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Sample records for race feminism crf

  1. Feminism, peer culture, gender and race: a reflection on being a black girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raíssa Francisco Santos

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to discuss studies on the production of children's cultures, highlighting the importance of the role of black girls in pre-school and show how affected they are by racist and sexist relationships in pre-school, legitimized by the capitalist system. From the studies of Kimberly Crenshaw (1989, Helena Hirata (2014, Angela Davis (1982, Lélia Gonzales (1984 and Fernandes (1989 we will provide the historical scope for the subject as inter-relations and processes of the interaction between power relations and categories such as class, race, gender and identity. Racial struggle, a class struggle, and gender equality must all come together in the struggle for the transformation of society.

  2. The Feminizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Timothy

    1995-01-01

    Defines "feminizing" as a form of womanizing in which male professors espouse feminist doctrine in order to receive sexual favors. Feminizing constitutes a new form of sexual harassment, disguised as education but perpetuating male-dominant power sexuality. The modern version of men posing as sympathizers on women's issues in order to seduce them…

  3. Feminism today

    OpenAIRE

    Subhani, Muhammad Imtiaz; Osman, Ms. Amber

    2012-01-01

    Feminism has been noticed at various stages of time and still is unnoticed. The acts of sexism are apparently at large and only dialogues are delivered without any prompt action. This paper highlights the stage of feminism now and its prospects for the better. This topic talks about women from all walks of life and their thirst of justified identity. One has to develop in the conscious of mankind that women are equal to man and their suppleness to adapt to the environment does not give a sign...

  4. Where Feminism Will Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Lucy

    1974-01-01

    Predicts multiple, far-reaching and profound social changes in American society resulting from the growth of feminism which advocates a new and human ethos based on an end to stereotypes, hierarchies, power-based relationships and force. Topics discussed include Federal policies toward women, the effects of feminism on men and building a new…

  5. Design, Research, and Feminism(s)'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Li; Lindström, Kristina; Mazé, Ramia

    2018-01-01

    into practice-based, interventionist and activist modalities to propose, materialize and experience how things may become “otherwise”. This track invite contributions exploring notions of criticality and, or, feminism in design research. Possible topics among others may include: • feminist perspectives...

  6. Gnosticism and Radical Feminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahana, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and radical feminism would easily fall under this definition. There is, however, one major difference: since radical feminism is a relatively recent phenomenon which also benefited from modern modes of text production and preservation, almost all of the sources are still with us. This, in turn, may allow us...... to use radical feminism to make certain aspects of ancient Gnosticism re-emerge from their long submersion, provided that enough similarities can be independently drawn between the two phenomena to merit such a comparison. This paper therefore presents a comparison between concepts and positions...

  7. Introduction: Righting Feminism

    OpenAIRE

    Farris, Sara R.

    2017-01-01

    This is the introduction to a special issue on Righting Feminism. In recent years, we have witnessed the multifarious ways in which feminism as an emancipatory project dedicated to women's liberation has increasingly “converged” with non-emancipatory/racist, conservative, and neo-liberal economic and political agendas. Today, feminist themes are not only being "mainstreamed" but are also increasingly being mobilized to bolster existing power hierarchies as well as neo-liberal and right-wing x...

  8. White Men Misbehaving: Feminism, Afrocentrism, & the Promise of a Critical Standpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    Explores the intersection of race and gender by examining two ascendant political discourses about African American males: (1) Afrocentrism; and (2) black feminist thought. Reviews recent African American history and the development of both Afrocentrism and black feminism. (CFR)

  9. Exclusionary Feminism: Stories of Undergraduate Women of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Seven activist Women of Color shared experiences of racism in feminist activism and provided strategies for building a more inclusive movement through this narrative study. A history of exclusion in the feminist movement and examples of marginalization provide a context for this study. Critical race feminism and intersectionality theory inform the…

  10. Radioimmunoassay for GRF and CRF in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalla, G.K.; Losa, M.; Kaliebe, T.; Stalla, J.; Schopohl, J.; Muller, O.A.; Von Werder, K.

    1987-01-01

    In 1981 the structure of ovine CRF was established. One year later others isolated a 44 amino acid peptide with GH releasing activity from a pancreatic islet cell carcinoma of an acromegalic patient (hp GRF/sup 1-44/). In 1983 the gene of human CRF was cloned and the amino acid sequence of hCRF could be elucidated. It differs in 7 amino acids from oCRF. Many investigators demonstrated the biological activity of these peptides in vitro and in vivo. The aim of the authors study was to establish radioimmunoassays for GRF and hCRF with the synthetic derivates, measure endogenous GFR and CRF and circulating GRF- and CRF-levels after intravenous injection and calculate metabolic clearance rate and half-time of disappearance from serum for both releasing hormones

  11. Ubuntu feminism: Tentative reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drucilla Cornell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The starting-point for the article is to provide a brief background on the Ubuntu Project that Prof. Drucilla Cornell convened in 2003; most notably the interviews conducted in Khayamandi, the support of a sewing collective, and the continued search to launch an Ubuntu Women�s Centre. The article will reflect on some of the philosophical underpinnings of ubuntu, whereafter debates in Western feminism will be revisited. Ubuntu feminism is suggested as a possible response to these types of feminisms. The authors support an understanding of ubuntu as critique and ubuntu feminism accordingly as a critical intervention that recalls a politics of refusal. The article ends by raising the importance of thinking about spatiality through ubuntu, and vice versa. It may seem strange to title an article Ubuntu feminism when feminism itself has often been identified as a European or Western idea. But, this article will argue that ubuntu offers conceptions of transindividuality and ways of social belonging that could respond in a meaningful way to some of European feminism�s own dilemmas and contradictions. Famously, one of the most intense debates in feminism was between those who defended an ethic of care in a relational view of the self, on one side, and those feminists who held on to more traditional conceptions of justice, placing an emphasis on individuality and autonomy, on the other side. The authors will suggest that ubuntu could address this tension in feminism. Thus, in this article the focus will not simply be on ubuntu, in order to recognise that there are other intellectual heritages worthy of consideration, other than those in Europe and the United States. It will also take a next step in arguing that ubuntu may be a better standpoint entirely from which to continue thinking about what it means to be a human being, as well as how to conceive of the integral interconnection human beings all have with one another. This connection through

  12. Marx and Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Federici

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This contribution focuses on aspects of feminism and gender in Marx’s theory. Marx’s methodology has given us the tools and the categories enabling us to think together gender and class, feminism and anti-capitalism. However, his contribution is an indirect one because Marx never developed a theory of gender. It is important to include the role of reproductive labour, slave labour, migrant labour, labour in the Global South and the unemployed in the critical analysis of capitalism and its division of labour. Reproductive labour is the largest activity on this planet and a major ground of divisions within the working class. A different Marx was discovered in the 1970s by feminists who turned to his work searching for a theory capable of explaining the roots of women’s oppression from a class viewpoint. The result has been a theoretical revolution that has changed both Marxism and Feminism. What was redefined by the realisation of the centrality of women’s unpaid labour in the home to the production of the work-force was not domestic work alone but the nature of capitalism itself and the struggle against it. This meant to turn Marx upside down to make his work important for feminism.

  13. Millian Liberal Feminism Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulloch, Gail

    1989-01-01

    It is proposed that John Stuart Mill's principles on liberal feminism are still relevant and have not yet been fully implemented. A Millian account of equality of opportunity and discrimination is developed, and current measures in the field of sexual equality are critiqued. (Author/MSE)

  14. Feminism's Perverse Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Elaine

    2000-01-01

    Discusses directions in which literary, cultural, ethnic, and women's studies have moved in recent years, noting what has been lost by following certain discursive directions proposed by feminism and rejecting others. Examines the steady move toward separation of political from poetic and recommends a return to the literary imagination and…

  15. Discursive psychology and feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Ann

    2012-09-01

    This appraisal highlights the productive engagement between feminism and discursive psychology (DP). It discusses some of the confluence and tensions between DP and feminism. The two share critical perspectives on science and psychology, a concern with prejudice, and have ideas in common about the constructed nature of social categories, such as gender. One difficulty arises from the relativism associated with the post-structural theoretical underpinnings of DP, which can be understood as politically paralyzing. Another problem comes from an endorsement of a conversation analytic mentality, where identity categories such as gender can only be legitimately used in an analysis when participants' orient to their relevance. The high-profile debates and literature in DP shows it has made a notable contribution to social psychology and its influence can also be found in other areas. A particular influence of DP highlighted in the present appraisal is on gender and language research. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  16. [Feminism and qualitative nursing research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun; Yih, Bong-Sook

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe feminism and to propose the integration of a feminist method into qualitative nursing methodology in order to expand the body of nursing knowledge. The world view of feminism including philosophy, epistemology and methodology was outlined, and a feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were suggested as a way of strengthening nursing research methodology using literature review. Four different philosophical perspectives of feminism, that is, liberal feminism, radical feminism, Marxist feminism, and social feminism were described. Also epistemological perspectives including feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint, and postmodern feminism, were explained and were related to the methodology and methods of feminism. To enhance the strengths of nursing research within the feminist perspectives, feminist grounded theory and feminist ethnography were exemplified in the paradigm of qualitative nursing research. This paper suggested that incorporation of feminist approaches within nursing is a valuable attempt to expand the body of nursing knowledge and to enhance the quality of nursing care services by rectifying male-oriented knowledge and by empowering women in the care of other people as well as themselves.

  17. Sciences from below: feminisms, postcolonialities, and modernities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Harlan

    2010-01-01

    Sandra Harding's newest book, Sciences from Below: Feminisms, Postcolonialities, and Modernities, continues her work in feminist standpoint theory and science and technologies studies, asking how we might judge "good" science. Attentive to race, class, gender, and imperialism, Harding critically examines Northern and Southern sciences and technologies by adopting the perspective of those who see from below. This vision from the peripheries lets Harding question stories of modern scientific progress, revealing a multiplicity of "ethnosciences" and critiquing modernity itself. However, while Harding aims to produce knowledge for the North's others by emphasizing woman's experience, she fails to question the category "woman," ignoring contemporary transgender and queer scholarship. Further, it is Harding's care for the North's subjugated others that motivates her writing, revealing that the struggle to achieve the standpoint "from below" so critical to her project is fueled by what her ally Maria Puig de la Bellacasa would term not thinking from, but thinking with, or, more precisely, "thinking with care."

  18. The CRF1 and the CRF2 receptor mediate recognition memory deficits and vulnerability induced by opiate withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisot, Nadège; Contarino, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Opiate use disorders are associated with impaired cognitive function and altered stress-responsive systems. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system mediates stress responses via CRF1 and CRF2 receptors and may be implicated in substance use disorders. However, the specific role for each of the two known CRF receptor subtypes in cognitive impairment induced by opiate administration and withdrawal remains to be elucidated. In the present study, CRF1-/-, CRF2-/- and their respective wild-type mice are injected with escalating doses of morphine and cognitive function assessed by the novel object recognition (NOR) memory task throughout relatively long periods of opiate withdrawal. Early (2 days) phases of opiate withdrawal impair NOR memory in wild-type, CRF1-/- and CRF2-/- mice. However, the duration of opiate withdrawal-induced NOR memory deficits is prolonged in CRF1-/- but shortened in CRF2-/- mice, as compared to their respective wild-type mice, indicating opposite roles for the two CRF receptor subtypes. Nevertheless, following apparent recovery, exposure to an environmental stressor induces the reemergence of NOR memory deficits in long-term opiate-withdrawn wild-type but not CRF1-/- or CRF2-/- mice, indicating an essential role for both CRF receptor subtypes in stress vulnerability. These findings bring initial evidence of a complex physiopathological role for the CRF system in cognitive deficits and the long-lasting vulnerability induced by opiate drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. "Hope in Failure": A Level Students, Discursive Agency, Post-Feminism and Feminism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with Pollock's comment that Judith Butler "finds hope in failure" and its aim is to explore what "hope in failure" means in relation to A Level students' engagements with post-feminism and feminism. The article grounds its argument in an exploration of how post-feminism and feminism intersect with sixth form…

  20. Feminism and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, P L; Wheeler, C E

    1985-01-01

    Feminism provides a personal, philosophic and political means for analyzing the realities of women's lives as lived in patriarchal systems. It is not a single line of thought; multiple approaches have been developed that provide diverse avenues for confronting systematic injustices while learning to value ourselves as women. Jo Ann Ashley, recognizing that new realities must emerge from within nursing rather than from other groups, states: "For many years we have heard that nursing is at the crossroads. Nursing never seems to get over being at a crossroads. Indeed, nursing has been at a crossroads many times, but instead of taking a new road, leaders in the profession always choose to continue bearing the burden of continuing to live out the subservient role under the patriarchal system, rather than taking a new road that can lead beyond patriarchy. Nursing is no longer at a crossroads. It is at a turning point. It needs to turn away from being the "token torturer" of itself and other women. It needs to turn toward the health awaiting women in a woman-defined, woman-created world that lies beyond patriarchal ideas and institutions." Movement in this direction requires becoming familiar with feminist literature and the insights that women scholars have provided. In nursing, a feminist perspective requires an uncompromising questioning of the forces that divide us from one another, the ethics of our actions, and our co-optation into the unhealthy environment of the current health care system.

  1. Reconciling Islam and feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, I

    1999-03-01

    This paper objects to the popular view that Islam supports a segregated social system where women are marginalized, and argues that certain Islamic texts are supportive of women's rights. The article proposes that Islam reconcile with feminism by returning to the Qur'an. The Qur'an provides rights which address the common complaints of women such as lack of freedom to make decisions for themselves and the inability to earn an income. One example is a verse in the Qur'an (4:34) that is frequently interpreted as giving women complete control over their own income and property. This article also explains how Islam has been used as a method of controlling women, particularly in the practices of veiling and purdah (seclusion). The article points out the need to engage in Islam from a position of knowing, and to ensure that Muslim women have access to this knowledge. It is only through this knowledge that women can assert their rights and challenge patriarchal interpretations of Islam.

  2. CRF receptor antagonist astressin-B reverses and prevents alopecia in CRF over-expressing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixin Wang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF signaling pathways are involved in the stress response, and there is growing evidence supporting hair growth inhibition of murine hair follicle in vivo upon stress exposure. We investigated whether the blockade of CRF receptors influences the development of hair loss in CRF over-expressing (OE-mice that display phenotypes of Cushing's syndrome and chronic stress, including alopecia. The non-selective CRF receptors antagonist, astressin-B (5 µg/mouse injected peripherally once a day for 5 days in 4-9 months old CRF-OE alopecic mice induced pigmentation and hair re-growth that was largely retained for over 4 months. In young CRF-OE mice, astressin-B prevented the development of alopecia that occurred in saline-treated mice. Histological examination indicated that alopecic CRF-OE mice had hair follicle atrophy and that astressin-B revived the hair follicle from the telogen to anagen phase. However, astressin-B did not show any effect on the elevated plasma corticosterone levels and the increased weights of adrenal glands and visceral fat in CRF-OE mice. The selective CRF₂ receptor antagonist, astressin₂-B had moderate effect on pigmentation, but not on hair re-growth. The commercial drug for alopecia, minoxidil only showed partial effect on hair re-growth. These data support the existence of a key molecular switching mechanism triggered by blocking peripheral CRF receptors with an antagonist to reset hair growth in a mouse model of alopecia associated with chronic stress.

  3. Effects of fluoxetine on CRF and CRF1 expression in rats exposed to the learned helplessness paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Macedo, Georgina Valeria; Cladouchos, María Laura; Sifonios, Laura; Cassanelli, Pablo Martín; Wikinski, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    Stress is a common antecedent reported by people suffering major depression. In these patients, extrahypothalamic brain areas, like the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala (BLA), have been found to be affected. The BLA synthesizes CRF, a mediator of the stress response, and projects to hippocampus. The main hippocampal target for this peptide is the CRF subtype 1 receptor (CRF1). Evidence points to a relationship between dysregulation of CRF/CRF1 extrahypothalamic signaling and depression. Because selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the first-line pharmacological treatment for depression, we investigated the effect of chronic treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine on long-term changes in CRF/CRF1 signaling in animals showing a depressive-like behavior. Male Wistar rats were exposed to the learned helplessness paradigm (LH). After evaluation of behavioral impairment, the animals were treated with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg i.p.) or saline for 21 days. We measured BLA CRF expression with RT-PCR and CRF1 expression in CA3 and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus with in situ hybridization. We also studied the activation of one of CRF1's major intracellular signaling targets, the extracellular signal-related kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in CA3. In saline-treated LH animals, CRF expression in the BLA increased, while hippocampal CRF1 expression and ERK1/2 activation decreased. Treatment with fluoxetine reversed the changes in CRF and CRF1 expressions, but not in ERK1/2 activation. In animals exposed to the learned helplessness paradigm, there are long-term changes in CRF and CRF1 expression that are restored with a behaviorally effective antidepressant treatment.

  4. The CRF system and social behavior: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Caroline M; Ryabinin, Andrey E

    2013-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system plays a key role in a diversity of behaviors accompanying stress, anxiety and depression. There is also substantial research on relationships between social behaviors and the CRF system in a variety of taxa including fish, birds, rodents, and primates. Some of these relationships are due to the broad role of CRF and urocortins in stress and anxiety, but these peptides also modulate social behavior specifically. For example, the social interaction (SI) test is often used to measure anxiety-like behavior. Many components of the CRF system including CRF, urocortin1, and the R1 receptor have been implicated in SI, via general effects on anxiety as well as specific effects depending on the brain region. The CRF system is also highly responsive to chronic social stressors such as social defeat and isolation. Animals exposed to these stressors display a number of anxiety- and stress-related behaviors, accompanied by changes in specific components the CRF system. Although the primary focus of CRF research on social behavior has been on the deleterious effects of social stress, there are also insights on a role for CRF and urocortins in prosocial and affiliative behaviors. The CRF system has been implicated in parental care, maternal defense, sexual behavior, and pair bonding. Species differences in the ligands and CRF receptors have been observed in vole and bird species differing in social behavior. Exogenous administration of CRF facilitates partner preference formation in monogamous male prairie voles, and these effects are dependent on both the CRF R1 and R2 receptors. These findings are particularly interesting as studies have also implicated the CRF and urocortins in social memory. With the rapid progress of social neuroscience and in understanding the complex structure of the CRF system, the next challenge is in parsing the exact contribution of individual components of this system to specific social behaviors.

  5. The CRF System and Social Behavior: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline M Hostetler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF system plays a key role in a diversity of behaviors accompanying stress, anxiety and depression. There is also substantial research on relationships between social behaviors and the CRF system in a variety of taxa including fish, birds, rodents, and primates. Some of these relationships are due to the broad role of CRF and urocortins in stress and anxiety, but these peptides also modulate social behavior specifically. For example, the social interaction (SI test is often used to measure anxiety-like behavior. Many components of the CRF system including CRF, urocortin1, and the R1 receptor have been implicated in SI, via general effects on anxiety as well as specific effects depending on the brain region. The CRF system is also highly responsive to chronic social stressors such as social defeat and isolation. Animals exposed to these stressors display a number of anxiety- and stress-related behaviors, accompanied by changes in specific components the CRF system. Although the primary focus of CRF research on social behavior has been on the deleterious effects of social stress, there are also insights on a role for CRF and urocortins in prosocial and affiliative behaviors. The CRF system has been implicated in parental care, maternal defense, sexual behavior, and pair bonding. Species differences in the ligands and CRF receptors have been observed in vole and bird species differing in social behavior. Exogenous administration of CRF facilitates partner preference formation in monogamous male prairie voles, and these effects are dependent on both the CRF R1 and R2 receptors. These findings are particularly interesting as studies have also implicated the CRF and urocortins in social memory. With the rapid progress of social neuroscience and in understanding the complex structure of the CRF system, the next challenge is in parsing the exact contribution of individual components of this system to specific social

  6. Populism and Feminism: Odd Bedfellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroes, Rob

    2018-01-01

    In this era of populist insurgency breaking the mold of democratic politics, two movements clashed.They represented opposite sides of the political spectrum, one emancipatory, the other exclusionary. One may be identified as feminism, the other as populism. This essay analyzes both concepts and explores their connection.

  7. Diana Leonard and Materialist Feminism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stevi

    2013-01-01

    This tribute to Diana Leonard focuses on her contribution to materialist feminism, both through bringing the work of key French theorists to the attention of an Anglophone audience and through her own sociological work on the family, marriage and childhood. In so doing it draws attention to the importance of her work as editor and…

  8. Feminism, Neoliberalism, and Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeichel, Mardi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the sparse presence of women in social studies education and to consider the possibility of a confluence of feminism and neoliberalism within the most widely distributed National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) publication, "Social Education." Using poststructural conceptions of discourse, the author…

  9. To Brazil of my Dreams: Feminism and Modernism in the Utopia of Adalzira Bittencourt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernardete Ramos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay articulates Brazilian writer Adalzira Bittencourt’s feminism to the modernist movement in Brazil, drawing relationships between her modernist utopia – which cannot be restricted to concerns about women’s power – and the national dream that projected the nation in the 1920s. It also articulates Bittencourt’s brand of feminism – in line with the Feminine Republican Party’s ideology (in the 1920s and 1930s and under the influence of eugenic laws or hygienic practices – with the hegemonic discourses emphasizing maternity as women’s mission in improving both the race and the nation.

  10. CRF1 receptor-deficiency increases cocaine reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contarino, Angelo; Kitchener, Pierre; Vallée, Monique; Papaleo, Francesco; Piazza, Pier-Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    Stimulant drugs produce reward but also activate stress-responsive systems. The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis stress-responsive systems are activated by stimulant drugs. However, their role in stimulant drug-induced reward remains poorly understood. Herein, we report that CRF 1 receptor-deficient (CRF 1 -/-), but not wild-type, mice show conditioned place preference (CPP) responses to a relatively low cocaine dose (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Conversely, wild-type, but not CRF 1 -/-, mice display CPP responses to a relatively high cocaine dose (20 mg/kg, i.p.), indicating that CRF 1 receptor-deficiency alters the rewarding effects of cocaine. Acute pharmacological antagonism of the CRF 1 receptor by antalarmin also eliminates cocaine reward. Nevertheless, CRF 1 -/- mice display higher stereotypy responses to cocaine than wild-type mice. Despite the very low plasma corticosterone concentration, CRF 1 -/- mice show higher nuclear glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels in the brain region of the hippocampus than wild-type mice. Full rescue of wild-type-like corticosterone and GR circadian rhythm and level in CRF 1 -/- mice by exogenous corticosterone does not affect CRF 1 receptor-dependent cocaine reward but induces stereotypy responses to cocaine. These results indicate a critical role for the CRF 1 receptor in cocaine reward, independently of the closely related HPA axis activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. "Women's Work": Feminization and Media Production

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Erin Truesdell

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines historically feminized professions in the American film industry, such as casting, script supervision and secretaryial positions -work that remains female-dominated or feminized across gender today. To account for the continued existence of these gendered sectors of labor and illuminate the place of feminized labor in the industrial logic of media production, the dissertation locates the origins of industrial notions of "women's work" in the sex segregation practice...

  12. Civil disobedience, feminism and body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalía Romero Pérez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, feminist civil disobedience is analysed as democracy’s daughter. As regards the analysis of different interpretations of natural rights, the path of the ownership of the own body is followed from Sufragism and its epoch until the global world. At the present time, the right to own your body is defended from opposite positions, such as Femen and Islamic Feminism.

  13. Gender, race, and class: intersecting oppressions and convergences reproducing inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Biroli

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses approaches to the convergences between gender, class and race within theoretical debates in the last decades, focusing especially on feminism. It aims to present a broad and non-homogeneous field of researches, that has as a common ground the understanding that oppressions are multiple and complex and it is not possible to understand social inequalities when one variable is taken separately. The relative prominence of each axe, its meaning and the comprehension of the way they operate together vary in the three different sets of approaches discussed in the article: marxist or socialist feminism, black feminism, and the studies of intersectionalities

  14. What feminism can do for bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, L M

    2001-01-01

    Feminist criticism of health care and of bioethics has become increasingly rich and sophisticated in the last years of the twentieth century. Nonetheless, this body of work remains quite marginalized. I believe that there are (at least) two reasons for this. First, many people are still confused about feminism. Second, many people are unconvinced that significant sexism still exists and are therefore unreceptive to arguments that it should be remedied if there is no larger benefit. In this essay I argue for a thin, "core" conception of feminism that is easy to understand and difficult to reject. Core feminism would render debate within feminism more fruitful, clear the way for appropriate recognition of differences among women and their circumstances, provide intellectually compelling reasons for current non-feminists to adopt a feminist outlook, and facilitate mutually beneficial cooperation between feminism and other progressive social movements. This conception of feminism also makes it clear that feminism is part of a larger egalitarian moral and political agenda, and adopting it would help bioethics focus on the most urgent moral priorities. In addition, integrating core feminism into bioethics would open a gateway to the more speculative parts of feminist work where a wealth of creative thinking is occurring. Engaging with this feminist work would challenge and strengthen mainstream approaches: it should also motivate mainstream bioethicists to explore other currently marginalized parts of bioethics.

  15. [Feminism in nursing science in Korea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Myungsun

    2005-08-01

    Although feminism has been actively discussed and applied to nursing in Western societies since the 1980s, it is little known among Korean scholars as well as Korean nurses. This article explores the use of feminist perspectives in nursing science in other developed countries and suggests how feminism could be applied to nursing science in Korea. The literature related to nursing and feminism were reviewed in terms of nursing practice, education, and research. This article describes what feminism is and how feminism and nursing have evolved historically over time in other countries, especially in Western societies. In addition, it discusses how it can be applied to nursing practice, education, and research in Korea. Accepting feminist perspective in Korean nursing could benefit in empowering nurses by valuing nursing, by raising self-esteem of nurses, and by raising the consciousness of socio-political realities. Eventually it could benefit in changing and developing nursing science in Korea.

  16. Feminism and Women with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA LAURA SERRA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Women with disabilities are doubly discriminated against and socially excluded: through gender and disability. In order to perform an in-depth analysis of their actual situation, it is necessary to understand which models have been able to provide legal and political answers to this issue. Hence, the feminist model can be identified, on the basis of which we might elaborate upon its possible ties with the social model of disability. This study shows the correctness of feminist conclusions when dealing with inequality between men and women, but it also proves the inaccurateness of feminism in its approach on women with disabilities.

  17. Midwives, gender equality and feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Denis

    2016-03-01

    Gender inequality and the harmful effects of patriarchy are sustaining the wide spread oppression of women across the world and this is also having an impact on maternity services with unacceptable rates of maternal mortality, the continued under investment in the midwifery profession and the limiting of women's place of birth options. However alongside these effects, the current zeitgeist is affirming an alignment of feminism and gender equality such that both have a high profile in public discourse. This presents a once in a generation opportunity for midwives to self-declare as feminists and commit to righting the wrongs of this most pernicious form of discrimination.

  18. The role of non-CRF inhibition in contour detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorescu, C.; Petkov, N.; Westenberg, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    We propose a biologically motivated computational step, called non-classical receptive field (non-CRF) inhibition, to improve the performance of contour detectors. Non-CRF inhibition is exhibited by 80% of the orientation selective neurons in the primary visual cortex of macaque monkeys and has been

  19. Feminism between Islamism and Postmodernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassyla Tamzali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the wider context of dialogue among cultures, the analysis of women’s conditions in Muslim cultures -or in those European milieus affected by immigration from Maghreb- proves to be a difficult task, marked as it is by an ambiguity which is inherent to those power relations defined by economic and political balances between states at a global level. The debate on the veil is an exemplifying issue of the terms in which the dialogue is conducted between European nations and Islamist movements, and it sets the limits by which -given a certain power structure- women’s freedom is lost in the name of a culture presenting itself as promoting the value of differences. Within the European debate, Islamic feminism represents the main interlocutor of international institutions which -unable to solve those more radical questions giving origin to conflicts between peoples- exclude from their analysis other forms of social critique, in this way favoring culturalist and differentialist approaches. All considered, though, Islamic feminism does not limit itself to represent the positions expressed by those Maghreb and Arab feminists that -in reaction to a cultural model continuing to propose the image of a society based on the absolute control of women- keep struggling to reaffirm their right to freedom and equality: they instead carry on the deconstruction work that originally gave birth to world women’s movements.

  20. 'Generations' and 'waves' in Nordic Feminism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stormhøj, Christel; Halsaa, Beatrice; Stoltz, Pauline

    shift; on the one hand to a conservative, highly individualized, post-feminist generation which takes feminism for granted, and on the other hand a radically new, inclusive, diverse and transnational generation of feminism (Dean, 2009; McRobbie, 2009; Widerberg, 2001). The empirical point of departure...... (and some men). Examining the issue of generations of feminisms, we will look into empirical dimensions, such as type and strategy of mobilization, problem-representation and causes producing social bads, demands and strategies, goals and aims....

  1. Grin1 receptor deletion within CRF neurons enhances fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette Gafford

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF dysregulation is implicated in mood and anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. CRF is expressed in areas engaged in fear and anxiety processing including the central amygdala (CeA. Complicating our ability to study the contribution of CRF-containing neurons to fear and anxiety behavior is the wide variety of cell types in which CRF is expressed. To manipulate specific subpopulations of CRF containing neurons, our lab has developed a mouse with a Cre recombinase gene driven by a CRF promoter (CRFp3.0Cre (Martin et al., 2010. In these studies, mice that have the gene that encodes NR1 (Grin1 flanked by loxP sites (floxed were crossed with our previously developed CRFp3.0Cre mouse to selectively disrupt Grin1 within CRF containing neurons (Cre+/fGrin1+. We find that disruption of Grin1 in CRF neurons did not affect baseline levels of anxiety, locomotion, pain sensitivity or exploration of a novel object. However, baseline expression of Grin1 was decreased in Cre+/fGrin1+ mice as measured by RTPCR. Cre+/fGrin1+ mice showed enhanced auditory fear acquisition and retention without showing any significant effect on fear extinction. We measured Gria1, the gene that encodes AMPAR1 and the CREB activator Creb1 in the amygdala of Cre+/fGrin1+ mice after fear conditioning. Both Gria1 and Creb1 were enhanced in the amygdala after training. To determine if the Grin1-expressing CRF neurons within the CeA are responsible for the enhancement of fear memory in adults, we infused a lentivirus with Cre driven by a CRF promoter (LV pCRF-Cre/fGrin1+ into the CeA of floxed Grin1 mice. Cre driven deletion of Grin1 specifically within CRF expressing cells in the CeA also resulted in enhanced fear memory acquisition and retention. Altogether, these findings suggest that selective disruption of Grin1 within CeA CRF neurons strongly enhances fear memory.

  2. Family Structure, Race, and the Feminization of Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniesner, Thomas J.; And Others.

    For women, leaving home, marriage, childbearing, and remarriage can create drastic changes in income. Divorce or giving birth out of wedlock frequently accompanies entry into poverty, while marriage or remarriage often results in exit from poverty. In the United States since 1970, the increase in the number of poor women greatly exceeded that of…

  3. Critical Race Feminism and the Complex Challenges of Educational Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers-McKee, Cherese D.; Hytten, Kathy

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the past several decades, there has been an abundance of research about school reform, particularly in schools predominated by students of color and students experiencing poverty. Critics acknowledge that many reform efforts have failed and comprehensive solutions to school change remain elusive. In this article, we provide an overview…

  4. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-01-01

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of 125 I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR

  5. A Central Amygdala CRF Circuit Facilitates Learning about Weak Threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Christina A; Soden, Marta E; Baird, Madison A; Miller, Samara M; Schulkin, Jay; Palmiter, Richard D; Clark, Michael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2017-01-04

    Fear is a graded central motive state ranging from mild to intense. As threat intensity increases, fear transitions from discriminative to generalized. The circuit mechanisms that process threats of different intensity are not well resolved. Here, we isolate a unique population of locally projecting neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) that produce the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). CRF-producing neurons and CRF in the CeA are required for discriminative fear, but both are dispensable for generalized fear at high US intensities. Consistent with a role in discriminative fear, CRF neurons undergo plasticity following threat conditioning and selectively respond to threat-predictive cues. We further show that excitability of genetically isolated CRF-receptive (CRFR1) neurons in the CeA is potently enhanced by CRF and that CRFR1 signaling in the CeA is critical for discriminative fear. These findings demonstrate a novel CRF gain-control circuit and show separable pathways for graded fear processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Feminism and public health nursing: partners for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipert, B D

    2001-01-01

    It is a well-known fact that nursing and feminism have enjoyed an uneasy alliance. In recent years, however, nursing has begun to recognize the importance of feminism. Nevertheless, the literature still rarely addresses the relevance of feminism for public health nursing. In this article, I articulate the relevance of feminism for public health nursing knowledge and practice. First, I define and describe feminism and public health nursing and then I discuss the importance of feminism for public health nursing practice. The importance of feminism for the metaparadigm concepts of public health nursing is then reviewed. Finally, I examine several existing challenges relating to feminism and public health nursing research, education, and practice. The thesis of this article is that feminism is vitally important for the development of public health nursing and for public health care.

  7. Feminism and women's health professions in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Tracey L; Bourgeault, Ivy Lynn

    2003-01-01

    Historically, prevailing gender ideologies were an important element in both the exclusionary strategies employed by male occupational groups and the countervailing responses by female groups. The way in which evolving gender ideologies, and feminism in particular, influence the continuing struggle for greater status and recognition by female professions, however, remains to be fully explored. In this paper, we examine the impact and the role of feminism and feminist ideologies within three female professional projects: nursing, dental hygiene and midwifery in Ontario. We argue that feminism provides an ideology of opposition that enables leaders in these professions to battle against professional inequalities by laying bare the gender inequalities that underlie them. Framing their struggles in feminist terms, female professions also seek recognition for the uniquely female contribution they make to the health care division of labour. At the same time, there exists a tension between ideals of feminism and ideals of professionalism, that has the potential to undermine female professional projects.

  8. Black Feminism: An Integrated Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Katie L

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a systematic literature review exploring the uses and potential benefits of Black Feminism in nursing research. Black Feminism may benefit knowledge development for nursing in a variety of ways, such as illuminating the multifaceted factors of Black women's identities in helping scholars move away from generalization of experiences, to improve understanding of health disparities, and making such changes by broadening the social consciousness of the nurse researchers, who are predominantly White. Discrimination in health disparities may be deconstructed if the focus is placed on asking different research questions and offering different interventions with the social structures that contributes to such actions. When Black Feminism guides the research method (including research questions and analysis), the accuracy of representing the experiences of Black women is increased. In this research, Black Feminism highlights experience, coping mechanisms, spiritual values, a tradition of strength, and a holistic view of identity.

  9. The selective advantage of host feminization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tommy; Nielsen, Anders Isberg; Stig-Jørgensen, Anders Isak

    2012-01-01

    Male crabs infected by parasitic barnacles (Rhizocephala) are known to be morphologically feminized. Here, we investigate morphological chances in green crabs, Carcinus maenas, induced by the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini. Infected males acquire a broader, longer and segmented abdomen......, fringed with marginal setae. Copulatory appendages and pereopods are reduced in length, and the chelae become smaller. The feminization show great individual variation. Males with scars from lost externae, the parasites reproductive organ situated under the abdomen, are less modified than males carrying...... an externa, and the feminization is more pronounced in smaller than in larger males. No super-feminization is evident in female crabs that remain morphologically unaffected by infection. The protective value of a parasitically induced enlargement of the male abdomen may constitute an adaptation...

  10. Chronic renal failure (CRF in children in Jugoslavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the demographic variables of chronic non-terminal (CRF and terminal (TRF renal failure patients (pts younger than 19 years treated in Serbia in June 2001. The prevalence of CRF pts was registered as 4,7 per million total population (pmtp or 14,1 per million child population (pmcp while corresponding values for TRF pts were 4,5 pmtp or 13,5 pmcp. The incidence of TRF pts during the period Jan.2000-Jan.2002 was 4,35 pmcp. Boys dominated only among CRF pts (34:14; 60,4% beeing between the ages of 6 and 19 yrs while at the time of diagnosis of HBI, 33,3 % of boys were yanger than 2 yrs.The causes of CRF were: reflux nephropathy 58,3%, congenital kidney disease 16,7%, familial/hereditary 14,6% glomerulonephritis 6,2% and Willms tu 4,1%. Reflux nephropathy was also the most common underlying disease of TRF accounted for 36,9% of total cases while glomerulonephritis was responsible for 23,9 %. Reflux nephropathy was associated with neural tube defect in 53,3% and with congenital lower urinary tract obstruction in 66,7%. The most of CRF (81,25% and TRF pts (95,6% were from Serbia, the others were from Monte Negro and Republic Srpska. The most of CRF (65% and TRF (80% pts were treated in University Children’s Hospital in Belgrade. Of CRF pts 46% had serum sreatinine 100-200 μmol/l, in 11% of pts it was 400-600 μmol/l and 2% of pts were in pre-terminal CRF. One third of CRF pts had proteinuria 150-500 mg/l, and second third had proteinuria greater of 1000 mg/l. Anemia was present in 54% of CRf pts, and arterial hypertension in 56%. Hemodialysis was dominant treatment modality for TRF pts and only 23,9% had functioning transplant. Conclusion: This is the first national study of demographic characteristics of pediatric CRF in Serbia. Since its prevalence is considerably lower than that in Western and North European countries the true prevalence is some what higher. The increasing incidence of pediatric TRF from 2

  11. Four Closely Related HIV-1 CRF01_AE/CRF07_BC Recombinant Forms Identified in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Li, Yuxueyun; Feng, Yi; Hu, Jing; Ruan, Yuhua; Xing, Hui; Shao, Yiming

    2017-07-01

    Five near full-length genomes of novel second-generation HIV-1 recombinant virus (JS150021, JS150029, JS150129, JS150132, and AH150183) were identified from five HIV-positive people in Jiangsu and Anhui province, east China. Phylogenic analyses showed that these five sequences are all composed of two well-established circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) CRF07_BC and CRF01_AE, grouped into four new discovered recombinant forms, which show several very similar but not identical recombinant breakpoints. The four recombinant forms are also identified to be a sort of family or related viruses, seems to be the results of different recombination events. The emergence of a serious new closely related CRF07_BC/CRF01_AE recombinant strain indicates the increasing complexity of sexual transmission of the HIV-1 epidemic in China.

  12. Feminism and Composition Research: Researching as a Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, Alice M.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties and frustrations of trying to make explicit connections among teaching, scholarship, and feminism. Points out the deleterious effects of the feminization of the field of composition on the research and scholarship of women in the field. (SR)

  13. Feminizing Adrenocortical Carcinoma Without Gynecomastia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Chentli1*,

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Malignant feminizing adrenocortical tumors are exceedingly rare. Their main presentation is gynecomastia. In these estrogen secreting tumors (with or without other adrenocortical hormones lack of gynecomastia is exceptional as in our case. A 44-year-old man presented with abdominal pain. Radiological assessment revealed a tumor measuring 120 × 95 mm in the retroperitoneal area with numerous metastases. Pathological examination pleaded for an adrenal origin with a Weiss’s score of 5. Six months later, the tumor relapsed, and he had a second surgery and was sent for hormone assessment. Clinical examination showed a skinny man with severe fatigue. He had no Cushingoid features. Gynecomastia and galactorrhea were absent. Penile length, testicular volume, and body hair growth were normal. Several cutaneous nodules were present. Biological assessment showed high morning plasma cortisol, which failed to be suppressed by treatment with 2 mg dexamethasone. Plasma estradiol and 17OH progesterone levels were high, but his testosterone levels were low. Radiological exploration showed numerous metastases: pleural, pulmonary, retroperitoneal, and abdominal. He was treated with classical chemotherapy, but he died four months after diagnosis.

  14. Editorial: Race/matter - materialism and the politics of racialization

    OpenAIRE

    Papadopoulos, D; Sharma, S

    2008-01-01

    A materialist turn in the humanities and social sciences has revitalized work in feminism, science and technology studies, critical social theory and phenomenology. Nonetheless, we want to ask what’s at stake when ‘race’ is grasped from a materialist standpoint? Is the focus on materiality able to track and unravel the manifold neo-racisms of contemporary globalization? Does it supersede the limitations of social constructionist accounts of race? And could a materialist ontology of race trans...

  15. Much More than Power: The Pedagogy of Promiscuous Black Feminism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckaby, M. Francyne

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores promiscuous black feminism by juxtaposing black feminism, Foucualt's poststructuralism, and my grandmother. The tensions created by these juxtapositions illuminate the ways black feminism and poststructuralism are resources and challenges to each other, and how both offer understandings of the relations at play that shape…

  16. Expansion of the CRF19_cpx Variant in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño Galindo, Juan Angel; Torres-Puente, Manoli; Gimeno, Concepción; Ortega, Enrique; Navarro, David; Galindo, María José; Navarro, Laura; Navarro, Vicente; Juan, Amparo; Belda, Josefina; Bracho, María Alma; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 CRF19_cpx, is a recombinant variant found almost exclusively in Cuba and recently associated to a faster AIDS onset. Infection with this variant leads to higher viral loads and levels of RANTES and CXCR4 co-receptor use. The goal of this study was to assess the presence of CRF19_cpx in the Spanish province of Valencia, given its high pathogenicity. 1294 HIV-1 protease-reverse transcriptase (PR/RT) sequences were obtained in Valencia (Spain), between 2005 and 2014. After subtyping, the detected CRF19_cpx sequences were aligned with 201 CRF19_cpx and 66 subtype D sequences retrieved from LANL, and subjected to maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analyses and Bayesian coalescent reconstructions. The presence of resistance mutations in the PR/RT region of these sequences was also analyzed. Among the 9 CRF19_cpx sequences from different patients found (prevalence <0.1%), 7 grouped in two well-supported clades (groups A, n=4, and B, n=3), suggesting the existence of at least two independent introductions which subsequently started to expand in the studied Spanish region. Unprotected sex between men was the only known transmission route. Coalescent analyses suggested that the introductions in Valencia occurred between 2008 and 2010. Resistance mutations in the RT region were found in all sequences from group A (V139D) and in two sequences from group B (E138A). This study reports for the first time the recent expansion of CRF19_cpx outside Cuba. Our results suggest that CRF19_cpx might become an emerging HIV variant in Spain, affecting Spanish native MSM and not only Cuban migrants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Islamic Feminism: transnational and national reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulki Al-Sharmani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on contemporary interpretive knowledge projects that engage critically with Islamic religious sciences, and which are driven by the question of gender justice. These projects, which have been loosely termed as Islamic Feminism, are undertaken by Muslim women scholars from different countries who are committed to their religious faith and who are working towards the production of alternative, gender-sensitive religious knowledge. The paper has three aims: 1 to review the contestations about the definition, categorization, goals, and significance of what has been termed Islamic feminism, 2 to provide an alternative description of these knowledge projects and identify some hermeneutical characteristics that link them and which perhaps could be the basis for delineating them as a new field of knowledge, 3 to map out the trajectory of building new religion-based feminist knowledge in Egypt, shedding light on light on current knowledge projects that can be labelled as Islamic feminism.

  18. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor (CRF) Neurocircuitry and Neuropharmacology in Alcohol Drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Allyson L; Gilpin, Nicholas W

    2018-01-28

    Alcohol use is pervasive in the United States. In the transition from nonhazardous drinking to hazardous drinking and alcohol use disorder, neuroadaptations occur within brain reward and brain stress systems. One brain signaling system that has received much attention in animal models of excessive alcohol drinking and alcohol dependence is corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The CRF system is composed of CRF, the urocortins, CRF-binding protein, and two receptors - CRF type 1 and CRF type 2. This review summarizes how acute, binge, and chronic alcohol dysregulates CRF signaling in hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic brain regions and how this dysregulation may contribute to changes in alcohol reinforcement, excessive alcohol consumption, symptoms of negative affect during withdrawal, and alcohol relapse. In addition, it summarizes clinical work examining CRF type 1 receptor antagonists in humans and discusses why the brain CRF system is still relevant in alcohol research.

  19. Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve

    2015-08-01

    This commentary is adapted from the Irvin M. Cushner Memorial Lecture, "Feminism and the Moral Imperative for Contraception," given at 2014 Annual Clinical Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in Chicago. It provides a brief and simplified historical review of the feminist movement, primarily in the United States, focusing on feminism's association with contraception. This commentary reflects the perspective and opinions of the author. Contraception is fundamental to a woman's ability to achieve equality and realize her full social, economic, and intellectual potential.

  20. On Learning to Teach Fat Feminism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boling, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    As a feminist theorist who frequently teaches theorizing that starts from embodied experience, the author has begun to incorporate fat feminism into her teaching. As a neophyte and a relatively thin woman, she has been self-conscious about broaching issues related to fat bodies in her teaching, even though they clearly raise important issues about…

  1. Incorporating Feminism into Rehabilitation Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Mookyong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The author describes how rehabilitation counselor educators can incorporate the feminist perspective in teaching rehabilitation counselors-in-training by exploring history, core values, and training methods of feminism. Method: Based on a literature review, the author compares philosophy and concepts of rehabilitation counseling and…

  2. A Freudian Looks at Freud and Feminity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldawsky, Stanley

    This article deals with the author's interpretation of the Freudian concept of penis envy. Penis envy is viewed as a psychological phenomenon rather than a biological phenomenon characterized as the "bedrock of feminity." Based on his experiences as a psychoanalyst, the author states that penis envy involves the child's early…

  3. For Members Only: Feminism on Campus Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agness, Karin L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of contemporary feminism in the classroom and on campus is widespread, and student clubs, women's centers, and women's studies departments often exclude women who hold traditional views. In this article, the author takes a look at how this influence evolved and describes the very successful actions she took as a student to challenge…

  4. Feminism, Pedagogy, and the Politics of Kindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnet, Shoshana; Mason, Corinne Lysandra; Trevenen, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors seek to explore how kindness might produce pedagogical relationships that sow the seeds of possibility for the transformation of students' lives. In particular, they ask: how might a feminism that uses kindness as a pedagogical strategy be imagined? And what might feminist kindness in the classroom do to the lives,…

  5. Feminism's Fandango with the State Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Lyn

    This essay discusses the effects of feminism on educational policy in Australia and the role of feminist educators in developing and implementing the feminist agenda. It also examines the conditions framing Australian feminist work in education. The essay reviews the gains that girls and women have made in educational attainment and employment, as…

  6. Contribution of amygdala CRF neurons to chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Matthew; Marketkar, Tanvi; Dimitrov, Eugene

    2017-12-01

    We investigated the role of amygdala corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the perturbations of descending pain inhibition caused by neuropathic pain. Forced swim increased the tail-flick response latency in uninjured mice, a phenomenon known as stress-induced analgesia (SIA) but did not change the tail-flick response latency in mice with neuropathic pain caused by sciatic nerve constriction. Neuropathic pain also increased the expression of CRF in the central amygdala (CeAmy) and ΔFosB in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Next, we injected the CeAmy of CRF-cre mice with cre activated AAV-DREADD (Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs) vectors. Activation of CRF neurons by DREADD/Gq did not affect the impaired SIA but inhibition of CRF neurons by DREADD/Gi restored SIA and decreased allodynia in mice with neuropathic pain. The possible downstream circuitry involved in the regulation of SIA was investigated by combined injections of retrograde cre-virus (CAV2-cre) into the locus ceruleus (LC) and cre activated AAV-diphtheria toxin (AAV-FLEX-DTX) virus into the CeAmy. The viral injections were followed by a sciatic nerve constriction ipsilateral or contralateral to the injections. Ablation of amygdala projections to the LC on the side of injury but not on the opposite side, completely restored SIA, decreased allodynia and decreased ΔFosB expression in the spinal cord in mice with neuropathic pain. The possible lateralization of SIA impairment to the side of injury was confirmed by an experiment in which unilateral inhibition of the LC decreased SIA even in uninjured mice. The current view in the field of pain research attributes the process of pain chronification to abnormal functioning of descending pain inhibition. Our results demonstrate that the continuous activity of CRF neurons brought about by persistent pain leads to impaired SIA, which is a symptom of dysregulation of descending pain inhibition. Therefore, an over

  7. Potent and long-acting corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor 2 selective peptide competitive antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivier, J; Gulyas, J; Kirby, D; Low, W; Perrin, M H; Kunitake, K; DiGruccio, M; Vaughan, J; Reubi, J C; Waser, B; Koerber, S C; Martinez, V; Wang, L; Taché, Y; Vale, W

    2002-10-10

    We present evidence that members of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) family assume distinct structures when interacting with the CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors. Predictive methods, physicochemical measurements, and structure-activity relationship studies have suggested that CRF, its family members, and competitive antagonists such as astressin [cyclo(30-33)[DPhe(12),Nle(21),Glu(30),Lys(33),Nle(38)]hCRF((12-41))] assume an alpha-helical conformation when interacting with their receptors. We had shown that alpha-helical CRF((9-41)) and sauvagine showed some selectivity for CRF receptors other than that responsible for ACTH secretion(1) and later for CRF2.(2) More recently, we suggested the possibility of a helix-turn-helix motif around a turn encompassing residues 30-33(3) that would confer high affinity for both CRF(1) and CRF(2)(2,4) in agonists and antagonists of all members of the CRF family.(3) On the other hand, the substitutions that conferred ca. 100-fold CRF(2) selectivity to the antagonist antisauvagine-30 [[DPhe(11),His(12)]sauvagine((11-40))] did not confer such property to the corresponding N-terminally extended agonists. We find here that a Glu(32)-Lys(35) side chain to side chain covalent lactam constraint in hCRF and the corresponding Glu(31)-Lys(34) side chain to side chain covalent lactam constraint in sauvagine yield potent ligands that are selective for CRF(2). Additionally, we introduced deletions and substitutions known to increase duration of action to yield antagonists such as cyclo(31-34)[DPhe(11),His(12),C(alpha)MeLeu(13,39),Nle(17),Glu(31),Lys(34)]Ac-sauvagine((8-40)) (astressin(2)-B) with CRF(2) selectivities greater than 100-fold. CRF receptor autoradiography was performed in rat tissue known to express CRF(2) and CRF(1) in order to confirm that astressin(2)-B could indeed bind to established CRF(2) but not CRF(1) receptor-expressing tissues. Extended duration of action of astressin(2)-B vs that of antisauvagine-30 is demonstrated in

  8. Identification of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) target cells and effects of dexamethasone on binding in anterior pituitary using a fluorescent analog of CRF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, J; Billestrup, Nils; Perrin, M

    1986-01-01

    A fluorescein-conjugated bioactive analog of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) was synthesized and used to label cells that have high affinity CRF-binding sites. Of cultured bovine anterior pituitary cells, 6.1 +/- 0.6% were visible by fluorescence microscopy after incubation with the analog......-binding sites and suggest that binding of CRF to anterior pituitary cells is altered by glucocorticoids....

  9. Molecular detection of HIV-1 subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B, and newly emerging recombinant lineages in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chook, Jack Bee; Ong, Lai Yee; Takebe, Yutaka; Chan, Kok Gan; Choo, Martin; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-03-01

    A molecular genotyping assay for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) circulating in Southeast Asia is difficult to design because of the high level of genetic diversity. We developed a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to detect subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF33_01B, and three newly described circulating recombinant forms, (CRFs) (CRF53_01B, CRF54_01B, and CRF58_01B). A total of 785 reference genomes were used for subtype-specific primers and TaqMan probes design targeting the gag, pol, and env genes. The performance of this assay was compared and evaluated with direct sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. A total of 180 HIV-infected subjects from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were screened and 171 samples were successfully genotyped, in agreement with the phylogenetic data. The HIV-1 genotype distribution was as follows: subtype B (16.7%); CRF01_AE (52.8%); CRF33_01B (24.4%); CRF53_01B (1.1%); CRF54_01B (0.6%); and CRF01_AE/B unique recombinant forms (4.4%). The overall accuracy of the genotyping assay was over 95.0%, in which the sensitivities for subtype B, CRF01_AE, and CRF33_01B detection were 100%, 100%, and 97.7%, respectively. The specificity of genotyping was 100%, inter-subtype specificities were > 95% and the limit of detection of 10(3) copies/mL for plasma. The newly developed real-time PCR assay offers a rapid and cost-effective alternative for large-scale molecular epidemiological surveillance for HIV-1. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Involvement of CRF2 signaling in enterocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarouge, Benjamin; Pelissier-Rota, Marjolaine; Powell, Rebecca; Buisson, Alain; Bonaz, Bruno; Jacquier-Sarlin, Muriel

    2017-07-28

    To determine the role of corticotropin releasing factor receptor (CRF2) in epithelial permeability and enterocyte cell differentiation. For this purpose, we used rat Sprague Dawley and various colon carcinoma cell lines (SW620, HCT8R, HT-29 and Caco-2 cell lines). Expression of CRF2 protein was analyzed by fluorescent immunolabeling in normal rat colon and then by western blot in dissociated colonic epithelial cells and in the lysates of colon carcinoma cell lines or during the early differentiation of HT-29 cells (ten first days). To assess the impact of CRF2 signaling on colonic cell differentiation, HT-29 and Caco-2 cells were exposed to Urocortin 3 recombinant proteins (Ucn3, 100 nmol/L). In some experiments, cells were pre-exposed to the astressin 2b (A2b) a CRF2 antagonist in order to inhibit the action of Ucn3. Intestinal cell differentiation was first analyzed by functional assays: the trans-cellular permeability and the para-cellular permeability were determined by Dextran-FITC intake and measure of the transepithelial electrical resistance respectively. Morphological modifications associated to epithelial dysfunction were analyzed by confocal microscopy after fluorescent labeling of actin (phaloidin-TRITC) and intercellular adhesion proteins such as E-cadherin, p120ctn, occludin and ZO-1. The establishment of mature adherens junctions (AJ) was monitored by following the distribution of AJ proteins in lipid raft fractions, after separation of cell lysates on sucrose gradients. Finally, the mRNA and the protein expression levels of characteristic markers of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) differentiation such as the transcriptional factor krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) or the dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) were performed by RT-PCR and western blot respectively. The specific activities of DPPIV and alkaline phosphatase (AP) enzymes were determined by a colorimetric method. CRF2 protein is preferentially expressed in undifferentiated epithelial cells from

  11. FEMINISM AND COSMOPOLITANISM: SOME INEVITABLE CONNECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA ELENA NEAGA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will approach the issue of feminism and cosmopolitanism in order to give arguments in sustaining the fact that, today, feminism and cosmopolitanism are inevitable connected. In constructing my discourse I will begin by laying out the main ideas of cosmopolitanism, followed by a presentation of the construction of the feminist movement over time, inter-relating these two discourses at the end of the analysis. Connected with political ethics, political theory and political philosophy, the theoretical framework selected for this paper is based on the cosmopolitan theory developed by scholars like Martha Nussbaum, Fiona Robinson and Kwame Anthony Appaih who, underlining universality, define cosmopolitism as a universal concern with every human life and its well-being, but who are also giving value to the differences (seen as cultural or/ and of identity insofar as they are not harmful to people.

  12. The feminization of psychiatry? Some ruminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Martha

    2004-01-01

    This article considers the position of women in psychiatry today from the historical perspective of feminism. Feminism in medicine demands the inclusion of the traditional priorities of women: collaboration and cooperation over competition and hierarchy, compassionate care over technology and automation, flexible care for the individual in a social context over the study of units of diseased organs. These themes, in addition to the care of women and children, were prominent in the lives of early women physicians and again in the 1970s and 1980s. The number of women in psychiatry has increased. However, their influence is scant and feminist goals are again submerged. At the same time psychiatry has become increasingly interested in the organ (brain) at the expense of the individual person. Women need a new awakening. They must use their new presence to assert feminine values in patient care and protect themselves from becoming provider units on the assembly line.

  13. Presynaptic CRF1 Receptors Mediate the Ethanol Enhancement of GABAergic Transmission in the Mouse Central Amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Nie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is a 41-amino-acid neuropeptide involved in stress responses initiated from several brain areas, including the amygdala formation. Research shows a strong relationship between stress, brain CRF, and excessive alcohol consumption. Behavioral studies suggest that the central amygdala (CeA is significantly involved in alcohol reward and dependence. We recently reported that the ethanol augmentation of GABAergic synaptic transmission in rat CeA involves CRF1 receptors, because both CRF and ethanol significantly enhanced the amplitude of evoked GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs in CeA neurons from wild-type (WT and CRF2 knockout (KO mice, but not in neurons of CRF1 KO mice. The present study extends these findings using selective CRF receptor ligands, gene KO models, and miniature IPSC (mIPSC analysis to assess further a presynaptic role for the CRF receptors in mediating ethanol effects in the CeA. In whole-cell patch recordings of pharmacologically isolated GABAAergic IPSCs from slices of mouse CeA, both CRF and ethanol augmented evoked IPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, with low EC50s. A CRF1 (but not CRF2 KO construct and the CRF1-selective nonpeptide antagonist NIH-3 (LWH-63 blocked the augmenting effect of both CRF and ethanol on evoked IPSCs. Furthermore, the new selective CRF1 agonist stressin1, but not the CRF2 agonist urocortin 3, also increased evoked IPSC amplitudes. Both CRF and ethanol decreased paired-pulse facilitation (PPF of evoked IPSCs and significantly enhanced the frequency, but not the amplitude, of spontaneous miniature GABAergic mIPSCs in CeA neurons of WT mice, suggesting a presynaptic site of action. The PPF effect of ethanol was abolished in CeA neurons of CRF1 KO mice. The CRF1 antagonist NIH-3 blocked the CRF- and ethanol-induced enhancement of mIPSC frequency in CeA neurons. These data indicate that presynaptic CRF1 receptors play a critical role in permitting

  14. DDT-induced feminization of gull embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, D.M.; Toone, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    Injection of DDT [1, 1, 1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane] into gull eggs at concentrations comparable to those found in contaminated seabird eggs in 1970 induces abnormal development of ovarian tissue and oviducts in male embryos. Developmental feminization of males is associated with inability to breed as adults and may explain the highly skewed sex ratio and reduced number of male gulls breeding on Santa Barbara Island in southern California

  15. The Impact of Feminism on Sociology

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia Walby

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the impact of feminism on British sociology over the last 60 years. It focuses on changes in the intellectual content of the discipline, including epistemology, methodology, theory, concepts and the fields of economy, polity, violence and civil society. It situates these changes in the context of changes in gendered organisation of sociology, the rise of women's/gender studies, the ecology of social sciences and societal changes, especially the transformation of the gen...

  16. Urocortin II: A member of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide family that is selectively bound by type 2 CRF receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, T. M.; Lewis, K.; Perrin, M. H.; Kunitake, K. S.; Vaughan, J.; Arias, C. A.; Hogenesch, J. B.; Gulyas, J.; Rivier, J.; Vale, W. W.; Sawchenko, P. E.

    2001-01-01

    Here we describe the cloning and initial characterization of a previously unidentified CRF-related neuropeptide, urocortin II (Ucn II). Searches of the public human genome database identified a region with significant sequence homology to the CRF neuropeptide family. By using homologous primers deduced from the human sequence, a mouse cDNA was isolated from whole brain poly(A)+ RNA that encodes a predicted 38-aa peptide, structurally related to the other known mammalian family members, CRF and Ucn. Ucn II binds selectively to the type 2 CRF receptor (CRF-R2), with no appreciable activity on CRF-R1. Transcripts encoding Ucn II are expressed in discrete regions of the rodent central nervous system, including stress-related cell groups in the hypothalamus (paraventricular and arcuate nuclei) and brainstem (locus coeruleus). Central administration of 1–10 μg of peptide elicits activational responses (Fos induction) preferentially within a core circuitry subserving autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation, but whose overall pattern does not broadly mimic the CRF-R2 distribution. Behaviorally, central Ucn II attenuates nighttime feeding, with a time course distinct from that seen in response to CRF. In contrast to CRF, however, central Ucn II failed to increase gross motor activity. These findings identify Ucn II as a new member of the CRF family of neuropeptides, which is expressed centrally and binds selectively to CRF-R2. Initial functional studies are consistent with Ucn II involvement in central autonomic and appetitive control, but not in generalized behavioral activation. PMID:11226328

  17. Molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 infection in Iran: genomic evidence of CRF35_AD predominance and CRF01_AE infection among individuals associated with injection drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanbakhsh, Fatemeh; Ibe, Shiro; Hattori, Junko; Monavari, Seyed Hamid Reza; Matsuda, Masakazu; Maejima, Masami; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Memarnejadian, Arash; Keyvani, Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Sugiura, Wataru

    2013-01-01

    To understand the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 infection in Iran, we conducted the first study to analyze the genome sequence of Iranian HIV-1 isolates. For this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 10 HIV-1-infected individuals associated with injection drug use from Tehran, Shiraz, and Kermanshah. Near full-length genome sequences obtained from their plasma samples were used for phylogenetic tree and similarity plotting analyses. Among 10 isolates, nine were clearly identified as CRF35_AD and the remaining one as CRF01_AE. Interestingly, five of our Iranian CRF35_AD isolates made two clusters with 10 Afghan CRF35_AD isolates in a phylogenetic tree, indicating epidemiological connections among injection drug users in Iran and Afghanistan. In contrast, our CRF01_AE isolate had no genetic relationship with any other CRF01_AE isolates worldwide, even from Afghanistan. This study provides the first genomic evidence of HIV-1 CRF35_AD predominance and CRF01_AE infection among individuals associated with injection drug use in Iran.

  18. Feminismo comunitario: pluralizando el sujeto y objeto del feminismo=Community feminism: pluralizing the subject and object from feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Evangelina Cano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La intención del presente trabajo es pensar al feminismo como un movimiento social, dentro del cual surgen otros movimientos que además de cuestionar al Patriarcado, cuestionan al propio feminismo por entender que cierto feminismo blanco, burgués y de clase media hegemonizó las demandas del colectivo, invisibilizando las situaciones de muchas mujeres con realidades específicas y demandas particulares, que no se sienten representadas, como el feminismo afrodescendiente, indígena, lesbiano, etcétera. Puntualmente me interesa abordar al feminismo comunitario para preguntarme acerca de su potencial disidente. En esta (pseudoruptura, aunque la identidad de lo que entendemos por feminismo no se pone en cuestión, lo cierto es que el feminismo hegemónico no estaría ofreciendo lugar para todas aquellas identidades de mujeres que necesitan crear otros espacios de identificación, sin divorciarse plenamente del feminismo, “conservando el apellido”.   Abstract The aim of the present paper is to think feminism as a social movement, in which other movements arise questioning not only the Patriarchy, but also questioning feminism itself. This questioning to feminism is due by the fact that white, bourgeois and middle class feminism hegemonized the demands of women´s collective, making invisible the situations of many women with specific realities and particular demands, who do not feel represented as Afro-descendant feminism, Indigenous feminism, Lesbian feminism, etcetera. I am interested in exploring the dissident potential of community feminism. In this (pseudo rupture, although the identity of what we understand as feminism is not challenged, it is true that hegemonic feminism would not be giving place to all the identities of women who need to create other spaces of identification without fully divorcing from the feminism, in other words, "preserving the surname".

  19. Feminisms and Educational Research. Philosophy, Theory, and Educational Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Wendy R.; Burbules, Nicholas C.

    2011-01-01

    Feminist theory has come a long way from its nascent beginnings--no longer can it be classified as "liberal," "socialist," or "radical." It has shaped and evolved to take on multiple meanings and forms, each distinct in its own perspective and theory. In "Feminisms and Educational Research," the authors explore the various forms of feminisms,…

  20. Self-Presentation of Beliefs about Gender Discrimination and Feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosell, Michelle Ceynar; Hartman, Shelly L.

    2001-01-01

    Examined whether college students' expressed beliefs about gender discrimination and feminism related to concerns about self-presentation. Students completed gender discrimination and feminism scales and discussed hypothetical court cases. They were told their views would be either shared publicly or remain private. Men expressed more belief in…

  1. Travelling Theory The Feminism and Womanism of Tess Onwueme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osonye Tess Onwueme is arguably the leading female Nigerian dramatist today within and outside the country. Since leaving Nigeria for the United States, she seems to have acquired a deeper orientation of the concept and theory of feminism, especially feminism as praxis. The totality of her plays since A Hen too Soon ...

  2. Experiencing Second-Wave Feminism in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biklen, Sari; Marshall, Catherine; Pollard, Diane

    2008-01-01

    How has feminism mattered in the lives of particular academic feminists? Three scholars in education whose careers developed during the era of second-wave feminism describe how their personal and political stances were affected by theories, methodological advances, the milieus of academia as well as legal, and political events in the USA. The…

  3. The "F" Word: Is Feminism Incompatible with Beauty and Romance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudman, Laurie A.; Fairchild, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Three studies examined the predictive utility of heterosexual relationship concerns vis-a-vis support for feminism. Study 1 showed that beauty is perceived to be at odds with feminism, for both genders. The stereotype that feminists are unattractive was robust, but fully accounted for by romance-related attributions. Moreover, more attractive…

  4. Oracle or Monacle: Research Concerning Attitudes Toward Feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Suzanne; Schmid, Margaret

    Both popular studies and more serious empirical studies of attitudes toward feminism are reviewed beginning with Clifford Kirkpatrick's early empirical work and including the more recent empirical studies completed since 1970. The review examines the contents of items used to measure feminism, and the methodology and sampling used in studies, as…

  5. An update on CRF mechanisms underlying alcohol use disorders and dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Marian Hartmann Quadros

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is the most commonly used and abused substance worldwide. The emergence of alcohol use disorders, and alcohol dependence in particular, is accompanied by functional changes in brain reward and stress systems, which contribute to escalated alcohol drinking and seeking. Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF systems have been critically implied in the transition towards problematic alcohol drinking and alcohol dependence. This review will discuss how dysregulation of CRF function contributes to the vulnerability for escalated alcohol drinking and other consequences of alcohol consumption, based on preclinical evidence. CRF signaling, mostly via CRF1 receptors, seems to be particularly important in conditions of excessive alcohol taking and seeking, including during early and protracted withdrawal, relapse, as well as during withdrawal-induced anxiety and escalated aggression promoted by alcohol. Modulation of CRF1 function seems to exert a less prominent role over low to moderate alcohol intake, or to species-typical behaviors. While CRF mechanisms in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis have some contribution to the neurobiology of alcohol abuse and dependence, a pivotal role for extra-hypothalamic CRF pathways, particularly in the extended amygdala, is well characterized. More recent studies further suggest a direct modulation of brain reward function by CRF signaling in the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens and the prefrontal cortex, among other structures. This review will further discuss a putative role for other components of the CRF system that contribute for the overall balance of CRF function in reward and stress pathways, including CRF2 receptors, CRF binding protein and Urocortins, a family of CRF-related peptides.

  6. Media Misrepresentations of a Mascot Controversy: Contested Constructions of Race and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl-Pepin, Cynthia; Liang, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    This article examines media coverage of a high school Native American mascot controversy. Discourse analysis of media documents and artifacts was utilized to explore how the issue was socially constructed for public consumption. Critical race feminism was used as a framework to examine how media discourses can oversimplify the complex interaction…

  7. Global Dispersal Pattern of HIV Type 1 Subtype CRF01_AE

    OpenAIRE

    Poljak, Mario; Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Stuck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie; Alexiev, Ivailo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01_AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01_AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. Methods. We assembled a global data set of 2736 CRF01_AE sequences by pooling sequences from public databases and patient-cohort studies. We estimated viral dispersal patterns, using statistical phylogeographic analysis run over bootstrap...

  8. Gendered race: are infants’ face preferences guided by intersectionality of sex and race?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojin I.; Johnson, Kerri L.; Johnson, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    People occupy multiple social categories simultaneously (e.g., a White female), and this complex intersectionality affects fundamental aspects of social perception. Here, we examined the possibility that infant face processing may be susceptible to effects of intersectionality of sex and race. Three- and 10-month-old infants were shown a series of computer-generated face pairs (5 s each) that differed according to sex (Female or Male) or race (Asian, Black, or White). All possible combinations of face pairs were tested, and preferences were recorded with an eye tracker. Infants showed preferences for more feminine faces only when they were White, but we found no evidence that White or Asian faces were preferred even though they are relatively more feminized. These findings challenge the notions that infants’ social categories are processed independently of one another and that infants’ preferences for sex or race can be explained from mere exposure. PMID:26388823

  9. Gendered race: are infants' face preferences guided by intersectionality of sex and race?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hojin I; Johnson, Kerri L; Johnson, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    People occupy multiple social categories simultaneously (e.g., a White female), and this complex intersectionality affects fundamental aspects of social perception. Here, we examined the possibility that infant face processing may be susceptible to effects of intersectionality of sex and race. Three- and 10-month-old infants were shown a series of computer-generated face pairs (5 s each) that differed according to sex (Female or Male) or race (Asian, Black, or White). All possible combinations of face pairs were tested, and preferences were recorded with an eye tracker. Infants showed preferences for more feminine faces only when they were White, but we found no evidence that White or Asian faces were preferred even though they are relatively more feminized. These findings challenge the notions that infants' social categories are processed independently of one another and that infants' preferences for sex or race can be explained from mere exposure.

  10. Gendered Race: Are Infants’ Face Preferences Guided by Intersectionality of Sex and Race?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojin I Kim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available People occupy multiple social categories simultaneously (e.g., a White female, and this complex intersectionality affects fundamental aspects of social perception. Here, we examined the possibility that infant face processing may be susceptible to effects of intersectionality of sex and race. Three- and 10-month-old infants were shown a series of computer-generated face pairs (5 s each that differed according to sex (F or M or race (Asian, Black, or White. All possible combinations of face pairs were tested, and preferences were recorded with an eye tracker. Infants showed preferences for more feminine faces only when they were White, but we found no evidence that White or Asian faces were preferred even though they are relatively more feminized. These findings challenge the notions that infants’ social categories are processed independently of one another and that infants’ preferences for sex or race can be explained from mere exposure.

  11. Feminism and Critical Political Economy of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Pajnik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the study of feminist analysis in the field of political economy of communication. We discuss feminisms that flirt with Marxism, socialist and radical feminism, in the light of the importance of studies in the field of communication. We highlight the relevance of the feminist critique of Marxism, drawing attention to the engendered class and addressing the inequalities of capitalist society, not only in the sphere of production but also with relation to the reproductive labor. We introduce notions of “capitalist patriarchy” and “sex class” in order to emphasize the dialectical relationship between the class stratification and hierarchical structuring of capitalist society. We problematize the decline of the materialist perspectives in feminist critique as a turn to discourse and ideology while marginalizing class as an analytical category. In this article, we introduce an intersectional understanding of gender that contributes to gender de-essencialization and de-homogenization. Attention is also paid to prospects for the feminist political economy of communication today, to how it is constituted and what types of analyses it brings and why it is important for the understanding of contemporary society and the processes of communication.

  12. The Rise of Islamic Feminism in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haya al-Mughni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the emergence of Islamic Feminism in Kuwait, based on the writings and personal accounts of leading Islamist women activists.  It begins with an analysis of the socio-political factors that led to the creation of Islamic groups in the 1980s. It then outlines the role of women in the growth of the Islamic movement and shows how the contradictions between women’s contributions to the Islamic cause and the secondary role they play within the Islamic organizations controlled by men were conducive to the rise of Islamic feminism in the 1990s. The paper also demonstrates how the involvement of islamist women in the struggle for suffrage forging a coalition with liberal women activists had played a decisive role in changing the position of islamist groups towards the enfranchisement of women. The last two sections of the paper look at the participation of islamist women activists in the re-definition of the dichotomy between the public and private spheres and at their involvement in the process of interpretation of Islamic sources, known as Ijtihâd. The paper concludes that the engagement of islamist women activists in the discourse of women’s rights can be powerful agent of change towards a more egalitarian society.

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of radioiodinated NPC 22009, a putative CRF receptor antagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Hiner, R.N.; Mavunkel, B.J.; Elliott, R.L.; Abreu, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) plays a role in stress-related disorders such as anxiety, depression, anorexia nervosa and stress-induced immune suppression. Hence CRF antagonists have potential therapeutic utility. Recently the authors discovered that pyrazolones such as NPC 22009 and the corresponding disulfide behave as CRF antagonists in vitro with micromolar potency. To probe the nature of this CRF antagonism they developed a convenient synthesis of radioiodinated NPC 22009. Details of the synthesis and preliminary pharmacological studies are presented

  14. Sex, social status, and CRF receptor densities in naked mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Annaliese K; Bicks, Lucy; Mooney, Skyler J; Goodwin, Nastacia L; Holmes, Melissa M

    2016-02-01

    Naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber) live in groups that are notable for their large size and caste structure, with breeding monopolized by a single female and a small number of males. Recent studies have demonstrated substantial differences between the brains of breeders and subordinates induced by changes in social standing. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors-which bind the hormone CRF as well as related peptides-are important regulators of stress and anxiety, and are emerging as factors affecting social behavior. We conducted autoradiographic analyses of CRF1 and CRF2 receptor binding densities in female and male naked mole-rats varying in breeding status. Both globally and in specific brain regions, CRF1 receptor densities varied with breeding status. CRF1 receptor densities were higher in subordinates across brain regions, and particularly in the piriform cortex and cortical amygdala. Sex differences were present in CRF2 receptor binding densities, as is the case in multiple vole species. CRF2 receptor densities were higher in females, both globally and in the cortical amygdala and lateral amygdalar nucleus. These results provide novel insights into the neurobiology of social hierarchy in naked mole-rats, and add to a growing body of work that links changes in the CRF system with social behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Intersectionality and Transnational Feminism between Constructivism, Post-Structuralism and Epistemological Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Demaria

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean today to talk about intersectionality or, better, about intersectional approaches within the vast and fragmented field of Feminist Studies? And how can intersectionality help understanding the development of transnational feminism, and viceversa? By offering a brief critical genealogy of the notion of intersectionality, from the systemic to the anti-categorial positions that have characterized the debate on this notion, the essay tries to present a reading of the main questions that stemmed from thinking the working of the many power differentials and identity markers (gender, race, class, ages, disabilities, etc. that constitute regional, national and transnational subjectivities. In adopting an anti-categorial stance, this work attempts at showing how feminism has changed thanks to different, yet complementary, perspectives on intersectional subject formations and positioning, along with the relational and transnational struggles that have been imagined in order to refine a feminist gaze at every level of social, cultural and political life, be it theoretical, methodological or epistemological.

  16. The impact of stress on tumor growth: peripheral CRF mediates tumor-promoting effects of stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stathopoulos Efstathios N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Stress has been shown to be a tumor promoting factor. Both clinical and laboratory studies have shown that chronic stress is associated with tumor growth in several types of cancer. Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF is the major hypothalamic mediator of stress, but is also expressed in peripheral tissues. Earlier studies have shown that peripheral CRF affects breast cancer cell proliferation and motility. The aim of the present study was to assess the significance of peripheral CRF on tumor growth as a mediator of the response to stress in vivo. Methods For this purpose we used the 4T1 breast cancer cell line in cell culture and in vivo. Cells were treated with CRF in culture and gene specific arrays were performed to identify genes directly affected by CRF and involved in breast cancer cell growth. To assess the impact of peripheral CRF as a stress mediator in tumor growth, Balb/c mice were orthotopically injected with 4T1 cells in the mammary fat pad to induce breast tumors. Mice were subjected to repetitive immobilization stress as a model of chronic stress. To inhibit the action of CRF, the CRF antagonist antalarmin was injected intraperitoneally. Breast tissue samples were histologically analyzed and assessed for neoangiogenesis. Results Array analysis revealed among other genes that CRF induced the expression of SMAD2 and β-catenin, genes involved in breast cancer cell proliferation and cytoskeletal changes associated with metastasis. Cell transfection and luciferase assays confirmed the role of CRF in WNT- β-catenin signaling. CRF induced 4T1 cell proliferation and augmented the TGF-β action on proliferation confirming its impact on TGFβ/SMAD2 signaling. In addition, CRF promoted actin reorganization and cell migration, suggesting a direct tumor-promoting action. Chronic stress augmented tumor growth in 4T1 breast tumor bearing mice and peripheral administration of the CRF antagonist antalarmin suppressed this

  17. Feminism: Silence and Voicelessness as Tools of Patriarchy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Afam

    feminism characterize patriarchy as a wicked social system of rule that is oppressive to women .... institution known as patriarchy, that form of social organization in which males assume power and ... mission of self recovery. To buttress this ...

  18. Feminism and Self-Assessertion of Female Characters in Buchi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feminism and Self-Assessertion of Female Characters in Buchi Emecheta's Second ... and ideological frame work it directly opposes sexism by supporting gender ... stereotype of women, whereby women are seen as helpless, dependent and ...

  19. Feminism and the Literature of Pramoedya Ananta Toer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cendrawaty Tjong

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Feminism refers to the social ideological trends that women ask for equal rights as well as the results of ideology when women know the world, the ego, and the sexual relationship in their process of seeking self-liberation. This paper starts with describing the periods in which Indonesian women acknowledged and was associated with western feminism as well as analyzing its period of development. This paper aims at researching the feminism idelology of Pramoedya Ananta Toer, a leading Indonesian writer, including the factors which affect his opinion on women and the expression of his feminism, which is richly displayed throughout his works. The finding of this research shows that in Pramoedya Ananta Toer’s perspective, equality between men and women is manifested in the partnership between men and women, that this partnership is applied in every aspect of lives, which is advanced-throught in Indonesian’s patriarchal society.

  20. The Semiotics of Pemature Burial: Feminism in a Postfeminist Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hawkesworth

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I will explore how the death of feminism is represented in order to plumb the larger meanings embedded in proclamations of feminism’s symbolic death. I will begin by investigating two mechanisms by which feminism’s death has been produced to unearth the tacit values of feminism’s morticians. I will then consider competing accounts of the “signs of death” in order to explore how particular assumptions about the ontology of feminism are tied to specific forms of metaphorical death. Given the particular kind of distortion involved in the premature burial of a thriving global feminism, the final section of the article situates contemporary feminism’s death knell in the context of a gendered history of live burial practices. By excavating and interpreting such archaic practices, I will link the rhetorical burial of contemporary feminism to an ongoing effort to undermine feminist struggles for social justice.

  1. Feminized Power and Adversarial Advocacy: Levelling Arguments or Analyzing Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, Celeste Michelle

    1989-01-01

    Examines the journalistic analysis of the 1988 Presidential Debates from a feminist perspective in order to identify the revisions needed in the debate process. Provides historical background of feminized power and adversarial advocacy. (MM)

  2. Feminist Online Identity: Analyzing the Presence of Hashtag Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitsy Dixon

    2014-08-01

    Using the ongoing debate that feminism does not acknowledge real life experience outside of academic terrain, this paper explores how hashtag feminists identify in redefining feminism in their generation. Using the public platform of Twitter and Facebook (less specifically, this paper will explore the online followings of women who identify as hashtag feminists, and how their dialogue has set the tone for the era of internet activism.

  3. Feminism and Political Participation in Nigeria: An Empirical Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fatile Olufemi Jacob; Akhakpe Ighodalo; Igbokwe-Ibeto; Chinyeaka Justine; Oteh, Chukwuemeka Okpo Ph D

    2012-01-01

    Nigerian women have encountered a number of problems while venturing into politics. There is large scale discrimination from the men folk, both in voting for candidates and in allocating political offices. This paper examines women political participation in Nigeria and the challenges facing them. In analysizing the issues raised, the paper utilizes the nature of society, political, socio-cultural, and economic approach to feminism. To scientifically investigate the issues of feminism and pol...

  4. Feminizing adrenocortical carcinoma with distant metastases: can surgery be considered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Fancellu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Functioning adrenocortical carcinomas are rare diseases with dismal prognosis. A 41-year-old man presenting with gynecomastia had a giant feminizing adrenocortical carcinoma at stage IV. Although surgical resection was controversial, we removed the primary tumor to reduce the mass effects. He lived for 12 months with an acceptable quality of life. Gynecomastia may be the first sign of feminizing adrenal malignancies. Surgery may ameliorate the quality of life in selected patients with metastatic disease.

  5. Split infinities : German feminisms and the generational project

    OpenAIRE

    Mikus, Birgit; Spiers, Emily

    2016-01-01

    When, in the mid-2000s, a number of pop-feminist essayistic volumes appeared in Germany, their authors expressed the desire to reinvigorate feminism for a new generation of young women. Their texts focus in part on the continuing need to ensure equal democratic rights for young women in terms of equal pay, reproductive capacities and child care. Yet they simultaneously register their dissatisfaction with the legacy of the New Feminism and, more specifically, with the role models it produced. ...

  6. CONSOLIDATING FEMINISMS IN ROMANIA – A CONTERFACTUAL ANALISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Elena NEAGA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, only after almost quarter-century since the fall of communism we can talk about feminismS. Furthermore, we can also talk about left feminism (anarchist and socialist formal and informal activist groups and about the upsurge of a more and more grass-roots women's rights movement. What are the variables that can explain such a state of affair and what lessons can be learned from this experience are the main questions that I am trying to give possible answers in this paper. In doing so I will first use a descriptive approach for presenting a brief summary of the way Romanian feminist/women's rights movement has developed and I will use a methodology mostly based on documents analysis. Some locally developed theories are definitely important here: feminist vs Phoenix organization theory, state men-market women theory, the theory of the feminism lost opportunity in transition, the contradiction between communism and feminism theory, the domination of liberal feminism etc. More than that, my proposal is a counterfactual meta-analysis of the data first presented using here, beside the critical approach, also my subjective experience as a scholar and activist form more than 7 years of participative observation in the field of feminist phenomenon in Romania.

  7. Behavioral, biological, and chemical perspectives on targeting CRF1 receptor antagonists to treat alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Heilig, Markus; de Wit, Harriet; Shaham, Yavin

    2013-01-01

    Background Alcohol use disorders are chronic disabling conditions for which existing pharmacotherapies have only modest efficacy. In the present review, derived from the 2012 Behavior, Biology and Chemistry “Translational Research in Addiction” symposium, we summarize the anti-relapse potential of corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 (CRF1) receptor antagonists to reduce negative emotional symptoms of acute and protracted alcohol withdrawal and stress-induced relapse to alcohol seeking. Methods We review the biology of CRF1 systems, the activity of CRF1 receptor antagonists in animal models of anxiolytic and antidepressant activity, and experimental findings in alcohol addiction models. We also update the clinical trial status of CRF1 receptor antagonists, including pexacerfont (BMS-562086), emicerfont (GW876008), verucerfont (GSK561679), CP316311, SSR125543A, R121919/NBI30775, R317573/19567470/CRA5626, and ONO-2333Ms. Finally, we discuss the potential heterogeneity and pharmacogenomics of CRF1 receptor pharmacotherapy for alcohol dependence. Results The evidence suggests that brain penetrant-CRF1 receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential for alcohol dependence. Lead compounds with clinically desirable pharmacokinetic properties now exist, and longer receptor residence rates (i.e., slow dissociation) may predict greater CRF1 receptor antagonist efficacy. Functional variants in genes that encode CRF system molecules, including polymorphisms in Crhr1 (rs110402, rs1876831, rs242938) and Crhbp genes (rs10055255, rs3811939) may promote alcohol seeking and consumption by altering basal or stress-induced CRF system activation. Conclusions Ongoing clinical trials with pexacerfont and verucerfont in moderately to highly severe dependent anxious alcoholics may yield insight as to the role of CRF1 receptor antagonists in a personalized medicine approach to treat drug or alcohol dependence. PMID:23294766

  8. Forebrain CRF1 Modulates Early-Life Stress-Programmed Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Rammes, Gerhard; Kraev, Igor; Wolf, Miriam; Liebl, Claudia; Scharf, Sebastian H.; Rice, Courtney J.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M.; Baram, Tallie Z.; Stewart, Michael G.; Müller, Marianne B.; Schmidt, Mathias V.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood traumatic events hamper the development of the hippocampus and impair declarative memory in susceptible individuals. Persistent elevations of hippocampal corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), acting through CRF receptor 1 (CRF1), in experimental models of early-life stress have suggested a role for this endogenous stress hormone in the resulting structural modifications and cognitive dysfunction. However, direct testing of this possibility has been difficult. In the current study, we subjected conditional forebrain CRF1 knock-out (CRF1-CKO) mice to an impoverished postnatal environment and examined the role of forebrain CRF1 in the long-lasting effects of early-life stress on learning and memory. Early-life stress impaired spatial learning and memory in wild-type mice, and postnatal forebrain CRF overexpression reproduced these deleterious effects. Cognitive deficits in stressed wild-type mice were associated with disrupted long-term potentiation (LTP) and a reduced number of dendritic spines in area CA3 but not in CA1. Forebrain CRF1 deficiency restored cognitive function, LTP and spine density in area CA3, and augmented CA1 LTP and spine density in stressed mice. In addition, early-life stress differentially regulated the amount of hippocampal excitatory and inhibitory synapses in wild-type and CRF1-CKO mice, accompanied by alterations in the neurexin-neuroligin complex. These data suggest that the functional, structural and molecular changes evoked by early-life stress are at least partly dependent on persistent forebrain CRF1 signaling, providing a molecular target for the prevention of cognitive deficits in adults with a history of early-life adversity. PMID:21940453

  9. Relay race

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 19th May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on the course, and how to register your team for the relay race, can be found at: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay Some advice for all runners from the medical service can also be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay/RelayPagePictures/MedicalServiceAnnoncement.pdf

  10. Relay race

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 19th May starting at 12·15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on the course, and how to register your team for the relay race, can be found at: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay Some advice for all runners from the medical service can also be found here: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay/RelayPagePictures/MedicalServiceAnnoncement.pdf

  11. Enact, Discard, and Transform: A Critical Race Feminist Perspective on Professional Socialization among Tenured Black Female Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulé, Venice Thandi

    2014-01-01

    Through an analysis informed by critical race feminism, this paper examines the intersection of professional socialization and agency among tenured Black female faculty at Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). Professional socialization entails the transmission and reproduction of professional norms. However, within PWIs, professional…

  12. Human CRF2 α and β splice variants: pharmacological characterization using radioligand binding and a luciferase gene expression assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardati, A.; Goetschy, V.; Gottowick, J.; Henriot, S.; Deuschle, U.; Kilpatrick, G.J.; Valdenaire, O.

    1999-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors belong to the super-family of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are classified into two subtypes (CRF 1 and CRF 2 ). Both receptors are positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase but they have a distinct pharmacology and distribution in brain. Two isoforms belonging to the CRF 2 subtype receptors, CRF 2α and CRF 2β , have been identified in rat and man. The neuropeptides CRF and urocortin mediate their actions through this CRF G protein-coupled receptor family. In this report, we describe the pharmacological characterization of the recently identified hCRF 2β receptor. We have used radioligand binding with [ 125 I]-tyr 0 -sauvagine and a gene expression assay in which the firefly luciferase gene expression is under the control of cAMP responsive elements. Association kinetics of [ 125 I]-tyr 0 -sauvagine binding to the hCRF 2β receptor were monophasic while dissociation kinetics were biphasic, in agreement with the kinetics results obtained with the hCRF 2α receptor. Saturation binding analysis revealed two affinity states in HEK 293 cells with binding parameters in accord with those determined kinetically and with parameters obtained with the hCRF 2α receptor. A non-hydrolysable GTP analog, Gpp(NH)p, reduced the high affinity binding of [ 125 I]-tyr 0 -sauvagine to both hCRF 2 receptor isoforms in a similar manner. The rank order of potency of CRF agonist peptides in competition experiments was identical for both hCRF 2 α-helical CRF (9-41) oCRF). Similarly, agonist potency was similar for the two isoforms when studied using the luciferase gene reporter system. The peptide antagonist α-helical CRF (9-41) exhibited a non-competitive antagonism of urocortin-stimulated luciferase expression with both hCRF 2 receptor isoforms. Taken together, these results indicate that the pharmacological profiles of the CRF 2 splice variants are identical. This indicates that the region of the N-terminus that varies

  13. Transcending race?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    Using accounts of militant schoolteachers from a province in the central sierra of Peru, this article attempts to show how and why concepts of race and political commitment among teachers changed at three critical moments in Peruvian history: agrarian reform, mass unionisation, and Maoist...

  14. RELAY RACE

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Well done to all runners, the fans and the organizers of this great race which took place on Thursday 23rd May! You were many to participate in the run or by supporting your colleagues. The Staff Association contributed with its team of runners and also with its information stall where you could meet with your delegates.  

  15. Stress and addiction: contribution of the corticotropin releasing factor (CRF system in neuroplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina L Haass-Koffler

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF has been shown to induce various behavioral changes related to adaptation to stress. Dysregulation of the CRF system at any point can lead to a variety of psychiatric disorders, including substance use disorders (SUDs. CRF has been associated with stress-induced drug reinforcement. Extensive literature has identified CRF to play an important role in the molecular mechanisms that lead to an increase in susceptibility that precipitates relapse to SUDs. The CRF system has a heterogeneous role in SUDs. It enhances the acute effects of drugs of abuse and is also responsible for the potentiation of drug-induced neuroplasticity evoked during the withdrawal period. We present in this review the brain regions and circuitries where CRF is expressed and may participate in stress-induced drug abuse. Finally, we attempt to evaluate the role of modulating the CRF system as a possible therapeutic strategy for treating the dysregulation of emotional behaviors that result from the acute positive reinforcement of substances of abuse as well as the negative reinforcement produced by withdrawal.

  16. Phylodynamic analysis of the dissemination of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Huanan; Tee, Kok Keng; Hase, Saiki; Uenishi, Rie; Li, Xiao-Jie; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Thang, Pham Hong; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Pybus, Oliver G; Takebe, Yutaka

    2009-08-15

    To estimate the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Vietnam and adjacent Guangxi, China, we determined near full-length nucleotide sequences of CRF01_AE from a total of 33 specimens collected in 1997-1998 from different geographic regions and risk populations in Vietnam. Phylogenetic and Bayesian molecular clock analyses were performed to estimate the date of origin of CRF01_AE lineages. Our study reconstructs the timescale of CRF01_AE expansion in Vietnam and neighboring regions and suggests that the series of CRF01_AE epidemics in Vietnam arose by the sequential introduction of founder strains into new locations and risk groups. CRF01_AE appears to have been present among heterosexuals in South-Vietnam for more than a decade prior to its epidemic spread in the early 1990s. In the late 1980s, the virus spread to IDUs in Southern Vietnam and subsequently in the mid-1990s to IDUs further north. Our results indicate the northward dissemination of CRF01_AE during this time.

  17. The CRF Family of Neuropeptides and their Receptors - Mediators of the Central Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedic, Nina; Chen, Alon; Deussing, Jan M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Dysregulated stress neurocircuits, caused by genetic and/or environmental changes, underlie the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major physiological activator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and conse-quently a primary regulator of the mammalian stress response. Together with its three family members, urocortins (UCNs) 1, 2, and 3, CRF integrates the neuroendocrine, autonomic, metabolic and behavioral responses to stress by activating its cognate receptors CRFR1 and CRFR2. Objective: Here we review the past and current state of the CRF/CRFR field, ranging from pharmacologi-cal studies to genetic mouse models and virus-mediated manipulations. Results: Although it is well established that CRF/CRFR1 signaling mediates aversive responses, includ-ing anxiety and depression-like behaviors, a number of recent studies have challenged this viewpoint by revealing anxiolytic and appetitive properties of specific CRF/CRFR1 circuits. In contrast, the UCN/CRFR2 system is less well understood and may possibly also exert divergent functions on physiol-ogy and behavior depending on the brain region, underlying circuit, and/or experienced stress conditions. Conclusion: A plethora of available genetic tools, including conventional and conditional mouse mutants targeting CRF system components, has greatly advanced our understanding about the endogenous mecha-nisms underlying HPA system regulation and CRF/UCN-related neuronal circuits involved in stress-related behaviors. Yet, the detailed pathways and molecular mechanisms by which the CRF/UCN-system translates negative or positive stimuli into the final, integrated biological response are not completely un-derstood. The utilization of future complementary methodologies, such as cell-type specific Cre-driver lines, viral and optogenetic tools will help to further dissect the function of genetically defined CRF/UCN neurocircuits in the context of

  18. Repeated restraint stress lowers the threshold for response to third ventricle CRF administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ruth B S

    2017-03-01

    Rats and mice exposed to repeated stress or a single severe stress exhibit a sustained increase in energetic, endocrine, and behavioral response to subsequent novel mild stress. This study tested whether the hyper-responsiveness was due to a lowered threshold of response to corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) or an exaggerated response to a standard dose of CRF. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 3h of restraint on each of 3 consecutive days (RRS) or were non-restrained controls. RRS caused a temporary hypophagia but a sustained reduction in body weight. Eight days after the end of restraint, rats received increasing third ventricle doses of CRF (0-3.0μg). The lowest dose of CRF (0.25μg) increased corticosterone release in RRS, but not control rats. Higher doses caused the same stimulation of corticosterone in the two groups of rats. Fifteen days after the end of restraint, rats were food deprived during the light period and received increasing third ventricle doses of CRF at the start of the dark period. The lowest dose of CRF inhibited food intake during the first hour following infusion in RRS, but not control rats. All other doses of CRF inhibited food intake to the same degree in both RRS and control rats. The lowered threshold of response to central CRF is consistent with the chronic hyper-responsiveness to CRF and mild stress in RRS rats during the post-restraint period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 CRF01_AE transmission in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J H K; Wong, K H; Li, P; Chan, K C; Lee, M P; Lam, H Y; Cheng, V C C; Yuen, K Y; Yam, W C

    2009-08-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transmission history of the HIV-1 CRF01_AE epidemics in Hong Kong between 1994 and 2007. A total of 465 HIV-1 CRF01_AE pol sequences were derived from an in-house or a commercial HIV-1 genotyping system. Phylogenies of CRF01_AE sequences were analyzed by the Bayesian coalescent method. CRF01_AE patient population included 363 males (78.1%) and 102 females (21.9%), whereas 65% (314 of 465) were local Chinese. Major transmission routes were heterosexual contact (63%), followed by intravenous drug use (IDU) (19%) and men having sex with men (MSM) (17%). From phylogenetic analysis, local CRF01_AE strains were from multiple origins with 3 separate transmission clusters identified. Cluster 1 consisted mainly of Chinese male IDUs and heterosexuals. Clusters 2 and 3 included mainly local Chinese MSM and non-Chinese Asian IDUs, respectively. Chinese reference isolates available from China (Fujian, Guangxi, or Liaoning) were clonally related to our transmission clusters, demonstrating the epidemiological linkage of CRF01_AE infections between Hong Kong and China. The 3 individual local transmission clusters were estimated to have initiated since late 1980s and late 1990s, causing subsequent epidemics in the early 2000s. This is the first comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in Hong Kong. It revealed that MSM contact is becoming a major route of local CRF01_AE transmission in Hong Kong. Epidemiological linkage of CRF01_AE between Hong Kong and China observed in this study indicates the importance of regular molecular epidemiological surveillance for the HIV-1 epidemic in our region.

  20. Evidence for possible biological advantages of the newly emerging HIV-1 circulating recombinant form from Malaysia - CRF33_01B in comparison to its progenitors - CRF01_AE and subtype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Katherine A; Wang, Bin; Miranda-Saksena, Monica; Boadle, Ross; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Ng, Kee-Peng; Saksena, Nitin K

    2010-04-01

    In Malaysia, co-circulation of CRF01_AE and subtype B has resulted in the emergence of the second generation derivative; CRF33_01B in approximately 20% of its HIV-1 infected individuals. Our objective was to identify possible biological advantages that CRF33_01B possesses over its progenitors. Biological and molecular comparisons of CRF33_01B against its parental subtypes clearly show that CRF33_01B replicated better in activated whole peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CD4+ T-lymphocytes, but not monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Also, its acquired fitness was greater than CRF01_AE but not subtype B. Moreover, CRF33_01B has higher rate of apoptotic cell death and syncytia induction compared to subtype B. These adaptive and survival abilities could have been acquired by CRF33_01B due to the incorporation of subtype B fragments into the gag-RT region of its full-length genome. Our studies confirm the previously held belief that HIV-1 strains may harbor enhanced biological fitness upon recombination. We therefore estimate a possible gradual replacement of the current predominance of CRF01_AE, as well as wider dissemination of CRF33_01B, together with the identification of other new CRF01_AE/B inter-subtype recombinants in Malaysia.

  1. HIV-1 CRF_BC recombinants infection in China: molecular epidemic and characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yabo; Shao, Yiming; Ma, Liying

    2012-03-01

    CRF_BC recombinant strains were first identified in China and are one of the most prevalent and characteristically unique HIV-1 subtypes across China. Here we aim to review the published data about HIV-1 CRF_BC recombinant strains epidemic in China and to characterize the genetics, biology and drug resistance of this virus. This study may help to better understand the current situation of HIV-1 CRF_BC prevalence and facilitate the development of vaccines and more efficient anti-HIV-1 regimens in China.

  2. Female headship, feminization of poverty and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimenyi, M S; Mbaku, J M

    1995-07-01

    Female-headed households are at greater risk of slipping into poverty than male-headed households. Indeed, sex and marital status of the head of household are the most important determinants of a family's poverty status in the US. Divorce, separation, death of a husband, and out-of-wedlock births can lead to female headship. Transfer payments, especially the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program, are blamed for contributing to increased marital instability and out-of-wedlock births. The authors examined the role of welfare benefits in influencing female headship. Preliminary results using standard estimation procedures indicate that transfers do not significantly influence female headship. Standard estimation procedures are, however, erroneous because they ignore differences in propensities to establish mother-only households. Therefore, adjusting for differences in propensities to establish female-headed households, the level of welfare benefits is indeed an important factor in explaining the variation in the changes in the birth rates to unmarried women. The use of a weighted measure suggests that welfare benefits, by increasing female headship of women who otherwise have low propensities to be female heads, have played a significant role in the feminization of poverty.

  3. God and Coitus: Between Misogyny and Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Calabuig Cañestro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to point out that for a philosophical reflection on the sexes, there are two vitally important issues that are intimately related: the meaning we attribute to the intercourse and how we understand the human being relationship with the absolute (or with God. For that purpose, we will resort to the philosophies of two authors who represent antagonistic views on this matter: Otto Weinigner, an undoubtedly misogynist author, and Simone de Beauvoir, a precursor of feminism. Since their speeches coincide in many relevant aspects —for both indentify masculine values with human values, believe that women have been deceived and support the femininity disappearance— the reason why they merit opposite judgments must be found in their discrepancies. Here we support that the fundamental divergence between these theories lies in the meaning they ascribe to the intercourse. This meaning depends on how they understand the relationship between the human being and divinity. The comparison between these two authors reveals the essential nature of such issues for the philosophical discourse on the sexes.

  4. Brazilian Feminism Since the Seventies: Revisiting a Trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Andersen Sarti

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Brazilian experience in the last decades, the text approaches feminism as a phenomenon that, although enunciating women’s emancipation in general and abstract terms, concretizes itself in specific social, cultural, political and historical contexts. Initially, the article shows feminism in Brazil, in the seventies, as a women’s movement that was framed in opposition to the military dictatorship. In the following decades, it developed within the possibilities and limits of the process of political democratization. Nevertheless, the text argues that the difficulties faced by Brazilian feminism concerns not only the conjuncture constraints, but are related to structural impasses of feminism, due to the fact that women are not a universal category, except by the projection of our own cultural references. Their cultural and social existence implies diversity and institutes boundaries that cut the world culturally identified as feminine. As such, the analysis of feminism requires the reference to the context of its enunciation, which gives its meaning. Accordingly, the analysis of gender relations implies considering the notion of the person as conceived in the symbolic universe to which they refer.

  5. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors in intermediate lobe of the pituitary: Biochemical characterization and autoradiographic localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; De Souza, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    CRF receptors were characterized using radioligand binding and chemical affinity cross-linking techniques and localized using autoradiographic techniques in porcine, bovine and rat pituitaries. The binding of 125I-[Tyr0]-ovine CRF (125I-oCRF) to porcine anterior and neurointermediate lobe membranes was saturable and of high affinity with comparable KD values (200-600 pM) and receptor densities (100-200 fmoles/mg protein). The pharmacological rank order of potencies for various analogs and fragments of CRF in inhibiting 125I-oCRF binding in neurointermediate lobe was characteristic of the well-established CRF receptor in anterior pituitary. Furthermore, the binding of 125I-oCRF to both anterior and neurointermediate lobes of the pituitary was guanine nucleotide-sensitive. Affinity cross-linking studies revealed that the molecular weight of the CRF binding protein in rat intermediate lobe was identical to that in rat anterior lobe (Mr = 75,000). While the CRF binding protein in the anterior lobes of porcine and bovine pituitaries had identical molecular weights to CRF receptors in rat pituitary (Mr = 75,000), the molecular weight of the CRF binding protein in porcine and bovine intermediate lobe was slightly higher (Mr = 78,000). Pituitary autoradiograms from the three species showed specific binding sites for 125I-oCRF in anterior and intermediate lobes, with none being apparent in the posterior pituitary. The identification of CRF receptors in the intermediate lobe with comparable characteristics to those previously identified in the anterior pituitary substantiate further the physiological role of CRF in regulating intermediate lobe hormone secretion

  6. Laos Organization Name Using Cascaded Model Based on SVM and CRF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Shaopeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the characteristics of Laos organization name, this paper proposes a two layer model based on conditional random field (CRF and support vector machine (SVM for Laos organization name recognition. A layer of model uses CRF to recognition simple organization name, and the result is used to support the decision of the second level. Based on the driving method, the second layer uses SVM and CRF to recognition the complicated organization name. Finally, the results of the two levels are combined, And by a subsequent treatment to correct results of low confidence recognition. The results show that this approach based on SVM and CRF is efficient in recognizing organization name through open test for real linguistics, and the recalling rate achieve 80. 83%and the precision rate achieves 82. 75%.

  7. Robust rooftop extraction from visible band images using higher order CRF

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Er; Femiani, John; Xu, Shibiao; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wonka, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust framework for building extraction in visible band images. We first get an initial classification of the pixels based on an unsupervised presegmentation. Then, we develop a novel conditional random field (CRF

  8. Down the Neoliberal Path: The Rise of Free Choice Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankica Čakardić

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The free choice ideology dictates that any time a woman makes a choice it is an act of feminism. The idea that personal choice presupposes the faraway horizons of freedom and its guarantee, as well as the undoubted potentials of women’s empowerment, makes up the central position of the critique in this essay. Our text is divided into two parts. In the first part of the paper we are going to outline the basic assumptions of neoliberalism, in order to use them as foundations for the argument about its feminist affirmation. We will illustrate the relationship between neoliberalism and feminism by using the example of women's entrepreneurship, which is usually interpreted as a strategy of undeniable emancipation. In the second part of the essay, as a concrete response to ‘neoliberal feminism’, we are going to point to the progressive potential of social reproduction theory and socialist-feminist practice to be further developed out of it. Given the intention of this text is not to exhibit a detailed historical-comparative analysis of feminism, we are merely going to use concrete examples to illustrate the link between feminism and neoliberalism, and to map the shift from early second-wave feminism to identity politics and the cultural turn that swallows up the critique of political economy.   Article received: June 2, 2017; Article accepted: June 16, 2017; Published online: October 15, 2017; Original scholarly paper How to cite this article: Čakardić, Ankica. "Down the Neoliberal Path: The Rise of Free Choice Feminism." AM Journal of Art and Media Studies 14 (2017: 33-44. doi: 10.25038/am.v0i14.215

  9. Feminized Intergenerational Mobility Without Assimilation? Post-1965 U.S. Immigrants and the Gender Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie; Nawyn, Stephanie J; Benetsky, Megan J

    2015-10-01

    Women in the United States have made significant socioeconomic advances over the last generation. The second generation of post-1965 immigrants came of age during this "gender revolution." However, assimilation theories focus mainly on racial/ethnic trajectories. Do gendered trajectories between and within groups better capture mobility patterns? Using the 1980 decennial census and the 2003-2007 Current Population Survey (CPS), we observe the socioeconomic status of Latino and Asian immigrant parents and their second-generation children 25 years later. We compare the educational, occupational, and earnings attainment of second-generation daughters and sons with that of their immigrant mothers and fathers. We simultaneously compare those socioeconomic trajectories with a U.S.-born white, non-Latino reference group. We find that second-generation women experience greater status attainment than both their mothers and their male counterparts, but the earnings of second-generation women lag behind those of men. However, because white mainstream women experienced similar intergenerational mobility, many gaps between the second generation and the mainstream remain. These patterns remain even after we control for parenthood status. With feminized intergenerational mobility occurring similarly across race, the racial/ethnic gaps observed in 1980 narrow but persist into the next generation for many outcomes. Both gender and race shape mobility trajectories, so ignoring either leads to an incomplete picture of assimilation.

  10. The CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels: I – the 2D case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Barone

    1992-05-01

    Full Text Available If the collisions are redefined as a flux a kinetic conservation law can be written in divergence form. This can be handled numerically, in the framework of Finite Particle Approximation, using the CRF-method. In the present paper the relevant quantities needed for computer implementation of the CRF-method are derived in the case of a 2D momentum space for the semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels.

  11. The CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels: II – The 3D case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Barone

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available If the collisions are redefined as a flux a kinetic conservation law can be written in divergence form. This can be handled numerically, in the framework of Finite Particle Approximation, using the CRF-method. In this paper we use the CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels. We extend the results obtained in a previous paper to the case of a 3D momentum space.

  12. Fast Dissemination of New HIV-1 CRF02/A1 Recombinants in Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Chen

    Full Text Available A number of HIV-1 subtypes are identified in Pakistan by characterization of partial viral gene sequences. Little is known whether new recombinants are generated and how they disseminate since whole genome sequences for these viruses have not been characterized. Near full-length genome (NFLG sequences were obtained by amplifying two overlapping half genomes or next generation sequencing from 34 HIV-1-infected individuals in Pakistan. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the newly characterized sequences were 16 subtype As, one subtype C, and 17 A/G recombinants. Further analysis showed that all 16 subtype A1 sequences (47%, together with the vast majority of sequences from Pakistan from other studies, formed a tight subcluster (A1a within the subtype A1 clade, suggesting that they were derived from a single introduction. More in-depth analysis of 17 A/G NFLG sequences showed that five shared similar recombination breakpoints as in CRF02 (15% but were phylogenetically distinct from the prototype CRF02 by forming a tight subcluster (CRF02a while 12 (38% were new recombinants between CRF02a and A1a or a divergent A1b viruses. Unique recombination patterns among the majority of the newly characterized recombinants indicated ongoing recombination. Interestingly, recombination breakpoints in these CRF02/A1 recombinants were similar to those in prototype CRF02 viruses, indicating that recombination at these sites more likely generate variable recombinant viruses. The dominance and fast dissemination of new CRF02a/A1 recombinants over prototype CRF02 suggest that these recombinant have more adapted and may become major epidemic strains in Pakistan.

  13. Fast Dissemination of New HIV-1 CRF02/A1 Recombinants in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Hora, Bhavna; DeMarco, Todd; Shah, Sharaf Ali; Ahmed, Manzoor; Sanchez, Ana M.; Su, Chang; Carter, Meredith; Stone, Mars; Hasan, Rumina; Hasan, Zahra; Busch, Michael P.; Denny, Thomas N.; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A number of HIV-1 subtypes are identified in Pakistan by characterization of partial viral gene sequences. Little is known whether new recombinants are generated and how they disseminate since whole genome sequences for these viruses have not been characterized. Near full-length genome (NFLG) sequences were obtained by amplifying two overlapping half genomes or next generation sequencing from 34 HIV-1-infected individuals in Pakistan. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the newly characterized sequences were 16 subtype As, one subtype C, and 17 A/G recombinants. Further analysis showed that all 16 subtype A1 sequences (47%), together with the vast majority of sequences from Pakistan from other studies, formed a tight subcluster (A1a) within the subtype A1 clade, suggesting that they were derived from a single introduction. More in-depth analysis of 17 A/G NFLG sequences showed that five shared similar recombination breakpoints as in CRF02 (15%) but were phylogenetically distinct from the prototype CRF02 by forming a tight subcluster (CRF02a) while 12 (38%) were new recombinants between CRF02a and A1a or a divergent A1b viruses. Unique recombination patterns among the majority of the newly characterized recombinants indicated ongoing recombination. Interestingly, recombination breakpoints in these CRF02/A1 recombinants were similar to those in prototype CRF02 viruses, indicating that recombination at these sites more likely generate variable recombinant viruses. The dominance and fast dissemination of new CRF02a/A1 recombinants over prototype CRF02 suggest that these recombinant have more adapted and may become major epidemic strains in Pakistan. PMID:27973597

  14. Short Communication: Reassessing the Origin of the HIV-1 CRF02_AG Lineages Circulating in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatorre, Edson; Velasco-De-Castro, Carlos A; Pilotto, José H; Couto-Fernandez, José Carlos; Bello, Gonzalo; Morgado, Mariza G

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 CRF02_AG is responsible for at least 8% of the HIV-1 infections worldwide and is distributed mainly in West Africa. CRF02_AG has recently been reported in countries where it is not native, including Brazil. In a previous study including 10 CRF02_AG Brazilian samples, we found at least four independent introductions and two autochthonous transmission networks of this clade in Brazil. As more CRF02_AG samples have been identified in Brazil, we performed a new phylogeographic analysis using a larger dataset than before. A total of 20 Brazilian (18 from Rio de Janeiro and two from São Paulo) and 1,485 African HIV-1 CRF02_AG pol sequences were analyzed using maximum likelihood (ML). The ML tree showed that the Brazilian sequences were distributed in five different lineages. The Bayesian phylogeographic analysis of the Brazilian and their most closely related African sequences (n = 212) placed the origin of all Brazilian lineages in West Africa, probably Ghana, Senegal, and Nigeria. Two monophyletic clades were identified, comprising only sequences from Rio de Janeiro, and their date of origin was estimated at around 1985 (95% highest posterior density: 1979-1992). These results support the existence of at least five independent introductions of the CRF02_AG lineage from West Africa into Brazil and further indicate that at least two of these lineages have been locally disseminated in the Rio de Janeiro state over the past 30 years.

  15. Verapamil reverses PTH- or CRF-induced abnormal fatty acid oxidation in muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perna, A.F.; Smogorzewski, M.; Massry, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with impaired long chain fatty acids (LCFA) oxidation by skeletal muscle mitochondria. This is due to reduced activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT). These derangements were attributed to the secondary hyperparathyroidism of CRF, since prior parathyroidectomy in CRF rats reversed these abnormalities and PTH administration to normal rats reproduced them. It was proposed that these effects of PTH are mediated by its ionophoric property leading to increased entry of calcium into skeletal muscle. A calcium channel blocker may, therefore, correct these derangements. The present study examined the effects of verapamil on LCFA oxidation, CPT activity by skeletal muscle mitochondria, and 45 Ca uptake by skeletal muscle obtained from CRF rats and normal animals treated with PTH with and without verapamil. Both four days of PTH administration and 21 days of CRF produced significant (P less than 0.01) reduction in LCFA oxidation and CPT activity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, and significant (P less than 0.01) increment in 45 Ca uptake by skeletal muscle. Simultaneous treatment with verapamil corrected all these derangements. Administration of verapamil alone to normal rats did not cause a significant change in any of these parameters. The data are consistent with the proposition that the alterations in LCFA in CRF or after PTH treatment are related to the ionophoric action of the hormone and could be reversed by a calcium channel blocker

  16. The Effect of Peripheral CRF Peptide and Water Avoidance Stress on Colonic and Gastric Transit in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Zahid; Kim, Hae Won; Huh, Cheal Wung; Lee, Young Ju; Park, Hyojin

    2017-07-01

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common gastrointestinal (GI) diseases; however, there is frequent overlap between FD and IBS patients. Emerging evidence links the activation of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors with stress-related alterations of gastric and colonic motor function. Therefore, we investigated the effect of peripheral CRF peptide and water avoidance stress (WAS) on upper and lower GI transit in guinea pigs. Dosages 1, 3, and 10 μg/kg of CRF were injected intraperitoneally (IP) in fasted guinea pigs 30 minutes prior to the intragastric administration of charcoal mix to measure upper GI transit. Colonic transits in non-fasted guinea pigs were assessed by fecal pellet output assay after above IP CRF doses. Blockade of CRF receptors by Astressin, and its effect on GI transit was also analyzed. Guinea pigs were subjected to WAS to measure gastrocolonic transit in different sets of experiments. Dose 10 μg/kg of CRF significantly inhibited upper GI transit. In contrast, there was dose dependent acceleration of the colonic transit. Remarkably, pretreatment of astressin significantly reverses the effect of CRF peptide on GI transit. WAS significantly increase colonic transit, but failed to accelerate upper GI transit. Peripheral CRF peptide significantly suppressed upper GI transit and accelerated colon transit, while central CRF involved WAS stimulated only colonic transit. Therefore, peripheral CRF could be utilized to establish the animal model of overlap syndrome. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017.

  17. The Effect of Short Moderate Stress on the Midbrain CRF System in a Macaque Model of Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Phu, Kenny; Reddy, Arubala P; Cameron, Judy L

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of moderate stress on CRF components in the serotonergic midbrain region in a monkey model of FHA. Design After characterization of stress sensitivity, monkeys were moved to a novel room and given 20% less chow for 5 days prior to euthanasia. Setting University of Pittsburgh nonhuman primate facility. Animals Female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) characterized as highly stress resilient (HSR, n=5), medium stress resilient (MSR, N=4) or stress sensitive (SS, n=4). Intervention 5 days of diet in a novel room with unfamiliar conspecifics. Main Outcome Measures Density of CRF axons in the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus; the number of UCN1 cells; the density of UCN1 axons; the expression of CRF-R1 and CRF-R2 in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Results CRF innervation was higher in HSR than SS animals; UCN1 cell number was higher in HSR than SS animals and UCN1 axon bouton density was not different, all opposite of non-stressed animals. CRF-R1 was not different between the sensitivity groups, but CRF-R2 was higher in HSR than SS animals. The relative expression of CRF-R1 and R2 was similar to non-stressed animals. Conclusions HSR animals respond to stress with an increase in CRF delivery to serotonin neurons. With stress, UCN1 transport decreases in HSR animals. CRF receptor expression was similar with or without stress. These changes may contribute to resilience in HSR animals. PMID:23849846

  18. CRF1 receptor activation increases the response of neurons in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala to afferent stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The basolateral nucleus (BLA of the amygdala contributes to the consolidation of memories for emotional or stressful events. The nucleus contains a high density of CRF1 receptors that are activated by corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF. Modulation of the excitability of neurons in the BLA by CRF may regulate the immediate response to stressful events and the formation of associated memories. In the present study, CRF was found to increase the amplitude of field potentials recorded in the BLA following excitatory afferent stimulation, in vitro. The increase was mediated by CRF1 receptors, since it could be blocked by the selective, non-peptide antagonists, NBI30775 and NBI35583, but not by the CRF2-selective antagonist, astressin 2B. Furthermore, the CRF2-selective agonist, urocortin II had no effect on field potential amplitude. The increase induced by CRF was long-lasting, could not be reversed by subsequent administration of NBI35583, and required the activation of protein kinase C. This effect of CRF in the BLA may be important for increasing the salience of aversive stimuli under stressful conditions, and for enhancing the consolidation of associated memories. The results provide further justification for studying the efficacy of selective antagonists of the CRF1 receptor to reduce memory formation linked to emotional or traumatic events, and suggest that these compounds might be useful as prophylactic treatment for stress-related illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

  19. Overexpression of CRF in the BNST diminishes dysphoria but not anxiety-like behavior in nicotine withdrawing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaoli; Guzhva, Lidia; Yang, Zhihui; Febo, Marcelo; Shan, Zhiying; Wang, Kevin K W; Bruijnzeel, Adriaan W

    2016-09-01

    Smoking cessation leads to dysphoria and anxiety, which both increase the risk for relapse. This negative affective state is partly mediated by an increase in activity in brain stress systems. Recent studies indicate that prolonged viral vector-mediated overexpression of stress peptides diminishes stress sensitivity. Here we investigated whether the overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) diminishes nicotine withdrawal symptoms in rats. The effect of nicotine withdrawal on brain reward function was investigated with an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure. Anxiety-like behavior was investigated in the elevated plus maze test and a large open field. An adeno-associated virus (AAV) pseudotype 2/5 vector was used to overexpress CRF in the lateral BNST and nicotine dependence was induced using minipumps. Administration of the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine and cessation of nicotine administration led to a dysphoria-like state, which was prevented by the overexpression of CRF in the BNST. Nicotine withdrawal also increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze test and large open field test and slightly decreased locomotor activity in the open field. The overexpression of CRF in the BNST did not prevent the increase in anxiety-like behavior or decrease in locomotor activity. The overexpression of CRF increased CRF1 and CRF2 receptor gene expression and increased the CRF2/CRF1 receptor ratio. In conclusion, the overexpression of CRF in the BNST prevents the dysphoria-like state associated with nicotine withdrawal and increases the CRF2/CRF1 receptor ratio, which may diminish the negative effects of CRF on mood. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Relay race

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 24th May at 12:00. This annual event is for teams of six runners covering distances of 1000 m, 800 m, 800 m, 500 m, 500 m and 300 m respectively. Teams may be entered in the Seniors, Veterans, Ladies, Mixed or Open categories. There will also this year be a Nordic Walking event, as part of the Medical Service’s initiative “Move more, eat better!” The registration fee is 10 CHF per runner, and each runner will receive a souvenir prize. There will be a programme of entertainment from 12:00 on the arrival area (the lawn in front of Restaurant 1): 12:00 - 12:45  Music from the Old Bottom Street band 12:15 Start of the race 12:45 - 13h Demonstrations by the Fitness club and Dancing club 13:00 Results and prize giving (including a raffle to win an iPad2 3G offered by the Micro club) 13:20 à 14:00 Music from “What’s next” And many information st...

  1. Instances of Bessie Head's distinctive feminism, womanism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It will be argued that her fiction highlights the plight of the socially marginalized in eccentric and seminal ways and that it bears the potential to enrich debates on Africanism, feminism and womanism. Conclusions on how the complexities of Head's psyche can be beneficially used to enrich a more judicious reading will be ...

  2. Process-Model Feminism in the Corporate University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer-Hanks, D. T.

    2016-01-01

    In a period characterised by worries over the rise of the corporate university, it is important to ask what role feminism plays in the academy, and whether that role is commensurate with feminist values and ethics. Commercial and political pressures brought to bear on the encounter between instructor and student can rob teaching of its efficacy,…

  3. Is Feminism Trending? Pedagogical Approaches to Countering (Sl)Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillard, Julianne

    2016-01-01

    As they say in social media, feminism is "trending"; feminist conversations, grassroots movements, and activism mark a fourth wave of feminist practice and theory defined by digital spaces. This article considers the effectiveness of using social media as both a course assignment and as a conduit for civic engagement. I analyse survey…

  4. Chicana and Black Feminisms: "Testimonios" of Theory, Identity, and Multiculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Cinthya M.; Perez, Michelle Salazar

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we examine our own "testimonios" inspired by Chicana and Black feminisms that have not only informed our research and teaching but have also helped us to make sense of our lives. We offer our "testimonios" related to theory, identity negotiations, and pedagogical concerns with teaching multiculturalism as a way to recognize and…

  5. Social Justice Activism: Feminism and Strategies for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernflores, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Success in social justice activism often hinges on judging when to employ the most effective strategy for action. Strategies for action include militancy, peaceful protest, and sometimes, engaging in a longer term program of "marginal gains." The militant feminism of many 19th century suffragettes, such as Emmeline Pankhurst, is a good…

  6. Travelling Theory – The Feminism and Womanism of Tess Onwueme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precious

    deal with her early feminism (The Broken Calabash and The. Reign of Wazobia); the .... The face of the sun changes, so does the moon. Seasons too change .... It is this negation that makes the playwright's flight at international politics a ...

  7. Media Coverage of International Women's Decade: Feminism and Conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Anne; Davenport, Lucinda

    A study examined changes in the treatment of women's issues and feminism from 1975 to 1985--the United Nations (UN) designated "Women's Decade"--by two nationally circulated newspapers. The purpose was to find out how much and what kind of news was reported during the three UN World conferences for women held in 1975, 1980, and 1985;…

  8. Feminism: Silence and Voicelessness as Tools of Patriarchy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feminism works hand in hand with egalitarianism (human equality) towards achieving the equality of the sexes in a perfect utopian state. Though patriarchy takes different forms in different cultures, its different belief is the same. The man is superior by nature, born to rule in all works of life, the woman, and inferior, born to be ...

  9. Negotiating the Geopolitics of Student Resistance in Global Feminisms Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Emek

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the geo-political operations of student resistance in global feminisms classrooms, a topic that is largely ignored in the feminist pedagogies literature, where a generic understanding of the feminist teacher as a white, American and/or Western, and upper-class PhD seems to dominate. Given that the number of minority faculty…

  10. Feminizing genitoplasty in congenital adrenal hyperplasia: the value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of feminizing genitoplasty after the use of urogenital mobilization. ... the common wall between the vagina and the urethra, hence avoiding the related complications. With the use of the perineal approach, the application of this technique had been extended .... was resolved using systemic and topical antibiotics. Ischemia of ...

  11. Religion and feminization of poverty in Nigeria: a Christian perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poverty is a cankerworm which has eaten deep into the very fabric of the Nigeria society. Though poverty is a common denominator among the people of the average Nigerian society, women are the most vulnerable group. Therefore the concept, feminization of poverty seeks to describe a phenomenon in which women ...

  12. Work, women employment and feminization of poverty in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The continued exposure of the latter either in the traditional or modern society to deepening poverty has therefore aroused a lot of interest in the discussion of the reality of the 'feminization of poverty'. In examining this, accusing fingers have often been pointed at men as the ones responsible for the higher incidence of ...

  13. An exploration of issues relating to feminism and nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, B; Biley, F C

    1992-08-01

    This paper explores the issue of feminism in relation to nursing and nurse education. As a result of this exploration, the authors suggest there is a need for a move away from traditional patriarchal approaches to nurse education, towards an educational programme based on empowerment principles that maximises the potential of feminine patterns of thinking.

  14. What Is Protest? Feminism, Psychoanalysis and Methods of Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that feminism has recognised psychoanalysis to be a theory with direct application to the understanding of sexism for over 50 years, the application of psychoanalytic thinking to feminist activism has yet to be significantly realised. Using the work of Julia Kristeva, sexism is described as a symptom of an intolerable situation…

  15. A PICTURE OF MODERN FEMINISM THROUGH SOUNDTRACKS LYRICS IN FROZEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sriastuti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Feminism as it is viewed in the modern world is appreciated in various products. It has become a common sense and understanding that women keep on having movements to pursue equality to men. Literary works play an important role to promote the awareness and spirit of women emancipation. It becomes an interesting view to examine how this women movement is introduced to women in general regardless age. This issue has also been introduced to kids through various ways; among them are novel sand movies. A movie produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios, Frozen, is rich in the elements of the story, animations, pictures, and music. The story itself draws the young readers of the stories of princesses with abundant moral issued of goodness against badness, loyalty, and courage. However, examining deeper to the lyrics of the soundtracks, readers can get a more vivid picture of modern feminism through encouragements of women‘s struggles to face problems, to have bargaining power, and to have right to decide what the best for them. This paper is aimed to find out a picture of modern feminism through the lyrics of the soundtracks. The result of the study can be used to track the development of feminism ideas in modern world.

  16. Making Feminism Matter: The Revitalization of a Campus Women's Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alice

    1988-01-01

    Describes the revitalization of the Brooklyn College Women's Center, a 10-year-old women's center experiencing the effects of the conservative 1980s. Discusses the challenge of making feminism matter to young women who may be suspicious or indifferent, or who may not have identified their needs as "women's issues." (NB)

  17. The Politics of Tutoring: Feminism within the Patriarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolbright, Meg

    1992-01-01

    Examines a writing conference between a tutor and a student, both feminists. Discusses the conflicts expressed by the tutor and the student as they attempt to espouse feminist values within a patriarchal system. Concludes that feminism (and good tutoring) will have a chance only if students have options and the power to choose. (RS)

  18. Identification of urocortin III, an additional member of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family with high affinity for the CRF2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K; Li, C; Perrin, M H; Blount, A; Kunitake, K; Donaldson, C; Vaughan, J; Reyes, T M; Gulyas, J; Fischer, W; Bilezikjian, L; Rivier, J; Sawchenko, P E; Vale, W W

    2001-06-19

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family of neuropeptides includes the mammalian peptides CRF, urocortin, and urocortin II, as well as piscine urotensin I and frog sauvagine. The mammalian peptides signal through two G protein-coupled receptor types to modulate endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stress, as well as a range of peripheral (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and immune) activities. The three previously known ligands are differentially distributed anatomically and have distinct specificities for the two major receptor types. Here we describe the characterization of an additional CRF-related peptide, urocortin III, in the human and mouse. In searching the public human genome databases we found a partial expressed sequence tagged (EST) clone with significant sequence identity to mammalian and fish urocortin-related peptides. By using primers based on the human EST sequence, a full-length human clone was isolated from genomic DNA that encodes a protein that includes a predicted putative 38-aa peptide structurally related to other known family members. With a human probe, we then cloned the mouse ortholog from a genomic library. Human and mouse urocortin III share 90% identity in the 38-aa putative mature peptide. In the peptide coding region, both human and mouse urocortin III are 76% identical to pufferfish urocortin-related peptide and more distantly related to urocortin II, CRF, and urocortin from other mammalian species. Mouse urocortin III mRNA expression is found in areas of the brain including the hypothalamus, amygdala, and brainstem, but is not evident in the cerebellum, pituitary, or cerebral cortex; it is also expressed peripherally in small intestine and skin. Urocortin III is selective for type 2 CRF receptors and thus represents another potential endogenous ligand for these receptors.

  19. Water-avoidance stress enhances gastric contractions in freely moving conscious rats: role of peripheral CRF receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2014-05-01

    Stress alters gastrointestinal motility through central and peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) pathways. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that peripheral CRF is deeply involved in the regulation of gastric motility, and enhances gastric contractions through CRF receptor type 1 (CRF1) and delays gastric emptying (GE) through CRF receptor type 2 (CRF2). Since little is known whether water-avoidance stress (WAS) alters gastric motility, the present study tried to clarify this question and the involvement of peripheral CRF receptor subtypes in the mechanisms. We recorded intraluminal gastric pressure waves using a perfused manometric method. The rats were anesthetized and the manometric catheter was inserted into the stomach 4-6 days before the experiments. We assessed the area under the manometric trace as the motor index (MI), and compared this result with those obtained 1 h before and after initiation of WAS in nonfasted conscious rats. Solid GE for 1 h was also measured. WAS significantly increased gastric contractions. Intraperitoneal (ip) administration of astressin (100 μg/kg, 5 min prior to stress), a nonselective CRF antagonist, blocked the response to WAS. On the other hand, pretreatment (5 min prior to stress) with neither astressin2-B (200 μg/kg, ip), a selective CRF2 antagonist, nor urocortin 2 (30 μg/kg, ip), a selective CRF2 agonist, modified the response to WAS. These drugs did not alter the basal MI. WAS did not change GE. WAS may activate peripheral CRF1 but not CRF2 signaling and stimulates gastric contractions without altering GE.

  20. CRF-like diuretic hormone negatively affects both feeding and reproduction in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter Van Wielendaele

    Full Text Available Diuretic hormones (DH related to the vertebrate Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF have been identified in diverse insect species. In the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, the CRF-like DH (CRF/DH is localized in the same neurosecretory cells as the Ovary Maturating Parsin (OMP, a neurohormone that stimulates oocyte growth, vitellogenesis and hemolymph ecdysteroid levels in adult female locusts. In this study, we investigated whether CRF-like DH can influence feeding and reproduction in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. We identified two highly similar S. gregaria CRF-like DH precursor cDNAs, each of which also encodes an OMP isoform. Alignment with other insect CRF-like DH precursors shows relatively high conservation of the CRF/DH sequence while the precursor region corresponding to OMP is not well conserved. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that the precursor transcripts mainly occur in the central nervous system and their highest expression level was observed in the brain. Injection of locust CRF/DH caused a significantly reduced food intake, while RNAi knockdown stimulated food intake. Therefore, our data indicate that CRF-like DH induces satiety. Furthermore, injection of CRF/DH in adult females retarded oocyte growth and caused lower ecdysteroid titers in hemolymph and ovaries, while RNAi knockdown resulted in opposite effects. The observed effects of CRF/DH may be part of a wider repertoire of neurohormonal activities, constituting an integrating control system that affects food intake and excretion, as well as anabolic processes like oocyte growth and ecdysteroidogenesis, following a meal. Our discussion about the functional relationship between CRF/DH and OMP led to the hypothesis that OMP may possibly act as a monitoring peptide that can elicit negative feedback effects.

  1. Evolutionary Psychology is Compatible with Equity Feminism, but Not with Gender Feminism: A Reply to Eagly and Wood (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry X. Kuhle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available I comment on Eagly and Wood's biosocial constructionist evolutionary theory (2011; DOI: 10.1007/s11199-011-9949-9. Although this gender feminist theory allows for evolved physical differences between men and women and evolved psychological similarities for men and women, it fails to consider evolutionary accounts of psychological sex differences. I hypothesize that gender feminists' reluctance to acknowledge that evolution has left different fingerprints on men's and women's bodies and brains stems from two common misunderstandings of evolutionary psychology: the myth of immutability and the naturalistic fallacy. I conclude that although evolutionary psychology is eminently compatible with equity feminism, evolutionary psychology and feminist psychology will conflict as long as the latter adheres to gender feminism and its unwillingness to acknowledge the evidence for evolved psychological sex differences. Gender feminism's dualistic view of evolution hinders the search for and understanding of the proximate and ultimate causes of inequality. Feminist psychology needs to evolve by embracing equity feminism, which has no a priori stance on the origin or existence of differences between the sexes.

  2. Evolutionary psychology is compatible with equity feminism, but not with gender feminism: a reply to Eagly and Wood (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhle, Barry X

    2012-01-11

    I comment on Eagly and Wood's biosocial constructionist evolutionary theory (2011; DOI: 10.1007/s11199-011-9949-9). Although this gender feminist theory allows for evolved physical differences between men and women and evolved psychological similarities for men and women, it fails to consider evolutionary accounts of psychological sex differences. I hypothesize that gender feminists' reluctance to acknowledge that evolution has left different fingerprints on men's and women's bodies and brains stems from two common misunderstandings of evolutionary psychology: the myth of immutability and the naturalistic fallacy. I conclude that although evolutionary psychology is eminently compatible with equity feminism, evolutionary psychology and feminist psychology will conflict as long as the latter adheres to gender feminism and its unwillingness to acknowledge the evidence for evolved psychological sex differences.  Gender feminism's dualistic view of evolution hinders the search for and understanding of the proximate and ultimate causes of inequality. Feminist psychology needs to evolve by embracing equity feminism, which has no a priori stance on the origin or existence of differences between the sexes.

  3. Spatio-Temporal History of HIV-1 CRF35_AD in Afghanistan and Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eybpoosh, Sana; Bahrampour, Abbas; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Jahanbakhsh, Fatemeh; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Zolala, Farzaneh; Haghdoost, Ali Akbar

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form 35_AD (CRF35_AD) has an important position in the epidemiological profile of Afghanistan and Iran. Despite the presence of this clade in Afghanistan and Iran for over a decade, our understanding of its origin and dissemination patterns is limited. In this study, we performed a Bayesian phylogeographic analysis to reconstruct the spatio-temporal dispersion pattern of this clade using eligible CRF35_AD gag and pol sequences available in the Los Alamos HIV database (432 sequences available from Iran, 16 sequences available from Afghanistan, and a single CRF35_AD-like pol sequence available from USA). Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm was implemented in BEAST v1.8.1. Between-country dispersion rates were tested with Bayesian stochastic search variable selection method and were considered significant where Bayes factor values were greater than three. The findings suggested that CRF35_AD sequences were genetically similar to parental sequences from Kenya and Uganda, and to a set of subtype A1 sequences available from Afghan refugees living in Pakistan. Our results also showed that across all phylogenies, Afghan and Iranian CRF35_AD sequences formed a monophyletic cluster (posterior clade credibility> 0.7). The divergence date of this cluster was estimated to be between 1990 and 1992. Within this cluster, a bidirectional dispersion of the virus was observed across Afghanistan and Iran. We could not clearly identify if Afghanistan or Iran first established or received this epidemic, as the root location of this cluster could not be robustly estimated. Three CRF35_AD sequences from Afghan refugees living in Pakistan nested among Afghan and Iranian CRF35_AD branches. However, the CRF35_AD-like sequence available from USA diverged independently from Kenyan subtype A1 sequences, suggesting it not to be a true CRF35_AD lineage. Potential factors contributing to viral exchange between Afghanistan and Iran could be injection drug

  4. Activity-based anorexia activates CRF immunoreactive neurons in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharner, Sophie; Friedrich, Tiemo; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Kobelt, Peter; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas

    2018-05-01

    Activity-based anorexia (ABA) is a well-established animal model mimicking the eating disorder anorexia nervosa (AN). Since the pathophysiology of AN is yet poorly understood and specific drug treatments are lacking so far, animal models might be useful to further understand this disease. ABA consists of time-restricted access to food for 1.5 h/day and the possibility to exercise in a running wheel for 24 h/day. This combination leads to robust body weight loss as observed in AN. Here, we investigated the activation of brain corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons, a transmitter involved in the response to stress, emotional processes and also food intake. After development of ABA, rat brains were processed for c-Fos and CRF double immunohistochemistry. ABA increased the number of c-Fos/CRF double labeled neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH) compared to the ad libitum (AL, ad libitum fed, no running wheel) and activity (AC, ad libitum fed, running wheel, p  0.05) group. Also the number of CRF neurons was increased in the DMH of ABA rats compared to AL and AC (p  0.05). Taken together, brain CRF activated under conditions of ABA might play a role in the development and maintenance of this animal model and possibly also in human AN. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. CRF2 signaling is a novel regulator of cellular adhesion and migration in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarouge, Benjamin; Pelissier-Rota, Marjolaine; Lainé, Michèle; Cristina, Nadine; Vachez, Yvan; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bonaz, Bruno; Jacquier-Sarlin, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    Stress has been proposed to be a tumor promoting factor through the secretion of specific neuromediators, such as Urocortin2 and 3 (Ucn2/3), however its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains elusive. We observed that Ucn2/3 and their receptor the Corticotropin Releasing Factor receptor 2 (CRF2) were up-regulated in high grade and poorly differentiated CRC. This suggests a role for CRF2 in the loss of cellular organization and tumor progression. Using HT-29 and SW620 cells, two CRC cell lines differing in their abilities to perform cell-cell contacts, we found that CRF2 signals through Src/ERK pathway to induce the alteration of cell-cell junctions and the shuttle of p120ctn and Kaiso in the nucleus. In HT-29 cells, this signaling pathway also leads to the remodeling of cell adhesion by i) the phosphorylation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and ii) a modification of actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion complexes. These events stimulate cell migration and invasion. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CRF2 signaling controls cellular organization and may promote metastatic potential of human CRC cells through an epithelial-mesenchymal transition like process. This contributes to the comprehension of the tumor-promoting effects of stress molecules and designates Ucn2/3-CRF2 tandem as a target to prevent CRC progression and aggressiveness.

  6. Dominance of HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE in sexually acquired cases leads to a new epidemic in Yunnan province of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dating back to the first epidemic among injection drug users in 1989, the Yunnan province has had the highest number of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infections in China. However, the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 in Yunnan has not been fully characterized.Using immunoassays, we identified 103,015 accumulated cases of HIV-1 infections in Yunnan between 1989 and 2004. We studied 321 patients representing Yunnan's 16 prefectures from four risk groups, 11 ethnic populations, and ten occupations. We identified three major circulating subtypes: C/CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC (53%, CRF01_AE (40.5%, and B (6.5% by analyzing the sequence of p17, which is part of the gag gene. For patients with known risk factors, 90.9% of injection drug users had C/CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC viruses, whereas 85.4% of CRF01_AE infections were acquired through sexual transmission. No distinct segregation of CRF01_AE viruses was found among the Dai ethnic group. Geographically, C/CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC was found throughout the province, while CRF01_AE was largely confined to the prefectures bordering Myanmar. Furthermore, C/CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC viruses were found to consist of a group of viruses, including C, CRF08_BC, CRF07_BC, and new BC recombinants, based on the characterization of their reverse transcriptase genes.This is the first report of a province-wide HIV-1 molecular epidemiological study in Yunnan. While C/CRF07_BC/CRF08_BC and CRF01_AE are codominant, the discovery of many sexually transmitted CRF01_AE cases is new and suggests that this subtype may lead to a new epidemic in the general Chinese population. We discuss implications of our results for understanding the evolution of the HIV-1 pandemic and for vaccine development.

  7. Robust rooftop extraction from visible band images using higher order CRF

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Er

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust framework for building extraction in visible band images. We first get an initial classification of the pixels based on an unsupervised presegmentation. Then, we develop a novel conditional random field (CRF) formulation to achieve accurate rooftops extraction, which incorporates pixel-level information and segment-level information for the identification of rooftops. Comparing with the commonly used CRF model, a higher order potential defined on segment is added in our model, by exploiting region consistency and shape feature at segment level. Our experiments show that the proposed higher order CRF model outperforms the state-of-the-art methods both at pixel and object levels on rooftops with complex structures and sizes in challenging environments. © 1980-2012 IEEE.

  8. New Heroines of Labour: Domesticating Post-feminism and Neoliberal Capitalism in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmenniemi, Suvi; Adamson, Maria

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, post-feminism has become an important element of popular media culture and the object of feminist cultural critique. This article explores how post-feminism is domesticated in Russia through popular self-help literature aimed at a female audience. Drawing on a close reading of self-help texts by three best-selling Russian authors, the article examines how post-feminism is made intelligible to the Russian audience and how it articulates with other symbolic frameworks. It identifies labour as a key trope through which post-feminism is domesticated and argues that the texts invite women to invest time and energy in the labour of personality, the labour of femininity and the labour of sexuality in order to become 'valuable subjects'. The article demonstrates that the domestication of post-feminism also involves the domestication of neoliberal capitalism in Russia, and highlights how popular psychology, neoliberal capitalism and post-feminism are symbiotically related.

  9. The Effect of Citalopram on Midbrain CRF Receptors 1 and 2 in a Primate Model of Stress-Induced Amenorrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senashova, Olga; Reddy, Arubala P.; Cameron, Judy L.; Bethea, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    We have demonstrated marked differences in the neurobiology of the serotonin system between stress-sensitive (SS) and stress-resilient (SR) cynomolgus macaques characterized in a model of stress-induced amenorrhea, also called functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA). Dysfunction of the serotonin system in SS monkeys suggested that administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) might correct FHA. This study examines the effect of escitalopram (CIT) administration to SS and SR monkeys on corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor 1 (CRF-R1) and CRF receptor 2 (CRF-R2) gene expression in the serotonin cell body region of the midbrain dorsal raphe. CRF-R1 was not significantly different between groups. There was a significant effect of treatment and a significant interaction between treatment and stress sensitivity on the average CRF-R2-positive pixel area (P < .004 and P < .006, respectively) and on the average number of CRF-R2-positive cells (P < .023 and P < .025, respectively). CIT significantly increased CRF-R2-positive pixel area and cell number in the SS group (pixel area P < .001; cell number P < .01; Bonferoni) but not in the SR group. In summary, CIT administration tended to decrease CRF-R1, but the small animal number precluded significance. CIT administration significantly increased CRF-R2 only in SS animals. These data suggest that the administration of CIT reduces anxiogenic components and increases anxiolytic components of the CRF system in the midbrain serotonin network, which in turn leads to improved ovarian function. Moreover, these data raise the possibility that SSRIs may be effective in the treatment of stress-induced infertility. PMID:22412189

  10. Risky choice and brain CRF after adolescent ethanol vapor exposure and social stress in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutros, Nathalie; Der-Avakian, Andre; Semenova, Svetlana; Lee, Soon; Markou, Athina

    2016-09-15

    Adolescent ethanol exposure increases risky choice and alters corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) systems in adulthood. The impact of stress on risky choice after adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) exposure is not known. We investigated time-specific effects of AIE vapor exposure during early adolescence on risky choice after stress or no stress in adulthood. Male Wistar rats were exposed to air or AIE vapor on postnatal days 28-42 (adolescence) and were exposed to 10days of social defeat or no stress on postnatal days 172-181 (adulthood). Risky choice was assessed in the probability discounting task under baseline conditions and after days 1 and 10 of social defeat. CRF and CRF receptor 1 (CRFR1) mRNA levels were assessed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) 24h post-stress to evaluate persistent effects of stress on the brain. AIE exposure had no effect on risky choice either at baseline or after social defeat. Additionally, neither acute nor chronic social defeat affected risky choice in air-exposed rats. In the PFC, chronic social defeat selectively decreased CRF mRNA levels in air-exposed rats and increased CRFR1 mRNA levels in all rats. AIE exposure increased CRF mRNA levels in the CeA with no effect of social stress. Our results indicate no effect of ethanol exposure via vapor during early adolescence on risky choice, while our previous findings indicated that AIE exposure via gavage affected risky choice. Both AIE exposure and social defeat altered CRF and CRFR1 mRNA levels in the brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The economic ramification of equating women empowerment to feminism in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Senzu, Emmanuel Tweneboah

    2017-01-01

    There is quantum empirical evidence and numerous literature that correlate women economic empowerment to macroeconomic growth, which further argue a strong correlation of economic empowerment of women to feminism agenda. This has led to the rise of gender democracy and feminism in the past two decades up to date. However, this development of women with high educational status driven under feminism is failing to correlate to any meaningful macroeconomic growth in Africa as proposed, which this...

  12. Decolonizing Higher Education: Black Feminism and the Intersectionality of Race and Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Safia Mirza

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on black feminist theory, this paper examines the professional experiences of postcolonial diasporic black and ethnicized female academics in higher education. The paper explores the embodiment of gendered and racialized difference and reflects on the power of whiteness to shape everyday experiences in such places of privilege. The powerful yet hidden histories of women of color in higher education, such as the Indian women suffragettes and Cornelia Sorabji in late nineteenth century, are symbolic of the erasure of an ethnicized black feminist/womanist presence in mainstream (white educational establishments. The paper concludes that an understanding of black and ethnicized female agency and desire for education and learning is at the heart of a black feminist analysis that reclaims higher education as a radical site of resistance and refutation.

  13. Gentlemanly Orthodoxy: Critical Race Feminism, Whiteness Theory, and the APA Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Audrey

    2004-01-01

    Although often viewed as burdensome, academic writing guidelines are rarely treated as actively problematic. Even progressive scholars are unlikely to challenge the cultural assumptions or political investments of academic style guides. Yet standards regarding clarity, precision, appropriateness, sensitivity, and objectivity are not politically…

  14. Becoming lesbian: Monique Wittig's queer-trans-feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kevin

    2018-04-03

    Inspired by Lynne Huffer's queer feminist genealogy, this article explores queer-trans-feminism as a project that would bring together queer, feminist, and transgender theory and politics into a shared critical lineage. I suggest that Monique Wittig is a neglected thinker who could re-enliven connections and debates within queer, feminist, and trans theory and politics. Utilizing recent historiographies of queer and feminist theory, I imagine what it would mean to hold on to the figure of the lesbian as a figure for queer-trans-feminist politics rather than render the lesbian anachronistic. I then explore the implications of Wittig's notion that "lesbians are not women" for a queer-trans-feminism. I argue that Wittig's critique of the language of the social sciences offers queer-trans-feminist scholars a source for contemporary self-critique and coalition.

  15. Lost Purity. Social in Nineteenth and Twentieth-century Feminisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Persano

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ‘Social Purity’ appears in a part of the French and Anglo-Saxon (Britain and the United States nineteenth-twentieth century’s feminisms, as a mean for many claims: from the full recognition of sexual difference in Hubertine Auclert’s social and ‘differentialist’ republicanism in France to Josephine Butler’s refusal of any purity imposed from above in England, until the absolute turn of the idea of women’s moral superiority and the equal and opposite force to the final exit from ‘the social’ by the American ‘New Womanism’, individualizing and de-feminizing the act of sexual liberation. All this in a continuous play of actions and reactions, sometimes paradoxical, weaving together suffragism and anti-suffragism, contestation of the conjugal complementarity and the never overcome temptations of hetero or self-control.

  16. Wesleyan (AntiFeminism: A Religious Construction of Gender Equality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Weaver Swartz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using ethnographic research and interviews, this article explored the construction of gender equality among students and faculty members at the Asbury Theological Seminary. The institution constructed an unusual blend of egalitarianism and anti-feminism using explicitly religious tools. Specifically, it was found that community members constructed firm commitments to gender equality from their heavily individualistic theology and from identification with the New Testament Church. The community’s resonance with feminism was also limited by evangelical anti-structuralism and an ethic of Christian humility and moderation. Established constructions of gender equality and inequality in established scholarly, and especially feminist, literature could not fully explain this unusual blend. This paper argues that agency and empowerment can be available to women because of the theological content of their religion.

  17. Steps towards the institutionalisation of feminism in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra COLUMBAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses important issues related to the institutionalisation of feminism in Norway, by providing a case study on the country’s first feminist magazine, Sirene. The first part of the article focuses on the political and historical context which favoured the emergence of the magazine, and insists on a series of legal measures taken in the twentieth century – suffrage rights, equal payment, political representation, etc. – which provided the institutional framework for the women’s movement. The more comprehensive second part of the article focuses on Sirene itself: it analyses the magazine’s structure and key concepts, its political agenda, its aims, but also thebranch of feminism to which Sirene adheres. The article concludes that the magazine represented an influential alternative to the mainstream press of the time, and contributed greatly to achieving the goals of women’s liberation movement.

  18. Simone de Beauvoirs feminism : De digitala spelen idag

    OpenAIRE

    Alesö, Rikard; Widén, Fredrika

    2013-01-01

    Detta kandidatarbete utgår ifrån två stycken frågeställningar kopplade till feminism: ”Hur kan Simone de Beauvoirs feminism gestaltas i digitala spel?” och ”Vad finns det för typiska könsroller i dagens digitala spel?”. För att svara på dess frågeställningar studerade vi de Beauvoirs bok ”Det Andra Könet”, utförde spelanalyser samt delade ut skriftliga intervjuer till spelare. Resultaten blev en prototyp till ett digitalt spel vars handling är en direkt inspiration ifrån utvalda kapitel från ...

  19. Formations of Femininity: Science and Aesthetics in Facial Feminization Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plemons, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Facial feminization surgery (FFS) is a set of bone and soft tissue reconstructive surgical procedures intended to feminize the faces of trans- women in order to make their identities as women recognizable to others. In this article, I explore how the identification of facial femininity was negotiated in two FFS surgeons' practices. One committed to the metrics of normal skeletal form and the other to aspirational aesthetics of individual optimization; I argue that surgeons' competing clinical approaches illustrate a constitutive tension in the proliferating therapeutic logics of trans- medicine. The growing popularity of surgical practices like FFS demonstrates a shift in American trans- therapeutics away from a singular focus on the genitalia as the location of bodily sex and toward understandings of sex as a product of social recognition.

  20. Debate on redistribution and recognition: towards an oposition posmodern feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Pilar Rodríguez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Marxist tradition has strongly criticized Derrida’s deconstruction approach as well as the postmodern positions, considering them as only concerned with differences but with no regards for socioeconomic inequality. Nevertheless, an important part of feminism has nursed in such theories to support its own arguments. We analyze the pertinence of such criticism as well as the particular effects of deconstruction and postmodernism in the theory and praxis of feminism in the light of two current debates. The first one regarding the political potential of deconstruction and postmodernism positions; the second one, referred to the so-called contradiction between socioeconomic redistribution and cultural acknowledgement of the differences. This will lead us to a broader and more comprehensive analysis horizon.

  1. Feminism as a media product: the Beyoncé paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola Fernández Hernández

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2014, an increasing number of celebrities has manifested itself publicly as feminist, a phenomenon that has coincided in time with the emergence of a new space for the discussion about women issues in traditional media and social media netwotks. Taking as paradigmatic the case of Beyoncé, this text explores the intersection between mainstream culture, mass media and feminism, contextualized in the logics of advanced capitalism, neo-liberalism and its patriarchal rearmament and the celebritization of the media space in which they coincide. Its objective will be to expose, through the academic and media reactions to Beyonce’s feminism, the strengths and weaknesses of the so-called postfeminism, and to propose that its utility as a subversive tool could be considered not in relation to the public that receives and reworks it, but in terms of its ability to mobilize and produce mutations in both journalistic and academic practice.

  2. Feminism and/in/as psychology: The public sciences of sex and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Alexandra; Pettit, Michael

    2015-08-01

    In our introduction to this special issue on the histories of feminism, gender, sexuality, and the psy-disciplines, we propose the tripartite framework of "feminism and/in/as psychology" to conceptualize the dynamics of their conjoined trajectories and relationship to gender and sexuality from the late 19th through the late 20th centuries. "Feminism and psychology" highlights the tensions between a political movement and a scientific discipline and the efforts of participants in each to problematize the other. "Feminism in psychology" refers to those historical moments when self-identified feminists intervened in psychology to alter its content, methodologies, and populations. We propose, as have others, that these interventions predate the 1970s, the period most commonly associated with the "founding" of feminist psychology. Finally, "feminism as psychology/psychology as feminism" explores the shared ground between psychology and feminism-the conceptual, methodological, and (more rarely) epistemological moments when psychology and feminism made common cause. We suggest that the traffic between feminism and psychology has been persistent, continuous, and productive, despite taking different historically and geographically contingent forms. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Reflections on health care consumerism: insights from feminism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Charlotte

    2001-01-01

    Health care consumerism is a movement concerned with patients’ interests in health care, crucially those that are repressed or partly repressed by dominant interest‐holders. Like feminism, health care consumerism attracts dislike and confusion as well as enthusiasm. But just as the voicing of women’s repressed interests leads to their gradual acceptance by dominant interest‐holders, so does the voicing of patients’ repressed interests. PMID:11281891

  4. Femininity, neoliberalism and popular culture: the depolitization of feminism

    OpenAIRE

    Esquirol, Meritxell

    2015-01-01

    This thesis intends to analyze the logics of representation of contemporary femininity in the popular imagery that has instrumentalized feminism. Such is the case of the transmedia narrative The Twilight Saga, the cultural franchise of 50 Shades of Grey, and TV fiction Girls. All of these cultural products have earned an important position in contemporary cultural consumption, invite a form of cultural participation closely linked to the consumer industry, and propose female ideals characteri...

  5. Feminism, CSR and Global Governance: The Case of WEP

    OpenAIRE

    Cervi, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at understanding whether corporations can be considered facilitators of feminism through their involvement in international political and feminist projects. Such question stems from the acknowledgment of the new political role corporations are taking in global governance dynamics and institutions, which in turn allows them to be influential actors when it comes to tackling global political issues – such as, in this case, gender issues. In 2011 the UN Millennium Developme...

  6. Religion, Intersectionality, and Epistemic Habits of Academic Feminism. Perspectives from Global Feminist Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Vuola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article pays critical attention to the ways in which academic feminism has regarded religion. Issues related to religion and gender have by and large either been ignored or treated quite stereotypically. I have called this phenomenon a simultaneous under- and overestimation of religion. The phenomenon is not global. Feminists of the global south tend to pay much more and more multi-faceted attention to religion than scholars from the global north. I will illustrate this problem through a close reading of intersectionality in feminist research in religion, especially feminist theology. My argument – which can be supported by evidence from historical records – is that what has been called intersectionality since Kimberlé Crenshaw, has in fact been explicitly present in early feminist theology (1970s-. The reason why feminist liberation theologians stressed the interstructuring of gender, class, and race/ethnicity lies in their practical and theoretical cooperation with liberation and feminist theologians from the global south, for example through the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians (EATWOT. My article is a critical re-reading of the history of feminist theorizing from the perspective of religious feminists, academic feminist theologians and liberation theologians from both the global north and south (including black and womanist theologians from the USA, Latin America and Africa. My aim is to correct a long-held understanding of the history of feminist theorizing as purely “secular”.

  7. Leads Detection Using Mixture Statistical Distribution Based CRF Algorithm from Sentinel-1 Dual Polarization SAR Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Fei; Zhang, Shengkai; Zhu, Tingting

    2017-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is significantly important for polar remote sensing since it can provide continuous observations in all days and all weather. SAR can be used for extracting the surface roughness information characterized by the variance of dielectric properties and different polarization channels, which make it possible to observe different ice types and surface structure for deformation analysis. In November, 2016, Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) 33rd cruise has set sails in sea ice zone in Antarctic. Accurate leads spatial distribution in sea ice zone for routine planning of ship navigation is essential. In this study, the semantic relationship between leads and sea ice categories has been described by the Conditional Random Fields (CRF) model, and leads characteristics have been modeled by statistical distributions in SAR imagery. In the proposed algorithm, a mixture statistical distribution based CRF is developed by considering the contexture information and the statistical characteristics of sea ice for improving leads detection in Sentinel-1A dual polarization SAR imagery. The unary potential and pairwise potential in CRF model is constructed by integrating the posteriori probability estimated from statistical distributions. For mixture statistical distribution parameter estimation, Method of Logarithmic Cumulants (MoLC) is exploited for single statistical distribution parameters estimation. The iteration based Expectation Maximal (EM) algorithm is investigated to calculate the parameters in mixture statistical distribution based CRF model. In the posteriori probability inference, graph-cut energy minimization method is adopted in the initial leads detection. The post-processing procedures including aspect ratio constrain and spatial smoothing approaches are utilized to improve the visual result. The proposed method is validated on Sentinel-1A SAR C-band Extra Wide Swath (EW) Ground Range Detected (GRD) imagery with a

  8. A newly emerging HIV-1 recombinant lineage (CRF58_01B) disseminating among people who inject drugs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Takebe, Yutaka; Syafina, Nur Ezreen; Prakasa, Malarvelli Soorya; Chan, Kok Gan; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Koh, Clayton; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2014-01-01

    The HIV epidemic is primarily characterised by the circulation of HIV-1 group M (main) comprising of 11 subtypes and sub-subtypes (A1, A2, B-D, F1, F2, G, H, J, and K) and to date 55 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). In Southeast Asia, active inter-subtype recombination involving three main circulating genotypes--subtype B (including subtype B', the Thai variant of subtype B), CRF01_AE, and CRF33_01B--have contributed to the emergence of novel unique recombinant forms. In the present study, we conducted the molecular epidemiological surveillance of HIV-1 gag-RT genes among 258 people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between 2009 and 2011 whereby a novel CRF candidate was recently identified. The near full-length genome sequences obtained from six epidemiologically unlinked individuals showed identical mosaic structures consisting of subtype B' and CRF01_AE, with six unique recombination breakpoints in the gag-RT, pol, and env regions. Among the high-risk population of PWIDs in Malaysia, which was predominantly infected by CRF33_01B (>70%), CRF58_01B circulated at a low but significant prevalence (2.3%, 6/258). Interestingly, the CRF58_01B shared two unique recombination breakpoints with other established CRFs in the region: CRF33_01B, CRF48_01B, and CRF53_01B in the gag gene, and CRF15_01B (from Thailand) in the env gene. Extended Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling analysis showed that CRF58_01B and other recently discovered CRFs were most likely to have originated in Malaysia, and that the recent spread of recombinant lineages in the country had little influence from neighbouring countries. The isolation, genetic characterization, and evolutionary features of CRF58_01B among PWIDs in Malaysia signify the increasingly complex HIV-1 diversity in Southeast Asia that may hold an implication on disease treatment, control, and prevention.

  9. A newly emerging HIV-1 recombinant lineage (CRF58_01B disseminating among people who inject drugs in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhen Chow

    Full Text Available The HIV epidemic is primarily characterised by the circulation of HIV-1 group M (main comprising of 11 subtypes and sub-subtypes (A1, A2, B-D, F1, F2, G, H, J, and K and to date 55 circulating recombinant forms (CRFs. In Southeast Asia, active inter-subtype recombination involving three main circulating genotypes--subtype B (including subtype B', the Thai variant of subtype B, CRF01_AE, and CRF33_01B--have contributed to the emergence of novel unique recombinant forms. In the present study, we conducted the molecular epidemiological surveillance of HIV-1 gag-RT genes among 258 people who inject drugs (PWIDs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between 2009 and 2011 whereby a novel CRF candidate was recently identified. The near full-length genome sequences obtained from six epidemiologically unlinked individuals showed identical mosaic structures consisting of subtype B' and CRF01_AE, with six unique recombination breakpoints in the gag-RT, pol, and env regions. Among the high-risk population of PWIDs in Malaysia, which was predominantly infected by CRF33_01B (>70%, CRF58_01B circulated at a low but significant prevalence (2.3%, 6/258. Interestingly, the CRF58_01B shared two unique recombination breakpoints with other established CRFs in the region: CRF33_01B, CRF48_01B, and CRF53_01B in the gag gene, and CRF15_01B (from Thailand in the env gene. Extended Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling analysis showed that CRF58_01B and other recently discovered CRFs were most likely to have originated in Malaysia, and that the recent spread of recombinant lineages in the country had little influence from neighbouring countries. The isolation, genetic characterization, and evolutionary features of CRF58_01B among PWIDs in Malaysia signify the increasingly complex HIV-1 diversity in Southeast Asia that may hold an implication on disease treatment, control, and prevention.

  10. Detecting New Words from Chinese Text Using Latent Semi-CRF Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao; Huang, Degen; Ren, Fuji

    Chinese new words and their part-of-speech (POS) are particularly problematic in Chinese natural language processing. With the fast development of internet and information technology, it is impossible to get a complete system dictionary for Chinese natural language processing, as new words out of the basic system dictionary are always being created. A latent semi-CRF model, which combines the strengths of LDCRF (Latent-Dynamic Conditional Random Field) and semi-CRF, is proposed to detect the new words together with their POS synchronously regardless of the types of the new words from the Chinese text without being pre-segmented. Unlike the original semi-CRF, the LDCRF is applied to generate the candidate entities for training and testing the latent semi-CRF, which accelerates the training speed and decreases the computation cost. The complexity of the latent semi-CRF could be further adjusted by tuning the number of hidden variables in LDCRF and the number of the candidate entities from the Nbest outputs of the LDCRF. A new-words-generating framework is proposed for model training and testing, under which the definitions and distributions of the new words conform to the ones existing in real text. Specific features called “Global Fragment Information” for new word detection and POS tagging are adopted in the model training and testing. The experimental results show that the proposed method is capable of detecting even low frequency new words together with their POS tags. The proposed model is found to be performing competitively with the state-of-the-art models presented.

  11. Recovery of stress-impaired social behavior by an antagonist of the CRF binding protein, CRF6-33, in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Mailton; Stein, Dirson J; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Miczek, Klaus A; de Almeida, Rosa Maria M

    2018-01-09

    Social stress is recognized to promote the development of neuropsychiatric and mood disorders. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is an important neuropeptide activated by social stress, and it contributes to neural and behavioral adaptations, as indicated by impaired social interactions and anhedonic effects. Few studies have focused on the role of the CRF binding protein (CRFBP), a component of the CRF system, and its activity in the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), a limbic structure connecting amygdala and hypothalamus. In this study, animals' preference for sweet solutions was examined as an index of stress-induced anhedonic responses in Wistar rats subjected to four brief intermittent episodes of social defeat. Next, social approach was assessed after local infusions of the CRFBP antagonist, CRF fragment 6-33 (CRF 6-33 ) into the BNST. The experience of brief episodes of social defeat impaired social approach behaviors in male rats. However, intra-BNST CRF 6-33 infusions restored social approach in stressed animals to the levels of non-stressed rats. CRF 6-33 acted selectively on social interaction and did not alter general exploration in nether stressed nor non-stressed rats. These findings suggest that BNST CRFBP is involved in the modulation of anxiety-like responses induced by social stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Human CRF{sub 2} {alpha} and {beta} splice variants: pharmacological characterization using radioligand binding and a luciferase gene expression assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardati, A. [Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, Cardiovascular Biology, NW4, 500 Arcola Road, Collegeville, PA (United States); Goetschy, V.; Gottowick, J.; Henriot, S.; Deuschle, U.; Kilpatrick, G.J. [Central Nervous System, Pharma Division, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, CH-4070 Basel (Switzerland); Valdenaire, O. [Cardiovascular Research, Pharma Division, F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, CH-4070 Basel (Switzerland)

    1999-03-14

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptors belong to the super-family of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are classified into two subtypes (CRF{sub 1} and CRF{sub 2}). Both receptors are positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase but they have a distinct pharmacology and distribution in brain. Two isoforms belonging to the CRF{sub 2} subtype receptors, CRF{sub 2{alpha}} and CRF{sub 2{beta}}, have been identified in rat and man. The neuropeptides CRF and urocortin mediate their actions through this CRF G protein-coupled receptor family. In this report, we describe the pharmacological characterization of the recently identified hCRF{sub 2{beta}} receptor. We have used radioligand binding with [{sup 125}I]-tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine and a gene expression assay in which the firefly luciferase gene expression is under the control of cAMP responsive elements. Association kinetics of [{sup 125}I]-tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine binding to the hCRF{sub 2{beta}} receptor were monophasic while dissociation kinetics were biphasic, in agreement with the kinetics results obtained with the hCRF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor. Saturation binding analysis revealed two affinity states in HEK 293 cells with binding parameters in accord with those determined kinetically and with parameters obtained with the hCRF{sub 2{alpha}} receptor. A non-hydrolysable GTP analog, Gpp(NH)p, reduced the high affinity binding of [{sup 125}I]-tyr{sup 0}-sauvagine to both hCRF{sub 2} receptor isoforms in a similar manner. The rank order of potency of CRF agonist peptides in competition experiments was identical for both hCRF{sub 2}{alpha}-helical CRF{sub (9-41)}oCRF). Similarly, agonist potency was similar for the two isoforms when studied using the luciferase gene reporter system. The peptide antagonist {alpha}-helical CRF{sub (9-41)} exhibited a non-competitive antagonism of urocortin-stimulated luciferase expression with both hCRF{sub 2} receptor isoforms. Taken together, these results indicate that the

  13. "I'm Not a Feminist, But...": Introducing Feminism in Psychology of Women Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottolo, Andrea L.

    2011-01-01

    This article will describe an exercise the author uses within the first week (usually the second day) of her Psychology of Women courses in order to (a) quickly introduce basic principles of feminism, (b) dispel some of the myths and stereotypes about feminists, and (c) address some students' fears and misconceptions about feminism and the course.…

  14. "The World Is Our Home": Environmental Justice, Feminisms, and Student Ideology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plevin, Arlene

    2006-01-01

    From interacting with their students, many teachers are aware that the concepts of feminism and environmentalism can conjure up impoverished, deficient, and equally painful stereotypes. For some college students, feminism can mean merely equal pay for equal work. Environmentalism may trigger similarly limited associations, but inevitably…

  15. Library Feminism and Library Women's History: Activism and Scholarship, Equity and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildenbrand, Suzanne

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the development of library women's history in the context of library feminism and American history. Considers the aftermath of World War II and the Cold War and suggests that the earlier equity or fairness orientation is today challenged by a cultural orientation in both library feminism and library women's history. (Contains 70…

  16. A Critical Survey of Selected Texts on the Growth of Feminism in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Women in Nigeria practise a brand of feminism that regards the men folk as complementary partners in progress, and not competitors. Indeed, the communalistic nature of African societies may frown at certain aspects of western individualism that permit radical feminism; for this may spell societal disintegration. Selected ...

  17. The neuroanatomic complexity of the CRF and DA systems and their interface: What we still don't know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E A; Fudge, J L

    2018-07-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a neuropeptide that mediates the stress response. Long known to contribute to regulation of the adrenal stress response initiated in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA), a complex pattern of extrahypothalamic CRF expression is also described in rodents and primates. Cross-talk between the CRF and midbrain dopamine (DA) systems links the stress response to DA regulation. Classically CRF + cells in the extended amygdala and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are considered the main source of this input, principally targeting the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However, the anatomic complexity of both the DA and CRF system has been increasingly elaborated in the last decade. The DA neurons are now recognized as having diverse molecular, connectional and physiologic properties, predicted by their anatomic location. At the same time, the broad distribution of CRF cells in the brain has been increasingly delineated using different species and techniques. Here, we review updated information on both CRF localization and newer conceptualizations of the DA system to reconsider the CRF-DA interface. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bridged Race Population Estimates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Population estimates from "bridging" the 31 race categories used in Census 2000, as specified in the 1997 Office of Management and Budget (OMB) race and ethnicity...

  19. Yacht Race Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Observer Single-handed Transatlantic Race (OSTAR) participants were aided by a French-American space-based monitoring system which reported the yacht's positions throughout the race, and also served as an emergency locator service. Originating from NASA's Nimbus 6 Satellite, use of this system, called ARGOS made the OSTAR competition the most accurately reported sea race ever conducted. Each boat carried a portable transmitter allowing 88 new sources of oceanographic data available during the race.

  20. Victimization of women as a consequence of feminization of migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paunović Nikola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bearing in mind the increased exposure of migrant women to victimization, this article analyses the etiology of feminization of migration and phenomenology of victimization of migrant women, particularly focusing on the abuse of female domestic workers and trafficking in women for sexual and labor exploitation. The main objective of this article is to offer suggestions for improving the position of female migrants by analyzing the causes and forms of their victimization. The main causes of feminization of migration include: 1 poverty, unemployment and poor economic conditions, 2 different forms of gender based violence, including domestic violence and sexual violence, and 3 gender inequality in access to education and information. In the context of phenomenology of feminization of migration the article considers as a main problem - unequal position of female migrants at the labor market, which is related to various forms of their discrimination. In order to eliminate discrimination of female migrants, it is concluded that it is crucial to improve employment conditions in countries of destination in terms of providing migrant women with the access to professional training, retraining and legal protection in case of unjustified termination of employment. On the other hand, because of the fact that female migrants are exposed to trafficking in women for sexual and labor exploitation in countries of destination, the states should provide the possibility of granting them a temporary residence permit during criminal proceedings against traffickers, in order to avoid secondary victimization of female victims of trafficking. In this regard, the main task of the international community must be a continuous and persistent struggle against all forms of discrimination against migrant women.

  1. Down the Neoliberal Path: The Rise of Free Choice Feminism

    OpenAIRE

    Ankica Čakardić

    2017-01-01

    The free choice ideology dictates that any time a woman makes a choice it is an act of feminism. The idea that personal choice presupposes the faraway horizons of freedom and its guarantee, as well as the undoubted potentials of women’s empowerment, makes up the central position of the critique in this essay. Our text is divided into two parts. In the first part of the paper we are going to outline the basic assumptions of neoliberalism, in order to use them as foundations for the argument ab...

  2. Real Knockouts The Physical Feminism of Women's Self-Defense

    CERN Document Server

    McCaughey, Martha

    1997-01-01

    An examination of women's self-defense culture and its relationship to feminism. I was once a frightened feminist. So begins Martha McCaughey's odyssey into the dynamic world of women's self- defense, a culture which transforms women involved with it and which has equally profound implications for feminist theory and activism. Unprecedented numbers of American women are learning how to knock out, maim, even kill men who assault them. Sales of mace and pepper spray have skyrocketed. Some 14 million women own handguns. From behind the scenes at gun ranges, martial arts dojos, fitness centers off

  3. Lost Purity. Social in Nineteenth and Twentieth-century Feminisms

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Persano

    2016-01-01

    ‘Social Purity’ appears in a part of the French and Anglo-Saxon (Britain and the United States) nineteenth-twentieth century’s feminisms, as a mean for many claims: from the full recognition of sexual difference in Hubertine Auclert’s social and ‘differentialist’ republicanism in France to Josephine Butler’s refusal of any purity imposed from above in England, until the absolute turn of the idea of women’s moral superiority and the equal and opposite force to the final exit from ‘the social’ ...

  4. Third Wave Feminism's Unhappy Marriage of Poststructuralism and Intersectionality Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Archer Mann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article first traces the history of unhappy marriages of disparate theoretical perspectives in US feminism. In recent decades, US third-wave authors have arranged their own unhappy marriage in that their major publications reflect an attempt to wed poststructuralism with intersectionality theory. Although the standpoint epistemology of intersectionality theory shares some common ground with the epistemology of poststructuralism, their epistemological assumptions conflict on a number of important dimensions. This contested terrain has generated serious debates within the third wave and between second- and thirdwave feminists. The form, content, and political implications of their "unhappy marriage" are the subject of this article.

  5. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    OpenAIRE

    Andreas Stengel; Yvette F. Taché; Yvette F. Taché

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a br...

  6. Academic Feminisms: Between Disidentification, Messy Everyday Utopianism, and Cruel Optimism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Lykke

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews current debates on epistemic habits of critique and affirmation, specifically focusing on approaches which combine criticality with ways to encourage unfoldings of alternative futurities, figurations and worlding practices. Embedded in a process of critical self-reflection regarding epistemic habits, the article discusses disidentification (Butler 1993, Muñoz 1999, cruel optimism (Berlant 2011, and everyday utopianism (Cooper 2014 understood as examples of such habits. The article explores how feminisms, unfolding within academia, and thus institutionally embedded in the logics of global capitalism, neoliberalism and particular nation-state politics, on the one the hand, are bound to a performance of cruel optimism, glossing over dilemmas and contradictions, and, on the other hand, perhaps enabled to enact messy kinds of everyday utopianism. Finally, the article reflects upon possibilities for changing one’s epistemic habits, suggesting a couple of changes: to systematically integrate reflections on changing conditions of academic knowledge production, as well as on geopolitical grammars. These issues are addressed as being interwoven with and mixed up in the epistemic practices that are produced by messy links with both feminist activist resistance and institutionalized and professionalized academic feminisms.

  7. Reversal of CRF- and stress-induced anorexia by an ayurvedic formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kulkarni

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Trikatu churna is one of the commonly used Ayurvedic formulations in the traditional system of medicine in India for the treatment of agnimandya, i.e. anorexia. Trikatu contains equal amounts of finely powdered rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae and fruits of Piper longum L. and Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae. The chief objective of the study was to determine the antianorectic effects of three drugs individually and to compare these effects with the effect of Trikatu. The activity of the drugs was studied after anorexia was induced in rats by (1 physical stress arising from immobilization for 60 min; (2 intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/kg body weight; and (3 intraperitoneal administration of fluoxetine (8 mg/kg body weight. Similar doses of the extracts were tested on freely feeding rats and on rats that had been deprived of food for 20 h. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, 0.3 μg/rat can induce anxiogenic-like behavior and reduced food intake. This model was also studied, and the results were compared. The components of Trikatu churna failed to individually reverse the inhibition of feeding. In contrast, Trikatu churna pretreatment reversed stress-, fluoxetine- and CRF-induced anorexia. The study provides strong evidence of the synergistic action of Ayurvedic formulas and also proves the ability of Trikatu churna to reduce stress and CRF-induced anorexia.

  8. Reversal of CRF- and stress-induced anorexia by an ayurvedic formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Kulkarni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Trikatu churna is one of the commonly used Ayurvedic formulations in the traditional system of medicine in India for the treatment of agnimandya, i.e. anorexia. Trikatu contains equal amounts of finely powdered rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae and fruits of Piper longum L. and Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae. The chief objective of the study was to determine the antianorectic effects of three drugs individually and to compare these effects with the effect of Trikatu. The activity of the drugs was studied after anorexia was induced in rats by (1 physical stress arising from immobilization for 60 min; (2 intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/kg body weight; and (3 intraperitoneal administration of fluoxetine (8 mg/kg body weight. Similar doses of the extracts were tested on freely feeding rats and on rats that had been deprived of food for 20 h. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF, 0.3 μg/rat can induce anxiogenic-like behavior and reduced food intake. This model was also studied, and the results were compared. The components of Trikatu churna failed to individually reverse the inhibition of feeding. In contrast, Trikatu churna pretreatment reversed stress-, fluoxetine- and CRF-induced anorexia. The study provides strong evidence of the synergistic action of Ayurvedic formulas and also proves the ability of Trikatu churna to reduce stress and CRF-induced anorexia.

  9. Inhibition of the CRF1 receptor influences the activity of antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Andrzej; Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Rojek, Karol; Poleszak, Ewa; Skalicka-Woźniak, Krystyna; Dudka, Jarosław

    2017-08-01

    Hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) and impairment of the central corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system are factors in the pathogenesis of depression. Though several antagonists of the CRF 1 receptor were effective in the recognized behavioral tests for antidepressant activity, there is still little information on the potential interactions between CRF 1 receptor inhibitors and conventional antidepressant therapy. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of SN003, a CRF 1 receptor blocker, on the activity of imipramine and fluoxetine in the forced swim test (FST) in rats which presented some signs of depression. The experiments were carried out on female Wistar rats subjected to 14-day subcutaneous corticosterone (CORT) administration (20 mg/kg/day). The antidepressant-like effect was determined by the FST and the CRF levels in the hypothalamus, amygdala, and peripheral blood were measured by a high-sensitivity immunoenzymatic test. SN003 (0.5 mg/kg) potentiated the antidepressant-like effect of imipramine (15 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (7.5 mg/kg). Moreover, the co-administration of the tested agents abolished CORT-induced increase in CRF levels in the examined biological material more profoundly than monotherapy. Our present findings give further evidence that the blockage of CRF action may be useful in the treatment of mood disorders. The concurrent use of well-known antidepressants with CRF 1 receptor antagonists could be beneficial in terms of safety, since it requires lower doses of the applied agents.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and α 2 adrenergic receptors mediate heroin withdrawal-potentiated startle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Paula E; Vendruscolo, Leandro F; Schlosburg, Joel E; Edwards, Scott; Schulteis, Gery; Koob, George F

    2013-09-01

    Anxiety is one of the early symptoms of opioid withdrawal and contributes to continued drug use and relapse. The acoustic startle response (ASR) is a component of anxiety that has been shown to increase during opioid withdrawal in both humans and animals. We investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and norepinephrine (NE), two key mediators of the brain stress system, on acute heroin withdrawal-potentiated ASR. Rats injected with heroin (2 mg/kg s.c.) displayed an increased ASR when tested 4 h after heroin treatment. A similar increase in ASR was found in rats 10-20 h into withdrawal from extended access (12 h) to i.v. heroin self-administration, a model that captures several aspects of heroin addiction in humans. Both the α 2 adrenergic receptor agonist clonidine (10 μg/kg s.c.) and CRF1 receptor antagonist N,N-bis(2-methoxyethyl)-3-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-7-amine (MPZP; 20 mg/kg s.c.) blocked heroin withdrawal-potentiated startle. To investigate the relationship between CRF1 and α 2 adrenergic receptors in the potentiation of the ASR, we tested the effect of MPZP on yohimbine (1.25 mg/kg s.c.)-potentiated startle and clonidine on CRF (2 μg i.c.v.)-potentiated startle. Clonidine blocked CRF-potentiated startle, whereas MPZP partially attenuated but did not reverse yohimbine-potentiated startle, suggesting that CRF may drive NE release to potentiate startle. These results suggest that CRF1 and α 2 receptors play an important role in the heightened anxiety-like behaviour observed during acute withdrawal from heroin, possibly via CRF inducing the release of NE in stress-related brain regions.

  11. Building coalitions: The interconnections between feminism and trans* activism in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas Platero, R; Ortega-Arjonilla, Esther

    2016-01-01

    What made current Spanish feminism shift toward transfeminism? Based on in-depth interviews and literature reviews, we explore what factors facilitated the participation of trans* women in Spanish feminism. Tracing the history through relevant events such as the National Feminist Conferences, it becomes clear that trans* women participated in the 1993, 2000, and 2009 conferences, posing relevant issues regarding prostitution, transgenderism, and the political subject of feminism. Our research allows a break with global oppositional narratives, in which these movements are in conflict, and highlights the importance of understanding the vernacular nuances that take place in a particular geopolitical context.

  12. Effects of Feminism on The Qur’anic Tafsir in Modern Period

    OpenAIRE

    Korkmaz, Arif

    2017-01-01

    This article contains some examples of the effects of feminism as aphilosophical and social movement emerged in the modern era on the modernQur’anic tafsir and tries to discuss the ways in which tafsir activities areinfluenced by contemporary thought movements in the sample of feminism. In thisstudy “new” examples of translation and tafsir made by “feminists” and “women” andare thought to have emerged under the influence of feminism will be includedand it will be questioned whether or not to ...

  13. The Second Space Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawkes, S.

    This paper compares and contrasts the characteristics of the first space race, which ran from the late 1950s to the late 1990s, and the second space race that began with the successful space flight of SpaceShipOne in 2004. The first space race was between superpowers seeking to establish geo-political dominance in the Cold War. The second space race will be between competing companies seeking to establish low cost access to space for ordinary people. The first space race achieved its geo- political objectives but did not open up low cost access to space but rather restricted access to a select few, highly trained astronauts and cosmonauts. The second space race, driven by the size and growth of the travel and tourism industry, promises to open up access to space to millions of space tourists.

  14. Affectivity and race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitus, Kathrine; Andreassen, Rikke

    into the experience of racial difference and the unfolding of political discourses on race in various social spheres. Organised around the themes of the politicisation of race through affect, the way that race produces affect and the affective experience of race, this interdisciplinary collection sheds light...... on the role of feelings in the formation of subjectivities, how race and whiteness are affectively circulated in public life and the ways in which emotions contribute to regimes of inclusion and exclusion. As such it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences, with interests in sociology, anthropology......This book presents new empirical studies of social difference in the Nordic welfare states, in order to advance novel theoretical perspectives on the everyday practices and macro-politics of race and gender in multi-ethnic societies. With attention to the specific political and cultural landscapes...

  15. ‘This is the Age of Woman’: Black Feminism and Black Internationalism in the Works of Una Marson, 1928-1938

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imaobong D. Umoren

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Una Marson (1905-1965 was an Afro-Jamaican intellectual who in the 1930s became an internationally famous feminist, Pan-Africanist, poet, playwright, journalist and social activist. Between 1932 and 1936 Marson lived in London and became involved in the burgeoning Pan-African movement and a number of British and international women’s and feminist organisations. In 1936, she briefly returned to Jamaica amidst the nationalist movements of the time before journeying back to Britain in 1938, where she remained until 1946. This article builds on and differs from previous scholarship on Marson through its exploration of the changes that took place in her black feminist ideas relating to race, gender and class between 1928 and 1938, and how these influenced her intellectual view concerning black internationalism. This article puts two arguments forward. First, Marson’s engagement with Pan-Africanism and her experiences of racism and sexism in London changed her vision of black feminism. Second, this change contributed to her bringing black feminism into the male-dominated sphere of black internationalism. Thus, it calls for more recognition of Una Marson both as a black feminist and a black internationalist

  16. Ao Brasil dos meus sonhos: feminismo e modernismo na utopia de Adalzira Bittencourt To Brazil of my dreams: feminism and modernism in the utopia of Adalzira Bittencourt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA BERNARDETE RAMOS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O texto associa o feminismo de Adalzira Bittencourt ao movimento modernista, tecendo relações entre sua utopia-- não só de uma sociedade sob o poder das mulheres, mas também sua utopia de modernidade-- e o sonho nacional que projetou a nação na década de 1920. Tece também relações entre o feminismo de Adalzira, na linha do Partido Republicano Feminino dos anos 1920 e 1930, e o discurso hegemônico que enfatizou a maternidade como missão da mulher no projeto de regeneração nacional, ou do cultivo da raça, sob as leis da eugenia ou da higiene que se espalharam pelo mundo ocidental.This essay articulates Brazilian writer Adalzira Bittencourt's feminism to the modernist movement in Brazil, drawing relationships between her modernist utopia -- which cannot be restricted to concerns about women's power -- and the national dream that projected the nation in the 1920s. It also articulates Bittencourt's brand of feminism -- in line with the Feminine Republican Party's ideology (in the 1920s and 1930s and under the influence of eugenic laws or hygienic practices -- with the hegemonic discourses emphasizing maternity as women's mission in improving both the race and the nation,.

  17. Race: Deflate or pop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Neven Sesardic has recently defended his arguments in favour of racial naturalism-the view that race is a valid biological category-in response to my criticism of his work. While Sesardic claims that a strong version of racial naturalism can survive critique, he has in fact weakened his position considerably. He concedes that conventional racial taxonomy is arbitrary and he no longer identifies 'races' as human subspecies. Sesardic now relies almost entirely on Theodosius Dobzhansky's notion of race-as-population. This weak approach to 'race'-according to which all genetic difference between populations is 'racial' and 'the races' are simply the populations we choose to call races-survived its early critiques. As it is being mobilised to support racial naturalism once more, we need to continue the debate about whether we should weaken the concept of race to mean 'population', or abandon it as a failed biological category. I argue that Sesardic's case for racial naturalism is only supported by his continued mischaracterisation of anti-realism about biological race and his appeal to Dobzhansky's authority. Rather than deflating the meaning of 'race', it should be eliminated from our biological ontology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CRF1-R activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid system in the mouse basolateral amygdala mediates anxiety-like behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Bruchas

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a complex human experience and having both rewarding and aversive motivational properties. The adverse effects of stress are well documented, yet many of underlying mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Here we report that the anxiogenic properties of stress are encoded by the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin acting in the basolateral amygdala. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we found that the anxiogenic-like effects of Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF were triggered by CRF(1-R activation of the dynorphin/kappa opioid receptor (KOR system. Central CRF administration significantly reduced the percent open-arm time in the elevated plus maze (EPM. The reduction in open-arm time was blocked by pretreatment with the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI, and was not evident in mice lacking the endogenous KOR ligand dynorphin. The CRF(1-R agonist stressin 1 also significantly reduced open-arm time in the EPM, and this decrease was blocked by norBNI. In contrast, the selective CRF(2-R agonist urocortin III did not affect open arm time, and mice lacking CRF(2-R still showed an increase in anxiety-like behavior in response to CRF injection. However, CRF(2-R knockout animals did not develop CRF conditioned place aversion, suggesting that CRF(1-R activation may mediate anxiety and CRF(2-R may encode aversion. Using a phosphoselective antibody (KORp to identify sites of dynorphin action, we found that CRF increased KORp-immunoreactivity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA of wildtype, but not in mice pretreated with the selective CRF(1-R antagonist, antalarmin. Consistent with the concept that acute stress or CRF injection-induced anxiety was mediated by dynorphin release in the BLA, local injection of norBNI blocked the stress or CRF-induced increase in anxiety-like behavior; whereas norBNI injection in a nearby thalamic nucleus did not. The intersection of stress-induced CRF and the dynorphin/KOR system in the BLA was

  19. Refuting feminism: Brazilian lettered culture's complacency/complicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Terezinha Schmidt

    Full Text Available In appraising the power of antifeminist discourse in Brazil, I examine how this discourse appears in the realm of cultural journalism in order to make some connections to Brazilian social history, in the light of which it may be possible to understand why feminism as transforming praxis seems so alien to the habits of the country. To sustain my arguments I draw on the readings of Brazilian historical and cultural thinkers considered "leftists". At the same time, I point out the limits of their analyses, that is, their silence regarding women's oppression and gender issues. Finally, I examine the persistence of various forms of antifeminism in the lettered milieu so as to understand the statute of feminist critique in the field of literary studies and the reasons for its invisibility, including considerations on its achievements and the limitations of its practices.

  20. Feminizing adrenal tumors: Our experience about three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chentli Farida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Feminizing adrenal tumors (FATs are very rare as they account for less than 2% of all the adrenal neoplasms. Their prognosis is deemed to be very poor. We aimed to present a mono centre (adult and pediatric experience over a long period of time (January 1980 to Jun 2012. During the study period, we observed only three cases in men aged 22 (2 cases and 45 (1 case. They all consulted for a painful gynecomastia, decreased libido and impotency. Estradiol was high in two cases at presentation, and after a relapsing tumor in the third one. All had big adrenal tumors (5.9, 6, and 17 cm, and a mixed secretion composed by high estradiol and cortisol. The pathological study argued for malignancy in two cases. But, only one had diffuse metastasis and died 4 years after diagnosis; the others diagnosed one and three years ago are still alive without any metastasis or relapsing.

  1. Islam and feminism in post-colonial era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ejub Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary academic debates often deal with the issue of the compatibility of Islam with liberal values. The issues most commonly encountered in these debates are the compatibility of Islam with principles of secularism, democracy and human rights. The definition of human rights in current international documents includes: the position and status of religious minorities, freedom of belief, opinion and expression, the position of women in society, children's rights, the rights of people with disabilities, and many others. This paper will specifically deal with (corelations between Islam and the position of women in society, as well as a theoretical analysis of the most important works of women theorists who have dealt with Islamic feminism and rereading of Qur'an from a woman's perspective. Also, once the work has given basic assumptions of the most important works of these women theorists, we will offer their critical review.

  2. Feminism and nurse-midwifery. Historical overview and current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, W F; McCool, S J

    1989-01-01

    Despite the fact that the profession of nurse-midwifery and feminism are both disciplines concerned with women and issues affecting women's lives, there has been little investigation or acknowledgement of relationships between their two paradigms. The work presented here is an attempt to discover both similarities and differences between nurse-midwifery and feminist thought. Using a historical approach, it is shown that despite the common goal of improving and maintaining women's status in the world, whether in general or more specifically with regard to health, feminist theorists and nurse-midwives, to a large degree, have worked separately from each other, rarely acknowledging in any formal way the importance of the other discipline. Current issues that have an effect on the practice of nurse-midwifery today--lay midwifery, the profession of nursing, and nurse-midwifery research--are presented in relation to contemporary feminist thought.

  3. The lesbian rights movement and feminism in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park-Kim, Soo Jin; Lee-Kim, Soo Youn; Kwon-Lee, Eun Jung

    2006-01-01

    The lesbians' rights movement in South Korea has undertaken various projects for solidarity with feminist movement groups for over 10 years. In spite of these efforts, lesbian issues have been blatantly excluded from all the agendas of women's rights. The same thing has happened in Women's Studies. Some feminists express homophobic thoughts without understanding the reality of lesbians, and other young scholars take on a lesbian identity temporarily as a sign of being progressive and liberated; in neither situation are they committed to dealing with the oppression of lesbians or seeing lesbian rights as a feminist concern. In order to further lesbian rights there are two strategies possible: forming a movement only for lesbians or forming solidarity with feminists. In the latter case, a concern about lesbian rights will help achieve the goals of a true feminism as patriarchy is built upon heterosexism. doi:10.1300/J155v10n03_11.

  4. Role of TLR4 in the Modulation of Central Amygdala GABA Transmission by CRF Following Restraint Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varodayan, F P; Khom, S; Patel, R R; Steinman, M Q; Hedges, D M; Oleata, C S; Homanics, G E; Roberto, M; Bajo, M

    2018-01-04

    Stress induces neuroimmune responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation. Here, we investigated the role of TLR4 in the effects of the stress peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on GABAergic transmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) following restraint stress. Tlr4 knock out (KO) and wild-type rats were exposed to no stress (naïve), a single restraint stress (1 h) or repeated restraint stress (1 h per day for 3 consecutive days). After 1 h recovery from the final stress session, whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to investigate the effects of CRF (200 nM) on CeA GABAA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). TLR4 does not regulate baseline GABAergic transmission in the CeA of naive and stress-treated animals. However, CRF significantly increased the mean sIPSC frequencies (indicating enhanced GABA release) across all genotypes and stress treatments, except for the Tlr4 KO rats that experienced repeated restraint stress. Overall, our results suggest a limited role for TLR4 in CRF's modulation of CeA GABAergic synapses in naïve and single stress rats, though TLR4-deficient rats that experienced repeated psychological stress exhibit a blunted CRF cellular response. TLR4 has a limited role in CRF's activation of the CeA under basal conditions, but interacts with the CRF system to regulate GABAergic synapse function in animals that experience repeated psychological stress. © The Author(s) 2018. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. CRF19_cpx is an Evolutionary fit HIV-1 Variant Strongly Associated With Rapid Progression to AIDS in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouri, Vivian; Khouri, Ricardo; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Theys, Kristof; Megens, Sarah; Moutschen, Michel; Pfeifer, Nico; Van Weyenbergh, Johan; Pérez, Ana B; Pérez, Jorge; Pérez, Lissette; Van Laethem, Kristel; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians reported an increasing trend of rapid progression (RP) (AIDS within 3 years of infection) in Cuba. Recently infected patients were prospectively sampled, 52 RP at AIDS diagnosis (AIDS-RP) and 21 without AIDS in the same time frame (non-AIDS). 22 patients were sampled at AIDS diagnosis (chronic-AIDS) retrospectively assessed as > 3 years infected. Clinical, demographic, virological, epidemiological and immunological data were collected. Pol and env sequences were used for subtyping, transmission cluster analysis, and prediction of resistance, co-receptor use and evolutionary fitness. Host, immunological and viral predictors of RP were explored through data mining. Subtyping revealed 26 subtype B strains, 6 C, 6 CRF18_cpx, 9 CRF19_cpx, 29 BG-recombinants and other subtypes/URFs. All patients infected with CRF19 belonged to the AIDS-RP group. Data mining identified CRF19, oral candidiasis and RANTES levels as the strongest predictors of AIDS-RP. CRF19 was more frequently predicted to use the CXCR4 co-receptor, had higher fitness scores in the protease region, and patients had higher viral load at diagnosis. CRF19 is a recombinant of subtype D (C-part of Gag, PR, RT and nef), subtype A (N-part of Gag, Integrase, Env) and subtype G (Vif, Vpr, Vpu and C-part of Env). Since subtypes D and A have been associated with respectively faster and slower disease progression, our findings might indicate a fit PR driving high viral load, which in combination with co-infections may boost RANTES levels and thus CXCR4 use, potentially explaining the fast progression. We propose that CRF19 is evolutionary very fit and causing rapid progression to AIDS in many newly infected patients in Cuba.

  6. Feminism in the News: Representations of the Women's Movement Since the 1960s

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Kaitlynn

    2011-01-01

    Feminism in the News is a detailed exploration of how the women's movement, its members, and their goals were represented in eight British and American newspapers between 1968 and 2008 – a period covering the height of the Second Wave, and a more contemporary Third Wave. Examining over 1100 news articles, the book analyses the nuanced ways feminism has historically been supported, marginalized and debated in the mainstream press.Mendes asks questions such as: How have feminists and the women'...

  7. Empowertise Me! Understanding Marketplace Feminism through Deconstructing Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Rachel E.

    2018-01-01

    Courses: Introduction to advanced classes in Media Studies, Women's Studies, Gender Studies, Race, Communication, and Advertising. Objectives: In this unit activity, students critically assess advertisements that co-opt female empowerment and then identify ways they can resist such strategies.

  8. Testing the race inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gondan, Matthias; Heckel, A.

    2008-01-01

    In speeded response tasks with redundant signals, parallel processing of the redundant signals is generally tested using the so-called race inequality. The race inequality states that the distribution of fast responses for a redundant stimulus never exceeds the summed distributions of fast...

  9. Latina "Testimonios": A Reflexive, Critical Analysis of a "Latina Space" at a Predominantly White Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Judith; Garcia, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Judith Flores and Silvia Garcia (University of Utah) draw from the work of their mentor, Rina Benmayor and "Telling to live: Latina feminist testimonios" to establish an organization for Latinas who are staff, faculty, students, alumni, and community members at a predominantly White institution (PWI). Critical race feminism (CRF),…

  10. Fear extinction learning can be impaired or enhanced by modulation of the CRF system in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Abiri, Dina; Douglas, Christina E.; Calakos, Katina C.; Barbayannis, Georgia; Roberts, Andrea; Bauer, Elizabeth P.

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is released during periods of anxiety and modulates learning and memory formation. One region with particularly dense concentrations of CRF receptors is the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA), a critical structure for both Pavlovian fear conditioning and fear extinction. While CRF has the potential to modify amygdala-dependent learning, its effect on fear extinction has not yet been assessed. In the present study, we examined the mo...

  11. Effect of the CRF1-receptor antagonist pexacerfont on stress-induced eating and food craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, David H; Kennedy, Ashley P; Furnari, Melody; Heilig, Markus; Shaham, Yavin; Phillips, Karran A; Preston, Kenzie L

    2016-12-01

    In rodents, antagonism of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) blocks stress-induced reinstatement of drug or palatable food seeking. To test anticraving properties of the CRF 1 antagonist pexacerfont in humans. We studied stress-induced eating in people scoring high on dietary restraint (food preoccupation and chronic unsuccessful dieting) with body-mass index (BMI) >22. In a double-blind, between-groups trial, 31 "restrained" eaters were stabilized on either pexacerfont (300 mg/day for 7 days, then 100 mg/day for 21 days) or placebo. On day 15, they underwent a math-test stressor; during three subsequent visits, they heard personalized craving-induction scripts. In each session, stress-induced food consumption and craving were assessed in a bogus taste test and on visual analog scales. We used digital video to monitor daily ingestion of study capsules and nightly rating of food problems/preoccupation on the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS). The study was stopped early due to an administrative interpretation of US federal law, unrelated to safety or outcome. The bogus taste tests suggested some protective effect of pexacerfont against eating after a laboratory stressor (r effect  = 0.30, 95 % CL = -0.12, 0.63, Bayes factor 11.30). Similarly, nightly YFAS ratings were lower with pexacerfont than placebo (r effect  = 0.39, CI 0.03, 0.66), but this effect should be interpreted with caution because it was present from the first night of pill ingestion, despite pexacerfont's slow pharmacokinetics. The findings may support further investigation of the anticraving properties of CRF 1 antagonists, especially for food.

  12. Study on the chronic inflammatory status in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Lirong; Wang Caili; Wei Hong; Yang Yuhua

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the status of chronic inflammation and deterioration of renal function in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Methods: Serum CRP, IL-10 (with ELISA), TNF-α, IL-6 (with RIA) and creatinine (with bio-chemistry methods) levels were determined in 126 patients with CRF of various stages as well as in 30 controls. The creatinine clearance rate (CCr) was also calculated. Results: (1)In all these patients, the serum CRP, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α contents were significantly higher than those in the controls (P <0.01). (2) CRP, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α levels were linearly positively correlated with the creatinine levels (r= 0.716, 0.836, 0.501 and 0.574 respectively), linearly negatively correlated with the creatinine clearance rate (r=-0.755, -0.825, -0.497 and -0.564 respectively). As the renal function deteriorated progressively, the serum levels of CRP, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α increased correspondingly. (3) The acute phase protein CRP and inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α levels were correlated with those of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 (r=0.463, 0.546 and 0.402 respectively). Conclusion: The serum acute phase protein CRP, inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 contents were all gradually increased along with the progression of CRF and these inflammatory mediators were mutually positively correlated with each other. (authors)

  13. Vad associeras egentligen med begreppet feminism? : En kvantitativ och kvalitativ studie av hur begreppet och identiteten feminism porträtteras i tidningarna Aftonbladet och Nyheter24.

    OpenAIRE

    Edmark, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    Feminism is a concept that stands for equality and it is being lively discussed in both political, private and media spheres. As a concept that is so discussed and that is essential in the fight for equality between men and women, it is essential to study what is connected to it. The aim with this study was to examine how the concept feminism and the identity feminist were being illustrated and constructed in the newspaper Aftonbladet and newssite Nyheter24. The methods for the study were qua...

  14. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-01-01

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  15. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-02-15

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone

  16. A Class of Effective of Decarboxylative Perfluoroalkylating Reagents: [(phen)2Cu](O2CRF)

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yangjie

    2016-04-13

    This article describes the invention of a class of effective reagents [(phen)2Cu](O2CRF) (1) for the decarboxylative perfluoroalkylation of aryl and heteroaryl halides. Treatment of the copper tert-butyloxide with phenanthroline ligands, with subsequent addition of perfluorocarboxylic acids afforded the air-stable copper(I) perfluorocarboxylato complexes 1. These complexes reacted with a variety of aryl and heteroaryl halides to form perfluoroalkyl(hetero)arenes in moderate to high yields. Computational studies suggested that the coordination of the second phen ligand may reduce the energy barrier for the decarboxylation of perfluorocarboxylate to facilitate the perfluoroalkylation.

  17. A Class of Effective of Decarboxylative Perfluoroalkylating Reagents: [(phen)2Cu](O2CRF)

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yangjie; Ajitha, Manjaly John; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Zhang, Zhongxing; Weng, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the invention of a class of effective reagents [(phen)2Cu](O2CRF) (1) for the decarboxylative perfluoroalkylation of aryl and heteroaryl halides. Treatment of the copper tert-butyloxide with phenanthroline ligands, with subsequent addition of perfluorocarboxylic acids afforded the air-stable copper(I) perfluorocarboxylato complexes 1. These complexes reacted with a variety of aryl and heteroaryl halides to form perfluoroalkyl(hetero)arenes in moderate to high yields. Computational studies suggested that the coordination of the second phen ligand may reduce the energy barrier for the decarboxylation of perfluorocarboxylate to facilitate the perfluoroalkylation.

  18. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Stengel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates—in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis—other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  19. Activation of Brain Somatostatin Signaling Suppresses CRF Receptor-Mediated Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette F

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the hallmark brain peptide triggering the response to stress and mediates-in addition to the stimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis-other hormonal, behavioral, autonomic and visceral components. Earlier reports indicate that somatostatin-28 injected intracerebroventricularly counteracts the acute stress-induced ACTH and catecholamine release. Mounting evidence now supports that activation of brain somatostatin signaling exerts a broader anti-stress effect by blunting the endocrine, autonomic, behavioral (with a focus on food intake) and visceral gastrointestinal motor responses through the involvement of distinct somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  20. Low-Grade Glioma Segmentation Based on CNN with Fully Connected CRF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeju Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work proposed a novel automatic three-dimensional (3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI segmentation method which would be widely used in the clinical diagnosis of the most common and aggressive brain tumor, namely, glioma. The method combined a multipathway convolutional neural network (CNN and fully connected conditional random field (CRF. Firstly, 3D information was introduced into the CNN which makes more accurate recognition of glioma with low contrast. Then, fully connected CRF was added as a postprocessing step which purposed more delicate delineation of glioma boundary. The method was applied to T2flair MRI images of 160 low-grade glioma patients. With 59 cases of data training and manual segmentation as the ground truth, the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC of our method was 0.85 for the test set of 101 MRI images. The results of our method were better than those of another state-of-the-art CNN method, which gained the DSC of 0.76 for the same dataset. It proved that our method could produce better results for the segmentation of low-grade gliomas.

  1. Sex differences between CRF1 receptor deficient mice following naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in a conditioned place aversion paradigm: implication of HPA axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Antonio García-Carmona

    Full Text Available Extinction period of positive affective memory of drug taking and negative affective memory of drug withdrawal, as well as the different response of men and women might be important for the clinical treatment of drug addiction. We investigate the role of corticotropin releasing factor receptor type one (CRF1R and the different response of male and female mice in the expression and extinction of the aversive memory.We used genetically engineered male and female mice lacking functional CRF1R. The animals were rendered dependent on morphine by intraperitoneally injection of increasing doses of morphine (10-60 mg/kg. Negative state associated with naloxone (1 mg/kg s.c.-precipitated morphine withdrawal was examined by using conditioned place aversion (CPA paradigm. No sex differences for CPA expression were found in wild-type (n = 29 or CRF1R knockout (KO mice (n = 29. However, CRF1R KO mice presented less aversion score than wild-type mice, suggesting that CRF1R KO mice were less responsive than wild-type to continuous associations between drug administration and environmental stimuli. In addition, CPA extinction was delayed in wild-type and CRF1R KO male mice compared with females of both genotypes. The genetic disruption of the CRF1R pathway decreased the period of extinction in males and females suggesting that CRF/CRF1R is implicated in the duration of aversive memory. Our results also showed that the increase in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH levels observed in wild-type (n = 11 mice after CPA expression, were attenuated in CRF1R KO mice (n = 10. In addition, ACTH returned to the baseline levels in males and females once CPA extinction was finished.These results suggest that, at least, CPA expression is partially due to an increase in plasma ACTH levels, through activation of CRF1R, which can return when CPA extinction is finished.

  2. A crosstalk between muscarinic and CRF2 receptors regulates cellular adhesion properties of human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelissier-Rota, M; Chartier, N T; Bonaz, B; Jacquier-Sarlin, M R

    2017-07-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease often suffer from chronic and relapsing intestinal inflammation that favor the development of colitis associated cancer. An alteration of the epithelial intestinal barrier function observed in IBD is supposed to be a consequence of stress. It has been proposed that corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor (CRF2), one of the two receptors of CRF, the principal neuromediator of stress, acts on cholinergic nerves to induce stress-mediated epithelial barrier dysfunction. Non-neuronal acetylcholine (Ach) and muscarinic receptors (mAchR) also contribute to alterations of epithelial cell functions. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms through which stress and Ach modulate epithelial cell adhesive properties. We show that Ach-induced activation of mAchR in HT-29 cells results in cell dissociation together with changes in cell-matrix contacts, which correlates with the acquisition of invasive potential consistent with a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) mode of invasion. These processes result from mAchR subsequent stimulation of the cascade of src/Erk and FAK activation. Ach-induced secretion of laminin 332 leads to α3β1 integrin activation and RhoA-dependent reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We show that Ach-mediated effects on cell adhesion are blocked by astressin 2b, a CRF2 antagonist, suggesting that Ach action depends partly on CRF2 signaling. This is reinforced by the fact that Ach-mediated activation of mAchR stimulates both the synthesis and the release of CRF2 ligands in HT-29 cells (effects blocked by atropine). In summary, our data provides evidence for a novel intracellular circuit involving mAchR acting on CRF2-signaling that could mediate colonic mucosal barrier dysfunction and exacerbate mucosal inflammation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. CERN Relay Race 2009

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 14th May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. More details on how to register your team for the relay race

  4. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Running Club

    2010-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 20 May, starting at 12.15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on the route, and how to register your team for the relay race, can be found at: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay

  5. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 17 May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Details on how to register your team for the relay race are given on the Staff Association Bulletin web site.

  6. Race, money and medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloche, M Gregg

    2006-01-01

    Taking notice of race is both risky and inevitable, in medicine no less than in other endeavors. On the one hand, race can be a useful stand-in for unstudied genetic and environmental factors that yield differences in disease expression and therapeutic response. Attention to race can make a therapeutic difference, to the point of saving lives. On the other hand, racial distinctions have social meanings that are often pejorative or worse, especially when these distinctions are cast as culturally or biologically fixed. I argue in this essay that we should start with a presumption against racial categories in medicine, but permit their use when it might prolong lives or meaningfully improve health. Use of racial categories should be understood as an interim step; follow-up inquiry into the factors that underlie race-correlated clinical differences is important both to improve the efficacy of clinical care and to prevent race in itself from being misunderstood as a biological determinant. If we pursue such inquiry with vigor, the pernicious effects of racial categories on public understanding can be managed. But perverse market and regulatory incentives create the danger that use of race will be "locked-in," once drugs or other therapies are approved. These incentives should be revisited.

  7. Global dispersal pattern of HIV type 1 subtype CRF01-AE : A genetic trace of human mobility related to heterosexual sexual activities centralized in southeast Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G.; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01-AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01-AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. Methods. We assembled a global data set

  8. Peripheral a-helical CRF (9-41) does not reverse stress-induced mast cell dependent visceral hypersensitivity in maternally separated rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Wijngaard, R. M.; Stanisor, O. I.; van Diest, S. A.; Welting, O.; Wouters, M. M.; de Jonge, W. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute stress-induced hypersensitivity to colorectal distention was shown to depend on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)-induced mast cell degranulation. At present it remains unclear whether CRF also induces chronic poststress activation of these cells. Accordingly, the objective of

  9. Different for girls? Feminism, health information and librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilett, Rosie

    2002-03-01

    This paper focuses on the provision and organization of health information materials in women's health centres in UK and Ireland in the late 20th century Such centres sprung from the work of feminist activists and health workers from the late 1960s onwards, promoting health information and other interventions to counteract women's devalued status within society, and the stereotypes perpetuated by health care and other systems. Centres that developed were (and still are) typically within the voluntary sector, have a strong feminist perspective and are run by lay workers. This paper will draw on research into information provision in these centres, its scope, organization and who provides it. It will argue that this work is of interest to mainstream librarianship, but there are minimal linkages as feminist thinking within librarianship has been unable overall to make common cause with the work of these, and other such agencies, which has inhibited potential developments of mutual benefit. This paper draws on ongoing research into feminism and librarianship, and findings that have been presented in a number of settings.

  10. Penelope and the feminism. The reinterpretation of a myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Pérez Miranda

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We try to analyze the figure of Penelope in Greek mythology, and how she has become one of the mythological prominent figures more reinterpreted throughout the times, with enormous influence in the art and the present culture. rom certain feminist positions it has been wanted to see in Penelope role many characteristics that they would give us a supposition about the existence of a matriarchy, which was previous to the arrival of the patriarchy order. Nevertheless, we considered that the analysis of the sources demonstrate that powerful women such as Penelope, Areté,Yocasta or Níobe, had not the power by themselves, neither they have the character to be considered into the matriarchy parameters. The myth can transform itself to adapt to the new times, and it can serve to redefine the feminine gender and our current culture, but it must lead us neither to misinterpreting in an anachronistic way the past, nor to judging the ancient myths from a set of moral current values Key words: Penelope, Feminism, Classic Tradition, Myth, Gender.

  11. Feminism and liberalism: a not-so-unhappy marriag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Saen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It seems that political liberalism and feminism constitute an “unhappy marriage.” I shall argue that it should be a happy one.  Liberalism does more feminist work than feminist theorists acknowledge. Feminist theorists raise both internal and external critiques.  Some of the internal critiques are ungrounded and based on misinterpretation of key liberal concepts, while others can be accommodated by revisingthe liberal framework.  In contrast, the external criticisms, which are presented as a definitive challenge to liberalism, are unsuccessful.  They themselves implicitly rely on some key liberal assumptions, which shows that they are ultimately internal critiques. My primary aim in this paper is to show that the feminist critiques remain within a liberal framework.  Feminists also claim that liberal theory is incompatible with current facts about gender.  I shall call these “inefficacy critiques.”  As my secondary aim I shall show that this  critique of liberalism relies on a misunderstanding of the distinction between normative and descriptive claims

  12. Beyond Sovereignty and Particularism: for a Truly Universalist Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Čičigoj

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Intersectional understandings of identities as traversed by diverse forms of oppression have brought to light also the ways commitments to contesting these forms of oppression might come into conflict. A salient form of conflicting intersectionality is the apparent conflict between feminist and anti-racist or anti-colonial commitments today. By offering a materialist rereading of Simone de Beauvoir’s understanding of oppression and emancipation against her postcolonial critics, I argue that instead of a particularistic one, a universalist and egalitarian account of conflicting intersectionality is required today – an account which is however fully aware of the historical nature of the universal itself. Such an account may allow us to keep condemning all forms of oppression, with Beauvoir’s words, as an “absolute evil”.   Article received: June 5, 2017; Article accepted: June 12, 2017; Published online: October 15, 2017; Original scholarly paper How to cite this article: Čičigoj, Katja. "Beyond Sovereignty and Particularism: for a Truly Universalist Feminism." AM Journal of Art and Media Studies 14 (2017: 91-104. doi: 10.25038/am.v0i14.216

  13. Are Muslim Women in Need of Islamic Feminism? In Consideration of a Re-Imagined Islamic Educational Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Nuraan

    2015-01-01

    In its remonstrations against male patriarchy, common understandings of Islamic feminism have, on the one hand, claimed attachment to other forms of feminism. On the other hand, because of its location within the structures of Qur'anic exegesis and prophetic traditions, it has claimed a detachment from what has been understood as the largely…

  14. Traditionalism and Feminism: A Typology of Strategies Used by University Women to Manage Career-Family Conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an Eriksonian analysis of the impact of traditionalism and feminism on the identity formation of university-attending women and postulates four "identity strategies": traditionalism, ambivalent semi-traditionalism, confident semi-traditionalism, and feminism. Describes a study assessing the reliability and validity of an…

  15. PET Imaging of CRF1 with [11C]R121920 and [11C]DMP696: is the target of sufficient density?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, Gregory M.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Kumar, J.S. Dileep; Arango, Victoria; Kassir, Suham A.; Huang, Yung-yu; Simpson, Norman R.; Van Heertum, Ronald L.; Mann, J. John

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Overstimulation of the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF1) is implicated in anxiety and depressive disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo binding characteristics of [ 11 C]R121920 and [ 11 C]DMP696 in the nonhuman primate for application in positron emission tomography (PET) studies of CRF1. Methods: PET imaging with the two novel CRF1 radioligands was performed in baboon. In vitro binding studies for CRF1 were performed in postmortem brain tissue of baboon and human to assess sufficiency of receptor density for PET. Results: Both [ 11 C]R121920 and [ 11 C]DMP696 distributed rapidly and uniformly throughout the brain. Washout was comparable across brain regions, without differences in volume of distribution between regions reported to have high and low in vitro CRF1 binding. Membrane-enriched tissue homogenate assay using [ 125 I]Tyr 0 -sauvagine and specific CRF1 antagonists CP154,526 and SN003 in human occipital cortex yielded maximal binding (B max ) of 63.3 and 147.3 fmol/mg protein, respectively, and in human cerebellar cortex yielded B max of 103.6 and 64.6 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Dissociation constants (K D ) were subnanomolar. In baboon, specific binding was not detectable in the same regions; therefore, B max and K D were not measurable. Autoradiographic results were consistent except there was also detectable CRF1-specific binding in baboon cerebellum. Conclusion: Neither [ 11 C]R121920 nor [ 11 C]DMP696 demonstrated quantifiable regional binding in vivo in baboon. In vitro results suggest CRF1 density in baboon may be insufficient for PET. Studies in man may generate more promising results due to the higher CRF1 density compared with baboon in cerebral cortex and cerebellum

  16. Internalization of the human CRF receptor 1 is independent of classical phosphorylation sites and of beta-arrestin 1 recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Trine N; Novak, Ivana; Nielsen, Søren M

    2004-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRFR1) belongs to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. Though CRF is involved in the aetiology of several stress-related disorders, including depression and anxiety, details of CRFR1 regulation such as internalization remain uncharacterized...

  17. A qualitative investigation of Muslim and Christian women's views of religion and feminism in their lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saba Rasheed; Mahmood, Amina; Moel, Joy; Hudson, Carolyn; Leathers, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative investigation explored a relatively understudied aspect of cultural diversity: feminism and religion in the lives of religiously diverse women. More specifically, structured interviews were used to investigate views of religion, women's issues, gender roles, culture, and feminism for a small group of Muslim and Christian women living in the United States. The data were analyzed using consensual qualitative research methods (Hill, Thompson, & Williams, 1997). Findings indicated a complex relationship between feminism, gender roles, culture, and religion for these women with the majority of the Muslim women reporting that their religion supports feminist principles and identifying themselves as feminist. Christian women were less willing to endorse the feminist label. Implications for multicultural feminist practice are discussed. 2008 APA

  18. A Second Look at the Process of Occupational Feminization and Pay Reduction in Occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Hadas

    2018-04-01

    Using the IPUMS-USA data for the years 1960-2015, this study examines trends in the effect of occupational feminization on occupational pay in the U.S. labor market and explores some of the mechanisms underlying these trends. The findings show that the (negative) association between occupational feminization and occupational pay level has declined, becoming insignificent in 2015. This trend, however, is reversed after education is controlled for at the individual as well as the occupational level. The two opposite trends are discussed in light of the twofold effect of education: (1) the entry of women into occupations requiring high education, and (2) the growing returns to education and to occupations with higher educational requirements. These two processes have concealed the deterioration in occupational pay following feminization. The findings underscore the significance of structural forms of gender inequality in general, and occupational devaluation in particular.

  19. Theory of feminism and tribal women: an empirical study of koraput.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Anil Kumar

    2009-01-01

    In the mainstream culture to identify oneself as a "feminist" has been a fashion. Feminism covers all issues degrading and depriving women of their due in society vis-à-vis male members and it has started a crusade against atrocities on women across the globe. It is therefore regarded as synonymous with a movement and revolution to defend and promote issues involving women. However, the concerns that feminism raises do seem alien to tribal inhabitants in the Koraput district of Orissa, because, unknowingly, they are its champions. Its principles are ingrained in their very culture. They practice and follow feminism as a matter of habit that has come to them down the ages. They do not follow it out of fear, compassion, enlightenment, education or compulsion; it is a necessity that comes quite naturally to them. It has been spontaneous and indigenous.

  20. Influence of the shot-peening treatment on the CRF gearing behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinie, D.; Lemaire, E.; Randrianarivo, L.; Dorier, C.

    1998-01-01

    Surface damage are observed in service on CRF case-hardened cases. Such damage is like surface fatigue which appears in the form of frosting and can come to a micro-spalling or even a spalling damage. Survey and studies realised on gears affected by such damage, led EDF and the manufacturer to search for appropriated solutions since 1985 (optimisation of the gear bottom profile, care of the grinding and the thermochemical processing, use of oils with higher viscosity). Simulations on a running wheel device can reproduce the meshing conditions on simplified specimen. The aim is to study the influence of residual stresses following a severe grinding and shot peening treatments. An empiric selection was realised among different shot peening treatments. Endurance tests are realised on case-hardened gears with or without shot-peening treatments. Compared with standard grinded gears, it appears that the shot-peening selected increases up to 40% the gear lifetime till extended spalling. (authors)

  1. Increased adrenal steroid secretion in response to CRF in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genazzani, A D; Bersi, C; Luisi, S; Fruzzetti, F; Malavasi, B; Luisi, M; Petraglia, F; Genazzani, A R

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate adrenal steroid hormone secretion in response to corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) or to adrenocorticotropin hormone in women with hypothalamic amenorrhea. Controlled clinical study. Department of Reproductive Medicine and Child Development, Section of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University of Pisa, Italy. Fifteen women with hypothalamic amenorrhea were enrolled in the study. Eight normal cycling women were used as control group. Blood samples were collected before and after an injection of ovine CRF (0.1 microg/kg iv bolus) or after synthetic ACTH (0.25 mg iv). Plasma levels of ACTH, 17-hydroxypregnenolone (17OHPe), progesterone (P), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP), cortisol (F), 11-deoxycortisol (S) and androstenedione (A). Basal plasma concentrations of ACTH, cortisol, 11-deoxycortisol, DHEA and 17OHPe were significantly higher in patients than in controls, whereas plasma levels of progesterone and 17-OHP were significantly lower in patients than in controls. In amenorrheic women the ratio of 17-OHPe/DHEA, of 17-OHPe/17-OHP and of 11-deoxycortisol/cortisol were significantly higher than in controls, while a significant reduction in the ratio of 17-OHP/androstenedione, of 17-OHP/11-deoxycortisol was obtained. In response to corticotropin-releasing factor test, plasma levels of ACTH, cortisol, 17-OHP, 11-deoxycortisol, DHEA and androstenedione were significantly lower in patients than in controls. In response to adrenocorticotropin hormone, plasma levels of 17-OHP, androstenedione and androstenedione/cortisol were significantly higher in patients than in controls. Patients suffering for hypothalamic amenorrhea showed an increased activation of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, as shown by the higher basal levels and by augmented adrenal hormone response to corticotropin-releasing factor administration. These data suggest a possible derangement of adrenal androgen enzymatic pathway.

  2. Voicing Gay Women's Liberation: Judy Grahn and the Shaping of Lesbian Feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rio, Chelsea Del

    2015-01-01

    A closer look at the rich world of California feminisms demonstrates how Judy Grahn served as a central figure in bay area feminism, working to establish and support lesbian activist organizations, feminist publications, women's cultural events, and more. Two of Grahn's early political writings consider how lesbians sat at the nexus of homophobia and sexism. These writings demonstrate the formative role played by San Francisco lesbians in reframing ideas about "women-loving women" and the intersections of gender and sexuality in creating the oppressions faced by all women.

  3. Problem of Democracy Promotion in the of Postcolonial Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav A. Muzalevskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problems of democratization as a neocolonial practice. The author argues that the spread of democracy is similar in many respects to colonialism and civilizing mission as universal and even messianic phenomena. He notes that both of these phenomena, despite the similarity of their origin, have different "gender basis" (colonialism has characteristics of masculinity and civilizing mission - of femininity. The author reviewed the history of transforming the concepts of "colonialism" and "civilizing mission". Results parallels between the two phenomena are analyzed as a specific intellectual and public discourse in a particular era influenced the formation of both phenomena. Examples of national civilizing projects, their intellectual potential and influence on contemporary world politics are also considered. The echoes of colonialism and civilizing mission are visible in US and the EU doctrines of democracy promotion. Examining the evolution of approaches to democratization, the author finds the differences in strategic culture of the United States and the European Union: if the American establishment have a propensity to masculine practice of democracy promotion ("democratic enlargement", the project "Greater Middle East", etc., and European leadership prefers feminine practices. In terms of the post-colonial feminism, this approach does not give these actors any special benefits, as it offers the ineffective governing strategy of the local population, not taking into account, and often denying the specific cultural environment of democracy promotion, paying more attention to institutional characteristics (lack of certain civil rights and freedoms, lack of transparency in the work of public authorities, etc.. The author notes that the current strategy of democracy promotion, though being more complex, creates the effect of "double discrimination", when both the local people and local women (imposing image of "a free and

  4. The arms race control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemo, J.

    2010-01-01

    Written in 1961, this paper presents the content of a book entitled 'The arms race control' where the author outlined the difference between disarmament and arms control, described the economic and moral role of arms race, the importance of force balance for international security. He wandered whether arms control could ensure this balance and whether nuclear balance meant force balance. Force balance then appears to be a precarious and unsteady component of international security. He commented the challenges of disarmament, recalled some arguments for a nuclear disarmament. Then he discussed what would be an arms control with or without disarmament (either nuclear or conventional)

  5. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 5 June starting at 12:15 p.m. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on how to register your team for the relay race are given on the Staff Association Bulletin web site. You can access the online registration form at: http://cern.ch/club-running-relay/form.html

  6. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 23 May starting at 12:15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details on how to register your team for the relay race are given on the Staff Association Bulletin web site. You can access the online registration form at: http://cern.ch/club-running-relay/form.html

  7. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CERN relay race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 19 May starting at 12-15. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20-minute period. If you do meet runners while driving your car, please STOP until they have all passed. Thank you for your cooperation. Details of the course and of how to register your team for the relay race can be found here. Some advice for all runners from the Medical Service can also be found here.   

  8. Teamwork in adventure racing

    OpenAIRE

    Šavrňák, Ondřej

    2011-01-01

    Title: Teamwork in Adventure racing Goals: The main goal is to make up the chapter about an ideal teamwork in Adventure racing. And so, to help starting teams but also help experienced teams to learn about their lacks in cooperation and to shift teamwork level above. Method: We used the method of literature retrieval from books, articles and researches. Results: It is very hard task to define ideal teamwork, we would not find same two teams in the world and therefore each team suits something...

  9. Affectivity and race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    on the role of feelings in the formation of subjectivities, how race and whiteness are affectively circulated in public life and the ways in which emotions contribute to regimes of inclusion and exclusion. As such it will appeal to scholars across the social sciences, with interests in sociology, anthropology...... of the Nordic countries, Affectivity and Race draws on a variety of sources, including television programmes, news media, fictional literature, interviews, ethnographic observations, teaching curricula and policy documents, to explore the ways in which ideas about affectivity and emotion afford new insights...

  10. 47th Relay Race!

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    On Thursday June 1st at 12.15, Fabiola Gianotti, our Director-General, will fire the starting shot for the 47th Relay Race. This Race is above all a festive CERN event, open for runners and walkers, as well as the people cheering them on throughout the race, and those who wish to participate in the various activities organised between 11.30 and 14.30 out on the lawn in front of Restaurant 1. In order to make this sports event accessible for everyone, our Director-General will allow for flexible lunch hours on the day, applicable for all the members of personnel. An alert for the closure of roads will be send out on the day of the event. The Staff Association and the CERN Running Club thank you in advance for your participation and your continued support throughout the years. This year the CERN Running Club has announced the participation of locally and internationally renowned runners, no less! A bit over a week from the Relay Race of 1st June, the number of teams is going up nicely (already almost 40). Am...

  11. 2013 CERN Road Race

    CERN Document Server

    Klaus Hanke

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 18 September at 6.15 p.m.   The 5.5 km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent and best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found here.

  12. 2013 CERN Road Race

    CERN Document Server

    Klaus Hanke

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 18 September at 18.15.   The 5.5 km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and the online entry form, can be found at: htt...

  13. Race Car Rally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Joan L.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an activity where teams of parents and children work together to solve problems involving matchbox-sized race cars. The teams collect, record, and analyze data; measure distances in metric; and explore concepts related to mass, friction, and force. (PR)

  14. Aerodynamics of Race Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Race car performance depends on elements such as the engine, tires, suspension, road, aerodynamics, and of course the driver. In recent years, however, vehicle aerodynamics gained increased attention, mainly due to the utilization of the negative lift (downforce) principle, yielding several important performance improvements. This review briefly explains the significance of the aerodynamic downforce and how it improves race car performance. After this short introduction various methods to generate downforce such as inverted wings, diffusers, and vortex generators are discussed. Due to the complex geometry of these vehicles, the aerodynamic interaction between the various body components is significant, resulting in vortex flows and lifting surface shapes unlike traditional airplane wings. Typical design tools such as wind tunnel testing, computational fluid dynamics, and track testing, and their relevance to race car development, are discussed as well. In spite of the tremendous progress of these design tools (due to better instrumentation, communication, and computational power), the fluid dynamic phenomenon is still highly nonlinear, and predicting the effect of a particular modification is not always trouble free. Several examples covering a wide range of vehicle shapes (e.g., from stock cars to open-wheel race cars) are presented to demonstrate this nonlinear nature of the flow field.

  15. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 19 May between 12.15 and 12.35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding

  16. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday May 21st between 12h15 and 12h35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding

  17. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 23 May between 12:20 and 12:35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 15 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please stop until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding.

  18. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 22 May between 12h20 and 12h35. If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 15 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding.

  19. Race, Ethnicity and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Ballard, Roger

    2002-01-01

    Prepared for a textbook in sociology, this paper offers a clear set of definitions for the three crucial but much contended concepts of race, ethnicity and culture, and having done so explores how they can be used to make sense of the dynamics of pluralism in contemporary Britain.

  20. Intelligence, Race, and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Grigorenko, Elena L.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that the overwhelming portion of the literature on intelligence, race, and genetics is based on folk taxonomies rather than scientific analysis. They suggest that because theorists of intelligence disagree as to what it is, any consideration of its relationships to other constructs must be tentative at best. They…

  1. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The CERN relay race, now in its 39th year, is already a well-known tradition, but this year the organizers say the event will have even more of a festival feeling. Just off the starting line of the CERN relay race.For the past few years, spectators and runners at the CERN relay race have been able to enjoy a beer while listening to music from the CERN music and jazz clubs. But this year the organizers are aiming for "even more of a festival atmosphere". As David Nisbet, President of the CERN running club and organizer of the relay race, says: "Work is not just about getting your head down and doing the theory, it’s also about enjoying the company of your colleagues." This year, on top of music from the Santa Luis Band and the Canettes Blues Band, there will be demonstrations from the Aikido and softball clubs, a stretching session by the Fitness club, as well as various stalls and of course, the well-earned beer from AGLUP, the B...

  2. Managing new arms races

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segal, G.

    1992-01-01

    The management of new arms races in the region of Asia-Pacific includes considerations of weapons trade and transfer in the region, with an emphasis on nuclear weapons proliferation. It deals with the problem of controlling the arms trade and the efforts to control conventional weapons and underlines the possible role and influence of Conference on Cooperation and Security in Europe (CSCE)

  3. 2005 CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race takes place each year in May and sees participants from all areas of the CERN staff. The winners in 2005 were The Shabbys with Los Latinos Volantes in second and Charmilles Technologies a close third. To add a touch of colour and levity, the CERN Jazz Club provided music at the finishing line.

  4. Race, Racism, and Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeynes, William H.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the views of Darwinist evolution on issues regarding race and how this contributed to the spread of racism in the United States. The writings of Charles Darwin and a myriad of his followers are examined, including Herbert Spencer, Francis Galton, and others. The influence of Darwinism in contributing to the growth of…

  5. Race, Emotions, and Socialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James E.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated the connection between emotion and behavior, examining the connection between the construct of emotional intelligence and criminal behavior. Data collected from a group of men and women on probation from prison indicated that people received different socialization with regard to emotions based on gender and race. Results suggest that…

  6. Race walking gait and its influence on race walking economy in world-class race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ezeiza, Josu; Torres-Unda, Jon; Tam, Nicholas; Irazusta, Jon; Granados, Cristina; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between biomechanical parameters of the gait cycle and race walking economy in world-class Olympic race walkers. Twenty-One world-class race walkers possessing the Olympic qualifying standard participated in this study. Participants completed an incremental race walking test starting at 10 km·h -1 , where race walking economy (ml·kg -1 ·km -1 ) and spatiotemporal gait variables were analysed at different speeds. 20-km race walking performance was related to race walking economy, being the fastest race walkers those displaying reduced oxygen cost at a given speed (R = 0.760, p < 0.001). Longer ground contact times, shorter flight times, longer midstance sub-phase and shorter propulsive sub-phase during stance were related to a better race walking economy (moderate effect, p < 0.05). According to the results of this study, the fastest race walkers were more economi cal than the lesser performers. Similarly, shorter flight times are associated with a more efficient race walking economy. Coaches and race walkers should avoid modifying their race walking style by increasing flight times, as it may not only impair economy, but also lead to disqualification.

  7. Addressing the Puzzle of Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Although racial discrimination poses a devastating instrument of oppression, social work texts lack a clear and consistent definition of "race". The solution lies in according race the status of an "actor version" concept, while exploring the origins and variations of race ideas using "scientific observer version" explanations. This distinction…

  8. Dental Hygiene Students' Perceptions of Themselves and Their Professional Role in Regard to Feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Christine M.

    Dental hygiene students' perceptions of themselves and the "typical dental hygienist" were assessed in relation to feminist attitudes at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Dempewolff's (1972) 56-item Feminism II Scale was administered to all first-year, second-year, and…

  9. An Old Map of State feminism and an insufficient Recognition of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2010-01-01

    with a new map showing the changed landscape in which there are different obstacles and through which we need to navigate. A thick description of a feminist Nirvana is not provided here, but instead useful reflections on the recognition of care as engineered by state feminism in a European context...

  10. Changing the Place of Teacher Education: Feminism, Fear, and Pedagogical Paradoxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie; Hughes, Hilary E.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Stephanie Jones and Hilary E. Hughes suggest that particular discursive lessons are readily available in justice-oriented teacher education which might influence a pedagogy that crowds out responsiveness, the experience of the student, and the role of gender and feminism in teacher education. They contend that changing the place…

  11. Shaping Futures and Feminisms: Qur'anic Schools in West African Francophone Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Shirin

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the representation of female education in Qur'anic schools in a selection of West African francophone novels. I argue that in being the earliest form of education for most Muslim women and also a neglected topic of scholarly interest, the Qur'anic school shapes their feminisms in more significant ways than has been…

  12. Humanism, Feminism, and Multiculturalism: Essential Elements of Social Justice in Counseling, Education, and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady-Amoon, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the association between and among humanism, feminism, multiculturalism, and social justice in counseling, education, and advocacy. In so doing, it shows how these theoretical forces, individually and collectively, are essential to professional counseling, client welfare, education, and the promotion of social justice. The…

  13. PSYCHOSEXUAL FUNCTIONING IN WOMEN WITH COMPLETE TESTICULAR FEMINIZATION - IS ANDROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY PREFERABLE TO ESTROGEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SLOB, AK; TENBOSCH, JJ; VANHALL, EV; DEJONG, FH; SCHULTZ, WCMW; EIKELBOOM, FA

    1993-01-01

    Effects of oral testosterone undecanoate (Andriol) on blood hormone levels, moods, sociosexual functioning and self-image of the body were studied in four gonadectomized patients with complete testicular feminization. In a double-blind cross-over experiment, patients were treated with oral

  14. The future of Asian feminisms: confronting fundamentalisms, conflicts and neo-liberalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katjasungkana, N.; Wieringa, S.E.

    2012-01-01

    This book on the future of Asian feminisms, confronting fundamentalisms, conflicts, and neo-liberalism is a critical contribution to the rising voices of Asian women’s studies scholars and activists. It is based on the ongoing research and advocacy work of the Kartini Asia Network, founded in 2003

  15. Women, feminism and social change in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, 1980-1940

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimoar Dueñas

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Asunción Lavrin. Women, feminism and social change in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay, 1890-1940. Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1995, 481 páginas. Tercer volúmen de la serie Engendering Latin America.

  16. From Performativity to Aporia: Taking "Tremendous Responsibility" towards Feminism and the University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrablikova, Lenka

    2016-01-01

    This paper seeks to contribute to the thinking on feminism's past and present entanglement with the university and strives to imagine its future. Through a close reading of the opening passage of Derrida's essay "Mochlos, or The Conflict of the Faculties," I trace "a university responsibility" which does not lead to a subject…

  17. Reconciling Feminism and Psychoanalysis: The Patient as Therapist to the Therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanefield, Linda

    Although incompatible differences appear to exist between psychoanalytic therapy, which involves a hierarchical relationship, and feminism, which stresses egalitarian values, some versions of psychoanalytic theory are able to maintain their hierarchy within a context consistent with feminist values. Freud touched on the importance of the…

  18. Women's Relationship to Feminism: Effects of Generation and Feminist Self-Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    The relative importance to feminism of generation and feminist self-labeling was explored in a sample of 667 women riding buses to a 1992 March on Washington for Reproductive Rights. Specifically, generational (Generation X vs. Baby Boomers) and feminist self-labeling (strong feminists vs. weak feminists vs. nonfeminists) similarities and…

  19. Debate: The Two Faces of African Feminism | Touré | CODESRIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Debate: The Two Faces of African Feminism. Abibatou Touré, Mamadou Cellou Barry, Pounthioun Diallo. Abstract. No Abstract Available CODESRIA Bulletin No 1 2003: 2-3. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms ...

  20. Miss Congeniality Meets the New Managerialism: Feminism, Contingent Labour, and the New University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    In Canada, non-permanent faculty are no longer simply a reserve, flexible labour pool available for administrators to draw on when needed (e.g. during times of fluctuating enrollments); rather, they represent a strategy utilized by universities to reduce overall labour costs. In this article I bring together Women's Studies, feminism, contingent…

  1. Activating Archives in Women's Studies 101: New Stories about Old Feminism and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaneld, Jen

    2017-01-01

    The classroom is a sort of ground zero for feminist storytelling--it's there that we encounter the commonplace, surface stories students have absorbed about feminism, and it's there that we complicate, reiterate, or replace those stories through our syllabi and coursework. How can activating feminist archives in the classroom intervene in these…

  2. Concentration of radiolabeled cholesterol in a feminizing adenoma of the testis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.M.; Rudd, T.G.; Gurgess, E.C.; Monda, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative tissue studies demonstrated increased 19-[ 131 I]-iodocholesterol concentration in a feminizing adenoma of the testis. The potential application of iodocholesterol and its isomers in the detection of steroid-secreting neoplasms of the testis and ovary is suggested

  3. Exploring Women Faculty's Experiences and Perceptions in Higher Education: The Effects of Feminism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midkiff, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses women faculty's discourse about feminism, themselves, and their professional experiences as scholars in the North American university context. This case study pushes at the boundaries of what we believe we know about "the gender question" in the academy, opening a discursive space for scholars to examine university…

  4. Counter-Stereotypes and Feminism Promote Leadership Aspirations in Highly Identified Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Carola; Gocłowska, Małgorzata A.; Van Breen, Jolien A.; de Lemus, Soledad; Randsley de Moura, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Although women who highly identify with other women are more susceptible to stereotype threat effects, women's identification might associate with greater leadership aspirations contingent on (1) counter-stereotype salience and (2) feminist identification. When gender counter-stereotypes are salient, women's identification should associate with greater leadership aspiration regardless of feminism, while when gender stereotypes are salient, women's identification would predict greater leadership aspirations contingent on a high level of feminist identification. In our study US-based women (N = 208) attended to gender stereotypic (vs. counter-stereotypic) content. We measured identification with women and identification with feminism, and, following the manipulation, leadership aspirations in an imagined work scenario. The interaction between identification with women, identification with feminism, and attention to stereotypes (vs. counter-stereotypes) significantly predicted leadership aspirations. In the counter-stereotypic condition women's identification associated with greater leadership aspirations regardless of feminist identification. In the stereotypic condition women's identification predicted leadership aspirations only at high levels of feminist identification. We conclude that salient counter-stereotypes and a strong identification with feminism may help high women identifiers increase their leadership aspirations. PMID:28626437

  5. Localization/Globalization and the Midwife State: Strategic Dilemmas for State Feminism in Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Jill

    1999-01-01

    Explores implications of the globalization/localization process for state feminism, focusing on Australia. Localization is one response to globalization, exemplified by devolution to self-managing schools. However, global/local relations have gendered effects that resonate cross-nationally. Problems will emerge as the state withdraws from its…

  6. Counter-Stereotypes and Feminism Promote Leadership Aspirations in Highly Identified Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Carola; Gocłowska, Małgorzata A; Van Breen, Jolien A; de Lemus, Soledad; Randsley de Moura, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Although women who highly identify with other women are more susceptible to stereotype threat effects, women's identification might associate with greater leadership aspirations contingent on (1) counter-stereotype salience and (2) feminist identification. When gender counter-stereotypes are salient, women's identification should associate with greater leadership aspiration regardless of feminism, while when gender stereotypes are salient, women's identification would predict greater leadership aspirations contingent on a high level of feminist identification. In our study US-based women ( N = 208) attended to gender stereotypic (vs. counter-stereotypic) content. We measured identification with women and identification with feminism, and, following the manipulation, leadership aspirations in an imagined work scenario. The interaction between identification with women, identification with feminism, and attention to stereotypes (vs. counter-stereotypes) significantly predicted leadership aspirations. In the counter-stereotypic condition women's identification associated with greater leadership aspirations regardless of feminist identification. In the stereotypic condition women's identification predicted leadership aspirations only at high levels of feminist identification. We conclude that salient counter-stereotypes and a strong identification with feminism may help high women identifiers increase their leadership aspirations.

  7. Counter-Stereotypes and Feminism Promote Leadership Aspirations in Highly Identified Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Leicht

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although women who highly identify with other women are more susceptible to stereotype threat effects, women's identification might associate with greater leadership aspirations contingent on (1 counter-stereotype salience and (2 feminist identification. When gender counter-stereotypes are salient, women's identification should associate with greater leadership aspiration regardless of feminism, while when gender stereotypes are salient, women's identification would predict greater leadership aspirations contingent on a high level of feminist identification. In our study US-based women (N = 208 attended to gender stereotypic (vs. counter-stereotypic content. We measured identification with women and identification with feminism, and, following the manipulation, leadership aspirations in an imagined work scenario. The interaction between identification with women, identification with feminism, and attention to stereotypes (vs. counter-stereotypes significantly predicted leadership aspirations. In the counter-stereotypic condition women's identification associated with greater leadership aspirations regardless of feminist identification. In the stereotypic condition women's identification predicted leadership aspirations only at high levels of feminist identification. We conclude that salient counter-stereotypes and a strong identification with feminism may help high women identifiers increase their leadership aspirations.

  8. Counter-Stereotypes and Feminism Promote Leadership Aspirations in Highly Identified Women

    OpenAIRE

    Leicht, Carola; Goclowska, Malgorzata A.; Van Breen, Jolien A.; de Lemus, Soledad; Randsley de Moura, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Although women who highly identify with other women are more susceptible to stereotype threat effects, women's identification might associate with greater leadership aspirations contingent on (1) counter-stereotype salience and (2) feminist identification. When gender counter-stereotypes are salient, women's identification should associate with greater leadership aspiration regardless of feminism, while when gender stereotypes are salient, women's identification would predict greater leadersh...

  9. Wish to Live: The Hip-Hop Feminism Pedagogy Reader. Educational Psychology. Volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ruth Nicole, Ed.; Kwakye, Chamara Jewel, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Wish To Live: The Hip-hop Feminism Pedagogy Reader" moves beyond the traditional understanding of the four elements of hip-hop culture--rapping, breakdancing, graffiti art, and deejaying--to articulate how hip-hop feminist scholarship can inform educational practices and spark, transform, encourage, and sustain local and global youth…

  10. Feminism and the politics of identity in Ingrid de Kok's Familiar Ground

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In her foreword to South African Feminisms: Writing, Theory, and Criticism ... is, to a large extent, based on the fact that the use of the word “sympathetic” carries ..... allow her female identity to be compromised for the sake of male gratification.

  11. A Dim Light on the Way to Damascus: Selective Feminism Among College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesser, Clinton J.

    1974-01-01

    A sex-role equality inventory was developed as a measure of feminism to assess attitude toward changes in women's sex roles, Scale scores were then related to other selected variables for a limited sample of college women. Results are interpreted to indicate that there seems to be as much tendency to hesitate as to convert to an all-out drive for…

  12. Teaching the Conflicts: (Re)Engaging Students with Feminism in a Postfeminist World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Meredith A.; Helmbrecht, Brenda M.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors ask: What is the difference between an assumed image of empowerment and a "real" image of empowerment? How can feminist educators help students to tell the difference? What do the discourses of current third-wave feminism and postfeminism teach women about representation, empowerment, and their place in the realm of…

  13. Three Accounts of Feminism and Women's Studies in Higher Education. Book Review Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Suzanne

    1996-01-01

    Provides an integrative essay that explores three books and their contributions to feminism and women's studies in higher education. Indicates that only one of the three works managed to escape the tendency of academic and popular media to either valorize or demonize feminists and their pursuits. (MAB)

  14. Pink truck ads: second-wave feminism and gendered marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ella

    2010-01-01

    Second-wave feminist media had a contentious relationship with corporate advertisers. This article uses automotive advertisements to explore the role of gender, class, and race in the construction of consumer markets from the 1970s through the 1980s. It analyzes the struggle of Gloria Steinem and other liberal feminists to navigate the terrain between the women's movement and corporate advertisers. The increased economic power of women, stemming from the Equal Credit Opportunity Act as well as broader social and political shifts, facilitated their efforts. In the 1980s, automobiles continued to be marketed to women, albeit through "feminine" imagery conforming to the era's dominant trends.

  15. MEDIA APPROPRIATIONS OF BLACK FEMINISM IN BRAZILIAN CONTEMPORANEITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Sueli Pinto Johnson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Este artigo examina apropriações midiáticas pelo feminismo negro baseadas em reflexões teórico-conceituais sobre a problemática da comunicação em sociedades midiatizadas e suas relações com a literacia midiática. O Instituto da Mulher Negra Geledés, fundado em 1998 no período da redemocratização brasileira, constitui-se no objeto de investigação. O movimento Geledés foi observado e mapeado em sua página no site de rede social Facebook, durante um período consecutivo de oito semanas em 2016, com o propósito de identificar modalidades de interações entre seus visitantes. A análise dedica-se, para além das postagens do Geledés, a apreender e compreender o que acontece na esfera da recepção quando se trata de tipos de usos, apropriações e produções de sentidos. Um construto metodológico baseado na Cartografia de Controvérsias (CC foi operacionalizado para analisar as interações dos actantes sociais do Geledés no Facebook, revelando predominância de interações passivas e elevado número de comentários participativos desqualificados sob a ótica do debate público racional.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Comunicação; Redes Sociais; Feminismo Negro; Literacia Midiática; Cartografia de Controvérsias.     ABSTRACT This article examines media appropriations by black feminism based on theoretical-conceptual reflections on the problem of communication in mediatized societies and their relations with media literacy. The Geledés Black Women's Institute, founded in 1998 in the period of Brazilian redemocratization, is the object of this research. The Geledés movement was observed and mapped on its page on the social networking site Facebook, during a consecutive period of eight weeks in 2016, with the purpose of identifying modalities of interactions among its visitors. The analysis is dedicated, in addition to the posts of the Geledés, to apprehend and to understand what happens in the sphere of the reception when

  16. Genetic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF74_01B) Identified among Intravenous Drug Users in Malaysia: Recombination History and Phylogenetic Linkage with Previously Defined Recombinant Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hui Ting; Chow, Wei Zhen; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Chan, Kok Gan; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Koh, Clayton; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    In many parts of Southeast Asia, the HIV-1 epidemic has been driven by the sharing of needles and equipment among intravenous drug users (IDUs). Over the last few decades, many studies have proven time and again that the diversity of HIV-1 epidemics can often be linked to the route of infection transmission. That said, the diversity and complexity of HIV-1 molecular epidemics in the region have been increasing at an alarming rate, due in part to the high tendency of the viral RNA to recombine. This scenario was exemplified by the discovery of numerous circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), especially in Thailand and Malaysia. In this study, we characterized a novel CRF designated CRF74_01B, which was identified in six epidemiologically unlinked IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The near-full length genomes were composed of CRF01_AE and subtype B', with eight breakpoints dispersed in the gag-pol and nef regions. Remarkably, this CRF shared four and two recombination hotspots with the previously described CRF33_01B and the less prevalent CRF53_01B, respectively. Genealogy-based Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of CRF74_01B genomic regions showed that it is closely related to both CRF33_01B and CRF53_01B. This observation suggests that CRF74_01B was probably a direct descendent from specific lineages of CRF33_01B, CRF53_01B and subtype B' that could have emerged in the mid-1990s. Additionally, it illustrated the active recombination processes between prevalent HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants in Malaysia. In summary, we report a novel HIV-1 genotype designated CRF74_01B among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The characterization of the novel CRF74_01B is of considerable significance towards the understanding of the genetic diversity and population dynamics of HIV-1 circulating in the region.

  17. Genetic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF74_01B Identified among Intravenous Drug Users in Malaysia: Recombination History and Phylogenetic Linkage with Previously Defined Recombinant Lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ting Cheong

    Full Text Available In many parts of Southeast Asia, the HIV-1 epidemic has been driven by the sharing of needles and equipment among intravenous drug users (IDUs. Over the last few decades, many studies have proven time and again that the diversity of HIV-1 epidemics can often be linked to the route of infection transmission. That said, the diversity and complexity of HIV-1 molecular epidemics in the region have been increasing at an alarming rate, due in part to the high tendency of the viral RNA to recombine. This scenario was exemplified by the discovery of numerous circulating recombinant forms (CRFs, especially in Thailand and Malaysia. In this study, we characterized a novel CRF designated CRF74_01B, which was identified in six epidemiologically unlinked IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The near-full length genomes were composed of CRF01_AE and subtype B', with eight breakpoints dispersed in the gag-pol and nef regions. Remarkably, this CRF shared four and two recombination hotspots with the previously described CRF33_01B and the less prevalent CRF53_01B, respectively. Genealogy-based Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of CRF74_01B genomic regions showed that it is closely related to both CRF33_01B and CRF53_01B. This observation suggests that CRF74_01B was probably a direct descendent from specific lineages of CRF33_01B, CRF53_01B and subtype B' that could have emerged in the mid-1990s. Additionally, it illustrated the active recombination processes between prevalent HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants in Malaysia. In summary, we report a novel HIV-1 genotype designated CRF74_01B among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The characterization of the novel CRF74_01B is of considerable significance towards the understanding of the genetic diversity and population dynamics of HIV-1 circulating in the region.

  18. The effect of corrosion product CrF3 on thermo-physical properties of FLiNaK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Huiqin; Zhang Peng; An Xuehui; Zhao Sufang; Xie Leidong; Wang Wenfeng

    2016-01-01

    FLiNaK (LiF–NaF–KF: 46.5–11.5–42 mol%) is a promising candidate as the secondary loop coolant in molten salt reactor. The thermo-physical properties of pure FLiNaK and FLiNaK containing up to 6000 ppm (equivalent to mg/kg) corrosion product CrF 3 were measured. The results indicate that the effects of CrF 3 on melting point, enthalpy, specific heat capacity, density and thermal diffusivity of FLiNaK in liquid state are negligible within the allowable error range, meanwhile the change of thermal diffusivity is significant for FLiNaK in solid state. This work provides fundamental knowledge for the thermo-physical properties of coolant in molten salt reactor. (author)

  19. Construction and characterization of HIV type 1 CRF07_BC infectious molecular clone from men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan-Ling; Bai, Wen-Wei; Qu, Fan-Wei; Ma, Hua; Jiang, Run-Sheng; Shen, Bao-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the biological characterization of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) CRF07_BC infection among men who have sex with men (MSM). From November 2011 to November 2013, a total of 66 blood samples were collected from MSM with acute HIV-1 infection with CRF07_BC subgroup strains. Deletion in the gag p6 region was detected by sequence alignment and comparative analysis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HNXX1301-1307 samples were separated by density gradient centrifugation. Nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) was used to amplify the viral DNA. The near full-length HIV-1 DNA products were ligated to the long terminal repeat (LTR) vector plasmid (07BCLTR) to construct a full-length HIV clone. The molecular clone was transfected into HEK-293T cells, TZM-b1 cells and patients' PBMCs. The pregenome of an infectious molecular clone of HIV-1 (pNL4-3) was amplified, and a subclone with CRF07_BC was developed to construct the full-length chimeric molecular clone pNL4-3/07BCLTR. Detection of p24 antigen and luciferase activity was used to measure the in vitro infectivity of pNL4-3/07BCLTR. Among the 66 MSM patients infected with CRF07_BC strains, deletion mutations of the Gag P6 proteins were found in 7 of 18CRF07_BC strains; deletion mutations of 2-13 amino acids in different regions were discovered in 6 strains; and the remaining 42 strains did not show deletions. Seven strains with amino acids deficiency in the P6 protein accounted for 27% of all strains and 75% of all deletion genotype strains. A total of 186 full-length molecular clones of CRF07_BC were constructed. There were 5, 9, 10 and 11 clones of HNXX1302, HNXX1304, HNXX1305 and HNXX1306 that resulted in p24-positive supernatant when transfected into HEK-293T cells. Full-length clones of HNXX1302, HNXX1304, HNXX1305 and HNXX1306 showed slight infection in the transfected TZM-b1 cells, as judged by the fluorescence values of TZM-b1 cells 48h post-transfection. However, we were unable to

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 pol gene: first subgenomic evidence of CRF29-BF among Iranian HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem Baesi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the dominant subtype among the HIV-1 strains circulation in Iran. Methods: In this cross sectional study 100 HIV positive patients participated. HIV-1 RNA was extracted from plasma. RT nested-PCR was performed and the final products were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed; reference sequences were downloaded from Los Alamos, aligned with Iranian pol sequences in the study and analyzed by neighbor-joining method. Results: The results of the phylogenetic analysis showed that HIV-1 subtype CRF-35AD was the dominant subtype among HIV-1 infected patients in Iran; this analysis also suggested a new circulating recombinant form that had not previously been identified in Iran: CRF-29BF. Conclusions: The impact of HIV diversity on pathogenesis, transmission and clinical management have been discussed in different studies; therefore, analyses of HIV genetic diversity is required to design effective antiretroviral strategies for different HIV subtypes.

  1. On Feminism in Amy Tan's Works --A Case Study of The Joy Luck Club%论谭恩美作品中的女性主义特征--以小说《喜福会》为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王赟

    2012-01-01

    Amy Tan is a minority writer who is located in the verge of sex and race in American literature world. As a woman, she is a "the other" in the male-dominated literary circle; as a minority writer, she is a "the other" as well to the American dominant culture. However, the dual personality characterizes her works by feminism. This thesis analyzes one of Amy Tan's main works, The Joy Luck Club, to interpret the feminism reflected in it.%谭恩美作为美国文坛一名女性少数族裔作家,在性别和种族上都处于边缘性的境地。作为女性,在男权话语为主的文坛,她是一个“他者”;作为少数族裔作家,对美国主流文化而言,她也是一个“他者”。但是这种复杂的双重身份却赋予她的作品一种鲜明而独特的女性主义特征。文章重点以谭恩美的《喜福会》为文本,通过女性主义的视角,来解析其作品中所表现出的女性主义特征。

  2. Arms Races and Negotiations

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Baliga; Tomas Sjostrom

    2003-01-01

    Two players simultaneously decide whether or not to acquire new weapons in an arms race game. Each player's type determines his propensity to arm. Types are private information, and are independently drawn from a continuous distribution. With probability close to one, the best outcome for each player is for neither to acquire new weapons (although each prefers to acquire new weapons if he thinks the opponent will). There is a small probability that a player is a dominant strategy type who alw...

  3. CERN Relay Race 2018

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Running club

    2018-01-01

    The CERN running club, in collaboration with the Staff Association, is happy to announce the 2018 relay race edition. It will take place on Thursday, May 24th and will consist as every year in a round trip of the CERN Meyrin site in teams of 6 members. It is a fun event, and you do not have to run fast to enjoy it. Registrations will be open from May 1st to May 22nd on the running club web site. All information concerning the race and the registration are available there too: http://runningclub.web.cern.ch/content/cern-relay-race. A video of the previous edition is also available here : http://cern.ch/go/Nk7C. As every year, there will be animations starting at noon on the lawn in front of restaurant 1, and information stands for many CERN associations and clubs will be available. The running club partners will also be participate in the event, namely Berthie Sport, Interfon and Uniqa.

  4. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    Running Club

    2010-01-01

    This year’s CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Thursday 20th May at 12h00. This annual event is for teams of 6 runners covering distances of 1000m, 800m, 800m, 500m, 500m and 300m respectively. Teams may be entered in the Seniors, Veterans, Ladies, Mixed or Open categories. The registration fee is 10 CHF per runner, and each runner receives a souvenir prize. As usual, there will be a programme of entertainments from 12h in the arrival area, in front of the Restaurant no. 1. Drinks, food, CERN club information and music will be available for the pleasure of both runners and spectators. The race starts at 12h15, with results and prize giving at 13:15.   For details of the race, and of how to sign up a team, please visit: https://espace.cern.ch/Running-Club/CERN-Relay The event is organised by the CERN Running Club with the support of the CERN Staff Association.  

  5. The racing dragon

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Dating back nearly 2000 years, the ancient Chinese tradition of Dragon Boat Racing was originally a celebration that fell on the 5th day of the 5th lunar month as a gesture to please the Gods and bring forth necessary rains to cultivate the lands. Now the CERN Canoe and Kayak Club, too, participates in this tradition, though not so much to please the Gods on the ritualistic date, but to bring forth giant smiles on the faces of members. Dragon Boat Racing has been rising steadily in popularity in Europe since the mid nineties and with the great potential to host and promote Dragon Boat Racing in the Geneva area, the CERN Canoe and Kayak Club, has taken the initiative to bring the sport to the region. Some members of the Club traveled to Dole in June to participate in the Festival Dragon Boat 2009. Under perfect sunny conditions, the team triumphed in their first ever tournament, cruising to a convincing first place overall finish. T...

  6. Near Full-Length Identification of a Novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C Recombinant in Northern Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan-Heng; Chen, Xin; Liang, Yue-Bo; Pang, Wei; Qin, Wei-Hong; Zhang, Chiyu; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-08-01

    The Myanmar-China border appears to be the "hot spot" region for the occurrence of HIV-1 recombination. The majority of the previous analyses of HIV-1 recombination were based on partial genomic sequences, which obviously cannot reflect the reality of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in this area well. Here, we present a near full-length characterization of a novel HIV-1 CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant isolated from a long-distance truck driver in Northern Myanmar. It is the first description of a near full-length genomic sequence in Myanmar since 2003, and might be one of the most complicated HIV-1 chimeras ever detected in Myanmar, containing four CRF01_AE, six B segments, and five C segments separated by 14 breakpoints throughout its genome. The discovery and characterization of this new CRF01_AE/B/C recombinant indicate that intersubtype recombination is ongoing in Myanmar, continuously generating new forms of HIV-1. More work based on near full-length sequence analyses is urgently needed to better understand the genetic diversity of HIV-1 in these regions.

  7. Acute and repeated ECS treatment increases CRF, POMC and PENK gene expression in selected regions of the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, L; Llewellyn-Jones, V; Fernandez Fernandez, I; Fuentes, J A; Manzanares, J

    1998-01-05

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acute and repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS) on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and proenkephalin (PENK) gene expression in selected regions of the brain and pituitary of the rat. Acute ECS increased CRF gene expression in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) by 20%, an effect that was further enhanced to 38% when rats received repeated ECS treatment. Acute and repeated ECS increased POMC gene expression in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) by 49-59% but failed to alter these mRNA levels in the anterior lobe (AL) of the pituitary gland. PENK gene expression was increased by 35% in the nucleus accumbens (NA) and by 180% the ventromedial nucleus (VMN) after acute or repeated ECS treatment but no significant changes were found in the PVN or striatum (ST). Taken together, these results indicate a differential CRF and opioid gene expression regulation after acute or repeated ECS treatment that may be relevant to their therapeutic or side effects in depression.

  8. Urocortin, a CRF-like peptide, restores key indicators of damage in the substantia nigra in a neuroinflammatory model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biggs Christopher S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have recently observed that the corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRF related peptide urocortin (UCN reverses key features of nigrostriatal damage in the hemiparkinsonian 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rat. Here we have studied whether similar effects are also evident in the lipopolysaccaride (LPS neuroinflammatory paradigm of Parkinson's disease (PD. To do this we have measured restoration of normal motor behaviour, retention of nigral dopamine (DA and also tyrosine hydroxylase (TH activity. Fourteen days following intranigral injections of LPS and UCN, rats showed only modest circling after DA receptor stimulation with apomorphine, in contrast to those given LPS and vehicle where circling was pronounced. In separate experiments, rats received UCN seven days following LPS, and here apomorphine challenge caused near identical circling intensity to those that received LPS and UCN concomitantly. In a similar and consistent manner with the preservation of motor function, UCN 'protected' the nigra from both DA depletion and loss of TH activity, indicating preservation of DA cells. The effects of UCN were antagonised by the non-selective CRF receptor antagonist α-helical CRF and were not replicated by the selective CRF2 ligand UCN III. This suggests that UCN is acting via CRF1 receptors, which have been shown to be anti-inflammatory in the periphery. Our data therefore indicate that UCN is capable of maintaining adequate nigrostriatal function in vivo, via CRF1 receptors following a neuro-inflammatory challenge. This has potential therapeutic implications in PD.

  9. Feminisms and Challenges to Institutionalized Philosophy of Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Eric Dickman

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available For my invited contribution to this special issue of Religions on “Feminisms and the Study of ‘Religions,’” I focus on philosophy of religion and contestations over its relevance to the academic field of Religious Studies. I amplify some feminist philosophers’ voices—especially Pamela Sue Anderson—in corroboration with recent calls from Religious Studies scholars to diversify philosophy of religions in the direction of locating it properly within the current state of Religious Studies. I want to do this by thinking through two proposals in productive tension: first, any philosophy of religions worthy of the name is intrinsically feminist; second, any philosophy of religions worthy of the name is intrinsically traditional. I want to use the productive tension between these two to illuminate ways calls for broadening the field can be enhanced when such calls are seen as both feminist and traditional. I proceed as follows. First, I note three instances of explicitly feminist work in philosophy of religions that do not suffer from the same narrowness as so-called “traditional” philosophy of religion. Religious Studies critics of philosophy of religion overstate the case in claiming feminist philosophy of religion is too narrow. Second, I develop a useful distinction between the concepts of “tradition” and “institution” to locate forces of oppression more precisely in dynamics of institutionalization so that we might rehabilitate tradition as a resource for combating institutionalized oppressiveness. I do this in response to the hegemony of current philosophers of religion who claim to speak about “the traditional god.” And third, I briefly coordinate four topics in religions from diverse feminist perspectives to help refine paths of inquiry for future philosophy of religions that is both feminist and traditional. My hope is that these clarify a philosophy of religions renewed through feminisms—moving from fringe to

  10. The academic rat race

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Xavier; Andersen, Martin Marchman; Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2012-01-01

    : an increased pressure to produce articles (in peer-reviewed journals) has created an unbalanced emphasis on the research criterion at the expense of the latter two. More fatally, this pressure has turned academia into a rat race, leading to a deep change in the fundamental structure of academic behaviour......, and entailing a self-defeating and hence counter-productive pattern, where more publications is always better and where it becomes increasingly difficult for researchers to keep up with the new research in their field. The article identifies the pressure to publish as a problem of collective action. It ends up...

  11. Logical empiricists on race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Liam Kofi

    2017-10-01

    The logical empiricists expressed a consistent attitude to racial categorisation in both the ethical and scientific spheres. Their attitude may be captured in the following slogan: human racial taxonomy is an empirically meaningful mode of classifying persons that we should refrain from deploying. I offer an interpretation of their position that would render coherent their remarks on race with positions they adopted on the scientific status of taxonomy in general, together with their potential moral or political motivations for adopting that position. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Race By Hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Tobias; Jensen, Mads Møller

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the qualities of sharing biometric data in re- al-time between athletes, in order to increase two motivational factors for gym- goers: Enjoyment and social interaction. We present a novel smartphone appli- cation, called Race By Hearts, which enables competition based...... on heart rate data sharing between users in real-time. Through an empirical study conducted in the gym, we show that sharing biometric data in real-time can strengthen so- cial relations between participants, increase motivation, and improve the en- joyment of the fitness activity. Nevertheless, we found...

  13. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Mimitopes for Characterization of CRF01_AE HIV-1 Antibody Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse V. Schoen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Mapping humoral immune responses to HIV-1 over the course of natural infection is important in understanding epitope exposure in relation to elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs, which is considered imperative for effective vaccine design. When analyzing HIV-specific immune responses, the antibody binding profiles may be a correlate for functional antibody activity. In this study, we utilized phage display technology to identify novel mimitopes that may represent Env epitope structures bound by bNAbs directed at V1V2 and V3 domains, CD4 binding site (CD4bs and the membrane proximal external region (MPER of Env. Mimitope sequence motifs were determined for each bNAb epitope. Given the ongoing vaccine development efforts in Thailand, these mimitopes that represent CD4bs and MPER epitopes were used to map immune responses of HIV-1 CRF01_AE-infected individuals with known neutralizing responses from two distinct time periods, 1996-98 and 2012-15. The more contemporary cohort showed an increase in binding breadth with binding observed for all MPER and CD4bs mimitopes, while the older cohort showed only 75% recognition of the CD4bs mimitopes and no MPER mimotope binding. Furthermore, mimitope binding profiles correlated significantly with magnitude (p=0.0036 and breadth (p=0.0358 of neutralization of a multi-subtype Tier 1 panel of pseudoviruses. These results highlight the utility of this mimitope mapping approach for detecting human plasma IgG-specificities that target known neutralizing antibody epitopes, and may also provide an indication of the plasticity of antibody binding within HIV-1 Env neutralization determinants.

  14. Intra-Abdominal Testicular Seminoma in a Woman with Testicular Feminization Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darshana D. Rasalkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of intra-abdominal testicular tumor in a 36-year-old married lady presenting with chief complaints of primary amenorrhea. The patient was later diagnosed with testicular feminization syndrome, a form of male pseudohermaphroditism. This testicular tumor was histologically proven as seminoma. Due to rarity, imaging findings in patients with testicular feminization syndrome and intraabdominal testicular tumor have been poorly documented. So far, only one case report had described the combined role of CT and MR imaging in intraabdominal testicular sex-cord stromal tumor. To our knowledge, this case is first to document USG and MR imaging in addition to MR spectroscopy features in intraabdominal testicular seminoma.

  15. Understanding Transgender and Medically Assisted Gender Transition: Feminism as a Critical Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jamie Lindemann

    2016-11-01

    Feminism has fought the trivialization of women's experiences, championed women's security, and insisted on respect for women's choices. In so doing, feminism has developed important perspectives on the complicated connections between what gender means as it plays itself in people's lives, and the inequalities of power and authority that structure much of human experience. Here, I put a few of these perspectives into contact with an issue where the interactions of gender and power are squarely in play: medicine's role in assisting gender transitioning generally and, specifically, the enduring controversy between medicine and many transgender people about the pathologization of transgender and the role of clinicians as gatekeepers to gender-transition interventions. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Womanism and Black Feminism in the Work of Carrie Mae Weems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Stephens

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the liberatory aspects of Womanisn and Black Feminism in the work of artist Carrie Mae Weems.  Weems, artist and anthropologist creates artwork that highlights the issues of oppression and giving voice to worldwide issues.  Under the theoretical lens of Womanism, the article utilizes  Arts- Based -Educational Research (ABER, a non traidtional methodology, which aligns with Womanism to provide into past and present issues of liberation and equity. Womanism, Black women’s feminism, and ABER have the potential to bring issues of equity and social justice out of the academies and into the everyday world for those most in need of liberation.

  17. Understanding feminism: considerations for nurses working to end violence against women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2011-03-01

    Violence against women is a pervasive and serious human rights and public health problem worldwide. As interdisciplinary research teams try to address the effects of this health problem of which the effects transcend all women, nurses are at the forefront. Using a feminist philosophy and methodology to explore violence against women is one way to uncover new knowledge to address this health epidemic. In this paper, we will review the basic concepts of feminism and provide examples of viewing violence research and forensic nursing practice through this theoretical lens. These perspectives provide a foundation for understanding feminism and facilitating nurses' awareness as they consider careers in research and practice. Through this lens, nurses who are helping to ease the burden of violence in our global society may affect change in women's lives. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  18. Navigating treatment impasses at the disclosure of incest: combining ideas from feminism and social constructionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinberg, M

    1992-09-01

    This article describes an approach to the social and emotional schisms that characterize the disclosure of intrafamilial sexual abuse (incest). It argues that ideas from social constructionism and feminism can be combined in such a way that what appear as either/or choices become both--and possibilities. These include: social control versus therapy, shame versus pride, attachment to one's abusive partner versus attachment to one's injured child, and "justice" versus "care."

  19. “The Other”in Feminism and Post-colonialism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁飞

    2015-01-01

    “The other” is one of the key terms of Western literary theory. The political critique of “the other” is most obvious in feminism and post-colonialism. This essay intends to ilustrate their different application of “the other”. With the enrichment of its concept, feminists and post-colonial theorists tend to emphasize difference, fighting against sexism or racism.

  20. Feminism and the Academy. Exploring the Politics of Institutionalization in Gender Studies in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Liinason, Mia

    2011-01-01

    The main aim of this thesis is to analyze the process of institutionalization and neo-/interdisciplinarization in Women’s/Gender/Feminist Studies (WGFS) in Sweden, and the construction of feminist knowledge within this process. Furthermore, the thesis aims to contribute to the feminist debates on academic feminism as a transformative project. Three questions have guided the research process: 1) How has feminist knowledge been organized and institutionalized into the academy? 2) What are the e...

  1. What Type of Feminism is this that Grows in the Vegetable Garden?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ignez Silveira Paulilo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7984.2016v15nesp1p296 This paper seeks to demonstrate the need to adapt feminist theories if they are to account for feminism such as is part of the ideals of the Movimento de Mulheres Camponesas (MMC (Peasant Women’s Movement, an organization that has been active in Brazil since 1983, although it only defined itself as feminist in 2010. The type of evolutionism usually underlying comparisons of the countryside and the city must be shunned. Rodríguez Magda’s concept of “transmodernity” (2007 proves useful in that it is not based on evolutionist notions of feminism, but rather holds that elements of different strands of feminism, old and new, are combined in the current forms. Magda does not see these recent forms as more accurate than previous ones, preferring to address the “useful fictions” that mobilize movements and are therefore “real”. To trace these “useful fictions”, a historical review of the strands which have contributed to the feminism of rural women is undertaken. Scott (1999 concept of “experience” and Geertz (2003 concepts of “experience-near” and “experience-distant” are proposed to explain the practice of these militant women. We believe that the full investigation can only be completed after a theoretical-methodological discussion focused on the research problem.

  2. Emergence as an outbreak of the HIV-1 CRF19_cpx variant in treatment-naïve patients in southern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domenech, Carmen M; Viciana, Isabel; Delaye, Luis; Mayorga, María Luisa; Palacios, Rosario; de la Torre, Javier; Jarilla, Francisco; Castaño, Manuel; Del Arco, Alfonso; Clavijo, Encarnación; Santos, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    CRF19_cpx is a complex circulating recombination form (CRF) of HIV-1. We describe the characteristics of an outbreak of the CRF19_cpx variant among treatment-naïve patients in southern Spain. The study was undertaken at the Virgen de la Victoria Hospital, a reference centre for the analysis of HIV-1 genotype in Malaga (Spain). Subtyping was performed through REGA v3.0 and the relationship of our CRF19_cpx sequences, among themselves and regarding other reference sequences from the same variant, was defined by phylogenetic analysis. We used PhyML program to perform a reconstruction of the phylogeny by Maximum Likelihood method as well as further confirmation of the transmission clusters by Bayesian inference. Additionally, we collected demographic, clinical and immunovirological data. Between 2011 and 2016, we detected 57 treatment-naïve patients with the CRF19_cpx variant. Of these, 55 conformed a very well-defined transmission cluster, phylogenetically close to CRF19_cpx sequences from the United Kingdom. The origin of this subtype in Malaga was dated between 2007 and 2010. Over 50% of the patients presented the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor G190A resistance mutation. This variant was mostly represented by young adult Spanish men who had sex with men. Almost half of them were recent seroconverters, though a similar percentage was diagnosed at a late state of HIV infection. Five cases of AIDS and one non-AIDS defined death occurred during follow-up. The majority of patients treated with first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) responded. We report the largest HIV-1 CRF19_cpx cohort of treatment-naïve patients outside Cuba, almost all emerging as an outbreak in the South of Spain. Half the cases had the G190A resistance mutation. Unlike previous studies, the variant from Malaga seems less pathogenic, with few AIDS events and an excellent response to ART.

  3. The CRF1 Antagonist Verucerfont in Anxious Alcohol-Dependent Women: Translation of Neuroendocrine, But not of Anti-Craving Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Melanie L; Cortes, Carlos R; Kwako, Laura E; George, David T; Momenan, Reza; Sinha, Rajita; Grigoriadis, Dimitri E; Pich, Emilio Merlo; Leggio, Lorenzo; Heilig, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1) suppresses stress-induced alcohol seeking in rodents, but clinical translation remains. Here, we first showed that the CRF1 antagonist verucerfont potently blocks hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis activation in adrenalectomized rats. We then evaluated verucerfont for its ability to block HPA axis activation and reduce stress-induced alcohol craving in alcohol-dependent patients. Anxious, alcohol-dependent women (age 21–65 years, n=39) were admitted to the NIH Clinical Center and completed withdrawal treatment before enrollment if needed. One-week single-blind placebo was followed by randomized double-blind verucerfont (350 mg per day) or placebo for 3 weeks. Verucerfont effects on the HPA axis were evaluated using the dexamethasone-CRF test. Craving was evaluated using two established protocols, one that combines a social stressor with physical alcohol cue exposure, and one that uses guided imagery to present personalized stress, alcohol, or neutral stimuli. An fMRI session examined brain responses to negative affective stimuli and alcohol cues. In contrast to our recent observations with another CRF1 antagonist, pexacerfont, verucerfont potently blocked the HPA axis response to the dexamethasone-CRF test, but left alcohol craving unaffected. Right amygdala responses to negative affective stimuli were significantly attenuated by verucerfont, but responses to alcohol-associated stimuli were increased in some brain regions, including left insula. Discontinuation rates were significantly higher in the verucerfont group. Our findings provide the first translational evidence that CRF1 antagonists with slow receptor dissociation kinetics may have increased efficacy to dampen HPA axis responses. The findings do not support a clinical efficacy of CRF1 blockade in stress-induced alcohol craving and relapse. PMID:27109623

  4. Molecular Epidemiology of HIV-1 in Jilin Province, Northeastern China: Emergence of a New CRF07_BC Transmission Cluster and Intersubtype Recombinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Chuanyi; Feng, Yi; Xie, Cunxin; He, Xiang; Takebe, Yutaka; Sun, Liuyan; Guo, Qi; Xing, Hui; Kalish, Marcia L.; Shao, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the HIV-1 molecular epidemiology among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected persons living in the Jilin province of northeastern China. Methods Plasma samples from 189 newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected patients were collected between June 2010 and August 2011 from all nine cities of Jilin province. HIV-1 nucleotide sequences of gag P17–P24 and env C2–C4 gene regions were amplified using a multiplex RT-PCR method and sequenced. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses were used to determine the HIV-1 genotypes. Results Based on all sequences generated, the subtype/CFR distribution was as follows: CRF01_AE (58.1%), CRF07_BC (13.2%), subtype B’ (13.2%), recombinant viruses (8.1%), subtype B (3.7%), CRF02_AG (2.9%), subtype C (0.7%). In addition to finding CRF01_AE strains from previously reported transmission clusters 1, 4 and 5, a new transmission cluster was described within the CRF07_BC radiation. Among 11 different recombinants identified, 10 contained portions of gene regions from the CRF01_AE lineage. CRF02_AG was found to form a transmission cluster of 4 in local Jilin residents. Conclusions Our study presents a molecular epidemiologic investigation describing the complex structure of HIV-1 strains co-circulating in Jilin province. The results highlight the critical importance of continuous monitoring of HIV-infections, along with detailed socio-demographic data, in order to design appropriate prevention measures to limit the spread of new HIV infections. PMID:25356726

  5. Emergence as an outbreak of the HIV-1 CRF19_cpx variant in treatment-naïve patients in southern Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M González-Domenech

    Full Text Available CRF19_cpx is a complex circulating recombination form (CRF of HIV-1. We describe the characteristics of an outbreak of the CRF19_cpx variant among treatment-naïve patients in southern Spain.The study was undertaken at the Virgen de la Victoria Hospital, a reference centre for the analysis of HIV-1 genotype in Malaga (Spain. Subtyping was performed through REGA v3.0 and the relationship of our CRF19_cpx sequences, among themselves and regarding other reference sequences from the same variant, was defined by phylogenetic analysis. We used PhyML program to perform a reconstruction of the phylogeny by Maximum Likelihood method as well as further confirmation of the transmission clusters by Bayesian inference. Additionally, we collected demographic, clinical and immunovirological data.Between 2011 and 2016, we detected 57 treatment-naïve patients with the CRF19_cpx variant. Of these, 55 conformed a very well-defined transmission cluster, phylogenetically close to CRF19_cpx sequences from the United Kingdom. The origin of this subtype in Malaga was dated between 2007 and 2010. Over 50% of the patients presented the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor G190A resistance mutation. This variant was mostly represented by young adult Spanish men who had sex with men. Almost half of them were recent seroconverters, though a similar percentage was diagnosed at a late state of HIV infection. Five cases of AIDS and one non-AIDS defined death occurred during follow-up. The majority of patients treated with first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (ART responded.We report the largest HIV-1 CRF19_cpx cohort of treatment-naïve patients outside Cuba, almost all emerging as an outbreak in the South of Spain. Half the cases had the G190A resistance mutation. Unlike previous studies, the variant from Malaga seems less pathogenic, with few AIDS events and an excellent response to ART.

  6. Agonizing care: care ethics, agonistic feminism and a political theory of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyes, Kristin G

    2002-09-01

    'Care' is central to nursing theory and practice, and has been described in a variety of ways. Intense conversations about care have been developing in other fields of study as well, from the social sciences to the humanities. Care ethics has grown out of intellectual exchange between feminist thought, moral theory and the critique of traditional western political philosophy. However, care ethics is not without its critics, as these accounts of care have also sparked vigorous challenges. This paper traces the construct of care through nursing theory, care ethics, feminist critiques of moral and political theory and agonistic feminism to outline a set of problematics that a political theory of care should engage. It discusses how care is conventionally posited in more or less essentialist, universalizing and naturalizing terms. It introduces the ideas of feminist theorists who resist dichotomizing care and the political, and situate care in the context of power and politics. The tensions between care feminism and agonistic feminism are highlighted in order to explore the potential of theorizing both care and nursing in political terms.

  7. Double trouble: combined action of meiotic drive and Wolbachia feminization in Eurema butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Peter; Cook, James M; Kageyama, Daisuke; Riegler, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Arthropod sex ratios can be manipulated by a diverse range of selfish genetic elements, including maternally inherited Wolbachia bacteria. Feminization by Wolbachia is rare but has been described for Eurema mandarina butterflies. In this species, some phenotypic and functional females, thought to be ZZ genetic males, are infected with a feminizing Wolbachia strain, wFem. Meanwhile, heterogametic WZ females are not infected with wFem. Here, we establish a quantitative PCR assay allowing reliable sexing in three Eurema species. Against expectation, all E. mandarina females, including wFem females, had only one Z chromosome that was paternally inherited. Observation of somatic interphase nuclei confirmed that W chromatin was absent in wFem females, but present in females without wFem. We conclude that the sex bias in wFem lines is due to meiotic drive (MD) that excludes the maternal Z and thus prevents formation of ZZ males. Furthermore, wFem lines may have lost the W chromosome or harbour a dysfunctional version, yet rely on wFem for female development; removal of wFem results in all-male offspring. This is the first study that demonstrates an interaction between MD and Wolbachia feminization, and it highlights endosymbionts as potentially confounding factors in MD of sex chromosomes. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Gender-Associated Genomic Differences in Colorectal Cancer: Clinical Insight from Feminization of Male Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rola H. Ali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gender-related differences in colorectal cancer (CRC are not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that CRC arising in females are significantly associated with CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP-high. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we analyzed a cohort of 116 CRCs (57 males, 59 females for chromosomal copy number aberrations (CNA and found that CRC in females had significantly higher numbers of gains involving chromosome arms 1q21.2–q21.3, 4q13.2, 6p21.1 and 16p11.2 and copy number losses of chromosome arm 11q25 compared to males. Interestingly, a subset of male CRCs (46% exhibited a "feminization" phenomenon in the form of gains of X chromosomes (or an arm of X and/or losses of the Y chromosome. Feminization of cancer cells was significantly associated with microsatellite-stable CRCs (p-value 0.003 and wild-type BRAF gene status (p-value 0.009. No significant association with other clinicopathological parameters was identified including disease-free survival. In summary, our data show that some CNAs in CRC may be gender specific and that male cancers characterized by feminization may constitute a specific subset of CRCs that warrants further investigation.

  9. THE FEMINISM AND FEMININITY OF ANN VERONICA IN H. G. WELLS' ANN VERONICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liem Satya Limanta

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available H.G. Well's Ann Veronica structurally seems to be divided into two parts; the first deals with Ann Veronica's struggle to get equality with men and freedom in most aspects of life, such as in politics, economics, education, and sexuality; the second describes much the other side of her individuality which she cannot deny, namely her femininity, such as her crave for love, marriage, maternity, and beauty. H.G. Wells describes vividly the two elements in Ann Veronica, feminism and femininity. As a feminist, Ann Veronica rebelled against her authoritative Victorian father, who regarded women only as men's property to be protected from the harsh world outside. On the other side, Ann could not deny her being a woman after she fell in love with Capes. Her femininity from the second half of the novel then is explored. Although the novel ends with the depiction of the domestic life of Ann Veronica, it does not mean that the feminism is gone altogether. The key point is that the family life Ann chooses as a `submissive' wife and good mother is her choice. It is very different if it is forced on her to do. Thus, this novel depicts both sides of Ann Veronica, her feminism and her femininity.

  10. Race and Class on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Angel B.

    2016-01-01

    Colleges and universities have a significant role to play in shaping the future of race and class relations in America. As exhibited in this year's presidential election, race and class continue to divide. Black Lives Matter movements, campus protests, and police shootings are just a few examples of the proliferation of intolerance, and higher…

  11. Intersectionality and Critical Race Parenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePouw, Christin

    2018-01-01

    This conceptual article employs critical race theory (CRT) as a theoretical framework to explore the importance of intersectionality in critical race parenting. In particular, I focus on intersectionality to understand better how Whiteness and racial power play out in intimate relationships within the family, particularly between White parents and…

  12. Helping Students Discuss Race Openly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, Julie

    2016-01-01

    One way teachers can disrupt inequities is by doing the work to foster discussions in which students talk about race--and racism--honestly together. Teachers also need to be ready to talk with students sensitively when the subject of race comes up spontaneously--in a student's work, connected to events outside school, or in response to a…

  13. CERN Relay Race

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Relay Race will take place around the Meyrin site on Wednesday 18 May between 12.15 and 12.35. This year, weather permitting, there will be some new attractions in the start/finish area on the field behind the Main Building. You will be able to: listen to music played by the CERN Jazz Club; buy drinks at the bar organised by the CERN Running Club; buy lunch served directly on the terrace by the restaurant Novae. ATTENTION: concerning traffic, the recommendations are the same as always: If possible, please avoid driving on the site during this 20 minute period. If you do meet runners in your car, please STOP until they all have passed. Thank you for your understanding.

  14. Patent Races and Market Value

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin; Leten, Bart

    Patent races are models of strategic interactions between firms competing to develop an invention. The winning firm secures a patent, protecting the invention from imitation. This paper tests the assumption made about the reward structure in patent races, both in discrete and complex industries. We...... identify patent race winners using detailed information from the patent examination reports at the European Patent Office (EPO). Estimates of a market value equation featuring large, R&D-intensive U.S., European and Japanese firms, show that if firms win patent races, their market value increases...... significantly. We further show that the gain in market value is significantly larger for patent race winners in discrete industries than for firms in complex industries....

  15. Estimativas corrigidas de feminicídios no Brasil, 2009 a 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Posenato Garcia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar as taxas de feminicídios corrigidas e apresentar o perfil desses óbitos no Brasil durante o triênio de 2009 a 2011. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado estudo descritivo com dados do Sistema de Informações sobre Mortalidade (SIM. Foram considerados como feminicídios os óbitos de mulheres cuja causa básica foi classificada nos códigos X85-Y09 da CID-10 (agressões. Esses dados foram corrigidos em duas etapas: redistribuição proporcional dos eventos cuja intenção é indeterminada (Y10-Y34 e aplicação de fatores de correção das taxas de mortalidade descritos anteriormente na literatura. RESULTADOS: No período analisado, foram registrados 13 071 feminicídios no SIM. Após a correção, estimou-se a ocorrência de 17 167 feminicídios, o que equivale a uma taxa de 5,86 óbitos por 100 000 mulheres. Taxas mais elevadas foram observadas nas regiões Nordeste, Centro-Oeste e Norte (6,93, 6,88 e 6,43 óbitos por 100 000 mulheres, respectivamente, enquanto as mais baixas foram nas regiões Sul e Sudeste (5,07 e 5,09 óbitos por 100 000 mulheres, respectivamente. Entre as vítimas, 29,7% tinham entre 20 e 29 anos; 60,9% eram negras; 48% daquelas com 15 ou mais anos de idade tinham até 8 anos de estudo. Houve envolvimento de armas de fogo em 50,2% das mortes; 27,6% ocorreram no domicílio e 35,1% aos finais de semana. CONCLUSÕES: As taxas de feminicídios foram elevadas e corroboram a necessidade de correção, visando a reduzir a subestimação. As vítimas foram mulheres de todas as faixas etárias, etnias e níveis de escolaridade. Todavia, as principais vítimas foram mulheres jovens, negras e com baixa escolaridade, residentes nas regiões Nordeste, Centro-Oeste e Norte.

  16. An Examination of the Opinions of the University Students About Feminism and Gender Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül UNUTKAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gender discrimination adversely affected women in all areas of social life, especially in the fields of education, work, marriage and family life. Feminism has emerged to draw attention to the these impacts of gender discrimination and to reduce it's negative consequences. Social transformation is necessary to ensure gender justice. One of the important steps for achieving this transformation is to educate the youth and increase their awareness. This study was conducted with the aim to determine Dumlupinar University, School of Health students' opinions on feminism and gender roles. The population of this study consists of 1293 students. Sample is comprised of 846 students who accepted to enrolled in the study. Data have been collected with using a questionnaire and assessed with percentiles, Kruskal-Walls and Mann-Whitney U-Tests. 43.3% of students defined feminism as “a style of thought that advocates women are more superior than men” and 31.9% of them as “a style of thought that advocates the equity of social opportunity”. It was identified that male students have more traditional opinions on gender roles related to work, social, marriage and family life. This study has revealed that male students have more conventional opinions in the fields of in working and married life, while the male and female students have egalatirian opinions in the propositions about social life and family life. Besides, the results of the study have revealed that opinions of students on gender roles related to work, social, marriage and family life exhibit statistically significant differences among the departments for all of the statements given. It was observed that midwifery students have more egalitarian views. Also, it was determined that upper class students have more egalitarian opinions. As a result of our study, it has been seen that university students still have a traditional perspective on social gender roles. According to the results of the

  17. The involvement of CRF1 receptor within the basolateral amygdala and dentate gyrus in the naloxone-induced conditioned place aversion in morphine-dependent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, E; Gómez-Milanés, I; Almela, P; Ribeiro Do Couto, B; Laorden, M L; Milanés, M V; Núñez, C

    2018-06-08

    Drug withdrawal-associated aversive memories trigger relapse to drug-seeking behavior. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) is an important mediator of the reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse. However, the involvement of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in aversive memory induced by opiate withdrawal has yet to be elucidated. We used the conditioned-place aversion (CPA) paradigm to evaluate the role of CRF1R on opiate withdrawal memory acquisition, along with plasticity-related processes that occur after CPA within the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and dentate gyrus (DG). Male mice were rendered dependent on morphine and injected acutely with naloxone before paired to confinement in a naloxone-associated compartment. The CPA scores as well as the number of TH-positive neurons (in the NTS-A2 noradrenergic cell group), and the expression of the transcription factors Arc and pCREB (in the BLA and DG) were measured with and without CRF1R blockade. Mice subjected to conditioned naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal robustly expressed CPA. Pre-treatment with the selective CRF1R antagonist CP-154,526 before naloxone conditioning session impaired morphine withdrawal-induced aversive memory acquisition. CP-154,526 also antagonized the enhanced number of TH-positive neurons in the NTS-A2 that was seen after CPA. Increased Arc expression and Arc-pCREB co-localization were seen in the BLA after CPA, which was not modified by CP-154,526. In the DG, CPA was accompanied by a decrease of Arc expression and no changes in Arc-pCREB co-localization, whereas pre-treatment with CP-154,526 induced an increase in both parameters. These results indicate that CRF-CRF1R pathway could be a critical factor governing opiate withdrawal memory storage and retrieval and might suggest a role for TH-NA pathway in the effects of withdrawal on memory. Our results might indicate that the blockade of CRF1R could represent a promising pharmacological treatment strategy approach for the attenuation of the relapse

  18. Means of Transportation to Work by Race

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — Except where noted, 'race' refers to people reporting only one race. 'Hispanic' refers to an ethnic category; Hispanics may be of any race. An entry of '+/-0' in...

  19. The HIV-1 epidemic in Bolivia is dominated by subtype B and CRF12_BF "family" strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Monick L; Velarde-Dunois, Ketty G; Segurondo, David; Morgado, Mariza G

    2012-01-16

    Molecular epidemiological studies of HIV-1 in South America have revealed the occurrence of subtypes B, F1 and BF1 recombinants. Even so, little information concerning the HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in Bolivia is available. In this study we performed phylogenetic analyses from samples collected in Bolivia at two different points in time over a 10 year span. We analyzed these samples to estimate the trends in the HIV subtype and recombinant forms over time. Fifty one HIV-1 positive samples were collected in Bolivia over two distinct periods (1996 and 2005). These samples were genetically characterized based on partial pol protease/reverse transcriptase (pr/rt) and env regions. Alignment and neighbor-joining (NJ) phylogenetic analyses were established from partial env (n = 37) and all pol sequences using Mega 4. The remaining 14 env sequences from 1996 were previously characterized based on HMA-env (Heteroduplex mobility assay). The Simplot v.3.5.1 program was used to verify intragenic recombination, and SplitsTree 4.0 was employed to confirm the phylogenetic relationship of the BF1 recombinant samples. Phylogenetic analysis of both env and pol regions confirmed the predominance of "pure" subtype B (72.5%) samples circulating in Bolivia and revealed a high prevalence of BF1 genotypes (27.5%). Eleven out of 14 BF1 recombinants displayed a mosaic structure identical or similar to that described for the CRF12_BF variant, one sample was classified as CRF17_BF, and two others were F1pol/Benv. No "pure" HIV-1 subtype F1 or B" variant of subtype B was detected in the present study. Of note, samples characterized as CRF12_BF-related were depicted only in 2005. HIV-1 genetic diversity in Bolivia is mostly driven by subtype B followed by BF1 recombinant strains from the CRF12_BF "family". No significant temporal changes were detected between the mid-1990s and the mid-2000s for subtype B (76.2% vs 70.0%) or BF1 recombinant (23.8% vs 30.0%) samples from Bolivia.

  20. The HIV-1 epidemic in Bolivia is dominated by subtype B and CRF12_BF "family" strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Monick L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular epidemiological studies of HIV-1 in South America have revealed the occurrence of subtypes B, F1 and BF1 recombinants. Even so, little information concerning the HIV-1 molecular epidemiology in Bolivia is available. In this study we performed phylogenetic analyses from samples collected in Bolivia at two different points in time over a 10 year span. We analyzed these samples to estimate the trends in the HIV subtype and recombinant forms over time. Materials and methods Fifty one HIV-1 positive samples were collected in Bolivia over two distinct periods (1996 and 2005. These samples were genetically characterized based on partial pol protease/reverse transcriptase (pr/rt and env regions. Alignment and neighbor-joining (NJ phylogenetic analyses were established from partial env (n = 37 and all pol sequences using Mega 4. The remaining 14 env sequences from 1996 were previously characterized based on HMA-env (Heteroduplex mobility assay. The Simplot v.3.5.1 program was used to verify intragenic recombination, and SplitsTree 4.0 was employed to confirm the phylogenetic relationship of the BF1 recombinant samples. Results Phylogenetic analysis of both env and pol regions confirmed the predominance of "pure" subtype B (72.5% samples circulating in Bolivia and revealed a high prevalence of BF1 genotypes (27.5%. Eleven out of 14 BF1 recombinants displayed a mosaic structure identical or similar to that described for the CRF12_BF variant, one sample was classified as CRF17_BF, and two others were F1pol/Benv. No "pure" HIV-1 subtype F1 or B" variant of subtype B was detected in the present study. Of note, samples characterized as CRF12_BF-related were depicted only in 2005. Conclusion HIV-1 genetic diversity in Bolivia is mostly driven by subtype B followed by BF1 recombinant strains from the CRF12_BF "family". No significant temporal changes were detected between the mid-1990s and the mid-2000s for subtype B (76.2% vs 70

  1. Postcolonial Feminisms and Introducing Sociology in the Imperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Puri

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the limits of teaching sociology as a Eurocentric modernist discipline in the context of the postcolonial present. Living in a transnational and globalized world makes the most basic and fundamental sociological concepts woefully delimiting, since they are ahistoricized and universalized terms rooted in a very specific modernist life-world. Words such as ‘individual,’ ‘self,’ ‘society,’ and ‘social’ are used routinely in everyday parlance as if their meanings are self-evident. This is not surprising given that scholarship and undergraduate teaching in the United States have also rendered them as generic, self-evident words without unraveling them reflectively as concepts, much like the ways in which ‘nation,’ ‘state,’ ‘gender,’ ‘race,’ ‘ethnicity,’ ‘sexuality,’ ‘citizen,’ ‘immigrant,’ ‘migrant,’ and ‘other,’ have been shown to reflect particular modern, liberal understandings. What scholarly, disciplinary and pedagogical challenges are faced when notions such as the ‘individual’ and ‘self’ are interrogated in the classroom from transnational and postcolonial perspectives? Writing from the standpoint of an immigrant feminist sociologist teaching in liberal arts colleges in northeast United States, I reflect on strategies that draw students toward a critical engagement with sociology while coming to grips with subject positions and political and cultural histories that shape such engagements.

  2. Global Dispersal Pattern of HIV Type 1 Subtype CRF01_AE: A Genetic Trace of Human Mobility Related to Heterosexual Sexual Activities Centralized in Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Konstantinos; Albert, Jan; Mamais, Ioannis; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Hatzakis, Angelos; Hamouda, Osamah; Struck, Daniel; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Alexiev, Ivailo; Åsjö, Birgitta; Balotta, Claudia; Camacho, Ricardo J; Coughlan, Suzie; Griskevicius, Algirdas; Grossman, Zehava; Horban, Andrzej; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Lepej, Snjezana; Liitsola, Kirsi; Linka, Marek; Nielsen, Claus; Otelea, Dan; Paredes, Roger; Poljak, Mario; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Sönnerborg, Anders; Staneková, Danica; Stanojevic, Maja; Boucher, Charles A B; Kaplan, Lauren; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Paraskevis, Dimitrios

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype CRF01_AE originated in Africa and then passed to Thailand, where it established a major epidemic. Despite the global presence of CRF01_AE, little is known about its subsequent dispersal pattern. We assembled a global data set of 2736 CRF01_AE sequences by pooling sequences from public databases and patient-cohort studies. We estimated viral dispersal patterns, using statistical phylogeographic analysis run over bootstrap trees estimated by the maximum likelihood method. We show that Thailand has been the source of viral dispersal to most areas worldwide, including 17 of 20 sampled countries in Europe. Japan, Singapore, Vietnam, and other Asian countries have played a secondary role in the viral dissemination. In contrast, China and Taiwan have mainly imported strains from neighboring Asian countries, North America, and Africa without any significant viral exportation. The central role of Thailand in the global spread of CRF01_AE can be probably explained by the popularity of Thailand as a vacation destination characterized by sex tourism and by Thai emigration to the Western world. Our study highlights the unique case of CRF01_AE, the only globally distributed non-B clade whose global dispersal did not originate in Africa. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Cultural conflict: the impact of western feminism(s) on nurses caring for women of non-English speaking background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Jeanine; Street, Annette

    2002-09-01

    Much research has been conducted for understanding the health needs of people of different cultural backgrounds and the problems they experience in seeking health care. In Australia, despite such research, it is argued that there remains an exclusionary health care culture that continues to affect equity and access for people of non-English speaking background. There was a need for research in which health professionals examined their own Anglo-Australian culture and its impact on other ethnic communities. Such concerns provided the impetus for a feminist praxis study to engage nurses in understanding and improving care for migrant women. This study was conducted with 26 nurses in a paediatric hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Five collaborative research groups were formed, each consisting of four to six nurses who were co-researchers. Together, the nurses and researchers explored the health care experiences of migrant women, using a variety of quantitative and qualitative data collection strategies. This paper explores a major finding of the study, which was the impact of liberal feminist approaches on the practices of Australian nurses who cared for women of different ethnicity and race. The study found that the efforts of liberal feminist nurses to "treat all people the same" meant that women from different cultural backgrounds did not always receive equity in care. Through the feminist praxis process the nurses were able to explore contradictions in their practice and focus on equity in care to meet the specific gendered and racially constructed needs of women of different cultural backgrounds. A number of strategies were adopted that included regular use of female health interpreters and provision of privacy for migrant women when caring for their children.

  4. AFSC/RACE/GAP: RACE Groundfish Survey Photo Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The core function of the Resource Assessment and Conservation Engineering (RACE) Groundfish Assessment Program (GAP) is to conduct quantitative fishery surveys and...

  5. The Epidemic History of HIV-1 CRF07_BC in Hetian Prefecture and the Role of It on HIV Spreading in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianjun; Guo, Hongxiong; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Xiaoming; Ayoupu, Aideaierli; Shen, Yuelan; Miao, Lifeng; Tang, Jihai; Lei, Yanhua; Su, Bin

    2017-04-01

    CRF07_BC is one of the most prevalent HIV-1 strains in China, and Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region has ever been considered to be a second epidemic center after Yunnan Province in previous studies. Here we use HIV-1 pol gene sequences identified from Hetian Prefecture located in Xinjiang Autonomous Region to reconstruct the epidemic history of HIV CRF07_BC strain circulating in this region. We found that CRF07_BC is the predominant HIV-1 form in Hetian Prefecture, and the estimated tMRCA analysis shows that there is no enough evidence supporting Xinjiang Autonomous Region as a second epidemic center of spreading HIV-1. It may imply that every city may be only a point among the HIV spreading network because of the frequent migration of population in the whole country nowadays.

  6. Performance analysis of CRF-based learning for processing WoT application requests expressed in natural language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effectiveness of a CRF-based learning method for identifying necessary Web of Things (WoT) application components that would satisfy the users' requests issued in natural language. For instance, a user request such as "archive all sports breaking news" can be satisfied by composing a WoT application that consists of ESPN breaking news service and Dropbox as a storage service. We built an engine that can identify the necessary application components by recognizing a main act (MA) or named entities (NEs) from a given request. We trained this engine with the descriptions of WoT applications (called recipes) that were collected from IFTTT WoT platform. IFTTT hosts over 300 WoT entities that offer thousands of functions referred to as triggers and actions. There are more than 270,000 publicly-available recipes composed with those functions by real users. Therefore, the set of these recipes is well-qualified for the training of our MA and NE recognition engine. We share our unique experience of generating the training and test set from these recipe descriptions and assess the performance of the CRF-based language method. Based on the performance evaluation, we introduce further research directions.

  7. Race trouble: attending to race and racism in online interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrheim, Kevin; Greener, Ross; Whitehead, Kevin A

    2015-03-01

    This article advocates the concept of race trouble as a way of synthesizing variation in racial discourse, and as a way of studying how social interaction and institutional life continue to be organized by conceptions of 'race' and 'racism'. Our analysis of an online discussion at a South African University about the defensibility of a characterization of (black) student protesters as 'savages' revealed a number of familiar strategies: participants avoided explicit racism, denied racism, and denied racism on behalf of others. However, the aim of this analysis was not to identify the 'real' racism, but to show how race and racism were used in the interaction to develop perspectives on transformation in the institution, to produce social division in the University, and to create ambivalently racialized and racializing subject positions. We demonstrate how, especially through uses of deracialized discourse, participants' actions were observably shaped by the potential ways in which others could hear 'race' and 'racism'. Race trouble thus became manifest through racial suggestion, allusion, innuendo, and implication. We conclude with a call to social psychologists to study the ways in which meanings of 'race' and 'racism' are forged and contested in relation to each other. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  8. The 2009 Relay Race

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 CERN Relay Race was as popular as ever, with a record number of 88 teams competing. var flash_video_player=get_video_player_path(); insert_player_for_external('Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-0753-kbps-480x360-25-fps-audio-64-kbps-44-kHz-stereo', 'mms://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-Multirate-200-to-753-kbps-480x360.wmv', 'false', 288, 216, 'https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-posterframe-480x360-at-10-percent.jpg', '1178303', true, 'Video/Public/Movies/2009/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048/CERN-MOVIE-2009-048-0600-kbps-maxH-360-25-fps-audio-128-kbps-48-kHz-stereo.mp4'); Even the rain didn’t dampen the spirits, and it still managed to capture the ‘festival feeling’ with live music, beer and stalls from various CERN clubs set up outside Restaurant 1. The Powercuts on the podium after win...

  9. The Rat Race

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephen Haywood

    Dear Muriel, Being an animal, you are probably more familiar with rats than most of us. Yet it seems to me that our Community (not just ATLAS) is stuck in a huge "rat race". I am somewhat mystified as to how we have got ourselves into this and I wonder whether you or your readers could explain this - I give my own observations below. In HEP and ATLAS specifically, we are all working long hours and we are all becoming exhausted. There are people at Point 1 who are working day and night, every day of the week; there are people writing software who send emails round the clock, including weekends. It is one thing to have bursts of activity which require us to put in some longer hours, but in ATLAS, the bursts last months or years. I have been on ATLAS 14 years and it has felt like one endless rush. Why do we do this? We are all highly motivated, we love our work and want to succeed individually and collectively. We are parts of various teams, and we do not want to let the side down. We worked hard at school an...

  10. The magazine feminal: photography and visualization of the feminine contribution to the educational reform in Catalonia 1907-1917

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernat SUREDA GARCIA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Barcelona, between 1907 and 1917, a monthly feminine supplement called Feminal run by Carme Karr i Alfonsetti was published in the magazine Ilustració Catalana. Feminal systematically resorted to photographs to round off its reports on current affairs. The orientation Karr sets the publication responds to the ideas of conservative feminism that advocate for a greater public presence of women, without ceasing to be a wife and a mother, by modernizing their education. These aims are framed in and committed to the broad Regenerationist programme promoted by the Catalan industrial bourgeoisie at the time, with education as one of its main axes. In this article we analyse the role of photographs in reinforcing the modernizing discourse of education.

  11. Technology and the arms race

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKenzie, D.

    1988-01-01

    This article makes a review of the book Innovation and the Arms Race: How the United States and the Soviet Union Develop New Military Technologies written by Matthew Evangelista. For at least the last two decades, scholars have struggled to come to grips with the role of technological change in the arms race. Possible relationships between theories on technology and politics are examined. The contrasts between U.S. and Soviet approaches are highlighted

  12. Demasculinization and feminization of male gonads by atrazine: Consistent effects across vertebrate classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Tyrone B.; Anderson, Lloyd L.; Beasley, Val R.; de Solla, Shane R.; Iguchi, Taisen; Ingraham, Holly; Kestemont, Patrick; Kniewald, Jasna; Kniewald, Zlatko; Langlois, Valerie S.; Luque, Enrique H.; McCoy, Krista A.; Muñoz-de-Toro, Mónica; Oka, Tomohiro; Oliveira, Cleida A.; Orton, Frances; Ruby, Sylvia; Suzawa, Miyuki; Tavera-Mendoza, Luz E.; Trudeau, Vance L.; Victor-Costa, Anna Bolivar; Willingham, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine is the most commonly detected pesticide contaminant of ground water, surface water, and precipitation. Atrazine is also an endocrine disruptor that, among other effects, alters male reproductive tissues when animals are exposed during development. Here, we apply the nine so-called “Hill criteria” (Strength, Consistency, Specificity, Temporality, Biological Gradient, Plausibility, Coherence, Experiment, and Analogy) for establishing cause–effect relationships to examine the evidence for atrazine as an endocrine disruptor that demasculinizes and feminizes the gonads of male vertebrates. We present experimental evidence that the effects of atrazine on male development are consistent across all vertebrate classes examined and we present a state of the art summary of the mechanisms by which atrazine acts as an endocrine disruptor to produce these effects. Atrazine demasculinizes male gonads producing testicular lesions associated with reduced germ cell numbers in teleost fish, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals, and induces partial and/or complete feminization in fish, amphibians, and reptiles. These effects are strong (statistically significant), consistent across vertebrate classes, and specific. Reductions in androgen levels and the induction of estrogen synthesis – demonstrated in fish, amphibians, reptiles, and mammals – represent plausible and coherent mechanisms that explain these effects. Biological gradients are observed in several of the cited studies, although threshold doses and patterns vary among species. Given that the effects on the male gonads described in all of these experimental studies occurred only after atrazine exposure, temporality is also met here. Thus the case for atrazine as an endocrine disruptor that demasculinizes and feminizes male vertebrates meets all nine of the “Hill criteria”. PMID:21419222

  13. From Metrosexual to Retrosexual: The Importance of Shifting Male Gender Roles to Feminism

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Katherine Noel

    2008-01-01

    The study of gender in feminism should not only concentrate on female gender roles and queer transgressions of established gender roles, but should also include an in-depth discussion on male gender roles as they exist in society. This paper focuses on the metrosexual and the retrosexual trends which have recently affected the male gender role in society. The emergence of the metrosexual in the 1990s through 2005 was a profound change in the traditional male gender role which allowed men to ...

  14. Feeding Feminism: Food and Gender Ideology in American Women's Art, 1960-01979

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Emily Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In my dissertation, I examine the ways that women artists engage with two primary and interrelated themes in their art practice — food and femininity — in an attempt to challenge gender inequality in midcentury American society. As such, I illustrate how these women’s art practices are related to the discourse and political actions of the American feminism during mid-1960s. Recognizing that — despite the unity implied by the commonly employed umbrella terms of “Second Wave Feminism” and the “...

  15. SHAPE OF FEMININITY IN THE TEXT OF GEGURITAN (PHILOSOPICAL VERSE IN BALI: ANALYSIS OF FEMINISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Karmini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study is Balinese traditional literature which is the form of geguritan(philosophical verse. The reason why such texts are used as the object of the study is that theycontain very complex and interesting narrations about feminism. The objectives of this studyare to find out the formal and narrative structure of the texts and to describe the shape offemininity in the texts and its relevance to the lives of Balinese women who are Hindufollowers in the society. The objectives are all at once the answers to the problems of the study.The theory applied is that of feminism which emphasizes the concept ofRadical-Cultural Feminism. This study is a qualitative one of which the data were collected bydocumentation method, that is, by the techniques of note taking, observation and interview. Thedata were analyzed using the formal method in accordance with literature studies.There were nine geguritan (philosophical verses which were used as the object of thestudy. From the formal structural analysis, the pupuh (strophe used, its function and literarystyle could be identified. From the content, religious and amusement functions could beidentified. From the narrative structural analysis, it could be identified that the plot waschronological and sorot balik (backward directed; the characters and characterization weredescribed to express extraordinary ability, which was based on Hinduism, while the theme wasdescribed to express the application of panca crada (the five principles in Hinduism. Therewere seven findings as far as the analysis of the text is concerned: they are: (1 the educatedwomen could determine their attitudes, make decisions, show prestige and maintain theirdignity; (2 the women in the texts had extraordinary power. This means that the women werenot weak. Therefore, the stereotype that women were weak was neglected; (3 the educatedwomen who used Hinduism as the reference could become the men’s power; (4 the womenwho could

  16. Feminism and Society: Solidarity Amongst Pakistani Women Still a Distant Dream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Farhat Jabeen

    2013-06-01

    Patriarchal structure of society, socio-customary practices and discrimination against women are very serious concerns/issues which need to be understood as multidimensional problem. This paper examines the role of feminism on gender development in south Asian perspective especially in Pakistan. Pakistani women seem to have been circumscribed in bounds of religious, cultural and national ideologies as envisioned by the patriarchy of Pakistan. Due to certain cultural, male domination state of affairs the solidarity amongst Pakistani women still distant dream. Current research paper would draw attention to issue mentioned above.

  17. The politics of rape: Traces of radical feminism in Disgrace by J. M. Coetzee

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, Lianne

    2013-01-01

    Disgroce can be read as a deliberation on rape in all its complexity, articulating and commenting upon many of the positions typical of the radical feminism of the seventies. Some feminists classify prostitution as a form of rape. Prostitution is the ideal form of sex for the main character, David, because it allows him to fantasize that a woman mirrors his wishes. The border between rape and consensual sex is shown to be problematic in the relationship between David and his young student, Me...

  18. Revista Estudos Feministas Is Ten Years Old - A Brief History of Feminism in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Pillar Grossi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a report on the activities of Revista Estudos Feministas during its first phase at UFSC (1999-2002. It is divided into three parts: the first presents a brief review of literature about feminism and gender studies in Brazil; the second covers the move of Estudos Feministas from Rio de Janeiro to Santa Catarina, and the third presents some considerations on the role of this periodical in relation to the movement and to the field of gender, feminist and women’s studies in Brazil.

  19. New British feminisms, UK Feminista and young women’s activism

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Nickie; Wadia, Khursheed

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been a resurgence of feminist activism in the UK with young women becoming increasingly interested in feminist ideas as a means of making sense of their lives. This is accompanied by claims from media commentators that we are witnessing a third or even fourth wave of feminism, and debates within feminist theory over the meaning of the wave metaphor and whether it is helpful in understanding the temporality of feminist activism. In this paper we engage with this debat...

  20. Perinatal exposure to the fungicide prochloraz feminizes the male rat offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Christiansen, Sofie; Laier, Peter

    2005-01-01

    . Behavioral studies showed that the activity level and sweet preference of adult males were significantly increased. Overall these results strongly indicate that prochloraz feminizes the male offspring after perinatal exposure, and that these effects are due, at least in part, to diminished fetal...... of reproductive organs, affecting androgen-regulated gene expressions, and increasing luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The purpose of this study was to investigate reproductive toxic effects after exposure during gestation and lactation to prochloraz alone and a mixture of five pesticides (deltamethrin...

  1. Pop Feminism: Televised Superheroines from the 1990s to the 2010s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bercuci Loredana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the construction of two superheroines, one from the 1990s (Buffy the Vampire Slayer and one from the 2010s (Jessica Jones. I contend that popular feminism has changed between the 1990s and the present and that this is evident in the representation of televised superheroines. While in the 1990s superheroines were more conformist, today they are more transparent in their feminist intentions. I suggest that this is due to contemporary cultural trends in the United States.

  2. The Social Representation of Feminism within the On-line Movement “Women Against Feminism”

    OpenAIRE

    Oana Crusmac

    2017-01-01

    The present paper aims to analyse the social representation of feminism within the “Women Against Feminism” (WAF) on-line movement that is based on a shared blog which gained significant coverage in the U.S. and U.K. media since the summer of 2014. Using the method of quantitative content analysis and the insights provided by social representations theory, the paper will disclose what lies behind the concept of ‘feminism’ for the group embracing the WAF movement and also aims to find whether ...

  3. Cultural feminization of educational practices: ethnographies of the popularization of science and technology in two southern countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pérez-Bustos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This research paper explores experiences with the popularization of science and technology from an ethnographic perspective. It argues that they become culturally feminized –rather than only demographically– in their educational mise-en-scene and that it occurs in a similar manner in two southern countries, India and Colombia. The first experience is an example of hands on science models and the second, refers to fun science models. The article closes by proposing some connections between these experiences, aiming at providing an understanding as to how the educational staging of the popularization of science and technology reinforces a central dichotomy between what is considered androcentric and feminized

  4. Molecular Diversity of HIV-1 among People Who Inject Drugs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Massive Expansion of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF) 33_01B and Emergence of Multiple Unique Recombinant Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Ng, Kim Tien; Yong, Yean Kong; Azmel, Azureen; Takebe, Yutaka; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B in Malaysia in the early 2000 s, continuous genetic diversification and active recombination involving CRF33_01B and other circulating genotypes in the region including CRF01_AE and subtype B′ of Thai origin, have led to the emergence of novel CRFs and unique recombinant forms. The history and magnitude of CRF33_01B transmission among various risk groups including people who inject drugs (PWID) however have not been investigated despite the high epidemiological impact of CRF33_01B in the region. We update the most recent molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among PWIDs recruited in Malaysia between 2010 and 2011 by population sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 128 gag-pol sequences. HIV-1 CRF33_01B was circulating among 71% of PWIDs whilst a lower prevalence of other previously dominant HIV-1 genotypes [subtype B′ (11%) and CRF01_AE (5%)] and CRF01_AE/B′ unique recombinants (13%) were detected, indicating a significant shift in genotype replacement in this population. Three clusters of CRF01_AE/B′ recombinants displaying divergent yet phylogenetically-related mosaic genomes to CRF33_01B were identified and characterized, suggestive of an abrupt emergence of multiple novel CRF clades. Using rigorous maximum likelihood approach and the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of CRF33_01Bpol sequences to elucidate the past population dynamics, we found that the founder lineages of CRF33_01B were likely to have first emerged among PWIDs in the early 1990 s before spreading exponentially to various high and low-risk populations (including children who acquired infections from their mothers) and later on became endemic around the early 2000 s. Taken together, our findings provide notable genetic evidence indicating the widespread expansion of CRF33_01B among PWIDs and into the general population. The emergence of numerous previously unknown recombinant clades highlights the

  5. Molecular diversity of HIV-1 among people who inject drugs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: massive expansion of circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B and emergence of multiple unique recombinant clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Wei Zhen; Ong, Lai Yee; Razak, Siti Humaira; Lee, Yeat Mei; Ng, Kim Tien; Yong, Yean Kong; Azmel, Azureen; Takebe, Yutaka; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF) 33_01B in Malaysia in the early 2000 s, continuous genetic diversification and active recombination involving CRF33_01B and other circulating genotypes in the region including CRF01_AE and subtype B' of Thai origin, have led to the emergence of novel CRFs and unique recombinant forms. The history and magnitude of CRF33_01B transmission among various risk groups including people who inject drugs (PWID) however have not been investigated despite the high epidemiological impact of CRF33_01B in the region. We update the most recent molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among PWIDs recruited in Malaysia between 2010 and 2011 by population sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 128 gag-pol sequences. HIV-1 CRF33_01B was circulating among 71% of PWIDs whilst a lower prevalence of other previously dominant HIV-1 genotypes [subtype B' (11%) and CRF01_AE (5%)] and CRF01_AE/B' unique recombinants (13%) were detected, indicating a significant shift in genotype replacement in this population. Three clusters of CRF01_AE/B' recombinants displaying divergent yet phylogenetically-related mosaic genomes to CRF33_01B were identified and characterized, suggestive of an abrupt emergence of multiple novel CRF clades. Using rigorous maximum likelihood approach and the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling of CRF33_01Bpol sequences to elucidate the past population dynamics, we found that the founder lineages of CRF33_01B were likely to have first emerged among PWIDs in the early 1990 s before spreading exponentially to various high and low-risk populations (including children who acquired infections from their mothers) and later on became endemic around the early 2000 s. Taken together, our findings provide notable genetic evidence indicating the widespread expansion of CRF33_01B among PWIDs and into the general population. The emergence of numerous previously unknown recombinant clades highlights the escalating

  6. Molecular diversity of HIV-1 among people who inject drugs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: massive expansion of circulating recombinant form (CRF 33_01B and emergence of multiple unique recombinant clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhen Chow

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF 33_01B in Malaysia in the early 2000 s, continuous genetic diversification and active recombination involving CRF33_01B and other circulating genotypes in the region including CRF01_AE and subtype B' of Thai origin, have led to the emergence of novel CRFs and unique recombinant forms. The history and magnitude of CRF33_01B transmission among various risk groups including people who inject drugs (PWID however have not been investigated despite the high epidemiological impact of CRF33_01B in the region. We update the most recent molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 among PWIDs recruited in Malaysia between 2010 and 2011 by population sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 128 gag-pol sequences. HIV-1 CRF33_01B was circulating among 71% of PWIDs whilst a lower prevalence of other previously dominant HIV-1 genotypes [subtype B' (11% and CRF01_AE (5%] and CRF01_AE/B' unique recombinants (13% were detected, indicating a significant shift in genotype replacement in this population. Three clusters of CRF01_AE/B' recombinants displaying divergent yet phylogenetically-related mosaic genomes to CRF33_01B were identified and characterized, suggestive of an abrupt emergence of multiple novel CRF clades. Using rigorous maximum likelihood approach and the Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling of CRF33_01Bpol sequences to elucidate the past population dynamics, we found that the founder lineages of CRF33_01B were likely to have first emerged among PWIDs in the early 1990 s before spreading exponentially to various high and low-risk populations (including children who acquired infections from their mothers and later on became endemic around the early 2000 s. Taken together, our findings provide notable genetic evidence indicating the widespread expansion of CRF33_01B among PWIDs and into the general population. The emergence of numerous previously unknown recombinant clades highlights the

  7. Race and Raceness: A Theoretical Perspective of the Black American Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Jacqueline E.

    1987-01-01

    Gives a theoretical perspective of the multidimensional nature of Black-race/White-race consciousness. American perceptions of race are expressed in White race centeredness. Blacks face the dilemma of adhering to two sets of values: a positive valuation of their race and a necessity of passing in White society. (PS)

  8. Recognition of Own-Race and Other-Race Faces by Three-Month-Old Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrigoli, Sandy; De Schonen, Scania

    2004-01-01

    Background: People are better at recognizing faces of their own race than faces of another race. Such race specificity may be due to differential expertise in the two races. Method: In order to find out whether this other-race effect develops as early as face-recognition skills or whether it is a long-term effect of acquired expertise, we tested…

  9. SEMANTIC LABELLING OF ULTRA DENSE MLS POINT CLOUDS IN URBAN ROAD CORRIDORS BASED ON FUSING CRF WITH SHAPE PRIORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Yao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a labelling method for the semantic analysis of ultra-high point density MLS data (up to 4000 points/m2 in urban road corridors is developed based on combining a conditional random field (CRF for the context-based classification of 3D point clouds with shape priors. The CRF uses a Random Forest (RF for generating the unary potentials of nodes and a variant of the contrastsensitive Potts model for the pair-wise potentials of node edges. The foundations of the classification are various geometric features derived by means of co-variance matrices and local accumulation map of spatial coordinates based on local neighbourhoods. Meanwhile, in order to cope with the ultra-high point density, a plane-based region growing method combined with a rule-based classifier is applied to first fix semantic labels for man-made objects. Once such kind of points that usually account for majority of entire data amount are pre-labeled; the CRF classifier can be solved by optimizing the discriminative probability for nodes within a subgraph structure excluded from pre-labeled nodes. The process can be viewed as an evidence fusion step inferring a degree of belief for point labelling from different sources. The MLS data used for this study were acquired by vehicle-borne Z+F phase-based laser scanner measurement, which permits the generation of a point cloud with an ultra-high sampling rate and accuracy. The test sites are parts of Munich City which is assumed to consist of seven object classes including impervious surfaces, tree, building roof/facade, low vegetation, vehicle and pole. The competitive classification performance can be explained by the diverse factors: e.g. the above ground height highlights the vertical dimension of houses, trees even cars, but also attributed to decision-level fusion of graph-based contextual classification approach with shape priors. The use of context-based classification methods mainly contributed to smoothing of

  10. Semantic Labelling of Ultra Dense Mls Point Clouds in Urban Road Corridors Based on Fusing Crf with Shape Priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, W.; Polewski, P.; Krzystek, P.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a labelling method for the semantic analysis of ultra-high point density MLS data (up to 4000 points/m2) in urban road corridors is developed based on combining a conditional random field (CRF) for the context-based classification of 3D point clouds with shape priors. The CRF uses a Random Forest (RF) for generating the unary potentials of nodes and a variant of the contrastsensitive Potts model for the pair-wise potentials of node edges. The foundations of the classification are various geometric features derived by means of co-variance matrices and local accumulation map of spatial coordinates based on local neighbourhoods. Meanwhile, in order to cope with the ultra-high point density, a plane-based region growing method combined with a rule-based classifier is applied to first fix semantic labels for man-made objects. Once such kind of points that usually account for majority of entire data amount are pre-labeled; the CRF classifier can be solved by optimizing the discriminative probability for nodes within a subgraph structure excluded from pre-labeled nodes. The process can be viewed as an evidence fusion step inferring a degree of belief for point labelling from different sources. The MLS data used for this study were acquired by vehicle-borne Z+F phase-based laser scanner measurement, which permits the generation of a point cloud with an ultra-high sampling rate and accuracy. The test sites are parts of Munich City which is assumed to consist of seven object classes including impervious surfaces, tree, building roof/facade, low vegetation, vehicle and pole. The competitive classification performance can be explained by the diverse factors: e.g. the above ground height highlights the vertical dimension of houses, trees even cars, but also attributed to decision-level fusion of graph-based contextual classification approach with shape priors. The use of context-based classification methods mainly contributed to smoothing of labelling by removing

  11. Increased CRF mRNA expression in the sexually dimorphic BNST of male but not female GAD67 mice and TMT predator odor stress effects upon spatial memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janitzky, K; Peine, A; Kröber, A; Yanagawa, Y; Schwegler, H; Roskoden, T

    2014-10-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) is an important region for 2,5-dihydro-2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline (TMT) predator odor-induced stress responses in mice. It is sexually dimorphic and a region for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-enhanced stress responses. Dense GABAergic and CRF input from the amygdala to the BNST gives point to relevant interactions between CRF and GABA activity in these brain regions. Hence, to investigate sexual dimorphism of stress-induced neuronal changes, we studied effects of acute TMT exposure on CRF mRNA expression in stress-related brain regions in male and female GAD67 mice and their wild-type littermates. In GAD67 mice, heterozygous knock-in of GFP in GABAergic neurons caused a 50% decrease of GAD67 protein level in the brain [91,99]. Results show higher CRF mRNA levels in the BNST of male but not female GAD67 mice after TMT and control odor exposure. While CRF neurons in the BNST are predominantly GABAergic and CRF enhances GABAergic transmission in the BNST [20,51], the deficit in GABAergic transmission in GAD67 mice could induce a compensatory CRF increase. Sexual dimorphism of the BNST with greater density of GABA-ir neurons in females could explain the differences in CRF mRNA levels between male and female GAD67 mice. Effects of odor exposure were studied in a radial arm maze (RAM) task. Results show impaired retrieval of spatial memory after acute TMT exposure in both sexes and genotypes. However, only GAD67 mice show increased working memory errors after control odor exposure. Our work elicits GAD67 mice as a model to further study interactions of GABA and CRF in the BNST for a better understanding of how sex-specific characteristics of the brain may contribute to differences in anxiety- and stress-related psychological disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of the Drug Resistance Profiles of Patients Infected with CRF07_BC Using Phenotypic Assay and Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Wei Huang

    Full Text Available The usefulness of ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS for the diagnosis of HIV-1 drug resistance (DR remains to be determined. Previously, we reported an explosive outbreak of HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF 07_BC among injection drug users (IDUs in Taiwan in 2004. The goal of this study was to characterize the DR of CRF07_BC strains using different assays including UDPS. Seven CRF07_BC isolates including 4 from early epidemic (collected in 2004-2005 and 3 from late epidemic (collected in 2008 were obtained from treatment-naïve patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Viral RNA was extracted directly from patient's plasma or from cultural supernatant and the pol sequences were determined using RT-PCR sequencing or UDPS. For comparison, phenotypic drug susceptibility assay using MAGIC-5 cells (in-house phenotypic assay and Antivirogram were performed. In-house phenotypic assay showed that all the early epidemic and none of the late epidemic CRF07_BC isolates were resistant to most protease inhibitors (PIs (4.4-47.3 fold. Neither genotypic assay nor Antivirogram detected any DR mutations. UDPS showed that early epidemic isolates contained 0.01-0.08% of PI DR major mutations. Furthermore, the combinations of major and accessory PI DR mutations significantly correlated with the phenotypic DR. The in-house phenotypic assay is superior to other conventional phenotypic assays in the detection of DR variants with a frequency as low as 0.01%.

  13. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in stress and disease: A review of literature and treatment perspectives with special emphasis on psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohg, K.; Hageman, I.; Jorgensen, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    The CRF family of neuropeptides and receptors is involved in a variety of stress responses, in the regulation of appetite, metabolic and inflammatory processes as well as intestinal movements. From a primarily psychiatric perspective, the present paper reviews the literature on its anatomy...

  14. Angiotensin II and CRF receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala mediate hemodynamic response variability to cocaine in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mari A; Kucenas, Sarah; Bowman, Tamara A; Ruhlman, Melissa; Knuepfer, Mark M

    2010-01-14

    Stress or cocaine evokes either a large increase in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) or a smaller increase in SVR accompanied by an increase in cardiac output (designated vascular and mixed responders, respectively) in Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) mediates this variability. Conscious, freely-moving rats, instrumented for measurement of arterial pressure and cardiac output and for drug delivery into the CeA, were given cocaine (5 mg/kg, iv, 4-6 times) and characterized as vascular (n=15) or mixed responders (n=10). Subsequently, we administered cocaine after bilateral microinjections (100 nl) of saline or selective agents in the CeA. Muscimol (80 pmol), a GABA(A) agonist, or losartan (43.4 pmol), an AT(1) receptor antagonist, attenuated the cocaine-induced increase in SVR in vascular responders, selectively, such that vascular responders were no longer different from mixed responders. The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) antagonist, alpha-helical CRF(9-41) (15.7 pmol), abolished the difference between cardiac output and SVR in mixed and vascular responders. We conclude that greater increases in SVR observed in vascular responders are dependent on AT(1) receptor activation and, to a lesser extent on CRF receptors. Therefore, AT(1) and CRF receptors in the CeA contribute to hemodynamic response variability to intravenous cocaine.

  15. Parental LTRs are important in a construct of a stable and efficient replication-competent infectious molecular clone of HIV-1 CRF08_BC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiwei; Zhang, Xiaomin; Wu, Hao; Seto, Donald; Zhang, Hao-Jie; Chen, Zhiwei; Wan, Chengsong; Zheng, Bo-Jian

    2012-01-01

    Circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) of HIV-1 have been identified in southern China in recent years. CRF08_BC is one of the most predominant subtypes circulating in China. In order to study HIV subtype biology and to provide a tool for biotechnological applications, the first full-length replication-competent infectious molecular clone harboring CRF08_BC is reported. The construction of this clone pBRGX indicates that a moderate-copy number vector is required for its amplification in E. coli. In addition, it is shown that the parental CRF08_BC LTRs are important for generating this efficient replication-competent infectious clone. These observations may aid in the construction of infectious clones from other subtypes. Both the pBRGX-derived virus and its parental isolate contain CCR5 tropism. Their full-length genomes were also sequenced, analyzed, compared and deposited in GenBank (JF719819 and JF719818, respectively). The availability of pBRGX as the first replication-competent molecular clone of CRF08_BC provides a useful tool for a wide range of studies of this newly emergent HIV subtype, including the development of HIV vaccine candidates, antiviral drug screening and drug resistance analysis.

  16. Empowerment, feminism, and self-efficacy: relationships to body image and disordered eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsaul, Jessica A E; Curtin, Lisa; Bazzini, Doris; Martz, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Sociocultural norms pertaining to an ideal of thinness for women likely play a role in the development and maintenance of disturbance in body image, and by extension, disordered eating. However, competing norms associated with feminism may buffer women from pressures associated with achieving the thin ideal. The present study explored the relationship between feminist ideology, empowerment, and self-efficacy relative to body image and eating behavior with a sample of U.S. undergraduate women (N=318) attending a southeastern U.S. mid-sized university. In planned hierarchical multiple regression analyses, endorsement of feminist ideology predicted perceptions of positive body image, but did not appear to predict disordered eating. Self-efficacy emerged as a robust predictor of positive body image and lower disordered eating even after controlling for perceptions of personal empowerment and feminism. Results, although limited by correlational data, suggest that self-efficacy may protect college-aged women from disordered eating and negative body image. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Feminism and Society: Solidarity Amongst Pakistani Women Still a Distant Dream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Farhat Jabeen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper envisages feminism in a south Asian gender development particularly in Pakistan. Law is the manifestation of principles of justice, equity and good conscience. As’ Gender’ has been taken up in development policy and practices, have been created that have emphasized some aspects of feminist agendas, and pushed others out of the frame. Research paper gives an overview of women in Pakistan are victimized of gender biases begin from the very first institution home. They are facing challenges in claiming their rights of inheritance owing to customary practices, lacunae in the prevailing legal framework and procedure. Patriarchal structure of society, socio-customary practices and discrimination against women are very serious concerns/issues which need to be understood as multidimensional problem. This paper examines the role of feminism on gender development in south Asian perspective especially in Pakistan. Pakistani women seem to have been circumscribed in bounds of religious, cultural and national ideologies as envisioned by the patriarchy of Pakistan. Due to certain cultural, male domination state of affairs the solidarity amongst Pakistani women still distant dream. Current research paper would draw attention to issue mentioned above.

  18. Special Edition: Fighting Feminism – Organised Opposition to Women’s Rights; Guest Editors’ Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Dragiewicz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue presents a series of papers by scholars who participated in a workshop entitled ‘Men's Groups: Challenging Feminism’, which was held at the University of British Columbia (UBC, Canada, 26-27 May 2014. The workshop was organised by Susan B Boyd, Professor of Law and Chair in Feminist Legal Studies at the UBC Faculty of Law, and was sponsored by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies at UBC, the Peter A Allard School of Law, the Centre for Feminist Legal Studies at UBC, and the Canadian Journal of Women and the Law. The aim of the workshop was to bring together feminist scholars from multiple disciplines and multiple national contexts to explore a source of resistance to feminism that has been largely overlooked in scholarly research: the growing number of nationally situated and globally linked organisations acting in the name of men's rights and interests which contend that men are discriminated against in law, education and government funding, and that feminism is to blame for this. This special edition presents eight papers inspired by the workshop, authored by scholars from Canada, New Zealand, Poland, Sweden and the United States. A second special issue comprised of eight other papers inspired by the workshop was published in the Canadian Journal of Women and the Law as volume 28(1 in 2016.To find out more about this special edition, download the PDF file from this page.

  19. Esbozo de un feminismo latinoamericano Outlines of a Latin American feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Femenías

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available ¿Existe un feminismo latinoamericano? Creemos que sí, y que tienen sus propias raíces y su propio perfil, que abreva de las múltiples corrientes teóricas y filosóficas de los desarrollos actuales del feminismo. Creemos además que la situación periférica del continente le permite tomar y situar diversas lecturas, trazar redes conceptuales y aceptar el desafío de pensar y plantear sus propios problemas. Este artículo pretende dar cuenta de algunos de esos desafíos y recorridos.Does a Latin American feminism exist? We believe it does and that it has its own roots and profile which derives from different theoretical and philosophical lines of the most important feminist achievements. We also believe that the so-called peripheral situation of the continent allows to situate and locate different readings, draw conceptual maps and accept that feminism's own challenges. This paper intends to map out some of challenges and trajectories.

  20. Stress in adolescence and drugs of abuse in rodent models: Role of dopamine, CRF, and HPA axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Andrew R.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Research on adolescence and drug abuse increased substantially in the past decade. However, drug-addiction related behaviors following stressful experiences during adolescence are less studied. We focus on rodent models of adolescent stress cross-sensitization to drugs of abuse. Objectives Review the ontogeny of behavior, dopamine, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), and the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis in adolescent rodents. We evaluate evidence that stressful experiences during adolescence engender hypersensitivity to drugs of abuse and offer potential neural mechanisms. Results and Conclusions Much evidence suggests that final maturation of behavior, dopamine systems, and HPA axis occurs during adolescence. Stress during adolescence increases amphetamine- and ethanol-stimulated locomotion, preference, and self-administration under many conditions. The influence of adolescent stress on subsequent cocaine- and nicotine-stimulated locomotion and preference is less clear. The type of adolescent stress, temporal interval between stress and testing, species, sex, and the drug tested are key methodological determinants for successful cross-sensitization procedures. The sensitization of the mesolimbic dopamine system is proposed to underlie stress cross-sensitization to drugs of abuse in both adolescents and adults through modulation by CRF. Reduced levels of mesocortical dopamine appear to be a unique consequence of social stress during adolescence. Adolescent stress may reduce the final maturation of cortical dopamine through D2 dopamine receptor regulation of dopamine synthesis or glucocorticoid-facilitated pruning of cortical dopamine fibers. Certain rodent models of adolescent adversity are useful for determining neural mechanisms underlying the cross-sensitization to drugs of abuse. PMID:24370534

  1. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Zaragoza, J.; Martínez-Laorden, E.; Mora, L.; Hidalgo, J.; Milanés, M.V.; Laorden, M.L., E-mail: laorden@um.es

    2014-02-15

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence.

  2. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro-Zaragoza, J.; Martínez-Laorden, E.; Mora, L.; Hidalgo, J.; Milanés, M.V.; Laorden, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence

  3. Broad antibody mediated cross-neutralization and preclinical immunogenicity of new codon-optimized HIV-1 clade CRF02_AG and G primary isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon M Agwale

    Full Text Available Creation of an effective vaccine for HIV has been an elusive goal of the scientific community for almost 30 years. Neutralizing antibodies are assumed to be pivotal to the success of a prophylactic vaccine but previous attempts to make an immunogen capable of generating neutralizing antibodies to primary "street strain" isolates have resulted in responses of very limited breadth and potency. The objective of the study was to determine the breadth and strength of neutralizing antibodies against autologous and heterologous primary isolates in a cohort of HIV-1 infected Nigerians and to characterize envelopes from subjects with particularly broad or strong immune responses for possible use as vaccine candidates in regions predominated by HIV-1 CRF02_AG and G subtypes. Envelope vectors from a panel of primary Nigerian isolates were constructed and tested with plasma/sera from the same cohort using the PhenoSense HIV neutralizing antibody assay (Monogram Biosciences Inc, USA to assess the breadth and potency of neutralizing antibodies. The immediate goal of this study was realized by the recognition of three broadly cross-neutralizing sera: (NG2-clade CRF02_AG, NG3-clade CRF02_AG and NG9- clade G. Based on these findings, envelope gp140 sequences from NG2 and NG9, complemented with a gag sequence (Clade G and consensus tat (CRF02_AG and G antigens have been codon-optimized, synthesized, cloned and evaluated in BALB/c mice. The intramuscular administration of these plasmid DNA constructs, followed by two booster DNA immunizations, induced substantial specific humoral response against all constructs and strong cellular responses against the gag and tat constructs. These preclinical findings provide a framework for the design of candidate vaccine for use in regions where the HIV-1 epidemic is driven by clades CRF02_AG and G.

  4. Broad antibody mediated cross-neutralization and preclinical immunogenicity of new codon-optimized HIV-1 clade CRF02_AG and G primary isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agwale, Simon M; Forbi, Joseph C; Notka, Frank; Wrin, Terri; Wild, Jens; Wagner, Ralf; Wolf, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Creation of an effective vaccine for HIV has been an elusive goal of the scientific community for almost 30 years. Neutralizing antibodies are assumed to be pivotal to the success of a prophylactic vaccine but previous attempts to make an immunogen capable of generating neutralizing antibodies to primary "street strain" isolates have resulted in responses of very limited breadth and potency. The objective of the study was to determine the breadth and strength of neutralizing antibodies against autologous and heterologous primary isolates in a cohort of HIV-1 infected Nigerians and to characterize envelopes from subjects with particularly broad or strong immune responses for possible use as vaccine candidates in regions predominated by HIV-1 CRF02_AG and G subtypes. Envelope vectors from a panel of primary Nigerian isolates were constructed and tested with plasma/sera from the same cohort using the PhenoSense HIV neutralizing antibody assay (Monogram Biosciences Inc, USA) to assess the breadth and potency of neutralizing antibodies. The immediate goal of this study was realized by the recognition of three broadly cross-neutralizing sera: (NG2-clade CRF02_AG, NG3-clade CRF02_AG and NG9- clade G). Based on these findings, envelope gp140 sequences from NG2 and NG9, complemented with a gag sequence (Clade G) and consensus tat (CRF02_AG and G) antigens have been codon-optimized, synthesized, cloned and evaluated in BALB/c mice. The intramuscular administration of these plasmid DNA constructs, followed by two booster DNA immunizations, induced substantial specific humoral response against all constructs and strong cellular responses against the gag and tat constructs. These preclinical findings provide a framework for the design of candidate vaccine for use in regions where the HIV-1 epidemic is driven by clades CRF02_AG and G.

  5. Persistent Mullerian duct syndrome in a Miniature Schnauzer dog with signs of feminization and a Sertoli cell tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, A. R.; Kooistra, H. S.; van Sluijs, F. J.; van Bruggen, L. W. L.; Ijzer, J.; Zijlstra, C.; Okkens, A. C.

    2010-01-01

    A 5-year-old male Miniature Schnauzer was presented with unilateral cryptorchidism and signs of feminization. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed an enlarged right testis and a large, fluid-filled cavity that appeared to arise from the prostate. Computed tomography revealed the cavity to be

  6. Hip-Hop Feminism: A Standpoint to Enhance the Positive Self-Identity of Black College Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Wilma J.

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of hip-hop among young Black college women, coupled with the deluge of negative and positive messages in this culture regarding these women's identity, signals an opportunity for the arrival of a contemporary, culturally relevant epistemology--hip-hop feminism. Through the lens of Black feminist theory, this article explores hip-hop…

  7. Are We "There" Yet? the Treatment of Gender and Feminism in Technical, Business, and Workplace Writing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kate; Rumsey, Suzanne Kesler; Amidon, Stevens

    2016-01-01

    This article reexamines the treatment of gender and feminism in technical, business, and workplace writing studies--areas in which the three of us teach. Surprisingly, the published discourse of our field seems to implicitly minimize the gendered nature of business and technical writing workplaces and classrooms. To understand this apparent lack…

  8. Feminicídios em Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil: iniquidades de gênero ao morrer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Feminicídios são assassinatos de mulheres decorrentes das desigualdades de gênero e representam a forma mais extrema da violência contra a mulher. O referencial teórico-metodológico utilizado neste estudo foi a teoria do patriarcado e a análise crítica do discurso. Foram analisados os discursos referentes ao relatório final de 64 inquéritos policiais categorizados como feminicídios, ocorridos na cidade de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, no período de 2006 a 2010. As vítimas eram majoritariamente mulheres pobres, jovens e moradoras de regiões de periferia, havendo uma frequência elevada de prostitutas e mulheres executadas pelo tráfico; mortes não consideradas feminicídios pelos operadores policiais. Muitos inquéritos foram arquivados devido à ausência de provas e outros não foram nem ao menos iniciados. Nos inquéritos, havia discursos que desqualificavam e culpavam as vítimas, embora alguns criticassem as desigualdades entre homens e mulheres e identificassem os efeitos letais do machismo. Inquéritos policiais são fontes importantes para estudar o feminicídio na sociedade, agregando grande quantidade de informações sobre vítimas, agressores e cenários dos crimes.

  9. Secular Feminisms and Attitudes towards Religion in the Context of a West-European Society – Flanders, Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brandt, H.P.

    2014-01-01

    Ideologies and politics of humanism and secularism in Western Europe historically have a tensioned relationship with religion as well as with feminism and the women's movement. In this article, I aim to demonstrate the multiplicity and complexity of several recent secular feminist responses to

  10. Up the Down Staircase: Women's Upward Mobility and the Wage Penalty for Occupational Feminization, 1970-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Hadas

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the long-term trends of two parallel and related gender effects, in light of the hypothesis that highly rewarded occupations will be the most penalized by the process of feminization. Using multilevel models of the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series data from 1970 to 2007, the study analyzes trends in women's occupational…

  11. Identity Politics, Justice and the Schooling of Muslim Girls: Navigating the Tensions between Multiculturalism, Group Rights and Feminism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddie, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on the concerns expressed by three female Muslim educators who are support staff at an English comprehensive school. Consistent with the debates associated with multiculturalism, group rights and feminism, the article illuminates spaces of gender constraint and possibility within the discourses shaping these women's lives and…

  12. AESA 2012 Presidential Address "What My Community Means to Me": Reimagining Civic Praxis with Latina/Chicana Feminisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villenas, Sofia A.

    2015-01-01

    This article invites imaginings of democracy and education with and through "other" knowledges. It argues for the possibilities of working across difference as articulated in the transnational, border, and decolonial perspectives of Chicana/Latina feminisms. Specifically, it explores Gloria Anzaldúa's notions of…

  13. A Community of Disagreement: Feminism in the University. Counterpoints: Studies in the Postmodern Theory of Education, Volume 431

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    As academic feminism has critiqued the often-violent inscriptions of institutionality, it has also produced a narrative of its role in the university fraught with difficulties of its own. The understanding of difference--as an object to be agreed upon and as the foundation for a diversity model of inclusion--that has emerged as the defining…

  14. Predictive Modeling in Race Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Wiktorowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of linear and nonlinear multivariable models as tools to support training process of race walkers. These models are calculated using data collected from race walkers’ training events and they are used to predict the result over a 3 km race based on training loads. The material consists of 122 training plans for 21 athletes. In order to choose the best model leave-one-out cross-validation method is used. The main contribution of the paper is to propose the nonlinear modifications for linear models in order to achieve smaller prediction error. It is shown that the best model is a modified LASSO regression with quadratic terms in the nonlinear part. This model has the smallest prediction error and simplified structure by eliminating some of the predictors.

  15. Social Influence on Observed Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsófia Boda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a novel theoretical approach for understanding racial fluidity, emphasizing the social embeddedness of racial classifications. We propose that social ties affect racial perceptions through within-group micromechanisms, resulting in discrepancies between racial self-identifications and race as classified by others. We demonstrate this empirically on data from 12 Hungarian high school classes with one minority group (the Roma using stochastic actor-oriented models for the analysis of social network panel data. We find strong evidence for social influence: individuals tend to accept their peers' judgement about another student’s racial category; opinions of friends have a larger effect than those of nonfriends. Perceived social position also matters: those well-accepted among majority-race peers are likely to be classified as majority students themselves. We argue that similar analyses in other social contexts shall lead to a better understanding of race and interracial processes.

  16. Contemporary Culture and the Undoing of Feminism: Review of Angela McRobbie's The Aftermath of Feminism: Gender, Culture and Social Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Henderson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A
 couple
 of
 times
 a
 year
 (usually
 around
 International
 Women’s
 Day
 or
 the
latest
 gender
 controversy
 there’ll
 be
 a
 journalist
 on
 the
 phone,
 asking
 me,
 ‘where
 is
 feminism
 now?’ 
Angela 
McRobbie’s
 The 
Aftermath 
of
 Feminism: Gender,
 Culture
 and
 Social
 Change
 provides
 the
 perfect
 answer,
 though
 one
 that
 probably
 won’t
 be
 dutifully
 reported
 in
 the
 pages
 of
 the
 Courier­ Mail.
 McRobbie
 has
 always
 been
 a
 preeminent
 figure
 in
 feminist
 cultural
 studies,
 and
 this
 work
 highlights
 her
 continuing 
importance.
Indeed, The 
Aftermath 
of 
Feminism
 reminds
 us 
of 
the 
power
 of 
feminist 
cultural
 studies 
to 
explain
 what’s 
going 
on,
whether
 this 
is 
in 
the
media,
 popular
 culture,
 everyday
 life,
 governmentality,
 the
 corporate
 world,
 or
 their
 interrelationships.
 And
 McRobbie’s
 diagnosis
 of
 ‘a
 social
 and
 cultural
 landscape
 which
 could
 be
 called
 post‐feminist’
 
is
 uncompromising,
 far‐reaching 
in
 scope,
 and 
deeply 
disturbing.

  17. CERN Road Race | 1 October

    CERN Multimedia

    Klaus Hanke

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday 1 October at 18:15.   The 5.5 km race takes place over 3 laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 to over 34 minutes, and the race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over 1 lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judged on best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by a registration fee of 10 CHF. Children enter for free and each child will receive a medal. More information, and the online entry form, can be fo...

  18. Nuclear Arms Race and Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Anpeng

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a new factor, environment, into nuclear arms race model. In this model, nuclear weapons produce larger defense power compared with conventional arms, but hurt the environment meanwhile. In the global welfare maximum level, both conventional and nuclear weapons budget are zero. However, the competitive equilibrium may not achieve the optimum. I give the condition to jump out of the prisoner's dilemma.

  19. CERN Road Race | 7 October

    CERN Multimedia

    Klaus Hanke, CERN Running Club

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 edition of the annual CERN Road Race will be held on Wednesday, 7 October at 6.15 p.m.   The 5.5 km race takes place over three laps of a 1.8 km circuit in the West Area of the Meyrin site, and is open to everyone working at CERN and their families. There are runners of all speeds, with times ranging from under 17 minutes to over 34 minutes. The race is run on a handicap basis, by staggering the starting times so that (in theory) all the runners finish together. Children (< 15 years) have their own race over one lap of 1.8 km. As usual, there will be a “best family” challenge (judging best parent + best child). Trophies are awarded in the usual men’s, women’s and veterans’ categories, and there is a challenge for the best age/performance. Every adult will receive a souvenir prize, financed by the registration fee of 10 CHF. Children are free (each child will receive a medal). More information, and t...

  20. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  1. Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Colorectal Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English (US) ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting colorectal cancer or dying from colorectal cancer varies by race ...

  2. The Spectre of Race in American Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Fofana, Mariam O.

    2013-01-01

    Controversies and debates surrounding race have long been a fixture in American medicine. In the past, the biological concept of race—the idea that race is biologically determined and meaningful—has served to justify the institution of slavery and the conduct of unethical research trials. Although these days may seem far behind, contemporary debates over the race-specific approval of drugs and the significance of genetic differences are evidence that race still yields tremendous influence on ...

  3. Novel HIV-1 recombinants spreading across multiple risk groups in the United Kingdom: the identification and phylogeography of Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF 50_A1D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine M Foster

    Full Text Available An increase in non-B HIV-1 infections among men who have sex with men (MSM in the United Kingdom (UK has created opportunities for novel recombinants to arise and become established. We used molecular mapping to characterize the importance of such recombinants to the UK HIV epidemic, in order to gain insights into transmission dynamics that can inform control strategies.A total of 55,556 pol (reverse transcriptase and protease sequences in the UK HIV Drug Resistance Database were analyzed using Subtype Classification Using Evolutionary Algorithms (SCUEAL. Overall 72 patients shared the same A1/D recombination breakpoint in pol, comprising predominantly MSM but also heterosexuals and injecting drug users (IDUs. In six MSM, full-length single genome amplification of plasma HIV-1 RNA was performed in order to characterize the A1/D recombinant. Subtypes and recombination breakpoints were identified using sliding window and jumping profile hidden markov model approaches. Global maximum likelihood trees of gag, pol and env genes were drawn using FastTree version 2.1. Five of the six strains showed the same novel A1/D recombinant (8 breakpoints, which has been classified as CRF50_A1D. The sixth strain showed a complex CRF50_A1D/B/U structure. Divergence dates and phylogeographic inferences were determined using Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis using Sampling Trees (BEAST. This estimated that CRF50_A1D emerged in the UK around 1992 in MSM, with subsequent transmissions to heterosexuals and IDUs. Analysis of CRF50_A1D/B/U demonstrated that around the year 2000 CRF50_A1D underwent recombination with a subtype B strain.We report the identification of CRF50_A1D, a novel circulating recombinant that emerged in UK MSM around 1992, with subsequent onward transmission to heterosexuals and IDUs, and more recent recombination with subtype B. These findings highlight the changing dynamics of HIV transmission in the UK and the converging of the two previously

  4. Children's Attitudes toward Race and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Juliet L.

    An implicit assumption in the majority of literature looking at development of prejudice in children is that race prejudice and sex prejudice are equivalent across groups; that is, sex bias is not conditional on race, and likewise race bias is not conditional on sex bias of the child. However, Warner, Fishbein, Ritchey and Case (2001) found strong…

  5. Researching Race within Educational Psychology Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCuir-Gunby, Jessica T.; Schutz, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we question why race as a sociohistorical construct has not traditionally been investigated in educational psychology research. To do so, we provide a historical discussion of the significance of race as well as present current dilemmas in the exploration of race, including an examination of the incidence and prevalence of…

  6. Students To Race Solar-Powered Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    4 1999 — Middle school students from across the state next week will race model solar cars designed Race Solar-Powered Vehicles For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., May 12 inches high. The 20-meter race is a double elimination competition with awards going to the five

  7. Simple model of the arms race

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zane, L.I.

    1982-01-01

    A simple model of a two-party arms race is developed based on the principle that the race will continue so long as either side can unleash an effective first strike against the other side. The model is used to examine how secrecy, the ABM, MIRV-ing, and an MX system affect the arms race

  8. Disciplinary discourses: rates of cesarean section explained by medicine, midwifery, and feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy Su May; Kirkman, Maggie

    2008-05-01

    In the context of international concern about increasing rates of cesarean sections, we used discourse analysis to examine explanations arising from feminism and the disciplines of medicine and midwifery, and found that each was positioned differently in relation to the rising rates. Medical discourses asserted that doctors are authorities on birth and that, although cesareans are sometimes medically necessary, women recklessly choose unnecessary cesareans against medical advice. Midwifery discourses portrayed medicine as paternalistic toward both women and midwifery, and feminist discourses situated birth and women's bodies in the context of a patriarchally structured society. The findings illustrate the complex ways in which this intervention in birth is discursively constructed, and demonstrate its significance as a site of disciplinary conflict.

  9. Gloria Anzaldúa, Mestiza Consciousness, and “Feminism of Difference”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Lima Costa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article situates Gloria Anzaldúa’s influential “La Conciencia de la mestiza / Towards a New Consciousness” within the history of feminism, focusing on her epistemological perspective of intersectional difference to articulate a politics of coalition against the exclusion of alterity from privileged sites of modernity construction, in both space and time. Drawing on various academic sources of Anzaldúa criticism, we highlight some important ways her theory of mestiza identity actually anticipates not only critiques of the concepts of the subject, difference and modernity but also distinctions between capitalist and critical versions of cultural hybridity, all of which require sensitivity to discourses of dehistoricization, cooptation and assimilation.

  10. The Feminization of Female Figures in Spanish Women's Poetry of the 1980s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Keefe Ugalde

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines how women poets appropriate and transform man-made biblical and literary figures—Eve, Lot's wife, and Ophelia—in order to express female meaning. Poetry by women published since the democratization of Spain in the late 1970s serves as the basis of the study. Three strategies of feminization stand out. Enhancement reflects the predicament of poets living roles imposed by male denomination, but sensing the presence of a silenced, imprisoned self. Subversion is aimed at dismantling patriarchally defined reality, and revision corresponds to the constructive task of self-discovery. Poets, for example, embrace Ophelia, recognizing that their desperation (like hers is rooted in patriarchal order, and subvert the image of Lot's wife into a demand for autonomy. Eve is revised to communicate the awareness that female subjectivity is closely bound to female eroticism, and perhaps most astonishingly, poor, helpless Ophelia comes to symbolize woman's new freedom and power to inscribe herself.

  11. Liberating minds: Consciousness-raising as a bridge between feminism and psychology in 1970s Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruck, Nora

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the interrelations between psychology and feminism in the work of feminist psychologists and radical feminists in Toronto in the early 1970s. For Canadian feminist psychology as well as for second-wave activism, Toronto was a particular hotspot. It was the academic home of some of the first Canadian feminist psychologists, and was the site of a lively scene of feminists working in established women's organizations along with younger socialist and radical feminists. This article analyzes the interrelations of academic feminist psychology and feminist activism by focusing on consciousness-raising, a practice that promised to bridge tensions between the personal and the political, psychological and social liberation, everyday knowledge and institutionalized knowledge production, theory and practice, as well as the women's movement and other spheres of women's lives. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Feminicídio: uma leitura a partir da perspectiva feminista

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Tania Teixeira Laky de

    2016-01-01

    Com este trabalho, pretendo formular um olhar sobre o fenômeno do feminicídio a partir das categorias de análise da diferença e hierarquia, entendidas no âmbito dos estudos feministas, tendo como motivação inicial o debate jurídico sobre a pertinência de legislação específica e sua efetividade na reversão das condições que motivam a violência contra as mulheres. The aim of this study is to formulate an approach on the femicide phenomenon from the analysis of the categories of difference an...

  13. Historicizing (bi)sexuality: a rejoinder for gay/lesbian studies, feminism, and queer theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, Steven

    2006-01-01

    One of the principal aims of queer theory has been to challenge heteronormative constructions of sexuality and to work the hetero/homosexual structure to the point of critical collapse. Despite an epistemic location within this very structure, however, the category of bisexuality has been largely marginalized and even erased from the deconstructive field of queer theory. This article explores some of the factors behind this treatment of bisexuality and suggests that bisexuality's marginalization and erasure brings into relief the strained relationship between the fields of gay/lesbian history, feminism, and queer theory. In exploring some early influential queer deconstructionist texts, it argues that in overlooking the role the category of bisexuality has played in the formation of the hetero/homosexual structure, the project of queer deconstruction has in important ways fallen short of its goals. The author concludes with a call to rethink conventional deconstructive reading practices.

  14. Between universal feminism and particular nationalism: politics, religion and gender (in)equality in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin-Kaddari, Ruth; Yadgar, Yaacov

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that one of the many "idiosyncrasies" of the Israeli case, namely Israel's continuing, violent conflict with its Arab neighbours, is of highly influential relevance to the issue of gender relations. Viewed by many Israeli Jews as a struggle for the very existence of the Jewish state, the Arab-Israeli conflict has overshadowed most other civil and social issues, rendering them "secondary" to the primary concern of securing the safe existence of the state. This has pushed such pressing issues as gender equality and women's rights aside, thus allowing for the perpetuation of discriminatory, sometimes rather repressive treatment of women in Israel. The most blatant expression of this is the turning of the struggle for civil marriage and divorce into a non-issue. Following a short introduction of the relevant political context, we discuss women's positivist and legal status, then conclude with an analysis of the women's movement, highlighting the emergence of religious feminism.

  15. WOMEN RESISTANCE TOWARD DISCRIMINATIONS: A MODERN LITERARY WORK ANALYSIS ON FEMINISM REVIEW IN BEKISAR MERAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujiono .

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to discover the discriminations against women in the Bekisar Merah novel and how they formulate resistance to those discriminations. To address the above objective, this study used descriptive qualitative research design with a feminism approach. Source of the data in this study was the second edition of Bekisar Merah novel written by Ahmad Tohari. The data included were words, phrases, sentences, and paragraphs on Bekisar Merah which portray womens discrimination toward Lasi, the women figure in the novel, and power types formulated by her who resisted the discrimination. To analyze the data, content analysis was applied. Triangulation was used to ensure the trustworthiness of the data. The result of the study showed eight forms of discriminations and three resistances. The discriminations were domestic abuse, molestation, gender harassment, seduction behavior, imposition, coercion, bribery, and subordination. The resistances were physically, mentally, and verbally.

  16. The Spanish Constitutional Rights Court and its interpretation of the Term 'Feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Germán Doldán

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Constitutional Tribunal, the highest judicial court involved in the interpretation of the Spanish Constitution, has issued numerous judgments of high technical value in order to advance gender equality. Its decisions had widely developed, as a guarantee, the prohibition of gender discrimination included in Article 14 of the Spanish Constitution. However, these decisions had not always employed theoretically accurate concepts or adequately refined conceptual models This article is a critical examination of the body of case law produced by the Constitutional Tribunal regarding the definition and interpretation of the terms feminism and feminist. The purpose is to determine whether the content given by the Tribunal to these terms matches the theoretical construct derived from the consolidated sociology of gender research or if, contrariwise, it reproduces the ideas and concepts of the patriarchal society that provides the context where these decisions were produced

  17. Feminization and marginalization? Women Ayurvedic doctors and modernizing health care in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Mary

    2010-03-01

    The important diversity of indigenous medical systems around the world suggests that gender issues, well understood for Western science, may differ in significant ways for non-Western science practices and are an important component in understanding how social dimensions of women's health care are being transformed by global biomedicine. Based on ethnographic research conducted with formally trained women Ayurvedic doctors in Nepal, I identify important features of medical knowledge and practice beneficial to women patients, and I discuss these features as potentially transformed by modernizing health care development. The article explores the indirect link between Ayurveda's feminization and its marginalization, in relation to modern biomedicine, which may evolve to become more direct and consequential for women's health in the country.

  18. Enhanced metabolic effect of erythropoietin and keto acids in CRF patients on low-protein diet: Czech multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplan, Vladimír; Schück, Otto; Knotek, Antonín; Hajný, Jan; Horácková, Miroslava; Kvapil, Milan

    2003-03-01

    Our study is designed to establish whether supplementation with erythropoietin (EPO) exerts additional beneficial metabolic effects in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) treated with keto acids (KAs) on a low-protein diet (LPD). A long-term, prospective, randomized study was designed to use three therapeutic protocols: (A) EPO plus KAs plus LPD (group I), (B) EPO plus LPD (group II), and (C) LPD (group III). One hundred eighty-six randomly selected patients (90 men, 96 women; age, 22 to 78 years) with a creatinine clearance of 22 to 36 mL/min were monitored at the beginning and at every 6 months for 3 years. During the study period, glomerular filtration rate measured as inulin clearance decreased slightly (from 26.2 +/- 3.4 to 23.4 +/- 4.1 mL/min in group I), 27.4 +/- 4.8 to 20.2 +/- 4.4 mL/min in group II, and 26.8 +/- 3.6 to 17.4 +/- 4.1 mL/min in group III; P < 0.01). Serum urea levels also declined (P < 0.01), more pronouncedly in group I (P < 0.025). In group I, there was a significant increase in levels of leucine (P < 0.01) and albumin (P < 0.01) and a decrease in proteinuria (P < 0.01). Analysis of the lipid spectrum showed a mild, yet significant, decrease in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P < 0.025), more pronounced in group I. In group I, there was a decrease in plasma triglyceride levels (from 362.85 +/- 115.05 mg/dL [4.1 +/- 1.3 mmol/L] to values as low as 203.55 +/- 70.80 mg/dL [2.3 +/- 0.8 mmol/L]; P < 0.01), whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased (from 34.75 +/- 7.72 mg/dL [0.9 +/- 0.2 mmol/L] to 46.33 +/- 7.72 mg/dL [1.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/L]; P < 0.025). Mean arterial blood pressure was stable. EPO supplementation in patients with CRF administered KAs potentiates the beneficial effects on metabolism of proteins, amino acids, and lipids. Long-term coadministration of EPO, KA, and LPD was associated with a delay in progression of renal failure and reduction in proteinuria.

  19. (Un)Disciplined futures: Women of color feminism as a disruptive to white affect studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rojas, Claudia

    2017-07-03

    The aim of this article is to demonstrate how women of color feminism predates and disrupts dominant dialogues in the field of White affect studies. I introduce the concept of White affect studies as an arena of inquiry that draws from Western-European theories and literatures and architects a sociopolitical structure of affect that positions White affects as universal. Scholars contributing to the field of White affect studies posit theories of affect, embodiment, subjectivity, phenomenology, violence, war, and more, while disregarding the theoretical contributions made by women of color feminism in thinking through these notions and social issues. This is done by engaging in a citational practice that results in an epistemic erasure of women of color feminist thought. The voices of women of color feminists are thus disqualified, and their theoretical contributions are not acknowledged as significant or relevant in conceptualizing affect, affective economies, and the social. By turning to the writings of women of color feminists, I demonstrate how their theories on embodiment, subjectivity, and social structures predate the institutionalization of White affect studies. Feminists of color from the past and present have and continue to theorize through a language of self their experiences as subjects embedded within matrices of violence, power, and pleasure. Lorde, Martinez, and Chinchilla write about the ways in which lesbian and queer women of color institute different affects that counter dominant structures of emotion, systems of power, and heterosexual modes of being. In developing conceptual methodologies, Lorde, Martinez, and Chinchilla are able to weave into the dominant discursive logic a language of self that both introduces new queer subjectivities, while reinterpreting existing forms of thought, thereby contesting mainstream economies of White affects and White affect studies. It is through a language of self that Lorde, Martinez, and Chinchilla develop

  20. Fronto-orbital feminization technique. A surgical strategy using fronto-orbital burring with or without eggshell technique to optimize the risk/benefit ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villepelet, A; Jafari, A; Baujat, B

    2018-05-04

    The demand for facial feminization is increasing in transsexual patients. Masculine foreheads present extensive supraorbital bossing with a more acute glabellar angle, whereas female foreheads show softer features. The aim of this article is to describe our surgical technique for fronto-orbital feminization. The mask-lift technique is an upper face-lift. It provides rejuvenation by correcting collapsed features, and fronto-orbital feminization through burring of orbital rims and lateral canthopexies. Depending on the size of the frontal sinus and the thickness of its anterior wall, frontal remodeling is achieved using simple burring or by means of the eggshell technique. Orbital remodeling comprises a superolateral orbital opening, a reduction of ridges and a trough at the lateral orbital rim to support the lateral canthopexy. Frontal, corrugator and procerus myectomies, plus minimal scalp excision, complete the surgery. Our technique results in significant, natural-looking feminization. No complications were observed in our series of patients. The eggshell technique is an alternative to bone flap on over-pneumatized sinus. Fronto-orbital feminization fits into a wider surgical strategy. It can be associated to rhinoplasty, genioplasty, mandibular angle remodeling, face lift and laryngoplasty. Achieving facial feminization in 2 or 3 stages improves psychological and physiological tolerance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Chaotic evolution of arms races

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomochi, Masaki; Kono, Mitsuo

    1998-12-01

    A new set of model equations is proposed to describe the evolution of the arms race, by extending Richardson's model with special emphases that (1) power dependent defensive reaction or historical enmity could be a motive force to promote armaments, (2) a deterrent would suppress the growth of armaments, and (3) the defense reaction of one nation against the other nation depends nonlinearly on the difference in armaments between two. The set of equations is numerically solved to exhibit stationary, periodic, and chaotic behavior depending on the combinations of parameters involved. The chaotic evolution is realized when the economic situation of each country involved in the arms race is quite different, which is often observed in the real world.

  2. Isolation and characterization of a replication-competent molecular clone of an HIV-1 circulating recombinant form (CRF33_01B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Keng Tee

    Full Text Available A growing number of emerging HIV-1 recombinants classified as circulating recombinant forms (CRFs have been identified in Southeast Asia in recent years, establishing a molecular diversity of increasing complexity in the region. Here, we constructed a replication-competent HIV-1 clone for CRF33_01B (designated p05MYKL045.1, a newly identified recombinant comprised of CRF01_AE and subtype B. p05MYKL045.1 was reconstituted by cloning of the near full-length HIV-1 sequence from a newly-diagnosed individual presumably infected heterosexually in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The chimeric clone, which contains the 5' LTR (long terminal repeat region of p93JP-NH1 (a previously isolated CRF01_AE infectious clone, showed robust viral replication in the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This clone demonstrated robust viral propagation and profound syncytium formation in CD4+, CXCR4-expressing human glioma NP-2 cells, indicating that p05MYKL045.1 is a CXCR4-using virus. Viral propagation, however, was not detected in various human T cell lines including MT-2, M8166, Sup-T1, H9, Jurkat, Molt-4 and PM1. p05MYKL045.1 appears to proliferate only in restricted host range, suggesting that unknown viral and/or cellular host factors may play a role in viral infectivity and replication in human T cell lines. Availability of a CRF33_01B molecular clone will be useful in facilitating the development of vaccine candidates that match the HIV-1 strains circulating in Southeast Asia.

  3. The CRF system mediates increased passive stress-coping behavior following the loss of a bonded partner in a monogamous rodent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Oliver J; Nair, Hemanth P; Ahern, Todd H; Neumann, Inga D; Young, Larry J

    2009-05-01

    Social relationships significantly influence physiology and behavior, including the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, anxiety, and mental health. Disruption of social bonds through separation or death often results in profound grieving, depression, and physical illness. As the monogamous prairie vole forms enduring, selective pair bonds with the mating partner, they provide an animal model to study the physiological consequences of pair bonding and, thus, the loss of the bonded partner. Male prairie voles were paired with a novel female or male sibling. After 5 days, half of the males of each group were separated from the partner. Elevated plus-maze, forced swim, and tail suspension tests were used to assess anxiety-like and passive stress-coping behaviors indicative of depressive-like behavior. Following 4 days of separation from the female but not the male partner, experimental males displayed increased passive stress-coping. This effect was abolished by long-term intracerebroventricular infusion of a nonselective corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist without disrupting the bond itself. Both CRF type 1 and 2 receptors were involved in the emergence of passive stress-coping behavior. Furthermore, pairing with a female was associated with elevated CRF mRNA in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and partner loss elicited a pronounced increase in circulating corticosteroid and adrenal weight. We speculate that the CRF system may mediate an aversive affect following separation from the female partner, which may facilitate proximity seeking between the pair-bonded individuals. Hence, the prairie vole model may provide insights into brain mechanisms involved in the psychopathological consequences of partner loss.

  4. Nucleic acid amplification of HIV-1 integrase sequence subtypes CRF01_AE and B for development of HIV anti-integrase drug resistance genotyping assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlar, F. R.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    To anticipate the potential use of anti-integrase drugs in Indonesia for treatment of HIV-1 infection, the development of a drug resistance genotyping assay for anti-integrase is crucial in identifying the genetic drug resistance profile of Indonesian HIV-1 strains. This experiment aimed to amplify a target region in the integrase gene of Indonesian HIV-1 subtypes CRF01_AE and B that contain genetic mutations known to confer resistance to anti-integrase drug. Eleven archived plasma samples from individuals living with HIV-1 were obtained from the Virology and Cancer Pathobiology Research Center for Health Service (VCPRC FKUI-RSCM) laboratory. One of the plasma samples contained HIV-1 subtype B, and the remaining plasma samples contained subtype CRF01_AE. The target regions for all samples were amplified through RT-PCR, with an annealing temperature of 55 °C, using the primer pair AE_POL 4086F and AE_POL 5232R that were designed by VCPRC FKUI-RSCM. The results of this experiment show that 18.2% (2/11) of the samples were successfully amplified using the one-step RT-PCR. While the primer pair was effective in amplifying the target region in the integrase gene sequence for subtype B (100%; 1/1), it had a low efficacy (10%, 1/10) for subtype CRF01_AE. In conclusion, the primer pair can be used to amplify the target region in Indonesian HIV-1 strain subtypes CRF01_AE and B. However, optimization of the PCR condition and an increased number of samples would help to determine an accurate representation of the efficacy of the primer pair.

  5. The spectre of race in American medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fofana, Mariam O

    2013-12-01

    Controversies and debates surrounding race have long been a fixture in American medicine. In the past, the biological concept of race-the idea that race is biologically determined and meaningful-has served to justify the institution of slavery and the conduct of unethical research trials. Although these days may seem far behind, contemporary debates over the race-specific approval of drugs and the significance of genetic differences are evidence that race still yields tremendous influence on medical research and clinical practice. In many ways, the use of race in medicine today reflects the internalisation of racial hierarchies borne out of the history of slavery and state-mandated segregation, and there is still much uncertainty over its benefits and harms. Although using race in research can help elucidate disparities, the reflexive use of race as a variable runs the risk of reifying the biological concept of race and blinding researchers to important underlying factors such as socioeconomic status. Similarly, in clinical practice, the use of race in assessing a patient's risk of certain conditions (eg, sickle cell) turns harmful when the heuristic becomes a rule. Through selected historical and contemporary examples, I aim to show how the biological concept of race that gave rise to past abuses remains alive and harmful, and propose changes in medical education as a potential solution. By learning from the past, today's physicians will be better armed to discern-and correct-the ways in which contemporary medicine perpetuates historical injustices.

  6. Drug-resistant molecular mechanism of CRF01_AE HIV-1 protease due to V82F mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Xiu, Zhilong; Hao, Ce

    2009-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery. The circulating recombinant form 01 A/E (CRF01_AE, abbreviated AE) subtype is one of the most common HIV-1 subtypes, which is infecting more humans and is expanding rapidly throughout the world. It is, therefore, necessary to develop inhibitors against subtype AE HIV-1 PR. In this work, we have performed computer simulation of subtype AE HIV-1 PR with the drugs lopinavir (LPV) and nelfinavir (NFV), and examined the mechanism of resistance of the V82F mutation of this protease against LPV both structurally and energetically. The V82F mutation at the active site results in a conformational change of 79's loop region and displacement of LPV from its proper binding site, and these changes lead to rotation of the side-chains of residues D25 and I50'. Consequently, the conformation of the binding cavity is deformed asymmetrically and some interactions between PR and LPV are destroyed. Additionally, by comparing the interactive mechanisms of LPV and NFV with HIV-1 PR we discovered that the presence of a dodecahydroisoquinoline ring at the P1' subsite, a [2-(2,6-dimethylphenoxy)acetyl]amino group at the P2' subsite, and an N2 atom at the P2 subsite could improve the binding affinity of the drug with AE HIV-1 PR. These findings are helpful for promising drug design.

  7. A Methyl-Balanced Diet Prevents CRF-Induced Prenatal Stress-Triggered Predisposition to Binge Eating-like Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Mariana; Jakovcevski, Mira; Polacheck, Tamar; Lebow, Maya; Drori, Yonat; Engel, Mareen; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Chen, Alon

    2017-06-06

    Binge eating (BE) is a common aberrant form of eating behavior, characterized by overconsumption of food in a brief period of time. Recurrent episodes of BE constitute the BE disorder, which mostly affects females and is associated with early-life adversities. Here, we show that corticotropin releasing factor (CRF)-induced prenatal stress (PNS) in late gestation predisposes female offspring to BE-like behavior that coincides with hypomethylation of hypothalamic miR-1a and downstream dysregulation of the melanocortin system through Pax7/Pax3. Moreover, exposing the offspring to a methyl-balanced diet during adolescence prevents the dysregulation and predisposition from being triggered. We demonstrate that gestational programming, per se, will not lead to BE-like behavior, but pre-existing alterations due to prenatal programming are revealed only when challenged during adolescence. We provide experimental evidence for long-term epigenetic abnormalities stemming from PNS in predisposing female offspring to BE disorder as well as a potential non-invasive prevention strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Race and Subprime Loan Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, Ruben; Owyang, Michael; Ghent, Andra

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate whether race and ethnicity influenced subprime loan pricing during 2005, the peak of the subprime mortgage expansion. We combine loan-level data on the performance of non-prime securitized mortgages with individual- and neighborhood-level data on racial and ethnic characteristics for metropolitan areas in California and Florida. Using a model of rate determination that accounts for predicted loan performance, we evaluate the presence of disparate impact and dispar...

  9. Construction and characterisation of a full-length infectious molecular clone from a fast replicating, X4-tropic HIV-1 CRF02.AG primary isolate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tebit, Denis M.; Zekeng, Leopold; Kaptue, Lazare; Kraeusslich, Hans-Georg; Herchenroeder, Ottmar

    2003-01-01

    Based on our previous analysis of HIV-1 isolates from Cameroon, we constructed a full-length infectious molecular clone from a primary isolate belonging to the CRF02.AG group of recombinant viruses which dominate the HIV-epidemic in West and Central Africa. The virus derived by transfection of the proviral clone pBD6-15 replicated with similar efficiency compared to its parental isolate and used CXCR4 as coreceptor as well. Furthermore, HIV-1 BD6-15 exhibited similar replication properties and virus yield as the reference B-type HIV-1 strain NL4-3. Sequence analysis revealed open reading frames for all structural and accessory genes apart from vpr. Phylogenetic and bootscanning analyses confirmed that BD6-15 clusters with CRF02.AG recombinant strains from West and Central Africa with similar cross-over points as described for the CRF02.AG prototype strain lbNG. Thus, pBD6-15 represents the first non-subtype B infectious molecular clone of a fast replicating, high producer, X4-tropic primary HIV-1 isolate, which had only been briefly passaged in primary cells

  10. Social instigation and repeated aggressive confrontations in male Swiss mice: analysis of plasma corticosterone, CRF and BDNF levels in limbic brain areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Madeira Fortes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Agonistic behaviors help to ensure survival, provide advantage in competition, and communicate social status. The resident-intruder paradigm, an animal model based on male intraspecific confrontations, can be an ethologically relevant tool to investigate the neurobiology of aggressive behavior. Objectives: To examine behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms of aggressive behavior in male Swiss mice exposed to repeated confrontations in the resident intruder paradigm. Methods: Behavioral analysis was performed in association with measurements of plasma corticosterone of mice repeatedly exposed to a potential rival nearby, but inaccessible (social instigation, or to 10 sessions of social instigation followed by direct aggressive encounters. Moreover, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF were measured in the brain of these animals. Control mice were exposed to neither social instigation nor aggressive confrontations. Results: Mice exposed to aggressive confrontations exhibited a similar pattern of species-typical aggressive and non-aggressive behaviors on the first and the last session. Moreover, in contrast to social instigation only, repeated aggressive confrontations promoted an increase in plasma corticosterone. After 10 aggressive confrontation sessions, mice presented a non-significant trend toward reducing hippocampal levels of CRF, which inversely correlated with plasma corticosterone levels. Conversely, repeated sessions of social instigation or aggressive confrontation did not alter BDNF concentrations at the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Conclusion: Exposure to repeated episodes of aggressive encounters did not promote habituation over time. Additionally, CRF seems to be involved in physiological responses to social stressors.

  11. Short Communication Phylogenetic Characterization of HIV Type 1 CRF01_AE V3 Envelope Sequences in Pregnant Women in Northern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caridha, Rozina; Ha, Tran Thi Thanh; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Hung, Pham Viet; Anh, Nguyen Mai; Bao, Nguyen Huy; Khang, Dinh Duy; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Cam, Phung Dac; Chiodi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Characterization of HIV-1 strains is important for surveillance of the HIV-1 epidemic. In Vietnam HIV-1-infected pregnant women often fail to receive the care they are entitled to. Here, we analyzed phylogenetically HIV-1 env sequences from 37 HIV-1-infected pregnant women from Ha Noi (n=22) and Hai Phong (n=15), where they delivered in 2005–2007. All carried CRF01_AE in the gp120 V3 region. In 21 women CRF01_AE was also found in the reverse transcriptase gene. We compared their env gp120 V3 sequences phylogenetically in a maximum likelihood tree to those of 198 other CRF01_AE sequences in Vietnam and 229 from neighboring countries, predominantly Thailand, from the HIV-1 database. Altogether 464 sequences were analyzed. All but one of the maternal sequences colocalized with sequences from northern Vietnam. The maternal sequences had evolved the least when compared to sequences collected in Ha Noi in 2002, as shown by analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous changes, than to other Vietnamese sequences collected earlier and/or elsewhere. Since the HIV-1 epidemic in women in Vietnam may still be underestimated, characterization of HIV-1 in pregnant women is important to observe how HIV-1 has evolved and follow its molecular epidemiology. PMID:21936713

  12. Sociality and the telencephalic distribution of corticotrophin-releasing factor, urocortin 3, and binding sites for CRF type 1 and type 2 receptors: A comparative study of eusocial naked mole-rats and solitary Cape mole-rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, Clive W; Kalamatianos, Theodosis; Oosthuizen, Maria K; Poorun, Ravi; Faulkes, Christopher G; Bennett, Nigel C

    2015-11-01

    Various aspects of social behavior are influenced by the highly conserved corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) family of peptides and receptors in the mammalian telencephalon. This study has mapped and compared the telencephalic distribution of the CRF receptors, CRF1 and CRF2 , and two of their ligands, CRF and urocortin 3, respectively, in African mole-rat species with diametrically opposed social behavior. Naked mole-rats live in large eusocial colonies that are characterized by exceptional levels of social cohesion, tolerance, and cooperation in burrowing, foraging, defense, and alloparental care for the offspring of the single reproductive female. Cape mole-rats are solitary; they tolerate conspecifics only fleetingly during the breeding season. The telencephalic sites at which the level of CRF1 binding in naked mole-rats exceeds that in Cape mole-rats include the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, hippocampal CA3 subfield, and dentate gyrus; in contrast, the level is greater in Cape mole-rats in the shell of the nucleus accumbens and medial habenular nucleus. For CRF2 binding, the sites with a greater level in naked mole-rats include the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus and dentate gyrus, but the septohippocampal nucleus, lateral septal nuclei, amygdalostriatal transition area, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and medial habenular nucleus display a greater level in Cape mole-rats. The results are discussed with reference to neuroanatomical and behavioral studies of various species, including monogamous and promiscuous voles. By analogy with findings in those species, we speculate that the abundance of CRF1 binding in the nucleus accumbens of Cape mole-rats reflects their lack of affiliative behavior. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Re-Theorizing Intimate Partner Violence through Post-Structural Feminism, Queer Theory, and the Sociology of Gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Cannon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we apply three theoretical frameworks, poststructural feminism, queer, and sociology of gender to the issue of intimate partner violence (IPV in order to better account for heterosexual female perpetration and same-sex IPV. Although the traditional feminist paradigm—that assumes men use violence as an extension of patriarchy against their female victims—has been useful in explaining some instances of IPV, it does not adequately frame instances of heterosexual female perpetration and IPV in same-sex relationships. Therefore, in this article we seek to add to existing literature by re-theorizing IPV using poststructural feminism, queer, and sociology of gender perspectives, and their attendant understanding of power as dynamic, fluid, and relational and gender as both interactional and structural, in order to open up new ways of framing IPV and encourage new lines of empirical research resulting in better policy proscriptions and treatment interventions.

  14. Feminism put to the Test by Nuclear Catastrophe. Mothers, Nature, and Care in Post-Fukushima Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonon, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear catastrophe in Fukushima raised fundamental questions regarding the care of human beings, but also of the earth itself. Examining the care practices currently being applied in the Fukushima area seems to be a very effective tool for understanding what is being experimented with in terms of the relationships between nature and human beings. However, the usual conceptual frameworks available appear to be of no help. In this article, some possible conceptual attempts are critically explored to suggest that the dominant trends in Japanese feminism, which are divided between maternalism and anti-maternalism, and eco-feminism, which tends to imagine a typically Japanese nature, are not offering the proper analytical tools that might allow us to understand the reality of care in an irradiated environment. The nuclear catastrophe has triggered a crisis in feminist knowledge

  15. Feminicídios: estudo em capitais e municípios brasileiros de grande porte populacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Nazareth Meneghel

    Full Text Available Resumo Este estudo objetiva analisar a relação entre feminicídios e indicadores socioeconômicos, demográficos, de acesso e saúde em capitais e municípios brasileiros de grande porte populacional. Trata-se de um estudo ecológico que utilizou o coeficiente médio padronizado da mortalidade feminina por agressão como marcador de feminicídio nos triênios de 2007-2009 e 2011-2013. Para a análise estatística foi utilizado o teste de Correlação de Pearson entre o desfecho e 17 variáveis independentes, e as que apresentaram significância estatística (p < 0,05 foram introduzidas em um modelo de regressão linear multivariada, método Backward. No primeiro triênio a taxa média de feminicídio foi de 4,5 óbitos por 100 mil mulheres, e no segundo período foi de 4,9/100 mil. Pobreza (β = -0,330; p = 0,006, pentecostalismo (β = 0,237; p = 0,002 e mortalidade masculina por agressão (β = 0,841; p = 0,000 estiveram associados aos feminicídios. A associação negativa entre pobreza e mortes femininas indica uma relação paradoxal, na medida em que as mulheres que morrem nas regiões mais ricas são pobres em sua maioria. Ainda, encontrou-se relação entre violência de gênero, fundamentalismos e violência urbana.

  16. The question of women and environment in the Sudan: inquiries into eco-feminism and feminist environmentalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageeb, S A

    1994-12-01

    This article discusses a theoretical framework suggested by Agarwal on eco-feminism in the context of Sudan and the Kordofam region of Sudan. The paper focuses specifically on one aspect of eco-feminism that is discussed by Shiva (1988). Eco-feminism is the link between the domination and suppression of women and the domination and exploitation of nature. Women are identified with nature, while men are closer to culture, which places women in an inferior position. Because of the link of women with nature, women have a vested interest in restructuring the domination of nature. Feminism and environmentalism both reflect egalitarian and nonhierarchical systems. This analysis tests whether women are the central actors of environment and whether women's and environmental interests can be advanced simultaneously. The Indian experience reflects the class and gender process that results in loss of knowledge and livelihoods among poor rural women. The impact is related to the interaction between ideology and political and economic power. Grass-roots resistance to environmental degradation is strong, and women are engaged due to threats to survival. Sudanese women's role, position, status, and relation to the environment is shaped by the patriarchal order, class, ethnicity, and the sexual division of labor. The Shiva concepts apply to Sudan and the Kordofan region. The marginalization of traditional farming and pastoralism has pushed the growing population into marginal environmental zones. The focus on cash-oriented development, political instability, and insufficient and corrupt bureaucracies have aggravated the environmental crisis. Social inequality has increased. Shiva's theories do not fit Sudanese society and Agarwal's perspective is too general. Some Sudanese women have accumulated wealth, commercial interests, and exploited land.

  17. Unattainable goals, middle class fantasies: an ethnography of women's work in feminized retail banking in Istanbul, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Topçu, Berra; Topcu, Berra

    2012-01-01

    Drawing from a workplace ethnography among women professionals in the increasingly feminized lower echelons of commercial bank branches (so-called retail banking) in Istanbul, Turkey, this thesis is an examination of women’s affective labor and the construction of white-collar subjectivities. Given the performance criteria of professionalism, productivity, efficiency, and individualism as part of neoliberal discourses for attaining the ideal of the white-collar woman in the retail bank, how a...

  18. Supporting the underdog: feminism, animal rights and citizenship in the work of Alice Morgan Wright and Edith Goode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, L

    2000-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the overlap between feminism and animal causes, particularly through the lives of two women, the sculptor, Alice Morgan Wright (1881-1975), and her friend, Edith Goode (1882-1970). Feminism and animal causes had connections in the late nineteenth century, particularly in campaigns to abolish vivisection. Wright and Goode held to these politics throughout their lives, and were "precursors of a generation yet to come" who would argue the connections - as many ecofeminists do today. Both women were involved in suffrage campaigns, and continued to be involved in women's organisations such as the National Woman's Party. They were, however, opposed to all injustice, including human mistreatment of animals. Feminism was, to Wright and Goode, part of a wider set of problems; animal cruelty reflected a greater barbarism leading to mistreatment of humans. Accordingly, they actively campaigned for legislation to protect animals and the environment, and lobbied the fledgling United Nations to include such measures. That challenge to the United Nations represented a unique attempt to bring animals into citizenship' a move being made again today, through initiatives such as the Great Ape Project.

  19. The feminization of HPV: How science, politics, economics and gender norms shaped U.S. HPV vaccine implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Daley

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV can cause a number of anogenital cancers (i.e., cervical, penile, anal, vaginal, vulvar and genital warts. A decade ago, the HPV vaccine was approved, and has been shown to be a public health achievement that can reduce the morbidity and mortality for HPV-associated diseases. Yet, the mistaken over-identification of HPV as a female-specific disease has resulted in the feminization of HPV and HPV vaccines. In this critical review, we trace the evolution of the intersection of science, politics, economics and gender norms during the original HPV vaccine approval, marketing era, and implementation. Given the focus on cervical cancer screening, women were identified as bearing the burden of HPV infection and its related illnesses, and the group responsible for prevention. We also describe the consequences of the feminization of HPV, which has resulted primarily in reduced protection from HPV-related illnesses for males. We propose a multilevel approach to normalizing HPV vaccines as an important aspect of overall health for both genders. This process must engage multiple stakeholders, including providers, parents, patients, professional organizations, public health agencies, policymakers, researchers, and community-based organizations. Keywords: HPV vaccination, Feminization, Critical review

  20. "Our power to remodel civilization": the development of eugenic feminism in Alberta, 1909-1921.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    In addition to being a prominent political figure in equal rights legislation, Emily Murphy was a vital contributor to programs which sought to improve the human race through forced sterilization. These negative aspects of this period in feminist history tend to be described as outside of the women's sphere, representing instead the patriarchal realm of men. However, both eugenics and the first-wave feminist ambitions for equal political rights were connected through an agrarian construction of "mothers of the race." As "mothers of the race," women in Alberta were responsible for the physical and moral betterment of the nation, and were directly engaged in concepts of intelligent motherhood, healthy childhood, and an overarching moral philosophy that was politically driven.

  1. High prevalence of HIV-1 CRF01_AE viruses among female commercial sex workers residing in Surabaya, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Tomohiro; Khairunisa, Siti Qamariyah; Sukartiningrum, Septhia Dwi; Arfijanto, M Vitanata; Utsumi, Takako; Normalina, Irine; Handajani, Retno; Widiyanti, Prihartini; Rusli, Musofa; Rahayu, Retno Pudji; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Nasronudin; Kameoka, Masanori

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) cause serious health problems and have an impact on the Indonesian economy. In addition, the rapid epidemic growth of HIV is continuing in Indonesia. Commercial sex plays a significant role in the spread of HIV; therefore, in order to reveal the current HIV prevalence rate among commercial sex workers (CSWs), we conducted an epidemiological study on HIV infection among CSWs residing in Surabaya, the capital of East Java province of Indonesia with large communities of CSWs. The prevalence of HIV infection among 200 CSWs was studied. In addition, the subtype of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) and the prevalence of other blood-borne viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and GB virus C (GBV-C), were studied. The prevalence rates of HIV, hepatitis B core antibody, hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV antibodies and anti-GBV-C antibodies were 11%, 64%, 4%, 0.5% and 0% among CSWs involved in this study, respectively. HIV-1 CRF01_AE viral gene fragments were detected in most HIV-positive samples. In addition, most CSWs showed low awareness of sexually transmitted diseases and had unprotected sex with their clients. The HIV prevalence rate among CSWs was significantly higher than that among the general population in Indonesia (0.2-0.4%). In addition, CSWs were at a high risk of exposure to HBV, although chronic HBV infection was less frequently established. Our results suggest the necessity of efficient prevention programs for HIV and other blood-borne viral infections among CSWs in Surabaya, Indonesia.

  2. High prevalence of HIV-1 CRF01_AE viruses among female commercial sex workers residing in Surabaya, Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Kotaki

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS cause serious health problems and have an impact on the Indonesian economy. In addition, the rapid epidemic growth of HIV is continuing in Indonesia. Commercial sex plays a significant role in the spread of HIV; therefore, in order to reveal the current HIV prevalence rate among commercial sex workers (CSWs, we conducted an epidemiological study on HIV infection among CSWs residing in Surabaya, the capital of East Java province of Indonesia with large communities of CSWs.The prevalence of HIV infection among 200 CSWs was studied. In addition, the subtype of HIV type 1 (HIV-1 and the prevalence of other blood-borne viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and GB virus C (GBV-C, were studied. The prevalence rates of HIV, hepatitis B core antibody, hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV antibodies and anti-GBV-C antibodies were 11%, 64%, 4%, 0.5% and 0% among CSWs involved in this study, respectively. HIV-1 CRF01_AE viral gene fragments were detected in most HIV-positive samples. In addition, most CSWs showed low awareness of sexually transmitted diseases and had unprotected sex with their clients.The HIV prevalence rate among CSWs was significantly higher than that among the general population in Indonesia (0.2-0.4%. In addition, CSWs were at a high risk of exposure to HBV, although chronic HBV infection was less frequently established. Our results suggest the necessity of efficient prevention programs for HIV and other blood-borne viral infections among CSWs in Surabaya, Indonesia.

  3. Arms races between and within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, R; Krebs, J R

    1979-09-21

    An adaptation in one lineage (e.g. predators) may change the selection pressure on another lineage (e.g. prey), giving rise to a counter-adaptation. If this occurs reciprocally, an unstable runaway escalation or 'arms race' may result. We discuss various factors which might give one side an advantage in an arms race. For example, a lineage under strong selection may out-evolve a weakly selected one (' the life-dinner principle'). We then classify arms races in two independent ways. They may be symmetric or asymmetric, and they may be interspecific or intraspecific. Our example of an asymmetric interspecific arms race is that between brood parasites and their hosts. The arms race concept may help to reduce the mystery of why cuckoo hosts are so good at detecting cuckoo eggs, but so bad at detecting cuckoo nestlings. The evolutionary contest between queen and worker ants over relative parental investment is a good example of an intraspecific asymmetric arms race. Such cases raise special problems because the participants share the same gene pool. Interspecific symmetric arms races are unlikely to be important, because competitors tend to diverge rather than escalate competitive adaptations. Intraspecific symmetric arms races, exemplified by adaptations for male-male competition, may underlie Cope's Rule and even the extinction of lineages. Finally we consider ways in which arms races can end. One lineage may drive the other to extinction; one may reach an optimum, thereby preventing the other from doing so; a particularly interesting possibility, exemplified by flower-bee coevolution, is that both sides may reach a mutual local optimum; lastly, arms races may have no stable and but may cycle continuously. We do not wish necessarily to suggest that all, or even most, evolutionary change results from arms races, but we do suggest that the arms race concept may help to resolve three long-standing questions in evolutionary theory.

  4. Ground effect aerodynamics of racing cars

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xin; Toet, Willem; Zerihan, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We review the progress made during the last thirty years on ground effect aerodynamics associated with race cars, in particular open wheel race cars. Ground effect aerodynamics of race cars is concerned with generating downforce, principally via low pressure on the surfaces nearest to the ground. The “ground effected” parts of an open wheeled car's aerodynamics are the most aerodynamically efficient and contribute less drag than that associated with, for example, an upper rear wing. Whilst dr...

  5. Ultracold fermion race is on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulet, R.

    1999-01-01

    At the quantum level, particles behave very differently depending on whether their spin angular momentum is an integer or a half-integer. Half-integer spin particles are known as fermions, and include all the constituents of atoms: electrons, protons and neutrons. Bosons, on the other hand, are particles with integer spin, such as photons. Atoms are fermions if they are composed of an odd number of particles, like helium-3 or lithium-6. If they have an even number of constituents, like hydrogen, helium-4 or lithium-7, they are known as bosons. Fermions and bosons behave in profoundly different ways under certain conditions, especially at low temperatures. Four years ago, physicists created a Bose condensate, a quantum degenerate gas of bosons. Now the race is on to do the same with fermions. Deborah Jin's group at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado has cooled a fermion gas to the lowest temperature yet (B DeMarco 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4208). And John Thomas and co-workers at Duke University have set a new record for the length of time that fermions can be trapped using lasers (K O'Hara 1999 Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 4204). In this article the author describes the latest advances in the race to create a quantum degenerate gas of fermions. (UK)

  6. Antagonism of GABA-B but not GABA-A receptors in the VTA prevents stress- and intra-VTA CRF-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacktop, Jordan M; Vranjkovic, Oliver; Mayer, Matthieu; Van Hoof, Matthew; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R

    2016-03-01

    Stress-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking requires corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) actions in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). However the mechanisms through which CRF regulates VTA function to promote cocaine use are not fully understood. Here we examined the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in the VTA mediated by GABA-A or GABA-B receptors in the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking by a stressor, uncontrollable intermittent footshock, or bilateral intra-VTA administration of CRF. Rats underwent repeated daily cocaine self-administration (1.0 mg/kg/ing; 14 × 6 h/day) and extinction and were tested for reinstatement in response to footshock (0.5 mA, 0.5" duration, average every 40 s; range 10-70 s) or intra-VTA CRF delivery (500 ng/side) following intra-VTA pretreatment with the GABA-A antagonist, bicuculline, the GABA-B antagonist, 2-hydroxysaclofen or vehicle. Intra-VTA bicuculline (1, 10 or 20 ng/side) failed to block footshock- or CRF-induced cocaine seeking at either dose tested. By contrast, 2-hydroxysaclofen (0.2 or 2 μg/side) prevented reinstatement by both footshock and intra-VTA CRF at a concentration that failed to attenuate food-reinforced lever pressing (45 mg sucrose-sweetened pellets; FR4 schedule) in a separate group of rats. These data suggest that GABA-B receptor-dependent CRF actions in the VTA mediate stress-induced cocaine seeking and that GABA-B receptor antagonists may have utility for the management of stress-induced relapse in cocaine addicts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Black Feminism: What Women of Color Went Through in Toni Morrison’s Selected Novels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayda Rahmani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines two of Toni Morrison’s novels, The Bluest Eye and Beloved in the lights of black feminism, racism, realism and naturalism. It is an attempt to reflect the powerlessness, inhumanity, and pains that women of color went through.  By using a feminist racist and naturalist filter,  a descriptive-analytical method of study and by analyzing the situations, the characters and themes, the status of women of color  in Literature based on Morrison’s selected  novels are revealed and represented. Morrison very well describes how different women characters react and respond differently to the injustice and the inhumanity imposed on them through for example the contrasting nature of Sethe in Beloved and Pauline in The Bluest Eye. She depicts the bravery and courage in Sethe , the self-absorbedness in Pauline and the passiveness in Pecola all of which raise powerful questions regarding black-women’s self-identity, self-concept, and  struggles to achieve freedom as a living being if not a human being: a path which will deepen our understanding of  women issues in general. The researcher believes that a womanish and racist study of the selected novels would contribute to broaden our views of humanity. The researcher selected women of color because she thinks the sorrows of black women, and the pains and toils they went through have always been deeper than those of the white ones.

  8. The feminization of foreign currency earnings: women's labor in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinghe, V

    1998-01-01

    This paper considers women's participation in foreign currency earning activities in Sri Lanka. The author first analyzes the structure of women's participation patterns in the major foreign currency earning activities in the country, including consideration of their wage levels and the impact of ethnicity, age, educational levels, and skills upon the different components of those activities in which women participate. She then probes the applicability for Sri Lanka of Guy Standing's argument that structural adjustment policies (SAP) have triggered a change in labor force practices leading to a feminization through flexible labor. Many studies have shown that cutbacks in subsidies mandated by SAPs and initiated in the 1980s among developing countries have adversely affected poor women. Women have adjusted to the new situation in a variety of ways, ranging from cutting their household budgets for basic needs to seeking income-generating work in the informal sector and participating in labor-intensive manufacturing activities. In closing, the author assesses the degree to which the new demands made upon women resulting from the effect of SAPs upon their households have stimulated women's increasing participation in foreign currency earning activities.

  9. Breastfeeding and feminism: A focus on reproductive health, rights and justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbok, Miriam H; Smith, Paige Hall; Taylor, Emily C

    2008-01-01

    The annual Breastfeeding and Feminism Symposia aim to reposition breastfeeding as a valued part of women's (re)productive lives and rights. The symposia are designed to raise the profile of breastfeeding within the women's advocacy and feminist studies' communities, and to increase recognition among breastfeeding supporters that breastfeeding promotion could receive more socio-political support by partnering with those concerned with women's reproductive health, rights and justice, women's economic advancement, and the elimination of social, economic and health inequities. The third symposium (2007) sought to build dialogue and increase communications between and among these diverse communities. The nine articles presented in this thematic series were selected by the journal editors, and represent the core discussions at the symposium. This editorial presents the areas of synergy and strategies for action that emerged from the discussions. These strategies and this thematic issue are intended to reassert the momentum that evolved among participants, and to stimulate involvement among individuals and organizations not in attendance in promoting breastfeeding as a women's reproductive health, rights and justice concern. PMID:18680575

  10. Dignity in health-care: a critical exploration using feminism and theories of recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Kay; Jones, Andrea

    2010-09-01

    Growing concerns over undignified health-care has meant the concept of dignity is currently much discussed in the British National Health Service. This has led to a number of policies attempting to reinstate dignity as a core ethical value governing nursing practice and health-care provision. Yet these initiatives continue to draw upon a concept of dignity which remains reliant upon a depoliticised, ahistorical and decontexualised subject. In this paper, we argue the need to revise the dignity debate through the lens of feminism and theories of recognition. Postmodern feminist theories provide major challenges to what remain dominant liberal approaches as they pay attention to the contingent, reflexive, and affective aspects of care work. Theories of recognition provide a further critical resource for understanding how moral obligations and responsibilities towards others and our public and private responses to difference arise. This re-situates dignity as a highly contested and politicised concept involving complex moral deliberations and diverse political claims of recognition. The dignity debate is thus moved beyond simplistic rational injunctions to care, or to care more, and towards critical discussions of complex politicised, moral practices infused with power that involve the recognition of difference in health-care.

  11. O sujeito no feminismo: revisitando os debates Revisiting the debates on the subject in feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia de Lima Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente artigo, examino a condição disciplinar do sujeito no feminismo, sua identidade ambivalente e sua capacidade de agenciamento à luz das discussões sobre identidade, diferença, lugar e enunciação articulados pelas teorias feministas pós-estruturalistas. Tendo em vista que não podemos abordar questões sobre o(s sujeito(s e sua(s identidade(s sem examinarmos os vetores constitutivos dos mesmos, exploro como as teorias feministas têm sido capazes de oferecer definições alternativas (de uma maior positividade do sujeito e da identidade que, mesmo que se apoiando na inevitabilidade epistemológica da desconstrução desses, resistem ao perigo de esvaziá-los de qualquer materialidade.In the present article I revisit the disciplinary status of the subject in feminism, its ambivalent identity and its potential for agency in light of the debates on identity, difference, and the notion of place of enunciation articulated by recent poststructuralist feminist theories. Since one cannot broach questions about the subject and its identity without analyzing their constitutive vectors, in this essay I explore how feminist theories have articulated alternative and more positive accounts of the subject and identity which, without abandoning the epistemological inevitability of the subject's de-construction, nonetheless resist the danger of emptying it of any materiality.

  12. Feminization of the fat distribution pattern of children and adolescents in a recent German population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Christiane; Dammhahn, Melanie

    2017-09-10

    During the early 1990s, the economic and political situation in eastern Germany changed overnight. Here, we use the rare chance of an experiment-like setting in humans and aim to test whether the rapid change of environmental conditions in eastern Germany in the 1990s led to a change in the sex-specific fat distribution pattern, an endocrine-influenced phenotypic marker. Based on a cross-sectional data set of 6- to 18-year-old girls and boys measured between 1982-1991 and 1997-2012, we calculated a skinfold ratio of triceps to subscapular and percentage of body fat. Using linear regressions, we tested for differences in percentage of body fat and skinfold ratio between these two time periods. We found that the percentage of body fat increased in boys and girls, and they accumulated relatively more fat on extremities than on the trunk in all BMI groups measured after 1997 as compared to those measured between 1982 and 1991. Concurrent with drastic and rapid changes of environmental conditions, the body fat distribution of children and adolescents changed to a more feminized pattern during the early 1990s in an East German population. The changes in this endocrinologically mediated pattern might be associated with the increased exposure of individuals to endocrine-disrupting chemicals which are known to influence the endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems in animals and humans. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Choices and life chances: feminism and the politics of generational change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Deborah; Everingham, Christine; Robinson, Penelope

    2011-01-01

    The perception that young women are disengaged from feminist politics has provoked a great deal of tension between feminist generations. Recent feminist research into generational change has largely avoided this tension by focusing on the shifting meanings of feminism and the discrepancy between young women's reluctance to identify as “feminists” and their general acceptance of feminist attitudes toward gender issues. Nevertheless, in an era when gender equity goals seem to be if not slipping backwards then lacking urgency, young women are less likely to identify with a collective feminist politics than are older women. Underpinned by the findings of a major study of the attitudes toward work, family, and retirement of three generations of Australian women, this paper develops an approach that helps explain this reluctance. Drawing on the work of Karl Mannheim, the paper suggests that the cultural currents shaping the consciousness of different generations of women impact significantly on gender identity. The implications of this cultural shift are considered in the context of feminist politics and the contemporary “culture wars.”

  14. Rethinking the Change: Italian Feminism Between Crisis and Critique of Politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Dominijanni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available I think of the kinds of questions that I’ve heard female researchers and students ask of Italian feminism in Sydney, Melbourne and Auckland. I think of a certain ease of dialogue between men and feminists that is less suspicious than what we’re used to in Italy. There is an openness to the other and to otherness, which might derive from Australia being a multicultural society. The relativisation of Europe, and even more so of Italy, happens spontaneously when looked at from Australia with Asia in between. All this adds up to an ‘Australian Effect’ that has profoundly changed me and that in turn changes my way of talking about the ‘Italian Effect’. I am therefore writing from within a relationship to this context that already marks me, questions me and dislocates me, and my intention is to yield not so much a thought as a practice of thought, born and bred in close proximity to a political practice.

  15. The dynamics of female self-identification conceptions: from modernism to postmodernist feminism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е Е Agafonova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of new contradictions between the personality and society, including the accentuation of the problem of human being's identity and self-identification have been engendered by globalization. Whereas formerly the individual enjoyed a stable set of norms, values, and motivations determining his identity structure, nowadays social institutions bearing responsibility for the stable identity development are experiencing transformations and fail to accomplish their functions to the full extent or are actually in complete collapse. The social, economic and political status of woman has undergone the most drastic transformations resulting in pivotal changes of her identity structure and identification processes. Under the contemporary circumstances the old-fashioned modernist views and ideas about the role, status, and position of women, the traditional patterns of behaviour and value judgments turn out to be inappropriate. One can state that the classical ideas of women's self-identification are old and tired version and now it is time for a new apprehension of this significant process. The problem of identity and self-identification has been handled in a particular way both in the framework of postmodernist theories and in terms of contemporary feminist conceptions. The theorists of postmodernist feminism have put forward a sufficiently interesting and important project reconsidering female/gender identity structure as well as female identification/self-identification processes.

  16. In Exchange for Feminism: “Successful” Girls and “Gendered” Neo-Liberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerija Vendramin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to show predominant trends in discussions about gender equality in education today. It appears that the coordinates are more and more fixed: standardized international approaches in educational research are closely connected with political and economic imperatives. The issue of gender equality in education is put aside, as the success of girls in international testing presumably attests to the achieved gender equality. The parties in question are now the “post-feminist successful girls” on one side and the “failing boys” on the other. The author shows that the “rhetoric” of equal opportunities stems from a greatly narrowed focus on what gender means in terms of equality in education. This analysis is complemented with a wider view of the post-feminist landscape (in which feminism is seen as no longer needed, more and more marked by the neoliberal logic of practicality in the context of accountability; wider educational goals are disregarded completely. These developments toward neoliberal discourse of excellence have already been analyzed in detail in the Anglo-American tradition, but Slovenia has also followed in these footsteps, together with the promotion of the culture of standards and achievements.

  17. Feminismus: gestern – heute – und überhaupt? Feminism: yesterday—today—and at all?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Peters

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Feminismus für Eilige will, der Titel deutet es an, einen raschen Überblick über Geschichte und Theorie der feministischen Bewegung(en sein. Margret Karsch leitet her, aus welchen politischen Fragen die Frauenbewegung entstanden ist, welche wesentlichen Strömungen es gibt und mit welchen theoretischen Grundlagen und Strategien diese hantieren. Ihr ist ein instruktives, gut lesbares Buch gelungen, das als Einführung mit zahlreichen Namen und Daten glänzt.Feminismus für Eilige (Feminism for the Hurried intends to be, as the title suggests, a quick overview of the history and theory of the feminist movement(s. Margret Karsch deduces out of which political questions the women’s movement has developed, which fundamental currents there are, and with which theoretical fundaments and strategies these juggle. She succeeds in presenting an instructive, interesting to read book that shines as an introduction with numerous names and dates.

  18. Postmodern Feminism: Cultural Trauma in Construction of Female Identities in Virginia Woolf's The Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Baradaran Jamili

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The present article sheds new light on trauma as a devastating phenomenon respecting the construction of male and female characters' identities and reveals reconstruction of male and female identities in Virginia Woolf's (1882-1941 The Waves (1931. Trauma is defined as an unexpected event that leaves the most terrible marks on the person's self, identity, psyche, emotions, beliefs, etc. Individual trauma is diagnosed by the male and female characters' horrendous responses regarded as post-traumatic stress disorder in terms of a distressing recollection of the traumatic occurrence. In contrast, cultural trauma, like patriarchy, gender, or sexual difference which has a horrific influence on cultures, can encompass traumatically the collective identity of male and female characters. In The Waves, the characters such as Rhoda, Jinny, and Susan get involved in the struggle for the self-definition relating to their collective and individual identities, respectively. No wonder, this article exploits an integrated method of feminism and psycho-trauma. It contextualizes the ideologies of postmodern feminist critics, such as Judith Butler (1956-, Helene Cixous (1937-, Cathy Caruth (1955-, and Luce Irigaray (1930-. Woolf, de facto, reveals how trauma as a catastrophe, either individual or collective, affects shockingly male and female characters' identities, so that their physical and psychological responses can be analyzed in terms of diagnosis of the trauma and its aftermath.

  19. Breastfeeding and feminism: a focus on reproductive health, rights and justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbok, Miriam H; Smith, Paige Hall; Taylor, Emily C

    2008-08-04

    The annual Breastfeeding and Feminism Symposia aim to reposition breastfeeding as a valued part of women's (re)productive lives and rights. The symposia are designed to raise the profile of breastfeeding within the women's advocacy and feminist studies' communities, and to increase recognition among breastfeeding supporters that breastfeeding promotion could receive more socio-political support by partnering with those concerned with women's reproductive health, rights and justice, women's economic advancement, and the elimination of social, economic and health inequities. The third symposium (2007) sought to build dialogue and increase communications between and among these diverse communities. The nine articles presented in this thematic series were selected by the journal editors, and represent the core discussions at the symposium. This editorial presents the areas of synergy and strategies for action that emerged from the discussions. These strategies and this thematic issue are intended to reassert the momentum that evolved among participants, and to stimulate involvement among individuals and organizations not in attendance in promoting breastfeeding as a women's reproductive health, rights and justice concern.

  20. Feminism and psychology: analysis of a half-century of research on women and gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagly, Alice H; Eaton, Asia; Rose, Suzanna M; Riger, Stephanie; McHugh, Maureen C

    2012-04-01

    Starting in the 1960s, feminists argued that the discipline of psychology had neglected the study of women and gender and misrepresented women in its research and theories. Feminists also posed many questions worthy of being addressed by psychological science. This call for research preceded the emergence of a new and influential body of research on gender and women that grew especially rapidly during the period of greatest feminist activism. The descriptions of this research presented in this article derive from searches of the journal articles cataloged by PsycINFO for 1960-2009. These explorations revealed (a) a concentration of studies in basic research areas investigating social behavior and individual dispositions and in many applied areas, (b) differing trajectories of research on prototypical topics, and (c) diverse theoretical orientations that authors have not typically labeled as feminist. The considerable dissemination of this research is evident in its dispersion beyond gender-specialty journals into a wide range of other journals, including psychology's core review and theory journals, as well as in its coverage in introductory psychology textbooks. In this formidable body of research, psychological science has reflected the profound changes in the status of women during the last half-century and addressed numerous questions that these changes have posed. Feminism served to catalyze this research area, which grew beyond the bounds of feminist psychology to incorporate a very large array of theories, methods, and topics.

  1. Digital Feminisms and the Impasse: Time, Disappearance, and Delay in Neoliberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hester Baer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This collaborative essay considers the way feminist activism takes shape in the context of time-based feminist performance art. We argue that the formal and aesthetic interventions into digital culture of Noah Sow, Chicks on Speed, and Hito Steyerl articulate political resistance within feminist impasses and neoliberal circularities. Our analysis focuses on how these artists engage digital platforms to make visible otherwise imperceptible aspects of the present, including consumerism, wellness, imperial warfare as crisis ordinariness, and modes of digital hypervisibility, perception, and representation. Not only do these works uncover, grapple with, and potentially dissolve the bind of feminism, but they also work against the imperceptibility of neoliberalism as second nature or common sense. In the form of this essay (with comment bubbles and hyperlinks, we highlight our process of thinking about these works and expose the collaborative process of feminist academic writing in the digital age as yet another form of searching for spaces of political resistance and solidarity. Should be viewed with current versions of Firefox, Safari, or Adobe PDF viewer/reader.

  2. Bypassing Islamism and Feminism: Women’s Resistance and Rebellion in Post-revolutionary Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Sadeghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the reason behind the crisis of representation in post-revolutionary competing Iranian gender discourses. These competing discourses include Islamic fundamentalism, religious revisionism, and secular feminism. The crisis of representation is related to at least three main presuppositions and attendant action programs: first, discrimination against women and possible accommodations should be examined in the context of religious and legal institutions. This approach resulted in the depoliticization of women’s issues, even though most Iranian women have persistently proclaimed equality and citizenship through political participation. This was the case for the 1979 Islamic Revolution, the reform movement and most recently, the Green Movement following the 2009 presidential election. The second presupposition is that individual identity is a fundamental condition for socio-political activism. The third presupposition is that discrimination against women in post-revolutionary Iran is essentially a legalist strategy and has resulted in campaigns that failed to address women’s daily challenges. On the contrary, women’s political participation in post-revolutionary Iran shows that gender issues are always political issues and need to be understood politically and politicized. Such a notion challenges attitudes which relegate gender discrimination and social solutions to the purview of religion or secularism.

  3. Elevating the Role of Race in Ethnographic Research: Navigating Race Relations in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Keffrelyn D.

    2011-01-01

    Little work in the social sciences or in the field of education has fully explored the methodological issues related to the study of race and racism, yet qualitative researchers acknowledge that race plays (and should play) a role in the research process. Indeed, race frames and informs the context, practices and perspectives of everyday lived…

  4. Thermographic Imaging of the Superficial Temperature in Racing Greyhounds before and after the Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Vainionpää

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 47 racing greyhounds were enrolled in this study on two race days (in July and September, resp. at a racetrack. Twelve of the dogs participated in the study on both days. Thermographic images were taken before and after each race. From the images, superficial temperature points of selected sites (tendo calcaneus, musculus gastrocnemius, musculus gracilis, and musculus biceps femoris portio caudalis were taken and used to investigate the differences in superficial temperatures before and after the race. The thermographic images were compared between the right and left legs of a dog, between the raced distances, and between the two race days. The theoretical heat capacity of a racing greyhound was calculated. With regard to all distances raced, the superficial temperatures measured from the musculus gastrocnemius were significantly higher after the race than at baseline. No significant differences were found between the left and right legs of a dog after completing any of the distances. Significant difference was found between the two race days. The heat loss mechanisms of racing greyhounds during the race through forced conduction, radiation, evaporation, and panting can be considered adequate when observing the calculated heat capacity of the dogs.

  5. Thermographic imaging of the superficial temperature in racing greyhounds before and after the race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainionpää, Mari; Tienhaara, Esa-Pekka; Raekallio, Marja; Junnila, Jouni; Snellman, Marjatta; Vainio, Outi

    2012-01-01

    A total of 47 racing greyhounds were enrolled in this study on two race days (in July and September, resp.) at a racetrack. Twelve of the dogs participated in the study on both days. Thermographic images were taken before and after each race. From the images, superficial temperature points of selected sites (tendo calcaneus, musculus gastrocnemius, musculus gracilis, and musculus biceps femoris portio caudalis) were taken and used to investigate the differences in superficial temperatures before and after the race. The thermographic images were compared between the right and left legs of a dog, between the raced distances, and between the two race days. The theoretical heat capacity of a racing greyhound was calculated. With regard to all distances raced, the superficial temperatures measured from the musculus gastrocnemius were significantly higher after the race than at baseline. No significant differences were found between the left and right legs of a dog after completing any of the distances. Significant difference was found between the two race days. The heat loss mechanisms of racing greyhounds during the race through forced conduction, radiation, evaporation, and panting can be considered adequate when observing the calculated heat capacity of the dogs.

  6. Debate: Race, Labour and the Archbishop, or the Currency of Race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Jacqui

    2001-01-01

    Explores how race is exploited to serve political agendas in Britain, examining the Labour Government's orientation to race. Argues that the Labour Government manipulates issues to suggest concern while actually removing race from the policy agenda in education. Reflects on the Archbishop of Canterbury's "Jesus 2000" to support the…

  7. A Comparison of Responses on the Attitudes toward Women Scale and Attitudes toward Feminism Scale: Is There a Difference between College-Age and Later-Life Adults with the Original Norms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Zinta S.; Felker, Sydney; Vacha-Haase, Tammi; Rickard, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Responses from college-age students and those 50 years and older were compared using the Attitudes Toward Women Scale and the Attitudes Toward Feminism Scale. Results from a multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed groups differed on each scale, suggesting unidimensional scales no longer represent attitudes toward women or feminism.…

  8. Evolutionary History of HIV-1 Subtype B and CRF01_AE Transmission Clusters among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kim Tien; Ong, Lai Yee; Lim, Sin How; Takebe, Yutaka; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to expand in developed and developing countries. Although HIV infection in MSM is amongst the highest of the key affected populations in many countries in Southeast Asia, comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 among MSM remains inadequate in the region including in Malaysia. Here, we reported the phylodynamic profiles of HIV-1 genotypes circulating among MSM population in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of n = 459 newly-diagnosed treatment-naïve consenting subjects were recruited between March 2006 and August 2012, of whom 87 (18.9%) were self-reported MSM. Transmitted drug resistance mutations were absent in these isolates. Cumulatively, phylogenetic reconstructions of the pro-rt gene (HXB2∶2253–3275) showed that HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE were predominant and contributed to approximately 80% of the total HIV-1 infection among MSM. In addition to numerous unique transmission lineages within these genotypes, twelve monophyletic transmission clusters of different sizes (2–7 MSM sequences, supported by posterior probability value of 1) were identified in Malaysia. Bayesian coalescent analysis estimated that the divergence times for these clusters were mainly dated between 1995 and 2005 with four major transmission clusters radiating at least 12 years ago suggesting that active spread of multiple sub-epidemic clusters occurred during this period. The changes in effective population size of subtype B showed an exponential growth within 5 years between 1988 and 1993, while CRF01_AE lineage exhibited similar expansion between 1993 and 2003. Our study provides the first insight of the phylodynamic profile of HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE circulating among MSM population in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, unravelling the importance of understanding transmission behaviours as well as evolutionary history of HIV-1 in assessing the risk of outbreak or epidemic expansion. PMID:23840653

  9. Evolutionary history of HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE transmission clusters among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kim Tien; Ong, Lai Yee; Lim, Sin How; Takebe, Yutaka; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to expand in developed and developing countries. Although HIV infection in MSM is amongst the highest of the key affected populations in many countries in Southeast Asia, comprehensive molecular epidemiological study of HIV-1 among MSM remains inadequate in the region including in Malaysia. Here, we reported the phylodynamic profiles of HIV-1 genotypes circulating among MSM population in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. A total of n = 459 newly-diagnosed treatment-naïve consenting subjects were recruited between March 2006 and August 2012, of whom 87 (18.9%) were self-reported MSM. Transmitted drug resistance mutations were absent in these isolates. Cumulatively, phylogenetic reconstructions of the pro-rt gene (HXB2∶2253-3275) showed that HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE were predominant and contributed to approximately 80% of the total HIV-1 infection among MSM. In addition to numerous unique transmission lineages within these genotypes, twelve monophyletic transmission clusters of different sizes (2-7 MSM sequences, supported by posterior probability value of 1) were identified in Malaysia. Bayesian coalescent analysis estimated that the divergence times for these clusters were mainly dated between 1995 and 2005 with four major transmission clusters radiating at least 12 years ago suggesting that active spread of multiple sub-epidemic clusters occurred during this period. The changes in effective population size of subtype B showed an exponential growth within 5 years between 1988 and 1993, while CRF01_AE lineage exhibited similar expansion between 1993 and 2003. Our study provides the first insight of the phylodynamic profile of HIV-1 subtype B and CRF01_AE circulating among MSM population in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, unravelling the importance of understanding transmission behaviours as well as evolutionary history of HIV-1 in assessing the risk of outbreak or epidemic expansion.

  10. Early life stress is a risk factor for excessive alcohol drinking and impulsivity in adults and is mediated via a CRF/GABA(A) mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C; Warnock, Kaitlin T; Wang, Hong; June, Harry L; Bell, Kimberly A; Rabe, Holger; Tiruveedhula, Veera Venkata Naga Phani Babu; Cook, James; Lüddens, Hartmut; Aurelian, Laure; June, Harry L

    2016-01-01

    Childhood stress and trauma are associated with substance use disorders in adulthood, but the neurological changes that confer increased vulnerability are largely unknown. In this study, maternal separation (MS) stress, restricted to the pre-weaning period, was used as a model to study mechanisms of protracted effects of childhood stress/traumatic experiences on binge drinking and impulsivity. Using an operant self-administration model of binge drinking and a delay discounting assay to measure impulsive-like behavior, we report that early life stress due to MS facilitated acquisition of binge drinking and impulsivity during adulthood in rats. Previous studies have shown heightened levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) after MS, and here, we add that MS increased expression levels of GABA(A) α2 subunit in central stress circuits. To investigate the precise role of these circuits in regulating impulsivity and binge drinking, the CRF1 receptor antagonist antalarmin and the novel GABA(A) α2 subunit ligand 3-PBC were infused into the central amygdala (CeA) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Antalarmin and 3-PBC at each site markedly reduced impulsivity and produced profound reductions on binge-motivated alcohol drinking, without altering responding for sucrose. Furthermore, whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed that low concentrations of 3-PBC directly reversed the effect of relatively high concentrations of ethanol on α2β3γ2 GABA(A) receptors, by a benzodiazepine site-independent mechanism. Together, our data provide strong evidence that maternal separation, i.e. early life stress, is a risk factor for binge drinking, and is linked to impulsivity, another key risk factor for excessive alcohol drinking. We further show that pharmacological manipulation of CRF and GABA receptor signaling is effective to reverse binge drinking and impulsive-like behavior in MS rats. These results provide novel insights into the role of the brain stress systems in the

  11. Darwin on Race, Gender, and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Stephanie A.; Bhatia, Sunil

    2009-01-01

    Darwin's theories of natural selection and sexual selection are significant scientific achievements, although his understanding of race and gender was defined and limited by his own life circumstances and the sociohistorical context within which he worked. This article considers the ways in which race, gender, and culture were represented and…

  12. The ploidy races of Atriplex confertifolia (chenopodiaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart C. Sanderson

    2011-01-01

    Previous accounts of polyploidy in the North American salt desert shrub Atriplex confertifolia (shadscale) have dealt with the distribution of polyploidy and the morphological and secondary chemical differences between races. The present study amplifies these studies and reveals additional ploidy-flavonoid races, with ploidy levels known to extend from 2x to 12x, and...

  13. "Egg Races" and Other Practical Challenges

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    Auty, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    This article presents ideas behind science and technology challenges and shares experiences of "egg races." Different challenges were set, but there was always the need to transport an egg across some obstacle course without breaking it. It was so popular in the 1980s that the term "egg race" came to mean any kind of simple…

  14. Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both Men and Women” Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All Cancers Combined Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: ...

  15. Another Inconvenient Truth: Race and Ethnicity Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Willis D.; Nieto, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    When it comes to maximizing learning opportunities and outcomes for students from racially and ethnically diverse backgrounds, race and ethnicity matter: They affect how students respond to instruction and curriculum, and they influence teachers' assumptions about how students learn. Effective implementation of race- and ethnicity-responsive…

  16. Persistent escalation of alcohol consumption by mice exposed to brief episodes of social defeat stress: suppression by CRF-R1 antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Emily L; Albrechet-Souza, Lucas; Andrew, Peter M; Auld, John G; Burk, Kelly C; Hwa, Lara S; Zhang, Eric Y; DeBold, Joseph F; Miczek, Klaus A

    2018-06-01

    Episodic bouts of social stress can precede the initiation, escalation, or relapse to disordered alcohol intake. Social stress may engender neuroadaptations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and in extrahypothalamic stress circuitry to promote the escalation of alcohol intake. We aimed to (1) confirm a pattern of escalated drinking in socially defeated mice and to (2) test drugs that target distinct aspects of the HPA axis and extrahypothalamic neural substrates for their effectiveness in reducing murine, stress-escalated drinking. Male C57BL/6J (B6) mice were socially defeated by resident Swiss-derived males for ten consecutive days receiving 30 bites/day. Ten days after the final defeat, cohorts of B6 mice received continuous or intermittent access to 20% EtOH (w/v) and water. After 4 weeks of drinking, mice were injected with weekly, systemic doses of the CRF-R1 antagonist, CP376395; the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, mifepristone; the 11-beta-hydroxylase inhibitor, metyrapone; or the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. Prior to drug treatments, defeated mice reliably consumed more EtOH than non-defeated controls, and mice given alcohol intermittently consumed more EtOH than those with continuous access. CP376395 (17-30 mg/kg) reduced continuous, but not intermittent EtOH intake (g/kg) in socially defeated mice. Mifepristone (100 mg/kg), however, increased drinking by defeated mice with intermittent access to alcohol while reducing drinking during continuous access. When administered finasteride (100 mg/kg) or metyrapone (50 mg/kg), all mice reduced their EtOH intake while increasing their water consumption. Mice with a history of episodic social defeat stress were selectively sensitive to the effects of CRF-R1 antagonism, suggesting that CRF-R1 may be a potential target for treating alcohol use disorders in individuals who escalate their drinking after exposure to repeated bouts of psychosocial stress. Future studies will clarify

  17. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011, but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac biomarkers: creatin kinase (CK, creating kinase midbrain (CK-MB, myoglobin (MYO, highly sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT and N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. The population studied was a group of young trained cyclists participating in a 177-km cycling race. The group of individuals was selected for maximal homogeneity. Their annual training volume was between 10,000 and 16,000 kilometers. The rhythm of races is comparable and averages 35 km/h, depending on the race’s difficulty. The cardiac frequency was recorded via a heart rate monitor. Three blood tests were taken. The first blood test, T0, was taken approximately 2 hours before the start of the race and was intended to gather values which would act as references for the following tests. The second blood test, T1, was realized within 5 minutes of their arrival. The third and final blood test, T3, was taken 3 hours following their arrival. The CK, CK-MB, MYO, hs-TnT and NT-proBNP were measured on the Roche Diagnostic modular E (Manhein, Germany. For the statistical analysis, an ANOVA and post hoc test of Scheffé were calculated with the Statistica Software version 9.1. We noticed an important significant variation in the cardiac frequency between T0 and T1 (p < 0.0001, T0 and T3 (p < 0.0001, and T1 and T3 (p < 0.01. Table 1 shows the results obtained for the different biomarkers. CK and CK-MB showed significant variation between T0-T1 and T0-T3 (p < 0.0001. Myoglobin increased significantly

  18. The Spectre of Race in American Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fofana, Mariam O.

    2014-01-01

    Controversies and debates surrounding race have long been a fixture in American medicine. In the past, the biological concept of race—the idea that race is biologically determined and meaningful—has served to justify the institution of slavery and the conduct of unethical research trials. Although these days may seem far behind, contemporary debates over the race-specific approval of drugs and the significance of genetic differences are evidence that race still yields tremendous influence on medical research and clinical practice. In many ways, the use of race in medicine today reflects the internalization of racial hierarchies borne out of the history of slavery and state-mandated segregation, and there is still much uncertainty over its benefits and harms. Although using race in research can help elucidate disparities, the reflexive use of race as a variable runs the risk of reifying the biological concept of race and blinding researchers to important underlying factors such as socioeconomic status. Similarly, in clinical practice, the use of race in assessing a patient’s risk of certain conditions (e.g., sickle cell) turns harmful when the heuristic becomes a rule. Through selected historical and contemporary examples, I aim to show how the biological concept of race that gave rise to past abuses remains alive and harmful and propose changes in medical education as a potential solution. By learning from the past, today’s physicians will be better armed to discern—and correct—the ways in which contemporary medicine perpetuates historical injustices. PMID:23988563

  19. Feminization of the medical workforce in low-income settings; findings from surveys in three African capital cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Giuliano; Gonçalves, Luzia; Craveiro, Isabel; Dussault, Gilles

    2015-07-31

    Women represent an increasingly growing share of the medical workforce in high-income countries, with abundant research focusing on reasons and implications of the phenomenon. Little evidence is available from low- and middle-income countries, which is odd given the possible repercussion this may have for the local supply of medical services and, ultimately, for attaining universal health coverage. Drawing from secondary analysis of primary survey data, this paper analyses the proportion and characteristics of female physicians in Bissau, Maputo and Praia, with the objective of gaining insights on the extent and features of the feminization of the medical workforce in low- and middle-income settings. We used descriptive statistics, parametric and non-parametric test to compare groups and explore associations between different variables. Zero-inflated and generalized linear models were employed to analyse the number of hours worked in the private and public sector by male and female physicians. We show that although female physicians do not represent yet the majority of the medical workforce, feminization of the profession is under way in the three locations analysed, as women are presently over-represented in younger age groups. Female doctors distribute unevenly across medical specialties in the three cities and are absent from traditionally male-dominated ones such as surgery, orthopaedics and stomatology. Our data also show that they engage as much as their male peers in private practice, although overall they dedicate fewer hours to the profession, particularly in the public sector. While more research is needed to understand how this phenomenon affects rural areas in a broader range of locations, our work shows the value of exploring the differences between female and male physicians' engagement with the profession in order to anticipate the impact of such feminization on national health systems and workforces in low- and middle-income countries.

  20. Las jóvenes y el feminismo: ¿Indiferencia o compromiso? Young women and feminism: indifference or commitment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oralia Gómez-Ramírez

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo analizamos la relación entre el feminismo y las jóvenes en México. El eje rector responde a la interrogante de si existen jóvenes feministas y, de ser así, cuál es su participación y papel en los movimientos feministas del país. Si bien percibimos con toda claridad, por una parte, que el feminismo ha impactado directamente las vidas de las jóvenes; por otro lado, sólo un número minúsculo se asume como feminista. La situación en este sentido es inquietante, sin embargo, ya sea desde la política o la academia observamos que algunas jóvenes sí se comprometen con los feminismos, y son ellas quienes se integran a espacios establecidos o bien generan propuestas autónomas e independientes para dar expresión a sus posturas, entre otras, mediante la generación de redes.In this article we analyze the relationship between feminism and young women in Mexico. Our central purpose consists of analyzing whether there are young feminist women and, if so, what their participation and role in the Mexican feminist and women's movements are. We argue that while feminism has undoubtedly impacted young women's lives, only a small number of them self-identifies as feminists. This situation is disquieting; however, by participating either in local political movements or in the academia, some young women do commit themselves with feminisms, and thus, strengthen and/or generate autonomous and independent projects that allow them to express their points of view, among other means, by creating networks.