properties as well as the elements of radiation protection. The utilization characteristics of these radiations in different fields are finally given. (author)

  6. Arms Races and Negotiations

    Sandeep Baliga; Tomas Sjostrom

    2003-01-01

    Two players simultaneously decide whether or not to acquire new weapons in an arms race game. Each player's type determines his propensity to arm. Types are private information, and are independently drawn from a continuous distribution. With probability close to one, the best outcome for each player is for neither to acquire new weapons (although each prefers to acquire new weapons if he thinks the opponent will). There is a small probability that a player is a dominant strategy type who alw...

  7. CERN Relay Race 2018

    CERN Running club

    2018-01-01

    The CERN running club, in collaboration with the Staff Association, is happy to announce the 2018 relay race edition. It will take place on Thursday, May 24th and will consist as every year in a round trip of the CERN Meyrin site in teams of 6 members. It is a fun event, and you do not have to run fast to enjoy it. Registrations will be open from May 1st to May 22nd on the running club web site. All information concerning the race and the registration are available there too: http://runningclub.web.cern.ch/content/cern-relay-race. A video of the previous edition is also available here : http://cern.ch/go/Nk7C. As every year, there will be animations starting at noon on the lawn in front of restaurant 1, and information stands for many CERN associations and clubs will be available. The running club partners will also be participate in the event, namely Berthie Sport, Interfon and Uniqa.

  8. CERN Relay Race

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    This year’s CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 20th May at 12h00. This annual event is for teams of 6 runners covering distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m respectively. Teams may be entered in the Seniors, Veterans, Ladies, Mixed or Open categories. The registration fee is 10 CHF per runner, and each runner receives a souvenir prize. As usual, there will be a programme of entertainments from 12h in the arrival area, in front of the Restaurant no. 1. Drinks, food, CERN club information and music will be available for the pleasure of both runners and spectators. The race starts at 12h15, with results and prize giving at 13:15.   For details of the race, and of how to sign up a team, please visit: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay The event is organised by the CERN Running Club with the support of the CERN Staff Association.  

  9. The racing dragon

    2009-01-01

    Dating back nearly 2000 years, the ancient Chinese tradition of Dragon Boat Racing was originally a celebration that fell on the 5th day of the 5th lunar month as a gesture to please the Gods and bring forth necessary rains to cultivate the lands. Now the CERN Canoe and Kayak Club, too, participates in this tradition, though not so much to please the Gods on the ritualistic date, but to bring forth giant smiles on the faces of members. Dragon Boat Racing has been rising steadily in popularity in Europe since the mid nineties and with the great potential to host and promote Dragon Boat Racing in the Geneva area, the CERN Canoe and Kayak Club, has taken the initiative to bring the sport to the region. Some members of the Club traveled to Dole in June to participate in the Festival Dragon Boat 2009. Under perfect sunny conditions, the team triumphed in their first ever tournament, cruising to a convincing first place overall finish. T...

  10. Studies on the physicochemical properties of bacterial toxins by different radiation sources and utilization of modified toxin by irradiation

    Yoo, Y. C.; Kim, S. J.; Kim, S. S.; Yang, H. S.; Kim, S. Y.

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of irradiation technology to induce natural immunity/resistance has been best preserved when ionizing radiation (Co-60) has been used for detoxification. The result of SDS-PAGE showed that the treatment of LPS with an ionizing radiation dose destroyed most of the minor bands, including the more intensively staining ones in the slow-moving region. Increasing radiation doses caused further destruction of the bands, eliminating first the ones with lower migration ability. In the infrared spectrum, the qualitative change of functional groups were found in LPS by irradiation, and the patterns indicate some quantitative differences between the parent endotoxin and the irradiated derivative. Furthermore, scanning endotoxin in the UV range, we found that a complex absorption pattern was changed dependent upon increasing exposure of ionizing radiation to endotoxin LPS. Our results showed dose-dependent detoxification when LPS in water is exposed to ionizing radiation at ambient temperature. The harmful effects of LPS decrease after radiation, whereas its capacity to induce tolerance, to function as an the proliferation of immune cells and their cytokine/chemokine release such as TNF-α and Nitric Oxide (NO) to protect against shock and to stimulate natural resistance are preserved to a large extent. In conclusion, the present study demonstrate that in vitro or in vivo exposure to irradiated-LPS reduces the induction of inflammatory factors in response to stimulation by a high-dose treatment of intact LPS

  11. Radiation

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  12. Radiation

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  13. The academic rat race

    Landes, Xavier; Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    : an increased pressure to produce articles (in peer-reviewed journals) has created an unbalanced emphasis on the research criterion at the expense of the latter two. More fatally, this pressure has turned academia into a rat race, leading to a deep change in the fundamental structure of academic behaviour......, and entailing a self-defeating and hence counter-productive pattern, where more publications is always better and where it becomes increasingly difficult for researchers to keep up with the new research in their field. The article identifies the pressure to publish as a problem of collective action. It ends up...

  14. Logical empiricists on race.

    Bright, Liam Kofi

    2017-10-01

    The logical empiricists expressed a consistent attitude to racial categorisation in both the ethical and scientific spheres. Their attitude may be captured in the following slogan: human racial taxonomy is an empirically meaningful mode of classifying persons that we should refrain from deploying. I offer an interpretation of their position that would render coherent their remarks on race with positions they adopted on the scientific status of taxonomy in general, together with their potential moral or political motivations for adopting that position. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Race By Hearts

    Sonne, Tobias; Jensen, Mads Møller

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the qualities of sharing biometric data in re- al-time between athletes, in order to increase two motivational factors for gym- goers: Enjoyment and social interaction. We present a novel smartphone appli- cation, called Race By Hearts, which enables competition based...... on heart rate data sharing between users in real-time. Through an empirical study conducted in the gym, we show that sharing biometric data in real-time can strengthen so- cial relations between participants, increase motivation, and improve the en- joyment of the fitness activity. Nevertheless, we found...

  16. Utilizing 3-D and 4-D ultrasound systems to improve radiation treatment of cervix and prostate cancer patients

    Baker, Mariwan

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in modern treatment for cancer, such as cervical and prostate radiation treatment. One of the major issue in radiotherapy is that the target should be aligned to the planned target volume prior to each treatment fraction, for which different kilovoltage (k...

  17. Utilization of recycled cathode ray tubes glass in cement mortar for X-ray radiation-shielding applications.

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun; Lam, Wai-Shung; Chan, Tai-Po; Fung, Karl Ka-Lok

    2012-01-15

    Recycled glass derived from cathode ray tubes (CRT) glass with a specific gravity of approximately 3.0 g/cm(3) can be potentially suitable to be used as fine aggregate for preparing cement mortars for X-ray radiation-shielding applications. In this work, the effects of using crushed glass derived from crushed CRT funnel glass (both acid washed and unwashed) and crushed ordinary beverage container glass at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by volume) of sand on the mechanical properties (strength and density) and radiation-shielding performance of the cement-sand mortars were studied. The results show that all the prepared mortars had compressive strength values greater than 30 MPa which are suitable for most building applications based on ASTM C 270. The density and shielding performance of the mortar prepared with ordinary crushed (lead-free) glass was similar to the control mortar. However, a significant enhancement of radiation-shielding was achieved when the CRT glasses were used due to the presence of lead in the glass. In addition, the radiation shielding contribution of CRT glasses was more pronounced when the mortar was subject to a higher level of X-ray energy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Soft X-ray synchrotron radiation investigations of actinide materials systems utilizing X-ray emission spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    Shuh, D.K.; Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) methods have been utilized with increasing frequency over the past several years to study topics in actinide science, ranging from those of a fundamental nature to those that address a specifically-targeted technical need. In particular, the emergence of microspectroscopic and fluorescence-based techniques have permitted investigations of actinide materials at sources of soft x-ray SR. Spectroscopic techniques with fluorescence-based detection are useful for actinide investigations since they are sensitive to small amounts of material and the information sampling depth may be varied. These characteristics also serve to simplify both sample preparation and safety considerations. Examples of investigations using these fluorescence techniques will be described along with their results, as well as the prospects for future investigations utilizing these methodologies

  19. Utilization of recycled cathode ray tubes glass in cement mortar for X-ray radiation-shielding applications

    Ling, Tung-Chai; Poon, Chi-Sun; Lam, Wai-Shung; Chan, Tai-Po; Fung, Karl Ka-Lok

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► It is feasible to use recycled CRT glass in mortar as shield against X-ray radiation. ► Shielding properties of CRT mortar is strongly depended on CRT content. ► Linear attenuation coefficient was reduced by 142% upon 100% CRT glass in mortar. ► Effect of mortar thickness and irradiation energies on shielding was investigated. - Abstract: Recycled glass derived from cathode ray tubes (CRT) glass with a specific gravity of approximately 3.0 g/cm 3 can be potentially suitable to be used as fine aggregate for preparing cement mortars for X-ray radiation-shielding applications. In this work, the effects of using crushed glass derived from crushed CRT funnel glass (both acid washed and unwashed) and crushed ordinary beverage container glass at different replacement levels (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% by volume) of sand on the mechanical properties (strength and density) and radiation-shielding performance of the cement–sand mortars were studied. The results show that all the prepared mortars had compressive strength values greater than 30 MPa which are suitable for most building applications based on ASTM C 270. The density and shielding performance of the mortar prepared with ordinary crushed (lead-free) glass was similar to the control mortar. However, a significant enhancement of radiation-shielding was achieved when the CRT glasses were used due to the presence of lead in the glass. In addition, the radiation shielding contribution of CRT glasses was more pronounced when the mortar was subject to a higher level of X-ray energy.

  20. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in 68Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Hardcastle, Nicholas; Hofman, Michael S.; Hicks, Rodney J.; Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Jackson, Price; Siva, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: 68 Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration. Conclusions

  1. Accuracy and Utility of Deformable Image Registration in {sup 68}Ga 4D PET/CT Assessment of Pulmonary Perfusion Changes During and After Lung Radiation Therapy

    Hardcastle, Nicholas, E-mail: nick.hardcastle@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong (Australia); Hofman, Michael S. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Callahan, Jason [Molecular Imaging, Centre for Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne University, Victoria (Australia); MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Jackson, Price [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Measuring changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose requires registration of the functional imaging to the radiation therapy treatment planning scan. This study investigates registration accuracy and utility for positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging in radiation therapy for non–small cell lung cancer. Methods: {sup 68}Ga 4-dimensional PET/CT ventilation-perfusion imaging was performed before, during, and after radiation therapy for 5 patients. Rigid registration and deformable image registration (DIR) using B-splines and Demons algorithms was performed with the CT data to obtain a deformation map between the functional images and planning CT. Contour propagation accuracy and correspondence of anatomic features were used to assess registration accuracy. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to determine statistical significance. Changes in lung perfusion resulting from radiation therapy dose were calculated for each registration method for each patient and averaged over all patients. Results: With B-splines/Demons DIR, median distance to agreement between lung contours reduced modestly by 0.9/1.1 mm, 1.3/1.6 mm, and 1.3/1.6 mm for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.01 for all), and median Dice score between lung contours improved by 0.04/0.04, 0.05/0.05, and 0.05/0.05 for pretreatment, midtreatment, and posttreatment (P<.001 for all). Distance between anatomic features reduced with DIR by median 2.5 mm and 2.8 for pretreatment and midtreatment time points, respectively (P=.001) and 1.4 mm for posttreatment (P>.2). Poorer posttreatment results were likely caused by posttreatment pneumonitis and tumor regression. Up to 80% standardized uptake value loss in perfusion scans was observed. There was limited change in the loss in lung perfusion between registration methods; however, Demons resulted in larger interpatient variation compared with rigid and B-splines registration

  2. Utilization of ionizing radiation for the sterilization of membraneous connective tissue allografts. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation sterilization of medical products and biological tissues

    Triantafyllou, N.

    1978-05-01

    The work carried out, covered several aspects of radiation sterilization of membraneous allografts. In general the findings show that the sterilization of biological membranes with gamma irradiation using doses of up to 3 Mrads is a very satisfactory method for the sterilization of the material, since it does not seriously alter the biological properties of allografts. As for the changes of the mechanical properties, this is not considered to be a serious draw back, because the membraneous allografts cover surgical needs where the mechanical strength is not of paramount importance

  3. Disparities in staging prostate magnetic resonance imaging utilization for nonmetastatic prostate cancer patients undergoing definitive radiation therapy

    Ayobami Ajayi, BA

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: In this urban, academic center cohort, older patients across all risk groups and black or nonprivate insurance patients in the low risk group were less likely to undergo staging prostate MRI scans. Further research should investigate these differences to ensure equitable utilization across all demographic groups considering the burden of prostate cancer disparities.

  4. Race and Class on Campus

    Perez, Angel B.

    2016-01-01

    Colleges and universities have a significant role to play in shaping the future of race and class relations in America. As exhibited in this year's presidential election, race and class continue to divide. Black Lives Matter movements, campus protests, and police shootings are just a few examples of the proliferation of intolerance, and higher…

  5. Intersectionality and Critical Race Parenting

    DePouw, Christin

    2018-01-01

    This conceptual article employs critical race theory (CRT) as a theoretical framework to explore the importance of intersectionality in critical race parenting. In particular, I focus on intersectionality to understand better how Whiteness and racial power play out in intimate relationships within the family, particularly between White parents and…

  6. Helping Students Discuss Race Openly

    Landsman, Julie

    2016-01-01

    One way teachers can disrupt inequities is by doing the work to foster discussions in which students talk about race--and racism--honestly together. Teachers also need to be ready to talk with students sensitively when the subject of race comes up spontaneously--in a student's work, connected to events outside school, or in response to a…

  7. Utilization of Cs137 to generate a radiation barrier for weapons grade plutonium immobilized in borosilicate glass canisters. Revision 1

    Jardine, L.J.; Armantrout, G.A.; Collins, L.F.

    1995-01-01

    One of the ways recommended by a recent National Academy of Sciences study to dispose of excess weapons-grade plutonium is to encapsulate the plutonium in a glass in combination with high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) to generate an intense radiation dose rate field. The objective is to render the plutonium as difficult to access as the plutonium contained in existing US commercial spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel until it can be disposed of in a permanent geological repository. A radiation dose rate from a sealed canister of 1,000 rem/h (10 Sv/h) at 1 meter for at least 30 years after fabrication was assumed in this paper to be a radiation dose comparable to spent LWR fuel. This can be achieved by encapsulating the plutonium in a borosilicate glass with an adequate amount of a single fission product in the HLWS, namely radioactive Cs 137 . One hundred thousand curies of Cs 137 will generate a dose rate of 1,000 rem/h (10 Sv/h) at 1 meter for at least 30 years when imbedded into canisters of the size proposed for the Savannah River Site's vitrified high-level wastes. The United States has a current inventory of 54 MCi of CS 137 that has been separated from defense HLWs and is in sealed capsules. This single curie inventory is sufficient to spike 50 metric tons of excess weapons-grade plutonium if plutonium can be loaded at 5.5 wt% in glass, or 540 canisters. Additional CS 137 inventories exist in the United States' HLWs from past reprocessing operations, should additional curies be required. Using only one fission product, CS 137 , rather than the multiple chemical elements and compounds in HLWs to generate a high radiation dose rate from a glass canister greatly simplifies the processing engineering retirement for encapsulating plutonium in a borosilicate glass

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures.

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-07

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for (60)Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with (60)Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for 60 Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with 60 Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage. (paper)

  10. Some techniques and results from high-pressure shock-wave experiments utilizing the radiation from shocked transparent materials

    McQueen, R.G.; Fritz, J.N.

    1981-01-01

    It has been known for many years that some transparent materials emit radiation when shocked to high pressures. This property was used to determine the temperature of shocked fused and crystal quartz, which in turn allowed the thermal expansion of SiO 2 at high pressure and also the specific heat to be calculated. Once the radiative energy as a function of pressure is known for one material it is shown how this can be used to determine the temperature of other transparent materials. By the nature of the experiments very accurate shock velocities can be measured and hence high quality equation of state data obtained. Some techniques and results are presented on measuring sound velocities from symmetrical impact of nontransparent materials using radiation emitting transparent analyzers, and on nonsymmetrical impact experiments on transparent materials. Because of special requirements in the later experiments, techniques were developed that lead to very high-precision shock-wave data. Preliminary results, using these techniques are presented for making estimates of the melting region and the yield strength of some metals under strong shock conditions

  11. CERN Relay Race

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 18 May between 12.15 and 12.35. This year, weather permitting, there will be some new attractions in the start/finish area on the field behind the Main Building. You will be able to: listen to music played by the CERN Jazz Club; buy drinks at the bar organised by the CERN Running Club; buy lunch served directly on the terrace by the restaurant Novae. ATTENTION: concerning traffic, the recommendations are the same as always: If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding.

  12. Patent Races and Market Value

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Leten, Bart

    Patent races are models of strategic interactions between firms competing to develop an invention. The winning firm secures a patent, protecting the invention from imitation. This paper tests the assumption made about the reward structure in patent races, both in discrete and complex industries. We...... identify patent race winners using detailed information from the patent examination reports at the European Patent Office (EPO). Estimates of a market value equation featuring large, R&D-intensive U.S., European and Japanese firms, show that if firms win patent races, their market value increases...... significantly. We further show that the gain in market value is significantly larger for patent race winners in discrete industries than for firms in complex industries....

  13. Means of Transportation to Work by Race

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — Except where noted, 'race' refers to people reporting only one race. 'Hispanic' refers to an ethnic category; Hispanics may be of any race. An entry of '+/-0' in...

  14. What's in a Name … Or a Face? Student Perceptions of Faculty Race

    Mendez, Jeanette Morehouse; Mendez, Jesse Perez

    2018-01-01

    Utilizing Critical Race Theory (CRT) as a conceptual framework, this study examines student perception of faculty of color in academia from student professor preference. Using an experimental design to test the effect of race on selection of faculty with whom to take a course, we showed student participants two types of pairings of faculty: first,…

  15. Physicochemical effects of gamma radiation in peanuts and the utilization of their peanut skins as natural antioxidant

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de

    2012-01-01

    Peanuts are among the most popular oilseed in the world, their lipid content is about 50%, on average. Their fatty acid composition is characterized by high percentage of unsaturated fatty acids. Peanuts are a source of dietary tocopherol and polyphenols, antioxidants that play benefits to human health. However, the presence of potential mycotoxic fungi is a concern of this oilseed production chain. Gamma radiation, in addition to good agricultural practices, has been identified as an effective treatment for disinfecting peanuts of fungi and has been identified as a potential tool for reducing their allergenicity. However, the physicochemical quality of the peanuts deserves attention due to its high lipid percentage. The irradiation process can promote the formation of free radicals, increase lipid oxidation and induce molecular changes that may reflect changes in the antioxidant properties. In the present study samples of peanut from IAC Runner 886 cultivar, peeled, in shell and blanched as well as their peanut skins were subjected to gamma radiation in doses of 0.0, 5.0, 7.5 or 10.0 kGy with dose rate of 7.5 kGy.h -1 using a cobalt-60 source. The samples were stored for six months at room temperature and analysis were performed at the beginning of the study and after each three month storage on peanuts and just at the beginning of the study on peanut skins. Few changes noticed in the physical parameters of color seem to be more related to storage than the irradiation process Chemical parameters related to the antioxidant properties showed moderate change due to the irradiation process, while storage was determinant on the reduction of bioactive compounds as well as the antioxidant activity in the samples. No correlation was found between gamma radiation and fatty acid changes of peanuts. Tocopherol content and the induction period of the crude peanut oil were negatively correlated with gamma radiation doses. Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching

  16. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar

    2009-01-01

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg -1 protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg -1 protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg -1 protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg -1 protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg -1 protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions

  17. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg{sup -1} protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg{sup -1} protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg{sup -1} protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg{sup -1} protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg{sup -1} protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions.

  18. Utilization of thermoluminescent dosemeters for determination of exposure or absorbed dose in a radiation gamma or X radiation field with unknown spectral distribution

    Rosa, L.A.R. da.

    1981-06-01

    Having in view the choice of the best pair of dosemeters to be used in the 'Tandem' method, the main response characteristics of LiF:Mg, Ti, Li 2 B 4 O 7 :Mn, CaSO 4 Dy, CaF 2 :Mn and CaF 2 :Dy thermoluminescent dosemeters and also some critical parameters in their calibration and evaluation processes were studied. Three different physical forms of TLD's were investigated: hot pressed chips, disc teflon dosemeters and glass mini TLD's. Their calibration factors were obtained for the energy of Cobalt-60 gamma rays. Their energy dependences normalized to 60 Co radiation were determined using spectral width as parameter. 'Tandens' formed by all TLD's evaluated were compaired. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Dosimetry, metallurgical and code needs of the U.S. utilities related to radiation embrittlement of nuclear pressure vessels

    Rahn, F.J.; Marston, T.U.; Ozer, O.; Stahlkopf, K.

    1980-01-01

    Codes and regulation guides in the U.S.A., on performance of pressure vessel are examined. Limiting factors in the analysis and prediction of radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessels are: accurate measurement of neutron flux and spectrum in-situ, irradiation rate dependence, environmental conditions influence of flaws annealing, analysis of mechanical tests. The establishment of a self-consistent set of irradiated materials properties data taken at realistic flux rates is required, in conjunction with a careful technique in measuring with a careful technique in measuring the fluence and spectrum at the pressure vessel wall and material test specimen positions

  20. Utilization of Radiation Therapy in Norway After the Implementation of The National Cancer Plan—A National, Population-Based Study

    Åsli, Linn M.; Kvaløy, Stein O.; Jetne, Vidar; Myklebust, Tor Å.; Levernes, Sverre G.; Tveit, Kjell M.; Green, Tor O.; Johannesen, Tom B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate actual utilization rates of radiation therapy (RT) in Norway, describe time trends (1997-2010), and compare these estimates with corresponding optimal RT rates. Methods and Materials: Data from the population-based Cancer Registry of Norway was used to identify all patients diagnosed with cancer and/or treated by RT for cancer in 1997-2010. Radiation therapy utilization rates (RURs) were calculated as (1) the proportion of incident cancer cases who received RT at least once within 1 year of diagnosis (RUR 1Y ); and (2) the proportion who received RT within 5 years of diagnosis (RUR 5Y ). The number of RT treatment courses per incident cancer case (TCI) was also calculated for all cancer sites combined. The actual RURs were compared with corresponding Australian and Canadian epidemiologic- and evidence-based model estimates and criterion-based benchmark estimates of optimal RURs. The TCIs were compared with TCI estimates from the 1997 Norwegian/National Cancer Plan (NCP). Joinpoint regression was used to identify changes in trends and to estimate annual percentage change (APC) in actual RUR 1Y and actual TCI. Results: The actual RUR 5Y (all sites) increased significantly to 29% in 2005 but still differed markedly from the Australian epidemiologic- and evidence-based model estimate of 48%. With the exception of RUR 5Y for breast cancer and RUR 1Y for lung cancers, all actual RURs were markedly lower than optimal RUR estimates. The actual TCI increased significantly during the study period, reaching 42.5% in 2010, but was still lower than the 54% recommended in the NCP. The trend for RUR 1Y (all sites) and TCI changed significantly, with the annual percentage change being largest during the first part of the study period. Conclusions: Utilization rates of RT in Norway increased after the NCP was implemented and RT capacity was increased, but they still seem to be lower than optimal levels

  1. A pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    Stevenick, W. Van

    1994-01-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to ±3 · 10 -16 A over the environmental range of temperature (-40 to +40 C). Using a single 10 11 Ω feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 · 10 -15 A to 3 · 10 -11 A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 μR h -1 ), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically ∼27 pA at 1 mR h -1 . A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale trademark Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards

  2. Utility estimation of the application of auditory-visual-tactile sense feedback in respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Jo, Jung Hun; KIm, Byeong Jin; Roh, Shi Won; Lee, Hyeon Chan; Jang, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Hoi Nam [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Biomedical Engineering, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Hoon [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Jae [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Gwang Yang Health Collage, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to optimize the gated treatment delivery time and maintenance of stable respiratory by the introduction of breath with the assistance of auditory-visual-tactile sense. The experimenter's respiration were measured by ANZAI 4D system. We obtained natural breathing signal, monitor-induced breathing signal, monitor and ventilator-induced breathing signal, and breath-hold signal using real time monitor during 10 minutes beam-on-time. In order to check the stability of respiratory signals distributed in each group were compared with means, standard deviation, variation value, beam{sub t}ime of the respiratory signal. The stability of each respiratory was measured in consideration of deviation change studied in each respiratory time lapse. As a result of an analysis of respiratory signal, all experimenters has showed that breathing signal used both Real time monitor and Ventilator was the most stable and shortest time. In this study, it was evaluated that respiratory gated radiation therapy with auditory-visual-tactual sense and without auditory-visual-tactual sense feedback. The study showed that respiratory gated radiation therapy delivery time could significantly be improved by the application of video feedback when this is combined with audio-tactual sense assistance. This delivery technique did prove its feasibility to limit the tumor motion during treatment delivery for all patients to a defined value while maintaining the accuracy and proved the applicability of the technique in a conventional clinical schedule.

  3. Utility estimation of the application of auditory-visual-tactile sense feedback in respiratory gated radiation therapy

    Jo, Jung Hun; KIm, Byeong Jin; Roh, Shi Won; Lee, Hyeon Chan; Jang, Hyeong Jun; Kim, Hoi Nam; Song, Jae Hoon; Kim, Young Jae

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to optimize the gated treatment delivery time and maintenance of stable respiratory by the introduction of breath with the assistance of auditory-visual-tactile sense. The experimenter's respiration were measured by ANZAI 4D system. We obtained natural breathing signal, monitor-induced breathing signal, monitor and ventilator-induced breathing signal, and breath-hold signal using real time monitor during 10 minutes beam-on-time. In order to check the stability of respiratory signals distributed in each group were compared with means, standard deviation, variation value, beam t ime of the respiratory signal. The stability of each respiratory was measured in consideration of deviation change studied in each respiratory time lapse. As a result of an analysis of respiratory signal, all experimenters has showed that breathing signal used both Real time monitor and Ventilator was the most stable and shortest time. In this study, it was evaluated that respiratory gated radiation therapy with auditory-visual-tactual sense and without auditory-visual-tactual sense feedback. The study showed that respiratory gated radiation therapy delivery time could significantly be improved by the application of video feedback when this is combined with audio-tactual sense assistance. This delivery technique did prove its feasibility to limit the tumor motion during treatment delivery for all patients to a defined value while maintaining the accuracy and proved the applicability of the technique in a conventional clinical schedule

  4. Silica aerogel radiator for use in the A-RICH system utilized in the Belle II experiment

    Tabata, Makoto; Adachi, Ichiro; Hamada, Nao; Hara, Koji; Iijima, Toru; Iwata, Shuichi; Kakuno, Hidekazu; Kawai, Hideyuki; Korpar, Samo; Križan, Peter; Kumita, Tetsuro; Nishida, Shohei; Ogawa, Satoru; Pestotnik, Rok; Šantelj, Luka; Seljak, Andrej; Sumiyoshi, Takayuki; Tahirović, Elvedin; Yoshida, Keisuke; Yusa, Yosuke

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents recent progress in the development and mass production of large-area hydrophobic silica aerogels for use as radiators in the aerogel-based ring-imaging Cherenkov (A-RICH) counter, which will be installed in the forward end cap of the Belle II detector. The proximity-focusing A-RICH system is especially designed to identify charged kaons and pions. The refractive index of the installed aerogel Cherenkov radiators is approximately 1.05, and we aim for a separation capability exceeding 4σ at momenta up to 4 GeV/c. Large-area aerogel tiles (over 18×18×2 cm3) were first fabricated in test productions by pin drying in addition to conventional methods. We proposed to fill the large end-cap region (area 3.5 m2) with 124 water-jet-trimmed fan-shaped dual-layer-focusing aerogel combinations of different refractive indices (1.045 and 1.055). Guided by the test production results, we decided to manufacture aerogels by the conventional method and are currently proceeding with mass production. In an electron beam test undertaken at the DESY, we confirmed that the K/π separation capability of a prototype A-RICH counter exceeded 4σ at 4 GeV/c.

  5. AFSC/RACE/GAP: RACE Groundfish Survey Photo Database

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The core function of the Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering (RACE) Groundfish Assessment Program (GAP) is to conduct quantitative fishery surveys and...

  6. Measures for radiation prevention and remediation of islightly radioactive contaminated sites by phytoremediation and subsequent utilization of the loaded plant residues (PHYTOREST). Final report

    Willscher, Sabine; Werner, Peter; Jablonski, Lukasz; Wittig, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    In the presented scientific research project, the radiation protection of soil surfaces impacted by former industrial utilization or mining was investigated. This radiation protection of the contaminated soil surfaces was carried out by bioremediation techniques. The soil surfaces include larger agricultural or forestry areas useful for the production of sustainable plant-based raw materials and renewable energies. The contaminated areas show a positive climatic water balance with a subsequent impact of SM/R contaminants onto the adjacent ground water. During this scientific research project, the introduction of sustainable, biosphere conserving methods for a long-term remediation of slightly to moderately HM/R- contaminated areas was investigated; these areas are characterized by a radiotoxic amplifying potential due to a continued occurrence of radionuclides and heavy metals/ metalloids. The insights into transfer processes from the soil substrate over the mediating soil water phase and by microbes into the plant roots, into the shoots and the leaves of the plants represent necessary requirements for the control of SM/R transfer into the plants and its optimization. In this research project, considerable investigations were carried out for the understanding of binding of HM/R in the different plant compartments, also depending on different soil additives. The obtained first scientific results and their practical applicability were transformed onto experimental soil areas under natural field conditions. The transfer processes could be optimized and finally bioremediation efficiency could be enhanced due to the accompanying modifications (different soil additives of the field experiments). This new remediation method, further developed to a field application, represents a new tool for the stabilization / and extraction of HM/R on the field site and improves the efficiency of bioremediation processes. A pacification of the large areas with slightly to medium

  7. Race trouble: attending to race and racism in online interaction.

    Durrheim, Kevin; Greener, Ross; Whitehead, Kevin A

    2015-03-01

    This article advocates the concept of race trouble as a way of synthesizing variation in racial discourse, and as a way of studying how social interaction and institutional life continue to be organized by conceptions of 'race' and 'racism'. Our analysis of an online discussion at a South African University about the defensibility of a characterization of (black) student protesters as 'savages' revealed a number of familiar strategies: participants avoided explicit racism, denied racism, and denied racism on behalf of others. However, the aim of this analysis was not to identify the 'real' racism, but to show how race and racism were used in the interaction to develop perspectives on transformation in the institution, to produce social division in the University, and to create ambivalently racialized and racializing subject positions. We demonstrate how, especially through uses of deracialized discourse, participants' actions were observably shaped by the potential ways in which others could hear 'race' and 'racism'. Race trouble thus became manifest through racial suggestion, allusion, innuendo, and implication. We conclude with a call to social psychologists to study the ways in which meanings of 'race' and 'racism' are forged and contested in relation to each other. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  8. The 2009 Relay Race

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 CERN Relay Race was as popular as ever, with a record number of 88 teams competing. var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-0753-kbps-480x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-480x360.wmv', 'false', 288, 216, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-posterframe-480x360-at-10-percent.jpg', '1178303', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.mp4'); Even the rain didn’t dampen the spirits, and it still managed to capture the ‘festival feeling’ with live music, beer and stalls from various CERN clubs set up outside Restaurant 1. The Powercuts on the podium after win...

  9. The Rat Race

    Stephen Haywood

    Dear Muriel, Being an animal, you are probably more familiar with rats than most of us. Yet it seems to me that our Community (not just ATLAS) is stuck in a huge "rat race". I am somewhat mystified as to how we have got ourselves into this and I wonder whether you or your readers could explain this - I give my own observations below. In HEP and ATLAS specifically, we are all working long hours and we are all becoming exhausted. There are people at Point 1 who are working day and night, every day of the week; there are people writing software who send emails round the clock, including weekends. It is one thing to have bursts of activity which require us to put in some longer hours, but in ATLAS, the bursts last months or years. I have been on ATLAS 14 years and it has felt like one endless rush. Why do we do this? We are all highly motivated, we love our work and want to succeed individually and collectively. We are parts of various teams, and we do not want to let the side down. We worked hard at school an...

  10. Technology and the arms race

    MacKenzie, D.

    1988-01-01

    This article makes a review of the book Innovation and the Arms Race: How the United States and the Soviet Union Develop New Military Technologies written by Matthew Evangelista. For at least the last two decades, scholars have struggled to come to grips with the role of technological change in the arms race. Possible relationships between theories on technology and politics are examined. The contrasts between U.S. and Soviet approaches are highlighted

  11. Utilization of ultraviolet radiation in effluent disinfestation of domestic waste treatment systems; Utilizacao da radiacao ultravioleta na desinfeccao de efluentes de sistemas de tratamento de esgotos domesticos

    Camacho, P.R.R. [Companhia de Tecnologia de Saneamento Ambiental, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Andrade e Silva, L.G. de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1995-12-31

    Ultraviolet radiation disinfection of Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Biodigestor (UASB) and UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluents is possible to be reached utilizing a single low pressure mercury lamp arc (15 W nominal power) in a shell tube flow through reactor (1.2 L useful volume). Fecal coliforms, total coliforms and colifages were used as microbiological parameters. For fecal coliforms, about 3 logarithmic units (log. un.) was removed from UASB with aerated lagoon pos-treatment effluent and 4 log. un. from UASB effluent with 7 and 30 seconds of hydraulic retention time, respectively. Good empirical correlations were obtained between microbiological parameters and hydraulic retention times. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs.

  12. Utilization of ionizing radiation to obtention of polymeric supports for the enzyme immobilization with clinical potential use

    Rodas, Andrea Cecilia Dorion

    1997-01-01

    In the development of polymers with biological activity, it was studied the grafting of acrylic acid monomer onto polyethylene and polypropylene pellets by mutual radiation grafting technique. The effect of dose rate, irradiation total dose, and monomer concentration were studied. With the Pp pellets the best grafting yield occurred at dose rate of 0.25 kGy/h and with the PE pellets the dose rate was lower. The irradiation dose from 8 to 10 kGy was sufficient to obtain the highest grafting degree, and the AA concentration of 40% v/v was suitable. The graft of poly (acrylic acid) was chemically modified for the immobilization of two enzymes, the glucose oxidase and the urease. For both enzymes the increasing of grafting degree onto the pellets, increased the enzyme immobilization yield. The immobilized glucose oxidase showed the best activity when immobilized onto Pp-A A supports with grafting degree around 2%. The optimum p H and temperature profiles, and the Km and Vmax for free and immobilized enzyme were determined. The supports grafted with A A were not suitable for the chemical immobilization of urease. (author)

  13. Utilization of rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite

    Ferro, Waldir Pedro

    2009-01-01

    In order to improve the dimensional stability, as well as, electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of polymers, new filler to this purpose has been developed. The mos applied filler to propitiate the features previously mentioned are the glass and carbon fibers, the mineral filler as the calcium carbonate, the talc and the micro glass sphere. The main aim of this work was to study the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 and ionizing radiation effect studies on this composite, irradiated by electron beam at different doses, since it is constituted of at least 90% of silicon dioxide, and compared with the talc which is the most applied mineral filler. This comparison was made from a compound made through the refined rice husk ash and the polyamide 6 (PA 6), which is one of the main engineering plastic with applications in several productive areas. The samples were injected and irradiated in a electron accelerator. Afterwards, their mechanical and thermal properties were measured. It was also inject automotive parts to verify the processing of the PA 6 with CCA. The results showed that the use of the rice husk ash as filler for polyamide 6 composite is technically and economically viable. The irradiation of the studied composite (PA 6 with 30% of rice husk ash) did not provide any improvement for the mechanical and thermal properties previously appraised. (author)

  14. Report of the 1st RCM on Radiation Curing of Composites for Enhancing the Features and Utility in Health Care and Industry. Working Material

    2011-01-01

    Composite materials combine properties of the individual components in a synergetic manner to produce a variety of materials in an efficient and cost effective manner. Thus, composite materials today are being used in various applications from sports equipment, automotive and aerospace industries to food packaging and artificial organs. Materials reinforced with nanoscale components are adding new dimensions to composite materials and enable further major improvements in functional and structural properties. The incorporation of only a few percent of nano-sized particles can make dramatic property changes that may result in sensing, actualization or self-healing properties of the resulting composite. Several major issues need to be addressed to utilize the full potential of such nanofillers, and among them: (i) incompatibility or weak interfacial bonding between the matrix and the nanoscale component, and (ii) agglomeration of nanosized component during processing resulting in inhomogeneous distribution. According to the results of ongoing investigation and products preparation in several Member States institutions, radiation technology offers a way of overcoming these challenges by grafting of appropriate monomers/polymers onto the nanofiller surface thereby fixing their morphology and at the same time making them compatible with the host polymer. Additionally, radiation techniques offer the possibility for simultaneous synthesis of the nanoparticle component and crosslinking of the matrix of the composite that is not possible to achieve by other techniques. With the availability of lower cost self-shielded low energy electron beam accelerators, this process is increasingly becoming available for developing member states. In order to use the advantages of radiation techniques and address the needs of Member States for producing advanced composite materials, this CRP has been formulated based on the recommendations of the Consultant’s Meeting “meeting on “Radiation

  15. Report of the 1st RCM on Radiation Curing of Composites for Enhancing the Features and Utility in Health Care and Industry. Working Material

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    Composite materials combine properties of the individual components in a synergetic manner to produce a variety of materials in an efficient and cost effective manner. Thus, composite materials today are being used in various applications from sports equipment, automotive and aerospace industries to food packaging and artificial organs. Materials reinforced with nanoscale components are adding new dimensions to composite materials and enable further major improvements in functional and structural properties. The incorporation of only a few percent of nano-sized particles can make dramatic property changes that may result in sensing, actualization or self-healing properties of the resulting composite. Several major issues need to be addressed to utilize the full potential of such nanofillers, and among them: (i) incompatibility or weak interfacial bonding between the matrix and the nanoscale component, and (ii) agglomeration of nanosized component during processing resulting in inhomogeneous distribution. According to the results of ongoing investigation and products preparation in several Member States institutions, radiation technology offers a way of overcoming these challenges by grafting of appropriate monomers/polymers onto the nanofiller surface thereby fixing their morphology and at the same time making them compatible with the host polymer. Additionally, radiation techniques offer the possibility for simultaneous synthesis of the nanoparticle component and crosslinking of the matrix of the composite that is not possible to achieve by other techniques. With the availability of lower cost self-shielded low energy electron beam accelerators, this process is increasingly becoming available for developing member states. In order to use the advantages of radiation techniques and address the needs of Member States for producing advanced composite materials, this CRP has been formulated based on the recommendations of the Consultant’s Meeting “meeting on “Radiation

  16. Radiation protection of radioactively contaminated large areas by phytoremediation and subsequent utilization of the contaminated plant residues (PHYTOREST)

    Mirgorodsky, Daniel; Ollivier, Delphine; Merten, Dirk; Bergmann, Hans; Buechel, Georg; Willscher, Sabine; Wittig, Juliane; Jablonski, Lukasz; Werner, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Much progress has been achieved over the past 20 years in remediating sites contaminated by heavy metal. However, very large contaminated areas have presented major problems to this day because of remediation costs. Phytoremediation is a new, emerging, sustainable technique of remediating areas with low heavy-metal contamination. One advantage of phytoremediation is the comparatively low cost of the process, which may make it usable also on large areas with low levels of contamination. Besides extracting and immobilizing metals, respectively, phytoremediation among other things also contributes to improving soil quality in terms of physics, chemistry, and ecology. Consequently, phytoremediation offers a great potential for the future. Research into phytoremediation of an area contaminated by heavy metals and radionuclides is carried out on a site in a former uranium mining district in Eastern Thuringia jointly by the Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, and the Technical University of Dresden in a project funded by the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research. The project serves to promote the introduction of soft, biocompatible methods of long-term remediation and to develop conceptual solutions to the subsequent utilization of contaminated plant residues. Optimizing area management is in the focus of phytoremediation studies. (orig.)

  17. A novel method of utilization of hot dip galvanizing slag using the heat waste from itself for protection from radiation.

    Dong, Mengge; Xue, Xiangxin; Kumar, Ashok; Yang, He; Sayyed, M I; Liu, Shan; Bu, Erjun

    2018-02-15

    A novel, unconventional, low cost, eco-friendly and effective shielding materials have been made utilizing the hot dip galvanizing slag using the heat waste from itself, thereby saving the natural resources and preventing the environmental pollution. SEM-EDS of shielding materials indicates that the other elements are distributed in Zn element. The mass attenuation properties of shielding materials were measured using a narrow beam geometrical setup at 0.662MeV, 1.17MeV and 1.33MeV. The half value thickness layer, effective atomic number, and electron density were used to analyze the shielding performance of the materials. The EBFs and EABFs for the prepared shielding materials were also studied with incident photon energy for penetration depths upto 40mfp. The shielding effectiveness has been compared with lead, iron, zinc, some standard shielding concretes, different glasses and some alloys. The shielding effectiveness of the prepared samples is almost found comparable to iron, zinc, selected alloys and glasses while better than some standard shielding concretes. In addition, it is also found that the bending strength of all shielding materials is more than 110MPa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Utilizing Monte-Carlo radiation transport and spallation cross sections to estimate nuclide dependent scaling with altitude

    Argento, D.; Reedy, R. C.; Stone, J.

    2010-12-01

    Cosmogenic Nuclides (CNs) are a critical new tool for geomorphology, allowing researchers to date Earth surface events and measure process rates [1]. Prior to CNs, many of these events and processes had no absolute method for measurement and relied entirely on relative methods [2]. Continued improvements in CN methods are necessary for expanding analytic capability in geomorphology. In the last two decades, significant progress has been made in refining these methods and reducing analytic uncertainties [1,3]. Calibration data and scaling methods are being developed to provide a self consistent platform for use in interpreting nuclide concentration values into geologic data [4]. However, nuclide dependent scaling has been difficult to address due to analytic uncertainty and sparseness in altitude transects. Artificial target experiments are underway, but these experiments take considerable time for nuclide buildup in lower altitudes. In this study, a Monte Carlo method radiation transport code, MCNPX, is used to model the galactic cosmic-ray radiation impinging on the upper atmosphere and track the resulting secondary particles through a model of the Earth’s atmosphere and lithosphere. To address the issue of nuclide dependent scaling, the neutron flux values determined by the MCNPX simulation are folded in with estimated cross-section values [5,6]. Preliminary calculations indicate that scaling of nuclide production potential in free air seems to be a function of both altitude and nuclide production pathway. At 0 g/cm2 (sea-level) all neutron spallation pathways have attenuation lengths within 1% of 130 g/cm2. However, the differences in attenuation length are exacerbated with increasing altitude. At 530 g/cm2 atmospheric height (~5,500 m), the apparent attenuation lengths for aggregate SiO2(n,x)10Be, aggregate SiO2(n,x)14C and K(n,x)36Cl become 149.5 g/cm2, 151 g/cm2 and 148 g/cm2 respectively. At 700 g/cm2 atmospheric height (~8,400m - close to the highest

  19. Race and Raceness: A Theoretical Perspective of the Black American Experience.

    Wade, Jacqueline E.

    1987-01-01

    Gives a theoretical perspective of the multidimensional nature of Black-race/White-race consciousness. American perceptions of race are expressed in White race centeredness. Blacks face the dilemma of adhering to two sets of values: a positive valuation of their race and a necessity of passing in White society. (PS)

  20. Recognition of Own-Race and Other-Race Faces by Three-Month-Old Infants

    Sangrigoli, Sandy; De Schonen, Scania

    2004-01-01

    Background: People are better at recognizing faces of their own race than faces of another race. Such race specificity may be due to differential expertise in the two races. Method: In order to find out whether this other-race effect develops as early as face-recognition skills or whether it is a long-term effect of acquired expertise, we tested…

  1. Utility of Normal Tissue-to-Tumor {alpha}/{beta} Ratio When Evaluating Isodoses of Isoeffective Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Jin Jianyue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Chang, Albert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve a better understanding of the effect of the number of fractions on normal tissue sparing for equivalent tumor control in radiation therapy plans by using equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) isoeffect calculations. Methods and Materials: The simple linear quadratic (LQ) model was assumed to be valid up to 10 Gy per fraction. Using the model, we formulated a well-known mathematical equality for the tumor prescription dose and probed and solved a second mathematical problem for normal tissue isoeffect. That is, for a given arbitrary relative isodose distribution (treatment plan in percentages), 2 isoeffective tumor treatment regimens (N fractions of the dose D and n fractions of the dose d) were denoted, which resulted in the same BED (corresponding to 100% prescription isodose). Given these situations, the LQ model was further exploited to mathematically establish a unique relative isodose level, z (%), for the same arbitrary treatment plan, where the BED to normal tissues was also isoeffective for both fractionation regimens. Results: For the previously stated problem, the relative isodose level z (%), where the BEDs to the normal tissue were also equal, was defined by the normal tissue {alpha}/{beta} ratio divided by the tumor {alpha}/{beta} times 100%. Fewer fractions offers a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue located outside the isodose surface, z, whereas more fractions offer a therapeutic advantage for those portions of the normal tissue within the isodose surface, z. Conclusions: Relative isodose-based treatment plan evaluations may be useful for comparing isoeffective tumor regimens in terms of normal tissue effects. Regions of tissues that would benefit from hypofractionation or standard fractionation can be identified.

  2. IEEE Committee on Man and Radiation--COMAR technical information statement radiofrequency safety and utility Smart Meters.

    Bushberg, Jerrold T; Foster, Kenneth R; Hatfield, James B; Thansandote, Arthur; Tell, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    This Technical Information Statement describes Smart Meter technology as used with modern electric power metering systems and focuses on the radio frequency (RF) emissions associated with their operation relative to human RF exposure limits. Smart Meters typically employ low power (-1 W or less) transmitters that wirelessly send electric energy usage data to the utility company several times per day in the form of brief, pulsed emissions in the unlicensed frequency bands of 902-928 MHz and 2.4-2.48 GHz or on other nearby frequencies. Most Smart Meters operate as wireless mesh networks where each Smart Meter can communicate with other neighboring meters to relay data to a data collection point in the region. This communication process includes RF emissions from Smart Meters representing energy usage as well as the relaying of data from other meters and emissions associated with maintaining the meter's hierarchy within the wireless network. As a consequence, most Smart Meters emit RF pulses throughout the day, more at certain times and less at others. However, the duty cycle associated with all of these emissions is very small, typically less than 1%, and most of the time far less than 1%, meaning that most Smart Meters actually transmit RF fields for only a few minutes per day at most. The low peak power of Smart Meters and the very low duty cycles lead to the fact that accessible RF fields near Smart Meters are far below both U.S. and international RF safety limits whether judged on the basis of instantaneous peak power densities or time-averaged exposures. This conclusion holds for Smart Meters alone or installed in large banks of meters.

  3. Race to the finish

    Murphy, D.

    1981-01-01

    An organised study of the nuclear power controversy is presented. Chapter headings are: in the beginning was the bomb (development of nuclear controversy); Murphy's Law at Three Mile Island (detailed account of accident to Three Mile Island-2 reactor); econuts and loose screws (organization of anti-nuclear demonstrations); further aspects of human frailty (nuclear incidents and possible hazards in USA, UK and France; government policies, nuclear controversy and sociology); how irradiated can you get (radiation hazards); what is MUF and where is it (proliferation); MAD (mutual assured destruction; nuclear arms and war); yesterday's men. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    Rotblat, J.

    1986-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios; biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    Rotblat, J.

    1981-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios); biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (U.K.)

  6. The utility and cost-effectiveness of serial complete blood count monitoring in patients receiving radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    Blank, Kenneth; Cascardi, Michelle; Kao, Gary D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: It has been a standard practice in our department to monitor weekly complete blood counts (CBC) in patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy for prostate cancer. The utility and cost-effectiveness of this practice has not been analyzed. Material and Methods: We analyzed 1572 separate CBCs performed on 110 consecutive outpatients treated at the Veterans Administration Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA from June 1994 to June 1996 for localized prostate cancer. 92 of these patients fulfilled the study inclusion criteria of blood counts on at least four different weeks of treatment, a baseline hemoglobin (pretreatment or week one of radiation therapy), and at least one CBC after week four. Complete data was subjected to chi-square statistical analysis of factors including age, field size, concomitant hormonal therapy and the presence of hypertension or diabetes. Results: The mean hemoglobin level at the beginning of treatment of was 13.2 grams/dl (gms) and mean change in hemoglobin from baseline to the last week of treatment was - 0.53 gms (range +2.0 to -3.5 gm). No patients required blood transfusion or erythropoeitin treatment, and only five patients experienced declines of >2.0 gms (-2.1, -2.3, -2.5, -2.9 and -3.5). Two of these patients sustained the hemoglobin declines concomitantly with congestive heart failure requiring intensive care unit admission (suggesting fluid overload). The hemoglobin level in the remaining patients has returned to normal without treatment by one month after the end of radiation. No significant differences were found between the group of patients that dropped more than 1.0 gm (n=34) and the group that did not (n = 58) in field size (p0.08), presence of diabetes (p= 0.48) or hypertension (p= 0.43), concurrent or prior hormone therapy (p= 0.37), or age (p=0.83). No consistent trends in white blood cell or platelet counts could be detected during radiation and no patients had white blood cells counts fall below 2000/mm

  7. Expected utility without utility

    Castagnoli, E.; Licalzi, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper advances an interpretation of Von Neumann–Morgenstern’s expected utility model for preferences over lotteries which does not require the notion of a cardinal utility over prizes and can be phrased entirely in the language of probability. According to it, the expected utility of a lottery can be read as the probability that this lottery outperforms another given independent lottery. The implications of this interpretation for some topics and models in decision theory are considered....

  8. Predictive Modeling in Race Walking

    Krzysztof Wiktorowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of linear and nonlinear multivariable models as tools to support training process of race walkers. These models are calculated using data collected from race walkers’ training events and they are used to predict the result over a 3 km race based on training loads. The material consists of 122 training plans for 21 athletes. In order to choose the best model leave-one-out cross-validation method is used. The main contribution of the paper is to propose the nonlinear modifications for linear models in order to achieve smaller prediction error. It is shown that the best model is a modified LASSO regression with quadratic terms in the nonlinear part. This model has the smallest prediction error and simplified structure by eliminating some of the predictors.

  9. Social Influence on Observed Race

    Zsófia Boda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a novel theoretical approach for understanding racial fluidity, emphasizing the social embeddedness of racial classifications. We propose that social ties affect racial perceptions through within-group micromechanisms, resulting in discrepancies between racial self-identifications and race as classified by others. We demonstrate this empirically on data from 12 Hungarian high school classes with one minority group (the Roma using stochastic actor-oriented models for the analysis of social network panel data. We find strong evidence for social influence: individuals tend to accept their peers' judgement about another student’s racial category; opinions of friends have a larger effect than those of nonfriends. Perceived social position also matters: those well-accepted among majority-race peers are likely to be classified as majority students themselves. We argue that similar analyses in other social contexts shall lead to a better understanding of race and interracial processes.

  10. CERN Road Race | 1 October

    Klaus Hanke

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 1 October at 18:15.   The 5.5 km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter for free and each child will receive a medal. More information, and the online entry form, can be fo...

  11. Nuclear Arms Race and Environment

    Li, Anpeng

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new factor, environment, into nuclear arms race model. In this model, nuclear weapons produce larger defense power compared with conventional arms, but hurt the environment meanwhile. In the global welfare maximum level, both conventional and nuclear weapons budget are zero. However, the competitive equilibrium may not achieve the optimum. I give the condition to jump out of the prisoner's dilemma.

  12. CERN Road Race | 7 October

    Klaus Hanke, CERN Running Club

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday, 7 October at 6.15 p.m.   The 5.5 km race takes place over three laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 minutes to over 34 minutes. The race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all the runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over one lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judging best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by the registration fee of 10 CHF. Children are free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and t...

  13. Utility of the inspiratory phase in high-resolution computed tomography evaluations of pediatric patients with bronchiolitis obliterans after allogeneic bone marrow transplant: reducing patient radiation exposure

    Togni Filho, Paulo Henrique; Casagrande, Joao Luiz Marin; Lederman, Henrique Manoel, E-mail: paulotognifilho@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. of Diagnostico por Imagem; Universidade de Sao Paulo (InRad/HC/FMUSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Instituto de Radiologia

    2017-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of the inspiratory phase in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest for the diagnosis of post-bone marrow transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study. We selected patients of either gender who underwent bone marrow transplantation and chest HRCT between March 1, 2002 and December 12, 2014. Ages ranged from 3 months to 20.7 years. We included all examinations in which the HRCT was performed appropriately. The examinations were read by two radiologists, one with extensive experience in pediatric radiology and another in the third year of residency, who determined the presence or absence of the following imaging features: air trapping, bronchiectasis, alveolar opacities, nodules, and atelectasis. Results: A total of 222 examinations were evaluated (mean, 5.4 ± 4.5 examinations per patient). The expiratory phase findings were comparable to those obtained in the inspiratory phase, except in one patient, in whom a small uncharacteristic nodule was identified only in the inspiratory phase. Air trapping was identified in a larger number of scans in the expiratory phase than in the inspiratory phase, as was atelectasis, although the difference was statistically significant only for air trapping. Conclusion: In children being evaluated for post-bone marrow transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans, the inspiratory phase can be excluded from the chest HRCT protocol, thus reducing by half the radiation exposure in this population. (author)

  14. Utility of the inspiratory phase in high-resolution computed tomography evaluations of pediatric patients with bronchiolitis obliterans after allogeneic bone marrow transplant: reducing patient radiation exposure

    Togni Filho, Paulo Henrique; Casagrande, Joao Luiz Marin; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Universidade de Sao Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of the inspiratory phase in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the chest for the diagnosis of post-bone marrow transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study. We selected patients of either gender who underwent bone marrow transplantation and chest HRCT between March 1, 2002 and December 12, 2014. Ages ranged from 3 months to 20.7 years. We included all examinations in which the HRCT was performed appropriately. The examinations were read by two radiologists, one with extensive experience in pediatric radiology and another in the third year of residency, who determined the presence or absence of the following imaging features: air trapping, bronchiectasis, alveolar opacities, nodules, and atelectasis. Results: A total of 222 examinations were evaluated (mean, 5.4 ± 4.5 examinations per patient). The expiratory phase findings were comparable to those obtained in the inspiratory phase, except in one patient, in whom a small uncharacteristic nodule was identified only in the inspiratory phase. Air trapping was identified in a larger number of scans in the expiratory phase than in the inspiratory phase, as was atelectasis, although the difference was statistically significant only for air trapping. Conclusion: In children being evaluated for post-bone marrow transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans, the inspiratory phase can be excluded from the chest HRCT protocol, thus reducing by half the radiation exposure in this population. (author)

  15. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  16. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting colorectal cancer or dying from colorectal cancer varies by race ...

  17. The Spectre of Race in American Medicine

    Fofana, Mariam O.

    2013-01-01

    Controversies and debates surrounding race have long been a fixture in American medicine. In the past, the biological concept of race—the idea that race is biologically determined and meaningful—has served to justify the institution of slavery and the conduct of unethical research trials. Although these days may seem far behind, contemporary debates over the race-specific approval of drugs and the significance of genetic differences are evidence that race still yields tremendous influence on ...

  18. Reviews Equipment: Time Trial R/C Race Track Timer Book: A Universe from Nothing Equipment: Locktronics Electronics, Magnestism and Materials Unit Report: Nuclear Physics and Technology Book: Particle Physics Booklet: Radiation and You Book: The Million Death Quake Web Watch

    2013-03-01

    WE RECOMMEND Locktronics Electronics, Magnestism and Materials Unit Robust, reliable and proven classroom kit The Million Death Quake: the Science of Predicting the Earth's Deadliest Natural Disaster Accessible and well-written book covers everything you might (and perhaps should) want to know about earthquakes WORTH A LOOK Time Trial R/C Race Track Timer Fun kit for use with toy cars but little flexibility for other uses A Universe From Nothing: Why There is Something Rather Than Nothing Up-to-date account of cosmology explains very well but becomes polemical and loses focus Nuclear physics and technology—inside the atom IOP report useful for students considering a career in physics Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction Passages of good writing undermined by editing as the structure and illustrations disappoint Radiation and You Report is an interesting insight into radiation information from 25 years back, but some errors and a slow start let it down WEB WATCH App that aids star identification is highly recommended and videos for students and teachers also make the grade

  19. Children's Attitudes toward Race and Gender.

    Warner, Juliet L.

    An implicit assumption in the majority of literature looking at development of prejudice in children is that race prejudice and sex prejudice are equivalent across groups; that is, sex bias is not conditional on race, and likewise race bias is not conditional on sex bias of the child. However, Warner, Fishbein, Ritchey and Case (2001) found strong…

  20. Researching Race within Educational Psychology Contexts

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Schutz, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we question why race as a sociohistorical construct has not traditionally been investigated in educational psychology research. To do so, we provide a historical discussion of the significance of race as well as present current dilemmas in the exploration of race, including an examination of the incidence and prevalence of…

  1. Students To Race Solar-Powered Vehicles

    4 1999 — Middle school students from across the state next week will race model solar cars designed Race Solar-Powered Vehicles For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., May 12 inches high. The 20-meter race is a double elimination competition with awards going to the five

  2. Simple model of the arms race

    Zane, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    A simple model of a two-party arms race is developed based on the principle that the race will continue so long as either side can unleash an effective first strike against the other side. The model is used to examine how secrecy, the ABM, MIRV-ing, and an MX system affect the arms race

  3. Chaotic evolution of arms races

    Tomochi, Masaki; Kono, Mitsuo

    1998-12-01

    A new set of model equations is proposed to describe the evolution of the arms race, by extending Richardson's model with special emphases that (1) power dependent defensive reaction or historical enmity could be a motive force to promote armaments, (2) a deterrent would suppress the growth of armaments, and (3) the defense reaction of one nation against the other nation depends nonlinearly on the difference in armaments between two. The set of equations is numerically solved to exhibit stationary, periodic, and chaotic behavior depending on the combinations of parameters involved. The chaotic evolution is realized when the economic situation of each country involved in the arms race is quite different, which is often observed in the real world.

  4. The spectre of race in American medicine.

    Fofana, Mariam O

    2013-12-01

    Controversies and debates surrounding race have long been a fixture in American medicine. In the past, the biological concept of race-the idea that race is biologically determined and meaningful-has served to justify the institution of slavery and the conduct of unethical research trials. Although these days may seem far behind, contemporary debates over the race-specific approval of drugs and the significance of genetic differences are evidence that race still yields tremendous influence on medical research and clinical practice. In many ways, the use of race in medicine today reflects the internalisation of racial hierarchies borne out of the history of slavery and state-mandated segregation, and there is still much uncertainty over its benefits and harms. Although using race in research can help elucidate disparities, the reflexive use of race as a variable runs the risk of reifying the biological concept of race and blinding researchers to important underlying factors such as socioeconomic status. Similarly, in clinical practice, the use of race in assessing a patient's risk of certain conditions (eg, sickle cell) turns harmful when the heuristic becomes a rule. Through selected historical and contemporary examples, I aim to show how the biological concept of race that gave rise to past abuses remains alive and harmful, and propose changes in medical education as a potential solution. By learning from the past, today's physicians will be better armed to discern-and correct-the ways in which contemporary medicine perpetuates historical injustices.

  5. Race and Subprime Loan Pricing

    Hernandez, Ruben; Owyang, Michael; Ghent, Andra

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate whether race and ethnicity influenced subprime loan pricing during 2005, the peak of the subprime mortgage expansion. We combine loan-level data on the performance of non-prime securitized mortgages with individual- and neighborhood-level data on racial and ethnic characteristics for metropolitan areas in California and Florida. Using a model of rate determination that accounts for predicted loan performance, we evaluate the presence of disparate impact and dispar...

  6. Race categorization and the regulation of business and science.

    Lee, Catherine; Skrentny, John D

    2010-01-01

    Despite the lack of consensus regarding the meaning or significance of race or ethnicity amongst scientists and the lay public, there are legal requirements and guidelines that dictate the collection of racial and ethnic data across a range of institutions. Legal regulations are typically created through a political process and then face varying kinds of resistance when the state tries to implement them. We explore the nature of this opposition by comparing responses from businesses, scientists, and science-oriented businesses (pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies) to U.S. state regulations that used politically derived racial categorizations, originally created to pursue civil rights goals. We argue that insights from cultural sociology regarding institutional and cultural boundaries can aid understanding of the nature of resistance to regulation. The Food and Drug Administration's guidelines for research by pharmaceutical companies imposed race categories on science-based businesses, leading to objections that emphasized the autonomy and validity of science. In contrast, similar race categories regulating first business by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and later scientific research sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) encountered little challenge. We argue that pharmaceutical companies had the motive (profit) that NIH-supported scientists lacked and a legitimate discourse (boundary work of science) that businesses regulated by the EEOC did not have. The study suggests the utility of a comparative cultural sociology of the politics of legal regulation, particularly when understanding race-related regulation and the importance of examining legal regulations for exploring how the meaning of race or ethnicity are contested and constructed in law.

  7. Arms races between and within species.

    Dawkins, R; Krebs, J R

    1979-09-21

    An adaptation in one lineage (e.g. predators) may change the selection pressure on another lineage (e.g. prey), giving rise to a counter-adaptation. If this occurs reciprocally, an unstable runaway escalation or 'arms race' may result. We discuss various factors which might give one side an advantage in an arms race. For example, a lineage under strong selection may out-evolve a weakly selected one (' the life-dinner principle'). We then classify arms races in two independent ways. They may be symmetric or asymmetric, and they may be interspecific or intraspecific. Our example of an asymmetric interspecific arms race is that between brood parasites and their hosts. The arms race concept may help to reduce the mystery of why cuckoo hosts are so good at detecting cuckoo eggs, but so bad at detecting cuckoo nestlings. The evolutionary contest between queen and worker ants over relative parental investment is a good example of an intraspecific asymmetric arms race. Such cases raise special problems because the participants share the same gene pool. Interspecific symmetric arms races are unlikely to be important, because competitors tend to diverge rather than escalate competitive adaptations. Intraspecific symmetric arms races, exemplified by adaptations for male-male competition, may underlie Cope's Rule and even the extinction of lineages. Finally we consider ways in which arms races can end. One lineage may drive the other to extinction; one may reach an optimum, thereby preventing the other from doing so; a particularly interesting possibility, exemplified by flower-bee coevolution, is that both sides may reach a mutual local optimum; lastly, arms races may have no stable and but may cycle continuously. We do not wish necessarily to suggest that all, or even most, evolutionary change results from arms races, but we do suggest that the arms race concept may help to resolve three long-standing questions in evolutionary theory.

  8. Ground effect aerodynamics of racing cars

    Zhang, Xin; Toet, Willem; Zerihan, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We review the progress made during the last thirty years on ground effect aerodynamics associated with race cars, in particular open wheel race cars. Ground effect aerodynamics of race cars is concerned with generating downforce, principally via low pressure on the surfaces nearest to the ground. The “ground effected” parts of an open wheeled car's aerodynamics are the most aerodynamically efficient and contribute less drag than that associated with, for example, an upper rear wing. Whilst dr...

  9. Pareto utility

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  10. Attending to the role of race/ethnicity in family violence research.

    Malley-Morrison, Kathleen; Hines, Denise A

    2007-08-01

    Since the 1970s, researchers and public health and/or social policy communities have devoted increasing attention to family violence. Although officially reported crime figures for family violence appear to be declining, rates continue to be high in broadly defined racial and/or ethnic minority groups. More careful assessments of the potential role of race/ethnicity in family violence, and similarities and differences occurring across and within groups categorized based on race/ethnicity, are essential if adequate interventions are to be developed and utilized. This article provides suggestions on conducting better studies on family violence in the United States, particularly with respect to issues of race/ethnicity. The authors begin by considering conceptions and definitions of race/ethnicity and providing a broad definition of family violence. They then suggest issues for consideration at each stage of the research process, from reviewing previous research, to making methodological decisions, selecting samples, choosing measures, and analyzing and interpreting findings.

  11. Ultracold fermion race is on

    Hulet, R.

    1999-01-01

    At the quantum level, particles behave very differently depending on whether their spin angular momentum is an integer or a half-integer. Half-integer spin particles are known as fermions, and include all the constituents of atoms: electrons, protons and neutrons. Bosons, on the other hand, are particles with integer spin, such as photons. Atoms are fermions if they are composed of an odd number of particles, like helium-3 or lithium-6. If they have an even number of constituents, like hydrogen, helium-4 or lithium-7, they are known as bosons. Fermions and bosons behave in profoundly different ways under certain conditions, especially at low temperatures. Four years ago, physicists created a Bose condensate, a quantum degenerate gas of bosons. Now the race is on to do the same with fermions. Deborah Jin's group at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado has cooled a fermion gas to the lowest temperature yet (B DeMarco 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4208). And John Thomas and co-workers at Duke University have set a new record for the length of time that fermions can be trapped using lasers (K O'Hara 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4204). In this article the author describes the latest advances in the race to create a quantum degenerate gas of fermions. (UK)

  12. Elevating the Role of Race in Ethnographic Research: Navigating Race Relations in the Field

    Brown, Keffrelyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Little work in the social sciences or in the field of education has fully explored the methodological issues related to the study of race and racism, yet qualitative researchers acknowledge that race plays (and should play) a role in the research process. Indeed, race frames and informs the context, practices and perspectives of everyday lived…

  13. Debate: Race, Labour and the Archbishop, or the Currency of Race.

    Stanford, Jacqui

    2001-01-01

    Explores how race is exploited to serve political agendas in Britain, examining the Labour Government's orientation to race. Argues that the Labour Government manipulates issues to suggest concern while actually removing race from the policy agenda in education. Reflects on the Archbishop of Canterbury's "Jesus 2000" to support the…

  14. TU-CD-303-03: Localized Radiation Can Induce Systemic Anti-Cancer Immune and Non-Immune Responses and How We Might Utilize It

    Ahmed, M. [National Institutes of Health (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  15. TU-CD-303-03: Localized Radiation Can Induce Systemic Anti-Cancer Immune and Non-Immune Responses and How We Might Utilize It

    Ahmed, M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in cancer research have shed new light on the complex processes of how therapeutic radiation initiates changes at cellular, tissue, and system levels that may lead to clinical effects. These new advances may transform the way we use radiation to combat certain types of cancers. For the past two decades many technological advancements in radiation therapy have been largely based on the hypothesis that direct radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks cause cell death and thus tumor control and normal tissue damage. However, new insights have elucidated that in addition to causing cellular DNA damage, localized therapeutic radiation also initiates cascades of complex downstream biological responses in tissue that extend far beyond where therapeutic radiation dose is directly deposited. For instance, studies show that irradiated dying tumor cells release tumor antigens that can lead the immune system to a systemic anti-cancer attack throughout the body of cancer patient; targeted irradiation to solid tumor also increases the migration of tumor cells already in bloodstream, the seeds of potential metastasis. Some of the new insights may explain the long ago discovered but still unexplained non-localized radiation effects (bystander effect and abscopal effect) and the efficacy of spatially fractionated radiation therapy (microbeam radiation therapy and GRID therapy) where many “hot” and “cold” spots are intentionally created throughout the treatment volume. Better understanding of the mechanisms behind the non-localized radiation effects creates tremendous opportunities to develop new and integrated cancer treatment strategies that are based on radiotherapy, immunology, and chemotherapy. However, in the multidisciplinary effort to advance new radiobiology, there are also tremendous challenges including a lack of multidisciplinary researchers and imaging technologies for the microscopic radiation-induced responses. A better grasp of the essence of

  16. Comprehension of radiation for RI license

    Guk, Jin Sun

    2005-08-01

    This book starts with theoretical nuclear energy which explains technical terms such as nuclear physics and chemistry, RI and utilization of radiation, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry, radiation biology. It also explains radiation measurements technology including radiation detector and measurements radiation measurements circuit, measuring of energy spectrum. Radiation protection monitoring for radiation protection. It deals with nuclear law, enforcement regulation and ordinance.

  17. Darwin on Race, Gender, and Culture

    Shields, Stephanie A.; Bhatia, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Darwin's theories of natural selection and sexual selection are significant scientific achievements, although his understanding of race and gender was defined and limited by his own life circumstances and the sociohistorical context within which he worked. This article considers the ways in which race, gender, and culture were represented and…

  18. The ploidy races of Atriplex confertifolia (chenopodiaceae)

    Stewart C. Sanderson

    2011-01-01

    Previous accounts of polyploidy in the North American salt desert shrub Atriplex confertifolia (shadscale) have dealt with the distribution of polyploidy and the morphological and secondary chemical differences between races. The present study amplifies these studies and reveals additional ploidy-flavonoid races, with ploidy levels known to extend from 2x to 12x, and...

  19. "Egg Races" and Other Practical Challenges

    Auty, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    This article presents ideas behind science and technology challenges and shares experiences of "egg races." Different challenges were set, but there was always the need to transport an egg across some obstacle course without breaking it. It was so popular in the 1980s that the term "egg race" came to mean any kind of simple…

  20. Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    ... the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both Men and Women” Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All Cancers Combined Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: ...

  1. Another Inconvenient Truth: Race and Ethnicity Matter

    Hawley, Willis D.; Nieto, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to maximizing learning opportunities and outcomes for students from racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds, race and ethnicity matter: They affect how students respond to instruction and curriculum, and they influence teachers' assumptions about how students learn. Effective implementation of race- and ethnicity-responsive…

  2. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011, but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac biomarkers: creatin kinase (CK, creating kinase midbrain (CK-MB, myoglobin (MYO, highly sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT and N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. The population studied was a group of young trained cyclists participating in a 177-km cycling race. The group of individuals was selected for maximal homogeneity. Their annual training volume was between 10,000 and 16,000 kilometers. The rhythm of races is comparable and averages 35 km/h, depending on the race’s difficulty. The cardiac frequency was recorded via a heart rate monitor. Three blood tests were taken. The first blood test, T0, was taken approximately 2 hours before the start of the race and was intended to gather values which would act as references for the following tests. The second blood test, T1, was realized within 5 minutes of their arrival. The third and final blood test, T3, was taken 3 hours following their arrival. The CK, CK-MB, MYO, hs-TnT and NT-proBNP were measured on the Roche Diagnostic modular E (Manhein, Germany. For the statistical analysis, an ANOVA and post hoc test of Scheffé were calculated with the Statistica Software version 9.1. We noticed an important significant variation in the cardiac frequency between T0 and T1 (p < 0.0001, T0 and T3 (p < 0.0001, and T1 and T3 (p < 0.01. Table 1 shows the results obtained for the different biomarkers. CK and CK-MB showed significant variation between T0-T1 and T0-T3 (p < 0.0001. Myoglobin increased significantly

  3. Genetic mapping and identification of quantitative trait loci associated with resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum races 1 and 2 in watermelon

    Fusarium wilt is a major disease of watermelon caused by the soil-borne fungus Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f. sp. niveum (E.F. Sm.) W.C. Snyder & H.N. Hans (Fon). Fon race 1 is most prevalent throughout the U.S. while race 2 is more virulent. Our overall objective is to identify and utilize ...

  4. The Spectre of Race in American Medicine

    Fofana, Mariam O.

    2014-01-01

    Controversies and debates surrounding race have long been a fixture in American medicine. In the past, the biological concept of race—the idea that race is biologically determined and meaningful—has served to justify the institution of slavery and the conduct of unethical research trials. Although these days may seem far behind, contemporary debates over the race-specific approval of drugs and the significance of genetic differences are evidence that race still yields tremendous influence on medical research and clinical practice. In many ways, the use of race in medicine today reflects the internalization of racial hierarchies borne out of the history of slavery and state-mandated segregation, and there is still much uncertainty over its benefits and harms. Although using race in research can help elucidate disparities, the reflexive use of race as a variable runs the risk of reifying the biological concept of race and blinding researchers to important underlying factors such as socioeconomic status. Similarly, in clinical practice, the use of race in assessing a patient’s risk of certain conditions (e.g., sickle cell) turns harmful when the heuristic becomes a rule. Through selected historical and contemporary examples, I aim to show how the biological concept of race that gave rise to past abuses remains alive and harmful and propose changes in medical education as a potential solution. By learning from the past, today’s physicians will be better armed to discern—and correct—the ways in which contemporary medicine perpetuates historical injustices. PMID:23988563

  5. The Dependent Poisson Race Model and Modeling Dependence in Conjoint Choice Experiments

    Ruan, Shiling; MacEachern, Steven N.; Otter, Thomas; Dean, Angela M.

    2008-01-01

    Conjoint choice experiments are used widely in marketing to study consumer preferences amongst alternative products. We develop a class of choice models, belonging to the class of Poisson race models, that describe a "random utility" which lends itself to a process-based description of choice. The models incorporate a dependence structure which…

  6. Notes on a Bit of Psychological Nonsense: "Race Differences in Intelligence"

    Schoenfeld, William N.

    1974-01-01

    The issue of race differences in intelligence, especially with respect to American black and white populations, is adjudged to be "nonsensical" in terms of the framing of the question, the populations sampled, the testing instruments utilized, and the concept of "intelligence" postulated. (Author/EH)

  7. Husbands' and Wives' Relative Earnings: Exploring Variation by Race, Human Capital, Labor Supply, and Life Stage

    Winslow-Bowe, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Whereas much research has explored the causes and consequences of the gender wage gap, far less has examined earnings differentials within marriage. This article contributes to this literature by utilizing the 2000 wave of the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to examine variation in husbands' and wives' relative income by race/ethnicity,…

  8. Students' Self-Identified Long-Term Leadership Development Goals: An Analysis by Gender and Race

    Rosch, David M.; Boyd, Barry L.; Duran, Kristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Leadership development goal statements of 92 undergraduate students enrolled in a multi-year self-directed leadership development program were analyzed using content and thematic analyses to investigate patterns of similarities and differences across gender and race. This qualitative analysis utilized a theoretical framework that approached…

  9. Media Misrepresentations of a Mascot Controversy: Contested Constructions of Race and Gender

    Gerstl-Pepin, Cynthia; Liang, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    This article examines media coverage of a high school Native American mascot controversy. Discourse analysis of media documents and artifacts was utilized to explore how the issue was socially constructed for public consumption. Critical race feminism was used as a framework to examine how media discourses can oversimplify the complex interaction…

  10. In-vivo studies of mechanisms of haematologic oncogenesis after exposure to ionizing radiation utilizing a model of rats deficient in Potassium 53

    Casado, J.A.; Bauluz, C.; Vidania, R. de; Real, A.

    1997-01-01

    The development of an appropriate radiation protection system is based on the knowledge of health effects of moderate and low radiation. The knowledge of these effects at present is insufficient for determining with exactness the health risks of the said exposure. Epidemiological studies have serious limitations which stand in the way of addressing these problems. Through studies with new experimental models, interesting information can be obtained in this respect and in particular on the oncogenic mechanism of radiation. In this study, rats deficient in Phosphorus 53 have been used to study the impact of haematological cancer after irradiation. For the purpose of characterizing populations potentially implicated in carcinogenic development, cellular morphological analyses and expression of surface markers have been carried out and the content of DNA in haematopoietic cells has been looked into. Rats with Phosphorus 53 develop fundamentally altered lymphomas after irradiation. Leukaemias were also observed, even though the number of rats examined was low. The proposed methodology demonstrates great potential through the study of cellular changes and associated molecules in radiation induced carcinogenic development

  11. Race modulates neural activity during imitation

    Losin, Elizabeth A. Reynolds; Iacoboni, Marco; Martin, Alia; Cross, Katy A.; Dapretto, Mirella

    2014-01-01

    Imitation plays a central role in the acquisition of culture. People preferentially imitate others who are self-similar, prestigious or successful. Because race can indicate a person's self-similarity or status, race influences whom people imitate. Prior studies of the neural underpinnings of imitation have not considered the effects of race. Here we measured neural activity with fMRI while European American participants imitated meaningless gestures performed by actors of their own race, and two racial outgroups, African American, and Chinese American. Participants also passively observed the actions of these actors and their portraits. Frontal, parietal and occipital areas were differentially activated while participants imitated actors of different races. More activity was present when imitating African Americans than the other racial groups, perhaps reflecting participants' reported lack of experience with and negative attitudes towards this group, or the group's lower perceived social status. This pattern of neural activity was not found when participants passively observed the gestures of the actors or simply looked at their faces. Instead, during face-viewing neural responses were overall greater for own-race individuals, consistent with prior race perception studies not involving imitation. Our findings represent a first step in elucidating neural mechanisms involved in cultural learning, a process that influences almost every aspect of our lives but has thus far received little neuroscientific study. PMID:22062193

  12. Race in Supervision: Let's Talk About It.

    Schen, Cathy R; Greenlee, Alecia

    2018-01-01

    Addressing race and racial trauma within psychotherapy supervision is increasingly important in psychiatry training. A therapist's ability to discuss race and racial trauma in psychotherapy supervision increases the likelihood that these topics will be explored as they arise in the therapeutic setting. The authors discuss the contextual and sociocultural dynamics that contributed to their own avoidance of race and racial trauma within the supervisory relationship. The authors examine the features that eventually led to a robust discussion of race and culture within the supervisory setting and identify salient themes that occurred during three phases of the conversation about race: pre-dialogue, the conversation, and after the conversation. These themes include building an alliance, supercompetence, avoidance, shared vulnerability, "if I speak on this, I own it," closeness versus distance, and speaking up. This article reviews the key literature in the field of psychiatry and psychology that has shaped how we understand race and racial trauma and concludes with guidelines for supervisors on how to facilitate talking about race in supervision.

  13. Nuclear Knowledge and Competence: Fundamental Prerequisites for the Safe Utilization of Radiation Sources in a Small Non-Nuclear Country — Experience of Montenegro

    Jovanovic, S.; Dlabac, A.

    2016-01-01

    Provision of adequate knowledge, competence and expertise represents a major concern when addressing nuclear and radiation safety issues in small countries — if inadequate, safety will eventually be jeopardized. Montenegro is such a small, developing and “nonnuclear” country—the use of radiation sources being modest and limited to a few ordinary applications (primarily in health care). Even though, there is (or will be in the foreseeable future) a significant need in nuclear knowledge, competence and expertise — directly or indirectly related to nuclear/radiation safety and security issues. It goes about the following, the list being not exhaustive: (i) medical applications (diagnostics, radiotherapy, palliation, sterilization of equipment, consumables, blood products, etc.), (ii) radiation protection, including various dosimetry services and QC/QA of radiation sources; (iii) environmental protection (radioecology, analytical and monitoring services, etc.), (iv) low and medium activity radioactive waste management (including a newly licenced storage), (v) industrial, geological, hydrological, agricultural, biochemical and archaeological applications (non-destructive testing, various gauges, radioisotope labeling, harmful insects sterilization, etc.), (vi) scientific and educational uses, (vii) cultural heritage preservation and investigation, (viii) legislative and regulatory aspects, including complying to international safety/security norms and joining international conventions in the field, (ix) preparedness and response to radiological and nuclear emergency situations, (x) combating illicit trafficking of nuclear and other radioactive materials, (xi) nuclear forensics, (xii) security systems based on X-ray and other nuclear methods, (xiii) introduction of some future topics (e.g., nuclear power for electricity generation and sea water desalination), (xiv) public information and communication with media, etc.

  14. An investigation of racing performance and whip use by jockeys in thoroughbred races.

    David Evans

    Full Text Available Concerns have been expressed concerning animal-welfare issues associated with whip use during Thoroughbred races. However, there have been no studies of relationships between performance and use of whips in Thoroughbred racing. Our aim was to describe whip use and the horses' performance during races, and to investigate associations between whip use and racing performance. Under the Australian Racing Board (ARB rules, only horses that are in contention can be whipped, so we expected that whippings would be associated with superior performance, and those superior performances would be explained by an effect of whipping on horse velocities in the final 400 m of the race. We were also interested to determine whether performance in the latter sections of a race was associated with performance in the earlier sections of a race. Measurements of whip strikes and sectional times during each of the final three 200 metre (m sections of five races were analysed. Jockeys in more advanced placings at the final 400 and 200 m positions in the races whipped their horses more frequently. Horses, on average, achieved highest speeds in the 600 to 400 m section when there was no whip use, and the increased whip use was most frequent in the final two 200 m sections when horses were fatigued. This increased whip use was not associated with significant variation in velocity as a predictor of superior placing at the finish.

  15. Face-blind for other-race faces: Individual differences in other-race recognition impairments.

    Wan, Lulu; Crookes, Kate; Dawel, Amy; Pidcock, Madeleine; Hall, Ashleigh; McKone, Elinor

    2017-01-01

    We report the existence of a previously undescribed group of people, namely individuals who are so poor at recognition of other-race faces that they meet criteria for clinical-level impairment (i.e., they are "face-blind" for other-race faces). Testing 550 participants, and using the well-validated Cambridge Face Memory Test for diagnosing face blindness, results show the rate of other-race face blindness to be nontrivial, specifically 8.1% of Caucasians and Asians raised in majority own-race countries. Results also show risk factors for other-race face blindness to include: a lack of interracial contact; and being at the lower end of the normal range of general face recognition ability (i.e., even for own-race faces); but not applying less individuating effort to other-race than own-race faces. Findings provide a potential resolution of contradictory evidence concerning the importance of the other-race effect (ORE), by explaining how it is possible for the mean ORE to be modest in size (suggesting a genuine but minor problem), and simultaneously for individuals to suffer major functional consequences in the real world (e.g., eyewitness misidentification of other-race offenders leading to wrongful imprisonment). Findings imply that, in legal settings, evaluating an eyewitness's chance of having made an other-race misidentification requires information about the underlying face recognition abilities of the individual witness. Additionally, analogy with prosopagnosia (inability to recognize even own-race faces) suggests everyday social interactions with other-race people, such as those between colleagues in the workplace, will be seriously impacted by the ORE in some people. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Race, history, and black British jazz

    Toynbee, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the history of black British jazz across five moments from 1920 to the present. It also makes a theoretical argument about the nature of race and its connection both with music and belonging to the nation. Race is indeed a musical-discursive construction, as has been argued in the literature about culture and ethnicity over the last thirty years or so. But it is a social structure too, and the contradictions that result are key to understanding the race-music relationship.

  17. Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    Johnson, J.O.

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an ∼0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses

  18. Utilization of a Si-surface-barrier-detector for alpha-spectrometry and its application in radiation protection for the detection of law alpha-activities

    Steger, F.; Urbanich, E.; Lovranich, E.; Hefner, A.

    1974-12-01

    Due to the construction of the ''Safeguard Analytical Laboratory''(IAEA), the institute for radiation protection at the Research Center Seibersdorf is interested in a method for the alpha-spectroscopic determination of Pu-239 for personnel and environmental monitoring. Therefore an alpha-spectrometer has been built which will mainly be used for the excretion analysis. The design of the apparatus is described, results of measurements are given and other fields of its application are discussed. (C.R.)

  19. The racing-game effect: why do video racing games increase risk-taking inclinations?

    Fischer, Peter; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Morton, Thomas; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Postmes, Tom; Frey, Dieter; Kubitzki, Jörg; Odenwälder, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    The present studies investigated why video racing games increase players' risk-taking inclinations. Four studies reveal that playing video racing games increases risk taking in a subsequent simulated road traffic situation, as well as risk-promoting cognitions and emotions, blood pressure, sensation seeking, and attitudes toward reckless driving. Study 1 ruled out the role of experimental demand in creating such effects. Studies 2 and 3 showed that the effect of playing video racing games on risk taking was partially mediated by changes in self-perceptions as a reckless driver. These effects were evident only when the individual played racing games that reward traffic violations rather than racing games that do not reward traffic violations (Study 3) and when the individual was an active player of such games rather than a passive observer (Study 4). In sum, the results underline the potential negative impact of racing games on traffic safety.

  20. Effect of gamma radiation on wheat plant growth due to impact on gas exchange characteristics and mineral nutrient uptake and utilization

    Bhupinder Singh; Sumedha Ahuja; Singhal, R.K.; Venu Babu, P.

    2013-01-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine the effect of gamma radiation on plant growth and development, flag leaf gas exchange characteristics such as net photosynthetic rate (P N ), stomatal conductance (g s ), and transpiration rate (E) and activity of key carbon and nitrogen assimilating enzymes like Rubisco, starch synthase (SS) and nitrate reductase (NR) in field grown wheat. Grains of cultivar PBW-343 were exposed to a 60 Co (Cobalt-60) gamma source at a dose range from 0 to 500 Gy (Gray). Gas exchange characteristics of flag leaf were measured using Infrared Gas Analyzer (IRGA), while mineral nutrients were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Our results show that an irradiation treatment, in general, caused an improvement in plant growth and yield characteristics such as shoot and root mass, root length and surface area, leaf area and chlorophyll SPAD index, tiller number and grain yield. However, irradiation exceeding 5 Gy reduced the magnitude of radiation advantage for most of the investigated physiological and biochemical traits. No germination was recorded at 500 Gy irradiation dose. A dose-dependant increase in shoot Fe in radiated plants up to 25 Gy reflected its higher plant root to shoot translocation which may yield micronutrient rich grains. At higher dose of 100 Gy, there was a drastic reduction in flag leaf membrane stability index (MSI), photosynthesis, Rubisco, NR, and nutrients like K, P, Mg, Fe, and Zn. Starch synthase enzyme activity was unaffected by gamma irradiation indicating that the negative effect of high dose (100 Gy) on the grain yield were caused by the adverse effect of radiation on the gas exchange attributes particularly photosynthesis, carbon, and nitrogen assimilation efficiency and the plant uptake of mineral nutrients. The study concludes that gamma radiation at a low dose (25 Gy or lower) stimulates, while a high dose (100 Gy and above) inhibits plant growth and development of wheat. The adverse effect at 100 Gy and beyond

  1. Ceramic Rail-Race Ball Bearings

    Balzer, Mark A.; Mungas, Greg S.; Peters, Gregory H.

    2010-01-01

    Non-lubricated ball bearings featuring rail races have been proposed for use in mechanisms that are required to function in the presence of mineral dust particles in very low-pressure, dry environments with extended life. Like a conventional ball bearing, the proposed bearing would include an inner and an outer ring separated by balls in rolling contact with the races. However, unlike a conventional ball bearing, the balls would not roll in semi-circular or gothic arch race grooves in the rings: instead, the races would be shaped to form two or more rails (see figure). During operation, the motion of the balls would push dust particles into the spaces between the rails where the particles could not generate rolling resistance for the balls

  2. AFSC/RACE/GAP: RACEBASE Database

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The core function of the Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering (RACE) Division is to conduct quantitative fishery surveys and related ecological and...

  3. Poverty, Race, and Hospitalization for Childhood Asthma.

    Wissow, Lawrence S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examination of Maryland hospital discharge data for 1979 to 1982 reveals that Black children are three times more likely to be hospitalized for asthma than are White children. This, however, is due to poverty, not race. (Author/BJV)

  4. The Racing-Game Effect: Why Do Video Racing Games Increase Risk-Taking Inclinations?

    Fischer, Peter; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Morton, Thomas; Kastenmüller, Andreas; Postmes, Tom; Frey, Dieter; Kubitzki, Jörg; Odenwälder, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    The present studies investigated why video racing games increase players’ risk-taking inclinations. Four studies reveal that playing video racing games increases risk taking in a subsequent simulated road traffic situation, as well as risk-promoting cognitions and emotions, blood pressure,sensation seeking, and attitudes toward reckless driving. Study 1 ruled out the role of experimental demand in creating such effects. Studies 2 and 3 showed that the effect of playing video racing games on r...

  5. ["Human races": history of a dangerous illusion].

    Louryan, S

    2014-01-01

    The multiplication of offences prompted by racism and the increase of complaints for racism leads us to consider the illusory concept of "human races". This idea crossed the history, and was reinforced by the discovery of remote tribes and human fossils, and by the development of sociobiology and quantitative psychology. Deprived of scientific base, the theory of the "races" must bow before the notions of genetic variation and unicity of mankind.

  6. Ecology-driven stereotypes override race stereotypes

    Williams, Keelah E. G.; Sng, Oliver; Neuberg, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Why do race stereotypes take the forms they do? Life history theory posits that features of the ecology shape individuals’ behavior. Harsh and unpredictable (“desperate”) ecologies induce fast strategy behaviors such as impulsivity, whereas resource-sufficient and predictable (“hopeful”) ecologies induce slow strategy behaviors such as future focus. We suggest that individuals possess a lay understanding of ecology’s influence on behavior, resulting in ecology-driven stereotypes. Importantly, because race is confounded with ecology in the United States, we propose that Americans’ stereotypes about racial groups actually reflect stereotypes about these groups’ presumed home ecologies. Study 1 demonstrates that individuals hold ecology stereotypes, stereotyping people from desperate ecologies as possessing faster life history strategies than people from hopeful ecologies. Studies 2–4 rule out alternative explanations for those findings. Study 5, which independently manipulates race and ecology information, demonstrates that when provided with information about a person’s race (but not ecology), individuals’ inferences about blacks track stereotypes of people from desperate ecologies, and individuals’ inferences about whites track stereotypes of people from hopeful ecologies. However, when provided with information about both the race and ecology of others, individuals’ inferences reflect the targets’ ecology rather than their race: black and white targets from desperate ecologies are stereotyped as equally fast life history strategists, whereas black and white targets from hopeful ecologies are stereotyped as equally slow life history strategists. These findings suggest that the content of several predominant race stereotypes may not reflect race, per se, but rather inferences about how one’s ecology influences behavior. PMID:26712013

  7. Race Has Always Mattered: An Intergeneration Look at Race, Space, Place, and Educational Experiences of Blacks

    Denise G. Yull

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Within school settings race continues to be one of the most formidable obstacles for Black children in the United States (US school system. This paper expands the discussions of race in education by exploring how the social links among race, space, and place provide a lens for understanding the persistence of racism in the educational experiences of Black children. This paper examines how differences in a rural versus urban geographical location influence a student’s experience with race, racism, and racial identity across four generations of Black people in the context of school and community. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  8. Learning Race from Face: A Survey.

    Fu, Siyao; He, Haibo; Hou, Zeng-Guang

    2014-12-01

    Faces convey a wealth of social signals, including race, expression, identity, age and gender, all of which have attracted increasing attention from multi-disciplinary research, such as psychology, neuroscience, computer science, to name a few. Gleaned from recent advances in computer vision, computer graphics, and machine learning, computational intelligence based racial face analysis has been particularly popular due to its significant potential and broader impacts in extensive real-world applications, such as security and defense, surveillance, human computer interface (HCI), biometric-based identification, among others. These studies raise an important question: How implicit, non-declarative racial category can be conceptually modeled and quantitatively inferred from the face? Nevertheless, race classification is challenging due to its ambiguity and complexity depending on context and criteria. To address this challenge, recently, significant efforts have been reported toward race detection and categorization in the community. This survey provides a comprehensive and critical review of the state-of-the-art advances in face-race perception, principles, algorithms, and applications. We first discuss race perception problem formulation and motivation, while highlighting the conceptual potentials of racial face processing. Next, taxonomy of feature representational models, algorithms, performance and racial databases are presented with systematic discussions within the unified learning scenario. Finally, in order to stimulate future research in this field, we also highlight the major opportunities and challenges, as well as potentially important cross-cutting themes and research directions for the issue of learning race from face.

  9. From "Race-Consciousness" to "Colour-Consciousness"

    Le Grange, L.

    2010-01-01

    At the heart of the discussion in this special issue on race and affirmative action is the issue of whether race should be used as a category in admissions policies of South African universities. In my contribution I shall argue that there are no races. By race I mean the idea that skin colour (or other phenotypical features) associated with…

  10. From 'race-consciousness' to 'colour-consciousness' | Le Grange ...

    At the heart of the discussion in this special issue on race and affirmative action is the issue of whether race should be used as a category in admissions policies of South African universities. In my contribution I shall argue that there are no races. By race I mean the idea that skin colour (or other phenotypical features) ...

  11. Own-Race-Absent Racism | Martin | South African Journal of ...

    racepresent racism, the race of the racist figures as a term in her racist thinking; in own-race-absent racism it does not. While own-race-present racism might conform readily to commonsense understandings of racism, own-race-absent racism less clearly ...

  12. Capture and utilization of solar radiation by the soybean and common bean crops and by weeds; Captacao e aproveitamento da radiacao solar pelas culturas da soja e do feijao e por plantas daninhas

    Santos, Jose Barbosa dos; Procopio, Sergio de Oliveira; Silva, Antonio Alberto da [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). FItotecnia; Costa, Luiz Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), 36571-000, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola

    2003-07-01

    Aiming to develop techniques for the establishment of a Weed Integrated Management Program, the performance of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) and of weeds Bidens pilosa L., Euphorbia heterophylla L. (two biotypes), sensitive and resistant to ALS inhibitor - herbicides and [ Desmodium tortuosum (SW.) DC.], was evaluated in relation to their efficiency in capturing and utilizing solar radiation.The following indices were calculated: total dry biomass production rate (Ct), leaf dry biomass production rate (Cf), radiation efficient use (x), net assimilation rate (EA), specific leaf area (SA), leaf area index (L), leaf matter ratio (FW) and leaf area ratio (FA). No difference was observed for all characteristics evaluated among E. heterophylla biotypes. Soybean showed the highest rate of total dry biomass production along its cycle and also the highest leaf area index, indicating its greater capacity in capturing light and providing shade to competitive plants. Especially after flowering, common bean was the most efficient in draining its photoassimilates for leaf formation. Soybean showed greater efficiency in converting radiation intercepted in the biomass. (author)

  13. Utilizing 18F-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) positron emission tomography (PET) to define suspected nonenhancing tumor for radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma.

    Hayes, Aimee R; Jayamanne, Dasantha; Hsiao, Edward; Schembri, Geoffrey P; Bailey, Dale L; Roach, Paul J; Khasraw, Mustafa; Newey, Allison; Wheeler, Helen R; Back, Michael

    2018-01-31

    The authors sought to evaluate the impact of 18F-fluoroethyltyrosine (FET) positron emission tomography (PET) on radiation therapy planning for patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM) and the presence of suspected nonenhancing tumors compared with standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients with GBM and contrast-enhanced MRI scans showing regions suspicious of nonenhancing tumor underwent postoperative FET-PET before commencing radiation therapy. Two clinical target volumes (CTVs) were created using pre- and postoperative MRI: MRI fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences (CTV FLAIR ) and MRI contrast sequences with an expansion on the surgical cavity (CTV Sx ). FET-PET was used to create biological tumor volumes (BTVs) by encompassing FET-avid regions, forming BTV FLAIR and BTV Sx . Volumetric analyses were conducted between CTVs and respective BTVs using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The volume increase with addition of FET was analyzed with respect to BTV FLAIR and BTV Sx . Presence of focal gadolinium contrast enhancement within previously nonenhancing tumor or within the FET-avid region was noted on MRI scans at 1 and 3 months after radiation therapy. Twenty-six patients were identified retrospectively from our database, of whom 24 had demonstrable FET uptake. The median CTV FLAIR , CTV Sx , BTV FLAIR , and BTV Sx were 57.1 mL (range, 1.1-217.4), 83.6 mL (range, 27.2-275.8), 62.8 mL (range, 1.1-307.3), and 94.7 mL (range, 27.2-285.5), respectively. When FET-PET was used, there was a mean increase in volume of 26.8% from CTV FLAIR to BTV FLAIR and 20.6% from CTV Sx to BTV Sx . A statistically significant difference was noted on Wilcoxon signed-rank test when assessing volumetric change between CTV FLAIR and BTV FLAIR (P Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. FET-PET may help improve delineation of GBM in cases with a suspected nonenhancing component and reduce the risk of potential geographical miss. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Radiation

  14. Radiation Technology

    1990-01-01

    The conference was organized to evaluate the application directions of radiation technology in Vietnam and to utilize the Irradiation Centre in Hanoi with the Co-60 source of 110 kCi. The investigation and study of technico-economic feasibility for technology development to various items of food and non-food objects was reported. (N.H.A)

  15. What's Your "Street Race"? Leveraging Multidimensional Measures of Race and Intersectionality for Examining Physical and Mental Health Status Among Latinxs.

    López, Nancy; Vargas, Edward D; Juarez, Melina; Cacari-Stone, Lisa; Bettez, Sonia

    2018-01-01

    Using the 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (N= 1,197) we examine the relationship between physical and mental health status and three multidimensional measures of race: 1) "street race," or how you believe other "Americans" perceive your race at the level of the street; 2) socially assigned race or what we call "ascribed race," which refers to how you believe others usually classify your race in the U.S.; and 3) "self-perceived race," or how you usually self-classify your race on questionnaires. We engage in intersectional inquiry by combining street race and gender. We find that only self-perceived race correlates with physical health and that street race is associated with mental health. We also find that men reporting their street race as Latinx 1 or Arab were associated with higher odds of reporting worse mental health outcomes. One surprising finding was that, for physical health, men reporting their street race as Latinx were associated with higher odds of reporting optimal physical health. Among women, those reporting their street race as Mexican were associated with lower odds of reporting optimal physical health when compared to all other women; for mental health status, however, we found no differences among women. We argue that "street race" is a promising multidimensional measure of race for exploring inequality among Latinxs.

  16. Taking Race out of Scare Quotes: Race-Conscious Social Analysis in an Ostensibly Post-Racial World

    Warmington, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Academics and activists concerned with race and racism have rightly coalesced around the sociological project to refute biologistic conceptions of race. By and large, our default position as teachers, writers and researchers is that race is a social construct. However, the deconstruction of race and its claims to theoretical intelligibility has…

  17. Radiation area monitor device and method

    Vencelj, Matjaz; Stowe, Ashley C.; Petrovic, Toni; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Kosicek, Andrej

    2018-01-30

    A radiation area monitor device/method, utilizing: a radiation sensor; a rotating radiation shield disposed about the radiation sensor, wherein the rotating radiation shield defines one or more ports that are transparent to radiation; and a processor operable for analyzing and storing a radiation fingerprint acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor. Optionally, the radiation sensor includes a gamma and/or neutron radiation sensor. The device/method selectively operates in: a first supervised mode during which a baseline radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor; and a second unsupervised mode during which a subsequent radiation fingerprint is acquired by the radiation sensor as the rotating radiation shield is rotated about the radiation sensor, wherein the subsequent radiation fingerprint is compared to the baseline radiation fingerprint and, if a predetermined difference threshold is exceeded, an alert is issued.

  18. The Racing-Game Effect : Why Do Video Racing Games Increase Risk-Taking Inclinations?

    Fischer, Peter; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Morton, Thomas; Kastenmueller, Andreas; Postmes, Tom; Frey, Dieter; Kubitzki, Joerg; Odenwaelder, Joerg; Kastenmüller, A.; Odenwälder, J.

    2009-01-01

    The present studies investigated why video racing games increase players' risk-taking inclinations. Four studies reveal that playing video racing games increases risk taking in a subsequent simulated road traffic situation, as well as risk-promoting cognitions and emotions, blood pressure, sensation

  19. Let's Talk about Race: Evaluating a College Interracial Discussion Group on Race

    Ashby, Kimberly M.; Collins, Dana L.; Helms, Janet E.; Manlove, Joshua

    2018-01-01

    The authors evaluate Dialogues on Race, an interracial group intervention in which undergraduate student facilitators led conversations about race with their peers. The evaluation process is described, including developing collaborative relationships, identifying program goals, selecting measures, and analyzing and presenting results. The authors…

  20. Race and Ethical Reasoning: The Importance of Race to Journalistic Decision Making.

    Coleman, Renita

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the effects of race of news subjects on student journalists' ethical reasoning. Explains that journalism students were presented with four ethical dilemmas that working journalists might encounter. Concludes that the race of the people in the ethical dilemmas presented had a significant impact on ethical reasoning. (PM)

  1. Discovering Race in a "Post-Racial" World: Teaching Race through Primetime Television

    Khanna, Nikki; Harris, Cherise A.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching students about race remains a challenging task for instructors, made even more difficult in the context of a growing "post-racial" discourse. Given this challenge, it is important for instructors to find engaging ways to help students understand the continuing significance of race and racial/ethnic inequality. In this article,…

  2. Utility of Deep Inspiration Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Radiation Therapy in Preventing Early Cardiac Perfusion Defects: A Prospective Study

    Zagar, Timothy M., E-mail: zagar@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Kaidar-Person, Orit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Tang, Xiaoli [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, West Harrison, New York (United States); Jones, Ellen E.; Matney, Jason; Das, Shiva K.; Green, Rebecca L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Sheikh, Arif [Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Khandani, Amir H.; McCartney, William H.; Oldan, Jorge Daniel; Wong, Terence Z. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate early cardiac single photon computed tomography (SPECT) findings after left breast/chest wall postoperative radiation therapy (RT) in the setting of deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH). Methods and Materials: We performed a prospective single-institution single-arm study of patients who were planned for tangential RT with DIBH to the left breast/chest wall (± internal mammary nodes). The DIBH was done by use of a controlled surface monitoring technique (AlignRT, Vision RT Ltd, London, UK). The RT was given with tangential fields and a heart block. Radiation-induced cardiac perfusion and wall motion changes were assessed by pre-RT and 6-month post-RT SPECT scans. A cumulative SPECT summed-rest score was used to quantify perfusion in predefined left ventricle segments. The incidence of wall motion abnormalities was assessed in each of these same segments. Results: A total of 20 patients with normal pre-RT scans were studied; their median age was 56 years (range, 39-72 years). Seven (35%) patients also received irradiation to the left internal mammary chain, and 5 (25%) received an additional RT field to supraclavicular nodes. The median heart dose was 94 cGy (range, 56-200 cGy), and the median V25{sub Gy} was zero (range, 0-0.1). None of the patients had post-RT perfusion or wall motion abnormalities. Conclusions: Our results suggest that DIBH and conformal cardiac blocking for patients receiving tangential RT for left-sided breast cancer is an effective means to avoid early RT-associated cardiac perfusion defects.

  3. TU-AB-BRA-10: Treatment of Gastric MALT Lymphoma Utilizing a Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Radiation Therapy (MR-IGRT) System: Evaluation of Gating Feasibility

    Mazur, T; Gach, H; Chundury, A; Fischer-Valuck, B; Huang, J; Thomas, M; Green, O [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of real-time, real-anatomy tracking and gating for gastric lymphoma patients treated with magnetic resonance image-guided radiation therapy (MR-IGRT) Methods: Over the last 2 years, 8 patients with gastric lymphoma were treated with 0.3-T, Co-60 MR-IGRT. Post-treatment analysis of real-time cine imaging in the sagittal plane during each patient’s treatment revealed significant motion of the stomach. While this motion was accounted for with generous PTV margins, the system’s capability for real-time, real-anatomy tracking could be used to reduce treatment margins by gating. However, analysis was needed for the feasibility of gating using only the single available sagittal imaging plane. While any plane may be chosen, if the stomach moves differently where it is not being observed, there may potentially be a mistreatment. To that end, imaging with healthy volunteers was done to ascertain stomach motion over 2–4 min by analyzing multiple parallel sagittal and coronal planes 0.75 cm apart. The stomach was contoured on every slice, and the mean displacement between pairs of contour centroids was used to determine the amount of overall motion. Results: The mean displacement of the centroid in the image plane was 4.3 ± 0.7 mm. The greatest observed motion was more medial with respect to the patient, and less motion laterally, which implies that gating on a plane located closer to MRI isocenter will provide the more conservative scenario as it will turn the radiation delivery off when the stomach is observed to move outside a predetermined boundary. Conclusion: The stomach was observed to move relatively uniformly throughout, with maximum extent of motion closer to where most MRI systems have the best spatial integrity (near isocenter). Analysis of possible PTV margins from the healthy volunteer study (coupled with previous patient data on interfraction volumetric stomach deformation) is pending.

  4. Criticality calculations in reactor accelerator coupling experiment (Race)

    Reda, M.A.; Spaulding, R.; Hunt, A.; Harmon, J.F.; Beller, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    A Reactor Accelerator Coupling Experiment (RACE) is to be performed at the Idaho State University Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). The electron accelerator is used to generate neutrons by inducing Bremsstrahlung photon-neutron reactions in a Tungsten- Copper target. This accelerator/target system produces a source of ∼1012 n/s, which can initiate fission reactions in the subcritical system. This coupling experiment between a 40-MeV electron accelerator and a subcritical system will allow us to predict and measure coupling efficiency, reactivity, and multiplication. In this paper, the results of the criticality and multiplication calculations, which were carried out using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX, for different coupling design options are presented. The fuel plate arrangements and the surrounding tank dimensions have been optimized. Criticality using graphite instead of water for reflector/moderator outside of the core region has been studied. The RACE configuration at the IAC will have a criticality (k-effective) of about 0,92 and a multiplication of about 10. (authors)

  5. Design of Mechanically Actuated Aerodynamic Braking System on a Formula Student Race Car

    Muralidharan, Vivek; Balakrishnan, Abhijith; Vardhan, Vinit Ketan; Meena, Nikita; Kumar, Y. Suresh

    2018-04-01

    Every second in a racing competition counts the performance of a team against the other. Many innovative and sophisticated techniques are being employed to overcome loses in time and add to the performance of the vehicle. Especially in a car racing challenge there is more freedom to install these innovative systems to empower the car to maximum efficiency due to availability of more space. At the global spectrum there are few events which encourage such innovations. Formula Student Racing competitions are one of the global events organized by the Society of Automotive Engineers of different countries which gives opportunity to university students to build and race formula style cars. Like any other racing competitions in this high octane event having an inch over their opponents is always an advantage. Not just better acceleration and high velocities but also good deceleration is required to excel in the competition. Aerodynamic braking system is utilizing the aerodynamic drag force to create high deceleration. This mechanism can be installed on any car with spoilers with minimum modification. Being a student event great amount of care needs to be given to the safety concerns of the driver.

  6. CERN Relay Race: a great success!

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Thursday 1st June marked the traditional Relay Race at CERN, organised jointly by the Running Club and the CERN Staff Association. Once again, the Race lived up to the expectations and the number of participants came close to last year’s all-time high with no less than 715 entries across different categories! In total 116 teams of 6 runners and 19 walkers completed the course at the Meyrin site in bright sunshine. Congratulations to all of them! Our Director-General gave the starting signal for the Race, demonstrating the interest in this event at the highest level of the Organization. Thank you for this much appreciated commitment! Moreover, a number of very high-level runners came to spice up this 2017 edition. The 1000-meter race was a tight one between Alexandre Roche (top 5 in the “Tour du canton”) and Baptiste Fieux who tore up the race at 2’36 and 2’42 respectively. Baptiste passed the baton to Pierre Baqué, the winner of the 2015 Saint&a...

  7. The uncanny return of the race concept

    Andreas eHeinz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this Hypothesis & Theory is to question the recently increasing use of the race concept in contemporary genetic as well as social studies. We discuss race and related terms used to assign individuals to distinct groups and caution that also concepts such as ethnicity or culture unduly neglect diversity. We suggest that one factor contributing to the dangerous nature of the race concept is that it is based on a mixture of traditional stereotypes about physiognomy and unduly imbued by colonial traditions. Furthermore, the social impact on race classifications will be critically reflected. We then examine current ways to apply the term culture and caution that while originally derived from a fundamentally different background, culture is all too often used as a proxy for race, particularly when referring to the population of a certain national state or wider region. When used in such contexts, suggesting that all inhabitants of a geographical or political unit belong to a certain culture tends to ignore diversity and to suggest a homogeneity, which consciously or unconsciously appears to extend into the realm of biological similarities and differences. Finally, we discuss alternative approaches and their respective relevance to biological and cultural studies.

  8. Race, punishment, and the Michael Vick experience.

    Piquero, Alex R; Piquero, Nicole Leeper; Gertz, Marc; Baker, Thomas; Batton, Jason; Barnes, J C

    2011-01-01

    Objective. The relationship between race and crime has been contentious, focusing primarily on offending and incarceration patterns among minorities. There has been some limited work on public perceptions of criminal punishment, and findings show that while minorities believe in the role and rule of law, they simultaneously perceive the justice system as acting in a biased and/or unfair manner. Two limitations have stalled this literature. First, research has focused mainly on criminal punishments to the neglect of noncriminal punishments. Second, most studies have not examined whether race remains salient after considering other demographic variables or discrimination and legitimacy attitudes.Methods. Using data from 400 adults, we examine how race affects perceptions of criminal punishment and subsequent reinstatement into the National Football League in the case of Michael Vick, a star professional quarterback who pled guilty to charges of operating an illegal dog-fighting ring.Results. Findings show that whites are more likely to view Vick's punishment as too soft and that he should not be reinstated, while nonwhites had the opposite views. Race remained significant after controlling for other variables believed to be related to punishment perceptions.Conclusion. Attitudes toward both criminal punishment and NFL reinstatement vary across race such that there exists important divides in how individuals perceive the system meting out punishment and subsequently reintegrating offenders back into society. These results underscore that white and nonwhites perceive the law and its administration differently.

  9. Neuro-fuzzy model for estimating race and gender from geometric distances of human face across pose

    Nanaa, K.; Rahman, M. N. A.; Rizon, M.; Mohamad, F. S.; Mamat, M.

    2018-03-01

    Classifying human face based on race and gender is a vital process in face recognition. It contributes to an index database and eases 3D synthesis of the human face. Identifying race and gender based on intrinsic factor is problematic, which is more fitting to utilizing nonlinear model for estimating process. In this paper, we aim to estimate race and gender in varied head pose. For this purpose, we collect dataset from PICS and CAS-PEAL databases, detect the landmarks and rotate them to the frontal pose. After geometric distances are calculated, all of distance values will be normalized. Implementation is carried out by using Neural Network Model and Fuzzy Logic Model. These models are combined by using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Model. The experimental results showed that the optimization of address fuzzy membership. Model gives a better assessment rate and found that estimating race contributing to a more accurate gender assessment.

  10. SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

    Kohlbrenner, R; Kolli, KP; Taylor, A; Kohi, M; Fidelman, N; LaBerge, J; Kerlan, R; Gould, R [University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Methods: Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests. Results: Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms. Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav

  11. SU-C-18C-06: Radiation Dose Reduction in Body Interventional Radiology: Clinical Results Utilizing a New Imaging Acquisition and Processing Platform

    Kohlbrenner, R; Kolli, KP; Taylor, A; Kohi, M; Fidelman, N; LaBerge, J; Kerlan, R; Gould, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the patient radiation dose reduction achieved during transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) procedures performed in a body interventional radiology suite equipped with the Philips Allura Clarity imaging acquisition and processing platform, compared to TACE procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Methods: Total fluoroscopy time, cumulative dose area product, and cumulative air kerma were recorded for the first 25 TACE procedures performed to treat hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a Philips body interventional radiology suite equipped with Philips Allura Clarity. The same data were collected for the prior 85 TACE procedures performed to treat HCC in the same suite equipped with Philips Allura Xper. Mean values from these cohorts were compared using two-tailed t tests. Results: Following installation of the Philips Allura Clarity platform, a 42.8% reduction in mean cumulative dose area product (3033.2 versus 1733.6 mGycm∧2, p < 0.0001) and a 31.2% reduction in mean cumulative air kerma (1445.4 versus 994.2 mGy, p < 0.001) was achieved compared to similar procedures performed in the same suite equipped with the Philips Allura Xper platform. Mean total fluoroscopy time was not significantly different between the two cohorts (1679.3 versus 1791.3 seconds, p = 0.41). Conclusion: This study demonstrates a significant patient radiation dose reduction during TACE procedures performed to treat HCC after a body interventional radiology suite was converted to the Philips Allura Clarity platform from the Philips Allura Xper platform. Future work will focus on evaluation of patient dose reduction in a larger cohort of patients across a broader range of procedures and in specific populations, including obese patients and pediatric patients, and comparison of image quality between the two platforms. Funding for this study was provided by Philips Healthcare, with 5% salary support provided to authors K. Pallav

  12. Optimizing bone surveys performed for suspected non-accidental trauma with attention to maximizing diagnostic yield while minimizing radiation exposure: utility of pelvic and lateral radiographs

    Jha, Priyanka; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Seibert, Anthony; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin [University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Sacramento, CA (United States); Li, Chin-Shang [University of California Davis Medical Center, Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Skeletal surveys for non-accidental trauma (NAT) include lateral spinal and pelvic views, which have a significant radiation dose. To determine whether pelvic and lateral spinal radiographs should routinely be performed during initial bone surveys for suspected NAT. The radiology database was queried for the period May 2005 to May 2011 using CPT codes for skeletal surveys for suspected NAT. Studies performed for skeletal dysplasia and follow-up surveys were excluded. Initial skeletal surveys were reviewed to identify fractures present, including those identified only on lateral spinal and/or pelvic radiographs. Clinical information and MR imaging was reviewed for the single patient with vertebral compression deformities. Of the 530 children, 223 (42.1%) had rib and extremity fractures suspicious for NAT. No fractures were identified solely on pelvic radiographs. Only one child (<0.2%) had vertebral compression deformities identified on a lateral spinal radiograph. This infant had rib and extremity fractures and was clinically paraplegic. MR imaging confirmed the vertebral body fractures. Since no fractures were identified solely on pelvic radiographs and on lateral spinal radiographs in children without evidence of NAT, nor in nearly all with evidence of NAT, inclusion of these views in the initial evaluation of children for suspected NAT may not be warranted. (orig.)

  13. Utilization of special computerized tomography and nuclear medicine techniques for quality control and for the optimization of combined precision chemotherapy and precision radiation therapy

    Wiley, A.L. Jr.; Wirtanen, G.W.; Chien, I.-C.

    1984-01-01

    A combination of precision (selective, intra-arterial) chemotherapy and precision radiotherapy can be used for advanced pancreatic, biliary tract, and sarcomatous malignancies. There were some remarkable responses, but also a few poor responses and even some morbidity. Accordingly, methods are developed of pre-selecting those patients whose tumors are likely to respond to such therapy, as well as methods for improving the therapeutic ratio by the rational optimization of combined therapy. Specifically, clinical tumor blood flow characteristics (monitored with nuclear medicine techniques) may provide useful criteria for such selection. The authors also evaluate qualitatively the drug distribution or exposure space with specialized color-coded computerized tomography images, which demonstrate spatially dependent enhancement of intra-arterial contrast in tumor and in adjacent normal tissues. Such clinical data can improve the quality control aspects of intra-arterial chemotherapy administration, as well as the possibility of achievement of a significant therapeutic ratio by the integration of precision chemotherapy and precision radiation therapy. (Auth.)

  14. Measurement of the ferric diffusion coefficient in agarose and gelatine gels by utilization of the evolution of a radiation induced edge as reflected in relaxation rate images

    Pedersen, Torje V.; Olsen, Dag R.; Skretting, Arne

    1997-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine the diffusion coefficients of ferric ions in ferrous sulphate doped gels. A radiation induced edge was created in the gel, and two spin-echo sequences were used to acquire a pair of images of the gel at different points of time. For each of these image pairs, a longitudinal relaxation rate image was derived. From profiles through these images, the standard deviations of the Gaussian functions that characterize diffusion were determined. These data provided the basis for the determination of the ferric diffusion coefficients by two different methods. Simulations indicate that the use of single spin-echo images in this procedure may in some cases lead to a significant underestimation of the diffusion coefficient. The technique was applied to different agarose and gelatine gels that were prepared, irradiated and imaged simultaneously. The results indicate that the diffusion coefficient is lower in a gelatine gel than in an agarose gel. Addition of xylenol orange to a gelatine gel lowers the diffusion coefficient from 1.45 to 0.81 mm 2 h -1 , at the cost of significantly lower R 1 sensitivity. The addition of benzoic acid to the latter gel did not increase the R 1 sensitivity. (author) OK

  15. Optimizing bone surveys performed for suspected non-accidental trauma with attention to maximizing diagnostic yield while minimizing radiation exposure: utility of pelvic and lateral radiographs

    Jha, Priyanka; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Seibert, Anthony; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L.; Coulter, Kevin; Li, Chin-Shang

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal surveys for non-accidental trauma (NAT) include lateral spinal and pelvic views, which have a significant radiation dose. To determine whether pelvic and lateral spinal radiographs should routinely be performed during initial bone surveys for suspected NAT. The radiology database was queried for the period May 2005 to May 2011 using CPT codes for skeletal surveys for suspected NAT. Studies performed for skeletal dysplasia and follow-up surveys were excluded. Initial skeletal surveys were reviewed to identify fractures present, including those identified only on lateral spinal and/or pelvic radiographs. Clinical information and MR imaging was reviewed for the single patient with vertebral compression deformities. Of the 530 children, 223 (42.1%) had rib and extremity fractures suspicious for NAT. No fractures were identified solely on pelvic radiographs. Only one child (<0.2%) had vertebral compression deformities identified on a lateral spinal radiograph. This infant had rib and extremity fractures and was clinically paraplegic. MR imaging confirmed the vertebral body fractures. Since no fractures were identified solely on pelvic radiographs and on lateral spinal radiographs in children without evidence of NAT, nor in nearly all with evidence of NAT, inclusion of these views in the initial evaluation of children for suspected NAT may not be warranted. (orig.)

  16. Study on accumulation mechanism of lead and copper in metal-hypertolerant fern, Athyrium yokoscense, by micro-XRF analysis utilizing synchrotron radiation

    Mitsuo, Sakiko; Kashiwabara, Teruhiko; Hokura, Akiko; Nakai, Izumi; Kitajima, Nobuyuki; Goto, Fumiyuki; Yoshihara, Toshihiro; Abe, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    Athyrium yokoscense is a plant which accumulates high level of heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd, and is expected to be used for phytoremediation. This paper reports the distribution and the chemical forms of Pb and Cu in underground parts (root and old leaf stalks) of the metal-hypertolerant fern, A. yokoscense, by synchrotron radiation micro-XRF imaging and micro-XANES analyses. The old and new tissues of root and leaf stalks were prepared for micro-XRF analysis. The XRF imaging of the young root revealed that K, Cu and Zn were distributed in whole area of cross-section, whereas Pb was found in a certain part of the epidermal tissue. For the old root, Pb and Cu were mainly distributed in the cell wall of the whole tissue. The distribution of heavy metal in old tissue is different from those of new tissue, and consequently it was assumed that the root at different age have different heavy metal accumulation mechanism. Alternatively, for the old leaf stalks, Cu and Pb were highly accumulated in a specific part located around the vascular tissue. Cu K-edge micro-XANES analysis indicated that the chemical form of Cu at the Cu accumulating point was Cu (II). (author)

  17. Does Patient Race/Ethnicity Influence Physician Decision-Making for Diagnosis and Treatment of Childhood Disruptive Behavior Problems?

    Garland, Ann F; Taylor, Robin; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Baker-Ericzen, Mary; Haine-Schlagel, Rachel; Liu, Yi Hui; Wong, Sarina

    2015-06-01

    Race/ethnic disparities in utilization of children's mental health care have been well documented and are particularly concerning given the long-term risks of untreated mental health problems (Institute of Medicine, 2003; Kessler et al. Am J Psychiatry 152:10026-1032, 1995). Research investigating the higher rates of unmet need among race/ethnic minority youths has focused primarily on policy, fiscal, and individual child or family factors that can influence service access and use. Alternatively, this study examines provider behavior as a potential influence on race/ethnic disparities in mental health care. The goal of the study was to examine whether patient (family) race/ethnicity influences physician diagnostic and treatment decision-making for childhood disruptive behavior problems. The study utilized an internet-based video vignette with corresponding survey of 371 randomly selected physicians from across the USA representing specialties likely to treat these patients (pediatricians, family physicians, general and child psychiatrists). Participants viewed a video vignette in which only race/ethnicity of the mother randomly varied (non-Hispanic White, Hispanic, and African American) and then responded to questions about diagnosis and recommended treatments. Physicians assigned diagnoses such as oppositional defiant disorder (48 %) and attention deficit disorder (63 %) to the child, but there were no differences in diagnosis based on race/ethnicity. The majority of respondents recommended psychosocial treatment (98 %) and/or psychoactive medication treatment (60 %), but there were no significant differences based on race/ethnicity. Thus, in this study using mock patient stimuli and controlling for other factors, such as insurance coverage, we did not find major differences in physician diagnostic or treatment decision-making based on patient race/ethnicity.

  18. Locomotion evaluation for racing in thoroughbreds.

    Barrey, E; Evans, S E; Evans, D L; Curtis, R A; Quinton, R; Rose, R J

    2001-04-01

    The potential racing and locomotory profile of a Thoroughbred yearling should be taken into account for its training programme and racing career. A gait test has been designed to assist the trainer in this task. The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal and kinetic locomotory variables of Thoroughbreds at the gallop, in relationship to their racing ability. Thirty Thoroughbred horses in race training were tested at maximal speed during a training session. The training exercise consisted of a warming-up session at trot and canter for 10 min followed by a gallop session at increasing speed on a dirt track 1942 m long. The maximal speed was measured for the last 800 m before the finishing post. An acclerometric device attached to the girth provided quantitative information about the kinetic and temporal variables of the gallop such as: stride length (SL), stride frequency (SF), times elapsed between each hoof midstance phase (HIND, DIAGO, FORE), regularity of the strides (REG), mean vector of propulsion (VPROP), energy of propulsion (EPROP) and energy of loading (ELOAD). The performance records (number of wins, placings and average earning/start [PERF]) were used to analyse the relationship with the gait measurements. The mean maximum speed was 15.26 m/s. Several locomotory variables were significantly (P gait variables: REG (0.79), DIAGO (0.43), SF (0.42), SL (-0.32) and ELOAD (-0.40). The horses that won short distance races (gait test was easy to perform and provided useful locomotory variables that may be used to evaluate the racing ability of the Thoroughbreds in training.

  19. Estimating Utility

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental premise of absolute poverty lines is that they represent the same level of utility through time and space. Disturbingly, a series of recent studies in middle- and low-income economies show that even carefully derived poverty lines rarely satisfy this premise. This article proposes a......, with the current approach tending to systematically overestimate (underestimate) poverty in urban (rural) zones.......A fundamental premise of absolute poverty lines is that they represent the same level of utility through time and space. Disturbingly, a series of recent studies in middle- and low-income economies show that even carefully derived poverty lines rarely satisfy this premise. This article proposes...... an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially...

  20. Showing that the race model inequality is not violated

    Gondan, Matthias; Riehl, Verena; Blurton, Steven Paul

    2012-01-01

    important being race models and coactivation models. Redundancy gains consistent with the race model have an upper limit, however, which is given by the well-known race model inequality (Miller, 1982). A number of statistical tests have been proposed for testing the race model inequality in single...... participants and groups of participants. All of these tests use the race model as the null hypothesis, and rejection of the null hypothesis is considered evidence in favor of coactivation. We introduce a statistical test in which the race model prediction is the alternative hypothesis. This test controls...

  1. Stock-car racing makes intuitive physicists

    Gwynne, Peter

    2008-03-01

    Formula One races involve cars festooned with gadgets and complex electronic devices, in which millions of dollars are spent refining a vehicle's aerodynamics and reducing its weight. But in events run by America's National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR), cars hurtle round an oval track at speeds of about 300 km h-1 without the help of the complex sensors that are employed in Formula One cars. To avoid crashing, drivers must make their own adjustments to track conditions, engine problems and the traffic around them.

  2. CERN Relay Race: information for drivers

    2012-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday, 24 May starting at 12.15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. In addition, there will be a Nordic Walking event which will finish around 12.50. This should not block the roads, but please drive carefully during this time. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on how to register your team for the relay race can be found here.

  3. The 2009 Simulated Car Racing Championship

    Loiacono, Daniele; Lanzi, Pier Luca; Togelius, Julian

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we overview the 2009 Simulated Car Racing Championship-an event comprising three competitions held in association with the 2009 IEEE Congress on Evolutionary Computation (CEC), the 2009 ACM Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO), and the 2009 IEEE Symposium....... The organizers provide short summaries of the other competitors. Finally, we summarize the championship results, followed by a discussion about what the organizers learned about 1) the development of high-performing car racing controllers and 2) the organization of scientific competitions....

  4. Some aspects of the combined mutagenic utilization of ionizing radiation and chemical mutagens in the experimental mutagenesis with Chlorella vulgaris B

    Mekhandzhiev, A.D.; Chankova, S.G.; Petkova, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of mutagen dose and cell cycle phase in combined mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation and EMS was experimentally studied on Chlorella vulgaris B. The duration of the cell cycle phases was determined from autoradiographic data on the kinetics of the incorporated labelled precursor ( 3 H-thymidine). The mutagenic effect was evaluated on the 10th or 11th day by the induced pigment mutations on a total of 450,105 colonies. It was found that the combining of 2, 6 or 15 krad gamma rays with EMC in doses 0.002, 0.125 or 0.5 M on the 4th, 12th, 11th, 16th or 18th hour of the cell cycle has a different effect, depending on mutagen dose and cell cycle phase. In this way, combining three different doses of gamma rays with 0.5 M EMC(LDsub(90-99)) at the onset of G 1 induces a distinct rise in the percentage of pigment mutations, as compared to the theoretically expected. The superadditive effect in this case however was associated with limitation of the mutation spectrum. Treatment with average lethal combination (6 krad gamma rays + 0.002 M EMC or 6 krad gamma rays + 0.125 M EMC) was not very effective, but the induced mutations had a rather broader spectrum (8-9 types). A comparison of the theoretically expected yield of pigment mutations with the actually obtained one shows a superadditibility only in cells treated in G 1 (LD 60 ) and in the mid S-phase (LD 40 ). (A.B.)

  5. An empirical study of race times in recreational endurance runners.

    Vickers, Andrew J; Vertosick, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    Studies of endurance running have typically involved elite athletes, small sample sizes and measures that require special expertise or equipment. We examined factors associated with race performance and explored methods for race time prediction using information routinely available to a recreational runner. An Internet survey was used to collect data from recreational endurance runners (N = 2303). The cohort was split 2:1 into a training set and validation set to create models to predict race time. Sex, age, BMI and race training were associated with mean race velocity for all race distances. The difference in velocity between males and females decreased with increasing distance. Tempo runs were more strongly associated with velocity for shorter distances, while typical weekly training mileage and interval training had similar associations with velocity for all race distances. The commonly used Riegel formula for race time prediction was well-calibrated for races up to a half-marathon, but dramatically underestimated marathon time, giving times at least 10 min too fast for half of runners. We built two models to predict marathon time. The mean squared error for Riegel was 381 compared to 228 (model based on one prior race) and 208 (model based on two prior races). Our findings can be used to inform race training and to provide more accurate race time predictions for better pacing.

  6. Caucasian infants scan own- and other-race faces differently.

    Andrea Wheeler

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Young infants are known to prefer own-race faces to other race faces and recognize own-race faces better than other-race faces. However, it is entirely unclear as to whether infants also attend to different parts of own- and other-race faces differently, which may provide an important clue as to how and why the own-race face recognition advantage emerges so early. The present study used eye tracking methodology to investigate whether 6- to 10-month-old Caucasian infants (N = 37 have differential scanning patterns for dynamically displayed own- and other-race faces. We found that even though infants spent a similar amount of time looking at own- and other-race faces, with increased age, infants increasingly looked longer at the eyes of own-race faces and less at the mouths of own-race faces. These findings suggest experience-based tuning of the infant's face processing system to optimally process own-race faces that are different in physiognomy from other-race faces. In addition, the present results, taken together with recent own- and other-race eye tracking findings with infants and adults, provide strong support for an enculturation hypothesis that East Asians and Westerners may be socialized to scan faces differently due to each culture's conventions regarding mutual gaze during interpersonal communication.

  7. Catch shares slow the race to fish

    Birkenbach, Anna M.; Kaczan, David J.; Smith, Martin D.

    2017-04-01

    In fisheries, the tragedy of the commons manifests as a competitive race to fish that compresses fishing seasons, resulting in ecological damage, economic waste, and occupational hazards. Catch shares are hypothesized to halt the race by securing each individual’s right to a portion of the total catch, but there is evidence for this from selected examples only. Here we systematically analyse natural experiments to test whether catch shares reduce racing in 39 US fisheries. We compare each fishery treated with catch shares to an individually matched control before and after the policy change. We estimate an average policy treatment effect in a pooled model and in a meta-analysis that combines separate estimates for each treatment-control pair. Consistent with the theory that market-based management ends the race to fish, we find strong evidence that catch shares extend fishing seasons. This evidence informs the current debate over expanding the use of market-based regulation to other fisheries.

  8. Race Relations Training with Correctional Officers

    Wittmer, Joe; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The model presented in this article is intended to assist correctional counselors and others in facilitating communication among prison guards of a different race from inmates and, further, to illustrate how to train guards in the fundamentals of developing a helping relationship with inmates. (Author)

  9. The Truth about Mentoring Minorities: Race Matters.

    Thomas, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A 3-year study of mentoring patterns at 3 corporations reveals that whites and minorities follow distinct patterns of advancement and should be mentored in very different ways. Cross-race mentoring must acknowledge issues of negative stereotypes, role modeling, peer resentment, skepticism about intimacy, and network management. (JOW)

  10. Collaboration, Race, and the Rhetoric of Evasion.

    Leverenz, Carrie Shively

    1996-01-01

    Shares a participant-observer's close look at small group experiences in a course called "American Experience" taught at an urban university. Considers the issue of how race can be discussed in the classroom when even collaborative approaches with emphasis on student contributions can be undone by the power of the dominant discourse. (TB)

  11. Microcomputers, Model Rockets, and Race Cars.

    Mirus, Edward A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The industrial education orientation program at Wisconsin School for the Deaf (WSD) presents problem-solving situations to all seventh- and eighth-grade hearing-impaired students. WSD developed user-friendly microcomputer software to guide students individually through complex computations involving model race cars and rockets while freeing…

  12. CERN Relay Race: a great success!

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    On Thursday May 19, the traditional relay race was held at CERN, organised jointly by the Running Club and the CERN Staff Association. In spite of the less than optimal weather, the 127 registered teams were not discouraged. Warmed by their efforts on the roads of CERN, the participants were able to withstand the chilly May weather. The start signal for the race was given by our Director General, demonstrating the interest in this event at the highest level of the Organization. Thank you for this much appreciated commitment! Can we hope for next year to see a team from the Directorate in the race? The many spectators who had come to cheer on the runners could also visit the stalls staffed by a few clubs and some of Interfon’s commercial partners. Refreshment and food stands contributed to the friendly atmosphere. The organisation of such an event requires however a substantial investment in order to cover all aspects of logistics, from preparation before the race, to the actual establishment ...

  13. Ovotestes and Sexual Reversal in Racing Pigeons

    Chalmers, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of ovotestes associated with male behavioral characteristics in two mature female racing pigeons (Columba livia) is recorded. An ovotestis developed in the area of the vestigial right gonad of one bird and within the functional left ovary of the second bird.

  14. Breast Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    ... other race. Data for specified racial or ethnic populations other than white and black should be interpreted with caution. For more information, see the USCS technical notes. § Data are from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS). Data for death rates cover 100% of the U.S. population. Use ...

  15. Race, class, gender, and American environmentalism.

    Dorceta E. Taylor

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the environmental experiences of middle and working class whites and people of color in the United States during the 19th and 20th centuries. It examines their activism and how their environmental experiences influenced the kinds of discourses they developed. The paper posits that race, class, and gender had profound effects on people's...

  16. Seeing through Race, Gender and Socioeconomic Status.

    Gundi, Kirmanj

    This paper discusses the history of discrimination in the United States and the length of time it took to abolish the legal support of racism. The paper then discusses the problems of diversity in the United States. Acknowledging and accepting U.S. diversity in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, religious background, and national origin would…

  17. CDC WONDER: Population - Bridged-Race July 1st Estimates

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Population - Bridged-Race July 1st Estimates online databases report bridged-race population estimates of the July 1st resident population of the United States,...

  18. Greeley's Maplewood Middle School Stellar in Solar Car Race

    Colorado entered the 20-meter race, which gave students the opportunity to show off their engineering and design skills by building and racing model solar-powered vehicles. Trophies for the fastest cars were

  19. The correspondence between interracial births and multiple-race reporting.

    Parker, Jennifer D; Madans, Jennifer H

    2002-12-01

    Race-specific health statistics are routinely reported in scientific publications; most describe health disparities across groups. Census 2000 showed that 2.4% of the US population identifies with more than 1 race group. We examined the hypothesis that multiple-race reporting is associated with interracial births by comparing parental race reported on birth certificates with reported race in a national health survey. US natality data from 1968 through 1998 and National Health Interview Survey data from 1990 through 1998 were compared, by year of birth. Overall multiple-race survey responses correspond to expectations from interracial births. However, there are discrepancies for specific multiple-race combinations. Projected estimates of the multiple-race population can be only partially informed by vital records.

  20. Critical Race Theory and Counselor Education Pedagogy: Creating Equitable Training

    Haskins, Natoya H.; Singh, Anneliese

    2015-01-01

    Infusing critical race theory, the authors discuss specific pedagogical strategies to enhance educational experiences of counselor trainees. The authors then provide an evaluative checklist to facilitate and evaluate curricular integration of critical race theory.

  1. critical race theory and the question of safety in dialogues on race

    ABSTRACT. This study seeks to combine research from critical race theory, as applied to ... Two recurring strands from this body of academic work that are of particular ..... that the above exemplars stem from an online debate in which students.

  2. Prevalence and correlates of street racing among Ontario high school students.

    Vingilis, Evelyn; Smart, Reginald G; Mann, Robert E; Paglia-Boak, Angela; Stoduto, Gina; Adlaf, Edward M

    2011-10-01

    This study examined the prevalence and correlates of street racing among adolescents derived from the 2009 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS), an epidemiological survey of students in Ontario, Canada. The key response variable, self-reported street racing in past year, was examined in relation to grade level, rural/urban, school marks, cannabis use, drinking and driving, cannabis use and driving, and property, physical, drugs, and weapons delinquencies. All survey estimates were weighted, and variance and statistical tests were corrected for the complex sampling design. Of the 3053 9th- to 12th-graders (66% response rate), 5.6 percent of high-schoolers (an estimated 42,000 in the province) and (20.4% of grade 11 and 12 students with an advanced-level or full license) reported driving a car, truck, or sport utility vehicle (SUV) in a street race in the 12 months before the survey. Logistic regression analysis of the advanced-level or fully licensed students in grades 11 and 12 found that males compared to females and students in grade 11 compared to students in grade 12 had significantly higher adjusted odds of street racing. Supportive of problem behavior theory, students who reported property and drug delinquencies compared to students not engaging in these delinquencies also had significantly higher adjusted odds of street racing. This first population-based study in North America suggested that the prevalence of street racing at 1 in 5 of advanced or fully licensed high-schoolers in grades 11 and 12 poses significant public health concerns, especially related to the potential for unintentional injury.

  3. The Influence of Wealth and Race in Four-Year College Attendance

    Su Jin Jez

    2008-01-01

    College is increasingly essential for economic and social mobility. Current research devotes significant attention to race and socioeconomic factors in college access. Yet wealth’s role, as differentiated from income, is largely unexplored. Utilizing a nationally representative dataset, this study analyzes the role of wealth among students who attend four-year colleges. The hypothesis that wealth matters through the provision of differential habitus, social capital, and cultural capital tha...

  4. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment.

  5. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment

  6. Multiattribute Utility Theory without Expected Utility Foundations

    Stiggelbout, A.M.; Wakker, P.P.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for determining the form of utilities are needed for the implementation of utility theory in specific decisions. An important step forward was achieved when utility theorists characterized useful parametric families of utilities, and simplifying decompositions of multiattribute utilities.

  7. Multiattribute utility theory without expected utility foundations

    Wakker, P.P.; Miyamoto, J.

    1996-01-01

    Methods for determining the form of utilities are needed for the implementation of utility theory in specific decisions. An important step forward was achieved when utility theorists characterized useful parametric families of utilities, and simplifying decompositions of multiattribute utilities.

  8. America's Churning Races: Race and Ethnicity Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census.

    Liebler, Carolyn A; Porter, Sonya R; Fernandez, Leticia E; Noon, James M; Ennis, Sharon R

    2017-02-01

    A person's racial or ethnic self-identification can change over time and across contexts, which is a component of population change not usually considered in studies that use race and ethnicity as variables. To facilitate incorporation of this aspect of population change, we show patterns and directions of individual-level race and Hispanic response change throughout the United States and among all federally recognized race/ethnic groups. We use internal U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses in which responses have been linked at the individual level (N = 162 million). Approximately 9.8 million people (6.1 %) in our data have a different race and/or Hispanic-origin response in 2010 than they did in 2000. Race response change was especially common among those reported as American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islander, in a multiple-race response group, or Hispanic. People reported as non-Hispanic white, black, or Asian in 2000 usually had the same response in 2010 (3 %, 6 %, and 9 % of responses changed, respectively). Hispanic/non-Hispanic ethnicity responses were also usually consistent (13 % and 1 %, respectively, changed). We found a variety of response change patterns, which we detail. In many race/Hispanic response groups, we see population churn in the form of large countervailing flows of response changes that are hidden in cross-sectional data. We find that response changes happen across ages, sexes, regions, and response modes, with interesting variation across racial/ethnic categories. Researchers should address the implications of race and Hispanic-origin response change when designing analyses and interpreting results.

  9. Race encounters in ITE : tutors' narratives on race equality and initial teacher education (ITE)

    Lander, Arvinder Kaur

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the racialised narratives of White tutors in initial teacher education (ITE) with specific reference to how well initial teacher education (ITE) prepares student teachers to teach in an ethnically diverse society. It draws on critical race theory as a framework to identify how the discourse of whiteness is embedded in the experience, knowledge and hegemonic understandings of these tutors and how it affects their approach to the topic of race equality and teaching in a mult...

  10. Variability in energy cost and walking gait during race walking in competitive race walkers.

    Brisswalter, J; Fougeron, B; Legros, P

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the variability of energy cost (Cw) and race walking gait after a 3-h walk at the competition pace in race walkers of the same performance level. Nine competitive race walkers were studied. In the same week, after a first test of VO2max determination, each subject completed two submaximal treadmill walks (6 min length, 0% grade, 12 km X h(-1) speed) before and after a 3-h overground test completed at the individual competition speed of the race walker. During the two submaximal tests, subjects were filmed between the 2nd and the 4th min, and physiological parameters were recorded between the 4th and the 6th min. Results showed two trends. On the one hand, we observed a significant and systematic increase in energy cost of walking (mean deltaCw = 8.4%), whereas no variation in the gait kinematics prescribed by the rules of race walking was recorded. On the other hand, this increase in metabolic energy demand was accompanied by variations of different magnitude and direction of stride length, of the excursion of the heel and of the maximal ankle flexion at toe-off among the race walkers. These results indicated that competitive race walkers are able to maintain their walking gait with exercise duration apart from a systematic increase in energy cost. Moreover, in this form of locomotion the effect of fatigue on the gait variability seems to be an individual function of the race walk constraints and the constraints of the performer.

  11. America's Cup yacht racing: race analysis and physical characteristics of the athletes.

    Neville, Vernon; Calefato, Julian; Pérez-Encinas, Cristina; Rodilla-Sala, Enrique; Rada-Ruiz, Sergio; Dorochenko, Paul; Folland, Jonathan P

    2009-07-01

    The America's Cup is the oldest competing trophy in sport, yet little is known of the nature and intensity of racing or the physical characteristics of the athletes. In this study, aspects of the physical demands of America's Cup yacht racing were analysed, including the intensity of exercise and activity pattern of "grinding". Anthropometric data were collected from 92 professional male America's Cup sailors, and fitness data from a top-4 and a lower-7 ranking team during the 32nd America's Cup. Over the 135 races, mean race duration was 82 min (s = 9), with 20 tacks (s = 10) and 8 gybes (s = 3) per race. Grinding bouts were 5.5 s (s = 5.4; range: 2.2-66.3) long, with 143 exercise bouts per race and an exercise-to-rest ratio of 1:6. Mean and peak heart rate was 64% and 92% of maximum for all positions, with bowmen highest (71% and 96%). Grinders were taller, heavier, and stronger than all other positions. Body fat was similar between positions (13%, s = 4). The higher-standard team was stronger and had greater strength endurance, which probably contributed to their quicker manoeuvres. Intensity of exercise was dependent on the similarity of competing boats and the role of the athlete. The short duration and intermittent nature of grinding is indicative of predominantly anaerobic energy provision.

  12. Racial Differences in College Students' Assessments of Campus Race Relations

    Lo, Celia C.; McCallum, Debra M.; Hughes, Michael; Smith, Gabrielle P. A.; McKnight, Utz

    2017-01-01

    Guided by the principles of critical race theory, we sought to understand how race and racism help explain differences in White and Black students' assessments of race relations on a predominantly White college campus. The authors employed data from a campus-wide survey conducted in Spring 2013 at the University of Alabama; the sample numbered…

  13. Deliberating about race as a variable in biomedical research | van ...

    Race as a variable in research ethics is investigated: to what extent is it morally appropriate to regard the race of research subjects as pivotal for research outcomes? The challenges it poses to deliberation in research ethics committees are considered, and it is concluded that race sometimes must be considered, subject to ...

  14. QuantCrit: Rectifying Quantitative Methods through Critical Race Theory

    Garcia, Nichole M.; López, Nancy; Vélez, Verónica N.

    2018-01-01

    Critical race theory (CRT) in education centers, examines, and seeks to transform the relationship that undergirds race, racism, and power. CRT scholars have applied a critical race framework to advance research methodologies, namely qualitative interventions. Informed by this work, and 15 years later, this article reconsiders the possibilities of…

  15. Students To Compete in Model Solar Car Race

    cars in the 1998 Junior Solar Sprint. The race will be held at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE Compete in Model Solar Car Race For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo ., May 8, 1998 — Middle school students from across Colorado will design, build and race model solar

  16. The Mapping of a Framework: Critical Race Theory and TESOL

    Liggett, Tonda

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I attempt to elucidate some key intersections between critical race theory (CRT) in synthesis with English language learning as a way to examine linguistic and racial identity in English language teaching. I ask: How does critical race theory apply to English language learners when language rather than race is fore-grounded? What…

  17. 29 CFR 780.122 - Activities relating to race horses.

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Activities relating to race horses. 780.122 Section 780.122... Activities relating to race horses. Employees engaged in the breeding, raising, and training of horses on..., employees engaged in the racing, training, and care of horses and other activities performed off the farm in...

  18. Teacher-Principal Race and Teacher Satisfaction over Time, Region

    Viano, Samantha L.; Hunter, Seth B.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to replicate prior findings on teacher-principal race congruence and teacher job satisfaction and extend the literature by investigating trends over time and if the relationship between race congruence and teacher job satisfaction differs by principal race and region. Design/methodology/approach: The study…

  19. The Use of Social Media in Teaching Race

    Nakagawa, Kathy; Arzubiaga, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores ways in which race pedagogy interrogates social media as a significant influence on racism and source for race understandings. Social media serves as a context in which to learn about, challenge, and address issues of race. We discuss how social media may be used to promote racial literacy and question and resist racism,…

  20. The social patterns of a biological risk factor for disease: race, gender, socioeconomic position, and C-reactive protein.

    Herd, Pamela; Karraker, Amelia; Friedman, Elliot

    2012-07-01

    Understand the links between race and C-reactive protein (CRP), with special attention to gender differences and the role of class and behavioral risk factors as mediators. This study utilizes the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project data, a nationally representative study of older Americans aged 57-85 to explore two research questions. First, what is the relative strength of socioeconomic versus behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences in CRP levels? Second, what role does gender play in understanding race differences? Does the relative role of socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences vary when examining men and women separately? When examining men and women separately, socioeconomic and behavioral risk factor mediators vary in their importance. Indeed, racial differences in CRP among men aged 57-74 are little changed after adjusting for both socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors with levels 35% higher for black men as compared to white men. For women aged 57-74, however, behavioral risk factors explain 30% of the relationship between race and CRP. The limited explanatory power of socioeconomic position and, particularly, behavioral risk factors, in elucidating the relationship between race and CRP among men, signals the need for research to examine additional mediators, including more direct measures of stress and discrimination.

  1. Through the Prism of Critical Race Theory: "Niceness" and Latina/o Leadership in the Politics of Education

    Aleman, Enrique, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Utilizing a critical race theory (CRT) framework, I conduct a rhetorical and discursive analysis of data from a study of Utah Latino/a educational and political leaders. In analyzing how participants advocate closing the achievement gaps that affect Latina/o and Chicana/o students, I find that participants' political discourse is shaped by…

  2. New Finnish radiation law

    Niittyla, A.

    1992-01-01

    The new Finnish Radiation Act will enter into force on 1.1.1992. The Act aims to protect man's health against the harmful effects of radiation. The Act applies to the utilization of ionising radiation and natural radiation as well as non-ionising radiation. It emphasises the fact that a licensed organization or entrepreneur carrying out a practice which causes radiation exposure is responsible for the safety of the activity. The organization or entrepreneur in question is also obliged to take care of radioactive waste. The provisions of the Radiation Act which apply to monitoring of worker exposure are also applied to the use of nuclear energy. Activities involving the use of radiation and the use of nuclear energy are regulated by one authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety. (author)

  3. Comparison between two race/skin color classifications in relation to health-related outcomes in Brazil

    Szwarcwald Celia L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper aims to compare the classification of race/skin color based on the discrete categories used by the Demographic Census of the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE and a skin color scale with values ranging from 1 (lighter skin to 10 (darker skin, examining whether choosing one alternative or the other can influence measures of self-evaluation of health status, health care service utilization and discrimination in the health services. Methods This is a cross-sectional study based on data from the World Health Survey carried out in Brazil in 2003 with a sample of 5000 individuals older than 18 years. Similarities between the two classifications were evaluated by means of correspondence analysis. The effect of the two classifications on health outcomes was tested through logistic regression models for each sex, using age, educational level and ownership of consumer goods as covariables. Results Both measures of race/skin color represent the same race/skin color construct. The results show a tendency among Brazilians to classify their skin color in shades closer to the center of the color gradient. Women tend to classify their race/skin color as a little lighter than men in the skin color scale, an effect not observed when IBGE categories are used. With regard to health and health care utilization, race/skin color was not relevant in explaining any of them, regardless of the race/skin color classification. Lack of money and social class were the most prevalent reasons for discrimination in healthcare reported in the survey, suggesting that in Brazil the discussion about discrimination in the health care must not be restricted to racial discrimination and should also consider class-based discrimination. The study shows that the differences of the two classifications of race/skin color are small. However, the interval scale measure appeared to increase the freedom of choice of the respondent.

  4. Double-Checking the Race Box: Examining Inconsistency between Survey Measures of Observed and Self-Reported Race

    Saperstein, Aliya

    2006-01-01

    Social constructivist theories of race suggest no two measures of race will capture the same information, but the degree of "error" this creates for quantitative research on inequality is unclear. Using unique data from the General Social Survey, I find observed and self-reported measures of race yield substantively different results when used to…

  5. Contributions of Racial and Sociobehavioral Homophily to Friendship Stability and Quality among Same-Race and Cross-Race Friends

    McDonald, Kristina L.; Dashiell-Aje, Ebony; Menzer, Melissa M.; Rubin, Kenneth H.; Oh, Wonjung; Bowker, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined how racial and sociobehavioral similarities were associated with friendship stability and friendship quality. Cross-race friends were not significantly similar to each other in peer-nominated shyness/withdrawal, victimization, exclusion, and popularity/sociability. Relative to same-race friends, cross-race friends were…

  6. Disappearing and reappearing differences in drug-eluting stent use by race.

    Federspiel, Jerome J; Stearns, Sally C; Reiter, Kristin L; Geissler, Kimberley H; Triplette, Matthew A; D'Arcy, Laura P; Sheridan, Brett C; Rossi, Joseph S

    2013-04-01

    Drug-eluting coronary stents (DES) rapidly dominated the marketplace in the United States after approval in 2003, but utilization rates were initially lower among African American patients. We assess whether racial differences persisted as DES diffused into practice. Medicare claims data were used to identify coronary stenting procedures among elderly patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Regression models of the choice of DES versus bare mental stent controlled for demographics, ACS type, co-morbidities and hospital characteristics. Diffusion was assessed in the short run (2003-2004) and long run (2007), with the effect of race calculated to allow for time-varying effects. The sample included 381,887 Medicare beneficiaries treated with stent insertion; approximately 5% were African American. Initially (May 2003-February 2004), African American race was associated with lower DES use compared to other races (44.3% versus 46.5%, P differences were not significant (79.8% versus 80.3%, P = 0.45). Subsequent concerns regarding DES safety caused reductions in DES use, with African Americans having lower use than other racial groups in 2007 (63.1% versus 65.2%, P differences in race reflect decisions regarding treatment appropriateness. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. The Defining Moment: Children's Conceptualization of Race and Experiences with Racial Discrimination.

    Dulin-Keita, Akilah; Hannon, Lonnie; Fernandez, Jose R; Cockerham, William C

    2011-04-01

    This paper examines whether children of marginalized racial/ethnic groups have an awareness of race at earlier ages than youth from non-marginalized groups, documents their experiences with racial discrimination, and utilizes a modified racism-related stress model to explore the relationship between perceived racial discrimination and self-esteem. Data were collected for non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic children aged 7 - 12 using face-to-face interviews (n = 175). The concept of race was measured by assessing whether children could define race, if not a standard definition was provided. Racial discrimination was measured using the Williams Every-day-Discrimination Scale, self-esteem was measured using the Rosenberg Scale, and ethnic identity was assessed using the Multi-group Ethnic Identity Measure. Non-Hispanic black children were able to define race more accurately, but overall, Hispanic children encountered more racial discrimination, with frequent reports of ethnic slurs. Additionally, after accounting for ethnic identity, perceived racial discrimination remained a salient stressor that contributed to low self-esteem.

  8. Gender and race matter: the importance of considering intersections in Black women's body image.

    Capodilupo, Christina M; Kim, Suah

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, body image literature has used race as a variable to explain ethnic-specific differences in body satisfaction and the prevalence of eating disorders. Instead of employing race as an explanatory variable, the present study utilized a qualitative method to explore the relationships among race, ethnicity, culture, discrimination, and body image for African American and Black women. The purpose of the study was to gain a deeper understanding of how race and gender interface with and inform body image. Women were recruited through community centers in a major metropolitan city and represented a diversity of ethnicities. In total, 26 women who identified racially as Black (mean age = 26 years) participated in 6 focus groups, which explored body ideals, societal messages, cultural values, racism, and sexism. Narrative data from the focus groups were analyzed using grounded theory. The central category, Body/Self Image, was informed by perceptions of and feelings about not only weight and shape but also hair, skin, and attitude. Three additional categories, each with multiple properties, emerged: Interpersonal Influences, Experiences of Oppression, and Media Messages. These categories interact to explain the central category of Body/Self Image, and an emergent theory is presented. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. CERN Relay Race | 5 June | Get ready!

    CERN Medical Service

    2014-01-01

    In anticipation of the CERN relay race, the Medical Service would like to remind all participants that preparing for this sporting activity is essential - even though it is a short event.   Progressive and regular training. Adequate nutrition and hydration. Advice and information is available at the infirmary in Building 57. Everyone should adapt their physical activity to match their fitness levels, bearing in mind that the aim of this race is not necessarily to achieve great success but to participate in a collective sporting event. In the framework of the "Move! Eat better" campaign and for the third successive year, a 2.4 km route is open to walkers, both beginners and experts. Before, during and after this event, test yourself with a pedometer, available from the CERN infirmary! 

  10. Analysis of a model race car

    Coletta, Vincent P.; Evans, Jonathan

    2008-10-01

    We analyze the motion of a gravity powered model race car on a downhill track of variable slope. Using a simple algebraic function to approximate the height of the track as a function of the distance along the track, and taking account of the rotational energy of the wheels, rolling friction, and air resistance, we obtain analytic expressions for the velocity and time of the car as functions of the distance traveled along the track. Photogates are used to measure the time at selected points along the track, and the measured values are in excellent agreement with the values predicted from theory. The design and analysis of model race cars provides a good application of principles of mechanics and suggests interesting projects for classes in introductory and intermediate mechanics.

  11. The Blindside Flick: Race and Rugby League

    Drew Cottle

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of race was virtually beyond the touchline in Australian rugby league before the 1960s. It was a white man’s game. Institutionalised racism meant that few Aboriginal men played rugby league at the highest professional level. It is now presumed that race and racism has no place in a game where these questions have been historically ‘out of bounds’. The dearth of critical writing in rugby league history indicates that racism in the sport has been subject to a form of social blindness and deemed unworthy of study. Rugby league’s white exclusionist past and the denial of racism in the present era indicate habits of mind which may be described in league argot as the ‘blindside flick’.

  12. RACE, ETHNICITY, AND NIH RESEARCH AWARDS

    Ginther, Donna K.; Schaffer, Walter T.; Schnell, Joshua; Masimore, Beth; Liu, Faye; Haak, Laurel L.; Kington, Raynard

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the association between a U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) R01 applicant’s self-identified race or ethnicity and the probability of receiving an award by using data from the NIH IMPAC II grant database, the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and other sources. Although proposals with strong priority scores were equally likely to be funded regardless of race, we find that Asians are 4 percentage points and black or African-American applicants are 13 percentage points less likely to receive NIH investigator-initiated research funding compared with whites. After controlling for the applicant’s educational background, country of origin, training, previous research awards, publication record, and employer characteristics, we find that black or African-American applicants remain 10 percentage points less likely than whites to be awarded NIH research funding. Our results suggest some leverage points for policy intervention. PMID:21852498

  13. Philosophy of race meets population genetics.

    Spencer, Quayshawn

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, I respond to four common semantic and metaphysical objections that philosophers of race have launched at scholars who interpret recent human genetic clustering results in population genetics as evidence for biological racial realism. I call these objections 'the discreteness objection', 'the visibility objection', 'the very important objection', and 'the objectively real objection.' After motivating each objection, I show that each one stems from implausible philosophical assumptions about the relevant meaning of 'race' or the nature of biological racial realism. In order to be constructive, I end by offering some advice for how we can productively critique attempts to defend biological racial realism based on recent human genetic clustering results. I also offer a clarification of the relevant human-population genetic research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear Iran: the race against the clock

    Delpech, Therese; )

    2005-01-01

    The recent election of an ultra-conservative during the Iranian presidential race seems to further distance the idea of a positive conclusion to negotiations with Tehran. Confronted with a dangerous Iranian agenda, the Europeans have been leading negotiations that have had some positive effect so far, but which also pose the risk of a useless prolongation of discussion. A race against the clock has started in August 2005 when Iran resumed a suspended uranium conversion activity in Isfahan. Time has come for the Security Council to take over - what it should have already done in 2003 - in a way that will make Moscow and, even more Beijing, step out of their somewhat ambiguous stances

  15. Catastrophic biaxial proximal sesamoid bone fractures in UK Thoroughbred races (1999-2004): horse characteristics and racing history.

    Kristoffersen, M; Parkin, T D H; Singer, E R

    2010-07-01

    Catastrophic biaxial proximal sesamoid bone fractures (PSBF) have not yet been described in detail in the UK racing population. To determine the incidence and relative risk (RR) of PSBF in different types of racing in the UK; and to describe horse-level characteristics and racing histories of horses sustaining these injuries. Distal limbs were collected from all racehorses suffering catastrophic fractures during racing at all 59 racecourses in the UK, in a prospective study from February 1999 to December 2004. Post mortem investigation identified the anatomical location and type of fracture. Horse, racing history, race and racecourse details were obtained. Characteristics of the horses that sustained PSBF were described. The incidence and RR of PSBF in the different types of racing in the UK were calculated. Thirty-one horses suffered PSBF during the study period. The incidence of PSBF in all types of race was 0.63 per 10,000 starts (31/494,744). The incidence was highest in flat races on all weather surfaces (1.63 per 10,000 starts: 12/73,467; RR = 4.4 when compared to turf flat racing). Affected horses had an average age of 5.6 years and had started a mean of 28 races at the time of fracture. There is a strong association between type of racing surface and PSBF. Horses competing in flat races on all weather surfaces have an increased risk of PSBF. These fractures appear to happen in experienced horses with several starts, with few fractures occurring within the first season of racing. Further research should focus on identification of underlying pathology of these fractures. Epidemiological studies aimed at the identification of risk factors for PSBF in the UK racing population would require a large number of cases acquired over many years given the relatively low incidence of PSBF.

  16. Ecology-driven stereotypes override race stereotypes

    Williams, Keelah E. G.; Sng, Oliver; Neuberg, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Ecological features shape people’s goals, strategies, and behaviors. Our research suggests that social perceivers possess a lay understanding of ecology’s influence on behavior, resulting in ecology-driven stereotypes. Moreover, because race is confounded with ecology in the United States, Americans’ stereotypes about racial groups may actually reflect their stereotypes about these groups’ presumed home ecologies. In a series of studies, we demonstrate that (i) individuals possess ecology-dri...

  17. Innovation Races with the Possibility of Failure

    Subhasish M. Chowdhury; Stephen Martin

    2011-01-01

    The standard innovation race specification assumes a memoryless exponential distribution for the time to success of an R&D project. This specification implies that a project succeeds, eventually, with probability one. We introduce a positive probability that an R&D project fails. With this modified specification, we compare the non-cooperative and cooperative R&D in terms of innovation effort, consumer surplus, and net social welfare.

  18. Sex, race, gender, and the presidential vote

    Susan B. Hansen

    2016-01-01

    Racial resentment has been shown to have a significant impact on voting by whites in recent presidential elections, and a much larger impact than the traditional gender-gap measure based on the male-female dichotomy. This analysis will use data from the American National Election Studies [ANES] to compare broader indicators of race and gender applicable to the Democratic and Republican parties as well as to respondents’ opinions of appropriate roles for women. Since the 1980s the parties have...

  19. Uncertainty quantification and race car aerodynamics

    Bradford, J; Montomoli, F; D'Ammaro, A

    2014-01-01

    28.04.15 KB. Ok to add accepted version to spiral, embargo expired Car aerodynamics are subjected to a number of random variables which introduce uncertainty into the downforce performance. These can include, but are not limited to, pitch variations and ride height variations. Studying the effect of the random variations in these parameters is important to predict accurately the car performance during the race. Despite their importance the assessment of these variations is difficult and it...

  20. Intake acoustics of naturally aspirated racing engines

    Dolinar, A

    2006-01-01

    The intake system is one of the components on the internal combustion engine most linked with the achievement of the high volumetric efficiency required of naturally aspirated engines. High performance racing engine intake systems have unusual geometry with separate intake pipes (often known as intake trumpets) housed in a common airbox. These intake trumpets are short pipes that are sometimes cylindrical but often conical. The flow within the intake system is ve...

  1. Energy requirements for racing endurance sled dogs*

    Loftus, John P.; Yazwinski, Molly; Milizio, Justin G.; Wakshlag, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    Endurance sled dogs have unique dietary energy requirements. At present, there is disparity in the literature regarding energy expenditure and thus energy requirements of these dogs. We sought to further elucidate energy requirements for endurance sled dogs under field conditions. Three sled dog teams completing the 2011 Yukon Quest volunteered to provide diet history. Nutritional content was evaluated and a mock meal was analysed for each team. Race data were obtained from www.yukonquest.com...

  2. The CERN Relay Race: A Runaway Success!

    Staff Association

    2018-01-01

    24th May saw the traditional Relay Race take place at CERN, organised jointly by the Running Club and the CERN Staff Association. In 2018, the Relay Race lived up to expectations with a record number of participants, with no fewer than 848 entries across different categories! In total 135 teams of 6 runners and 38 walkers completed the course on the Meyrin site in beautiful sunshine. Congratulations to all those who took part! Ghislain Roy, President of the Staff Association, fired the starting pistol for the first batch of runners, which included a team from the Directorate, with the Director General also taking part. Demonstrating interest in this event at the highest level of the Organization. Thank you for this much-appreciated commitment! Also a number of very high-level runners brought added excitement to the 2018 edition. The 1000-meter men’s race was won by Marcin Patecki from the CERN Running Club in 2’40, just in front of Baptiste Fieux from the Berthie Sport team who came in at...

  3. Race and gender discrimination in the Marines.

    Foynes, Melissa Ming; Shipherd, Jillian C; Harrington, Ellen F

    2013-01-01

    Although women of color have been hypothesized to experience double jeopardy in the form of chronic exposure to both race-based (RBD) and gender-based discrimination (GBD; Beal, 1970), few empirical investigations that examine both RBD and GBD in multiple comparison groups have been conducted. In addition to being one of the only simultaneous examinations of RBD and GBD in multiple comparison groups, the current study includes both self-report and objective behavioral data to examine the independent and interactive effects of both forms of discrimination. This study is also the first of its kind to examine these constructs in these ways and to explore their impact in a unique sample of ethnically diverse male and female Marine recruits (N = 1,516). As anticipated, both RBD and GBD had a strong and consistent negative impact on mental health symptoms (e.g., depression, anxiety), independent of the contributions of gender and race. Partial support was found for the hypothesis that people of color are able to maintain resiliency (as measured by physical fitness testing) in the face of low levels of RBD, but are less able to overcome the negative effects of discrimination at high levels. It is interesting to note that the interaction between race, gender, and levels of discrimination was only found with objective physical fitness test scores but not with self-report measures. These findings underscore the importance of including objective measures when assessing the impact of discrimination in order to understand these complex interrelationships.

  4. Race and nation in the Dominican Republic

    Michiel Baud

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Coloring the Nation: Race and Ethnicity in the Dominican Republic. DAVID HOWARD. Oxford: Signal; Boulder: Lynne Rienner, 2001. x + 227 pp. (Paper US$ 19.95 Race and Politics in the Dominican Republic. ERNESTO SAGAS. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2000. xii + 161 pp. (Cloth US$ 49.95, Paper US$ 24.95 Peasants and Religion: A Socioeconomic Study of Dios Olivorio and the Palma Sola Movement in the Dominican Republic. JAN LUNDIUS & MATS LUNDAHL. London: Routledge, 2000. xxvi + 774 pp. (Cloth US$ 135.00 The social and political relations between the Dominican Republic and Haiti, and especially their racial and ethnic contents, are extremely difficult to approach in an even- handed and unbiased way. Much ink has been spilled over the conflictive relations between these two countries, and on race relations in the Dominican Republic. Much of what has been said must be considered unfounded or biased, not to mention sensationalist. The books under review try to pro vide new insights into the issue and at the same time to steer clear of these problems.

  5. Utilities objectives

    Cousin, Y.; Fabian, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    The policy of French and german utilities is to make use of nuclear energy as a long term, competitive and environmentally friendly power supply. The world electricity generation is due to double within the next 30 years. In the next 20 to 30 years the necessity of nuclear energy will be broadly recognized. More than for most industries, to deal properly with nuclear energy requires the combination of a consistent political will, of a proper institutional framework, of strong and legitimate control authorities, of a sophisticated industry and of operators with skilled management and human resources. One of the major risk facing nuclear energy is the loss of competitiveness. This can be achieved only through the combination of an optimized design, a consistent standardization, a proper industrial partnership and a stable long term strategy. Although the existing plants in Western Europe are already very safe, the policy is clearly to enhance the safety of the next generation of nuclear plants which are designing today. The French and German utilities have chosen an evolutionary approach based on experience and proven technologies, with an enhanced defense in depth and an objective of easier operation and maintenance. The cost objective is to maintain and improve what has been achieved in the best existing power plants in both countries. This calls for rational choices and optimized design to meet the safety objectives, a strong standardization policy, short construction times, high availability and enough flexibility to enable optimization of the fuel cycle throughout the lifetime of the plants. The conceptual design phase has proven that the French and German teams from industry and from the utilities are able to pursue both the safety and the cost objectives, basing their decision on a rational approach which could be accepted by the safety authorities. (J.S.)

  6. Radiation: boon or bane?

    Goyal, P.K.

    2013-01-01

    Mankind has been exposed to radiation ever since the very first stage of its evolutionary development. Radiation is one of the greatest discoveries of mankind. Radiation has turned out to be a razor-sharp double-edged sword. In earlier days, it worried no one, because nobody knew about it. The correct application of radiation, be it in any field, have made lives better. Radiation in reality, a boon as well as a curse. Radiation is important but it is time we have to decide where to draw the line. For example, the match stick by itself is just a harmless object. One can use it to light a lamp or light a fire for cooking. In the hands of a mother lighting the lamp or the cooking fire, it becomes beneficial. The same match stick in the hands of a small careless child could prove to be fatal. The increased use of radiation has created fear in the minds of people regarding its possible adverse effects on living systems. Radiation is highly dangerous if not used with caution. This fear is heightened by nuclear fallouts, nuclear accidents and of high levels of natural background radiation in geographical areas in a number of countries. Terrorists may take advantage of technology and may produce nuclear weapons, which is a great risk for entire world. There are numerous reports about increasing health hazards like headache, sleep disorders, lack of concentration, infertility, memory loss, cardiovascular problems, cancer etc. which arises due to over exposure of radiation. Apart from human race, radiation affects other animals and overall environment. Although it has adverse effects on living beings but it cannot be denied that today radiation is a common and valuable tool in medicine, agriculture, research and industry. Radiation has contributed to significant improvements in fields of communications technology and energy. Radiation has proved to be an excellent source in terms of amount of energy production with generation of minimal waste. Even though it produces small

  7. Genetic parameters of racing merit of Thoroughbred horses in steeplechase races

    József Stefler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate variance components of racing ability in Thoroughbreds involved in steeplechase races. Race results were collected from steeplechase races in France (n=9041, in the United Kingdom and Ireland (n=8314 and contained the results of overall 106 020 runs from 1998 to 2003. Performance was measured by two criteria: earnings and ranks after mathematical transformation. The effects of year, sex, age, and race were considered as fixed, animal, permanent environment and maternal as random. Maternal environmental component for ranks were 0.021 in France and 0.000 in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Estimated heritabilities for the ranking criteria were 0.18 (repeatability 0.33 in France and 0.06 (repeatability 0.19 in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The high genetic correlation between the two traits (0.94 and 0.97 gives the opportunity to find out the most suitable criteria for breeding value estimation.

  8. Human sex differences in emotional processing of own-race and other-race faces.

    Ran, Guangming; Chen, Xu; Pan, Yangu

    2014-06-18

    There is evidence that women and men show differences in the perception of affective facial expressions. However, none of the previous studies directly investigated sex differences in emotional processing of own-race and other-race faces. The current study addressed this issue using high time resolution event-related potential techniques. In total, data from 25 participants (13 women and 12 men) were analyzed. It was found that women showed increased N170 amplitudes to negative White faces compared with negative Chinese faces over the right hemisphere electrodes. This result suggests that women show enhanced sensitivity to other-race faces showing negative emotions (fear or disgust), which may contribute toward evolution. However, the current data showed that men had increased N170 amplitudes to happy Chinese versus happy White faces over the left hemisphere electrodes, indicating that men show enhanced sensitivity to own-race faces showing positive emotions (happiness). In this respect, men might use past pleasant emotional experiences to boost recognition of own-race faces.

  9. Thorium utilization

    Trauger, D B [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1978-01-01

    Some of the factors that provide incentive for the utilization of thorium in specific reactor types are explored and the constraints that stand in the way are pointed out. The properties of thorium and derived fuels are discussed, and test and reactor operating experience is reviewed. In addition, symbiotic systems of breeder and converter reactor are suggested as being particularly attractive systems for energy production. Throughout the discussion, the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor and Molten Salt Reactor are treated in some detail because they have been developed primarily for use with thorium fuel cycles.

  10. Japanese utilities' plutonium utilization program

    Matsuo, Yuichiro.

    1996-01-01

    Japan's 10 utility companies are working and will continue to work towards establishing a fully closed nuclear fuel cycle. The key goals of which are: (1) reprocessing spent fuel; (2) recycling recovered uranium and plutonium; and (3) commercializing fast breeder technology by around the year 2030. This course of action by the Japanese electric power industry is in full accordance with Japan's national policy outlined in the government's report ''The Long-Term Program for Research, Development, and Nuclear Energy,'' which was published in June 1994. The Japanese civilian nuclear program is a long-term program that looks into the 21st century and beyond. It is quite true that sustaining the recycling option for energy security and the global environment demands a large investment. For it to be accepted by the public, safety must be the highest priority and will be pursued at a great cost if necessary. In its history, Japan has learned that as technology advances, costs will come down. The Japanese utility industry will continue investment in technology without compromising safety until the recycling option becomes more competitive with other options. This effort will be equally applied to the development of the commercial FBRs. The Japanese utility industry is confident that Japan's stable policy and strong objective to develop competitive and peaceful technology will contribute to the global economy and the environment without increasing the threat of plutonium proliferation

  11. Multiattribute Utility Theory without Expected Utility Foundations

    J. Miyamoto (John); P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractMethods for determining the form of utilities are needed for the implementation of utility theory in specific decisions. An important step forward was achieved when utility theorists characterized useful parametric families of utilities and simplifying decompositions of multiattribute

  12. Broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) resistance breeding utilizing wild Helianthus species

    Wild Helianthus species possess valuable resistance genes for sunflower broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.), especially the 39 largely under-utilized perennial species. Resistance to race F has been transferred into cultivated background via bridging of interspecific amphiploids. More recently, a si...

  13. Gendered race: are infants’ face preferences guided by intersectionality of sex and race?

    Kim, Hojin I.; Johnson, Kerri L.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    People occupy multiple social categories simultaneously (e.g., a White female), and this complex intersectionality affects fundamental aspects of social perception. Here, we examined the possibility that infant face processing may be susceptible to effects of intersectionality of sex and race. Three- and 10-month-old infants were shown a series of computer-generated face pairs (5 s each) that differed according to sex (Female or Male) or race (Asian, Black, or White). All possible combinations of face pairs were tested, and preferences were recorded with an eye tracker. Infants showed preferences for more feminine faces only when they were White, but we found no evidence that White or Asian faces were preferred even though they are relatively more feminized. These findings challenge the notions that infants’ social categories are processed independently of one another and that infants’ preferences for sex or race can be explained from mere exposure. PMID:26388823

  14. Gendered race: are infants' face preferences guided by intersectionality of sex and race?

    Kim, Hojin I; Johnson, Kerri L; Johnson, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    People occupy multiple social categories simultaneously (e.g., a White female), and this complex intersectionality affects fundamental aspects of social perception. Here, we examined the possibility that infant face processing may be susceptible to effects of intersectionality of sex and race. Three- and 10-month-old infants were shown a series of computer-generated face pairs (5 s each) that differed according to sex (Female or Male) or race (Asian, Black, or White). All possible combinations of face pairs were tested, and preferences were recorded with an eye tracker. Infants showed preferences for more feminine faces only when they were White, but we found no evidence that White or Asian faces were preferred even though they are relatively more feminized. These findings challenge the notions that infants' social categories are processed independently of one another and that infants' preferences for sex or race can be explained from mere exposure.

  15. Gendered Race: Are Infants’ Face Preferences Guided by Intersectionality of Sex and Race?

    Hojin I Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available People occupy multiple social categories simultaneously (e.g., a White female, and this complex intersectionality affects fundamental aspects of social perception. Here, we examined the possibility that infant face processing may be susceptible to effects of intersectionality of sex and race. Three- and 10-month-old infants were shown a series of computer-generated face pairs (5 s each that differed according to sex (F or M or race (Asian, Black, or White. All possible combinations of face pairs were tested, and preferences were recorded with an eye tracker. Infants showed preferences for more feminine faces only when they were White, but we found no evidence that White or Asian faces were preferred even though they are relatively more feminized. These findings challenge the notions that infants’ social categories are processed independently of one another and that infants’ preferences for sex or race can be explained from mere exposure.

  16. Radiation chemistry

    Rodgers, F.; Rodgers, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book include: Interaction of ionizing radiation with matter; Primary products in radiation chemistry; Theoretical aspects of radiation chemistry; Theories of the solvated electron; The radiation chemistry of gases; Radiation chemistry of colloidal aggregates; Radiation chemistry of the alkali halides; Radiation chemistry of polymers; Radiation chemistry of biopolymers; Radiation processing and sterilization; and Compound index

  17. Dynamics control of autonomous vehicle at driving limits and experiment on an autonomous formula racing car

    Ni, Jun; Hu, Jibin

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a novel dynamics controller for autonomous vehicle to simultaneously control it to the driving limits and follow the desired path is proposed. The dynamics controller consists of longitudinal and lateral controllers. In longitudinal controller, the G-G diagram is utilized to describe the driving and handling limits of the vehicle. The accurate G-G diagram is obtained based on phase plane approach and a nonlinear vehicle dynamic model with accurate tyre model. In lateral controller, the tyre cornering stiffness is estimated to improve the robustness of the controller. The stability analysis of the closed-looped error dynamics shows that the controller remains stable against parameters uncertainties in extreme condition such as tyre saturation. Finally, an electric autonomous Formula race car developed by the authors is used to validate the proposed controller. The autonomous driving experiment on an oval race track shows the efficiency and robustness of the proposed controller.

  18. Radiation dosage

    Finston, Roland [Health Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    1986-07-01

    Radiation dosage at Bikini Atoll is the result of current soil contamination, a relic of the nuclear weapons testing program of some 30 years ago. The principal contaminants today and some of their physical properties are listed: cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium -239, 240 and americium-241. Cobalt-60 contributes less than 1 to the dose and is not considered significant. A resident of the atoll would accumulate radiation dose (rem) in two ways -- by exposure to radiation emanating from the ground and vegetation, and by exposure to radiation released in the spontaneous decay of radionuclides that have entered his body during the ingestion of locally grown foods. The latter process would account for some 90% of the dose; cesium-137 would be responsible for 0 90% of it. Since BARC's method of estimating dosage differs in some respects from that employed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (Ref.1, LLNL 1982) we are presenting our method in detail. The differences have two sources. First, the numbers used by BARC for the daily ingestion of radionuclides via the diet are higher than LLNL's. Second, BARC's calculation of dose from radionuclide intake utilizes the ICRP system. The net result is that BARC doses are consistently higher than LLNL doses, and in this respect are more conservative.

  19. Radiation dosage

    Finston, Roland

    1986-01-01

    Radiation dosage at Bikini Atoll is the result of current soil contamination, a relic of the nuclear weapons testing program of some 30 years ago. The principal contaminants today and some of their physical properties are listed: cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium -239, 240 and americium-241. Cobalt-60 contributes less than 1 to the dose and is not considered significant. A resident of the atoll would accumulate radiation dose (rem) in two ways -- by exposure to radiation emanating from the ground and vegetation, and by exposure to radiation released in the spontaneous decay of radionuclides that have entered his body during the ingestion of locally grown foods. The latter process would account for some 90% of the dose; cesium-137 would be responsible for 0 90% of it. Since BARC's method of estimating dosage differs in some respects from that employed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (Ref.1, LLNL 1982) we are presenting our method in detail. The differences have two sources. First, the numbers used by BARC for the daily ingestion of radionuclides via the diet are higher than LLNL's. Second, BARC's calculation of dose from radionuclide intake utilizes the ICRP system. The net result is that BARC doses are consistently higher than LLNL doses, and in this respect are more conservative

  20. Race, populations, and genomics: Africa as laboratory.

    Braun, Lundy; Hammonds, Evelynn

    2008-11-01

    Much of the recent debate over race, genetics, and health has focused on the extent to which typological notions of race have biological meaning. Less attention, however, has been paid to the assumptions about the nature of "populations" that both inform contemporary biological and medical research and that underlie the concept of race. Focusing specifically on Africa in the 1930s and 1940s, this paper explores the history of how fluid societies were transformed into bounded units amenable to scientific analysis. In the so-called "Golden Age of Ethnography," university-trained social anthropologists, primarily from Britain and South Africa, took to the field to systematically study, organize, and order the world's diverse peoples. Intent on creating a scientific methodology of neutral observation, they replaced amateur travelers, traders, colonial administrators, and missionaries as authoritative knowledge producers about the customs, beliefs, and languages of indigenous peoples. At the same time, linguists were engaged in unifying African languages and mapping language onto primordial "tribal" territories. We argue that the notion of populations or "tribes" as discrete units suitable for scientific sampling and classification emerged in the 1930s and 1940s with the ethnographic turn in social anthropology and the professionalization and institutionalization of linguistics in Western and South African universities. Once named and entered into international atlases and databases by anthropologists in the U.S., the existence of populations as bounded entities became self-evident, thus setting the stage for their use in large-scale population genetic studies and the contemporary reinvigoration of broad claims of difference based on population identification.

  1. [Medical coverage of a road bicycle race].

    Reifferscheid, Florian; Stuhr, Markus; Harding, Ulf; Schüler, Christine; Thoms, Jürgen; Püschel, Klaus; Kappus, Stefan

    2010-07-01

    Major sport events require adequate expertise and experience concerning medical coverage and support. Medical and ambulance services need to cover both participants and spectators. Likewise, residents at the venue need to be provided for. Concepts have to include the possibility of major incidents related to the event. Using the example of the Hamburg Cyclassics, a road bicycle race and major event for professional and amateur cyclists, this article describes the medical coverage, number of patients, types of injuries and emergencies. Objectives regarding the planning of future events and essential medical coverage are consequently discussed. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart-New York.

  2. Professional Mulatas: Race, Gender and Occupation

    Sonia Maria Giacomini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a research carried out with a group of black women enrolled in the II Course for Professional Formation of Mulatas, the article recovers and analyses the categories through which the students represent their condition of mulatta and their passing to the condition of professional mulata. The mulata, who represents and mediates a Brazilian way of being a woman, sensual and race-mixed, the professional mulata debates herself, permanently, between two poles which are both professional and moral: on the one hand, there is a positive pole, of being a dancer, on the other, there is a threatening and negative one, of being a prostitute.

  3. Understanding how race/ethnicity and gender define age-trajectories of disability: an intersectionality approach.

    Warner, David F; Brown, Tyson H

    2011-04-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated wide disparities in health among racial/ethnic groups and by gender, yet few have examined how race/ethnicity and gender intersect or combine to affect the health of older adults. The tendency of prior research to treat race/ethnicity and gender separately has potentially obscured important differences in how health is produced and maintained, undermining efforts to eliminate health disparities. The current study extends previous research by taking an intersectionality approach (Mullings & Schulz, 2006), grounded in life course theory, conceptualizing and modeling trajectories of functional limitations as dynamic life course processes that are jointly and simultaneously defined by race/ethnicity and gender. Data from the nationally representative 1994-2006 US Health and Retirement Study and growth curve models are utilized to examine racial/ethnic/gender differences in intra-individual change in functional limitations among White, Black and Mexican American Men and Women, and the extent to which differences in life course capital account for group disparities in initial health status and rates of change with age. Results support an intersectionality approach, with all demographic groups exhibiting worse functional limitation trajectories than White Men. Whereas White Men had the lowest disability levels at baseline, White Women and racial/ethnic minority Men had intermediate disability levels and Black and Hispanic Women had the highest disability levels. These health disparities remained stable with age-except among Black Women who experience a trajectory of accelerated disablement. Dissimilar early life social origins, adult socioeconomic status, marital status, and health behaviors explain the racial/ethnic disparities in functional limitations among Men but only partially explain the disparities among Women. Net of controls for life course capital, Women of all racial/ethnic groups have higher levels of functional

  4. Protection of carniolan bee - preserve breed or race of honeybee?

    Božič, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Slovenia protects authentic breed of carniolan bee based on zootechnical legislation. Different varieties of honeybee around the Earth are usually described with the term races and not breeds. Foundations for such nomenclature are in evolution of bee races with natural selection without considerable influence of the men. Acceptance of carniolan bee as a race determines environmental-protection approach in preservation of authentic carniolan bee population. Slovenia is locus typicus of the rac...

  5. Predictor Variables for Marathon Race Time in Recreational Female Runners

    Schmid, Wiebke; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We intended to determine predictor variables of anthropometry and training for marathon race time in recreational female runners in order to predict marathon race time for future novice female runners. Methods Anthropometric characteristics such as body mass, body height, body mass index, circumferences of limbs, thicknesses of skin-folds and body fat as well as training variables such as volume and speed in running training were related to marathon race time using bi- and multi-varia...

  6. Cautious NMPC with Gaussian Process Dynamics for Miniature Race Cars

    Hewing, Lukas; Liniger, Alexander; Zeilinger, Melanie N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive high performance control method for autonomous miniature race cars. Racing dynamics are notoriously hard to model from first principles, which is addressed by means of a cautious nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) approach that learns to improve its dynamics model from data and safely increases racing performance. The approach makes use of a Gaussian Process (GP) and takes residual model uncertainty into account through a chance constrained formulation. ...

  7. Utility training

    Villaros, P.E.; Luxo, Armando; Bruant, Jacques

    1977-01-01

    The study of operational training systems for electro-nuclear utilities may be conducted through two different approaches. A first analytical approach consists of determining, for each position of a given organization chart, the necessary qualifications required and the corresponding complementary training to be provided. This approach applies preferentially to existing classical systems which are converted to nuclear operation with objectives of minimum structural changes and conservation of maximum efficiency. A second synthetical approach consists of determining the specific characteristics of nuclear plant operation, then, of deducting the training contingencies and the optimized organization chart of the plant, while taking into account, at each step, the parameters linked to local conditions. This last approach is studied in some detail in the present paper, taking advantage of its better suitability to the problems raised at the first stage of an electro-nuclear program development. In this respect, the possibility offered by this apprach to coordinate the training system of a given nuclear power station personnel with the overall problem of developing a skilled industrial labor force in the country, may lead to reconsideration of some usual priorities in the economy of operation of the nuclear power plant

  8. Race-ing Class Ladies: Lineages of Privilege in an Elite South African School

    Epstein, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on fieldwork done in Greystone School in South Africa, a single sex girls' school. I explore how the legacy of coloniser and colonised is reconfigured through the history of the school and the particular racialised politics of South Africa, where race and class have always been imbricated in differently nuanced ways before, during…

  9. Critical race theory and the question of safety in dialogues on race ...

    On this foundation, the article moves on to consider the recommendations adduced by Leonardo and Porter (2010:147) and Sue (2013:666-669) as to how dialogues around race and racism can be enhanced. The article begins by contextualising its argument, followed by an overview of the guiding principles of CRT, ...

  10. Towards a Research Framework for Race in Education: Critical Race Theory and Judith Butler

    Chadderton, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    There has been much debate around the extent to which post-structuralist theory can be applied to critical research. In this article, it is argued that aspects of the two approaches can be combined, resulting in productive tensions that point towards a possible new framework for researching race and racism in education in the UK. The article…

  11. Development, Problems and Countermeasures of Chinese Racing Car Industry

    Yang, J. J.

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, motor car racing has developed rapidly in China. However, under the background of maximum vehicle production and car ownership in China, the racing car industry has a long way compared with that of the developed countries. The paper analyzes the current situation and summarizes the problems of Chinese racing car industry with supporting documentation and review of the literature. The future trend of the development of car industry in China is discussed. On the basis of the analysis and prediction, the strategies to respond to the future racing car industry in China are presented.

  12. Radiation and radiation protection

    Landfermann, H.H.; Solbach, C.

    1992-11-01

    The brochure explains the major types of radiation, the radiation sources, effects, uses, and risks, as well as the regulatory system adopted by the government in order to keep the risks as low as possible. (orig./DG) [de

  13. Utilization of radioisotopes in the agriculture

    Cerri, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects of radioisotopes utilization in the agriculture, such as, the use of gamma radiation for genetic improvement of plants; the use of C 14 as tracer for comprehension of the vegetable physiology; the use of nitrogen and phosphorus isotopes in soil fertilization and plant nutrition; the use of radiation for inset sterelization and, measurement of the humidity and density of soils by neutron moderation and attenuation of gamma radiation, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Prognostic value of Chinese race in nasopharyngeal cancer

    Su, Catherine K.; Wang, C.C.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is rare in the United States and common in southern China. Evaluating American patients treated using a uniform technique and staged with CT scanning, we determined whether Chinese and non-Chinese patients differ in presentation and outcome. Methods and Materials: Between 1979 and 1996, 172 patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital received primary radiotherapy with curative intent for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Forty-one patients (24%) were of Chinese descent, and 41% of cancers were classified as having lymphoepithelioma histologic features. Most patients received twice-daily radiotherapy and a brachytherapy boost, receiving a median dose of 72 Gy to the nasopharynx. Results: At the initial presentation, the Chinese patients were significantly younger, less likely to smoke, more likely to have Stage IV disease, and more likely to have cancer with lymphoepithelioma histologic features. After controlling for stage, age, histologic type, and treatment variables, Chinese patients were significantly more likely to develop distant metastases (p<0.05). Although Chinese race does not predict for local control or overall survival, a younger age, continued tobacco use, total radiation dose, and lymphoepithelioma histologic features do. Conclusion: In a large retrospective analysis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Chinese and non-Chinese patients differed significantly in presentation--age, stage, and histologic features--and outcome. We suggest as an explanation differences in intrinsic tumor biology rather than differences in treatment techniques or staging systems. Additional trials in endemic countries are needed to confirm the optimal treatment of Chinese and Chinese-American patients

  15. Race, genetics, and human reproductive strategies.

    Rushton, J P

    1996-02-01

    The international literature on racial differences is reviewed, novel data are reported, and a distinct pattern is found. People of east Asian ancestry and people of African ancestry average at opposite ends of a continuum, with people of European ancestry averaging intermediately, albeit with much variability within each major race. The racial matrix emerges from measures taken of reproductive behavior, sex hormones, twinning rate, speed of physical maturation, personality, family stability, brain size, intelligence, law abidingness, and social organization. An evolutionary theory of human reproduction is proposed, familiar to biologists as the r-K scale of reproductive strategies. At one end of this scale are r-strategies, which emphasize high reproductive rates; at the other end are K-strategies, which emphasize high levels of parental investment. This scale is generally used to compare the life histories of widely disparate species, but here it is used to describe the immensely smaller variations among human races. It is hypothesized that, again on average, Mongoloid people are more K-selected than Caucasoids, who are more K-selected than Negroids. The r-K scale of reproductive strategies is also mapped on to human evolution. Genetic distances indicate that Africans emerged from the ancestral hominid line about 200,000 years ago, with an African/non-African split about 110,000 years ago, and a Caucasoid/Mongoloid split about 41,000 years ago. Such an ordering fits with and explains how and why the variables cluster.

  16. Jocks, gender, race, and adolescent problem drinking.

    Miller, Kathleen E; Hoffman, Joseph H; Barnes, Grace M; Farrell, Michael P; Sabo, Don; Melnick, Merrill J

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol remains the drug of choice for many adolescents; however, the nature of the relationship between athletic involvement and alcohol misuse remains ambiguous. In this article, we used a longitudinal sample of over 600 Western New York adolescents and their families to explore the gender-specific and race-specific relationships between identification with the "jock" label and adolescent alcohol consumption, specifically problem drinking. Operationalization of problem drinking included frequency measures of heavy drinking, binge drinking, and social problems related to alcohol (e.g., trouble with family, friends, school officials over drinking). Self-identified adolescent "jocks" were more likely to engage in problem drinking than their non-jock counterparts, even after controlling for gender, age, race, socioeconomic status, physical maturity, social maturity, and frequency of athletic activity. Jock identity was strongly associated with higher binge drinking frequency in Black adolescent girls. This study underscores the need to distinguish between objective and subjective meanings of athletic involvement when assessing the relationship between sport and adolescent health-risk behavior.

  17. Record Participation in the Relay Race!

    2002-01-01

    CERN has a more sporting spirit than ever before. This is not the result of any survey, but the impression you got as soon as you saw the 62 teams of six runners each speeding around the laboratory in the 32nd annual relay race. This year 11 more teams competed than in 2001.   First changeover: Hervé Cornet takes over from Camille Ruiz Llamas for The Shabbys, and Sebastian Dorthe from Daniel Matteazzi for Charmilles Technologies. Jérôme Bendotti (EP/TA1) just holding off the team from the WHO at the finish. A total of 372 people ran together last Wednesday in this year's relay race, making for a record participation. It also seems that women are becoming more and more attracted by this competition, since this year there were eight ladies teams, also a new record. The first team were The Shabbys in a time of 10 minutes 45 seconds, finishing almost before the second team had started its last 300 metre leg. The 6 runners in each team cover distances of 1000, 800, 800,...

  18. Marked assisted selection for horses racing performance

    Rogério Abdallah Curi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although equines have participated in the forming and development of several civilizations around the world since their domestication 6,000 years ago in comparison to other species that have zootechnical interest, few researches have been done related to animal breeding area, especially in Brazil. Some reasons for that are difficulties associated with the species as well as operational aspects. However, developments in genetics in the last decades contributed to a better understanding of the traits related to reproduction, heath, behavior and performance of domestic animals, including equines. Recent technologies as next generation sequencing methods and the high density chips of SNPs for genotyping allowed some advances in the researches already done. These researches used basically the candidate gene strategy, and identified genomic regions related to diseases and syndromes and, more recently, the performance in sport competition and specific abilities. Using these genomic analysis tools, some regions related to race performance have been identified and based on this information; genetic tests to select superior animals for racing performance have started to be available in the market.

  19. Radiation measurement

    Go, Sung Jin; Kim, Seung Guk; No, Gyeong Seok; Park, Myeong Hwan; Ann, Bong Seon

    1998-03-01

    This book explains technical terms about radiation measurement, which are radiation, radiation quantity and unit such as prefix of international unit, unit for defence purposes of radiation, coefficient of radiation and interaction, kinds and principles of radiation detector, ionization chamber, G-M counter, G-M tube, proportional counter, scintillation detector, semiconductor radiation detector, thermoluminescence dosimeter, PLD, others detector, radiation monitor, neutron detector, calibration of radiation detector, statistics of counting value, activation analysis and electronics circuit of radiation detector.

  20. Does perceived race affect discrimination and recognition of ambiguous-race faces? A test of the sociocognitive hypothesis.

    Rhodes, Gillian; Lie, Hanne C; Ewing, Louise; Evangelista, Emma; Tanaka, James W

    2010-01-01

    Discrimination and recognition are often poorer for other-race than own-race faces. These other-race effects (OREs) have traditionally been attributed to reduced perceptual expertise, resulting from more limited experience, with other-race faces. However, recent findings suggest that sociocognitive factors, such as reduced motivation to individuate other-race faces, may also contribute. If the sociocognitive hypothesis is correct, then it should be possible to alter discrimination and memory performance for identical faces by altering their perceived race. We made identical ambiguous-race morphed faces look either Asian or Caucasian by presenting them in Caucasian or Asian face contexts, respectively. However, this perceived-race manipulation had no effect on either discrimination (Experiment 1) or memory (Experiment 2) for the ambiguous-race faces, despite the presence of the usual OREs in discrimination and recognition of unambiguous Asian and Caucasian faces in our participant population. These results provide no support for the sociocognitive hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).