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Sample records for rabbit trigeminal ganglia

  1. Whole transcriptome expression of trigeminal ganglia compared to dorsal root ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus

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    Kogelman, Lisette Johanna Antonia; Christensen, Rikke Elgaard; Pedersen, Sara Hougaard

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglia (TG) subserving the head and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) subserving the rest of the body are homologous handling sensory neurons. Differences exist, as a number of signaling substances cause headache but no pain in the rest of the body. To date, very few genes involved...... in this difference have been identified. We aim to reveal basal gene expression levels in TG and DRG and detect genes that are differentially expressed (DE) between TG and DRG. RNA-Sequencing from six naïve rats describes the whole transcriptome expression profiles of TG and DRG. Differential expression analysis...... was followed by pathway analysis to identify DE processes between TG and DRG. In total, 64 genes had higher and 55 genes had lower expressed levels in TG than DRG. Higher expressed genes, including S1pr5 and Gjc2, have been related to phospholipase activity. The lower expressed genes, including several Hox...

  2. Temporomandibular joint inflammation activates glial and immune cells in both the trigeminal ganglia and in the spinal trigeminal nucleus

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    Jasmin Luc

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glial cells have been shown to directly participate to the genesis and maintenance of chronic pain in both the sensory ganglia and the central nervous system (CNS. Indeed, glial cell activation has been reported in both the dorsal root ganglia and the spinal cord following injury or inflammation of the sciatic nerve, but no data are currently available in animal models of trigeminal sensitization. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated glial cell activation in the trigeminal-spinal system following injection of the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA into the temporomandibular joint, which generates inflammatory pain and trigeminal hypersensitivity. Results CFA-injected animals showed ipsilateral mechanical allodynia and temporomandibular joint edema, accompanied in the trigeminal ganglion by a strong increase in the number of GFAP-positive satellite glial cells encircling neurons and by the activation of resident macrophages. Seventy-two hours after CFA injection, activated microglial cells were observed in the ipsilateral trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and in the cervical dorsal horn, with a significant up-regulation of Iba1 immunoreactivity, but no signs of reactive astrogliosis were detected in the same areas. Since the purinergic system has been implicated in the activation of microglial cells during neuropathic pain, we have also evaluated the expression of the microglial-specific P2Y12 receptor subtype. No upregulation of this receptor was detected following induction of TMJ inflammation, suggesting that any possible role of P2Y12 in this paradigm of inflammatory pain does not involve changes in receptor expression. Conclusions Our data indicate that specific glial cell populations become activated in both the trigeminal ganglia and the CNS following induction of temporomandibular joint inflammation, and suggest that they might represent innovative targets for controlling pain during trigeminal nerve sensitization.

  3. Expression of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in normal human trigeminal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vafai, A.; Wellish, M.; Devlin, M.; Gilden, D.H.; Murray, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lysates of radiolabeled explants from four human trigeminal ganglia were immunoprecipitated with antibodies to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and to herpes simplex virus. Both herpes simplex virus- and VZV-specific proteins were detected in lysates of all four ganglia. Absence of reactivity in ganglion explants with monoclonal antibodies suggested that herpes simplex virus and VZV were not reactivated during the culture period. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated the presence of RNA transcripts from the VZV immediate early gene 63. This approach to the detection of herpes simplex virus and VZV expression in human ganglia should facilitate analysis of viral RNA and proteins in human sensory ganglia

  4. Human Asymptomatic Epitope Peptide/CXCL10-Based Prime/Pull Vaccine Induces Herpes Simplex Virus-Specific Gamma Interferon-Positive CD107+ CD8+ T Cells That Infiltrate the Cornea and Trigeminal Ganglia of Humanized HLA Transgenic Rabbits and Protect against Ocular Herpes Challenge.

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    Khan, Arif A; Srivastava, Ruchi; Vahed, Hawa; Roy, Soumyabrata; Walia, Sager S; Kim, Grace J; Fouladi, Mona A; Yamada, Taikun; Ly, Vincent T; Lam, Cynthia; Lou, Anthony; Nguyen, Vivianna; Boldbaatar, Undariya; Geertsema, Roger; Fraser, Nigel W; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2018-06-13

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a prevalent human pathogen that infects the cornea causing potentially blinding herpetic disease. A clinical herpes vaccine is still lacking. In the present study, a novel prime/pull vaccine was tested in Human Leukocyte Antigen- (HLA-) transgenic rabbit model of ocular herpes (HLA Tg rabbit). Three asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptide epitopes were selected from the HSV-1 membrane glycoprotein C (UL44 400-408 ), the DNA replication binding helicase (UL9 196-204 ), and the tegument protein (UL25 572-580 ), all preferentially recognized by CD8 + T cells from "naturally protected" HSV-1-seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who never had recurrent corneal herpetic disease). HLA Tg rabbits were immunized with a mixture of these three ASYMP CD8 + T cell peptide epitopes (UL44 400-408 , UL9 196-204 and UL25 572-580 ), delivered subcutaneously with CpG 2007 adjuvant (prime). Fifteen days later, half of the rabbits received a topical ocular treatment with a recombinant neurotropic AAV8 vector, expressing the T cell-attracting CXCL10 chemokine (pull). The frequency, function of HSV-specific CD8 + T cells induced by the prime/pull vaccine were assessed in peripheral blood, cornea, and trigeminal ganglia (TG). Compared to peptides alone, the peptides/CXCL10 prime/pull vaccine generated frequent polyfunctional gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ + ) CD107 + CD8 + T cells that infiltrated both the cornea and TG. CD8 + T cells mobilization into cornea and TG of prime/pull- vaccinated rabbits was associated with a significant reduction in corneal herpes infection and disease following an ocular HSV-1 challenge (McKrae). These findings draw attention to the novel prime/pull vaccine strategy to mobilize anti-viral CD8 + T cells into tissues protecting them against herpes infection and disease. IMPORTANCE There is an urgent need for a vaccine against widespread herpes simplex virus infections. The present study demonstrates that immunization of HLA

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Pulpitis Up-regulates TRPV1 in Trigeminal Ganglia

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    Chung, M.-K.; Lee, J.; Duraes, G.; Ro, J.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Tooth pain often accompanies pulpitis. Accumulation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a product of Gram-negative bacteria, is associated with painful clinical symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying LPS-induced tooth pain are not clearly understood. TRPV1 is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and hyperalgesia under inflammation or injury. Although TRPV1 is expressed in pulpal afferents, it is not known whether the application of LPS to teeth modulates TRPV1 in trigeminal nociceptors. By assessing the levels of protein and transcript of TRPV1 in mouse trigeminal ganglia, we demonstrate that dentinal application of LPS increases the expression of TRPV1. Our results suggest that the up-regulation of TRPV1 in trigeminal nociceptors following bacterial infection could contribute to hyperalgesia under pulpitis conditions. PMID:21712529

  6. Differential regulation of glutamate receptors in trigeminal ganglia following masseter inflammation

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    Lee, Jongseok; Ro, Jin Y.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined whether N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and 5-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) subunits and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are constitutively expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG) using Western blot analysis in male Sprague Dawley rats. We then investigated whether experimental induction of masseter inflammation influences glutamate receptor expressions by comparing the protein levels from naïve rats to th...

  7. RNA-Seq Analysis of Human Trigeminal and Dorsal Root Ganglia with a Focus on Chemoreceptors.

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    Caroline Flegel

    Full Text Available The chemosensory capacity of the somatosensory system relies on the appropriate expression of chemoreceptors, which detect chemical stimuli and transduce sensory information into cellular signals. Knowledge of the complete repertoire of the chemoreceptors expressed in human sensory ganglia is lacking. This study employed the next-generation sequencing technique (RNA-Seq to conduct the first expression analysis of human trigeminal ganglia (TG and dorsal root ganglia (DRG. We analyzed the data with a focus on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs and ion channels, which are (potentially involved in chemosensation by somatosensory neurons in the human TG and DRG. For years, transient receptor potential (TRP channels have been considered the main group of receptors for chemosensation in the trigeminal system. Interestingly, we could show that sensory ganglia also express a panel of different olfactory receptors (ORs with putative chemosensory function. To characterize OR expression in more detail, we performed microarray, semi-quantitative RT-PCR experiments, and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, we analyzed the expression data to identify further known or putative classes of chemoreceptors in the human TG and DRG. Our results give an overview of the major classes of chemoreceptors expressed in the human TG and DRG and provide the basis for a broader understanding of the reception of chemical cues.

  8. Effects of NSAIDs on the Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide and Prostaglandin E2 from Rat Trigeminal Ganglia

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    Vittorio Vellani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are frequently used to treat migraine, but the mechanisms of their effects in this pathology are not fully elucidated. The trigeminal ganglia and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. The release of CGRP and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 from freshly isolated rat trigeminal ganglia was evaluated after oral administration of nimesulide, etoricoxib, and ketoprofen, NSAIDs with different pharmacological features. Thirty minutes after oral administration, nimesulide, 10 mg/Kg, decreased the GCRP release induced by an inflammatory soup, while the other NSAIDs were ineffective at this point in time. Two hours after oral nimesulide (5 and 10 mg/Kg and ketoprofen (10 mg/Kg, but not of etoricoxib, a significant decrease in the CGRP release was observed. All drugs reduced PGE2, although with some differences in timing and doses, and the action on CGRP does not seem to be related to PGE2 inhibition. The reduction of CGRP release from rat trigeminal ganglia after nimesulide and ketoprofen may help to explain the mechanism of action of NSAIDs in migraine. Since at 30 minutes only nimesulide was effective in reducing CGRP release, these results suggest that this NSAID may exert a particularly rapid effect in patients with migraine.

  9. Cholinergic Nociceptive Mechanisms in Rat Meninges and Trigeminal Ganglia: Potential Implications for Migraine Pain.

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    Shelukhina, Irina; Mikhailov, Nikita; Abushik, Polina; Nurullin, Leniz; Nikolsky, Evgeny E; Giniatullin, Rashid

    2017-01-01

    Parasympathetic innervation of meninges and ability of carbachol, acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (AChR) agonist, to induce headaches suggests contribution of cholinergic mechanisms to primary headaches. However, neurochemical mechanisms of cholinergic regulation of peripheral nociception in meninges, origin place for headache, are almost unknown. Using electrophysiology, calcium imaging, immunohistochemistry, and staining of meningeal mast cells, we studied effects of cholinergic agents on peripheral nociception in rat hemiskulls and isolated trigeminal neurons. Both ACh and carbachol significantly increased nociceptive firing in peripheral terminals of meningeal trigeminal nerves recorded by local suction electrode. Strong nociceptive firing was also induced by nicotine, implying essential role of nicotinic AChRs in control of excitability of trigeminal nerve endings. Nociceptive firing induced by carbachol was reduced by muscarinic antagonist atropine, whereas the action of nicotine was prevented by the nicotinic blocker d-tubocurarine but was insensitive to the TRPA1 antagonist HC-300033. Carbachol but not nicotine induced massive degranulation of meningeal mast cells known to release multiple pro-nociceptive mediators. Enzymes terminating ACh action, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase, were revealed in perivascular meningeal nerves. The inhibitor of AChE neostigmine did not change the firing per se but induced nociceptive activity, sensitive to d-tubocurarine, after pretreatment of meninges with the migraine mediator CGRP. This observation suggested the pro-nociceptive action of endogenous ACh in meninges. Both nicotine and carbachol induced intracellular Ca 2+ transients in trigeminal neurons partially overlapping with expression of capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1 receptors. Trigeminal nerve terminals in meninges, as well as dural mast cells and trigeminal ganglion neurons express a repertoire of pro-nociceptive nicotinic and muscarinic AChRs, which

  10. Influence of nerve growth factor on developing dorso-medial and ventro-lateral neurons of chick and mouse trigeminal ganglia.

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    Davies, A; Lumsden, A

    1983-01-01

    Trigeminal ganglia have been removed from five, six, seven and eight day chick embryos and explants of the dorso-medial (DM) and ventro-lateral (VL) parts of the maxillomandibular lobe were grown in tissue culture. Quantitative methods were used to assess the influence of nerve growth factor (NGF) on fiber outgrowth from these explants. At all ages outgrowth from DM explants was significantly greater than from VL explants, the difference being most pronounced between the extreme DM and VL poles of the maxillomandibular lobe. These observations are interpreted as indicating the existence of two distinct populations of neurons in terms of their response to NGF rather than the consequence of the asynchronous differentiation and maturation of the VL and DM neurons. A similar study of 10, 11 and 12 day embryonic mouse trigeminal ganglia revealed no significant difference in neurite outgrowth between DM and VL regions grown in the presence or absence of NGF. Copyright © 1983. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Reduced basal ganglia μ-opioid receptor availability in trigeminal neuropathic pain: A pilot study

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    DosSantos Marcos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although neuroimaging techniques have provided insights into the function of brain regions involved in Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain (TNP in humans, there is little understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected during the course of this disorder. Understanding these processes is crucial to determine the systems involved in the development and persistence of TNP. Findings In this study, we examined the regional μ-opioid receptor (μOR availability in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential BPND of TNP patients with positron emission tomography (PET using the μOR selective radioligand [11C]carfentanil. Four TNP patients and eight gender and age-matched healthy controls were examined with PET. Patients with TNP showed reduced μOR BPND in the left nucleus accumbens (NAc, an area known to be involved in pain modulation and reward/aversive behaviors. In addition, the μOR BPND in the NAc was negatively correlated with the McGill sensory and total pain ratings in the TNP patients. Conclusions Our findings give preliminary evidence that the clinical pain in TNP patients can be related to alterations in the endogenous μ-opioid system, rather than only to the peripheral pathology. The decreased availability of μORs found in TNP patients, and its inverse relationship to clinical pain levels, provide insights into the central mechanisms related to this condition. The results also expand our understanding about the impact of chronic pain on the limbic system.

  12. Comparison of P2X and TRPV1 receptors in ganglia or primary culture of trigeminal neurons and their modulation by NGF or serotonin

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    Giniatullin Rashid

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultured sensory neurons are a common experimental model to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of pain transduction typically involving activation of ATP-sensitive P2X or capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1 receptors. This applies also to trigeminal ganglion neurons that convey pain inputs from head tissues. Little is, however, known about the plasticity of these receptors on trigeminal neurons in culture, grown without adding the neurotrophin NGF which per se is a powerful algogen. The characteristics of such receptors after short-term culture were compared with those of ganglia. Furthermore, their modulation by chronically-applied serotonin or NGF was investigated. Results Rat or mouse neurons in culture mainly belonged to small and medium diameter neurons as observed in sections of trigeminal ganglia. Real time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry showed upregulation of P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors after 1–4 days in culture (together with their more frequent co-localization, while P2X2 ones were unchanged. TRPV1 immunoreactivity was, however, lower in mouse ganglia and cultures. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch clamping showed functional P2X and TRPV1 receptors. Neurons exhibited a range of responses to the P2X agonist α, β-methylene-adenosine-5'-triphosphate indicating the presence of homomeric P2X3 receptors (selectively antagonized by A-317491 and heteromeric P2X2/3 receptors. The latter were observed in 16 % mouse neurons only. Despite upregulation of receptors in culture, neurons retained the potential for further enhancement of P2X3 receptors by 24 h NGF treatment. At this time point TRPV1 receptors had lost the facilitation observed after acute NGF application. Conversely, chronically-applied serotonin selectively upregulated TRPV1 receptors rather than P2X3 receptors. Conclusion Comparing ganglia and cultures offered the advantage of understanding early adaptive changes of nociception

  13. Role of Estrogens in the Size of Neuronal Somata of Paravaginal Ganglia in Ovariectomized Rabbits

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    Laura G. Hernández-Aragón

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the role of estrogens in modulating the size of neuronal somata of paravaginal ganglia. Rabbits were allocated into control (C, ovariectomized (OVX, and OVX treated with estradiol benzoate (OVX + EB groups to evaluate the neuronal soma area; total serum estradiol (E2 and testosterone (T levels; the percentage of immunoreactive (ir neurons anti-aromatase, anti-estrogen receptor (ERα, ERβ and anti-androgen receptor (AR; the intensity of the immunostaining anti-glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and the GDNF family receptor alpha type 1 (GFRα1; and the number of satellite glial cells (SGCs per neuron. There was a decrease in the neuronal soma size for the OVX group, which was associated with low T, high percentages of aromatase-ir and neuritic AR-ir neurons, and a strong immunostaining anti-GDNF and anti-GFRα1. The decrease in the neuronal soma size was prevented by the EB treatment that increased the E2 without affecting the T levels. Moreover, there was a high percentage of neuritic AR-ir neurons, a strong GDNF immunostaining in the SGC, and an increase in the SGCs per neuron. Present findings show that estrogens modulate the soma size of neurons of the paravaginal ganglia, likely involving the participation of the SGC.

  14. Thymidine kinase-negative herpes simplex virus mutants establish latency in mouse trigeminal ganglia but do not reactivate.

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    Coen, D M; Kosz-Vnenchak, M; Jacobson, J G; Leib, D A; Bogard, C L; Schaffer, P A; Tyler, K L; Knipe, D M

    1989-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection of mammalian hosts involves lytic replication at a primary site, such as the cornea, translocation by axonal transport to sensory ganglia and replication, and latent infection at a secondary site, ganglionic neurons. The virus-encoded thymidine kinase, which is a target for antiviral drugs such as acyclovir, is not essential for lytic replication yet evidently is required at the secondary site for replication and some phase of latent infection. To determine the ...

  15. The Role of LAT in Increased CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion in Trigeminal Ganglia of Mice Latently Infected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1▿

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    Allen, Sariah J.; Hamrah, Pedram; Gate, David; Mott, Kevin R.; Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Zheng, Lixin; Town, Terrence; Jones, Clinton; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Ahmed, Rafi; Wechsler, Steven L.; Ghiasi, Homayon

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is a classic example of latent viral infection in humans and experimental animal models. The HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) plays a major role in the HSV-1 latency reactivation cycle and thus in recurrent disease. Whether the presence of LAT leads to generation of dysfunctional T cell responses in the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of latently infected mice is not known. To address this issue, we used LAT-positive [LAT(+)] and LAT-deficient [LAT(−)] viruses to evaluate the effect of LAT on CD8 T cell exhaustion in TG of latently infected mice. The amount of latency as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) of viral DNA in total TG extracts was 3-fold higher with LAT(+) than with LAT(−) virus. LAT expression and increased latency correlated with increased mRNA levels of CD8, PD-1, and Tim-3. PD-1 is both a marker for exhaustion and a primary factor leading to exhaustion, and Tim-3 can also contribute to exhaustion. These results suggested that LAT(+) TG contain both more CD8+ T cells and more CD8+ T cells expressing the exhaustion markers PD-1 and Tim-3. This was confirmed by flow cytometry analyses of expression of CD3/CD8/PD-1/Tim-3, HSV-1, CD8+ T cell pentamer (specific for a peptide derived from residues 498 to 505 of glycoprotein B [gB498–505]), interleukin-2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). The functional significance of PD-1 and its ligands in HSV-1 latency was demonstrated by the significantly reduced amount of HSV-1 latency in PD-1- and PD-L1-deficient mice. Together, these results may suggest that both PD-1 and Tim-3 are mediators of CD8+ T cell exhaustion and latency in HSV-1 infection. PMID:21307196

  16. Comparison between DNA Detection in Trigeminal Nerve Ganglia and Serology to Detect Cattle Infected with Bovine Herpesviruses Types 1 and 5.

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    Rodrigo Puentes

    Full Text Available Bovine herpesviruses (BoHVs types 1 (BoHV-1 and 5 (BoHV-5 are alphaherpesviruses of major importance to the bovine production chain. Such viruses are capable of establishing latent infections in neuronal tissues. Infected animals tend to develop a serological response to infection; however, such response-usually investigated by antibody assays in serum-may eventually not be detected in laboratory assays. Nevertheless, serological tests such as virus neutralization (VN and various enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs are widely employed to check individual or herd status of BoHV infections. The correlation between detection of antibodies and the presence of viral nucleic acids as indicatives of infection in infected cattle has not been deeply examined. In order to investigate such correlation, 248 bovine serum samples were tested by VN to BoHV-1 and BoHV-5, as well as in a widely employed (though not type-differential gB ELISA (IDEXX IBR gB X2 Ab Test in search for antibodies to BoHVs. Immediately after blood withdrawal, cattle were slaughtered and trigeminal ganglia (TG excised for DNA extraction and viral nucleic acid detection (NAD by nested PCR. Neutralizing antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 were detected in 44.8% (111/248 of sera, whereas the gB ELISA detected antibodies in 51.2% (127/248 of the samples. However, genomes of either BoHV-1, BoHV-5, or both, were detected in TGs of 85.9% (213/248 of the animals. These findings reveal that the assays designed to detect antibodies to BoHV-1 and/or BoHV-5 employed here may fail to detect a significant number of latently infected animals (in this study, 35.7%. From such data, it is clear that antibody assays are poorly correlated with detection of viral genomes in BoHV-1 and BoHV-5-infected animals.

  17. Trigeminal Nerve Root Demyelination Not Seen in Six Horses Diagnosed with Trigeminal-Mediated Headshaking

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    Veronica L. Roberts

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal-mediated headshaking is an idiopathic neuropathic facial pain syndrome in horses. There are clinical similarities to trigeminal neuralgia, a neuropathic facial pain syndrome in man, which is usually caused by demyelination of trigeminal sensory fibers within either the nerve root or, less commonly, the brainstem. Our hypothesis was that the neuropathological substrate of headshaking in horses is similar to that of trigeminal neuralgia in man. Trigeminal nerves, nerve roots, ganglia, infraorbital, and caudal nasal nerves from horse abattoir specimens and from horses euthanized due to trigeminal-mediated headshaking were removed, fixed, and processed for histological assessment by a veterinary pathologist and a neuropathologist with particular experience of trigeminal neuralgia histology. No histological differences were detected between samples from horses with headshaking and those from normal horses. These results suggest that trigeminal-mediated headshaking may have a different pathological substrate from trigeminal neuralgia in man.

  18. The electrophysiological effects of nicotinic and electrical stimulation of intrinsic cardiac ganglia in the absence of extrinsic autonomic nerves in the rabbit heart.

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    Allen, Emily; Coote, John H; Grubb, Blair D; Batten, Trevor Fc; Pauza, Dainius H; Ng, G André; Brack, Kieran E

    2018-05-22

    The intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS) is a rich network of cardiac nerves that converge to form distinct ganglia and extend across the heart and is capable of influencing cardiac function. To provide a picture of the neurotransmitter/neuromodulator profile of the rabbit ICNS and determine the action of spatially divergent ganglia on cardiac electrophysiology. Nicotinic or electrical stimulation was applied at discrete sites of the intrinsic cardiac nerve plexus in the Langendorff perfused rabbit heart. Functional effects on sinus rate and atrioventricular conduction were measured. Immunohistochemistry for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and/or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) was performed on whole-mount preparations. Stimulation within all ganglia produced either bradycardia, tachycardia or a biphasic brady-tachycardia. Electrical stimulation of the right atrial (RA) and right neuronal cluster (RNC) regions produced the greatest chronotropic responses. Significant prolongation of atrioventricular conduction (AVC) was predominant at the pulmonary vein-caudal vein region (PVCV). Neurons immunoreactive (IR) only for ChAT, or TH or nNOS were consistently located within the limits of the hilum and at the roots of the right cranial and right pulmonary veins. ChAT-IR neurons were most abundant (1946±668 neurons). Neurons IR solely for nNOS were distributed within ganglia. Stimulation of intrinsic ganglia, shown to be of phenotypic complexity but predominantly of cholinergic nature, indicates that clusters of neurons are capable of independent selective effects on cardiac electrophysiology, therefore providing a potential therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of cardiac disease. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Trigeminal Neuralgia

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    ... your doctor. Causes In trigeminal neuralgia, also called tic douloureux, the trigeminal nerve's function is disrupted. Usually, ... logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical ...

  20. Mutations Inactivating Herpes Simplex Virus 1 MicroRNA miR-H2 Do Not Detectably Increase ICP0 Gene Expression in Infected Cultured Cells or Mouse Trigeminal Ganglia.

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    Pan, Dongli; Pesola, Jean M; Li, Gang; McCarron, Seamus; Coen, Donald M

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) latency entails the repression of productive ("lytic") gene expression. An attractive hypothesis to explain some of this repression involves inhibition of the expression of ICP0, a lytic gene activator, by a viral microRNA, miR-H2, which is completely complementary to ICP0 mRNA. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mutations that disrupt miR-H2 without affecting ICP0 in HSV-1. The mutant virus exhibited drastically reduced expression of miR-H2 but showed wild-type levels of infectious virus production and no increase in ICP0 expression in lytically infected cells, which is consistent with the weak expression of miR-H2 relative to the level of ICP0 mRNA in that setting. Following corneal inoculation of mice, the mutant was not significantly different from wild-type virus in terms of infectious virus production in the trigeminal ganglia during acute infection, mouse mortality, or the rate of reactivation from explanted latently infected ganglia. Critically, the mutant was indistinguishable from wild-type virus for the expression of ICP0 and other lytic genes in acutely and latently infected mouse trigeminal ganglia. The latter result may be related to miR-H2 being less effective in inhibiting ICP0 expression in transfection assays than a host microRNA, miR-138, which has previously been shown to inhibit lytic gene expression in infected ganglia by targeting ICP0 mRNA. Additionally, transfected miR-138 reduced lytic gene expression in infected cells more effectively than miR-H2. While this study provides little support for the hypothesis that miR-H2 promotes latency by inhibiting ICP0 expression, the possibility remains that miR-H2 might target other genes during latency. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which causes a variety of diseases, can establish lifelong latent infections from which virus can reactivate to cause recurrent disease. Latency is the most biologically interesting and clinically vexing feature of the virus. Ever since

  1. Trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Di Stefano, Giulia; Bendtsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    -occupying lesion affecting the trigeminal nerve. Differential diagnosis and treatment Important differential diagnoses include trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, posttraumatic or postherpetic pain and other facial pains. First line treatment is prophylactic medication with sodium channel blockers, and second line......Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterized by touch-evoked unilateral brief shock-like paroxysmal pain in one or more divisions of the trigeminal nerve. In addition to the paroxysmal pain, some patients also have continuous pain. TN is divided into classical TN (CTN) and secondary TN...

  2. De Novo Herpes Simplex Virus VP16 Expression Gates a Dynamic Programmatic Transition and Sets the Latent/Lytic Balance during Acute Infection in Trigeminal Ganglia.

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    Sawtell, Nancy M; Thompson, Richard L

    2016-09-01

    The life long relationship between herpes simplex virus and its host hinges on the ability of the virus to aggressively replicate in epithelial cells at the site of infection and transport into the nervous system through axons innervating the infection site. Interaction between the virus and the sensory neuron represents a pivot point where largely unknown mechanisms lead to a latent or a lytic infection in the neuron. Regulation at this pivot point is critical for balancing two objectives, efficient widespread seeding of the nervous system and host survival. By combining genetic and in vivo in approaches, our studies reveal that the balance between latent and lytic programs is a process occurring early in the trigeminal ganglion. Unexpectedly, activation of the latent program precedes entry into the lytic program by 12 -14hrs. Importantly, at the individual neuronal level, the lytic program begins as a transition out of this acute stage latent program and this escape from the default latent program is regulated by de novo VP16 expression. Our findings support a model in which regulated de novo VP16 expression in the neuron mediates entry into the lytic cycle during the earliest stages of virus infection in vivo. These findings support the hypothesis that the loose association of VP16 with the viral tegument combined with sensory axon length and transport mechanisms serve to limit arrival of virion associated VP16 into neuronal nuclei favoring latency. Further, our findings point to specialized features of the VP16 promoter that control the de novo expression of VP16 in neurons and this regulation is a key component in setting the balance between lytic and latent infections in the nervous system.

  3. Expression and function of a CP339,818-sensitive K+ current in a subpopulation of putative nociceptive neurons from adult mouse trigeminal ganglia

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    Sforna, Luigi; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Servettini, Ilenio; Guglielmi, Luca; Pessia, Mauro; Franciolini, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons are functionally and morphologically heterogeneous, and the molecular basis of this heterogeneity is still not fully understood. Here we describe experiments showing that a subpopulation of neurons expresses a delayed-rectifying K+ current (IDRK) with a characteristically high (nanomolar) sensitivity to the dihydroquinoline CP339,818 (CP). Although submicromolar CP has previously been shown to selectively block Kv1.3 and Kv1.4 channels, the CP-sensitive IDRK found in TG neurons could not be associated with either of these two K+ channels. It could neither be associated with Kv2.1 channels homomeric or heteromerically associated with the Kv9.2, Kv9.3, or Kv6.4 subunits, whose block by CP, tested using two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings from Xenopus oocytes, resulted in the low micromolar range, nor to the Kv7 subfamily, given the lack of blocking efficacy of 3 μM XE991. Within the group of multiple-firing neurons considered in this study, the CP-sensitive IDRK was preferentially expressed in a subpopulation showing several nociceptive markers, such as small membrane capacitance, sensitivity to capsaicin, and slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP); in these neurons the CP-sensitive IDRK controls the membrane resting potential, the firing frequency, and the AHP duration. A biophysical study of the CP-sensitive IDRK indicated the presence of two kinetically distinct components: a fast deactivating component having a relatively depolarized steady-state inactivation (IDRKf) and a slow deactivating component with a more hyperpolarized V1/2 for steady-state inactivation (IDRKs). PMID:25652918

  4. Local CD4 and CD8 T-cell reactivity to HSV-1 antigens documents broad viral protein expression and immune competence in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia.

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    Monique van Velzen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection results in lifelong chronic infection of trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons, also referred to as neuronal HSV-1 latency, with periodic reactivation leading to recrudescent herpetic disease in some persons. HSV-1 proteins are expressed in a temporally coordinated fashion during lytic infection, but their expression pattern during latent infection is largely unknown. Selective retention of HSV-1 reactive T-cells in human TG suggests their role in controlling reactivation by recognizing locally expressed HSV-1 proteins. We characterized the HSV-1 proteins recognized by virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells recovered from human HSV-1-infected TG. T-cell clusters, consisting of both CD4 and CD8 T-cells, surrounded neurons and expressed mRNAs and proteins consistent with in situ antigen recognition and antiviral function. HSV-1 proteome-wide scans revealed that intra-TG T-cell responses included both CD4 and CD8 T-cells directed to one to three HSV-1 proteins per person. HSV-1 protein ICP6 was targeted by CD8 T-cells in 4 of 8 HLA-discordant donors. In situ tetramer staining demonstrated HSV-1-specific CD8 T-cells juxtaposed to TG neurons. Intra-TG retention of virus-specific CD4 T-cells, validated to the HSV-1 peptide level, implies trafficking of viral proteins from neurons to HLA class II-expressing non-neuronal cells for antigen presentation. The diversity of viral proteins targeted by TG T-cells across all kinetic and functional classes of viral proteins suggests broad HSV-1 protein expression, and viral antigen processing and presentation, in latently infected human TG. Collectively, the human TG represents an immunocompetent environment for both CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition of HSV-1 proteins expressed during latent infection. HSV-1 proteins recognized by TG-resident T-cells, particularly ICP6 and VP16, are potential HSV-1 vaccine candidates.

  5. Dietary grape seed polyphenols repress neuron and glia activation in trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal nucleus caudalis

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    Durham Paul L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and pain associated with temporomandibular joint disorder, a chronic disease that affects 15% of the adult population, involves activation of trigeminal ganglion nerves and development of peripheral and central sensitization. Natural products represent an underutilized resource in the pursuit of safe and effective ways to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to investigate effects of grape seed extract on neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis in response to persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg/d MegaNatural-BP grape seed extract for 14 days prior to bilateral injections of complete Freund's adjuvant into the temporomandibular joint capsule. Results In response to grape seed extract, basal expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 was elevated in neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, and expression of the glutamate aspartate transporter was increased in spinal glia. Rats on a normal diet injected with adjuvant exhibited greater basal levels of phosphorylated-p38 in trigeminal ganglia neurons and spinal neurons and microglia. Similarly, immunoreactive levels of OX-42 in microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes were greatly increased in response to adjuvant. However, adjuvant-stimulated levels of phosphorylated-p38, OX-42, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly repressed in extract treated animals. Furthermore, grape seed extract suppressed basal expression of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in spinal neurons. Conclusions Results from our study provide evidence that grape seed extract may be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for temporomandibular joint disorders by suppressing development of peripheral and central sensitization.

  6. IMAGING EVALUATION OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

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    Marinos KONTZIALIS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating pain syndrome in the sensory distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Compression of the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve by a vessel, usually an artery, is considered the most common cause of trigeminal neuralgia. A number of additional lesions may affect the trigeminal nerve anywhere along its course from the trigeminal nuclei to the most peripheral branches to cause facial pain. Relevant differential considerations are reviewed starting proximally at the level of the brainstem.

  7. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

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    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  9. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

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    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  10. Trigeminal trophic syndrome

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    Parimalam Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS is a rare cause of facial ulceration, consequent to damage to the trigeminal nerve or its central sensory connections. We reporta case of TTS in a 48-year-old woman with Bell′s palsy following herpes zoster infection. The patient was treated and counseled. There hasnot been any recurrence for 1 year and the patient is being followed-up. The diagnosis of TTS should be suspected when there is unilateral facial ulceration, especially involving the ala nasi associated with sensory impairment.

  11. Aberrant TRPV1 expression in heat hyperalgesia associated with trigeminal neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Hiroko; Ara, Toshiaki; Fujinami, Yoshiaki; Hiraoka, B Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is a facial pain syndrome associated with trigeminal nerve injury. However, the mechanism of trigeminal neuropathic pain is poorly understood. This study aimed to determine the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in heat hyperalgesia in a trigeminal neuropathic pain model. We evaluated nociceptive responses to mechanical and heat stimuli using a partial infraorbital nerve ligation (pIONL) model. Withdrawal responses to mechanical and heat stimuli to vibrissal pads (VP) were assessed using von Frey filaments and a thermal stimulator equipped with a heat probe, respectively. Changes in withdrawal responses were measured after subcutaneous injection of the TRP channel antagonist capsazepine. In addition, the expression of TRPV1 in the trigeminal ganglia was examined. Mechanical allodynia and heat hyperalgesia were observed in VP by pIONL. Capsazepine suppressed heat hyperalgesia but not mechanical allodynia. The number of TRPV1-positive neurons in the trigeminal ganglia was significantly increased in the large-diameter-cell group. These results suggest that TRPV1 plays an important role in the heat hyperalgesia observed in the pIONL model.

  12. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification...

  13. Peripheral axotomy of the rat mandibular trigeminal nerve leads to an increase in VIP and decrease of other primary afferent neuropeptides in the spinal trigeminal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, M E; Shehab, S A

    1986-12-01

    In the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-rich lumbosacral spinal cord, VIP increases at the expense of other neuropeptides after primary sensory nerve axotomy. This study was undertaken to ascertain whether similar changes occur in peripherally axotomised cranial sensory nerves. VIP immunoreactivity increased in the terminal region of the mandibular nerve in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis following unilateral section of the sensory root of the mandibular trigeminal nerve at the foramen orale. Other primary afferent neuropeptides (substance P, cholecystokinin and somatostatin) were depleted and fluoride-resistant acid phosphatase activity was abolished in the same circumscribed areas of the nucleus caudalis. The rise in VIP and depletion of other markers began 4 days postoperatively and was maximal by 10 days, these levels remaining unchanged up to 1 year postoperatively. VIP-immunoreactive cell bodies were absent from trigeminal ganglia from the unoperated side but small and medium cells stained intensely in the ganglia of the operated side after axotomy. These observations indicate that increase of VIP in sensory nerve terminals is a general phenomenon occurring in both cranial and spinal sensory terminal areas. The intense VIP immunoreactivity in axotomised trigeminal ganglia suggests that the increased levels of VIP in the nucleus caudalis are of peripheral origin, indicating a change in expression of neuropeptides within primary afferent neurons following peripheral axotomy.

  14. Transient receptor potential channels encode volatile chemicals sensed by rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

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    Matthias Lübbert

    Full Text Available Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual's physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants, environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants. In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia.

  15. [Distribution of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 genomes in the human spinal ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Y

    1994-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is well known for its propensity to cause recurrent oral or genital mucosal infections in humans. HSV-1 is involved primarily in oral lesions, whereas HSV-2 is more frequently involved in genital lesions. Based on this, it is thought that HSV-1 may produce latent infections in trigeminal ganglia, and HSV-2 in the sacral ganglia. However the distribution pattern of latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in spinal ganglia remains unknown. Using the polymerase chain reaction we detected latent herpes HSV-1 and HSV-2 in human spinal ganglia obtained from autopsy material. A pair of primers which were specific for a part of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA polymerase domain were employed. HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNAs were detected in 11 of 40 (28%) and 15 of 40 (38%) cervical ganglia, respectively, 52 of 103 (50%) and 47 of 103 (46%) thoracic ganglia, 16 of 53 (30%) and 17 of 53 (32%) lumbar ganglia, and 3 of 20 (15%) and 3 of 20 (15%) sacral ganglia. These findings suggest that latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections have a widespread distribution from the cervical ganglia to sacral ganglia. Importantly this study demonstrated latent HSV-1 infection of both the lumbar and sacral ganglia for the first time.

  16. MR imaging of trigeminal neuropathy

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    Kim, Si Yeon; Yoon, Pyeong Ho; Chung, Jin Il; Lee, Seung Ik; Kim, Dong Ik [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves and has both sensory and motor functions. It can be divided into proximal (brainstem, preganglionic, gasserian ganglion, and cavernous sinus) and distal (extracranial opthalmic, maxillary, and mandibular) segments. Patients with trigeminal neuropathy present with a wide variety of symptoms, and lesions producing those symptoms may occur anywhere along the protracted course of the trigeminal nerve, from its distal facial branches to its nuclear columns in the brainstem. The purpose of this article is to illustrate the normal anatomy of the trigeminal nerve and associated various pathologic conditions. These are arranged anatomically according to their site of interaction with it.

  17. Pathogenesis of meningoencephalitis in rabbits by bovine herpesvirus type-5 (BHV-5

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    Silva Adriana M. da

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the main aspects of bovine herpesvirus type-5 (BHV-5 neurologic infection and disease in rabbits, a candidate animal model for studying BHV-5 neuropathogenesis. Intranasal inoculation of weanling rabbits with a Brazilian BHV-5 isolate produced neurological disease and death in 78.8% (26/33 of the animals. Neurological signs started as early as 5 days post-inoculation and lasted from 10-12 hours up to several days. Most animals evolved to a moribund state or death within 24 (69.2% to 48 hours (88.5%. Neurological disease was characterized by excitability or depression, tremors, bruxism, walking or running in circles, backward arching of the head and body, incoordination, backward and sideways falling, paddling, profound depression and death. Moderate levels of infectivity were detected in several areas of the brain, most consistently in the ventro-lateral hemisphere (in 16 out of 20 animals, anterior cerebrum (15/20, midbrain (11/20, dorso-lateral hemisphere (10/20 and pons (12/26. Infectious virus was also recovered from the olfactory bulb (9/20, medulla oblongata (10/26, cerebellum (7/20, posterior cerebrum (5/20 and trigeminal ganglia (4/20. No gross lesions were observed. Microscopic lesions were mild and consisted of non-suppurative meningitis, mononuclear perivascular cuffing and focal gliosis. These changes were observed most consistently in the ventro-lateral hemisphere and anterior cerebrum. Passive immunity partially protected rabbits from BHV-5-induced encephalitis. Rabbits born to immunized dams showed a significative delay in the onset of clinical disease and reduced morbidity and mortality rates compared to rabbits born to unvaccinated dams. These results demonstrate that BHV-5-induced neurological disease can consistently be reproduced in rabbits and point towards the use of this species as an animal model to study BHV-5 neuropathogenesis.

  18. MRI EVALUATION OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

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    Sama Surya Sravani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Neuralgia is the set of symptoms associated with nerve dysfunction. The most common of these symptoms is pain, which can occur intermittently in one area of the body or can radiate along the length of a damaged nerve. The most common type of neuralgia is trigeminal neuralgia. This study focuses on the effectiveness of MRI in visualising the entire course of trigeminal nerve and to diagnose the exact location, aetiology responsible for trigeminal neuralgia and possible pretreatment evaluation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Clinical records and imaging studies of 30 patients between the ages of 18-60 years who presented to the Department of Radiodiagnosis, KIMS, for brain magnetic resonance imaging with (Philips 1.5T machine during June 2015 to December 2016 were analysed retrospectively. RESULTS  The entire course of trigeminal nerve is evaluated in these patients.  There are different causes of trigeminal neuralgia, but in our study, most frequent cause is mechanical irritation of nerve is due to neurovascular contact (24 cases. The other causes identified are cerebellopontine angle lesions, brainstem tumours, demyelinating disease involving brainstem.  The cisternal portion of the nerve is the most common site of involvement. CONCLUSION Trigeminal nerve is the largest cranial nerve. MRI is unique as it produces images of entire course of the nerve. Of the many causes of trigeminal neuralgia, neurovascular conflict is the most common cause. The exact location and degree of neurovascular compression is graded on MRI.

  19. The Molecular Fingerprint of Dorsal Root and Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

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    Douglas M. Lopes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The dorsal root ganglia (DRG and trigeminal ganglia (TG are clusters of cell bodies of highly specialized sensory neurons which are responsible for relaying information about our environment to the central nervous system. Despite previous efforts to characterize sensory neurons at the molecular level, it is still unknown whether those present in DRG and TG have distinct expression profiles and therefore a unique molecular fingerprint. To address this question, we isolated lumbar DRG and TG neurons using fluorescence-activated cell sorting from Advillin-GFP transgenic mice and performed RNA sequencing. Our transcriptome analyses showed that, despite being overwhelmingly similar, a number of genes are differentially expressed in DRG and TG neurons. Importantly, we identified 24 genes which were uniquely expressed in either ganglia, including an arginine vasopressin receptor and several homeobox genes, giving each population a distinct molecular fingerprint. We compared our findings with published studies to reveal that many genes previously reported to be present in neurons are in fact likely to originate from other cell types in the ganglia. Additionally, our neuron-specific results aligned well with a dataset examining whole human TG and DRG. We propose that the data can both improve our understanding of primary afferent biology and help contribute to the development of drug treatments and gene therapies which seek targets with unique or restricted expression patterns.

  20. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in trigeminal ganglion cells during culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Zhou, MingFang; Zinck, Tina Jovanovic

    2005-01-01

    RNA and protein could be detected. The data suggest that iNOS expression may be a molecular mechanism mediating the adaptive response of trigeminal ganglia cells to the serum free stressful stimulus the culture environment provides. It may act as a cellular signalling molecule that is expressed after cell......Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signalling molecule that has been suggested to be a key molecule for induction and maintenance of migraine attacks based on clinical studies, animal experimental studies and the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity within the trigeminovascular......, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. In trigeminal ganglia cells not subjected to culture, endothelial (e) and neuronal (n) but not inducible (i) NOS mRNA and protein were detected. Culture of rat neurones resulted in a rapid axonal outgrowth of NOS positive...

  1. An autoradiographic analysis of the development of the chick trigeminal ganglion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amico-Martel, A.D; Noden, D.M.

    1980-01-01

    The avian trigeminal ganglion, which is embryonically derived from the neural crest and epidermal placodes, consists of two topographically segregated classes of immature neurons, large and small, during the second week of incubation, and two neuronal cell types, dark and light, interspersed throughout the mature ganglion. In order to establish the times of terminal mitosis of trigeminal sensory neurons, embryos were treated with [ 3 H]thymidine during the first week of incubation and their ganglia fixed on embryonic day 11. The embryonically large, distal, placodal-derived neurons were generated between days 2 and 5, while the small, proximal, neural crest-derived neurons were formed mostly between days 4 and 7. By comparing the locations of labelled cells in ganglia treated with isotope but fixed on day 18 on incubation with their 11-day counterparts, it was shown that there are no morpho-genetic rearrangements of neurons during the final week of incubation. Thus, no unique relationship exists between the two neuron types in the mature ganglion and the two cell classes in the immature trigeminal. Therefore, both the light and the dark neurons in the mature trigeminal ganglion arise from neural crest as well as placodal primordia. (author)

  2. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC of the infraorbital nerve

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    Ma Fei

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70. Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2 is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks.

  3. Celiac ganglia block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Akhan, Okan

    2005-01-01

    Pain occurs frequently in patients with advanced cancers. Tumors originating from upper abdominal viscera such as pancreas, stomach, duodenum, proximal small bowel, liver and biliary tract and from compressing enlarged lymph nodes can cause severe abdominal pain, which do not respond satisfactorily to medical treatment or radiotherapy. Percutaneous celiac ganglia block (CGB) can be performed with high success and low complication rates under imaging guidance to obtain pain relief in patients with upper abdominal malignancies. A significant relationship between pain relief and degree of tumoral celiac ganglia invasion according to CT features was described in the literature. Performing the procedure in the early grades of celiac ganglia invasion on CT can increase the effectiveness of the CGB, which is contrary to World Health Organization criteria stating that CGB must be performed in patients with advanced stage cancer. CGB may also be effectively performed in patients with chronic pancreatitis for pain palliation

  4. A bovine herpesvirus 5 recombinant defective in the thymidine kinase (TK gene and a double mutant lacking TK and the glycoprotein E gene are fully attenuated for rabbits

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    S.C. Silva

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5, the agent of herpetic meningoencephalitis in cattle, is an important pathogen of cattle in South America and several efforts have been made to produce safer and more effective vaccines. In the present study, we investigated in rabbits the virulence of three recombinant viruses constructed from a neurovirulent Brazilian BoHV-5 strain (SV507/99. The recombinants are defective in glycoprotein E (BoHV-5gEΔ, thymidine kinase (BoHV-5TKΔ and both proteins (BoHV-5gEΔTKΔ. Rabbits inoculated with the parental virus (N = 8 developed neurological disease and died or were euthanized in extremis between days 7 and 13 post-infection (pi. Infectivity was detected in several areas of their brains. Three of 8 rabbits inoculated with the recombinant BoHV-5gEΔ developed neurological signs between days 10 and 15 pi and were also euthanized. A more restricted virus distribution was detected in the brain of these animals. Rabbits inoculated with the recombinants BoHV-5TKΔ (N = 8 or BoHV-5gEΔTKΔ (N = 8 remained healthy throughout the experiment in spite of variable levels of virus replication in the nose. Dexamethasone (Dx administration to rabbits inoculated with the three recombinants at day 42 pi did not result in viral reactivation, as demonstrated by absence of virus shedding and/or increase in virus neutralizing titers. Nevertheless, viral DNA was detected in the trigeminal ganglia or olfactory bulbs of all animals at day 28 post-Dx, demonstrating they were latently infected. These results show that recombinants BoHV-5TKΔ and BoHV-5gEΔTKΔ are attenuated for rabbits and constitute potential vaccine candidates upon the confirmation of this phenotype in cattle.

  5. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LESIONS IN PERIPHERAL GANGLIA IN CHIMPANZEE AND IN HUMAN POLIOMYELITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodian, David; Howe, Howard A.

    1947-01-01

    1. The peripheral ganglia of eighteen inoculated chimpanzees and thirteen uninoculated controls, and of eighteen fatal human poliomyelitis cases, were studied for histopathological evidence of the route of transmission of virus from the alimentary tract to the CNS. 2. Lesions thought to be characteristic of poliomyelitis in inoculated chimpanzees could not be sharply differentiated from lesions of unknown origin in uninoculated control animals. Moreover, although the inoculated animals as a group, in comparison with the control animals, had a greater number of infiltrative lesions in sympathetic as well as in sensory ganglia, it was not possible to make satisfactory correlations between the distribution of these lesions and the routes of inoculation. 3. In sharp contrast with chimpanzees, the celiac and stellate ganglia of the human poliomyelitis cases were free of any but insignificant infiltrative lesions. Lesions in human trigeminal and spinal sensory ganglia included neuronal damage as well as focal and perivascular inflitrative lesions, as is well known. In most ganglia, as in monkey and chimpanzee sensory ganglia, these were correlated in intensify with the degree of severity of lesions in the region of the CNS receiving their axons. This suggested that lesions in sensory ganglia probably resulted from spread of virus centrifugally from the CNS, in accord with considerable experimental evidence. 4. Two principal difficulties in the interpretation of histopathological findings in peripheral ganglia were revealed by this study. The first is that the specificity of lesions in sympathetic ganglia has not been established beyond doubt as being due to poliomyelitis. The second is that the presence of characteristic lesions in sensory ganglia does not, and cannot, reveal whether the virus reached the ganglia from the periphery or from the central nervous system, except in very early preparalytic stages or in exceptional cases of early arrest of virus spread and of

  6. Botulinum toxin in trigeminal neuralgia.

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    Castillo-Álvarez, Federico; Hernando de la Bárcena, Ignacio; Marzo-Sola, María Eugenia

    2017-01-06

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most disabling facial pain syndromes, with a significant impact on patients' quality of life. Pharmacotherapy is the first choice for treatment but cases of drug resistance often require new strategies, among which various interventional treatments have been used. In recent years a new therapeutic strategy consisting of botulinum toxin has emerged, with promising results. We reviewed clinical cases and case series, open-label studies and randomized clinical trials examining the use of botulinum toxin for drug-refractory trigeminal neuralgia published in the literature. The administration of botulinum toxin has proven to be a safe and effective therapeutic strategy in patients with drug-refractory idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia, but many questions remain unanswered as to the precise role of botulinum toxin in the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  8. [Herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, V; Leonardi, A; Pavese, M; Raviola, E; Giordano, M

    2004-01-01

    Herpes zoster (shingles) is caused when the varicella zoster virus that has remained latent since an earlier varicella infection (chicken-pox) is reactivated. Herpes Zoster is a less common and endemic disease than varicella: factors causing reactivation are still not well known, but it occurs in older and/or immunocompromised individuals. Following reactivation, centrifugal migration of herpes zoster virus (HZV) occurs along sensory nerves to produce a characteristic painful cutaneous or mucocutaneous vesicular eruption that is generally limited to the single affected dermatome. Herpes zoster may affect any sensory ganglia and its cutaneous nerve: the most common sites affected are thoracic dermatomes (56%), followed by cranial nerves (13%) and lumbar (13%), cervical (11%) and sacral nerves (4%). Among cranial nerves, the trigeminal and facial nerves are the most affected due to reactivation of HZV latent in gasserian and geniculated ganglia. The 1st division of the trigeminal nerve is commonly affected, whereas the 2nd and the 3rd are rarely involved. During the prodromal stage, the only presenting symptom may be odontalgia, which may prove to be a diagnostic challenge for the dentist, since many diseases can cause orofacial pain, and the diagnosis must be established before final treatment. A literature review of herpes zoster of the trigeminal nerve is presented and the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis and treatment modalities are underlined. A case report is presented.

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes cellular changes in trigeminal neurons and glia implicated in peripheral and central sensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cady Ryan J

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, a neuropeptide released from trigeminal nerves, is implicated in the underlying pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD. Elevated levels of CGRP in the joint capsule correlate with inflammation and pain. CGRP mediates neurogenic inflammation in peripheral tissues by increasing blood flow, recruiting immune cells, and activating sensory neurons. The goal of this study was to investigate the capability of CGRP to promote peripheral and central sensitization in a model of TMD. Results Temporal changes in protein expression in trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus were determined by immunohistochemistry following injection of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ capsule of male Sprague-Dawley rats. CGRP stimulated expression of the active forms of the MAP kinases p38 and ERK, and PKA in trigeminal ganglia at 2 and 24 hours. CGRP also caused a sustained increase in the expression of c-Fos neurons in the spinal trigeminal nucleus. In contrast, levels of P2X3 in spinal neurons were only significantly elevated at 2 hours in response to CGRP. In addition, CGRP stimulated expression of GFAP in astrocytes and OX-42 in microglia at 2 and 24 hours post injection. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that an elevated level of CGRP in the joint, which is associated with TMD, stimulate neuronal and glial expression of proteins implicated in the development of peripheral and central sensitization. Based on our findings, we propose that inhibition of CGRP-mediated activation of trigeminal neurons and glial cells with selective non-peptide CGRP receptor antagonists would be beneficial in the treatment of TMD.

  10. Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of arachnoidal adhesion and its neuroendoscopic confirmation for trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mami Ishikawa, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Straightening the trigeminal nerve axis by complete dissection of the arachnoidal adhesion around the trigeminal nerve was effective for typical trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression.

  11. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hong Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yoo, In Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen

  12. MR findings of trigeminal neurinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hong Suk; Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yoo, In Kyu; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kyoung Won; Jung, Hee Won; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-08-01

    To describe the MRI findings of trigeminal neurinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the MRI findings of 19 patients with trigeminal neurinomas proven by surgery and pathologic examination. Axial T1- and T2-weighted MR images in all patients and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in 14 patients were obtained at 2.0T(8 cases), 1.5T(6 cases) or 0.5T(5 cases). These were analyzed in terms of tumor size, signal intensity, degree of contrast enhancement, the presence or absence of cystic change and denervation atrophy of the masticator muscles. Clinical manifestations included sensory abnormality or pain(n=12), headache(n=10), impaired visual acuity or diplopia(n=6), hearing loss or tinnitus(n=3), weakness of masticator muscles(n=2), and mass or nasal obstruction(n=2). On MR images, tumor size was seen to average 4.2(range 1.5-6)cm;tumors were located in the posterior cranial fossa(n=8), middle cranial fossa(n=4), ophthalmic nerve(n=2), maxillary nerve(n=1), and mandibular nerve(n=1), and in three cases were dumbbell-shaped and extended into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa. On T1-weighted images, signals were isointense with cortical grey matter, in ten cases(53%), and of low intensity in nine (47%);on T2-weighted images, signals were of high intensity in 15cases(79%) and were isointense in four (21%). Cystic change was seen in 12 cases(63%). After enhancement, all (14/14) the tumors enhanced. Denervation atrophy was seen in nine cases(47%) and all of these involved the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve. A trigeminal neurinoma shows similar signal intensity and enhancement to other cranial neurinomas with a higher incidence of cystic degeneration. Its location and shape are characteristic, and where there is involvement of the trigeminal ganglion or mandibular nerve, denervation atrophy may be seen.

  13. A thymidine kinase-negative bovine herpesvirus 5 is highly attenuated for rabbits, but is neuroinvasive and establishes latent infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Campos da Silva

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutant viral strains deleted in non-essential genes represent useful tools to study the function of specific gene products in the biology of the virus. We herein describe an investigation on the phenotype of a bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5 recombinant deleted in the gene encoding the enzyme thymidine kinase (TK in rabbits, with special emphasis to neuroinvasiveness and the ability to establish and reactivate latent infection. Rabbits inoculated with the parental virus (SV-507/99 (n=18 at a low titer (10(5.5TCID50 shed virus in nasal secretions in titers up to 10(4.5TCID50 for up to 12 days (average: 9.8 days [5-12] and 5/ 16 developed neurological disease and were euthanized in extremis. Rabbits inoculated with the recombinant BoHV-5TKΔ at a high dose (10(7.1TCID50 also shed virus in nasal secretions, yet to lower titers (maximum: 10(2.3TCID50 and for a shorter period (average: 6.6 days [2-11] and remained healthy. PCR examination of brain sections of inoculated rabbits at day 6 post-infection (pi revealed a widespread distribution of the parental virus, whereas DNA of the recombinant BoHV-5TKΔ-was detected only in the trigeminal ganglia [TG] and olfactory bulbs [OB]. Nevertheless, during latent infection (52pi, DNA of the recombinant virus was detected in the TGs, OBs and also in other areas of the brain, demonstrating the ability of the virus to invade the brain. Dexamethasone (Dx administration at day 65 pi was followed by virus reactivation and shedding by 5/8 rabbits inoculated with the parental strain (mean duration of 4.2 days [1 - 9] and by none of seven rabbits inoculated with the recombinant virus. Again, PCR examination at day 30 post-Dx treatment revealed the presence of latent DNA in the TGs, OBs and in other areas of the brain of both groups. Taken together, these results confirm that the recombinant BoHV-5TKΔ is highly attenuated for rabbits. It shows a reduced ability to replicate in the nose but retains the ability to invade

  14. Trigeminal Neuropathy in Sjogren′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuropathy is the most common CNS disorder in Sjogren′s syndrome. It is believed to be caused by vasculitis. Unless this is recognised, a diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia is often made. The therapeutic response to steroids is unpredictable. There are two subgroups - those with associated collagen disorders and those only with the sicca syndrome.

  15. Massive Submucosal Ganglia in Colonic Inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naemi, Kaveh; Stamos, Michael J; Wu, Mark Li-Cheng

    2018-02-01

    - Colonic inertia is a debilitating form of primary chronic constipation with unknown etiology and diagnostic criteria, often requiring pancolectomy. We have occasionally observed massively enlarged submucosal ganglia containing at least 20 perikarya, in addition to previously described giant ganglia with greater than 8 perikarya, in cases of colonic inertia. These massively enlarged ganglia have yet to be formally recognized. - To determine whether such "massive submucosal ganglia," defined as ganglia harboring at least 20 perikarya, characterize colonic inertia. - We retrospectively reviewed specimens from colectomies of patients with colonic inertia and compared the prevalence of massive submucosal ganglia occurring in this setting to the prevalence of massive submucosal ganglia occurring in a set of control specimens from patients lacking chronic constipation. - Seven of 8 specimens affected by colonic inertia harbored 1 to 4 massive ganglia, for a total of 11 massive ganglia. One specimen lacked massive ganglia but had limited sampling and nearly massive ganglia. Massive ganglia occupied both superficial and deep submucosal plexus. The patient with 4 massive ganglia also had 1 mitotically active giant ganglion. Only 1 massive ganglion occupied the entire set of 10 specimens from patients lacking chronic constipation. - We performed the first, albeit distinctly small, study of massive submucosal ganglia and showed that massive ganglia may be linked to colonic inertia. Further, larger studies are necessary to determine whether massive ganglia are pathogenetic or secondary phenomena, and whether massive ganglia or mitotically active ganglia distinguish colonic inertia from other types of chronic constipation.

  16. Repression of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in trigeminal neurons by a Theobroma cacao extract☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Marcie J.; Patil, Vinit V.; Vause, Carrie V.; Durham, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Cocoa bean preparations were first used by the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations of South America to treat a variety of medical ailments involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Diets rich in foods containing abundant polyphenols, as found in cocoa, underlie the protective effects reported in chronic inflammatory diseases. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal nerves promotes inflammation in peripheral tissues and nociception. Aim of the study To determine whether a methanol extract of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) beans enriched for polyphenols could inhibit CGRP expression, both an in vitro and an in vivo approach was taken. Results Treatment of rat trigeminal ganglia cultures with depolarizing stimuli caused a significant increase in CGRP release that was repressed by pretreatment with Theobroma cacao extract. Pretreatment with Theobroma cacao was also shown to block the KCl- and capsaicin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Next, the effects of Theobroma cacao on CGRP levels were determined using an in vivo model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ capsule caused an ipsilateral decrease in CGRP levels. Theobroma cacao extract injected into the TMJ capsule 24 h prior to capsaicin treatment repressed the stimulatory effects of capsaicin. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Theobroma cacao extract can repress stimulated CGRP release by a mechanism that likely involves blockage of calcium channel activity. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of diets rich in cocoa may include suppression of sensory trigeminal nerve activation. PMID:17997062

  17. Repression of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in trigeminal neurons by a Theobroma cacao extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Marcie J; Patil, Vinit V; Vause, Carrie V; Durham, Paul L

    2008-01-17

    Cocoa bean preparations were first used by the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations of South America to treat a variety of medical ailments involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Diets rich in foods containing abundant polyphenols, as found in cocoa, underlie the protective effects reported in chronic inflammatory diseases. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal nerves promotes inflammation in peripheral tissues and nociception. To determine whether a methanol extract of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) beans enriched for polyphenols could inhibit CGRP expression, both an in vitro and an in vivo approach was taken. Treatment of rat trigeminal ganglia cultures with depolarizing stimuli caused a significant increase in CGRP release that was repressed by pretreatment with Theobroma cacao extract. Pretreatment with Theobroma cacao was also shown to block the KCl- and capsaicin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Next, the effects of Theobroma cacao on CGRP levels were determined using an in vivo model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ capsule caused an ipsilateral decrease in CGRP levels. Theobroma cacao extract injected into the TMJ capsule 24h prior to capsaicin treatment repressed the stimulatory effects of capsaicin. Our results demonstrate that Theobroma cacao extract can repress stimulated CGRP release by a mechanism that likely involves blockage of calcium channel activity. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of diets rich in cocoa may include suppression of sensory trigeminal nerve activation.

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia: report of 3 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geum Mee; Ki, Joo Yeon; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo

    2002-01-01

    Orofacial pain can be caused by intracranial disorders or can be musculoskeletal, vascular, internal derangemental, and neurologic in origin. The neurologic pain is derived from structural and functional disorders of nerve, and the trigeminal neuralgia is the typical manifestation. Trigeminal neuralgia is known from centuries ago, and is one of the most common pains in human. We present our experience with three patients who have trigeminal neuralgia. The first case is a 50-year-old female who had no specific evidence radiographically. Second is a 50-year-old male with microvascular compression on right trigeminal nerve. The third case is a 60-year-old female who had a neoplasm in cerebellopontine angle with associated mass effect.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia: report of 3 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Geum Mee; Ki, Joo Yeon; Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo [College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Orofacial pain can be caused by intracranial disorders or can be musculoskeletal, vascular, internal derangemental, and neurologic in origin. The neurologic pain is derived from structural and functional disorders of nerve, and the trigeminal neuralgia is the typical manifestation. Trigeminal neuralgia is known from centuries ago, and is one of the most common pains in human. We present our experience with three patients who have trigeminal neuralgia. The first case is a 50-year-old female who had no specific evidence radiographically. Second is a 50-year-old male with microvascular compression on right trigeminal nerve. The third case is a 60-year-old female who had a neoplasm in cerebellopontine angle with associated mass effect.

  20. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Kodrat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a debilitating pain syndrome with a distinct symptom mainly excruciating facial pain that tends to come and go unpredictably in sudden shock-like attacks. Medical management remains the primary treatment for classical trigeminal neuralgia. When medical therapy failed, surgery with microvascular decompression can be performed. Radiosurgery can be offered for classical trigeminal neuralgia patients who are not surgical candidate or surgery refusal and they should not in acute pain condition. Radiosurgery is widely used because of good therapeutic result and low complication rate. Weakness of this technique is a latency period, which is time required for pain relief. It usually ranges from 1 to 2 months. This review enlightens the important role of radiosurgery in the treatment of classical trigeminal neuralgia.

  1. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.; Khan, B.; Khan, A.A.; Afridi, E.A.A.; Mehmood, S.; Muhammad, G.; Hussain, I.; Zadran, K.K.; Bhatti, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) is the most frequently diagnosed type of facial pain. In idiopathic type of TGN it is caused by the neuro-vascular conflict involving trigeminal nerve. Microvascular decompression (MVD) aims at addressing this basic pathology in the idiopathic type of TGN. This study was conducted to determine the outcome and complications of patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD. Method: In a descriptive case series patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD were included in consecutive manner. Patients were diagnosed on the basis of detailed history and clinical examination. Retromastoid approach with craniectomy was used to access cerebellopontine angle (CP-angle) and microsurgical decompression was done. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Results: A total of 53 patients underwent MVD with mean age of 51.6±4.2 years and male predominance. In majority of cases (58.4 percentage) both Maxillary and Mandibular divisions were involved. Per-operatively superior cerebellar artery (SCA) was causing the neuro-vascular conflict in 33 (62.2 percentage) of the cases, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in 6 (11.3 percentage) cases, both CSA and AICA in 3 (5.6 percentage) cases, venous compressions in only 1 (1.8percentage) patient and thick arachnoid adhesions were seen in 10 (18.9 percentage) patients. Postoperatively, 33 (68 percentage) patients were pain free, in 14 (26.45 percentage) patients pain was significantly improved whereas in 3 (5.6 percentage) patients there was mild improvement in symptoms. Three (5.6 percentage) patients did not improve after the primary surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak was encountered in 7 (13.2 percentage) patients post-operatively, 4 (7.5 percentage) patients developed wound infection and 1 (1.8 percentage) patient developed aseptic meningitis. Three (5.6 percentage) patients had transient VII nerve palsy while one patient developed permanent VII nerve palsy. Conclusion: MVD is a safe and

  2. Malignant Lesions as Mammographically Appearing Intramammary Ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Miraveta, P.; Pons, M. J.; Pina, L. J.; Zornoza, G.

    2004-01-01

    Intramammary ganglia are frequent mammographic findings of no pathological importance. We present two cases of malignant breast lesions whose mammographic appearance could resemble that of intramammary ganglia. Although the mammographic appearance of a lesion is similar to that of intramammary ganglia, it should be carefully studied, especially if it presents a poorly defined border or is palpable. (Author)

  3. Trigeminal induced arousals during human sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Clemens; Baja, Jan; Lenz, Franziska; Sommer, J Ulrich; Hörmann, Karl; Herr, Raphael M; Stuck, Boris A

    2015-05-01

    Arousals caused by external stimuli during human sleep have been studied for most of the sensorial systems. It could be shown that a pure nasal trigeminal stimulus leads to arousals during sleep. The frequency of arousals increases dependent on the stimulus concentration. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of different stimulus durations on arousal frequency during different sleep stages. Ten young healthy volunteers with 20 nights of polysomnography were included in the study. Pure trigeminal stimulation with both different concentrations of CO2 (0, 10, 20, 40% v/v) and different stimulus durations (1, 3, 5, and 10 s) were applied during different sleep stages to the volunteers using an olfactometer. The application was performed during different sleep stages (light sleep, deep sleep, REM sleep). The number of arousals increased with rising stimulus duration and stimulus concentration during each sleep stage. Trigeminal stimuli during sleep led to arousals in dose- and time-dependent manner.

  4. MR imaging of persistent primitive trigeminal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikaga, Ryuichiro; Araki, Yutaka; Ono, Yukihiko; Ishida, Osamu; Mabuchi, Nobuhisa.

    1997-01-01

    The persistent trigeminal artery is the most common anomaly of the primitive carotid-vertebrobasilar anastomoses. We reviewed MR images and MR angiographies of 11 patients with primitive trigeminal artery. In 8 of the 11 cases, PTA were identified with conventional long TR spin-echo images. In 8 of 11 cases, a hypoplastic basilar trunk associated with PTA was seen on both MR images and MR angiographies. In 7 of 11 cases, a hypoplasia or agenesis of the ipsilateral posterior communicating artery was seen on MR angiographies. (author)

  5. Small-fiber dysfunction in trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruccu, G.; Leandri, M.; Iannetti, G. D.

    2001-01-01

    Background: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, results of clinical examination of sensory function are normal. Reflex and evoked potential studies have already provided information on large-afferent (non-nociceptive) function. Using laser-evoked potentials (LEP), the authors sought information...... was significantly longer than that of the age-matched controls. The nonpainful-side latency correlated significantly with the carbamazepine dose. Conclusions: LEP detect severe impairment of the nociceptive afferent system on the painful side of patients with idiopathic as well as symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia...

  6. MRI analysis of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ling; Chai Weimin; Song Qi; Ling Huawei; Miao Fei; Chen Kemin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia by magnetic resonance tomographic angiography (MRTA). Methods: MRTA images of 235 asymptomatic trigeminal nerves and 147 symptomatic trigeminal nerves were analyzed by two radiologists who were blinded to the clinical findings. Judgment was made on if there were some vessels close to the trigeminal nerve. The diameter of the offending vessel, the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve were also recorded at the same time. Group t-test and Chi-Square test were used for statistics. Results: Two hundred and forty-two trigeminal nerves of all 382 nerves can be detected offending vessels on MRTA images, 111 of 242 trigeminal nerves were asymptomatic, the rest 131 were symptomatic. Statistical analysis indicated that the distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons in symptomatic group (the median is 2 mm) was shorter than that in the asymptomatic group (the median is 4 mm) (P<0.01). In 89.3% cases (117/131) of the symptomatic group the angle between the vessel and the nerve is larger than 45 degree, but only in 67.6% cases (75/111) in the asymptomatic group the angle is larger than 45 degree. That means significant difference is between the two groups (P<0.01). Vessel-nerve compression can be seen in 1 case of asymptomatic group (0.4%, 1/235) and 45 eases in symptomatic group (30.6%, 45/147). The vessel-nerve compression rate of the symptomatic group was much higher than that of the asymptomatic group (P<0.01). Conclusion: MR is a useful tool to evaluate the offending vessels of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. The distance from the offending vessel's contact point to the pons and the direction of the vessel toward the nerve are related to the onset of vascular compressive trigeminal neuralgia. (authors)

  7. Trigeminal perineural spread of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornik, Alejandro; Rosenblum, Jordan; Biller, Jose

    2012-01-01

    A 55-year-old man had a five-day history of “pins and needles” sensation on the left chin. Examination showed decreased pinprick sensation on the territory of the left mandibular branch of the trigeminal nerve. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadolinium showed enhancement involving the left mandibular branch. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis showed a left kidney mass diagnosed as renal carcinoma following nephrectomy. The “numb-chin” syndrome heralds or accompanies systemic malignancies. Trigeminal perineural spread has been well-documented in head and neck neoplasms, however, to our knowledge, it has not been reported in renal neoplasms. (author)

  8. Distribution of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 genomes in human spinal ganglia studied by PCR and in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Y; Furuta, Y; Takasu, T; Suzuki, S; Suzuki, H; Matsukawa, S; Fujioka, Y; Takahashi, H; Kurata, T; Nagashima, K

    1997-06-01

    Clinical data indicate that the recurring herpes simplex virus (HSV) from oro-labial lesions is HSV subtype 1 and that the virus from genital lesions is HSV-2. This suggests that HSV-1 and HSV-2 reside in latent forms in the trigeminal ganglia and sacral ganglia, respectively. However, the distribution of latent HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in human spinal ganglia has not been fully examined. This report concerns the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) to such a study. By using PCR and employing the respective primers, HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNAs were detected in 207 of 524 samples from 262 spinal ganglia (from the cervical to the sacral ganglia) examined on both sides. The percentages of HSV-1 and HSV-2 detected in a given set of ganglia were similar, indicating an absence of site preference. By ISH, few but positive hybridization signals were detected evenly in sacral ganglia sections. The data suggest that regional specificity of recurrent HSV infections is not due to regional distribution of latent virus, but that local host factors may be important for recurrences.

  9. CONTRACTION CHARACTERISTICS AND MYOSIN HEAVY-CHAIN COMPOSITION OF RABBIT MASSETER MOTOR UNITS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KWA, SHS; WEIJS, WA; JUCH, PJW

    1. We studied isometric twitch peak force (TPF) and twitch contraction time (TCT) of 249 motor units of the masseter muscle in 41 rabbits after extracellular electrical stimulation of single trigeminal motoneurons in the brain stem. In 41 of these units we determined the amount of tension decrease

  10. Characterization of herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcription in human sacral ganglia and in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croen, K D; Ostrove, J M; Dragovic, L; Straus, S E

    1991-01-01

    The ability of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) to establish latency in and reactivate from sacral dorsal root sensory ganglia is the basis for recurrent genital herpes. The expression of HSV-2 genes in latently infected human sacral ganglia was investigated by in situ hybridization. Hybridizations with a probe from the long repeat region of HSV-2 revealed strong nuclear signals overlying neurons in sacral ganglia from five of nine individuals. The RNA detected overlaps with the transcript for infected cell protein O but in the opposite, or "anti-sense," orientation. These observations mimic those made previously with HSV-1 in human trigeminal ganglia and confirm the recent findings during latency in HSV-2-infected mice and guinea pigs. Northern hybridization of RNA from infected Vero cells showed that an HSV-2 latency-associated transcript was similar in size to the larger (1.85 kb) latency transcript of HSV-1. Thus, HSV-1 and HSV-2 latency in human sensory ganglia are similar, if not identical, in terms of their cellular localization and pattern of transcription.

  11. Structural magnetic resonance imaging can identify trigeminal system abnormalities in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle DeSouza

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one ofthe most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN.

  12. Ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve: MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athale, S.; Jinkins, J.R. [Neuroradiology Section, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 F. Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78284-7800 (United States); Hallet, K.K. [Neuropathology Department, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Ganglioglioma of the cranial nerves is extremely rare; only a few cases involving the optic nerves have been reported. We present a case of ganglioglioma of the trigeminal nerve, which was isointense with the brain stem on all MRI sequences and showed no contrast enhancement. (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  13. Idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy in a poodle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Aparicio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A seven years old, male poodle is examined presenting acute mandible paralysis (dropped jaw, drooling and difficulty for the apprehension and chewing; not evidence of an other alteration of cranial nerves. The muscular biopsy rules out a myositisof masticatory muscles. The disorder is resolved completely in 3 weeks confirming diagnosis of idiopathic trigeminal neuropathy.

  14. Management of trigeminal neuralgia by radiofrequency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outcome depends on the type of TN with best results with classical idiopathic type. Also better results occurred with isolated V3 affection. The radiofrequency thermocoagulation of trigeminal nerve is a low risk, highly effective and minimally invasive procedure that should be started with in all cases of TN.

  15. Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia using Amitriptyline and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a clinical condition presenting with severe, paroxysmal facial pain, often described by patients also known as tic douloureux. Carbamazepine (CBZ) is the drug of choice, but some patients develop adverse effects and some others may become unresponsive to CBZ. We present three cases of TN ...

  16. Uncovering the Forgotten Effect of Superior Cervical Ganglia on Pupil Diameter in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Yilmaz, Ilhan; Ramazanoglu, Leyla; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Keles, Sadullah; Baykal, Orhan; Aydin, Nazan; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between neuron density of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglia and pupil diameter in subarachnoid hemorrhage. This study was conducted on 22 rabbits; 5 for the baseline control group, 5 for the SHAM group and 12 for the study group. Pupil diameters were measured via sunlight and ocular tomography on day 1 as the control values. Pupil diameters were re-measured after injecting 0.5 cc saline to the SHAM group, and autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna of the study group. After 3 weeks, the brain, superior cervical sympathetic ganglia and ciliary ganglia were extracted with peripheral tissues bilaterally and examined histopathologically. Pupil diameters were compared with neuron densities of the sympathetic ganglia and ciliary ganglia which were examined using stereological methods. Baseline values were; normal pupil diameter 7.180±620 ?m and mean neuron density of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglia 6.321±510/mm3, degenerated neuron density of ciliary ganglia was 5±2/mm3 after histopathological examination in the control group. These values were measured as 6.850±578 ?m, 5.950±340/mm3 and 123±39/mm3 in the SHAM group and 9.910±840 ?m, 7.950±764/mm3 and 650±98/mm3 in the study group. A linear relationship was determined between neuron density of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglia and pupil diameters (p < 0.005). Degenerated ciliary ganglia neuron density had an inverse effect on pupil diameters in all groups (p < 0.0001). Highly degenerated neuron density of the ciliary ganglion is not responsible for pupil dilatation owing to parasympathetic pupilloconstrictor palsy, but high neuron density of the pupillodilatatory superior cervical sympathetic ganglia should be considered an important factor for pupil dilatation.

  17. Rabbit analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    With the increasing popularity of rabbits as household pets, the complexity of diagnostic and surgical procedures performed on rabbits is increasing, along with the frequency of routine surgical procedures. More practitioners are faced with the need to provide adequate analgesia for this species. Preemptive analgesia prior to planned surgical interventions may reduce nervous system changes in response to noxious input, as well as reduce postoperative pain levels and analgesic drug requirements. Concurrent administration of analgesic drugs to anesthetized rabbits undergoing painful procedures is warranted both pre- and intraoperatively as well as postoperatively. This article discusses the neuropharmacologic and pharmacologic aspects of pain in rabbits, and reviews current protocols for the use of analgesic drugs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Facial hyperalgesia due to direct action of endothelin-1 in the trigeminal ganglion of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Lenyta Oliveira; Chichorro, Juliana Geremias; Araya, Erika Ivanna; de Oliveira, Jade; Rae, Giles Alexander

    2018-03-23

    This study assessed the ability of endothelin-1 (ET-1) to evoke heat hyperalgesia when injected directly into the trigeminal ganglia (TG) of mice and determined the receptors implicated in this effect. The effects of TG ET A and ET B receptor blockade on alleviation of heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain induced by infraorbital nerve constriction (CION) were also examined. Naive mice received an intraganglionar (i.g.) injection of ET-1 (0.3-3 pmol) or the selective ET B R agonist sarafotoxin S6c (3-30 pmol), and response latencies to ipsilateral heat stimulation were assessed before the treatment and at 1-h intervals up to 5 h after the treatment. Heat hyperalgesia induced by i.g. ET-1 or CION was assessed after i.g. injections of ET A R and ET B R antagonists (BQ-123 and BQ-788, respectively, each at 0.5 nmol). Intraganglionar ET-1 or sarafotoxin S6c injection induced heat hyperalgesia lasting 4 and 2 h, respectively. Heat hyperalgesia induced by ET-1 was attenuated by i.g. BQ-123 or BQ-788. On day 5 after CION, i.g. BQ-788 injection produced a more robust antihyperalgesic effect compared with BQ-123. ET-1 injection into the TG promotes ET A R/ET B R-mediated facial heat hyperalgesia, and both receptors are clearly implicated in CION-induced hyperalgesia in the murine TG system. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  19. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1990-05-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs.

  20. Positron emission tomography and basal ganglia functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Motohiro; Otsuka, Makoto; Taniwaki, Koukyo; Hosokawa, Shinichi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi

    1990-01-01

    With the advent of positron emission tomography (PET), studies on the human brain function and pathophysiology of brain damage have been extremely progressed. It is well-known that the basal ganglia plays an important role as one of the central nervous system involved in exercise regulation. More recently, the potential involvement of the basal ganglia in psychological processes, such as cognitive function, has been pointed out, receiving much attention. In spite of such a lot of studies, however, basal ganglia function remains unclear. This paper describes the relationships between PET findings and basal ganglia function. PET findings are discussed in relation to brain energy metabolism and striatal dopamine function. Pathophysiology of the basal ganglia are described in terms of the following diseases: Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's syndrome, progressive supranuclear palsy, Huntington's disease, and dystonia. Physiological backgrounds of the basal ganglia for PET images are also referred to. (N.K.) 75 refs

  1. Effect of the gamma knife treatment on the trigeminal nerve root in Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi-Xiu; Qian, Wei; Wu, Yu-Quan; Sun, Fang-Jie; Fei, Jun; Huang, Run-Sheng; Fang, Jing-Yu; Wu, Cai-Zhen; An, You-Ming; Wang, Daxin; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of the gamma knife treating the trigeminal neuralgia. Using the MASEP-SRRS type gamma knife treatment system, 140 Chinese patients with trigeminal neuralgia (NT) were treated in our hospital from 2002 to 2010, in which the pain relief rate reached 95% and recurrence rate was 3% only. We investigated the effect of the gamma knife treatment on the trigeminal nerve root in 20 Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia by the magnetic resonance imager (MRI) observation. 1) The cross-sectional area of trigeminal nerve root became smaller and MRI signals were lower in the treatment side than those in the non-treatment side after the gamma knife treatment of primary trigeminal neuralgia; 2) in the treatment side, the cross-sectional area of the trigeminal nerve root decreased significantly after the gamma knife treatment; 3) there was good correlation between the clinical improvement and the MRI findings; and 4) the straight distance between the trigeminal nerve root and the brainstem did not change after the gamma knife treatment. The pain relief induced the gamma knife radiosurgery might be related with the atrophy of the trigeminal nerve root in Chinese patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.

  2. Preventive Role of Hilar Parasympathetic Ganglia on Pulmonary Artery Vasospasm in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araz, Omer; Aydin, Mehmet Dumlu; Gundogdu, Betul; Altas, Ender; Cakir, Murteza; Calikoglu, Cagatay; Atalay, Canan; Gundogdu, Cemal

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arteries are mainly innervated by sympathetic vasoconstrictor and parasympathetic vasodilatory fibers. We examined whether there is a relationship between the neuron densities of hilar parasympathetic ganglia and pulmonary vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Twenty-four rabbits were divided into two groups: control (n=8) and SAH (n=16). The animals were observed for 20 days following experimental SAH. The number of hilar parasympathetic ganglia and their neuron densities were determined. Proportion of pulmonary artery ring surface to lumen surface values was accepted as vasospasm index (VSI). Neuron densities of the hilar ganglia and VSI values were compared statistically. Animals in the SAH group experienced either mild (n=6) or severe (n=10) pulmonary artery vasospasm. In the control group, the mean VSI of pulmonary arteries was 0.777±0.048 and the hilar ganglion neuron density was estimated as 12.100±2.010/mm 3 . In SAH animals with mild vasospasm, VSI=1.148±0.090 and neuron density was estimated as 10.110±1.430/mm 3 ; in animals with severe vasospasm, VSI=1.500±0.120 and neuron density was estimated as 7.340±990/mm 3 . There was an inverse correlation between quantity and neuron density of hilar ganglia and vasospasm index value. The low numbers and low density of hilar parasympathetic ganglia may be responsible for the more severe artery vasospasm in SAH.

  3. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschini Alessia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT or knock-in (KI mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. Results KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Conclusions Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  4. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Alessia; Nair, Asha; Bele, Tanja; van den Maagdenberg, Arn Mjm; Nistri, Andrea; Fabbretti, Elsa

    2012-11-21

    Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT) or knock-in (KI) mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q) found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells) strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  5. Functional neuroanatomy of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciego, José L; Luquin, Natasha; Obeso, José A

    2012-12-01

    The "basal ganglia" refers to a group of subcortical nuclei responsible primarily for motor control, as well as other roles such as motor learning, executive functions and behaviors, and emotions. Proposed more than two decades ago, the classical basal ganglia model shows how information flows through the basal ganglia back to the cortex through two pathways with opposing effects for the proper execution of movement. Although much of the model has remained, the model has been modified and amplified with the emergence of new data. Furthermore, parallel circuits subserve the other functions of the basal ganglia engaging associative and limbic territories. Disruption of the basal ganglia network forms the basis for several movement disorders. This article provides a comprehensive account of basal ganglia functional anatomy and chemistry and the major pathophysiological changes underlying disorders of movement. We try to answer three key questions related to the basal ganglia, as follows: What are the basal ganglia? What are they made of? How do they work? Some insight on the canonical basal ganglia model is provided, together with a selection of paradoxes and some views over the horizon in the field.

  6. Migraine attacks the Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bigal Marcelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With time, episodes of migraine headache afflict patients with increased frequency, longer duration and more intense pain. While episodic migraine may be defined as 1-14 attacks per month, there are no clear-cut phases defined, and those patients with low frequency may progress to high frequency episodic migraine and the latter may progress into chronic daily headache (> 15 attacks per month. The pathophysiology of this progression is completely unknown. Attempting to unravel this phenomenon, we used high field (human brain imaging to compare functional responses, functional connectivity and brain morphology in patients whose migraine episodes did not progress (LF to a matched (gender, age, age of onset and type of medication group of patients whose migraine episodes progressed (HF. Results In comparison to LF patients, responses to pain in HF patients were significantly lower in the caudate, putamen and pallidum. Paradoxically, associated with these lower responses in HF patients, gray matter volume of the right and left caudate nuclei were significantly larger than in the LF patients. Functional connectivity analysis revealed additional differences between the two groups in regard to response to pain. Conclusions Supported by current understanding of basal ganglia role in pain processing, the findings suggest a significant role of the basal ganglia in the pathophysiology of the episodic migraine.

  7. Olfactory dysfunction affects thresholds to trigeminal chemosensory sensations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasnelli, J; Schuster, B; Hummel, T

    2010-01-14

    Next to olfaction and gustation, the trigeminal system represents a third chemosensory system. These senses are interconnected; a loss of olfactory function also leads to a reduced sensitivity in the trigeminal chemosensory system. However, most studies so far focused on comparing trigeminal sensitivity to suprathreshold stimuli; much less data is available with regard to trigeminal sensitivity in the perithreshold range. Therefore we assessed detection thresholds for CO(2), a relatively pure trigeminal stimulus in controls and in patients with olfactory dysfunction (OD). We could show that OD patients exhibit higher detection thresholds than controls. In addition, we were able to explore the effects of different etiologies of smell loss on trigeminal detection thresholds. We could show that in younger subjects, patients suffering from olfactory loss due to head trauma are more severely impaired with regard to their trigeminal sensitivity than patients with isolated congenital anosmia. In older patients, we could not observe any differences between different etiologies, probably due to the well known age-related decrease of trigeminal sensitivity. Furthermore we could show that a betterment of the OD was accompanied by decreased thresholds. This was most evident in patients with postviral OD. In conclusion, factors such as age, olfactory status and etiology of olfactory disorder can affect responsiveness to perithreshold trigeminal chemosensory stimuli. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Trigeminal Trophic Syndrome – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Matos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 1024x768 Trigeminal trophic syndrome is a rare condition resulting from compulsive self-manipulation of the skin after a peripheral or central injury to the trigeminal system. The classic triad consists of trigeminal anesthesia, facial paresthesias, and crescentric lateral nasal alar erosion and ulceration. Although the symptoms are visibly clear, the diagnosis is not easy to establish. The appearance of the ulcers mimics many other disease entities such as neoplasm, infection, granulomatous disease, vasculitis and factitial dermatitis. Trigeminal trophic syndrome should be considered with a positive neurologic history and when laboratory and biopsy workup is inconclusive. Once diagnosis is confirmed, treatment is complicated and often multidisciplinary. We report a case of a woman who developed a strictly unilateral crescent ulcer of the ala nasi after resection of an statoacoustic neurinoma. A clinician who is faced with a patient with nasal ulceration should consider this diagnosis.     Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  9. Trigeminal nerve injury-induced thrombospondin-4 up-regulation contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K-W; Kim, D-S; Zaucke, F; Luo, Z D

    2014-04-01

    Injury to the trigeminal nerve often results in the development of chronic pain states including tactile allodynia, or hypersensitivity to light touch, in orofacial area, but its underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to cause up-regulation of thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) in dorsal spinal cord that correlates with neuropathic pain development. In this study, we examined whether injury-induced TSP4 is critical in mediating orofacial pain development in a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve. Orofacial sensitivity to mechanical stimulation was examined in a unilateral infraorbital nerve ligation rat model. The levels of TSP4 in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 spinal cord (Vc/C2) from injured rats were examined at time points correlating with the initiation and peak orofacial hypersensitivity. TSP4 antisense and mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides were intrathecally injected into injured rats to see if antisense oligodeoxynucleotide treatment could reverse injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation and orofacial behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data indicated that trigeminal nerve injury induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 at a time point correlated with orofacial tactile allodynia. In addition, intrathecal treatment with TSP4 antisense, but not mismatch, oligodeoxynucleotides blocked both injury-induced TSP4 up-regulation in Vc/C2 and behavioural hypersensitivity. Our data support that infraorbital nerve injury leads to TSP4 up-regulation in trigeminal spinal complex that contributes to orofacial neuropathic pain states. Blocking this pathway may provide an alternative approach in management of orofacial neuropathic pain states. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  10. NEURAL PAIN PATHWAY TRACING OF RABBIT ISCHEMIC HEART BY DOUBLE-RETROGRADE NEUROTRACING

    OpenAIRE

    Theodorus Dapamede; Obed Trinurcahyo Kinantyo Paundralingga; Masruroh Rahayu; Bambang Soemantri

    2015-01-01

    Background. Myocardial ischaemia occurs due to inadequate supply of oxygen to fulfill the myocardial tissue oxygen demand. This leads to angina pectoris or referred pain, whichhappens because of the inability of the brain to distinguish the visceral afferent inputs from the somatic afferent inputs since they run along a common pathway via the dorsal root ganglia. Aims. This study aims to distinguish specific areas of the rabbit heart that are projected to specific dorsal root ganglia, whic...

  11. Pharmaceutical management of trigeminal neuralgia in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.M.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN) is a severe neuropathic pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve, which occurs in recurrent episodes, causing deterioration in quality of life, affecting everyday habits and inducing severe disability. The aim of this review is to

  12. Pharmaceutical Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (CTN) is a severe neuropathic pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve, which occurs in recurrent episodes, causing deterioration in quality of life, affecting everyday habits and inducing severe disability. The aim of this review is to

  13. Trigeminal small-fibre dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agostino, R.; Cruccu, G.; Iannetti, G. D.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate trigeminal small-fibre function in patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods: In 52 diabetic patients we studied the trigeminal laser evoked potentials after stimulation of the skin bordering the lower lip. In the 21 patients with the severest peripheral nerve damage we a...

  14. Trigeminal neuralgia: how often are trigeminal nerve-vessel contacts found by MRI in normal volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, B.; Schindler, M.; Haehnel, S.; Sartor, K.; Rasche, D.; Tronnier, V.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess prospectively how often contacts are found between the trigeminal nerve and arteries or veins in the perimesencephalic cistern via MRI in normal volunteers. Materials and methods: 48 volunteers without a history of trigeminal neuralgia were examined prospectively (MRI at 1.5T; T2-CISS sequence, coronal orientation, 0.9 mm slice thickness). Two radiologists decided by consensus whether there was a nerve-vessel contact in the perimesencephalic cistern. Results: In 27% of the volunteers, no contact was found between the trigeminal nerve and regional vessels, while in 73%, such a contact was present. In 61% of the cases, the offending vessel was an artery, in 39%, it was a vein. In 2 volunteers, a deformation of the nerve was noted. Conclusion: Contrary to what has been suggested by retrospective studies, the majority of normal volunteers, if studied prospectively, do show a contact between the trigeminal nerve and local vessels. A close proximity between the nerve and regional vessels is thus normal and is not necessarily proof of a pathological nerve-vessel conflict. (orig.)

  15. Linear accelerator radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyong Geun [Dongguk University International Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Trigeminal neuralgia is defined as an episodic electrical shock-like sensation in a dermatomal distribution of the trigeminal nerve. When medications fail to control pain, various procedures are used to attempt to control refractory pain. Of available procedures, stereotactic radiosurgery is the least invasive procedure and has been demonstrated to produce significant pain relief with minimal side effects. Recently, linear accelerators were introduced as a tool for radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia beneath the already accepted gamma unit. Author have experienced one case with trigeminal neuralgia treated with linear accelerator. The patient was treated with 85 Gy by means of 5 mm collimator directed to trigeminal nerve root entry zone. The patient obtained pain free without medication at 20 days after the procedure and remain pain free at 6 months after the procedure. He didn't experience facial numbness or other side effects.

  16. SOLITARY CHEMORECEPTOR CELL SURVIVAL IS INDEPENDENT OF INTACT TRIGEMINAL INNERVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbransen, Brian; Silver, Wayne; Finger, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cells (SCCs) are a population of specialized chemosensory epithelial cells presumed to broaden trigeminal chemoreceptivity in mammals (Finger et al., 2003). SCCs are innervated by peptidergic trigeminal nerve fibers (Finger et al., 2003) but it is currently unknown if intact innervation is necessary for SCC development or survival. We tested the dependence of SCCs on innervation by eliminating trigeminal nerve fibers during development with neurogenin-1 knockout mice, during early postnatal development with capsaicin desensitization, and during adulthood with trigeminal lesioning. Our results demonstrate that elimination of innervation at any of these times does not result in decreased SCC numbers. In conclusion, neither SCC development nor mature cell maintenance is dependent on intact trigeminal innervation. PMID:18300260

  17. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80–90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60–90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  18. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  19. Comparison of Trigeminal and Postherpetic Neuralgia

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    C Peter N Watson

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Although postherpetic neuralgia and trigeminal neuralgia (tic douloureux are common causes of facial pain, they have very little in common aside from lancinating pain (other qualities of pain in each disorder are different. Each disorder affects different areas of the face and the treatment of each is quite dissimilar. The pathogenesis of these two disorders quite likely involves different mechanisms. This report reviews aspects of these two difficult pain problems, particularly with reference to the work of the late Gerhard Fromm, to whom this is dedicated.

  20. Thoracoscopic sympathectomy ganglia ablation in the management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thoracoscopic sympathectomy ganglia ablation in the management of palmer hyperhidrosis: A decade experience in a single institution. D Kravarusic, E Freud. Abstract. Background: Hyperhidrosis can cause significant professional and social handicaps. Surgery is the preferred treatment modality for hyperhidrosis.

  1. Germinoma originating in the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anno, Y.; Hori, T.; Watanabe, T.; Takenobu, A.; Takigawa, H.; Kishimoto, M.; Tanaka, J.

    1990-01-01

    About 5-10% of primary intracranial germ cell tumors arise in basal ganglia and thalamus, where CT studies have been made. MR of the tumors in the pineal region, and to our knowledge, from one tumor in the basal ganglia were similar. In the present case, MR produced confusion in confirming diagnosis, which may require additional evidence from the clinical course, tumor markers, and CT images. (orig.)

  2. The usual treatment of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Juan A; Álvarez, Mónica

    2013-10-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection, tearing, and rhinorrhea (SUNCT). Conventional pharmacological therapy can be successful in the majority of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias patients. Most cluster headache attacks respond to 100% oxygen inhalation, or 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan. Nasal spray of sumatriptan (20 mg) or zolmitriptan (5 mg) are recommended as second choice. The bouts can be brought under control by a short course of corticosteroids (oral prednisone: 60-100 mg/day, or intravenous methylprednisolone: 250-500 mg/day, for 5 days, followed by tapering off the dosage), or by long-term prophylaxis with verapamil (at least 240 mg/day). Alternative long-term preventive medications include lithium carbonate (800-1600 mg/day), methylergonovine (0.4-1.2 mg/day), and topiramate (100-200 mg/day). As a rule, paroxysmal hemicrania responds to preventive treatment with indomethacin (75-150 mg/day). A short course of intravenous lidocaine (1-4 mg/kg/hour) can reduce the flow of attacks during exacerbations of SUNCT. Lamotrigine (100-300 mg/day) is the preventive drug of choice for SUNCT. Gabapentin (800-2700 mg/day), topiramate (50-300 mg/day), and carbamazepine (200-1600 mg/day) may be of help. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  3. CT findings of trigeminal neurinoma (root type)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munemoto, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Shuzo; Kimura, Akira; Shoin, Katsuo; Futami, Kazuya; Rikimaru, Shigeho; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kazuhiko

    1986-01-01

    The CT findings of three patients with trigeminal neurinomas arising from the trigeminal nerve roots were analysed. The tumors were seated behind the posterior wall of the petrous bone: The tumors showed a low density, an isodensity, or a mixed iso and low density on the CT scan. After contrast infusion, the two tumors were markedly enhanced, and the last showed rim enhancement. All the tumors had cystic lesions. None of the tumors had surrounding brain edema. In the 1st case, the tumor compressed the cerebellum mainly; in the 2nd case, it compressed the brain stem, and in the last case, it compressed both the brain stem and the cerebellum. The 2nd case is easy to differentiate from the acoustic neurinoma by its location. The other two cases could be differentiated from the acoustic neurinoma by means of CECT, because the enhanced masses were attached to the apex of the petrous bone. Metrizamide CT cisternography played an important role in circumscribing the tumor. (author)

  4. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomida, Mihoko; Hayashi, Motohiro; Kawakami, Yoriko; Ishimaru, Jun-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Gamma knife surgery (GKS) has been employed for treating intractable pain such as trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and pain relief has been gained from the treatment, however, little is understood about the side effects of other sensitivities induced from GKS. We assessed ten patients (four men and six women; mean age 67 years) with TN who were investigated by questionnaire for symptoms and visual analog scale (VAS) of pain, and their threshold of touch sensation was examined using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, cold sensation and allodynia before and after GKS. MR and CT images were obtained after a Leksell head frame was applied to the head parallel to the trigeminal nerve. These images were uploaded to a computer system and retro-Gasserian area planned the target was correctly marked on the images of a computer in which gamma planning software was installed. All patients were irradiated with a maximum dose of 90 Gy at retro-Gasserian using a 4 mm collimator. The mean±standard deviation (SD) of VAS of pain was 8.5±1.3 and 8 patients had facial paresthesia before GKS. All patients experienced a significant reduction in pain without side effects such as effect on the peripheral nerves without 6 month after GKS. Allodynia, facial paresthesia or cold sensation numbness occurred in the patients before GKS disappeared according to complete pain relief. These results suggest that GKS is a safe and effective treatment for TN. (author)

  5. Anatomic variation of cranial parasympathetic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Siéssere

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Having broad knowledge of anatomy is essential for practicing dentistry. Certain anatomical structures call for detailed studies due to their anatomical and functional importance. Nevertheless, some structures are difficult to visualize and identify due to their small volume and complicated access. Such is the case of the parasympathetic ganglia located in the cranial part of the autonomic nervous system, which include: the ciliary ganglion (located deeply in the orbit, laterally to the optic nerve, the pterygopalatine ganglion (located in the pterygopalatine fossa, the submandibular ganglion (located laterally to the hyoglossus muscle, below the lingual nerve, and the otic ganglion (located medially to the mandibular nerve, right beneath the oval foramen. The aim of this study was to present these structures in dissected anatomic specimens and perform a comparative analysis regarding location and morphology. The proximity of the ganglia and associated nerves were also analyzed, as well as the number and volume of fibers connected to them. Human heads were dissected by planes, partially removing the adjacent structures to the point we could reach the parasympathetic ganglia. With this study, we concluded that there was no significant variation regarding the location of the studied ganglia. Morphologically, our observations concur with previous classical descriptions of the parasympathetic ganglia, but we observed variations regarding the proximity of the otic ganglion to the mandibular nerve. We also observed that there were variations regarding the number and volume of fiber bundles connected to the submandibular, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia.

  6. Chemosensory Information Processing between Keratinocytes and Trigeminal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondersorg, Anna Christina; Busse, Daniela; Kyereme, Jessica; Rothermel, Markus; Neufang, Gitta; Gisselmann, Günter; Hatt, Hanns; Conrad, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Trigeminal fibers terminate within the facial mucosa and skin and transmit tactile, proprioceptive, chemical, and nociceptive sensations. Trigeminal sensations can arise from the direct stimulation of intraepithelial free nerve endings or indirectly through information transmission from adjacent cells at the peripheral innervation area. For mechanical and thermal cues, communication processes between skin cells and somatosensory neurons have already been suggested. High concentrations of most odors typically provoke trigeminal sensations in vivo but surprisingly fail to activate trigeminal neuron monocultures. This fact favors the hypothesis that epithelial cells may participate in chemodetection and subsequently transmit signals to neighboring trigeminal fibers. Keratinocytes, the major cell type of the epidermis, express various receptors that enable reactions to multiple environmental stimuli. Here, using a co-culture approach, we show for the first time that exposure to the odorant chemicals induces a chemical communication between human HaCaT keratinocytes and mouse trigeminal neurons. Moreover, a supernatant analysis of stimulated keratinocytes and subsequent blocking experiments with pyrodoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonate revealed that ATP serves as the mediating transmitter molecule released from skin cells after odor stimulation. We show that the ATP release resulting from Javanol® stimulation of keratinocytes was mediated by pannexins. Consequently, keratinocytes act as chemosensors linking the environment and the trigeminal system via ATP signaling. PMID:24790106

  7. Gastric Lymphoma with Secondary Trigeminal Nerve Lymphoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warissara Rongthong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma is scarce. Here, I report the case of 64-year-old Thai male diagnosed as gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma with secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. He had previously received one cycle of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP, followed by five cycles of rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP with intrathecal methotrexate (MTX and cytarabine (Ara-C. One month after the last cycle of R-CHOP, he developed a headache and numbness on the left side of his face. MRI revealed thickening of the left trigeminal nerve. He received one intrathecal injection of MTX and Ara-C, followed by systemic chemotherapy. After receiving intrathecal chemotherapy, his symptoms disappeared. Clinical response and MRI studies suggested secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma. Two months later, our patient’s secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma had progressed. Salvage whole brain irradiation (36 Gy with boost dose (50 Gy along the left trigeminal nerve was given. Unfortunately, our patient developed heart failure and expired during the radiotherapy session. In conclusion and specific to secondary central nervous system lymphoma (SCNSL, radiotherapy may benefit patients who fail to respond to systemic chemotherapy and palliative treatment. The results this report fail to support the role of radiotherapy in secondary trigeminal nerve lymphoma.

  8. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurus Marques de Almeida Holanda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  9. [Idiopathic rabbit syndrome: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, H; Sasaki, Y; Hatori, K; Tanaka, S; Mizuno, Y

    1999-10-01

    We report a patient with idiopathic oromandibular tremor resembling rabbit syndrome. The patient is a 36-year-old Japanese woman without any past and medical histories. On neurological examination, there was no abnormal finding except the oromandibular tremor. The tremor was confined to the jaw and perioral muscles. There was no extremity tremor. Laboratory findings were all normal, as well as her MRI and EEG. Surface EMG studies revealed that regular grouped discharges at a frequency of about 6 Hz appeared in the masseter, the orbicularis oris, and the digastric, and that the alternative contractions were found between the masseter and the digastric. Oral administration of tiapride was effective, but diazepam, trihexyphenydil, levodopa, and a beta-blocker were without effect. Although she had not taken neuroleptics, the appearance of the tremor was identical to the rabbit syndrome. The efficacy of the dopamine blockade may suggest that an abnormal basal ganglia function contributes to the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying this type of tremor.

  10. Linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Lema, Leonor; Lopez-Garcia, Marisa; Maceira-Rozas, Maria; Munoz-Garzon, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is accepted as an alternative for patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia, but existing evidence is fundamentally based on the Gamma Knife, which is a specific device for intracranial neurosurgery, available in few facilities. Over the last decade it has been shown that the use of linear accelerators can achieve similar diagnostic accuracy and equivalent dose distribution. To assess the effectiveness and safety of linear-accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia. We carried out a systematic search of the literature in the main electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, Cochrane, Biomed Central, IBECS, IME, CRD) and reviewed grey literature. All original studies on the subject published in Spanish, French, English, and Portuguese were eligible for inclusion. The selection and critical assessment was carried out by 2 independent reviewers based on pre-defined criteria. In view of the impossibility of carrying out a pooled analysis, data were analyzed in a qualitative way. Eleven case series were included. In these, satisfactory pain relief (BIN I-IIIb or reduction in pain = 50) was achieved in 75% to 95.7% of the patients treated. The mean time to relief from pain ranged from 8.5 days to 3.8 months. The percentage of patients who presented with recurrences after one year of follow-up ranged from 5% to 28.8%. Facial swelling or hypoesthesia, mostly of a mild-moderate grade appeared in 7.5% - 51.9% of the patients. Complete anaesthesia dolorosa was registered in only study (5.3%). Cases of hearing loss (2.5%), brainstem edema (5.8%), and neurotrophic keratoplasty (3.5%) were also isolated. The results suggest that stereotactic radiosurgery with linear accelerators could constitute an effective and safe therapeutic alternative for drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia. However, existing studies leave important doubts as to optimal treatment doses or the

  11. [Trigeminal purinergic P2X4 receptor involved in experimental occlusal interference-induced hyperalgesia in rat masseter muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxiang; Cao, Ye; Ding, Tingting; Fu, Kaiyuan; Xie, Qiufei

    2016-03-01

    To explore the expression of purinergic p2X4 receptor (P2X4R) in trigeminal ganglion of rats after occlusal interference. Investigation of peripheral receptor mechanism of occlusal interference-induced masticatory muscle pain will aid the development of drug intervention against this condition. Experimental occlusal interference was established by application of 0.4 mm metal crown to the upper right first molar of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Real-time PCR assay was used to investigate P2X4R mRNA level in trigeminal ganglion in rats with occlusal interference for 3, 7, 10 and 14 days and in control rats without occlusal interference (n=5 in each). Retrograde labelling combining immunofluorescence was performed to evaluate the percentage of P2X4R-positive cells in masseter afferent neurons (n=5 in each group). Graded concentrations of P2XR antagonist TNP-ATP (0.1, 10, 125, 250, 500 μmol/L) or saline (n=5 in each group) was administrated in right masseter and the mechanical sensitivity of bilateral masseters was measured before occlusal interference application, before the injection, and 30 min as well as 60 min after the injection. Compared with control rats (P2X4R mRNA: right side: 1.00±0.26, left side: 0.94± 0.21; percentage of P2X4R-positive masseter afferents: right side: [64.3±6.3]%, left side: [67.7±5.8]%), the level of P2X4R mRNA in bilateral trigeminal ganglia (right side: 5.98±3.56; left side: 5.06±2.88) of rats with occlusal interference for 7 days up-regulated (Pocclusal interference-induced masseter hyperalgesia.

  12. Gamma Knife® radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chun-Po; Schlesinger, David; Sheehan, Jason P

    2011-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by a temporary paroxysmal lancinating facial pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution. The prevalence is four to five per 100,000. Local pressure on nerve fibers from vascular loops results in painful afferent discharge from an injured segment of the fifth cranial nerve. Microvascular decompression addresses the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, making this treatment the gold standard for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. In patients who cannot tolerate a surgical procedure, those in whom a vascular etiology cannot be identified, or those unwilling to undergo an open surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery is an appropriate alternative. The majority of patients with typical facial pain will achieve relief following radiosurgical treatment. Long-term follow-up for recurrence as well as for radiation-induced complications is required in all patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

  13. Update on neuropathic pain treatment for trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome of unilateral, paroxysmal, stabbing facial pain, originating from the trigeminal nerve. Careful history of typical symptoms is crucial for diagnosis. Most cases are caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal root adjacent to the pons leading to focal demyelination and ephaptic axonal transmission. Brain imaging is required to exclude secondary causes. Many medical and surgical treatments are available. Most patients respond well to pharmacotherapy; carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are first line therapy, while lamotrigine and baclofen are considered second line treatments. Other drugs such as topiramate, levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and botulinum toxin-A are alternative treatments. Surgical options are available if medications are no longer effective or tolerated. Microvascular decompression, gamma knife radiosurgery, and percutaneous rhizotomies are most promising surgical alternatives. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on available evidence and guidelines. PMID:25864062

  14. Neurophysiological aspects of the trigeminal sensory system: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Cruyssen, Frederic; Politis, Constantinus

    2018-02-23

    The trigeminal system is one of the most complex cranial nerve systems of the human body. Research on it has vastly grown in recent years and concentrated more and more on molecular mechanisms and pathophysiology, but thorough reviews on this topic are lacking, certainly on the normal physiology of the trigeminal sensory system. Here we review the current literature on neurophysiology of the trigeminal nerve from peripheral receptors up to its central projections toward the somatosensory cortex. We focus on the most recent scientific discoveries and describe historical relevant research to substantiate further. One chapter on new insights of the pathophysiology of pain at the level of the trigeminal system is added. A database search of Medline, Embase and Cochrane was conducted with the search terms 'animal study', 'neurophysiology', 'trigeminal', 'oral' and 'sensory'. Articles were manually selected after reading the abstract and where needed the article. Reference lists also served to include relevant research articles. Fifty-six articles were included after critical appraisal. Physiological aspects on mechanoreceptors, trigeminal afferents, trigeminal ganglion and central projections are reviewed in light of reference works. Embryologic and anatomic insights are cited where needed. A brief description of pathophysiology of pain pathways in the trigeminal area and recent advances in dental stem cell research are also discussed. Neurophysiology at the level of the central nervous system is not reviewed. The current body of knowledge is mainly based on animal and cadaveric studies, but recent advancements in functional imaging and molecular neuroscience are elucidating the pathways and functioning of this mixed nerve system. Extrapolation of animal studies or functioning of peripheral nerves should be warranted.

  15. NEURAL PAIN PATHWAY TRACING OF RABBIT ISCHEMIC HEART BY DOUBLE-RETROGRADE NEUROTRACING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodorus Dapamede

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Myocardial ischaemia occurs due to inadequate supply of oxygen to fulfill the myocardial tissue oxygen demand. This leads to angina pectoris or referred pain, whichhappens because of the inability of the brain to distinguish the visceral afferent inputs from the somatic afferent inputs since they run along a common pathway via the dorsal root ganglia. Aims. This study aims to distinguish specific areas of the rabbit heart that are projected to specific dorsal root ganglia, which then associates to its specific dermatomes. Methods. A double-retrograde neurotracing method was used, with True Blue and Nuclear Yellow as the neurotracers. Rabbits were divided into 3 groups, which the first and second groups were ligated at the left anterior descending artery and at the left circumflex artery, respectively.The third group acted as the control group, without ligation.True blue was injected at ischaemic sites following ligation. Nuclear yellowwas injected at the skin, dermatomes T1-T4. Dorsal root ganglia levels T1-T4 were then examined for both neurotracers at 3 days post injection. Results. There is significant association between the site of ligation to the projection of the neurotracers at specific dorsal root ganglia (p<0.05. The first group showed high tendency to be projected to T2 and the second group showed a high tendency to project to T1. Conclusion. This study shows that the rabbit heart can be specifically projected neuronally to specific dorsal root ganglia, following coronary artery ligation.

  16. Therapeutic immunization with a mixture of herpes simplex virus 1 glycoprotein D-derived “asymptomatic” human CD8+ T-cell epitopes decreases spontaneous ocular shedding in latently infected HLA transgenic rabbits: association with low frequency of local PD-1+ TIM-3+ CD8+ exhausted T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif A; Srivastava, Ruchi; Chentoufi, Aziz A; Geertsema, Roger; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Dasgupta, Gargi; Osorio, Nelson; Kalantari, Mina; Nesburn, Anthony B; Wechsler, Steven L; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-07-01

    Most blinding ocular herpetic disease is due to reactivation of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) from latency rather than to primary acute infection. No herpes simplex vaccine is currently available for use in humans. In this study, we used the HLA-A*02:01 transgenic (HLA Tg) rabbit model of ocular herpes to assess the efficacy of a therapeutic vaccine based on HSV-1 gD epitopes that are recognized mainly by CD8(+) T cells from "naturally" protected HLA-A*02:01-positive, HSV-1-seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Three ASYMP CD8(+) T-cell epitopes (gD(53-61), gD(70-78), and gD(278-286)) were linked with a promiscuous CD4(+) T-cell epitope (gD(287-317)) to create 3 separate pairs of CD4-CD8 peptides, which were then each covalently coupled to an Nε-palmitoyl-lysine moiety, a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) ligand. This resulted in the construction of 3 CD4-CD8 lipopeptide vaccines. Latently infected HLA Tg rabbits were immunized with a mixture of these 3 ASYMP lipopeptide vaccines, delivered as eye drops in sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). The ASYMP therapeutic vaccination (i) induced HSV-specific CD8(+) T cells that prevent HSV-1 reactivation ex vivo from latently infected explanted trigeminal ganglia (TG), (ii) significantly reduced HSV-1 shedding detected in tears, (iii) boosted the number and function of HSV-1 gD epitope-specific CD8(+) T cells in draining lymph nodes (DLN), conjunctiva, and TG, and (iv) was associated with fewer exhausted HSV-1 gD-specific PD-1(+) TIM-3+ CD8(+) T cells. The results underscore the potential of an ASYMP CD8(+) T-cell epitope-based therapeutic vaccine strategy against recurrent ocular herpes. Seventy percent to 90% of adults harbor herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), which establishes lifelong latency in sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. This latent state sporadically switches to spontaneous reactivation, resulting in viral shedding in tears. Most blinding

  17. MRI of the basal ganglia calcification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Masayuki; Murata, Tetsuhito; Kimura, Hirohiko

    1992-01-01

    MR imaging was performed for 11 patients (9 in Down's syndrome and 2 in idiopathic intracerebral calcification) who showed calcifications in bilateral basal ganglia on CT. High signal intensity in the basal ganglia was found only in one patient with idiopathic intracerebral calcification on T1-weighted image. The calcified areas of all patients in Down's syndrome did not show high signal intensity on T1-weighted image. The exact reasons why MRI exhibits the different signal intensities in calcified tissue on T1-weighted image are unknown. Further clinical investigations will be needed. (author)

  18. Parallel basal ganglia circuits for decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Okihide; Ghazizadeh, Ali; Griggs, Whitney; Amita, Hidetoshi

    2018-03-01

    The basal ganglia control body movements, mainly, based on their values. Critical for this mechanism is dopamine neurons, which sends unpredicted value signals, mainly, to the striatum. This mechanism enables animals to change their behaviors flexibly, eventually choosing a valuable behavior. However, this may not be the best behavior, because the flexible choice is focused on recent, and, therefore, limited, experiences (i.e., short-term memories). Our old and recent studies suggest that the basal ganglia contain separate circuits that process value signals in a completely different manner. They are insensitive to recent changes in value, yet gradually accumulate the value of each behavior (i.e., movement or object choice). These stable circuits eventually encode values of many behaviors and then retain the value signals for a long time (i.e., long-term memories). They are innervated by a separate group of dopamine neurons that retain value signals, even when no reward is predicted. Importantly, the stable circuits can control motor behaviors (e.g., hand or eye) quickly and precisely, which allows animals to automatically acquire valuable outcomes based on historical life experiences. These behaviors would be called 'skills', which are crucial for survival. The stable circuits are localized in the posterior part of the basal ganglia, separately from the flexible circuits located in the anterior part. To summarize, the flexible and stable circuits in the basal ganglia, working together but independently, enable animals (and humans) to reach valuable goals in various contexts.

  19. Activation of Satellite Glial Cells in Rat Trigeminal Ganglion after Upper Molar Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunjigake, Kaori K.; Goto, Tetsuya; Nakao, Kayoko; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    The neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) are surrounded by satellite glial cells (SGCs), which passively support the function of the neurons, but little is known about the interactions between SGCs and TG neurons after peripheral nerve injury. To examine the effect of nerve injury on SGCs, we investigated the activation of SGCs after neuronal damage due to the extraction of the upper molars in rats. Three, 7, and 10 days after extraction, animals were fixed and the TG was removed. Cryosections of the ganglia were immunostained with antibodies against glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker of activated SGCs, and ATF3, a marker of damaged neurons. After tooth extraction, the number of ATF3-immunoreactive (IR) neurons enclosed by GFAP-IR SGCs had increased in a time-dependent manner in the maxillary nerve region of the TG. Although ATF3-IR neurons were not detected in the mandibular nerve region, the number of GFAP-IR SGCs increased in both the maxillary and mandibular nerve regions. Our results suggest that peripheral nerve injury affects the activation of TG neurons and the SGCs around the injured neurons. Moreover, our data suggest the existence of a neuronal interaction between maxillary and mandibular neurons via SGC activation

  20. Atrophy of the basal ganglia as the initial diagnostic sign of germinoma in the basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, K.; Ishikawa, K.; Takahashi, N.; Furusawa, T.; Sakai, K. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Medicine (Japan); Ito, J.; Tokiguchi, S. [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Faculty of Dentistry (Japan); Morii, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Niigata University Brain Research Institute (Japan); Yamada, M. [Department of Pathology, Niigata University Brain Research Institute (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    Germ-cell tumors of the central nervous system generally develop in the midline, but the tumors can also occur in the basal ganglia and/or thalamus. However, MR images have rarely been documented in the early stage of the tumor in these regions. We retrospectively reviewed MR images obtained on admission and approximately 3 years earlier in two patients with germinoma in the basal ganglia, and compared them with CT. In addition to hyperdensity on CT, both hyperintensity on T1-weighted images and a small hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images were commonly seen in the basal ganglia. These findings may be early MRI signs of germinoma in this region, and the earliest and most characteristic diagnostic feature on MRI was atrophy of the basal ganglia, which was recognizable before development of hemiparesis. (orig.)

  1. Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hematoma: A report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Grewal, Sarvpreet Singh; Gupta, Bharat; Jain, Vikas; Sobti, Harman

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Basal ganglia hemorrhage is relatively uncommon. Bilateral basal ganglia hematoma after trauma is extremely rare and is limited to case reports. We report two cases of traumatic bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage, and review the literature in brief. Both cases were managed conservatively.

  2. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  3. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  4. Trigeminal Trophic Syndrome Associated With the Use of Synthetic Marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fawad A; Manacheril, Rinu; Ulep, Robin; Martin, Julie E; Chimakurthy, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is an uncommon disorder of the trigeminal nerve tract and trigeminal brainstem nucleus. The syndrome is characterized by a triad of unilateral crescentic ulcers with anesthesia and paresthesias of the involved trigeminal dermatomes. A 24-year-old right-handed black female presented to our emergency department with a 4-week history of rapidly progressive painless desquamation/denudation of skin over her right face and scalp. Four weeks prior, she had been admitted to another institution for seizures and was diagnosed with seizures provoked by synthetic marijuana use. She was afebrile during her initial presentation at our institution. Dermatologic examination revealed denudation of the epidermis and partial dermis over the right frontal, parietal, and temporal scalp with associated alopecia. To our knowledge, the association of disorders of the trigeminal nerve pathway, including TTS, with the use of synthetic marijuana has not been previously reported. The long-term neurologic effects of synthetic marijuana are difficult to predict, and the pathologic underpinnings of TTS are largely unknown. Further studies dedicated to exploring the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms may translate into effective therapies and approaches to halt and reverse the process and prevent tissue destruction and cosmetic disfigurement.

  5. MRI volumetry for the preoperative diagnosis of trigeminal neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, Bodo; Schindler, Markus; Haehnel, Stefan; Sartor, Klaus; Stippich, Christoph [University of Heidelberg, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Neurology, Medical Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rasche, Dirk; Tronnier, Volker [University of Heidelberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Medical Center, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    To assess whether quantitative measuring methods can help improve the reliability of MRI-based evaluations of the pathological role of a neurovascular conflict between an artery and the trigeminal nerve. In a prospective study, magnetic resonance images were obtained from 62 patients with unilateral facial pain and 50 healthy test subjects. In coronal T1- and T2-weighted sequences volume measurements were performed by regions of interest and compared intraindividually (healthy versus affected side in the patient populations and right versus left side in the group of test subjects) and on the basis of the different clinical pictures (t test for dependent and independent samples, p<0.05). In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, the affected nerve showed a smaller volume than the trigeminal nerve on the healthy side (p<0.001). Such a volume difference was noted neither in the other patients nor in the healthy test subjects. Quantitative MRI measurements allow a pathological neurovascular conflict to be distinguished from a nonpathological condition where an artery is in close proximity to the trigeminal nerve. The measured volume difference between the healthy and the affected nerve in patients with neuralgia is indicative of trigeminal nerve atrophy resulting from damage to the nerve. (orig.)

  6. Pain in trigeminal neuralgia: neurophysiology and measurement: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Rastogi, S; Kumar, S; Mahendra, P; Bansal, M; Chandra, L

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined as sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing recurrent episodes of pain within the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is the most frequent cranial neuralgia, the incidence being 1 per 1,000,00 persons per year. Pain attacks start abruptly and last several seconds but may persist 1 to 2 minutes. The attacks are initiated by non painful physical stimulation of specific areas (trigger points or zones) that are located ipsilateral to the pain. After each episode, there is usually a refractive period during which stimulation of the trigger zone will not induce the pain. According to the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines on neuropathic pain assessment and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN)-EFNS guidelines on TN management the neurophysiological recording of trigeminal reflexes represents the most useful and reliable test for the neurophysiological diagnosis of trigeminal pains. The present article discusses different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system by which an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. With the aid of neurophysiological recordings and quantitative sensory testing, it is possible to approach a mechanism-based classification of orofacial pain.

  7. Evaluation of trigeminal neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia with 3.0 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lirong; Wang Dehang; Wang Dongqing; Wu Min; Xu Guangming; Ma Cong

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify anatomical characteristics of neurovascular compression associated with trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods: Fifty patients with TN (23 of 50 patients underwent microvascular decompression) and 50 patients without facial pain underwent 3.0 T MRI scanning for analysis of 50 trigeminal nerves ipsilateral to TN symptoms, 50 contralateral to TN symptoms, and 100 in asymptomatic patients. MRI sequences included balanced fast-field echo and 3D MR angiography. Images were fused and reconstructed into virtual cisternoscopy images to determine the degree (severity of compression was defined as follows: 1=no compression; 2 =compressed by a vein; 3 =contacted by an artery; 4 =indented by an artery; and 5 =nerve displaced or distorted by an artery) and site of neurovascular compression (the point of each offending vascular structure: proximal was defined as located in 1/3 length of the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve near root entry zone; the place of superior was defined as above the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve). Reconstructed MPR images were used to measure nerve length and cross sectional area. The chi-square test was used for all 2 × 2 contingency tables. The t-test was used for dependent samples. The Logistic regression was used for prediction of occurrence of the event of TN. Results: Twenty-three of 50 patients with TN underwent microvascular decompression, which confirmed predicted neurovascular relationships in all cases, and 21 of 23 patients were pain free after the operation. The incidence of neurovascular compression on asymptomatic nerves (no. of level 1=79, level 2=5, level 3 =8, level 4 =8), on nerves contralateral to TN symptoms (no. of level 1=27, level 2 =6, level 3 =9, level 4 =8), and on nerves ipsilateral to TN symptoms (no. of level 1=4, level 2 =12, level 3 =12, level 4 =7, level 5 =15) was 21.0% (21/100), 46.0% (23/50), and 92.0% (46/50), respectively. The difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic

  8. The Rabbit Stream Cipher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesgaard, Martin; Vesterager, Mette; Zenner, Erik

    2008-01-01

    The stream cipher Rabbit was first presented at FSE 2003, and no attacks against it have been published until now. With a measured encryption/decryption speed of 3.7 clock cycles per byte on a Pentium III processor, Rabbit does also provide very high performance. This paper gives a concise...... description of the Rabbit design and some of the cryptanalytic results available....

  9. Gamma-knife radiosurgery in the treatment of trigeminal schwannomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peker, S.; Bayrakli, F.; Kilic, T.; Pamir, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    Trigeminal nerve schwannomas account for 0.07 %-0.28 % of all intracranial tumors. Advances in skull base surgery have led to more aggressive resection of these tumors, but surgery may associated with development of new neurological deficits. In this report, we analyse the long-term results 15 patients with newly diagnosed or residual/recurrent trigeminal schwannoma who underwent gamma-knife treatment. During a mean 61 months of follow-up, MRI revealed reduction of tumor size in 13 and no size change in 2 patients. The tumor growth control rate was 100 % and only 1 patient had transient facial numbness and diplopia. For patients with small to moderate size trigeminal schwannomas, gamma-knife radiosurgery is associated with good tumor control and a minimal risk of adverse radiation effects. (author)

  10. Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant K Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral pure trigeminal motor nerve neuropathy is an extremely rare and unique condition, characterized by atrophy of the muscles, innervated by the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve. We report such a case in a 25-year-old male patient. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiological examinations. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI proved to be the key for establishing the diagnosis, which showed atrophy and fatty infiltration over the affected side of the muscles of mastication. We were unable to establish the cause of the condition even after performing a brain MRI.

  11. Trigeminal Neuralgia and Multiple Sclerosis: A Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, David B; Koehler, Peter J; Boes, Christopher J

    2017-09-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) was first described in Lehrbuch der Nervenkrankheiten für Ärzte und Studirende in 1894 by Hermann Oppenheim, including a pathologic description of trigeminal root entry zone demyelination. Early English-language translations in 1900 and 1904 did not so explicitly state this association compared with the German editions. The 1911 English-language translation described a more direct association. Other later descriptions were clinical with few pathologic reports, often referencing Oppenheim but citing the 1905 German or 1911 English editions of Lehrbuch. This discrepancy in part may be due to the translation differences of the original text.

  12. Significance of neurovascular contact in classical trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Wolfram, Frauke; Gozalov, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    and degree of neurovascular contact. Severe neurovascular contact was defined as displacement or atrophy of the trigeminal nerve. A total of 135 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia were included. Average age of disease onset was 53.0 years (95% confidence interval mean 40.5-55.5) and current age...... was 60.1 years (95% % confidence interval mean 57.5-62.7). Eighty-two (61%, 95% confidence interval 52-69%) patients were female. Neurovascular contact was prevalent both on the symptomatic and asymptomatic side [89% versus 78%, P = 0.014, odds ratio = 2.4 (1.2-4.8), P = 0.017], while severe...

  13. Learning Reward Uncertainty in the Basal Ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Mikhael

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Learning the reliability of different sources of rewards is critical for making optimal choices. However, despite the existence of detailed theory describing how the expected reward is learned in the basal ganglia, it is not known how reward uncertainty is estimated in these circuits. This paper presents a class of models that encode both the mean reward and the spread of the rewards, the former in the difference between the synaptic weights of D1 and D2 neurons, and the latter in their sum. In the models, the tendency to seek (or avoid options with variable reward can be controlled by increasing (or decreasing the tonic level of dopamine. The models are consistent with the physiology of and synaptic plasticity in the basal ganglia, they explain the effects of dopaminergic manipulations on choices involving risks, and they make multiple experimental predictions.

  14. Influence of oculomotor nerve afferents on central endings of primary trigeminal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manni, E; Bortolami, R; Pettorossi, V E; Lucchi, M L; Callegari, E; Draicchio, F

    1987-12-01

    Painful fibers running in the third nerve and originating from the ophthalmic trigeminal area send their central projections at level of substantia gelatinosa of nucleus caudalis trigemini. The central endings of these fibers form axoaxonic synapses with trigeminal fibers entering the brain stem through the trigeminal root. The effect of electrical stimulation of the third nerve central stump on the central endings of trigeminal afferent fibers consists in an increased excitability, possibly resulting in a presynaptic inhibition. This inhibitory influence is due to both direct and indirect connections of the third nerve afferent fibers with the trigeminal ones.

  15. Arterial compression of nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Whether arterial or venous compression or arachnoid adhesions are primarily responsible for compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the causes of trigeminal nerve compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical findings in patients with trigeminal neuralgia who were treated by micro vascular decompression were compared to those in patients with hemifacial spasm without any signs or symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia who were treated with microvascular decompression. The study included 99 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (median age, 57 years) and 101 patients with hemifacial spasm (median age, 47 years). There were significant differences between the groups in the relationship of artery to nerve (p relationship of vein to nerve. After adjustment for age, gender, and other factors, patients with vein compression of nerve or with artery compression of nerve were more likely to have trigeminal neuralgia (OR = 5.21 and 42.54, p = 0.026 and p compression of the trigeminal nerve is the primary cause of trigeminal neuralgia and therefore, decompression of veins need not be a priority when performing microvascular dissection in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

  16. Trigeminal nerve anatomy in neuropathic and non-neuropathic orofacial pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sophie L; Gustin, Sylvia M; Eykman, Elizabeth N; Fowler, Gordon; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2013-08-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia, painful trigeminal neuropathy, and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are chronic orofacial pain conditions that are thought to have fundamentally different etiologies. Trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy are thought to arise from damage to or pressure on the trigeminal nerve, whereas TMD results primarily from peripheral nociceptor activation. This study sought to assess the volume and microstructure of the trigeminal nerve in these 3 conditions. In 9 neuralgia, 18 neuropathy, 20 TMD, and 26 healthy controls, the trigeminal root entry zone was selected on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and the volume (mm(3)) calculated. Additionally, using diffusion-tensor images (DTIs), the mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy values of the trigeminal nerve root were calculated. Trigeminal neuralgia patients displayed a significant (47%) decrease in nerve volume but no change in DTI values. Conversely, trigeminal neuropathy subjects displayed a significant (40%) increase in nerve volume but again no change in DTI values. In contrast, TMD subjects displayed no change in volume or DTI values. The data suggest that the changes occurring within the trigeminal nerve are not uniform in all orofacial pain conditions. These structural and volume changes may have implications in diagnosis and management of different forms of chronic orofacial pain. This study reveals that neuropathic orofacial pain conditions are associated with changes in trigeminal nerve volume, whereas non-neuropathic orofacial pain is not associated with any change in nerve volume. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Allergy to Rabbits. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.A.; Longbottom, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out into the presence of antibody light chains in rabbit allergenic extracts and the interference in RAST and crossed-radioimmunoelectrophoresis (XRIE) caused by antibodies directed against them. A ''non-specific'' uptake of radioactivity in XRIE has been demonstrated to be caused by direct cross-linking of the 125 I rabbit anti-human IgE by the sheep antibodies in the immunoprecipitate of rabbit light chains. Preincubation with normal rabbit serum blocked this direct uptake of the labelled antibody and enabled specific IgE uptake on the light chains to be demonstrated for rabbit allergic sera. Verification of the allergenicity of the light chains was obtained from a specific light chain RAST. Elution from a Sephacryl S-200 gel filtration column indicated a MW of approx. 50Kd and confirmation of the components as light chain dimers, not Fab fragments, was obtained by allotyping for loci present on heavy chains and light chains in the Fab region. Light chains were detected in urine from rabbits of all ages and in an extract of dust collected in a rabbit housing area. No background staining was observed in XRIE using rabbit antisera, either with rabbit allergic sera with specific IgE or with a human serum containing specific IgG antibodies to rabbit IgG. This latter serum also showed no evidence of uptake on all immunoprecipitates in systems using rabbit antisera, and did not give false positive RAST results when the labelled rabbit anti-human IgE contained unlabelled rabbit IgG. Those sera with specific IgE to light chains showed no uptake in XRIE using rabbit antisera, indicating that the IgE was possibly specific for epitopes revealed by the dissociation on the whole IgG molecule. (author)

  18. Frequent mild head injury promotes trigeminal sensitivity concomitant with microglial proliferation, astrocytosis, and increased neuropeptide levels in the trigeminal pain system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyburski, Ashley L; Cheng, Lan; Assari, Soroush; Darvish, Kurosh; Elliott, Melanie B

    2017-12-01

    Frequent mild head injuries or concussion along with the presence of headache may contribute to the persistence of concussion symptoms. In this study, the acute effects of recovery between mild head injuries and the frequency of injuries on a headache behavior, trigeminal allodynia, was assessed using von Frey testing up to one week after injury, while histopathological changes in the trigeminal pain pathway were evaluated using western blot, ELISA and immunohistochemistry.  RESULTS: A decreased recovery time combined with an increased mild closed head injury (CHI) frequency results in reduced trigeminal allodynia thresholds compared to controls. The repetitive CHI group with the highest injury frequency showed the greatest reduction in trigeminal thresholds along with greatest increased levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Repetitive CHI resulted in astrogliosis in the central trigeminal system, increased GFAP protein levels in the sensory barrel cortex, and an increased number of microglia cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Headache behavior in rats is dependent on the injury frequency and recovery interval between mild head injuries. A worsening of headache behavior after repetitive mild head injuries was concomitant with increases in CGRP levels, the presence of astrocytosis, and microglia proliferation in the central trigeminal pathway. Signaling between neurons and proliferating microglia in the trigeminal pain system may contribute to the initiation of acute headache after concussion or other traumatic brain injuries.

  19. Microstructural abnormalities in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia revealed by multiple diffusion metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yaou [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Beijing Key laboratory of MRI and Brain Informatics, Beijing (China); Li, Jiping [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Butzkueven, Helmut [Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Duan, Yunyun; Zhang, Mo [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Shu, Ni [State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Yongjie [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Zhang, Yuqing, E-mail: yuqzhang@sohu.com [Department of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China); Li, Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli55@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2013-05-15

    Objective: To investigate microstructural tissue changes of trigeminal nerve (TGN) in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) by multiple diffusion metrics, and correlate the diffusion indexes with the clinical variables. Methods: 16 patients with TN and 6 healthy controls (HC) were recruited into our study. All participants were imaged with a 3.0 T system with three-dimension time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DTI-sequence. We placed regions of interest over the root entry zone of the TGN and measured fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The mean values of FA, MD, AD and RD were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient, and to HC values. The correlation between the side-to-side diffusion metric difference and clinical variables (disease duration and visual analogy scale, VAS) was further explored. Results: Compared with the unaffected side and HC, the affected side showed significantly decreased FA and increased RD; however, no significant changes of AD were found. A trend toward significantly increased MD was identified on the affected side comparing with the unaffected side. We also found the significant correlation between the FA reduction and VAS of pain (r = −0.55, p = 0.03). Conclusion: DTI can quantitatively assess the microstructural abnormalities of the affected TGN in patients with TN. Our results suggest demyelination without significant axonal injury is the essential pathological basis of the affected TGN by multiple diffusion metrics. The correlation between FA reduction and VAS suggests FA as a potential objective MRI biomarker to correlate with clinical severity.

  20. Microstructural abnormalities in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia revealed by multiple diffusion metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yaou; Li, Jiping; Butzkueven, Helmut; Duan, Yunyun; Zhang, Mo; Shu, Ni; Li, Yongjie; Zhang, Yuqing; Li, Kuncheng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate microstructural tissue changes of trigeminal nerve (TGN) in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN) by multiple diffusion metrics, and correlate the diffusion indexes with the clinical variables. Methods: 16 patients with TN and 6 healthy controls (HC) were recruited into our study. All participants were imaged with a 3.0 T system with three-dimension time-of-flight (TOF) magnetic resonance angiography and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) DTI-sequence. We placed regions of interest over the root entry zone of the TGN and measured fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity (RD). The mean values of FA, MD, AD and RD were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient, and to HC values. The correlation between the side-to-side diffusion metric difference and clinical variables (disease duration and visual analogy scale, VAS) was further explored. Results: Compared with the unaffected side and HC, the affected side showed significantly decreased FA and increased RD; however, no significant changes of AD were found. A trend toward significantly increased MD was identified on the affected side comparing with the unaffected side. We also found the significant correlation between the FA reduction and VAS of pain (r = −0.55, p = 0.03). Conclusion: DTI can quantitatively assess the microstructural abnormalities of the affected TGN in patients with TN. Our results suggest demyelination without significant axonal injury is the essential pathological basis of the affected TGN by multiple diffusion metrics. The correlation between FA reduction and VAS suggests FA as a potential objective MRI biomarker to correlate with clinical severity

  1. An additional trigeminal system in certain snakes possessing infrared receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, Gerard J.

    1974-01-01

    This communication describes a nucleus and tract of the trigeminal system whose existence is not mentioned in any account of brain stem architecture known to the present author. The structures were first recognised in the brain stem of a giant snake (Python reticulatus) and later were also found

  2. Update on the challenges of treating trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obermann M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Obermann Department of Neurology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: Despite the multitude of treatment options currently available for trigeminal neuralgia, its management remains challenging in a considerable number of patients. The response to any particular treatment can be quite variable interindividually, and personalized treatment options are both resource-consuming and time-consuming. Anticonvulsant drugs, muscle relaxants, and neuroleptic agents are the preferred medical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. Large placebo-controlled clinical trials are scarce, and no specific established substance has been developed for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Promising new treatment options currently in clinical evaluation are botulinum neurotoxin type A injections and CNV1014802, a novel sodium channel blocker that selectively blocks the Nav1.7 sodium channel. Patients who do not respond to medical therapy may be eligible for more invasive treatment options, such as percutaneous Gasserian ganglion techniques, gamma knife surgery, and microvascular decompression. Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, treatment, current, future, options, orphan drugs 

  3. Magnetic Resonance in trigeminal neuralgia: Presentation of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa Escudero, Martin; Echeverri Betancourt, Alejandro; Vargas Velez, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by episodes of acute facial pain. lt can be caused by diverse pathologies that affect anyone of the segments of the V cranial nerve. Magnetic resonance is of choice when imaging studies are necessary. Three cases evaluated by this modality and confirmed by surgery are shown

  4. Pain. Part 2a: Trigeminal Anatomy Related to Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Tara; Egbuniwe, Obi

    2015-04-01

    In order to understand the underlying principles of orofacial pain it is important to understand the corresponding anatomy and mechanisms. Paper 1 of this series explains the central nervous and peripheral nervous systems relating to pain. The trigeminal nerve is the 'great protector' of the most important region of our body. It is the largest sensory nerve of the body and over half of the sensory cortex is responsive to any stimulation within this system. This nerve is the main sensory system of the branchial arches and underpins the protection of the brain, sight, smell, airway, hearing and taste, underpinning our very existence. The brain reaction to pain within the trigeminal system has a significant and larger reaction to the threat of, and actual, pain compared with other sensory nerves. We are physiologically wired to run when threatened with pain in the trigeminal region and it is a 'miracle' that patients volunteer to sit in a dental chair and undergo dental treatment. Clinical Relevance: This paper aims to provide the dental and medical teams with a review of the trigeminal anatomy of pain and the principles of pain assessment.

  5. Endogenous neurotrophin-3 promotes neuronal sprouting from dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu-Yang; Gu, Pei-Yuan; Chen, Shi-Wen; Gao, Wen-Wei; Tian, Heng-Li; Lu, Xiang-He; Zheng, Wei-Ming; Zhuge, Qi-Chuan; Hu, Wei-Xing

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of endogenous neurotrophin-3 in nerve terminal sprouting 2 months after spinal cord dorsal root rhizotomy. The left L1-5 and L7-S2 dorsal root ganglia in adult cats were exposed and removed, preserving the L6 dorsal root ganglia. Neurotrophin-3 was mainly expressed in large neurons in the dorsal root ganglia and in some neurons in spinal lamina II. Two months after rhizotomy, the number of neurotrophin-3-positive neurons in the spared dorsal root ganglia and the density of neurite sprouts emerging from these ganglia were increased. Intraperitoneal injection of an antibody against neurotrophin-3 decreased the density of neurite sprouts. These findings suggest that endogenous neurotrophin-3 is involved in spinal cord plasticity and regeneration, and that it promotes axonal sprouting from the dorsal root ganglia after spinal cord dorsal root rhizotomy.

  6. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika, E-mail: m.figatowska@mp.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Mierzewska, Hanna, E-mail: h.mierzewska@gmail.com [Department of Neurology of Children and Adolescents, Institute of Mother and Child, ul. Kasprzaka 17a, 01-211 Warsaw (Poland); Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta, E-mail: e-jurkiewicz@o2.pl [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Al. Dzieci Polskich 20, 04-730 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-05-15

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive.

  7. Basal ganglia lesions in children and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, Monika; Mierzewska, Hanna; Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    The term “basal ganglia” refers to caudate and lentiform nuclei, the latter composed of putamen and globus pallidus, substantia nigra and subthalamic nuclei and these deep gray matter structures belong to the extrapyramidal system. Many diseases may present as basal ganglia abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) – to a lesser degree – allow for detection of basal ganglia injury. In many cases, MRI alone does not usually allow to establish diagnosis but together with the knowledge of age and circumstances of onset and clinical course of the disease is a powerful tool of differential diagnosis. The lesions may be unilateral: in Rassmussen encephalitis, diabetes with hemichorea/hemiballism and infarction or – more frequently – bilateral in many pathologic conditions. Restricted diffusion is attributable to infarction, acute hypoxic–ischemic injury, hypoglycemia, Leigh disease, encephalitis and CJD. Contrast enhancement may be seen in cases of infarction and encephalitis. T1-hyperintensity of the lesions is uncommon and may be observed unilaterally in case of hemichorea/hemiballism and bilaterally in acute asphyxia in term newborns, in hypoglycemia, NF1, Fahr disease and manganese intoxication. Decreased signal intensity on GRE/T2*-weighted images and/or SWI indicating iron, calcium or hemosiderin depositions is observed in panthotenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, Parkinson variant of multiple system atrophy, Fahr disease (and other calcifications) as well as with the advancing age. There are a few papers in the literature reviewing basal ganglia lesions. The authors present a more detailed review with rich iconography from the own archive

  8. The Basal Ganglia and Adaptive Motor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybiel, Ann M.; Aosaki, Toshihiko; Flaherty, Alice W.; Kimura, Minoru

    1994-09-01

    The basal ganglia are neural structures within the motor and cognitive control circuits in the mammalian forebrain and are interconnected with the neocortex by multiple loops. Dysfunction in these parallel loops caused by damage to the striatum results in major defects in voluntary movement, exemplified in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. These parallel loops have a distributed modular architecture resembling local expert architectures of computational learning models. During sensorimotor learning, such distributed networks may be coordinated by widely spaced striatal interneurons that acquire response properties on the basis of experienced reward.

  9. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miglierini, Marcel; Lančok, Adriana; Kopáni, Martin; Boča, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. 57 Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding 57 Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior

  10. Mössbauer spectroscopy of Basal Ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miglierini, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.miglierini@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava, Slovakia and Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials (Czech Republic); Lančok, Adriana [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry AS CR, v. v. i., 250 68 Husinec-Řež 1001 (Czech Republic); Kopáni, Martin [Institute of Medical Physics, Biophysics, Informatics and Telemedicine, Faculty of Medicine, Comenius University, Sasinkova 2, 811 08 Bratislava (Slovakia); Boča, Roman [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of SS. Cyril and Methodius, 917 01 Trnava (Slovakia)

    2014-10-27

    Chemical states, structural arrangement, and magnetic features of iron deposits in biological tissue of Basal Ganglia are characterized. The methods of SQUID magnetometry and electron microscopy are employed. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy is used as a principal method of investigation. Though electron microscopy has unveiled robust crystals (1-3 μm in size) of iron oxides, they are not manifested in the corresponding {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectra. The latter were acquired at 300 K and 4.2 K and resemble ferritin-like behavior.

  11. Mutated CaV2.1 channels dysregulate CASK/P2X3 signaling in mouse trigeminal sensory neurons of R192Q Cacna1a knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanasekaran, Aswini; Bele, Tanja; Hullugundi, Swathi; Simonetti, Manuela; Ferrari, Michael D; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea; Fabbretti, Elsa

    2013-12-02

    ATP-gated P2X3 receptors of sensory ganglion neurons are important transducers of pain as they adapt their expression and function in response to acute and chronic nociceptive signals. The present study investigated the role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) in controlling P2X3 receptor expression and function in trigeminal ganglia from Cacna1a R192Q-mutated knock-in (KI) mice, a genetic model for familial hemiplegic migraine type-1. KI ganglion neurons showed more abundant CASK/P2X3 receptor complex at membrane level, a result that likely originated from gain-of-function effects of R192Q-mutated CaV2.1 channels and downstream enhanced CaMKII activity. The selective CaV2.1 channel blocker ω-Agatoxin IVA and the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 were sufficient to return CASK/P2X3 co-expression to WT levels. After CASK silencing, P2X3 receptor expression was decreased in both WT and KI ganglia, supporting the role of CASK in P2X3 receptor stabilization. This process was functionally observed as reduced P2X3 receptor currents. We propose that, in trigeminal sensory neurons, the CASK/P2X3 complex has a dynamic nature depending on intracellular calcium and related signaling, that are enhanced in a transgenic mouse model of genetic hemiplegic migraine.

  12. Genetic tracing of the gustatory and trigeminal neural pathways originating from T1R3-expressing taste receptor cells and solitary chemoreceptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Yasuoka, Akihito; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Abe, Keiko

    2008-08-01

    We established transgenic mouse lines expressing a transneuronal tracer, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), under the control of mouse T1R3 gene promoter/enhancer. In the taste buds, WGA transgene was faithfully expressed in T1R3-positive sweet/umami taste receptor cells. WGA protein was transferred not laterally to the synapse-bearing, sour-responsive type III cells in the taste buds but directly to a subset of neurons in the geniculate and nodose/petrosal ganglia, and further conveyed to a rostro-central region of the nucleus of solitary tract. In addition, WGA was expressed in solitary chemoreceptor cells in the nasal epithelium and transferred along the trigeminal sensory pathway to the brainstem neurons. The solitary chemoreceptor cells endogenously expressed T1R3 together with bitter taste receptors T2Rs. This result shows an exceptional signature of receptor expression. Thus, the t1r3-WGA transgenic mice revealed the sweet/umami gustatory pathways from taste receptor cells and the trigeminal neural pathway from solitary chemoreceptor cells.

  13. Association of occlusal interference-induced masseter muscle hyperalgesia and P2X3 receptors in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and midbrain periaqueductal gray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuzhen; Qi, Dong; Yang, Yingying; Ji, Ping; Kong, Jingjing; Wu, Qingting

    2016-03-02

    P2X3 receptor plays a role in nociception transmission of orofacial pain in temporomandibular disorder patients. A previous study found that P2X3 receptors in masseter muscle afferent neurons and the trigeminal ganglia were involved in masseter muscle pain induced by inflammation caused by chemical agents or eccentric muscle contraction. In this study, we attempted to investigate changes in P2X3 receptors in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) and midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) in relation to the hyperalgesia of masseter muscles induced by occlusal interference. Experimental occlusal interference by crown application was established in 30 rats and another 30 rats were treated as sham controls. On days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 after crown application, the mechanical pain threshold was examined by von-Frey filaments. The expression of the P2X3 receptor in Vc and PAG was investigated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative PCR. We found that mechanical pain threshold of bilateral masseter muscles decreased significantly after occlusal interference, which remained for the entire experimental period. The mRNA expression of the P2X3 receptor increased significantly and the number of P2X3R-positive neurons increased markedly in Vc and PAG accordingly. These results indicate that the upregulated expression of P2X3 receptors in Vc and PAG may contribute toward the development of orofacial pain induced by occlusal interference and P2X3 receptors in the PAG may play a key role in the supraspinal antiociception effect.

  14. computed tomography features of basal ganglia and periventricular

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV is probably the most common cause of basal ganglia and periventricular calcification today. on-enhanced computed tomography (NECT) shows diffuse cerebral atrophy in 90% of cases. Bilateral, symmetrical basal ganglia calcification is seen in 30% of cases, but virtually never before 1 year of age.1. CMV (FIG.2).

  15. Early trigeminal nerve involvement in Listeria monocytogenes rhombencephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, William K; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Roed, Casper

    2017-01-01

    dysfunction on that side. In addition, we identified another 120 cases of Listeria rhombencephalitis following a systematic review. Cranial nerves VII, V, IX, and X, respectively, medulla oblongata, cerebellum and pons, were the most frequently involved brain structures. The present clinical and radiological...... findings corroborate earlier data from animal experiments, indicating that L. monocytogenes may be capable of retrograde intra-axonal migration along the cranial nerves. We suggest that in a subset of patients with rhombencephalitis L. monocytogenes enters the cerebellopontine angle through the trigeminal......Listeria monocytogenes is associated with rhombencephalitis. However, the exact mechanisms of brainstem invasion remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate clinical and radiological data suggesting that Listeria may invade the brainstem via the trigeminal nerve. Three females (41, 64 and 70...

  16. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsrinivas Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA. The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo.

  17. Intracranial Management of Perineural Spread in the Trigeminal Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Michael J; Panizza, Benedict J

    2016-04-01

    Since the mid-1960s surgeons have attempted to cure intracranial perineural spread (PNS) of cutaneous malignancies. Untreated patients with trigeminal PNS die from brainstem invasion and leptomeningeal disease. It was understood that resection with clear margins was potentially curative, but early surgical attempts were unsuccessful. The prevailing wisdom considered that this surgery failed to improve the results achieved with radiation therapy alone and was associated with high morbidity. However, with improved imaging, surgical equipment, and better understanding of cavernous sinus (CS) anatomy and access, contemporary surgeons can improve outcomes for this disease. The aim of this paper is to describe a technique to access the interdural compartment of the CS and treat PNS of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in the intracranial trigeminal nerve and ganglion. It is based on the experience of the Queensland Skull Base Unit, Australia in managing PNS of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (cSCCHN).

  18. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  19. Effect of beam channel plugging on the outcome of gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massager, Nicolas; Nissim, Ouzi; Murata, Noriko; Devriendt, Daniel; Desmedt, Francoise; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Regis, Jean; Levivier, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We studied the influence of using plugs for brainstem protection during gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with special emphasis on irradiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve, pain outcomes, and incidence of trigeminal dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A GKR procedure for TN using an anterior cisternal target and a maximum dose of 90 Gy was performed in 109 patients. For 49 patients, customized beam channel blocking (plugs) were used to reduce the dose delivered to the brainstem. We measured the mean and integrated radiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve and the clinical course of patients treated with and without plugs. Results: We found that blocking increases the length of trigeminal nerve exposed to high-dose radiation, resulting in a significantly higher mean dose to the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more of the patients with blocking achieved excellent pain outcomes (84% vs. 62%), but with higher incidences of moderate and bothersome trigeminal nerve dysfunction (37% mild/10% bothersome with plugs vs. 30% mild/2% bothersome without). Conclusions: The use of plugs to protect the brainstem during GKR treatment for TN increases the dose of irradiation delivered to the intracisternal trigeminal nerve root and is associated with an important increase in the incidence of trigeminal nerve dysfunction. Therefore, beam channel blocking should be avoided for 90 Gy-GKR of TN

  20. Results of Percutaneous Balloon Compression in Trigeminal Pain Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Sanjeet S; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Garcia, Oscar; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Reimer, Ronald; Wharen, Robert E

    2018-06-01

    To investigate initial pain relief and subsequent recurrence after percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) and describe its association with the nature of trigeminal pain, previous procedures, or other clinical factors. A total of 222 patients with medically refractory trigeminal pain treated with PBC at Mayo Clinic Florida between 1998 and 2017 were enrolled into this study. Patients were divided into those with typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and those with atypical trigeminal pain. The postprocedural rate of pain recurrence and associations between patient characteristics and recurrence were studied. One hundred fifty-two patients had TN and 70 patients had atypical pain. At the last follow-up, 158 patients had excellent pain relief, 37 had good pain relief, 11 had fair pain relief, and 16 had poor pain relief. The median duration of follow-up was 31.1 months. Patients with atypical pain were less likely to have an excellent result compared with patients with typical pain (61.4% vs. 82.9%; P < 0.001). Recurrence was observed in 103 patients (46.4%) and was associated with previous procedures (hazard ratio, 1.658; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-2.49; P = 0.017). Other clinical factors were not significant. Our study demonstrates the safety and efficacy of PBC, with 88% of patients pain-free at last follow-up. Patients with atypical pain have worse outcomes, and patients with previous procedures have a higher risk of recurrence. Repeat surgery does not decrease efficacy. We recommend conservative parameter selection at the initial procedure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immediate pain relief by microvascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, N.U.; Ali, M.; Khan, H.M.; Ishaq, M.; Khattak, M.I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal neuralgia is a common entity which is managed by neurosurgeons in day to day practice. Up-till now many treatment options have been adopted for it but micro-vascular decompression is much impressive in terms of pain control and recurrence rate in all of them. The objective of study was known the efficacy of micro vascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia by using muscle patch in terms of immediate pain relief. Methods: This descriptive study was carried out in Neurosurgery Department lady reading hospital, Peshawar from January 2010 to December 2012. All patients who underwent micro vascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia were included in the study. Patients were assessed 72 hours after the surgery by borrow neurological institute pain scale (BNIP scale) for pain relief and findings were documented on predesigned proforma. Data was analysed by SPSS-17. Results: Total 52 patients were included in this study. Among these 32 (61.53 percentage) were female and 20 (38.46 percentage) were males having age from 22-76 years (mean 49 years). Right side was involved in 36 (69.23 percentage) and left side in 16 (30.76 percentage) patients. Duration of symptoms ranged from 6 months to 16 years (mean 8 years). History of dental extraction and peripheral neurectomy was present in 20 (38 percentage) and 3(5.76 percentage) patients while V3 was most commonly involved branch with 28(57.69 percentage) frequency and combined V2,V3 involvement was 1 (11.53 percentage). Superior cerebellar artery was most common offending vessel in 46(88.46 percentage) while arachnoid adhesions were in 2(3.84 percentage) patients. We assessed patient immediate postoperatively using BNIP pain scale. Conclusion: Micro-vascular decompression is most effective mode of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia in terms of immediate pain relief. (author)

  2. Trigeminal complications arising after surgery of cranial base meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Ulf; Linderoth, Bengt; Mathiesen, Tiit

    2012-04-01

    Chronic severe facial pain is a feared sequel of cranial base surgery. This study explores the symptomatology, incidence and impact on the individual of postoperative de novo trigeminal nerve affection as well as the recovery potential. Out of 231 patients operated for cranial base meningiomas at the Karolinska University Hospital during 7 years, 25 complained of de novo trigeminal symptoms at clinical follow-up 3 months after surgery. Six were later lost to follow-up leaving 19 participants in the study, which was conducted using a questionnaire and a structured telephone interview. All patients complained of facial numbness, affecting the V1 branch in 10/19 patients (53%), the V2 branch in 18/19 (95%) and the V3 branch in 9/19 (47%). Surprisingly, only three (16%) suffered from trigeminal pain, which could be adequately managed by pharmacotherapy. However, five patients (26%) demonstrated ocular dysaesthetic problems. Twelve (63%) described their handicap to be mild, while seven (37%) had daily or severe symptoms. Five patients (26%) reported no improvement over time, while nine (47%) showed improvement and four (21%) stated good recovery. Only one patient (5%) claimed complete symptom remission. In the present study, 11% of the patients presented with a de novo postoperative affection of the trigeminal nerve after removal of a cranial base meningioma; 37% of these reported daily/severe symptoms. Only 26% showed good recovery, observed in patients without tumour infiltration of the nerve or intraoperative nerve damage. In spite of frequent complaints of numbness, pain was uncommon (16%) and often manageable by pharmacotherapy, while ocular symptoms turned out to be more frequent and more disabling than expected.

  3. Cytoarchitectonic study of the trigeminal ganglion in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    KRASTEV, DIMO STOYANOV; APOSTOLOV, ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The trigeminal ganglion (TG), a cluster of pseudounipolar neurons, is located in the trigeminal impression of the temporal pyramid. It is covered by a sheath of the dura mater and arachnoid and is near the rear end of the cavernous sinus. The peripheral processes of the pseudounipolar cells are involved in the formation of the first and second branch and the sensory part of the third branch of the fifth cranial nerve, and the central ones form the sensory root of the nerve, which penetrates at the level of the middle cerebellar peduncle, aside from the pons, and terminate in the sensory nuclei of the trigeminal complex. We found that the primary sensory neurons involved in sensory innervation of the orofacial complex are a diverse group. Although they possess the general structure of pseudounipolar neurons, there are significant differences among them, seen in varying intensities of staining. Based on our investigations we classified the neurons into 7 groups, i.e. large, subdivided into light and dark, medium, also light and dark, and small light and dark, and, moreover, neurons with an irregular shape of their perikarya. Further research by applying various immunohistochemical methods will clarify whether differences in the morphological patterns of the neurons are associated with differences in the neurochemical composition of various neuronal types. PMID:26527926

  4. Anatomic study of celiac ganglia using CT in cadavers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Qionghui; Zhang Xiaoming; Zeng Nanlin; Cai Changping; Xie Xingguo; Li Chengjun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To identify the celiac ganglia in cadavers by using current CT techniques, and to facilitate its identification in vivo by CT. Methods: Fifty cadavers were dissected, moving peritoneal organs such as liver and stomach to expose the celiac ganglia. The location, morphology, and dimensions of celiac ganglia, and their relationship to abutting structures, were noted. The celiac ganglia in 6 of the 50 cadavers without peripancreatic diseases and with clear anatomy were isolated and marked with yellow dye and Iohexol injection. In these 6 cadavers, the moved organs were relocated, the abdomen was closed, and CT was performed. CT derived measurements of celiac ganglia were compared with those from cadavers study. Results: The celiac ganglia of 47 of 50 cadavers (94%) were located between T12-L1, and those of 3 cadavers (6%) were located between T11-12. The superior-inferior diameter of the right ganglia was (25.01 ±6.09) mm, long (left-right) diameter was (13.18 ± 3.62) mm, and short (thickness) diameter was (1.40 ± 0.55) mm. In the left ganglia, these three diameters were (22.74 ± 5.70) mm, (15.07 ± 4.35) mm, and (2.00 ± 0.71 ) mm, respectively. On the CT images of 6 cadavers, the right and left ganglia were all identified and were hyperdense relative to viscus, such as liver and spleen. The long and short diameters on CT images were (15.20 ± 1.64) mm and (1.53 ± 0.52) mm for the right ganglia and (16.25 ± 1.73 ) mm and (2.20 ± 0.73) mm for the left ganglia. There was no significant difference between the diameters of the ganglia measured on CT images and by dissection (P>0.05). Conclusion: Current CT techniques can demonstrate accurately the celiac ganglia in cadavers. This can be a reference for identifying the celiac plexus in vivo. (authors)

  5. RabbitMQ essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Dossot, David

    2014-01-01

    This book is a quick and concise introduction to RabbitMQ. Follow the unique case study of Clever Coney Media as they progressively discover how to fully utilize RabbitMQ, containing clever examples and detailed explanations.Whether you are someone who develops enterprise messaging products professionally or a hobbyist who is already familiar with open source Message Queuing software and you are looking for a new challenge, then this is the book for you. Although you should be familiar with Java, Ruby, and Python to get the most out of the examples, RabbitMQ Essentials will give you the push y

  6. The presence of lytic HSV-1 transcripts and clonally expanded T cells with a memory effector phenotype in human sensory ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfuss, Tobias; Arbusow, Viktor; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Theil, Diethilde

    2009-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latent persistence in human trigeminal ganglia (TG) is accompanied by a chronic CD8 T-cell infiltration. Thus far, during HSV-1 latency only a single transcript, namely the latency-associated transcript (LAT), has been identified to be synthesized but not translated into a protein. In contrast, the chronic CD8 T-cell infiltration suggests that an antigen trigger must be present. The focus of the current work was to look for HSV-1 transcription activity as a potential trigger of the immune response and to demonstrate whether the immune cells are clonally expanded and have a phenotype that suggests that they have been triggered by viral antigen. By combining in situ hybridization, laser cutting microscopy, and single-cell real time RT-PCR, we demonstrated expression of the HSV-1 immediate early (IE) genes ICP0 and ICP4 in human trigeminal neurons. Using CDR3 spectratyping, we showed that the infiltrating T cells are clonally expanded, indicating an antigen-driven immune response. Moreover, the persisting CD8(+) T cells had prominent features of the memory effector phenotype. Chemokines CCL5 and CXCL10 were expressed by a subpopulation of infiltrating cells and the corresponding chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 were co-expressed on virtually all T cells bearing the CD8 phenotype. Thus, HSV-1 IE genes are expressed in human TG, and the infiltrating T cells bear several characteristics that suggest viral antigenic stimulation.

  7. Learning and memory functions of the Basal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Mark G; Knowlton, Barbara J

    2002-01-01

    Although the mammalian basal ganglia have long been implicated in motor behavior, it is generally recognized that the behavioral functions of this subcortical group of structures are not exclusively motoric in nature. Extensive evidence now indicates a role for the basal ganglia, in particular the dorsal striatum, in learning and memory. One prominent hypothesis is that this brain region mediates a form of learning in which stimulus-response (S-R) associations or habits are incrementally acquired. Support for this hypothesis is provided by numerous neurobehavioral studies in different mammalian species, including rats, monkeys, and humans. In rats and monkeys, localized brain lesion and pharmacological approaches have been used to examine the role of the basal ganglia in S-R learning. In humans, study of patients with neurodegenerative diseases that compromise the basal ganglia, as well as research using brain neuroimaging techniques, also provide evidence of a role for the basal ganglia in habit learning. Several of these studies have dissociated the role of the basal ganglia in S-R learning from those of a cognitive or declarative medial temporal lobe memory system that includes the hippocampus as a primary component. Evidence suggests that during learning, basal ganglia and medial temporal lobe memory systems are activated simultaneously and that in some learning situations competitive interference exists between these two systems.

  8. Systematic and quantitative mRNA expression analysis of TRP channel genes at the single trigeminal and dorsal root ganglion level in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandewauw Ine

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatosensory nerve fibres arising from cell bodies within the trigeminal ganglia (TG in the head and from a string of dorsal root ganglia (DRG located lateral to the spinal cord convey endogenous and environmental stimuli to the central nervous system. Although several members of the transient receptor potential (TRP superfamily of cation channels have been implicated in somatosensation, the expression levels of TRP channel genes in the individual sensory ganglia have never been systematically studied. Results Here, we used quantitative real-time PCR to analyse and compare mRNA expression of all TRP channels in TG and individual DRGs from 27 anatomically defined segments of the spinal cord of the mouse. At the mRNA level, 17 of the 28 TRP channel genes, TRPA1, TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPM2, TRPM3, TRPM4, TRPM5, TRPM6, TRPM7, TRPM8, TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV4, TRPML1 and TRPP2, were detectable in every tested ganglion. Notably, four TRP channels, TRPC4, TRPM4, TRPM8 and TRPV1, showed statistically significant variation in mRNA levels between DRGs from different segments, suggesting ganglion-specific regulation of TRP channel gene expression. These ganglion-to-ganglion differences in TRP channel transcript levels may contribute to the variability in sensory responses in functional studies. Conclusions We developed, compared and refined techniques to quantitatively analyse the relative mRNA expression of all TRP channel genes at the single ganglion level. This study also provides for the first time a comparative mRNA distribution profile in TG and DRG along the entire vertebral column for the mammalian TRP channel family.

  9. The expanding universe of disorders of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Jose A; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P; Burn, David J

    2014-08-09

    The basal ganglia were originally thought to be associated purely with motor control. However, dysfunction and pathology of different regions and circuits are now known to give rise to many clinical manifestations beyond the association of basal ganglia dysfunction with movement disorders. Moreover, disorders that were thought to be caused by dysfunction of the basal ganglia only, such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease, have diverse abnormalities distributed not only in the brain but also in the peripheral and autonomic nervous systems; this knowledge poses new questions and challenges. We discuss advances and the unanswered questions, and ways in which progress might be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A rare cause of hyperprolactinemia: persistent trigeminal artery with stalk-section effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekinci, G.; Baltacioglu, F.; Cimsit, C.; Akpinar, I.; Erzen, C.; Kilic, T.; Pamir, N.

    2001-01-01

    The primitive trigeminal, otic, hypoglossal, and proatlantal intersegmental arteries are fetal anastomoses between the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. Persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most frequent embryonic communication between the vertebrobasilar and carotid systems in adults. We report a case of PTA compressing the left side of the pituitary gland and stalk, in a patient with elevated blood prolactin level. (orig.)

  11. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    1988-01-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis. (author)

  12. Computed tomography of calcification of the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Churl Min; Suh, Soo Jhi; Kim, Soon Yong

    1981-01-01

    Calcifications of the basal ganglia are rarely found at routine autopsies and in skull radiographs. CT is superior to the plain skull radiographs in detecting intracranial attenuation differences and may be stated to be the method of choice in the diagnosis of intracranial calcifications. Of 5985 brain CT scans performed in Kyung Hee University Hospital during past 3 years, 36 cases were found to have high attenuation lesions suggesting calcifications within basal ganglia. 1. The incidence of basal ganglia calcification on CT scan was about 0.6%. 2. Of these 36 cases, 34 cases were bilateral and the remainder was unilateral. 3. The plain skull films of 23 cases showed visible calcification of basal ganglia in 3 cases (13%). 4. No specific metabolic disease was noted in the cases

  13. Basal ganglia calcification on computed tomography in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Shohei; Tani, Kenji; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki and others

    1988-09-01

    The development of basal ganglia calcification was studied in 85 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) by computed tomography (CT). Bilateral calcification of the basal ganglia was found to occur in 5 patients (5.9 %) with SLE, but was not seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and progressive systemic sclerosis. All were female with a mean age of 42 years (range 29 - 49). The patients with calcification of the basal ganglia had neurological symptoms, such as psychiatric problems (3 cases), grand mal seizures (1 case), CSF abnormalities (2 cases), and EEG changes (4 cases). There were significantly higher incidences of alopecia, cutaneous vasculitis, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia in the group with calcifications than those in the group with normal CT findings. Circulating immune complexes were detected and LE tests were positive in 2 patients. Endocrinological examination showed no abnormality in any. We suggest that basal ganglia calcification in SLE might be related to cerebral vasculitis.

  14. Trigeminal cardiac reflex and cerebral blood flow regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominga Lapi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals. During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart and brain, and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is requested within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing.The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral level, reducing the arterial blood pressure and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activated the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial. Therefore the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension, because produced opposite effects compared to those elicited by the diving reflex as it induces hypotension and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone.

  15. Predictors of Trigeminal Neuropathy After Radiosurgery for Vestibular Schwannomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senova, Suhan [Unité de Radiochirurgie Gamma Knife, Region Ile De France, Paris (France); Service de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Inserm, U955, Equipe 14, Université Paris Est, Faculté de médecine, Créteil (France); Aggad, Mourad [Unité de Radiochirurgie Gamma Knife, Region Ile De France, Paris (France); Service de Neurochirurgie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Golmard, Jean-Louis [Service de Biostatistiques, CHU La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Hasboun, Dominique [Service de Neuroanatomie, CHU La Pitié-Salpêtrière, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Lamproglou, Ioannis [Unité de Radiochirurgie Gamma Knife, Region Ile De France, Paris (France); and others

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between dosimetric characteristics and symptoms related to trigeminal neuropathy (TN) observed after radiosurgery (RS) for vestibular schwannomas (VS); to propose guidelines to optimize planification in VS RS regarding TN preservation; and to detail the mechanism of TN impairment after VS RS. Methods and Materials: One hundred seventy-nine patients treated between 2011 and 2013 for VS RS and without trigeminal impairment before RS were included in a retrospective study. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine predictors of TN among characteristics of the patients, the dosimetry, and the VS. Results: There were 20 Koos grade 1, 99 grade 2, 57 grade 3, and 3 grade 4. Fourteen patients (7.8%) presented a transitory or permanent TN. Between the patients with and without TN after VS RS, there was no significant difference regarding dosimetry or VS volume itself. Significant differences (univariate analysis P<.05, Mann-Whitney test) were found for parameters related to the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve: total integrated dose, maximum dose, mean dose, volume of the Vth nerve (Vol{sub v}), and volume of the Vth nerve receiving at least 11 Gy (Vol{sub Vcist>11Gy}), but also for maximal dose to the Vth nerve nucleus and intra-axial portion (Dose max{sub Vax}). After multivariate analysis, the best model predicting TN included Vol{sub Vcist>11Gy} (P=.0045), Dose max{sub Vax} (P=.0006), and Vol{sub v} (P=.0058). The negative predictive value of this model was 97%. Conclusions: The parameters Vol{sub Vcist>11Gy}, Dose max{sub Vax}, and Vol{sub v} should be checked when designing dosimetry for VS RS.

  16. Bilateral basal ganglia calcifications visualised on CT scan.

    OpenAIRE

    Brannan, T S; Burger, A A; Chaudhary, M Y

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-eight cases of basal ganglia calcification imaged on computed axial tomography were reviewed. Most cases were felt to represent senescent calcification. The possibility of a vascular aetiology in this group is discussed. A less common group of patients was identified with calcification secondary to abnormalities in calcium metabolism or radiation therapy. Three cases of basal ganglia calcifications were detected in juvenile epileptic patients receiving chronic anticonvulsants. These ca...

  17. Basal Ganglia Calcification with Tetanic Seizure Suggest Mitochondrial Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer, Josef; Enzelsberger, Barbara; Bastowansky, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 65 Final Diagnosis: Mitochondrial disorder Symptoms: Headache ? tetanic seizure Medication: Diazepam Clinical Procedure: Admission Specialty: Neurology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Basal ganglia calcification (BGC) is a rare sporadic or hereditary central nervous system (CNS) abnormality, characterized by symmetric or asymmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. Case Report: We report the case of a 65-year-old Gypsy female who was admitted for a...

  18. Treatment strategy for trigeminal neuralgia: a thirty years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, Giovanni; Ferroli, Paolo; Franzini, Angelo

    2008-05-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is an invalidating disease when become drug-resistant. The only possible treatment is surgery with different modalities, percutaneous, open surgery or radiosurgery. The thirty years experience at the Fondazione Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, Milano, Italy suggests that these surgical strategies are successful in pain control in short and long term period in more than 90% of cases, with a low rate of side effects and high improvement of quality of life. The type of surgery should be tailored on the particular patient considering age, general physical condition, neuroradiological assessment in which MRI with dedicated sequences are mandatory, and also patient's attitude.

  19. Neurogenic inflammation: a study of rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is linked to neurogenic inflammation and to migraine. Activation of the trigeminovascular system plays a prominent role during migraine attacks with the release of CGRP. The trigeminal ganglion (TG) contains three main cell types: neurons, satellite glial...... cells (SGC) and Schwann cells; the first two have before been studied in vitro separately. Culture of rat TG provides a method to induce inflammation and the possibility to evaluate the different cell types in the TG simultaneously. We investigated expression levels of various inflammatory cytokines...

  20. Electrophysiological Features of Neurons in the Mesencephalic Trigeminal Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ling Xing

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Mes V neurons represent an uncommon class of primary sensory neurons. Besides receiving somatosensory information, Mes V neurons are also involved in regulating multisensory information. The present review first describes the passive features as well as three important currents, followed by a distinct excitability classification and a description of the excitability transition of Mes V neurons. Furthermore, their resonance property, the existence of membrane oscillation and electrical coupling which may promote strong synchronization, as well as their function in controlling stretch reflex activity, are discussed.

  1. CT and MRI diagnosis of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shike; Zhang Yalin; Xu Derong; Zou Gaowei; Chen Dan; He Sujun; Zhou Lichao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze CT and MRI features of traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and investigate the diagnostic value. Methods: 21 cases with traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage diagnosed by clinic, CT and MRI in our hospital were collected in this study Plain CT scan were immediately performed in 21 cases after injury, plain MR scan were performed in 1 to 3 days. 12 cases of them underwent diffusion weighted imagine (DWI). The CT and MRI findings were retrospectively summarized. Results: 8 cases were found with simple traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage. Complexity of basal ganglia hemorrhage occurred in 13 cases, 6 cases combined with subdural hemorrhage, 3 cases with epidural hematoma, 2 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, 6 cases with brain contusion and laceration in other locations, 4 cases with skull fracture. 26 lesions of basal ganglia hematoma were showed in 21 cases, 14 lesions of pallidum hemorrhage in 11 cases confirmed by MR could not be distinguished from calcification at the fast CT scan. 5 more lesions of brain contusion and laceration and 4 more lesions of brain white matter laceration were found by MR. Conclusion: CT in combination with MRI can diagnose traumatic basal ganglia hemorrhage and its complications early, comprehensively and accurately, which plays an important role in the clinical therapy selection and prognosis evaluation. (authors)

  2. Basal ganglia - thalamus and the crowning enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianela eGarcia-Munoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available When Hubel (1982 referred to layer 1 of primary visual cortex as …a ‘crowning mystery’ to keep area-17 physiologists busy for years to come... he could have been talking about any cortical area. In the 80’s and 90’s there were no methods to examine this neuropile on the surface of the cortex: a tangled web of axons and dendrites from a variety of different places with unknown specificities and doubtful connections to the cortical output neurons some hundreds of microns below. Recently, three changes have made the crowning enigma less of an impossible mission: the clear presence of neurons in layer 1 (L1, the active conduction of voltage along apical dendrites and optogenetic methods that might allow us to look at one source of input at a time. For all of those reasons alone, it seems it is time to take seriously the function of L1. The functional properties of this layer will need to wait for more experiments but already L1 cells are GAD67 positive, i.e., inhibitory! They could reverse the sign of the thalamic glutamate (GLU input for the entire cortex. It is at least possible that in the near future normal activity of individual sources of L1 could be detected using genetic tools. We are at the outset of important times in the exploration of thalamic functions and perhaps the solution to the crowning enigma is within sight. Our review looks forward to that solution from the solid basis of the anatomy of the basal ganglia output to motor thalamus. We will focus on L1, its afferents, intrinsic neurons and its influence on responses of pyramidal neurons in layers 2/3 and 5. Since L1 is present in the whole cortex we will provide a general overview considering evidence mainly from the somatosensory cortex before focusing on motor cortex.

  3. Primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve: clinical and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majoie, C.B.L.M.; Hulsmans, F.J.H.; Sie, L.H.; Castelijns, J.A.; Valk, J.; Walter, A.; Albrecht, K.W.

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical and MRI findings in primary nerve-sheath tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records, imaging and histological specimens of 10 patients with 11 primary tumours of the trigeminal nerve. We assessed whether tumour site, size, morphology or signal characteristics were related to symptoms and signs or histological findings. Histological proof was available for 8 of 11 tumours: six schwannomas and two plexiform neurofibromas. The other three tumours were thought to be schwannomas, because they were present in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 and followed the course of the trigeminal nerve. Uncommon MRI appearances were observed in three schwannomas and included a large intratumoral haemorrhage, a mainly low-signal appearance on T2-weighted images and a rim-enhancing, multicystic appearance. Only four of nine schwannomas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms, including two with large cystic components, one haemorrhagic and one solid tumor. Of the five schwannomas which did not cause any trigeminal nerve symptoms, two were large. Only one of the plexiform neurofibromas caused trigeminal nerve symptoms. Additional neurological symptoms and signs, not related to the trigeminal nerve, could be attributed to the location of the tumour in three patients. (orig.)

  4. Trigeminal root entry zone involvement in neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Uchida, Tomohiko; Muto, Mayumi; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-08-15

    Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging has been frequently reported in multiple sclerosis patients, but it has not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of 128 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 46 neuromyelitis optica patients was evaluated. Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality was present in 11 (8.6%) of the multiple sclerosis patients and two (4.3%) of the neuromyelitis optica patients. The pontine trigeminal root entry zone may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hepatitis E Virus in Farmed Rabbits, Wild Rabbits and Petting Farm Rabbits in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, S.A.; Veltman, Jorg; Hakze-van der Honing, Renate; Schmitt, Heike; van der Poel, Wim H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Rabbits have been suggested as a zoonotic source of Hepatitis E virus. Phylogenetic analysis of HEV isolates from farmed, wild and pet rabbits in the Netherlands (23, 0, and 60 % respectively) showed them to be grouped amongst published rabbit HEV sequences and distinct from most human isolates.

  6. Hepatitis E Virus in Farmed Rabbits, Wild Rabbits and Petting Farm Rabbits in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, Sara A.; Veltman, Jorg; Hakze-van der Honing, Renate; Schmitt, Heike; Poel, van der Wim H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Rabbits have been suggested as a zoonotic source of Hepatitis E virus. Phylogenetic analysis of HEV isolates from farmed, wild and pet rabbits in the Netherlands (23, 0, and 60 % respectively) showed them to be grouped amongst published rabbit HEV sequences and distinct from most human isolates.

  7. Basal ganglia circuits changes in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Wang, Jue; Wang, Chaodong; Hallett, Mark; Zang, Yufeng; Wu, Xiaoli; Chan, Piu

    2012-08-22

    Functional changes in basal ganglia circuitry are responsible for the major clinical features of Parkinson's disease (PD). Current models of basal ganglia circuitry can only partially explain the cardinal symptoms in PD. We used functional MRI to investigate the causal connectivity of basal ganglia networks from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) in PD in the movement and resting state. In controls, SNc activity predicted increased activity in the supplementary motor area, the default mode network, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but, in patients, activity predicted decreases in the same structures. The SNc had decreased connectivity with the striatum, globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus, thalamus, supplementary motor area, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, insula, default mode network, temporal lobe, cerebellum, and pons in patients compared to controls. Levodopa administration partially normalized the pattern of connectivity. Our findings show how the dopaminergic system exerts influences on widespread brain networks, including motor and cognitive networks. The pattern of basal ganglia network connectivity is abnormal in PD secondary to dopamine depletion, and is more deviant in more severe disease. Use of functional MRI with network analysis appears to be a useful method to demonstrate basal ganglia pathways in vivo in human subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Kyu Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ. Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye, I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region.

  9. Utilization of tropical rabbits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5,0' a,b"differ (P<0,05) for reproducing rabbits, and may aid the prevention of enteric diseases. In Trial 3, ADG of several tropical legumes was the same as that obtained with alfalfa (Table 3). Gains with guinea grass, cassava, stylosanthes and the winged bean were lower than with alfalfa. Digestibilityof the protein and fibre ...

  10. The CareRabbit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Sanne; Stegwee, R.A.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda

    2010-01-01

    The CareRabbit (ZorgKonijn) is an e-health device that can be used to play messages (e.g. text, MP3) sent through the Internet. It is used in children's departments in hospitals. Its aim is to make children feel comfortable and make their stay more pleasant. Motivation - Our goal is to investigate

  11. The mechanism of functional up-regulation of P2X3 receptors of trigeminal sensory neurons in a genetic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi K Hullugundi

    Full Text Available A knock-in (KI mouse model of FHM-1 expressing the R192Q missense mutation of the Cacna1a gene coding for the α1 subunit of CaV2.1 channels shows, at the level of the trigeminal ganglion, selective functional up-regulation of ATP -gated P2X3 receptors of sensory neurons that convey nociceptive signals to the brainstem. Why P2X3 receptors are constitutively more responsive, however, remains unclear as their membrane expression and TRPV1 nociceptor activity are the same as in wildtype (WT neurons. Using primary cultures of WT or KI trigeminal ganglia, we investigated whether soluble compounds that may contribute to initiating (or maintaining migraine attacks, such as TNFα, CGRP, and BDNF, might be responsible for increasing P2X3 receptor responses. Exogenous application of TNFα potentiated P2X3 receptor-mediated currents of WT but not of KI neurons, most of which expressed both the P2X3 receptor and the TNFα receptor TNFR2. However, sustained TNFα neutralization failed to change WT or KI P2X3 receptor currents. This suggests that endogenous TNFα does not regulate P2X3 receptor responses. Nonetheless, on cultures made from both genotypes, exogenous TNFα enhanced TRPV1 receptor-mediated currents expressed by a few neurons, suggesting transient amplification of TRPV1 nociceptor responses. CGRP increased P2X3 receptor currents only in WT cultures, although prolonged CGRP receptor antagonism or BDNF neutralization reduced KI currents to WT levels. Our data suggest that, in KI trigeminal ganglion cultures, constitutive up-regulation of P2X3 receptors probably is already maximal and is apparently contributed by basal CGRP and BDNF levels, thereby rendering these neurons more responsive to extracellular ATP.

  12. Detailed mapping of serotonin 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor messenger RNA and ligand binding sites in guinea-pig brain and trigeminal ganglion: clues for function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysen, J.E.; Schotte, A.; Jurzak, M.; Luyten, W.H.M.L.; Voorn, P.; Bonaventure, P.

    1997-01-01

    The similar pharmacology of the 5-HT 1B and 5-HT 1D receptors, and the lack of selective compounds sufficiently distinguishing between the two receptor subtypes, have hampered functional studies on these receptors. In order to provide clues for differential functional roles of the two subtypes, we performed a parallel localization study throughout the guinea-pig brain and the trigeminal ganglia by means of quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry (using [ 35 S]-labelled riboprobes probes for receptor messenger RNA) and receptor autoradiography (using a new radioligand [ 3 H]alniditan).The anatomical patterns of 5-HT 1B and 5-HT 1D receptor messenger RNA were quite different. While 5-HT 1B receptor messenger RNA was abundant throughout the brain (with highest levels in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampal formation, amygdala, thalamus, dorsal raphe and cerebellum), 5-HT 1D receptor messenger RNA exhibited a more restricted pattern; it was found mainly in the olfactory tubercle, entorhinal cortex, dorsal raphe, cerebellum, mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus and in the trigeminal ganglion. The density of 5-HT 1B/1D binding sites (combined) obtained with [ 3 H]alniditan autoradiography was high in the substantia nigra, superior colliculus and globus pallidus, whereas lower levels were detected in the caudate-putamen, hypothalamus, hippocampal formation, amygdala, thalamus and central gray. This distribution pattern was indistinguishable from specific 5-HT 1B receptor labelling in the presence of ketanserin under conditions to occlude 5-HT 1D receptor labelling; hence the latter were below detection level. Relationships between the regional distributions of the receptor messenger RNAs and binding sites and particular neuroanatomical pathways are discussed with respect to possible functional roles of the 5-HT 1B and 5-HT 1D receptors. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Deep-Brain Stimulation for Basal Ganglia Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Thomas; Delong, Mahlon R

    2011-07-01

    The realization that medications used to treat movement disorders and psychiatric conditions of basal ganglia origin have significant shortcomings, as well as advances in the understanding of the functional organization of the brain, has led to a renaissance in functional neurosurgery, and particularly the use of deep brain stimulation (DBS). Movement disorders are now routinely being treated with DBS of 'motor' portions of the basal ganglia output nuclei, specifically the subthalamic nucleus and the internal pallidal segment. These procedures are highly effective and generally safe. Use of DBS is also being explored in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders, with targeting of the 'limbic' basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuitry. The results of these procedures are also encouraging, but many unanswered questions remain in this emerging field. This review summarizes the scientific rationale and practical aspects of using DBS for neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  14. Oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia and deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guridi, Jorge; Alegre, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, research into the neurophysiology of the basal ganglia has provided new insights into the pathophysiology of movement disorders. The presence of pathological oscillations at specific frequencies has been linked to different signs and symptoms in PD and dystonia, suggesting a new model to explain basal ganglia dysfunction. These advances occurred in parallel with improvements in imaging and neurosurgical techniques, both of which having facilitated the more widespread use of DBS to modulate dysfunctional circuits. High-frequency stimulation is thought to disrupt pathological activity in the motor cortex/basal ganglia network; however, it is not easy to explain all of its effects based only on changes in network oscillations. In this viewpoint, we suggest that a return to classic anatomical concepts might help to understand some apparently paradoxical findings. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Time representation in reinforcement learning models of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Joseph Gershman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforcement learning models have been influential in understanding many aspects of basal ganglia function, from reward prediction to action selection. Time plays an important role in these models, but there is still no theoretical consensus about what kind of time representation is used by the basal ganglia. We review several theoretical accounts and their supporting evidence. We then discuss the relationship between reinforcement learning models and the timing mechanisms that have been attributed to the basal ganglia. We hypothesize that a single computational system may underlie both reinforcement learning and interval timing—the perception of duration in the range of seconds to hours. This hypothesis, which extends earlier models by incorporating a time-sensitive action selection mechanism, may have important implications for understanding disorders like Parkinson's disease in which both decision making and timing are impaired.

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits trigeminal nociception in a rodent model of episodic migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan L. Hawkins

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion:. Our findings demonstrate that nVNS inhibits mechanical nociception and represses expression of proteins associated with peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal neurons in a novel rodent model of episodic migraine.

  17. Trigeminal nociception-induced, cerebral Fos expression in the conscious rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, GJ; Meijler, WJ; Korf, J; Kemper, RHA

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about trigeminal nociception-induced cerebral activity and involvement of cerebral structures in pathogenesis of trigeminovascular headaches such as migraine. Neuroimaging has demonstrated cortical, hypothalamic and brainstem activation during the attack and after abolition with

  18. Immunogold localization of serotonin within synaptic terminals in the rat mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, RSB; Copray, JCVM

    1996-01-01

    With the use of postembedding electron-microscopic immunogold cytochemistry, the vesicular distribution of serotonin within serotonergic synaptic terminals in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus was determined in order to obtain further insight into the mechanisms and function, significance of

  19. Percutaneous micro-balloon compression for treatment of high risk idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jianjun; Ma Yi; Wang Bin; Li Yanfeng; Huang Haitao; Li Fuyong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and complications of percutaneous micro- balloon compression (PMC) of trigeminal ganglion for high risk idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Methods: To analyze retrospectively the clinical data of 3053 cases of idiopathic trigeminal nemalgia, of which 804 cases were in high risk, who underwent PMC from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2007 in our department. Results: 833 procedures were performed on these 804 patients. The immediate effective rate was 97.3%; with recurrence rate of 6.8%, ipsilateral paresthesia incidence 3.7%; and no keratohelcosis with approximately 2/3 masticator, muscles weakness and diplopia 0.2%. Mean follow-up time was 36 months. Conclusions: PMC procedure is very effective for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia especially in high risk patients, and especially prefer for the pain involved the first branch neuralgia. (authors)

  20. MRI and MR angiography of persistent trigeminal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotin, M.; Miralbes, S.; Cattin, F.; Marchal, H.; Amor-Sahli, M.; Moulin, T.; Bonneville, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the MRA and MR angiography (MRA) features of persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) found incidentally in eight patients, with special attention to its origin, site and course. The different patterns of posterior communicating arteries were also noted. The PTA were shown on sagittal, coronal and axial MRI and on MRA. In four cases, the PTA arose from the lateral aspect of the intracavernous internal carotid artery, ran caudally, passing round the bottom of the dorsum sellae to join the basilar artery. In the other four cases, it arose from the medial aspect, ran caudally through the sella turcica and pierced the dorsum sellae to join the basilar artery. The posterior communicating arteries were present unilaterally in five cases and bilaterally in one, and absent bilaterally in two. Identification of a PTA with a trans-sellar course is crucial if a trans-sphenoidal surgery is planned. (orig.). With 3 figs

  1. Basal Ganglia Circuits as Targets for Neuromodulation in Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Mahlon R; Wichmann, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    The revival of stereotactic surgery for Parkinson disease (PD) in the 1990s, with pallidotomy and then with high-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS), has led to a renaissance in functional surgery for movement and other neuropsychiatric disorders. To examine the scientific foundations and rationale for the use of ablation and DBS for treatment of neurologic and psychiatric diseases, using PD as the primary example. A summary of the large body of relevant literature is presented on anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and functional surgery for PD and other basal ganglia disorders. The signs and symptoms of movement disorders appear to result largely from signature abnormalities in one of several parallel and largely segregated basal ganglia thalamocortical circuits (ie, the motor circuit). The available evidence suggests that the varied movement disorders resulting from dysfunction of this circuit result from propagated disruption of downstream network activity in the thalamus, cortex, and brainstem. Ablation and DBS act to free downstream networks to function more normally. The basal ganglia thalamocortical circuit may play a key role in the expression of disordered movement, and the basal ganglia-brainstem projections may play roles in akinesia and disturbances of gait. Efforts are under way to target circuit dysfunction in brain areas outside of the traditionally implicated basal ganglia thalamocortical system, in particular, the pedunculopontine nucleus, to address gait disorders that respond poorly to levodopa and conventional DBS targets. Deep brain stimulation is now the treatment of choice for many patients with advanced PD and other movement disorders. The success of DBS and other forms of neuromodulation for neuropsychiatric disorders is the result of the ability to modulate circuit activity in discrete functional domains within the basal ganglia circuitry with highly focused interventions, which spare uninvolved areas that are often disrupted with

  2. Ophthalmic branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation for atypical trigeminal neuralgia:a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shibin; Ma, Xiaoliang; Li, Xiaoqin; Yuan, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is an intense neuralgia involving facial areas supplied by trigeminal nerve. The pain is characterized by sudden onset, short persistence, sharp or lancinating. Trigeminal neuralgia commonly affects frontal areas, infraorbital or paranasal areas, mandibular areas and teeth. While Trigeminal neuralgia affecting merely the upper eyelid is rare. Here we report a case of atypical Trigeminal neuralgia confined to the upper eyelid. The patient was pain free during the follow-up period of 6 months after unusual ophthalmic branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation. A 55-year-old female patient was diagnosed as primary trigeminal neuralgia involving the right upper eyelid. As the pain could not be controlled by drug therapy, peripheral nerve branch radiofrequency thermocoagulation was recommended. A combination of infratrochlear, supratrochlear and lacrimal radiofrequency thermocoagulation was implemented in this case. The point where the bridge of the nose abuts the supraorbital ridge and the point slightly above the lateral canthus along outer border of the orbit were selected respectively as the puncture sites. After positive diagnostic test, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the above-mentioned nerve branches was performed respectively. The patient was pain free immediately after the treatment and during the follow-up period of 6 months. Trigeminal neuralgia is a common severe and chronic facial neuralgia which requires accurate diagnosis and effective therapy. With typical clinical symptoms, normal neurological signs, normal CT and MRI findings, the patient was diagnosed as classic trigeminal neuralgia. As the patient was drug resistant, some invasive treatments were considered. Peripheral branch neurolysis was chosen for its minimal invasiveness, convenience, low risk and not affecting further invasive treatments. According to the anatomic data and the diagnostic test results, infratrochlear, supratrochlear and lacrimal nerve were responsible

  3. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montano, Nicola; Conforti, Giulio; Di Bonaventura, Rina; Meglio, Mario; Fernandez, Eduardo; Papacci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression) and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures) have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that neurostimulation might represent an opportunity in TN refractory to other surgical treatments. The aim of this work was to review the recent literature about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatments, and discuss the significant advances in all these fields

  4. Synaptic dimorphism in Onychophoran cephalic ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Peña-Contreras

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic location of the Onychophora has been controversial because of their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, related to both annelids and arthropods. We analyzed the ultrastructure of the neurons and their synapses in the cephalic ganglion of a poorly known invertebrate, the velvet worm Peripatus sedgwicki, from the mountainous region of El Valle, Mérida, Venezuela. Cephalic ganglia were dissected, fixed and processed for transmission electron microscopy. The animal has a high degree of neurobiological development, as evidenced by the presence of asymmetric (excitatory and symmetric (inhibitory synapses, as well as the existence of glial cell processes in a wide neuropile zone. The postsynaptic terminals were seen to contain subsynaptic cisterns formed by membranes of smooth endoplasmic reticulum beneath the postsynaptic density, whereas the presynaptic terminal showed numerous electron transparent synaptic vesicles. From the neurophylogenetic perspectives, the ultrastructural characteristics of the central nervous tissue of the Onychophora show important evolutionary acquirements, such as the presence of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses, indicating functional synaptic transmission, and the appearance of mature glial cells. Rev. Biol . Trop. 55 (1: 261-267. Epub 2007 March. 31.Estudiamos la ultraestructura de las neuronas y sus sinapsis del ganglio cefálico de un invertebrado poco conocido del phylum Onychophora: Peripatus sedgwicki de los Andes Venezolanos, utilizando para ello la microscopía electrónica de transmisión. La localización taxonómica de los onicóforos ha sido controversial debido a sus características fenotípicas y genotípicas que los relacionan tanto con los anélidos como con los artrópodos. Para este trabajo se estudió el ganglio cefálico de P. sedgwicki de la zona montañosa de El Valle, Mérida, Venezuela. El ganglio cefálico se localiza en la región anterior del animal y fue diseccionado

  5. Brn3a regulates neuronal subtype specification in the trigeminal ganglion by promoting Runx expression during sensory differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Eng S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Brn3a, product of the pou4f1 gene, is expressed in most sensory neurons throughout embryogenesis. Prior work has demonstrated a role for Brn3a in the repression of early neurogenic genes; here we describe a second major role for Brn3a in the specification of sensory subtypes in the trigeminal ganglion (TG. Sensory neurons initially co-express multiple Trk-family neurotrophin receptors, but are later marked by the unique expression of TrkA, TrkB or TrkC. Maturation of these sensory subtypes is known to depend on the expression of Runx transcription factors. Newborn Brn3a knockout mice fail to express TrkC, which is associated in the TG with mechanoreceptors, plus a set of functional genes associated with nociceptor subtypes. In embryonic Brn3a-/- ganglia, the normal expression of Runx3 is never initiated in TrkC+ neurons, and Runx1 expression is greatly attenuated in TrkA+ nociceptors. These changes are accompanied by expanded expression of TrkB in neurons that abnormally express multiple Trks, followed by the loss of TrkC and TrkA expression. In transgenic embryos expressing a Brn3a-VP16 dominant transactivator, Runx3 mRNA expression is increased, suggesting that it is a direct regulatory target of Brn3a. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirms that Brn3a binds in vivo to a conserved upstream enhancer element within histone H3-acetylated chromatin in the Runx3 locus. Together these data show that Brn3a acts upstream of the Runx factors, which then repress TrkB expression to allow establishment of the non-overlapping Trk receptor profiles and correct terminally differentiated phenotypes.

  6. Effects of cold temperatures on the excitability of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that are not for cold-sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hirosato; Gu, Jianguo G.

    2016-01-01

    Except a small population of primary afferent neurons for sensing cold to generate the sensations of innocuous and noxious cold, it is generally believed that cold temperatures suppress the excitability of other primary afferent neurons that are not for cold-sensing. These not-for-cold-sensing neurons include the majority of non-nociceptive and nociceptive afferent neurons. In the present study we have found that not-for-cold-sensing neurons of rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) change their excitability in several ways at cooling temperatures. In nearly 70% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, the cooling temperature of 15°C increases their membrane excitability. We regard these neurons as cold-active neurons. For the remaining 30% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, the cooling temperature of 15°C either has no effect (regarded as cold-ineffective neurons) or suppress (regarded as cold-suppressive neurons) their membrane excitability. For cold-active neurons, the cold temperature of 15°C increases their excitability as is evidenced by the increases in action potential (AP) firing numbers and/or reduction of AP rheobase when these neurons are depolarized electrically. The cold temperature of 15°C significantly inhibits M-currents and increases membrane input resistance of cold-active neurons. Retigabine, an M-current activator, abolishes the effect of cold temperatures on AP firing but not the effect of cold temperature on AP rheobase levels. The inhibition of M-currents and the increases of membrane input resistance are likely two mechanisms by which cooling temperatures increase the excitability of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons. PMID:26709732

  7. Trigeminal ganglion neurons of mice show intracellular chloride accumulation and chloride-dependent amplification of capsaicin-induced responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Schöbel

    Full Text Available Intracellular Cl(- concentrations ([Cl(-](i of sensory neurons regulate signal transmission and signal amplification. In dorsal root ganglion (DRG and olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, Cl(- is accumulated by the Na(+-K(+-2Cl(- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1, resulting in a [Cl(-](i above electrochemical equilibrium and a depolarizing Cl(- efflux upon Cl(- channel opening. Here, we investigate the [Cl(-](i and function of Cl(- in primary sensory neurons of trigeminal ganglia (TG of wild type (WT and NKCC1(-/- mice using pharmacological and imaging approaches, patch-clamping, as well as behavioral testing. The [Cl(-](i of WT TG neurons indicated active NKCC1-dependent Cl(- accumulation. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A receptor activation induced a reduction of [Cl(-](i as well as Ca(2+ transients in a corresponding fraction of TG neurons. Ca(2+ transients were sensitive to inhibition of NKCC1 and voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCCs. Ca(2+ responses induced by capsaicin, a prototypical stimulus of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member-1 (TRPV1 were diminished in NKCC1(-/- TG neurons, but elevated under conditions of a lowered [Cl(-](o suggesting a Cl(--dependent amplification of capsaicin-induced responses. Using next generation sequencing (NGS, we found expression of different Ca(2+-activated Cl(- channels (CaCCs in TGs of mice. Pharmacological inhibition of CaCCs reduced the amplitude of capsaicin-induced responses of TG neurons in Ca(2+ imaging and electrophysiological recordings. In a behavioral paradigm, NKCC1(-/- mice showed less avoidance of the aversive stimulus capsaicin. In summary, our results strongly argue for a Ca(2+-activated Cl(--dependent signal amplification mechanism in TG neurons that requires intracellular Cl(- accumulation by NKCC1 and the activation of CaCCs.

  8. Visualization of isolated trigeminal nerve invasion by lymphoma using gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manon-Espaillat, R.; Lanska, D.J.; Ruff, R.L.; Cleveland Veteran's Administration Medical Center, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH; Masaryk, T.; University Hospitals of Cleveland, OH; Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    1990-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with active histiocytic lymphoma for 12 years developed an isolated right trigeminal neuropathy. Initial evaluation with head computed tomography, X-rays of the skull base, bone scan, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis including cytology were normal. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed enlargement of the proximal third of the right trigeminal nerve. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI can be useful for the early demonstration of cranial nerve invasion by lymphoma. (orig.)

  9. NEURO-VASCULAR CONFLICT AS CAUSATIVE FACTOR IN IDI-OPATHIC TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most unbearable pain syndromes in one or more branches of trigeminal nerve. The basic pathology is still poorly understood 1. Two divergent view points, central versus peripheral have been presented to explain the possible mechanism 2. In spite of numerous favorable reports, the neurovascular conflict theory remains contra-vertical 3. Nevertheless, whether or not, neurovascular compression is accessory or predominant in the mechanism of trigeminal neuralgia is not yet determined. Although neurovascular compression and global atrophy of the root, a focal arachnoid thickening and angulated root on crossing over the petrous ridge have been observed. Yet, neurovascular conflict has made responsible as the main cause of this neuralgia 4. This lead to focal demylination of the nerve due to its pulsatile compression. Demylination result in short circuiting of neuronal flow and hence trigeminal neuralgia 5.      Present study was therefore designed as to appreciate neurovascular conflict as causative agent in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Material and Methods This prospective observational study was conducted in department of Neurosurgery Government Lady Reading Hospital Peshawar where microvascular decompression is performed as a primary procedure of choice for patients with trigeminal neuralgia. The duration of this study was from May 2003 – to June 2007. Total number of patients operated was 86. Drug resistant cases of trigeminal neuralgia that were   willing for operation was selected and proper clinical record was documented. MRI was done in all patients to exclude secondary causes of trigeminal Neuralgia. Under general Anesthesia in lateral position, small 2.5x2.5cm retro-mastoid craniotomy was performed. All these cases were operated by one surgeon with a team of associate’s doctors. Microscopic per-operative anatomical findings were recorded. Any possible per-operative complications

  10. Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cell responses to bitter and trigeminal stimulants in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Gulbransen, Brian D; Clapp, Tod R; Kinnamon, Sue C; Finger, Thomas E

    2008-01-01

    Nasal trigeminal chemosensitivity in mice and rats is mediated in part by epithelial solitary chemoreceptor (chemosensory) cells (SCCs), but the exact role of these cells in chemoreception is unclear (Finger et al. 2003). Histological evidence suggests that SCCs express elements of the bitter taste transduction pathway including T2R (bitter taste) receptors, the G protein α-gustducin, PLCβ2, and TRPM5, leading to speculation that SCCs are the receptor cells that mediate trigeminal nerve respo...

  11. [Influence of trigeminal nerve lesion on facial growth: study of two cases of Goldenhar syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darris, Pierre; Treil, Jacques; Marchal-Sixou, Christine; Baron, Pascal

    2015-06-01

    This cases report confirms the hypothesis that embryonic and maxillofacial growth are influenced by the peripheral nervous system, including the trigeminal nerve (V). So, it's interesting to use the stigma of the trigeminal nerve as landmarks to analyze the maxillofacial volume and understand its growth. The aim of this study is to evaluate the validity of the three-dimensional cephalometric analysis of Treil based on trigeminal landmarks. The first case is a caucasian female child with Goldenhar syndrome. The second case is a caucasian male adult affected by the same syndrome. In both cases, brain MRI showed an unilateral trigeminal nerve lesion, ipsilateral to the facial dysmorphia. The results of this radiological study tend to prove the primary role of the trigeminal nerve in craniofacial growth. These cases demonstrate the validity of the theory of Moss. They are one of anatomo-functional justifications of the three-dimensional cephalometric biometry of Treil based on trigeminal nerve landmarks. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2015.

  12. Functional Neuroanatomy and Behavioural Correlates of the Basal Ganglia: Evidence from Lesion Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ward

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The basal ganglia are interconnected with cortical areas involved in behavioural, cognitive and emotional processes, in addition to movement regulation. Little is known about which of these functions are associated with individual basal ganglia substructures.

  13. Laparoscopic ovariectomy in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Al-Badrany

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative evaluation of three different techniques of laparoscopic ovariectomy was carried out in 33 healthy female in rabbits, which included resection and removal of ovary after clip application, electrocautery of the ovary, then resection, and pulling ovary outside abdomen, ligation by silk, then ovary was removed. The ovaries and associated structures were better visualized by laparoscopy and all three techniques were carried out perfectly. All rabbits after operation were healthy and they were monitored for one month after operation. However, 3 of them died after operation, two of them died due to bleeding and the other of them died due to unknown causes. General anesthesia by using ketamine-xylazine i.m., was suitable for this technique, and the anesthesia provided good analgesia and good muscle relaxation. CO2 was used to establish pneumoperitoneum. In conclusion, resection and removal of the ovaries after clip application technique was found superior to the other two techniques.

  14. Bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia on T1-weighted image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Seung Kug; Ahn, Woo Hyun; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Gi

    1994-01-01

    Bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted images is unusual, the purpose of this study is to describe the pattern of high signal intensity and underlying disease. During the last three years, 8 patients showed bilateral high signal intensity in basal ganglia on T1-weighted image, as compared with cerebral white matter. Authors analyzed the images and underlying causes retrospectively. Of 8 patients, 5 were male and 3 were female. The age ranged from 15 days to 79 years. All patient were examined by a 0.5T superconductive MRI. Images were obtained by spin echo multislice technique. Underlying causes were 4 cases of hepatopathy, 2 cases of calcium metabolism disorder, and one case each of neurofibromatosis and hypoxic brain injury. These process were bilateral in all cases and usually symmetric. In all cases the hyperintense areas were generally homogenous without mass effect or edema, although somewhat nodular appearance was seen in neurofibromatosis. Lesions were located in the globus pallidus and internal capsule in hepatopathy and neurofibromatosis, head of the caudate nucleus in disorder of calcum metabolism, and the globus pallidus in hypoxic brain injury. Although this study is limited by its patient population, bilateral hyperintense basal ganglia is associated with various disease entities. On analysis of hyperintense basal ganglia lesion, the knowledge of clinical information improved diagnostic accuracy

  15. Modulating basal ganglia and cerebellar activity to suppress parkinsonian tremor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Zhao, Yan; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive research, the detailed pathophysiology of the parkinsonian tremor is still unknown. It has been hypothesized that the generation of parkinsonian tremor is related to abnormal activity within the basal ganglia. The cerebello-thalamic-cortical loop has been suggested to indirectly

  16. Do gap junctions regulate synchrony in the parkinsonian basal ganglia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, B.C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) typically suffer severely from different types of symptoms. Motor symptoms, restricting the patients’ ability to perform controlled movements in daily life, are of special clinical interest and have been related to neural activity in the basal ganglia.

  17. Basal ganglia calcification as a putative cause for cognitive decline

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, João Ricardo Mendes; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Basal ganglia calcifications (BGC) may be present in various medical conditions, such as infections, metabolic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, associated with different etiologies and clinical outcomes, including parkinsonism, psychosis, mood swings and dementia. A literature review was performed highlighting the main neuropsychological findings of BGC, with particular attention to clinical reports of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging studies combined with neuropsychological an...

  18. Neuroradiology of basal ganglia diseases in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoiardo, M.; Passerini, A.; D'Incerti, L.

    1987-01-01

    Computerized tomography and NMR imaging findings observed in the diseases affecting the basal ganglia in childhood and adolescence are discussed. First the dystonic syndromes associated with hereditary neurologic disorders of probable metabolic degenerative origin are considered; then the non-hereditary dystonias caused by various intoxications or acute insults are briefly discussed. 26 refs.; 4 figs

  19. Rabbit Model of Retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Jeong Kang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We created a rabbit model of retinoblastoma and confirmed the tumor clinically and histopathologically. Seventeen New Zealand rabbits were immunosuppressed with cyclosporin A at doses of 10–15 mg/kg. At day 3, the animals received a 30 μl subretinal injection of 1×106 cultured WERI retinoblastoma cells. Digital fundus images were captured before euthanasia, and the eyes were submitted for histopathology. Retinoblastoma cells grew in all the inoculated eyes and established a tumor under the retina and/or in the vitreous. New blood vessels in the tumor were observed starting at week 5. Cuffs of viable tumor cells surrounded the blood vessels with regions of necrosis present at 70–80 μm from nutrient vessels. Occasional tumor seeds in the vitreous histologically exhibited central necrosis. This rabbit model demonstrated similar fundus appearance and pathologic features to human retinoblastoma and may be used as a model to test various routes of drug delivery for retinoblastoma.

  20. Toward sophisticated basal ganglia neuromodulation: Review on basal ganglia deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cunha, Claudio; Boschen, Suelen L; Gómez-A, Alexander; Ross, Erika K; Gibson, William S J; Min, Hoon-Ki; Lee, Kendall H; Blaha, Charles D

    2015-11-01

    This review presents state-of-the-art knowledge about the roles of the basal ganglia (BG) in action-selection, cognition, and motivation, and how this knowledge has been used to improve deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Such pathological conditions include Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, Tourette syndrome, depression, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The first section presents evidence supporting current hypotheses of how the cortico-BG circuitry works to select motor and emotional actions, and how defects in this circuitry can cause symptoms of the BG diseases. Emphasis is given to the role of striatal dopamine on motor performance, motivated behaviors and learning of procedural memories. Next, the use of cutting-edge electrochemical techniques in animal and human studies of BG functioning under normal and disease conditions is discussed. Finally, functional neuroimaging studies are reviewed; these works have shown the relationship between cortico-BG structures activated during DBS and improvement of disease symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Complex Dynamics in the Basal Ganglia: Health and Disease Beyond the Motor System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Daniela S; Darbin, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    The rate and oscillatory hypotheses are the two main current frameworks of basal ganglia pathophysiology. Both hypotheses have emerged from research on movement disorders sharing similar conceptualizations. These pathological conditions are classified either as hypokinetic or hyperkinetic, and the electrophysiological hallmarks of basal ganglia dysfunction are categorized as prokinetic or antikinetic. Although nonmotor symptoms, including neurobehavioral symptoms, are a key manifestation of basal ganglia dysfunction, they are uncommonly accounted for in these models. In patients with Parkinson's disease, the broad spectrum of motor symptoms and neurobehavioral symptoms challenges the concept that basal ganglia disorders can be classified into two categories. The profile of symptoms of basal ganglia dysfunction is best characterized by a breakdown of information processing, accompanied at an electrophysiological level by complex alterations of spiking activity from basal ganglia neurons. The authors argue that the dynamics of the basal ganglia circuit cannot be fully characterized by linear properties such as the firing rate or oscillatory activity. In fact, the neuronal spiking stream of the basal ganglia circuit is irregular but has temporal structure. In this context, entropy was introduced as a measure of probabilistic irregularity in the temporal organization of neuronal activity of the basal ganglia, giving place to the entropy hypothesis of basal ganglia pathology. Obtaining a quantitative characterization of irregularity of spike trains from basal ganglia neurons is key to elaborating a new framework of basal ganglia pathophysiology.

  2. Crossed cerebellar and cerebral cortical diaschisis in basal ganglia hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Joon Seok; Ryu, Young Hoon; Kim, Hee Joung; Kim, Byung Moon; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Byung Hee

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the phenomenon of diaschisis in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage using cerebral blood flow SPECT. Twelve patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage were studied with Tc-99m ECD brain SPECT. Asymmetric index (AI) was calculated in the cerebellum and cerebral cortical regions as | C R -C L |/ (C R -C L ) x 200, where C R and C L are the mean reconstructed counts for the right and left ROIs, respectively. Hypoperfusion was considered to be present when AI was greater than mean + 2 SD of 20 control subjects. Mean AI of the cerebellum and cerebral cortical regions in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage was significantly higher than normal controls (p<0.05): Cerebellum (18.68±8.94 vs 4.35±0.94, mean ±SD), thalamus (31.91±10.61 vs 2.57±1.45), basal ganglia (35.94±16.15 vs 4.34±2.08), parietal (18.94±10.69 vs 3.24±0.87), frontal (13.60±10.8 vs 4.02±2.04) and temporal cortex (18.92±11.95 vs 5.13±1.69). Ten of the 12 patients had significant hypoperfusion in the contralateral cerebellum. Hypoperfusion was also shown in the ipsilateral thalamus (n=12), ipsilateral parietal (n=12), frontal (n=6) and temporal cortex (n=10). Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and cortical diaschisis may frequently occur in patients with pure basal ganglia hemorrhage, suggesting that CCD can develop without the interruption of corticopontocerebellar pathway

  3. Ultrastructure of Reissner's membrane in the rabbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvortrup, K.; Rostgaard, Jørgen; Bretlau, P.

    1994-01-01

    Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit......Anatomy, Reissner's membrane, electron microscopy, tubulocisternal endoplasmic reticulum, subsurface cisterns, rabbit...

  4. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montano N

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Montano,1 Giulio Conforti,1 Rina Di Bonaventura,1 Mario Meglio,2 Eduardo Fernandez,1 Fabio Papacci1 1Institute of Neurosurgery, Catholic University, Rome, 2Institute of Neurosurgery, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy Abstract: Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN. Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that

  5. Welfare assessment in pet rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, F.; Koene, P.; Beerda, B.

    2009-01-01

    One million pet rabbits are kept in The Netherlands, but there are no data available on their behaviour and welfare. This study seeks to assess the welfare of pet rabbits in Dutch households and is a first step in the development of a welfare assessment system. In an internet survey, housing

  6. Advanced MRI manifestations of trigeminal ganglioneuroma: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Xiaojuan; Fang, Jingqin; Luo, Qingya; Tong, Haipeng; Zhang, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    Ganglioneuroma is a rare benign tumor originating from the sympathetic nerves, and its origination from the trigeminal nerves is even rarer. Only 4 cases of ganglioneuroma originating from the trigeminal nerve have previously been reported, and these studies only reported conventional MRI manifestations. To our knowledge, the advanced MRI features of trigeminal ganglioneuroma have not been reported thus far. This study reports a case of trigeminal ganglioneuroma in the left cerebellopontine angle. Advanced MRI showed the following tumor characteristics: significantly increased perfusion on perfusion imaging; isointense on diffusion-weighted imaging, whorled appearance within the tumor and no significant signs of damage to the white matter fiber tracts in the fractional anisotropy color map, and compare to the adjacent brain tissue, Choline didn’t show markedly elevation, and N-acetylaspartate peak showed slightly reduction on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The tumor was completely resected, and the diagnosis of ganglioneuroma was confirmed by postoperative pathological examination. This case demonstrates the conventional as well as advanced MRI manifestations of this rare extra-axial tumor, which have never been previously reported. In addition, we reviewed the literature to demonstrate the advanced MRI features of trigeminal ganglioneuroma, in order to aid preoperative diagnosis and differentiation

  7. Phenytoin and carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia: marketing-based versus evidence-based treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keppel Hesselink JM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jan M Keppel Hesselink,1 Michael E Schatman2,31Institute for Neuropathic Pain, Bosch en Duin, the Netherlands; 2Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Boston Pain Care, Waltham, MA, USAIntroductionMost review articles support carbamazepine as a first-line pharmacotherapy for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia.1–3 However, the empirical support for this recommendation is somewhat suspect. Phenytoin, as the prototype for all anticonvulsants, was already positioned as an analgesic compound 70 years ago. Since these initial findings, the data that have been gathered have supported the use of anticonvulsants as painkillers – from phenytoin up to and including more recent anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Since 1942, a number of papers supported phenytoin’s therapeutic effects in trigeminal neuralgia (Table 1. The introduction of carbamazepine in 1962 by Geigy shifted the interest of neurologists from phenytoin as a treatment for trigeminal neuralgia to carbamazepine, without sound scientific evidence. To date, no convincing randomized controlled trials (RCTs have been published supporting the role of carbamazepine in trigeminal neuralgia, and we could not identify a single study comparing the effects of phenytoin with those of carbamazepine. Accordingly, phenytoin should probably be considered more often as a viable therapy for (treatmentresistant trigeminal neuralgia.

  8. The White Rabbit project

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; Gousiou, E; van der Bij, E; Wlostowski, T; Daniluk, G; Lipinski, M

    2013-01-01

    White Rabbit (WR) is a multi-laboratory, multi- company collaboration for the development of a new Ethernet-based technology which ensures sub-nanosecond synchronisation and deterministic data transfer. The project uses an open source paradigm for the development of its hardware, gateware and software components. This article provides an introduction to the technical choices and an explanation of the basic principles underlying WR. It then describes some possible applications and the current status of the project. Finally, it provides insight on current developments and future plans.

  9. INFECTIOUS MYXOMATOSIS OF RABBITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadel, Joseph E.; Ward, S. M.; Rivers, Thomas M.

    1940-01-01

    A second soluble antigen, separable from the virus, occurs in extracts of infected skin and in the serum of rabbits acutely ill with infectious myxomatosis. Like the first antigen (A), the second (B) is heat labile and has certain characteristics of a globulin. The two antigens precipitate in different concentrations of ammonium sulfate and can be separated by this method. Neither of the antigens after being heated at 56°C. precipitates in the presence of specific antibody but each is capable of inhibiting the activity of its antibody. PMID:19871012

  10. Increased Asics Expression via the Camkii-CREB Pathway in a Novel Mouse Model of Trigeminal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Migraine is a disabling condition that severely impacts socioeconomic function and quality of life. The focus of this study was to develop a mouse model of trigeminal pain that mimics migraine. Methods: After undergoing dural cannulation surgery, mice were treated with repeated dural doses of an acidic solution to induce trigeminal pain. Results: The method elicited intermittent, head-directed wiping and scratching as well as the expression of both the c-FOS gene in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP in the periaqueductal grey matter. Interestingly, the acid-induced trigeminal pain behaviour was inhibited by amiloride, an antagonist of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs, but not by AMG-9810, an inhibitor of transient receptor potential cation channel V1(TRPV1. In addition, the relative mRNA and protein expression levels of ASIC1a and ASIC3 were increased in the acid-induced trigeminal nociceptive pathways. Furthermore, blocking CaMKII with KN-93 significantly reduced the acid-induced trigeminal pain behaviour and c-FOS gene expression. Conclusion: The data suggested that chronic intermittent administration of an acidic solution to mice resulted in trigeminal hypersensitivity and that dural acid-induced trigeminal pain behaviour in mice may mechanistically mimic migraine. The observations here identify an entirely novel treatment strategy for migraine.

  11. Centrality of striatal cholinergic transmission in basal ganglia function

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    Paola eBonsi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Work over the past two decades revealed a previously unexpected role for striatal cholinergic interneurons in the context of basal ganglia function. The recognition that these interneurons are essential in synaptic plasticity and motor learning represents a significant step ahead in deciphering how the striatum processes cortical inputs, and why pathological circumstances cause motor dysfunction.Loss of the reciprocal modulation between dopaminergic inputs and the intrinsic cholinergic innervation within the striatum appears to be the trigger for pathophysiological changes occurring in basal ganglia disorders. Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence showing profound changes in cholinergic markers in these disorders, in particular Parkinson’s disease and dystonia.Based on converging experimental and clinical evidence, we provide an overview of the role of striatal cholinergic transmission in physiological and pathological conditions, in the context of the pathogenesis of movement disorders.

  12. Sonographic detection of basal ganglia abnormalities in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, U; Blitzer, A; Benecke, R; Grossmann, A; Dressler, D

    2014-02-01

    Abnormalities of the lenticular nucleus (LN) on transcranial sonography (TCS) are a characteristic finding in idiopathic segmental and generalized dystonia. Our intention was to study whether TCS detects basal ganglia abnormalities also in spasmodic dysphonia, an extremely focal form of dystonia. Transcranial sonography of basal ganglia, substantia nigra and ventricles was performed in 14 patients with spasmodic dysphonia (10 women, four men; disease duration 16.5 ± 6.1 years) and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls in an investigator-blinded setting. Lenticular nucleus hyperechogenicity was found in 12 spasmodic dysphonia patients but only in one healthy individual (Fisher's exact test, P spasmodic dysphonia severity (Spearman test, r = 0.82, P spasmodic dysphonia to that of more widespread forms of dystonia. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  13. Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification Presented with Impulse Control Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Cem; Levent, Mustafa; Akbaba, Gulhan; Kara, Bilge; Yeniceri, Emine Nese; Inanc, Betul Battaloglu

    2015-01-01

    Primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), also referred to as Idiopathic Basal Ganglia Calcification (IBGC) or “Fahr’s disease,” is a clinical condition characterized by symmetric and bilateral calcification of globus pallidus and also basal ganglions, cerebellar nuclei, and other deep cortical structures. It could be accompanied by parathyroid disorder and other metabolic disturbances. The clinical features are dysfunction of the calcified anatomic localization. IBGC most commonly present...

  14. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  15. Hemodynamics in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinya; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kimura, Jun

    1991-01-01

    We examined ten healthy volunteers using positron emission tomography (PET) in order to elucidate regional changes and correlations in the cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism. We also studied eight lacunar stroke patients so as to disclose the influences of vascular risk factors and aging on the cerebral blood flow and metabolism. We can conclude from our result as follows: (1) Cerebral blood volume (CBV) was minimum in the basal ganglia and cerebral blood flow (CBF)/CBV ratio was higher than that of cerebral cortex in healthy volunteers; (2) CBF of gray matter in healthy volunteers correlated with CBV and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen where oxygen extraction fraction inversely correlated with CBF, CBV, and CBF/CBV; and (3) the basal ganglia CBF/CBV ratio in lacunar stroke patients was lower than that of healthy volunteers. These findings suggested that the perfusion pressure in the basal ganglia was so high in the normal condition than the angionecrosis or occlusion in the perforating arteries would be induced, especially in the aged and hypertensive patients. (author)

  16. Transmitter-induced glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in leech segmental ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, A J; Pentreath, V W

    1987-01-01

    1. The utilization and control of glycogen stores were studied in the isolated segmental ganglia of the horse leech, Haemopis sanguisuga. The glycogen in the ganglia was extracted and assayed fluorimetrically and its cellular localization and turnover studied by autoradiography in conjunction with [3H] glucose. 2. The glycogen levels were measured after incubation with different neurotransmitters for 60 min at 28 degrees C. The results for each experimental ganglion were compared to a paired control ganglion, and the results analysed by paired t-tests. 3. Several transmitter substances (5-HT, octopamine, dopamine, noradrenaline, histamine) produced reductions in glycogen (glycogenolysis); other transmitters (glutamate, GABA) produced increases in glycogen (gluconeogenesis); others (adenosine, glycine) produced reductions or increases, depending on concentration. Acetylcholine had no effect on the glycogen levels. 4. Most of the glycogen in the ganglia is localized in the packet glial cells, which surround the neuron perikarya. Autoradiographic analysis demonstrated that the effects of histamine and dopamine were principally on the glycogen in the glial cells. 5. Adenylate cyclase was demonstrated by electron microscope histochemistry to be localized on the plasma membranes of the glial cells, and to a lesser extent on the neuronal membranes. 6. It is concluded that the changes in glycogen in the glial cells may be party controlled by transmitters via adenylate cyclase. This may provide a sensitive mechanism for coupling neuronal activity with energy metabolism.

  17. Percutaneous high-frequency selective rhizotomy in the trigeminal neuralgia therapy in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Tyurnikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trigeminal neuralgia is a rare symptom of multiple sclerosis affecting the disability. Multiple sclerosis related trigeminal neuralgia has been attributed to a demyelinating lesion in the pons. When the adequate pain drug-relieve therapy is not possible or when the patient becomes refractory to the treatment or can not continue pharmacological treatment because of the side effects, surgical intervention, including percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy is being discussed. Literature review and the data upon the efficiency and safety of this neurosurgical treatment in 16 patients with multiple sclerosis have been analyzed. Percutaneous radiofrequency rhizotomy has been proved to be a safe, reproducible and effective method of the symptomatic surgical treatment of trigeminal neuralgia in patients with multiple sclerosis in cases of the intolerance/inefficiency of the pharmacological therapy.

  18. Oxcarbazepine: Drug of the future in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

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    Revant H Chole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the study was to estimate the efficacy of oxcarbazepine in trigeminal neuralgia. Oxcarbazepine is a novel antiepilepfic drug, and its effect on trigeminal neuralgia has not been studied extensively previously. Materials and methods: Fifty-three patients with trigeminal neuralgia (34 men and 19 women took a mean dose of 600 mg of oxcarbazepine for a period of three weeks. Pain intensity was measured by using visual analog scale. Results: Of the 53 patients, 42 (79% were completely or well controlled by OXC, and nine (17% partially but acceptably controlled. Treatment with OXC was therefore satisfactory initially in 51 (96% of the patients. In seven of these patients, mild transient side effects occurred but did not necessitate cessation of treatment Conclusion: OXC appears to be an effective substitute for carbamazepine in those patients intolerant of this agent, or experiencing significant side effects.

  19. Ultrasound-Guided Intervention for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

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    Abdallah El-Sayed Allam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Orofacial myofascial pain is prevalent and most often results from entrapment of branches of the trigeminal nerves. It is challenging to inject branches of the trigeminal nerve, a large portion of which are shielded by the facial bones. Bony landmarks of the cranium serve as important guides for palpation-guided injections and can be delineated using ultrasound. Ultrasound also provides real-time images of the adjacent muscles and accompanying arteries and can be used to guide the needle to the target region. Most importantly, ultrasound guidance significantly reduces the risk of collateral injury to vital neurovascular structures. In this review, we aimed to summarize the regional anatomy and ultrasound-guided injection techniques for the trigeminal nerve and its branches, including the supraorbital, infraorbital, mental, auriculotemporal, maxillary, and mandibular nerves.

  20. Pseudocapsule formation after gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neurinoma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takenori; Ikeda, Eiji; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    A 38-year-old female presented with a trigeminal neurinoma manifesting as left facial paresthesia. The diagnosis was based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings. Gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) was performed at another hospital at her request. Fifteen months after the GKR, follow-up MR imaging revealed tumor regrowth causing extensive compression of the brainstem, and cyst formation in the tumor. Her clinical symptoms including facial pain and diplopia had worsened, so she was referred to our affiliated hospital for microsurgery. The tumor was totally resected, but the left trigeminal nerve had to be sacrificed because of pseudocapsule formation which covered both the tumor and the trigeminal nerve fibers. The diplopia disappeared, but her facial pain deteriorated after the operation. GKR can induce fibrosis or degenerative change in nearby structures, which may complicate subsequent surgery. (author)

  1. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

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    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  2. Trigeminal neuralgia: successful antiepileptic drug combination therapy in three refractory cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prisco L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lara Prisco1, Mario Ganau2, Federica Bigotto1, Francesca Zornada11Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine, University Hospital of Cattinara, 2Graduate School of Nanotechnology, University of Trieste, ItalyAbstract: Antiepileptic drug combination therapy remains an empirical second-line treatment approach in trigeminal neuralgia, after treatment with one antiepileptic drug or other nonantiepileptic drugs have failed. The results in three patients followed in our clinic are not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions, but suggest the possibility of developing this type of therapeutic approach further.Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, antiepileptic drugs, combination therapy

  3. The Neuropharmacology of Cluster Headache and other Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alfredo; Antonaci, Fabio; Ramusino, Matteo Cotta; Nappi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) are a group of primary headaches including cluster headache (CH), paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT). Another form, hemicrania continua (HC), is also included this group due to its clinical and pathophysiological similarities. CH is the most common of these syndromes, the others being infrequent in the general population. The pathophysiology of the TACs has been partly elucidated by a number of recent neuroimaging studies, which implicate brain regions associated with nociception (pain matrix). In addition, the hypothalamic activation observed in the course of TAC attacks and the observed efficacy of hypothalamic neurostimulation in CH patients suggest that the hypothalamus is another key structure. Hypothalamic activation may indeed be involved in attack initiation, but it may also lead to a condition of central facilitation underlying the recurrence of pain episodes. The TACs share many pathophysiological features, but are characterised by differences in attack duration and frequency, and to some extent treatment response. Although alternative strategies for the TACs, especially CH, are now emerging (such as neurostimulation techniques), this review focuses on the available pharmacological treatments complying with the most recent guidelines. We discuss the clinical efficacy and tolerability of the currently used drugs. Due to the low frequency of most TACs, few randomised controlled trials have been conducted. The therapies of choice in CH continue to be the triptans and oxygen for acute treatment, and verapamil and lithium for prevention, but promising results have recently been obtained with novel modes of administration of the triptans and other agents, and several other treatments are currently under study. Indomethacin is extremely effective in PH and HC, while antiepileptic drugs (especially lamotrigine) appear to be

  4. Inclusion of Cocoa as a Dietary Supplement Represses Expression of Inflammatory Proteins in Spinal Trigeminal Nucleus in Response to Chronic Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Ryan J.; Denson, Jennifer E.; Durham, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Scope Central sensitization is implicated in the pathology of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and other types of orofacial pain. We investigated the effects of dietary cocoa on expression of proteins involved in the development of central sensitization in the spinal trigeminal nucleus (STN) in response to inflammatory stimulation of trigeminal nerves. Methods and results Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed either a control diet or an isocaloric diet consisting of 10% cocoa powder 14 days prior to bilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the temporomandibular joint to promote prolonged activation of trigeminal ganglion neurons and glia. While dietary cocoa stimulated basal expression of GLAST and MKP-1 when compared to animals on a normal diet, cocoa suppressed basal calcitonin gene-related peptide levels in the STN. CFA-stimulated levels of protein kinase A, P2X3, P-p38, GFAP, and OX-42, whose elevated levels in the STN are implicated in central sensitization, were repressed to near control levels in animals on a cocoa enriched diet. Similarly, dietary cocoa repressed CFA-stimulated inflammatory cytokine expression. Conclusion Based on our findings, we speculate that cocoa enriched diets could be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for TMD and other chronic orofacial pain conditions. PMID:23576361

  5. Basal ganglia disorders studied by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi

    1994-01-01

    Recent development of positron emitting radioligands has made it possible to investigate the alterations of neurotransmitter systems associated with basal ganglia disorders in vivo. The functional integrity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic terminals may be studied with [ 18 F]6-fluoro-L-dopa ([ 18 F]dopa), and striatal dopamine receptor density with suitable PET ligands. [ 18 F]dopa uptake in the striatum (putamen) is markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). [ 18 F]dopa-PET is capable of detecting sub-clinical nigral dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with familial PD and those who become Parkinsonian on conventional doses of dopamine receptor antagonists. While putamen [ 18 F]dopa uptake is reduced to a similar level in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and PD, caudate [ 18 F] dopa uptake is lower in MSA than PD. However, [ 18 F]dopa PET cannot consistently distinguish MSA from PD because individual ranges of caudate [ 18 F]dopa uptake overlap. D 1 and D 2 receptor binding is markedly reduced in the striatum (posterior putamen) of MSA patients. Therefore, dopamine receptor imaging is useful for the differential diagnosis of MSA and PD. Similar marked reductions in putamen and caudate [ 18 F]dopa uptake have been observed in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Moderate reductions in D 2 receptor binding have been reported in the striatum of PSP patients. The reduction in D 2 receptor binding is more prominent in the caudate than putamen. Striatal [ 18 F]dopa uptake is normal or only mildly reduced in patients with dopa responsive dystonia (DRD). D 2 receptor binding is markedly reduced in patients with Huntington's disease, while striatal [ 18 F]dopa uptake is normal or mildly reduced. In summary, PET can demonstrate characteristic patterns of disruption of dopaminergic systems associated with basal ganglia disorders. These PET findings are useful in the differential diagnosis of basal ganglia disorders. (J.P.N.) 55 refs

  6. Correlation transfer from basal ganglia to thalamus in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela, Reitsma; Brent, Doiron; Jonathan, Rubin

    2011-01-01

    Spike trains from neurons in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian primates show increased pairwise correlations, oscillatory activity, and burst rate compared to those from neurons recorded during normal brain activity. However, it is not known how these changes affect the behavior of downstream thalamic neurons. To understand how patterns of basal ganglia population activity may affect thalamic spike statistics, we study pairs of model thalamocortical (TC) relay neurons receiving correlated inhibitory input from the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi), a primary output nucleus of the basal ganglia. We observe that the strength of correlations of TC neuron spike trains increases with the GPi correlation level, and bursty firing patterns such as those seen in the parkinsonian GPi allow for stronger transfer of correlations than do firing patterns found under normal conditions. We also show that the T-current in the TC neurons does not significantly affect correlation transfer, despite its pronounced effects on spiking. Oscillatory firing patterns in GPi are shown to affect the timescale at which correlations are best transferred through the system. To explain this last result, we analytically compute the spike count correlation coefficient for oscillatory cases in a reduced point process model. Our analysis indicates that the dependence of the timescale of correlation transfer is robust to different levels of input spike and rate correlations and arises due to differences in instantaneous spike correlations, even when the long timescale rhythmic modulations of neurons are identical. Overall, these results show that parkinsonian firing patterns in GPi do affect the transfer of correlations to the thalamus. PMID:22355287

  7. Percutaneous microsphere compression for the treatment of bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanfeng; Ma Yi; Huang Haitao; Zou Jianjun; Wang Bin; Li Fuyong; Wang Quancai

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of percutaneous microsphere compression (PMC) in treating bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia and to discuss the optimal contralateral operation time after one side trigeminal neuralgia was treated with PMC. Methods: From Dec.2000 to Aug. 2009 PMC was performed in 74 patients with bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Based on the pain-relieving degree the therapeutic effect was evaluated. Complete disappearance of pain was regarded as the criteria of a successful procedure. According to the recovery of mastication function of the operated side, the operation time for the contralateral side was decided. Results: A total of 145 PMC procedures were carried out in 74 patients,including three repeated operations in 3 cases due to recurrent pain after initial PMC. The postoperative instant effective rate was 96.5%. The recurrence rate was 2.1% during a mean follow-up period of 2.9 years (ranged 1-7 years). Of the 74 patients, bilateral PMC was accomplished in 68, and among them 57 patients received the contralateral operation within 1-3 months after the initial procedure was finished. Conclusion: Percutaneous microsphere compression is a quite effective treatment for bilateral primary trigeminal neuralgia. Usually, PMC for the contralateral side can be considered to perform in 1-3 months after the initial procedure. (authors)

  8. Mastication induces long-term increases in blood perfusion of the trigeminal principal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggiano, A; Manara, R; Conforti, R; Paccone, A; Secondulfo, C; Lorusso, L; Sbordone, L; Di Salle, F; Monda, M; Tedeschi, G; Esposito, F

    2015-12-17

    Understanding mechanisms for vessel tone regulation within the trigeminal nuclei is of great interest because some headache syndromes are due to dysregulation of such mechanisms. Previous experiments on animal models suggest that mastication may alter neuron metabolism and blood supply in these nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis in humans, arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure blood perfusion within the principal trigeminal nucleus (Vp) and in the dorsolateral-midbrain (DM, including the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus) in healthy volunteers, before and immediately after a mastication exercise consisting of chewing a gum on one side of the mouth for 1 h at 1 bite/s. The side preference for masticating was evaluated with a chewing test and the volume of the masseter muscle was measured on T1-weighted MRI scans. The results demonstrated that the mastication exercise caused a perfusion increase within the Vp, but not in the DM. This change was correlated to the preference score for the side where the exercise took place. Moreover, the basal Vp perfusion was correlated to the masseter volume. These results indicate that the local vascular tone of the trigeminal nuclei can be constitutively altered by the chewing practice and by strong or sustained chewing. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Somesthetic, gustatory, olfactory function and salivary flow in patients with neuropathic trigeminal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siviero, M; Teixeira, M J; de Siqueira, J T T; Siqueira, S R D T

    2010-07-01

    To determine somesthetic, olfactory, gustative and salivary abnormalities in patients with burning mouth syndrome (BMS), idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN) and trigeminal postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Twenty patients from each group (BMS, ITN, PHN) and 60 healthy controls were evaluated with a systematized quantitative approach of thermal (cold and warm), mechanical, pain, gustation, olfaction and salivary flow; data were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey, Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests with a level of significance of 5%. There were no salivary differences among the groups with matched ages; the cold perception was abnormal only at the mandibular branch of PHN (P = 0.001) and warm was abnormal in all trigeminal branches of PHN and BMS; mechanical sensitivity was altered at the mandibular branch of PHN and in all trigeminal branches of BMS. The salty, sweet and olfactory thresholds were higher in all studied groups; the sour threshold was lower and there were no differences of bitter. All groups showed abnormal thresholds of gustation and olfaction; somesthetic findings were discrete in ITN and more common in PHN and BMS; central mechanisms of balance of sensorial inputs might be underlying these observations.

  10. Comparison of neurotrophin and repellent sensitivities of early embryonic geniculate and trigeminal axons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rochlin, M William; O'Connor, R.; Giger, Roman J; Verhaagen, J; Farbman, A I

    2000-01-01

    Geniculate (gustatory) and trigeminal (somatosensory) afferents take different routes to the tongue during rat embryonic development. To learn more about the mechanisms controlling neurite outgrowth and axon guidance, we are studying the roles of diffusible factors. We previously profiled the in

  11. Magnetic resonance neurography in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathy: experience in a tertiary care centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Brian; Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Zuniga, John R. [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Surgery, Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, Dallas, TX (United States); Panchal, Neeraj [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cheng, Jonathan [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Plastic Surgery, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-10-15

    This tertiary care experience examines the utility of magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathies. Seventeen patients with clinically suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathies (inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve) were imaged uniformly with 1.5-T examinations. MRN results were correlated with clinical and surgical findings in operated patients and the impact on clinical management was assessed. Clinical findings included pain (14/17), sensory changes (15/17), motor changes (2/17) and palpable masses (3/17). Inciting events included prior dental surgery (12/17), trauma (1/17) and idiopathic incidents (4/17). Non-affected side nerves and trigeminal nerves in the intracranial and skull base course were normal in all cases. Final diagnoses on affected sides were nerve inflammation (4/17), neuroma in continuity (2/17), LN transection (1/17), scar entrapment (3/17), infectious granuloma (1/17), low-grade injuries (3/17) and no abnormality (3/17). Associated submandibular gland and sublingual gland oedema-like changes were seen in 3/17 cases because of parasympathetic effects. Moderate-to-excellent MRN-surgical correlation was seen in operated (8/17) patients, and neuroma and nerve transection were prospectively identified in all cases. MRN is useful for the diagnostic work-up of suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathy patients with significant impact on clinical management and moderate-to-excellent correlation with intra-operative findings. (orig.)

  12. Magnetic resonance neurography in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathy: experience in a tertiary care centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, Brian; Chhabra, Avneesh; Zuniga, John R.; Panchal, Neeraj; Cheng, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This tertiary care experience examines the utility of magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in the management of peripheral trigeminal neuropathies. Seventeen patients with clinically suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathies (inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve) were imaged uniformly with 1.5-T examinations. MRN results were correlated with clinical and surgical findings in operated patients and the impact on clinical management was assessed. Clinical findings included pain (14/17), sensory changes (15/17), motor changes (2/17) and palpable masses (3/17). Inciting events included prior dental surgery (12/17), trauma (1/17) and idiopathic incidents (4/17). Non-affected side nerves and trigeminal nerves in the intracranial and skull base course were normal in all cases. Final diagnoses on affected sides were nerve inflammation (4/17), neuroma in continuity (2/17), LN transection (1/17), scar entrapment (3/17), infectious granuloma (1/17), low-grade injuries (3/17) and no abnormality (3/17). Associated submandibular gland and sublingual gland oedema-like changes were seen in 3/17 cases because of parasympathetic effects. Moderate-to-excellent MRN-surgical correlation was seen in operated (8/17) patients, and neuroma and nerve transection were prospectively identified in all cases. MRN is useful for the diagnostic work-up of suspected peripheral trigeminal neuropathy patients with significant impact on clinical management and moderate-to-excellent correlation with intra-operative findings. (orig.)

  13. New Insights in Trigeminal Anatomy: A Double Orofacial Tract for Nociceptive Input

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henssen, D.J.H.A.; Kurt, E.; Kozicz, L.T.; Dongen, R.T.M. van; Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Cappellen van Walsum, A.M. van

    2016-01-01

    Orofacial pain in patients relies on the anatomical pathways that conduct nociceptive information, originating from the periphery towards the trigeminal sensory nucleus complex (TSNC) and finally, to the thalami and the somatosensorical cortical regions. The anatomy and function of the so-called

  14. Nasal solitary chemoreceptor cell responses to bitter and trigeminal stimulants in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbransen, Brian D; Clapp, Tod R; Finger, Thomas E; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2008-06-01

    Nasal trigeminal chemosensitivity in mice and rats is mediated in part by epithelial solitary chemoreceptor (chemosensory) cells (SCCs), but the exact role of these cells in chemoreception is unclear. Histological evidence suggests that SCCs express elements of the bitter taste transduction pathway including T2R (bitter taste) receptors, the G protein alpha-gustducin, PLCbeta2, and TRPM5, leading to speculation that SCCs are the receptor cells that mediate trigeminal nerve responses to bitter taste receptor ligands. To test this hypothesis, we used calcium imaging to determine whether SCCs respond to classic bitter-tasting or trigeminal stimulants. SCCs from the anterior nasal cavity were isolated from transgenic mice in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was driven by either TRPM5 or gustducin. Isolated cells were exposed to a variety of test stimuli to determine which substances caused an increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). GFP-positive cells respond with increased [Ca2+]i to the bitter receptor ligand denatonium and this response is blocked by the PLC inhibitor U73122. In addition, GFP+ cells respond to the neuromodulators adenosine 5'-triphosphate and acetylcholine but only very rarely to other bitter-tasting or trigeminal stimuli. Our results demonstrate that TRPM5- and gustducin-expressing nasal SCCs respond to the T2R agonist denatonium via a PLC-coupled transduction cascade typical of T2Rs in the taste system.

  15. Intranasal trigeminal function in subjects with and without an intact sense of smell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannilli, E; Gerber, J; Frasnelli, J; Hummel, T

    2007-03-30

    The intranasal trigeminal system is involved in the perception of odors. To investigate the cerebral processing of sensory information from the trigeminal nerve in detail we studied subjects with and without olfactory function using functional magnetic resonance imaging. A normosmic group (n=12) was compared with a group of anosmic subjects (n=11). For trigeminal stimulation gaseous CO(2) was used. Following right-sided stimulation with CO(2) controls exhibited a stronger right-sided cerebral activation than anosmic subjects. Stronger activation was found in controls compared to anosmic subjects for the right prefrontal cortex, the right somatosensory cortex (SI), and the left parietal insula. In contrast, relatively higher activation was found in anosmic subjects for the left supplementary motor area in the frontal lobe, the right superior and middle temporal lobe, the left parahippocampal gyrus in the limbic lobe, and the sub-lobar region of the left putamen and right insula which was mostly due to a decreased BOLD signal of controls in these areas. Additional conjunction analysis revealed that activated areas common to the two groups were the cerebellum and the right premotor frontal cortex. These data suggest that the processing of the trigeminally mediated information is different in the presence or absence of an intact sense of smell, pointing towards the intimate connection between the two chemosensory systems.

  16. PROJECTIONS OF THE PARVOCELLULAR RETICULAR-FORMATION TO THE CONTRALATERAL MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MINKELS, RF; JUCH, PJW; TERHORST, GJ; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    Projections of the parvocellular reticular nucleus (PCRt) to the contralateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) were studied in the rat with neurophysiological and neuroanatomical techniques. Three types of responses (classified by latencies) were recorded extracellularly in the Me5 area after

  17. Trigeminal Schwannoma with intra- and extracranial portions - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Ricardo Pires de; Setubal, Roger; Florencio, Filipe Toledo; Gomes, Marcio Rogerio Alcala; Mayo, Suzete Varela; Leiro, Luis Carlos Filgueira; Soares, Aldemir Humberto

    1997-01-01

    The authors report a case of a 40-year-old male patient presenting a mandibular branch Schwannoma of the trigeminal nerve with intra-and extracranial portions. The radiologic, computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings are discussed and a review of the literature is presented. (author)

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia--a coherent cross-specialty management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinskou, Tone; Maarbjerg, Stine; Rochat, Per; Wolfram, Frauke; Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Bendtsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) requires specific treatment programs and close collaboration between medical, radiological and surgical specialties. Organization of such treatment programs has never been described before. With this paper we aim to describe the implementation and feasibility of an accelerated cross-speciality management program, to describe the collaboration between the involved specialties and to report the patient flow during the first 2 years after implementation. Finally, we aim to stimulate discussions about optimal management of TN. Based on collaboration between neurologists, neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons a standardized program for TN was implemented in May 2012 at the Danish Headache Center (DHC). First out-patient visit and subsequent 3.0 Tesla MRI scan was booked in an accelerated manner. The MRI scan was performed according to a special TN protocol developed for this program. Patients initially referred to neurosurgery were re-directed to DHC for pre-surgical evaluation of diagnosis and optimization of medical treatment. Follow-up was 2 years with fixed visits where medical treatment and indication for neurosurgery was continuously evaluated. Scientific data was collected in a structured and prospective manner. From May 2012 to April 2014, 130 patients entered the accelerated program. Waiting time for the first out-patient visit was 42 days. Ninety-four percent of the patients had a MRI performed according to the special protocol after a mean of 37 days. Within 2 years follow-up 35% of the patients were referred to neurosurgery after a median time of 65 days. Five scientific papers describing demographics, clinical characteristics and neuroanatomical abnormalities were published. The described cross-speciality management program proved to be feasible and to have acceptable waiting times for referral and highly specialized work-up of TN patients in a public tertiary referral centre for headache

  19. Role of Basal Ganglia in Swallowing Process: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hamideh Ghaemi; Davood Sobhani-Rad; Ali Arabi; Sadegh Saifpanahi; Zahra Ghayoumi Anaraki

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The basal ganglia (BG) controls different patterns of behavior by receiving inputs from sensory-motor and pre-motor cortex and projecting it to pre-frontal, pre-motor and supplementary motor areas. As the exact role of BG in swallowing process has not been fully determined, we aimed at reviewing the published data on neurological control in the swallowing technique to have a better understanding of BG’s role in this performance.  Methods: English-language articles, w...

  20. Cystic adventitial degeneration: ectopic ganglia from adjacent joint capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmann, J; Widmer, M K; Gretener, S; Do, D D; Willenberg, T; Daliri, A; Baumgartner, I

    2009-11-01

    Cystic adventitial degeneration is a rare non-atherosclerotic cause of peripheral arterial occlusive disease, mainly seen in young men without other evidence of vascular disease. Diagnosis will be established by clinical findings and by ultrasound or angiography and can be treated by excision or enucleation of the affected arterial segment or by percutaneous ultrasound-guided aspiration. However, the etiology of adventitial cysts remains unknown. We report a case of cystic adventitial degeneration showing a connection between the joint capsule and the adventitial cyst, supporting the theory that cystic adventitial degeneration may represent ectopic ganglia from adjacent joint capsules.

  1. SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States); Spalding, A [Norton Cancer Institute, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia with radiosurgery is well established, but often met with limited success. Recent advancements in imaging afford improvements in target localization for radiosurgery. Methods: A Trigeminal Neuralgia radiosurgery specific protocol was established for MR enhancement of the trigeminal nerve using a CISS scan with slice spacing of 0.7mm. Computed Tomography simulation was performed using axial slices on a 40 slice CT with slice spacing of 0.6mm. These datasets were registered using a mutual information algorithm and localized in a stereotactic coordinate system. Image registration between the MR and CT was evaluated for each patient by a Medical Physicist to ensure accuracy. The dorsal root entry zone target was defined on the CISS MR by a Neurosurgeon and dose calculations performed on the localized CT. Treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a Radiation Oncologist and Neurosurgeon. Image guided radiosurgery was delivered using positioning tolerance of 0.5mm and 1°. Eight patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia were treated with this protocol. Results: Seven patients reported a favorable response to treatment with average Barrow Neurological Index pain score of four before treatment and one following treatment. Only one patient had a BNI>1 following treatment and review of the treatment plan revealed that the CISS MR was registered to the CT via a low resolution (5mm slice spacing) T2 MR. All other patients had CISS MR registered directly with the localized CT. This patient was retreated 6 months later using direct registration between CISS MR and localized CT and subsequently responded to treatment with a BNI of one. Conclusion: Frameless radiosurgery offers an effective solution to Trigeminal Neuralgia management provided appropriate technology and imaging protocols (utilizing submillimeter imaging) are established and maintained.

  2. SU-E-T-669: Radiosurgery Failure for Trigeminal Neuralgia: A Study of Radiographic Spatial Fidelity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, J; Spalding, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia with radiosurgery is well established, but often met with limited success. Recent advancements in imaging afford improvements in target localization for radiosurgery. Methods: A Trigeminal Neuralgia radiosurgery specific protocol was established for MR enhancement of the trigeminal nerve using a CISS scan with slice spacing of 0.7mm. Computed Tomography simulation was performed using axial slices on a 40 slice CT with slice spacing of 0.6mm. These datasets were registered using a mutual information algorithm and localized in a stereotactic coordinate system. Image registration between the MR and CT was evaluated for each patient by a Medical Physicist to ensure accuracy. The dorsal root entry zone target was defined on the CISS MR by a Neurosurgeon and dose calculations performed on the localized CT. Treatment plans were reviewed and approved by a Radiation Oncologist and Neurosurgeon. Image guided radiosurgery was delivered using positioning tolerance of 0.5mm and 1°. Eight patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia were treated with this protocol. Results: Seven patients reported a favorable response to treatment with average Barrow Neurological Index pain score of four before treatment and one following treatment. Only one patient had a BNI>1 following treatment and review of the treatment plan revealed that the CISS MR was registered to the CT via a low resolution (5mm slice spacing) T2 MR. All other patients had CISS MR registered directly with the localized CT. This patient was retreated 6 months later using direct registration between CISS MR and localized CT and subsequently responded to treatment with a BNI of one. Conclusion: Frameless radiosurgery offers an effective solution to Trigeminal Neuralgia management provided appropriate technology and imaging protocols (utilizing submillimeter imaging) are established and maintained

  3. Long-Term Results for Trigeminal Schwannomas Treated With Gamma Knife Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Toshinori, E-mail: h-toshi@komakihp.gr.jp; Kato, Takenori; Iizuka, Hiroshi; Kida, Yoshihisa

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Surgical resection is considered the desirable curative treatment for trigeminal schwannomas. However, complete resection without any complications remains challenging. During the last several decades, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a minimally invasive treatment modality. Information regarding long-term outcomes of SRS for patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas is limited because of the rarity of this tumor. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term tumor control and functional outcomes in patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with SRS, specifically with gamma knife surgery (GKS). Methods and Materials: Fifty-three patients harboring trigeminal schwannomas treated with GKS were evaluated. Of these, 2 patients (4%) had partial irradiation of the tumor, and 34 patients (64%) underwent GKS as the initial treatment. The median tumor volume was 6.0 cm{sup 3}. The median maximum and marginal doses were 28 Gy and 14 Gy, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 98 months. On the last follow-up image, 7 patients (13%) had tumor enlargement, including the 2 patients who had partial treatment. Excluding the 2 patients who had partial treatment, the actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 90% and 82%, respectively. Patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle had significantly lower PFS rates. If those patients with tumors compressing the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle are excluded, the actuarial 5- and 10-year PFS rates increased to 95% and 90%, respectively. Ten percent of patients had worsened facial numbness or pain in spite of no tumor progression, indicating adverse radiation effect. Conclusions: GKS can be an acceptable alternative to surgical resection in patients with trigeminal schwannomas. However, large tumors that compress the brainstem with deviation of the fourth ventricle should be surgically removed first and then

  4. The White Rabbit Project

    CERN Document Server

    Serrano, J; Cattin, M; Garcia Cota, E; Lewis, J; Moreira, P; Wlostowski, T; Gaderer, G; Loschmidt, P; Dedic, J; Bär, R; Fleck, T; Kreider, M; Prados, C; Rauch, S

    2009-01-01

    Reliable, fast and deterministic transmission of control information in a network is a need formany distributed systems. One example is timing systems, where a reference frequency is used to accurately schedule time-critical messages. TheWhite Rabbit (WR) project is a multi-laboratory and multi-company effort to bring together the best of the data transfer and timing worlds in a completely open design. It takes advantage of the latest developments for improving timing over Ethernet, such as IEEE 1588 (Precision Time Protocol) and Synchronous Ethernet. The presented approach aims for a general purpose, fieldbus-like transmission system, which provides deterministic data and timing (sub-ns accuracy and ps jitter) to around 1000 stations. It automatically compensates for fiber lengths in the order of 10 km. This paper describes the WR design goals and the specification used for the project. It goes on to describe the central component of the WR system structure - the WR switch - with theoretical considerations a...

  5. Heterogeneity of rabbit platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpatkin, S.

    1978-01-01

    Rabbits were injected intravenously with a cohort platelet label, 75 Se-selenomethionine. Platelet-rich plasma was separated into five different platelet density fractions on each of seven days by repetitively centrifuging the same sample of platelet-rich plasma at increasing gravitational force. The heaviest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with larger platelets. The lightest platelet sediment fraction was enriched with smaller platelets. Incorporation of isotope into the heaviest platelet fraction was considerably greater than incorporation into the lightest platelet fraction. The mean platelet survival of the lightest two fractions was significantly shorter than that of the heaviest three fractions. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the platelet cell sap generally revealed 10 prominent protein bands for the heaviest platelet fractions. The lightest platelet fraction had six absent to markedly diminished platelet proteins. The data are compatible with two models, (1) heavy-large platelets are, on average, young platelets which become lighter-smaller platelets while losing platelet membranes and cell sap components with time. (2) Heavy-large platelets and light-small platelets are produced independently by specific megakarocytes. The heavy-large platelets incorporate more isotope that lighter-smaller platelets (possibly because of their megakarocyte precursor). However, they are released earlier into the circulation than lighter-smaller platelets and are therefore younger platelets. The light-smaller platelets which are released later into the circulation have a shorter survival. (author)

  6. Biology of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Nathan R

    2006-01-01

    In recognition of Dr. Nathan Brewer's many years of dedicated service to AALAS and the community of research animal care specialists, the premier issue of JAALAS includes the following compilation of Dr. Brewer's essays on rabbit anatomy and physiology. These essays were originally published in the ASLAP newsletter (formerly called Synapse), and are reprinted here with the permission and endorsement of that organization. I would like to thank Nina Hahn, Jane Lacher, and Nancy Austin for assistance in compiling these essays. Publishing this information in JAALAS allows Dr. Brewer's work to become part of the searchable literature for laboratory animal science and medicine and also assures that the literature references and information he compiled will not be lost to posterity. However, readers should note that this material has undergone only minor editing for style, has not been edited for content, and, most importantly, has not undergone peer review. With the agreement of the associate editors and the AALAS leadership, I elected to forego peer review of this work, in contradiction to standard JAALAS policy, based on the status of this material as pre-published information from an affiliate organization that holds the copyright and on the esteem in which we hold for Dr. Brewer as a founding father of our organization.

  7. Imaging insights into basal ganglia function, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A Jon; Lehericy, Stephane; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-08-09

    Recent advances in structural and functional imaging have greatly improved our ability to assess normal functions of the basal ganglia, diagnose parkinsonian syndromes, understand the pathophysiology of parkinsonism and other movement disorders, and detect and monitor disease progression. Radionuclide imaging is the best way to detect and monitor dopamine deficiency, and will probably continue to be the best biomarker for assessment of the effects of disease-modifying therapies. However, advances in magnetic resonance enable the separation of patients with Parkinson's disease from healthy controls, and show great promise for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and other akinetic-rigid syndromes. Radionuclide imaging is useful to show the dopaminergic basis for both motor and behavioural complications of Parkinson's disease and its treatment, and alterations in non-dopaminergic systems. Both PET and MRI can be used to study patterns of functional connectivity in the brain, which is disrupted in Parkinson's disease and in association with its complications, and in other basal-ganglia disorders such as dystonia, in which an anatomical substrate is not otherwise apparent. Functional imaging is increasingly used to assess underlying pathological processes such as neuroinflammation and abnormal protein deposition. This imaging is another promising approach to assess the effects of treatments designed to slow disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Basal Ganglia Calcification with Tetanic Seizure Suggest Mitochondrial Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Enzelsberger, Barbara; Bastowansky, Adam

    2017-04-09

    BACKGROUND Basal ganglia calcification (BGC) is a rare sporadic or hereditary central nervous system (CNS) abnormality, characterized by symmetric or asymmetric calcification of the basal ganglia. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 65-year-old Gypsy female who was admitted for a tetanic seizure, and who had a history of polyneuropathy, restless-leg syndrome, retinopathy, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, osteoporosis with consecutive hyperkyphosis, cervicalgia, lumbalgia, struma nodosa requiring thyroidectomy and consecutive hypothyroidism, adipositas, resection of a vocal chord polyp, arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease, atheromatosis of the aorta, peripheral artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steatosis hepatis, mild renal insufficiency, long-term hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, impingement syndrome, spondylarthrosis of the lumbar spine, and hysterectomy. History and clinical presentation suggested a mitochondrial defect which also manifested as hypoparathyroidism or Fanconi syndrome resulting in BGC. After substitution of calcium, no further tetanic seizures occurred. CONCLUSIONS Patients with BGC should be investigated for a mitochondrial disorder. A mitochondrial disorder may also manifest as tetanic seizure.

  9. Serum Fetuin-A Levels in Patients with Bilateral Basal Ganglia Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiryurek, Bekir Enes; Gundogdu, Asli Aksoy

    2018-02-14

    The idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (Fahr syndrome) may occur due to senility. Fetuin-A is a negative acute phase reactant which inhibits calcium-phosphorus precipitation and vascular calcification. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether serum fetuin-A levels correlate with bilateral basal ganglia calcification. Forty-five patients who had bilateral basal ganglia calcification on brain CT were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and 45 age and gender-matched subjects without basal ganglia calcification were included for the control group. Serum fetuin-A levels were measured from venous blood samples. All participants were divided into two groups; with and without basal ganglia calcification. These groups were divided into subgroups regarding age (18-32 and 33-45 years of age) and gender (male, female). We detected lower levels of serum fetuin-A in patients with basal ganglia calcification compared with the subjects without basal ganglia calcification. In all subgroups (female, male, 18-32 years and 33-45 years), mean fetuin-A levels were significantly lower in patients with basal ganglia calcification (p = 0.017, p = 0.014, p = 0.024, p = 0.026, p = 0.01 respectively). And statistically significantly lower levels of fetuin-A was found to be correlated with the increasing densities of calcification in the calcified basal ganglia group (p-value: <0.001). Considering the role of fetuin-A in tissue calcification and inflammation, higher serum fetuin-A levels should be measured in patients with basal ganglia calcification. We believe that the measurement of serum fetuin-A may play a role in the prediction of basal ganglia calcification as a biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Detailed mapping of serotonin 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor messenger RNA and ligand binding sites in guinea-pig brain and trigeminal ganglion: clues for function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leysen, J.E. [Graduate School Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schotte, A.; Jurzak, M.; Luyten, W.H.M.L. [Department of Biochemical Pharmacology, Janssen Research Foundation, Beerse (Belgium); Voorn, P.; Bonaventure, P. [Graduate School Neurosciences, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-10-17

    The similar pharmacology of the 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptors, and the lack of selective compounds sufficiently distinguishing between the two receptor subtypes, have hampered functional studies on these receptors. In order to provide clues for differential functional roles of the two subtypes, we performed a parallel localization study throughout the guinea-pig brain and the trigeminal ganglia by means of quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry (using [{sup 35}S]-labelled riboprobes probes for receptor messenger RNA) and receptor autoradiography (using a new radioligand [{sup 3}H]alniditan).The anatomical patterns of 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor messenger RNA were quite different. While 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor messenger RNA was abundant throughout the brain (with highest levels in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cortex, hypothalamus, hippocampal formation, amygdala, thalamus, dorsal raphe and cerebellum), 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor messenger RNA exhibited a more restricted pattern; it was found mainly in the olfactory tubercle, entorhinal cortex, dorsal raphe, cerebellum, mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus and in the trigeminal ganglion. The density of 5-HT{sub 1B/1D} binding sites (combined) obtained with [{sup 3}H]alniditan autoradiography was high in the substantia nigra, superior colliculus and globus pallidus, whereas lower levels were detected in the caudate-putamen, hypothalamus, hippocampal formation, amygdala, thalamus and central gray. This distribution pattern was indistinguishable from specific 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor labelling in the presence of ketanserin under conditions to occlude 5-HT{sub 1D} receptor labelling; hence the latter were below detection level. Relationships between the regional distributions of the receptor messenger RNAs and binding sites and particular neuroanatomical pathways are discussed with respect to possible functional roles of the 5-HT{sub 1B} and 5-HT{sub 1D} receptors. (Copyright (c

  11. Simple Additive Weighting to Diagnose Rabbit Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadiani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabbit is one of the many pets maintained by the general public in Indonesia. Like other pet, rabbits are also susceptible to various diseases. Society in general does not understand correctly the type of rabbit disease and the way of treatment. To help care for sick rabbits it is necessary a decision support system recommendation diagnosis of rabbit disease. The purpose of this research is to make the application of rabbit disease diagnosis system so that can help user in taking care of rabbit. This application diagnoses the disease by tracing the symptoms and calculating the recommendation of the disease using Simple Additive Weighting method. This research produces a web-based decision support system that is used to help rabbit breeders and the general public.

  12. Simple Additive Weighting to Diagnose Rabbit Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadiani; Marissa, Dyna; Jundillah, Muhammad Labib; Azainil; Hatta, Heliza Rahmania

    2018-02-01

    Rabbit is one of the many pets maintained by the general public in Indonesia. Like other pet, rabbits are also susceptible to various diseases. Society in general does not understand correctly the type of rabbit disease and the way of treatment. To help care for sick rabbits it is necessary a decision support system recommendation diagnosis of rabbit disease. The purpose of this research is to make the application of rabbit disease diagnosis system so that can help user in taking care of rabbit. This application diagnoses the disease by tracing the symptoms and calculating the recommendation of the disease using Simple Additive Weighting method. This research produces a web-based decision support system that is used to help rabbit breeders and the general public.

  13. A RARE CASE OF PERSISTENT TRIGEMINAL ARTERY IN AN ADULT FEMALE WITH PARA POSTERIOR COMMUNICATING ARTERY ANEURYSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banavathu Daya Bharath Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anastomosis found in the adulthood between the carotid and vertebro - basilar systems, apart from the posterior communicating artery, are extremely infrequent and are due to the persistence of vessels that joined both systems during the fetal period. This carotid - vertebrobasilar anastomosis are the trigeminal, otic, and hypoglossal and proatlantal arteries. P ersistent trigeminal artery is the commonest of the above mentioned four arteries. The reported incidence is about 0.2%. Patients may be asymptomatic or present symptoms due to low flow of posterior circulation or carotid microembolization from posterior circulation. PTA can cause trigemina l neuralgia. We report in this paper a case of a persistant trigeminal artery found in an adult female with a para p com aneurysm who had persistent trigeminal artery which was seen in C T angiogram .

  14. Effects of cold temperatures on the excitability of rat trigeminal ganglion neurons that are not for cold sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Hirosato; Gu, Jianguo G

    2017-05-01

    Aside from a small population of primary afferent neurons for sensing cold, which generate sensations of innocuous and noxious cold, it is generally believed that cold temperatures suppress the excitability of primary afferent neurons not responsible for cold sensing. These not-for-cold-sensing neurons include the majority of non-nociceptive and nociceptive afferent neurons. In this study we have found that the not-for-cold-sensing neurons of rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) change their excitability in several ways at cooling temperatures. In nearly 70% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, a cooling temperature of 15°C increases their membrane excitability. We regard these neurons as cold-active neurons. For the remaining 30% of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons, the cooling temperature of 15°C either has no effect (cold-ineffective neurons) or suppress their membrane excitability (cold-suppressive neurons). For cold-active neurons, the cold temperature of 15°C increases their excitability as is evidenced by increases in action potential (AP) firing numbers and/or the reduction in AP rheobase when these neurons are depolarized electrically. The cold temperature of 15°C significantly inhibits M-currents and increases membrane input resistance of cold-active neurons. Retigabine, an M-current activator, abolishes the effect of cold temperatures on AP firing, but not the effect of cold temperature on AP rheobase levels. The inhibition of M-currents and the increases of membrane input resistance are likely two mechanisms by which cooling temperatures increase the excitability of not-for-cold-sensing TG neurons. This article is part of the special article series "Pain". © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4, 7 and co-receptors in neurochemical sub-populations of rat trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, M P; Abate, W; Jackson, S K; Bennett, J H; Thompson, S W N

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery that mammalian nociceptors express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has raised the possibility that these cells directly detect and respond to pathogens with implications for either direct nociceptor activation or sensitization. A range of neuronal TLRs have been identified, however a detailed description regarding the distribution of expression of these receptors within sub-populations of sensory neurons is lacking. There is also some debate as to the composition of the TLR4 receptor complex on sensory neurons. Here we use a range of techniques to quantify the expression of TLR4, TLR7 and some associated molecules within neurochemically-identified sub-populations of trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons. We also detail the pattern of expression and co-expression of two isoforms of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), a phospholipid remodeling enzyme previously shown to be involved in the lipopolysaccharide-dependent TLR4 response in monocytes, within sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry shows that both TLR4 and TLR7 preferentially co-localize with transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3), markers of nociceptor populations, within both TG and DRG. A gene expression profile shows that TG sensory neurons express a range of TLR-associated molecules. LPCAT1 is expressed by a proportion of both nociceptors and non-nociceptive neurons. LPCAT2 immunostaining is absent from neuronal profiles within both TG and DRG and is confined to non-neuronal cell types under naïve conditions. Together, our results show that nociceptors express the molecular machinery required to directly respond to pathogenic challenge independently from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Teratology studies in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allais, Linda; Reynaud, Lucie

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is generally the non-rodent species or second species after the rat recommended by the regulatory authorities and is part of the package of regulatory reproductive studies for the detection of potential embryotoxic and/or teratogenic effects of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, food additives, and other compounds, including vaccines (see Chapters 1-7).Its availability, practicality in housing and in mating as well as its large size makes the rabbit the preferred choice as a non-rodent species. The study protocols are essentially similar to those established for the rat (Chapter 9), with some particularities. The study designs are well defined in guidelines and are relatively standardized between testing laboratories across the world.As for the rat, large litter sizes and extensive background data in the rabbit are valuable criteria for an optimal assessment of in utero development of the embryo or fetus and for the detection of potential external or internal fetal malformations.

  17. Homologous Basal Ganglia Network Models in Physiological and Parkinsonian Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotika Bahuguna

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The classical model of basal ganglia has been refined in recent years with discoveries of subpopulations within a nucleus and previously unknown projections. One such discovery is the presence of subpopulations of arkypallidal and prototypical neurons in external globus pallidus, which was previously considered to be a primarily homogeneous nucleus. Developing a computational model of these multiple interconnected nuclei is challenging, because the strengths of the connections are largely unknown. We therefore use a genetic algorithm to search for the unknown connectivity parameters in a firing rate model. We apply a binary cost function derived from empirical firing rate and phase relationship data for the physiological and Parkinsonian conditions. Our approach generates ensembles of over 1,000 configurations, or homologies, for each condition, with broad distributions for many of the parameter values and overlap between the two conditions. However, the resulting effective weights of connections from or to prototypical and arkypallidal neurons are consistent with the experimental data. We investigate the significance of the weight variability by manipulating the parameters individually and cumulatively, and conclude that the correlation observed between the parameters is necessary for generating the dynamics of the two conditions. We then investigate the response of the networks to a transient cortical stimulus, and demonstrate that networks classified as physiological effectively suppress activity in the internal globus pallidus, and are not susceptible to oscillations, whereas parkinsonian networks show the opposite tendency. Thus, we conclude that the rates and phase relationships observed in the globus pallidus are predictive of experimentally observed higher level dynamical features of the physiological and parkinsonian basal ganglia, and that the multiplicity of solutions generated by our method may well be indicative of a natural

  18. Microvascular Decompression for Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia Caused by Venous Compression: Novel Anatomic Classifications and Surgical Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Fu, Xianming; Ji, Ying; Ding, Wanhai; Deng, Dali; Wang, Yehan; Jiang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Chaoshi

    2018-05-01

    Microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve is the most effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia. However, when encountering classical trigeminal neuralgia caused by venous compression, the procedure becomes much more difficult, and failure or recurrence because of incomplete decompression may become frequent. This study aimed to investigate the anatomic variation of the culprit veins and discuss the surgical strategy for different types. We performed a retrospective analysis of 64 consecutive cases in whom veins were considered as responsible vessels alone or combined with other adjacent arteries. The study classified culprit veins according to operative anatomy and designed personalized approaches and decompression management according to different forms of compressive veins. Curative effects were assessed by the Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity score and BNI facial numbness score. The most commonly encountered veins were the superior petrosal venous complex (SPVC), which was artificially divided into 4 types according to both venous tributary distribution and empty point site. We synthetically considered these factors and selected an approach to expose the trigeminal root entry zone, including the suprafloccular transhorizontal fissure approach and infratentorial supracerebellar approach. The methods of decompression consist of interposing and transposing by using Teflon, and sometimes with the aid of medical adhesive. Nerve combing (NC) of the trigeminal root was conducted in situations of extremely difficult neurovascular compression, instead of sacrificing veins. Pain completely disappeared in 51 patients, and the excellent outcome rate was 79.7%. There were 13 patients with pain relief treated with reoperation. Postoperative complications included 10 cases of facial numbness, 1 case of intracranial infection, and 1 case of high-frequency hearing loss. The accuracy recognition of anatomic variation of the SPVC is crucial for the

  19. Keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression for primary trigeminal neuralgia:a report of 23 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-ge CHENG

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the surgical technique,effects,and complications of keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression for primary trigeminal neuralgia.Methods The craniotomy with a keyhole incision above postauricular hairline followed by microvascular decompression was performed in 23 patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia.Dissection of intracranial part of trigeminal nerve under microscope was done to search for the offending vessels,which were thereby freed and between which and the root entry zone(REZ of trigeminal nerve the Teflon grafts were placed.Effects and complications were observed in follow-up,ranging from 1 month to 2 years.Results Out of 23 patients who were all found compression in REZ of trigeminal nerves by the offending vessels in operation,disappearance of symptoms post-surgery was found in 22 cases,face numbness on the surgical side in 3 cases and no effects in 1 case.Recurrence of pain was not observed in patients who had initially benefited from the surgery at the follow-up.Conclusion The keyhole craniotomy through retrosigmoid approach followed by microvascular decompression is safe and effective for primary trigeminal neuralgia,in which accurate technique during operation plays a vital role in the decrease of complications and the outcome post-surgery.

  20. Carcass characteristics and meat quality of rabbit litters from rabbit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of restricted feeding and realimentation during pregnancy was studied to know the carryover effect on carcass characteristics and meat quality of rabbit litters.Young does fed ad libitum diets often show parturition problems (Dystokia and abnormal presentation) with the subsequent reduction of number of kits, ...

  1. Bilateral symmetrical low density areas in the basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Ihara, Yasuo

    1984-01-01

    We reported a case with dysarthria and gait disturbance, in which CT revealed symmetrical well-demarcated low density areas in the basal ganglia. The patient was a 43-year-old woman. Her family history and past history were not contributory. She had a little difficulty in speaking at the age of 17. Gait disturbance and micrographia appeared later. Although her expressionless face resembles to that seen in Parkinsonism, rigidity, akinesia and small-stepped gait were not present. The unclassified types of dysarthria and gait disturbance, which characterize the present case, were considered to be a kind of extrapyramidal symptoms, which were distinct from those of Parkinsonism. CT showed well demarcated low density areas predominantly in bilateral putamen. Metrizamide CT failed to show any communication between low density areas and subarachnoid spaces. To date, six cases, which presented similar clinical features and almost same CT findings as our case, were reported. (author)

  2. Basal ganglia calcification as a putative cause for cognitive decline

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    João Ricardo Mendes de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Basal ganglia calcifications (BGC may be present in various medical conditions, such as infections, metabolic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, associated with different etiologies and clinical outcomes, including parkinsonism, psychosis, mood swings and dementia. A literature review was performed highlighting the main neuropsychological findings of BGC, with particular attention to clinical reports of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging studies combined with neuropsychological analysis show that some patients have shown progressive disturbances of selective attention, declarative memory and verbal perseveration. Therefore, the calcification process might represent a putative cause for dementia syndromes, suggesting a probable link among calcinosis, the aging process and eventually with neuronal death. The increasing number of reports available will foster a necessary discussion about cerebral calcinosis and its role in determining symptomatology in dementia patients

  3. Basal ganglia calcification as a putative cause for cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, João Ricardo Mendes; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes

    2013-01-01

    Basal ganglia calcifications (BGC) may be present in various medical conditions, such as infections, metabolic, psychiatric and neurological diseases, associated with different etiologies and clinical outcomes, including parkinsonism, psychosis, mood swings and dementia. A literature review was performed highlighting the main neuropsychological findings of BGC, with particular attention to clinical reports of cognitive decline. Neuroimaging studies combined with neuropsychological analysis show that some patients have shown progressive disturbances of selective attention, declarative memory and verbal perseveration. Therefore, the calcification process might represent a putative cause for dementia syndromes, suggesting a probable link among calcinosis, the aging process and eventually with neuronal death. The increasing number of reports available will foster a necessary discussion about cerebral calcinosis and its role in determining symptomatology in dementia patients.

  4. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Small Radiation Beam Dosimetry for Radiosurgery of Trigeminal Neuralgia: One Case Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. J.; Celis, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The use of small radiation beams for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) treatment requires high precision and accuracy in dose distribution calculations and delivery. Special attention must be kept on the type of detector to be used. In this work, the use of GafChromic EBT registered radiochromic and X-OMAT V2 radiographic films for small radiation beam characterization is reported. The dosimetric information provided by the films (total output factors, tissue maximum ratios and off axis ratios) is compared against measurements with a shielded solid state (diode) reference detector. The film dosimetry was used for dose distribution calculations for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery. Comparison of the isodose curves shows that the dosimetry produced with the X-OMAT radiographic film overestimates the dose distributions in the penumbra region

  6. A Case of Acoustic Shock with Post-trauma Trigeminal-Autonomic Activation

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    Alain Londero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the case of an acoustic shock injury (ASI, which did not result in a significant hearing loss, but was followed by manifold chronic symptoms both within (tinnitus, otalgia, tingling in the ear, tension in the ear, and red tympanum and outside the ears (blocked nose, pain in the neck/temporal region. We suggest that these symptoms may result from a loop involving injury to middle ear muscles, peripheral inflammatory processes, activation and sensitization of the trigeminal nerve, the autonomic nervous system, and central feedbacks. The pathophysiology of this ASI is reminiscent of that observed in post-traumatic trigeminal-autonomic cephalalgia. This framework opens new and promising perspectives on the understanding and medical management of ASI.

  7. Selective percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia:report on 1860 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴承远; 孟凡刚; 徐淑军; 刘玉光; 王宏伟

    2004-01-01

    @@Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain as "a sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing, recurrent pain in the distribution of one or more branches of the fifth cranial nerve".1 The incidence rate is about three to five cases per year per 100000 persons and increases with age.2 In our hospital, percutaneous radiofrequency therapy was performed on 1860 patients with TN from June 1986 to April 2003, and percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency therapy on 579 cases. Among this group of patients, X-ray, 3-D CT, and navigational localization of the oval foramen were performed on 42 cases. The indications, techniques, and results are reported here.

  8. Clinical experience with Leksell gamma knife in the treatment of trigeminal schwannomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG En-min; PAN Li; ZHANG Nan; ZHOU Liang-fu; WANG Bing-jiang; DONG Ya-fei; DAI Jia-zhong; CAI Pei-wu

    2005-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal nerve schwannomas, which are rare, slowly growing, benign tumors, account for 0.2% to 1.0% of all intracranial tumors and 0.8% to 8.0% of intracranial schwannomas.1-5 These tumors are treated surgically.1-4 The development of microsurgery and skull base surgery has made complete resection possible in most patients. Nevertheless, cranial nerve sequelae appear after complete resection of these tumors because they are located close to the cavernous sinus and usually adhere to the vital vascular and neural structures. As an alternative to microsurgical resection, Leksell gamma knife (LGK) radiosurgery has been performed for patients with intracranial schwannomas to minimize the treatment-related morbidity and achieve a long-term control of tumor growth.6,7 In this report, we describe our 6-year experience in the treatment of 38 patients with trigeminal schwannomas by LGK.

  9. Preemptive application of QX-314 attenuates trigeminal neuropathic mechanical allodynia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong-Ho; Son, Jo-Young; Kim, Min-Ji; Kang, Song-Hee; Ju, Jin-Sook; Bae, Yong-Chul; Ahn, Dong-Kuk

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of preemptive analgesia on the development of trigeminal neuropathic pain. For this purpose, mechanical allodynia was evaluated in male Sprague-Dawley rats using chronic constriction injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION) and perineural application of 2% QX-314 to the infraorbital nerve. CCI-ION produced severe mechanical allodynia, which was maintained until postoperative day (POD) 30. An immediate single application of 2% QX-314 to the infraorbital nerve following CCI-ION significantly reduced neuropathic mechanical allodynia. Immediate double application of QX-314 produced a greater attenuation of mechanical allodynia than a single application of QX-314. Immediate double application of 2% QX-314 reduced the CCI-ION-induced upregulation of GFAP and p-p38 expression in the trigeminal ganglion. The upregulated p-p38 expression was co-localized with NeuN, a neuronal cell marker. We also investigated the role of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) in the antinociception produced by preemptive application of QX-314 through analysis of the changes in Nav expression in the trigeminal ganglion following CCI-ION. Preemptive application of QX-314 significantly reduced the upregulation of Nav1.3, 1.7, and 1.9 produced by CCI-ION. These results suggest that long-lasting blockade of the transmission of pain signaling inhibits the development of neuropathic pain through the regulation of Nav isoform expression in the trigeminal ganglion. Importantly, these results provide a potential preemptive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neuropathic pain after nerve injury.

  10. Oxcarbazepine: a new drug in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewska, J M; Patsalos, P N

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine, a keto derivative of carbamazepine, has been assessed in six patients (two males, four females; mean age 61 years, range 42-77), with trigeminal neuralgia refractory to carbamazepine therapy, over a period of 6 months. An excellent therapeutic response to oxcarbazepine was seen in all patients with pain control correlating well with serum drug concentrations of oxcarbazepine and its primary active metabolite 10-OH-carbazepine. Onset of the effec...

  11. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind Chaturvedi; H H Dash

    2011-01-01

    Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and...

  12. Bilateral descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abdallah

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence suggest that the hypothalamus is involved in trigeminal pain processing. However, the organization of descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Sp5C remains poorly understood. Microinjections of the retrograde tracer, fluorogold (FG, into the Sp5C, in rats, reveal that five hypothalamic nuclei project to the Sp5C: the paraventricular nucleus, the lateral hypothalamic area, the perifornical hypothalamic area, the A11 nucleus and the retrochiasmatic area. Descending hypothalamic projections to the Sp5C are bilateral, except those from the paraventricular nucleus which exhibit a clear ipsilateral predominance. Moreover, the density of retrogradely FG-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus varies according to the dorso-ventral localization of the Sp5C injection site. There are much more labeled neurons after injections into the ventrolateral part of the Sp5C (where ophthalmic afferents project than after injections into its dorsomedial or intermediate parts (where mandibular and maxillary afferents, respectively, project. These results demonstrate that the organization of descending hypothalamic projections to the spinal dorsal horn and Sp5C are different. Whereas the former are ipsilateral, the latter are bilateral. Moreover, hypothalamic projections to the Sp5C display somatotopy, suggesting that these projections are preferentially involved in the processing of meningeal and cutaneous inputs from the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in rats. Therefore, our results suggest that the control of trigeminal and spinal dorsal horn processing of nociceptive information by hypothalamic neurons is different and raise the question of the role of bilateral, rather than unilateral, hypothalamic control.

  13. PERCUTANEOUS BALLOON COMPRESSION OF GASSERIAN GANGLION FOR THE TREATMENT OF TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA: AN EXPERIENCE FROM INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anurag; Dhama, Vipin; Manik, Yogesh K; Upadhyaya, M K; Singh, C S; Rastogi, V

    2015-02-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterized by unilateral, lancinating, paroxysmal pain in the dermatomal distribution area of trigeminal nerve. Percutaneous balloon compression (PBC) of Gasserian ganglion is an effective, comparatively cheaper and simple therapeutic modality for treatment of TN. Compression secondary to PBC selectively injures the large myelinated A-alfa (afferent) fibers that mediate light touch and does not affect A-delta and C-fibres, which carry pain sensation. Balloon compression reduces the sensory neuronal input, thus turning off the trigger to the neuropathic trigeminal pain. In this current case series, we are sharing our experience with PBC of Gasserian Ganglion for the treatment of idiopathic TN in our patients at an academic university-based medical institution in India. During the period of August 2012 to October 2013, a total of twelve PBCs of Gasserian Ganglion were performed in eleven patients suffering from idiopathic TN. There were nine female patients and two male patients with the age range of 35-70 years (median age: 54 years). In all patients cannulation of foramen ovale was done successfully in the first attempt. In eight out of eleven (72.7%) patients ideal 'Pear-shaped' balloon visualization could be achieved. In the remaining three patients (27.3%), inflated balloon was 'Bullet-shaped'. In one patient final placement of Fogarty balloon was not satisfactory and it ruptured during inflation. This case was deferred for one week when it was completed successfully with 'Pear-shaped' balloon inflation. During the follow up period of 1-13 months, there have been no recurrences of TN. Eight out of eleven patients (72.7%) are completely off medicines (carbamazepine and baclofen) and other two patients are stable on very low doses of carbamazepine. All patients have reported marked improvement in quality of life. This case series shows that percutaneous balloon compression is a useful minimally invasive intervention for the

  14. Description of a neural sheath tumor of the trigeminal nerve: immunohistochemical and electron microscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Khademi, Bijan; Owji, Seied Mohammad; Khosh, Khadije Jamshidi; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Gandomi, Behrooz

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Malignant neural sheath tumors of the trigeminal nerve affecting the nasal cavity and the paranasal sinuses are extremely rare. With conventional optical microscopy, their identification is difficult, and it is necessary to confirm them by means of electron microscopy and immunohistochemical techniques. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 41-year-old woman with a ten-month progressive history of pain followed by painful edema in the left facial region, and with symptoms of bleeding, secre...

  15. Altered regional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yanping; Zhang, Xiaoling; Guan, Qiaobing; Wan, Lihong; Yi, Yahui; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Yanping Wang,1,2 Xiaoling Zhang,2 Qiaobing Guan,2 Lihong Wan,2 Yahui Yi,2 Chun-Feng Liu1 1Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, 2Department of Neurology, The Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The pathophysiology of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN) has conventionally been thought to be induced by neurovascular compression theory. Recent structural ...

  16. Trigeminal Neuralgia, Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia, and Myofascial Pain Dysfunction Syndrome: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a common phenomenon that affects millions of people worldwide. Maxillofacial structures consist of various tissues that receive frequent stimulation during food digestion. The unique functions (masticatory process and facial expression of the maxillofacial structure require the exquisite organization of both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Neuralgia is painful paroxysmal disorder of the head-neck region characterized by some commonly shared features such as the unilateral pain, transience and recurrence of attacks, and superficial and shock-like pain at a trigger point. These types of pain can be experienced after nerve injury or as a part of diseases that affect peripheral and central nerve function, or they can be psychological. Since the trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerves innervate the oral structure, trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia are the most common syndromes following myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome. Nevertheless, misdiagnoses are common. The aim of this review is to discuss the currently available diagnostic procedures and treatment options for trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, and myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome.

  17. [Trigeminal motor paralysis and dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, S; Yoshida, T; Ohsumi, Y; Tabuchi, M

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with left hemiparesis of sudden onset. A brain MRI demonstrated a cerebral infarction in the ventral part of the right lower pons. When left hemiparesis worsened, she had dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints repeatedly. Then, her lower jaw deviated to the right when she opened her mouth. Also, there was decreased contraction of the right masseter when she clenched her teeth. These findings suggest that there was trigeminal motor paralysis on the right side resulting from involvement of the intrapontine trigeminal motor nerve. She has no history of dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints. An X-ray film showed that the temporo-mandibular joints were intact. Thus, it is possible that deviation of the lower jaw was the cause of this dislocation. We suspect that dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints may occur as a complication of unilateral trigeminal motor paralysis. This has not been reported to our knowledge.

  18. Surgical Management of Familial Trigeminal Neuralgia With Different Inheritance Patterns: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cervera-Martinez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionTrigeminal neuralgia is a disorder characterized by unilateral electric shock-like pain, distributed in one or more trigeminal nerve branches and triggered by usually innocuous stimuli. Among the few case reports and literature reviews on familial trigeminal neuralgia (FTN, the results of several suggest the involvement of genes associated with biochemical alterations or atherosclerotic vascular malformations.BackgroundWe present four cases of FTN within two families (family A: two brothers; family B: two sisters. All patients were submitted to surgical treatment by the same surgeon.DiscussionCases 1 and 2 (family A exhibited FTN with an uncommon autosomal recessive pattern and clinical features consistent with previous literature reviews and case reports. However, in cases 3 and 4 (family B, we found FTN with a dominant autosomal pattern and an unusual physiopathology characterized by arachnoid adhesions.ConclusionWe conclude, in this case report, that there are several inheritance patterns as well as physiopathology that may be involved in FTN, and that both patterns described in our reported cases were successfully managed with surgery.

  19. Management of uncommon secondary trigeminal neuralgia related to a rare Arnold Chiari type I malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Ali Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Trigeminal neuralgia (TN may sometimes present secondary to an intra-cranial cause. Arnold Chiari Malformation (ACM is downward herniation of the cerebellar tonsils through the foramen magnum that may be a cause of TN like pain in very rare cases. Aims The aim of this brief report is to suggest the proper management of uncommon secondary trigeminal neuralgia related to a rare Arnold Chiari type I malformation. Methods A male patient presented electric shock like stabbing pain on the right side of the face for more than ten years. The symptoms were typical of trigeminal neuralgia except that there was loss of corneal reflex on the right side and the patient also complained of gait & sleep disturbances. Complex and multilevel diagnosis was made. Results A multiplanar imaging through brain acquiring T1/T2W1 revealed ACM Type I Malformation with caudal displacement of cerebellar tonsils through foramen magnum. Conclusion Dental surgeons and oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons should exclude intra-cranial causes by Magnetic Resonance Imaging(MRI in patients of TN presenting with loss of corneal reflex, gait and sleep disturbances due to night time pain episodes.

  20. Relationship between Sensory Stimulation and Side Effects in Percutaneous Radiofrequency Treatment of the Trigeminal Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Mark V; Koning, Nick J; Koning, Henk M; van Kleef, Maarten

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) treatment of the trigeminal ganglion for treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia, to determine which patients have a long-term benefit, and to evaluate the effect of RF parameters. A retrospective study in 28 consecutive patients in combination with a follow-up questionnaire (n = 26, 93% response). An initial treatment effect of 89% was observed, 60% sustained at 12-month follow-up. Major side effects were hypesthesia (56%), dry eye (20%), and masseter muscle weakness (12%). A lower sensory stimulation threshold during treatment was associated with better patient satisfaction (P = 0.016), improved pain relief (P = 0.039), and trended toward more hypesthesia (P = 0.077). This low-volume study reported treatment effects in an older population that were similar to previous studies. Only a higher incidence of hypesthesia was detected by long-term follow-up. This study supported the high efficiency of RF treatment, but there was a high level of side effects. Most notable, low sensory stimulation was associated with increased hypesthesia, whereas higher stimulation levels yielded less effectiveness. Further investigation of an optimal sensory stimulation range for percutaneous RF treatment of the trigeminal ganglion was found to be warranted. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  1. Post-operative orofacial pain, temporomandibular dysfunction and trigeminal sensitivity after recent pterional craniotomy: preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazoloto, Thiago Medina; de Siqueira, Silvia Regina Dowgan Tesseroli; Rocha-Filho, Pedro Augusto Sampaio; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Siqueira, José Tadeu Tesseroli

    2017-05-01

    Surgical trauma at the temporalis muscle is a potential cause of post-craniotomy headache and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of pain, masticatory dysfunction and trigeminal somatosensory abnormalities in patients who acquired aneurysms following pterional craniotomy. Fifteen patients were evaluated before and after the surgical procedure by a trained dentist. The evaluation consisted of the (1) research diagnostic criteria for TMD, (2) a standardized orofacial pain questionnaire and (3) a systematic protocol for quantitative sensory testing (QST) for the trigeminal nerve. After pterional craniotomy, 80% of the subjects, 12 patients, developed orofacial pain triggered by mandibular function. The pain intensity was measured by using the visual analog scale (VAS), and the mean pain intensity was 3.7. The prevalence of masticatory dysfunction was 86.7%, and there was a significant reduction of the maximum mouth opening. The sensory evaluation showed tactile and thermal hypoesthesia in the area of pterional access in all patients. There was a high frequency of temporomandibular dysfunction, postoperative orofacial pain and trigeminal sensory abnormalities. These findings can help to understand several abnormalities that can contribute to postoperative headache or orofacial pain complaints after pterional surgeries.

  2. Neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W C; Zhong, W X; Li, S T; Zheng, X S; Yang, M; Shi, J

    2012-03-01

    Although radiofrequency thermocoagulation is considered as a primary treatment for most patients with trigeminal neuralgia, neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation has been rarely reported. The object of this study was to assess the clinical value of neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. The radiofrequency thermocoagulation was performed in 100 cases of trigeminal neuralgia. The patients were positioned supine or sitting, under Hartel's technique (reported by Sweet and Wepsic J Neurosurg 40:143-156, 1974), by anterior lateral facial approaches. The Gasserian ganglions were acupunctured, assisted by intraoperative CT scanning (3-digital reconstruction) and electrophysiology in order to accurately locate target. The needles located in oval foramen at the first puncture, the direction and position could be defined according to the electrophysiology examination. The pain alleviated immediately after operation. There occurred no serious complication and other nerve injury in all patients despite face numbness only. 3D-CT and electrophysiology Gasser's ganglion locations can raise the success rate of puncture, enhance the safety and reduce the incidence of complication, showing high academic value and its promising future.

  3. Hemorrhagic intracranial inflammatory pseudotumor originating from the trigeminal nerve: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Tae-Young; Jung, Shin; Lee, Min-Cheol; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Kim, In-Young; Kang, Sam-Suk; Kim, Soo-Han

    2006-01-01

    We report here on a case of intracranial inflammatory pseudotumor arising from the trigeminal nerve. A 52-year-old man presented with sudden onset severe headache. He had had facial numbness several months earlier and no signs indicating infection. On the computerized tomography scan, intracranial hemorrhage was detected at the cerebellopontine angle. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a 2.7-cm-sized, homogenously enhancing mass. A provisional diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma was made, and suboccipital craniotomy was then performed. The mass was encapsulated and had multiple capsular veins. There was a evidence of intratumoral bleeding. It originated from the trigeminal root and was adhered to the 4th cranial nerve. Pathologic examination showed fibrovascular tissue with dense infiltrates of plasma cells and lymphocytes, some histiocytes, and occasional neutrophils and eosinophils. It showed immunopositivity for leukocyte common antigen (LCA) and immunonegativity for S-100 and lysozyme. It was also immunopositive for EBV antigen. Intracranial inflammatory pseudotumors mostly arise from dural/meningeal structures in the intracranial location. This case is the first to describe an intracranial inflammatory pseudotumor originating from a cranial nerve. The pathologic examination supported the postinfection hypothesis out of several possible pathologic mechanisms.

  4. An Open Study of Botulinum-A Toxin Treatment of Idiopathic Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Nikkhah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TN is a unilateral, recurrent, sharp facial pain disorder that is limited to the distribution of divisions of the trigeminal nerve. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BTX-A for alleviating the frequency and severity of TN pain. Materials and Methods: This trial was performed as a before and after study. We treated 31 patients (15 male and 16 female with mean age of 52 year old that their diagnosis was made at least 4.5 years before. We injected BTX-A in various parts of face and particularly in the origin of mandibular and maxillary branches of trigeminal nerve. Injection volume was determined by the necessity and pain intensity measured with visual analog scale up to 100U. Patients were evaluated before and after the injection and were followed after week, and each month, for a three months period. Other related variables were recorded such as: toxin complications, pain status variations by brushing, chewing, cold weather and patient’s satisfaction with their therapy. Results: showed that after injection, pain intensity and frequency decreased after tooth brushing, chewing and cold weather (P

  5. Spontaneous behavioral responses in the orofacial region: A model of trigeminal pain in mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Akerman, Simon; Nguyen, Elaine; Vijjeswarapu, Alice; Hom, Betty; Dong, Hong-Wei; Charles, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To develop a translational mouse model for the study and measurement of non-evoked pain in the orofacial region by establishing markers of nociceptive-specific grooming behaviors in the mouse. BACKGROUND Some of the most prevalent and debilitating conditions involve pain in the trigeminal distribution. Although there are current therapies for these pain conditions, for many patients they are far from optimal. Understanding the pathophysiology of pain disorders arising from structures innervated by the trigeminal nerve is still limited and most animal behavioral models focus on the measurement of evoked pain. In patients, spontaneous (non-evoked) pain responses provide a more accurate representation of the pain experience than do responses that are evoked by an artificial stimulus. Therefore, the development of animal models that measure spontaneous nociceptive behaviors may provide a significant translational tool for a better understanding of pain neurobiology. METHODS C57BL/6 mice received either an injection of 0.9% Saline solution or complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the right masseter muscle. Animals were video recorded and then analyzed by an observer blind to the experiment group. The duration of different facial grooming patterns performed in the area of injection were measured. After 2 hrs, mice were euthanized, perfused and the brainstem was removed. Fos protein expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis was quantified using immunohistochemistry to investigate nociceptive-specific neuronal activation. A separate group of animals was treated with morphine sulfate, to determine the nociceptive-specific nature of their behaviors. RESULTS We characterized and quantified 3 distinct patterns of acute grooming behaviors: fore-paw rubbing, lower lip skin/cheek rubbing against enclosure floor and hind paw scratching. These behaviors occurred with a reproducible frequency and time course, and were inhibited by the analgesic morphine. CFA

  6. Dermatophytes in pet Guinea pigs and rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, A; Mueller, R S; Werckenthin, C; Straubinger, R K; Hein, J

    2012-05-25

    The frequency of dermatophytes in pet Guinea pigs and rabbits. To determine the frequency and types of dermatophytes in pet Guinea pigs and rabbits. First, 2153 samples collected from pet Guinea pigs (n=1132) and rabbits (n=1021) with suspected dermatophytosis and submitted to three different laboratories for fungal culture were analysed. Subsequently, healthy Guinea pigs and rabbits, animals with skin lesions and with noncutaneous diseases were examined prospectively for dermatophytes. Trichophyton (T.) mentagrophytes was the most common fungal species isolated (91.6% and 72.3% of positive cultures from Guinea pigs (n=431) and rabbits (n=83), respectively). Animals with positive fungal culture did not show any gender predisposition, but affected animals were younger than those with negative fungal culture (PGuinea pigs and 0/140 healthy rabbits. In addition, fungal cultures of Guinea pigs with skin lesions (n=26) and other diseases (n=25) were positive in 7.7% and 8.0% respectively. Samples collected from 17 rabbits with skin lesions and 32 rabbits with noncutaneous disease were all negative in culture. T. mentagrophytes is the most common dermatophyte in pet Guinea pigs and rabbits, asymptomatic carriers are regularly seen in Guinea pigs, but not in rabbits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Basal ganglia disorders studied by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1994-04-01

    Recent development of positron emitting radioligands has made it possible to investigate the alterations of neurotransmitter systems associated with basal ganglia disorders in vivo. The functional integrity of nigro-striatal dopaminergic terminals may be studied with [[sup 18]F]6-fluoro-L-dopa ([[sup 18]F]dopa), and striatal dopamine receptor density with suitable PET ligands. [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake in the striatum (putamen) is markedly reduced in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). [[sup 18]F]dopa-PET is capable of detecting sub-clinical nigral dysfunction in asymptomatic patients with familial PD and those who become Parkinsonian on conventional doses of dopamine receptor antagonists. While putamen [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake is reduced to a similar level in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and PD, caudate [[sup 18]F] dopa uptake is lower in MSA than PD. However, [[sup 18]F]dopa PET cannot consistently distinguish MSA from PD because individual ranges of caudate [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake overlap. D[sub 1] and D[sub 2] receptor binding is markedly reduced in the striatum (posterior putamen) of MSA patients. Therefore, dopamine receptor imaging is useful for the differential diagnosis of MSA and PD. Similar marked reductions in putamen and caudate [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake have been observed in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Moderate reductions in D[sub 2] receptor binding have been reported in the striatum of PSP patients. The reduction in D[sub 2] receptor binding is more prominent in the caudate than putamen. Striatal [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake is normal or only mildly reduced in patients with dopa responsive dystonia (DRD). D[sub 2] receptor binding is markedly reduced in patients with Huntington's disease, while striatal [[sup 18]F]dopa uptake is normal or mildly reduced. In summary, PET can demonstrate characteristic patterns of disruption of dopaminergic systems associated with basal ganglia disorders. (J.P.N.) 55 refs.

  8. Nutritional studies on growing rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, A.M.E.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    This work was carried out to study the effect of adding drinking water with either, copper sulfate, ascorbic acid or drinking cooled water on growth performance (live body weight,body weight gain, feed intake, feed conversion and water consumption), digestibility coefficients of nutrients, carcass traits, some physiological parameters and economical efficiency of growing NZW rabbits under Egyptian summer conditions. Ninety six weanling New Zealand White (NZW) male rabbits at five weeks of age and nearly similar average body weight (650.3 ±3.7 g) were randomly divided into eight treatment groups (twelve rabbits in each group), and then each group was subdivided into four replicates, each of three rabbits. The rabbits were assigned to drinking water as follow: the 1 st group was given fresh tap water without any additives as a control. The 2 n d, 3 r d and 4 t h groups were given tap fresh water supplemented with copper sulfate at levels of 40, 80 and 120 mg/L drinking water, respectively. The 5 t h, 6 t h and 7 t h groups were given tap fresh water supplemented with ascorbic acid at levels of 250, 500 and 750 mg/L drinking water, respectively. The 8 t h group was given cooled drinking water (CW) at 10-15 degree C. Results showed that supplementation of 40 or 80 mg copper sulfate/L or 500 mg ascorbic acid/L to heat-stressed rabbits drinking water improved final live body weight, body weight gain, daily water consumption, feed conversion ratio, performance index and economical efficiency. Hot carcass percentage was significantly (P<0.01) decreased with 80 mg/L copper sulfate and increased significantly (P<0.01) due to supplementation the drinking water with 250 mg ascorbic acid/L. Cooled water (10-15 degree C) improved significantly (P<0.01) each of final body weight, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio, performance index, economical efficiency and decreased significantly (P<0.01) each of hot carcass %, dressed weight %, heart %, total giblets %, rectal

  9. Nerve growth factor induces facial heat hyperalgesia and plays a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, Renata C; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Nones, Carina F M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2016-09-01

    There is preclinical evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes toward inflammatory hyperalgesia in the orofacial region, but the mechanisms underlying its hyperalgesic effect as well as its role in trigeminal neuropathic pain require further investigation. This study investigated the ability of NGF to induce facial heat hyperalgesia and the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptor A, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, and mast cells in NGF pronociceptive effects. In addition, the role of NGF in heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain was evaluated. NGF injection into the upper lip of naive rats induced long-lasting heat hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with an antibody anti-NGF, antagonists of tyrosine kinase receptor A, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors or compound 48/80, to induce mast-cell degranulation, all attenuated NGF-induced hyperalgesia. In a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, local treatment with anti-NGF significantly reduced heat hyperalgesia. In addition, increased NGF levels were detected in the ipsilateral infraorbital nerve branch at the time point that represents the peak of heat hyperalgesia. The results suggest that NGF is a prominent hyperalgesic mediator in the trigeminal system and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for the management of painful orofacial conditions, including trigeminal neuropathic pain.

  10. Levodopa Effect on Basal Ganglia Motor Circuit in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Jia-Rong; Chan, Piu; Wu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of levodopa on the basal ganglia motor circuit (BGMC) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirty PD patients with asymmetrical bradykinesia and 30 control subjects were scanned using resting-state functional MRI. Functional connectivity of the BGMC was measured and compared before and after levodopa administration in patients with PD. The correlation between improvements in bradykinesia and changes in BGMC connectivity was examined. In the PD-off state (before medication), the posterior putamen and internal globus pallidus (GPi) had decreased connectivity while the subthalamic nucleus (STN) had enhanced connectivity within the BGMC relative to control subjects. Levodopa administration increased the connectivity of posterior putamen- and GPi-related networks but decreased the connectivity of STN-related networks. Improvements in bradykinesia were correlated with enhanced connectivity of the posterior putamen-cortical motor pathway and with decreased connectivity of the STN-thalamo-cortical motor pathway. In PD patients with asymmetrical bradykinesia, levodopa can partially normalize the connectivity of the BGMC with a larger effect on the more severely affected side. Moreover, the beneficial effect of levodopa on bradykinesia is associated with normalization of the striato-thalamo-cortical motor and STN-cortical motor pathways. Our findings inform the neural mechanism of levodopa treatment in PD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Toward a functional analysis of the basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, A E; Davidson, M C; Keele, S W; Rafal, R D

    1998-03-01

    Parkinson patients were tested in two paradigms to test the hypothesis that the basal ganglia are involved in the shifting of attentional set. Set shifting means a respecification of the conditions that regulate responding, a process sometimes referred to as an executive process. In one paradigm, upon the appearance of each stimulus, subjects were instructed to respond either to its color or to its shape. In a second paradigm, subjects learned to produce short sequences of three keypresses in response to two arbitrary stimuli. Reaction times were compared for the cases where set either remained the same or changed for two successive stimuli. Parkinson patients were slow to change set compared to controls. Parkinson patients were also less able to filter the competing but irrelevant set than were control subjects. The switching deficit appears to be dopamine based; the magnitude of the shifting deficit was related to the degree to which 1-dopa-based medication ameliorated patients' motor symptoms. Moreover, temporary withholding of medication, a so-called off manipulation, increased the time to switch. Using the framework of equilibrium point theory of movement, we discuss how a set switching deficit may also underlie clinical motor disturbances seen in Parkinson's disease.

  12. Basal Ganglia Outputs Map Instantaneous Position Coordinates during Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barter, Joseph W.; Li, Suellen; Sukharnikova, Tatyana; Rossi, Mark A.; Bartholomew, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) are implicated in many movement disorders, yet how they contribute to movement remains unclear. Using wireless in vivo recording, we measured BG output from the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) in mice while monitoring their movements with video tracking. The firing rate of most nigral neurons reflected Cartesian coordinates (either x- or y-coordinates) of the animal's head position during movement. The firing rates of SNr neurons are either positively or negatively correlated with the coordinates. Using an egocentric reference frame, four types of neurons can be classified: each type increases firing during movement in a particular direction (left, right, up, down), and decreases firing during movement in the opposite direction. Given the high correlation between the firing rate and the x and y components of the position vector, the movement trajectory can be reconstructed from neural activity. Our results therefore demonstrate a quantitative and continuous relationship between BG output and behavior. Thus, a steady BG output signal from the SNr (i.e., constant firing rate) is associated with the lack of overt movement, when a stable posture is maintained by structures downstream of the BG. Any change in SNr firing rate is associated with a change in position (i.e., movement). We hypothesize that the SNr output quantitatively determines the direction, velocity, and amplitude of voluntary movements. By changing the reference signals to downstream position control systems, the BG can produce transitions in body configurations and initiate actions. PMID:25673860

  13. Quantitation of the human basal ganglia with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendrien, B.; Dewey, S.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; Wolf, A.P.; Volkow, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the concentration of a radioisotope in small structures with PET requires a correction for quantitation loss due to the partial volume effect and the effect of scattered radiation. To evaluate errors associated with measures in the human basal ganglia (BG) the authors have built a unilateral model of the BG that the authors have inserted in a 20 cm cylinder. The recovery coefficient (RC = measured activity/true activity) for the BG phantom has been measured on a CTI tomograph (model 931-08/12) with different background concentrations (contrast) and at different axial locations in the gantry. The BG was visualized on 4 or 5 slices depending on its position in the gantry and on the contrast used. The RC was 0.75 with no background (contrast equal to 1.0). Increasing the relative radioactivity 2.00 when the contrast was -0.7 (BG 2 ). This paper also demonstrates that the higher the contrast the more sensitive to axial positioning PET measurements in the BG are. These data provide the authors' with some information about the variability of PET measurements in small structure like the BG and the authors have proposed some strategies to improve the reproducibility

  14. Quantitation of the human basal ganglia with Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendriem, B.; Dewey, S.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; Wolf, A.P.; Volkow, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the concentration of a radioisotope in small structures with PET requires a correction for quantitation loss due to the partial volume effect and the effect of scattered radiation. To evaluate errors associated with measures in the human basal ganglia (BG) we have built a unilateral model of the BG that we have inserted in a 20 cm cylinder. The recovery coefficient (RC = measured activity/true activity) for our BG phantom has been measured on a CTI tomograph (model 931-08/12) with different background concentrations (contrast) and at different axial locations in the gantry. The BG was visualized on 4 or 5 slices depending on its position in the gantry and on the contrast used. The RC was 0.75 with no background (contrast equal to 1.0). Increasing the relative radioactivity concentration in the background increased the RC from 0.75 to 2.00 when the contrast was -0.7 (BG 2 ). These results show that accurate RC correction depends not only on the volume of the structure but also on its contrast with its surroundings as well as on the selection of the ROI. They also demonstrate that the higher the contrast the more sensitive to axial positioning PET measurements in the BG are. These data provide us with some information about the variability of PET measurements in small structure like the BG and we have proposed some strategies to improve the reproducibility. 18 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Intravitreal flomoxef sodium in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, K; Torisaki, M; Yamashita, Y; Komatsu, M; Tanahashi, T

    1993-01-01

    We studied the intraocular concentration of flomoxef sodium in nonvitrectomized and vitrectomized eyes of albino rabbits after intravenous administration of 100 mg/kg flomoxef sodium. The concentration of flomoxef sodium in the vitreous body was undetectable (flomoxef sodium was investigated with ophthalmoscopy, electroretinography (ERG) and light microscopy after intravitreal injection of 200, 500, 1,000 and 2,000 micrograms flomoxef sodium in albino and pigmented rabbits. No ERG changes were induced with 200 micrograms. Other higher doses caused transient ERG changes. After the 200-micrograms injection, the intravitreal concentration decreased exponentially, the half-life being 4.4 h. The antibacterial activity, broad coverage and low intravitreal toxicity of flomoxef sodium suggest that this compound may be used to treat bacterial endophthalmitis.

  16. AHP 47: THE PROVOCATIVE RABBIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rnam rgyal རྣམ་རྒྱལ།

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A retreatant finished chanting for a family, packed up the offerings from the host, and started back to his hermitage feeling satisfied. A rabbit, called Ja dkrug mgo 'Trouble Maker', watched the retreatant through an evergreen bush, and decided he wanted to cheat the retreatant out of his offerings. Trouble Maker came out of the bush and stood in front of the retreatant in the middle of the path. As the retreatant came closer, Trouble Maker ran forward a few steps and then again turned back to watch the retreatant, who chased the rabbit for a while, but the heavy bag burdened him and he soon got very tired. He finally threw down his bag and chased Trouble Maker, who ran just beyond the retreatant’s grasp. Finally, having left the retreatant far behind, Trouble Maker doubled back, picked up the retreatant's bag, and carried it off. ...

  17. Bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia and thalamic lesions in children: an update (2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Yannes, Michael Paul; Nardone, Raffaele; Bailey, Ariel; Goldstein, Amy

    2015-01-01

    In children, many inherited or acquired neurological disorders may cause bilateral symmetrical signal intensity alterations in the basal ganglia and thalami. A literature review was aimed at assisting neuroradiologists, neurologists, infectious diseases specialists, and pediatricians to provide further understanding into the clinical and neuroimaging features in pediatric patients presenting with bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia and thalamic lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We discuss hypoxic-ischemic, toxic, infectious, immune-mediated, mitochondrial, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders affecting the basal ganglia and thalami. Recognition and correct evaluation of basal ganglia abnormalities, together with a proper neurological examination and laboratory findings, may enable the identification of each of these clinical entities and lead to earlier diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. The role of basal ganglia in language production: evidence from Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoir, Joël; Fossard, Marion; Mérette, Chantal; Langlois, Mélanie; Chantal, Sophie; Auclair-Ouellet, Noémie

    2013-01-01

    According to the dominant view in the literature, basal ganglia do not play a direct role in language but are involved in cognitive control required by linguistic and non-linguistic processing. In Parkinson's disease, basal ganglia impairment leads to motor symptoms and language deficits; those affecting the production of verbs have been frequently explored. According to a controversial theory, basal ganglia play a specific role in the conjugation of regular verbs as compared to irregular verbs. We report the results of 15 patients with Parkinson's disease in experimental conjugation tasks. They performed below healthy controls but their performance did not differ for regular and irregular verbs. These results confirm that basal ganglia are involved in language processing but do not play a specific role in verb production.

  19. Dopamine-dependent changes in the functional connectivity between basal ganglia and cerebral cortex in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, D; Tijssen, M; van Bruggen, G; Bosch, A; Insola, A; Di Lazzaro, V; Mazzone, P; Oliviero, A; Quartarone, A; Speelman, H; Brown, P

    2002-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that interaction between the human basal ganglia and cerebral cortex involves activity in multiple functional circuits characterized by their frequency of oscillation, phase characteristics, dopamine dependency and topography. To this end we took recordings from

  20. Past, present and future of the pathophysiological model of the basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A Obeso

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The current model of basal ganglia was introduced two decades ago and has settled most of our current understanding of basal ganglia function and dysfunction. Extensive research efforts have been carried out in recent years leading to further refinement and understanding of the normal and diseased basal ganglia. Several questions, however, are yet to be resolved. This short review provides a synopsis of the evolution of thought regarding the pathophysiological model of the BG and summarizes the main recent findings and additions to this field of research. We have also tried to identify major challenges that need to be addressed and resolved in the near future. Detailed accounts and state-of-the-art developments concerning research on the basal ganglia are provided in the articles that make up this Special Issue.

  1. Bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia and thalamic lesions in children: an update (2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuccoli, Giulio [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Section of Neuroradiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Yannes, Michael Paul [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nardone, Raffaele [Paracelsus Medical University, Department of Neurology, Christian Doppler Klinik, Salzburg (Austria); Bailey, Ariel [West Virginia University, Department of Radiology, Morgantown, WV (United States); Goldstein, Amy [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Neurology, Section of Metabolic Disorders and Neurogenetics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-10-15

    In children, many inherited or acquired neurological disorders may cause bilateral symmetrical signal intensity alterations in the basal ganglia and thalami. A literature review was aimed at assisting neuroradiologists, neurologists, infectious diseases specialists, and pediatricians to provide further understanding into the clinical and neuroimaging features in pediatric patients presenting with bilateral symmetrical basal ganglia and thalamic lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We discuss hypoxic-ischemic, toxic, infectious, immune-mediated, mitochondrial, metabolic, and neurodegenerative disorders affecting the basal ganglia and thalami. Recognition and correct evaluation of basal ganglia abnormalities, together with a proper neurological examination and laboratory findings, may enable the identification of each of these clinical entities and lead to earlier diagnosis. (orig.)

  2. Basal ganglia, movement disorders and deep brain stimulation: advances made through non-human primate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Thomas; Bergman, Hagai; DeLong, Mahlon R

    2018-03-01

    Studies in non-human primates (NHPs) have led to major advances in our understanding of the function of the basal ganglia and of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of hypokinetic movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease and hyperkinetic disorders such as chorea and dystonia. Since the brains of NHPs are anatomically very close to those of humans, disease states and the effects of medical and surgical approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), can be more faithfully modeled in NHPs than in other species. According to the current model of the basal ganglia circuitry, which was strongly influenced by studies in NHPs, the basal ganglia are viewed as components of segregated networks that emanate from specific cortical areas, traverse the basal ganglia, and ventral thalamus, and return to the frontal cortex. Based on the presumed functional domains of the different cortical areas involved, these networks are designated as 'motor', 'oculomotor', 'associative' and 'limbic' circuits. The functions of these networks are strongly modulated by the release of dopamine in the striatum. Striatal dopamine release alters the activity of striatal projection neurons which, in turn, influences the (inhibitory) basal ganglia output. In parkinsonism, the loss of striatal dopamine results in the emergence of oscillatory burst patterns of firing of basal ganglia output neurons, increased synchrony of the discharge of neighboring basal ganglia neurons, and an overall increase in basal ganglia output. The relevance of these findings is supported by the demonstration, in NHP models of parkinsonism, of the antiparkinsonian effects of inactivation of the motor circuit at the level of the subthalamic nucleus, one of the major components of the basal ganglia. This finding also contributed strongly to the revival of the use of surgical interventions to treat patients with Parkinson's disease. While ablative procedures were first used for this purpose, they have now been largely

  3. Cortical stimulation evokes abnormal responses in the dopamine-depleted rat basal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hitoshi; Kita, Takako

    2011-07-13

    The motor cortex (MC) sends massive projections to the basal ganglia. Motor disabilities in patients and animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) may be caused by dopamine (DA)-depleted basal ganglia that abnormally process the information originating from MC. To study how DA depletion alters signal transfer in the basal ganglia, MC stimulation-induced (MC-induced) unitary responses were recorded from the basal ganglia of control and 6-hydroxydopamine-treated hemi-parkinsonian rats anesthetized with isoflurane. This report describes new findings about how DA depletion alters MC-induced responses. MC stimulation evokes an excitation in normally quiescent striatal (Str) neurons projecting to the globus pallidus external segment (GPe). After DA-depletion, the spontaneous firing of Str-GPe neurons increases, and MC stimulation evokes a shorter latency excitation followed by a long-lasting inhibition that was invisible under normal conditions. The increased firing activity and the newly exposed long inhibition generate tonic inhibition and a disfacilitation in GPe. The disfacilitation in GPe is then amplified in basal ganglia circuitry and generates a powerful long inhibition in the basal ganglia output nucleus, the globus pallidus internal segment. Intra-Str injections of a behaviorally effective dose of DA precursor l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine effectively reversed these changes. These newly observed mechanisms also support the generation of pauses and burst activity commonly observed in the basal ganglia of parkinsonian subjects. These results suggest that the generation of abnormal response sequences in the basal ganglia contributes to the development of motor disabilities in PD and that intra-Str DA supplements effectively suppress abnormal signal transfer.

  4. Problems and prospects of rabbit production in Nigeria - a review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabbits are characterized by small body size, short gestation period, high ... feeders and other equipment for rabbits can be made using readily available materials such as ... Limitations to rabbit production in developing countries include the ...

  5. Electrophysiological Evidences of Organization of Cortical Motor Information in the Basal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Iwamuro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, the many developments in the treatment of movement disorders such as Parkinson disease and dystonia have enhanced our understanding on organization of the basal ganglia, and this knowledge has led to other advances in the field. According to many electrophysiological and anatomical findings, it is considered that motor information from different cortical areas is processed through several cortico-basal ganglia loops principally in a parallel fashion and somatotopy from each cortical area is also well preserved in each loop. Moreover, recent studies suggest that not only the parallel processing but also some convergence of information occur through the basal ganglia. Information from cortical areas whose functions are close to each other tends to converge in the basal ganglia. The cortico-basal ganglia loops should be comprehended more as a network rather than as separated subdivisions. However, the functions of this convergence still remain unknown. It is important even for clinical doctors to be well informed about this kind of current knowledge because some symptoms of movement disorders may be explained by disorganization of the information network in the basal ganglia.

  6. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus as a motor and cognitive interface between the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumika Mori

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As an important component of ascending activating systems, brainstem cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg are involved in the regulation of motor control (locomotion, posture and gaze and cognitive processes (attention, learning, and memory. The PPTg is highly interconnected with several regions of the basal ganglia, and one of its key functions is to regulate and relay activity from the basal ganglia. Together, they have been implicated in the motor control system (such as voluntary movement initiation or inhibition, and modulate aspects of executive function (such as motivation. In addition to its intimate connection with the basal ganglia, projections from the PPTg to the cerebellum have been recently reported to synaptically activate the deep cerebellar nuclei. Classically, the cerebellum and basal ganglia were regarded as forming separated anatomical loops that play a distinct functional role in motor and cognitive behavioral control. Here, we suggest that the PPTg may also act as an interface device between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. As such, part of the therapeutic effect of PPTg deep brain stimulation to relieve gait freezing and postural instability in advanced Parkinson’s disease patients might also involve modulation of the cerebellum. We review the anatomical position and role of the PPTg in the pathway of basal ganglia and cerebellum in relation to motor control, cognitive function, and Parkinson’s disease.

  7. Ganglia of the tarsal sinus: MR imaging features and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Jan S.; Müller, Dirk; Sauerschnig, Martin; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Rechl, H.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Woertler, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze MR imaging and clinical findings associated with ganglia of the tarsal sinus. Materials and methods: In a record search, ganglia of the tarsal sinus were retrospectively identified in 26 patients (mean age 48 ± 16 years), who underwent MR imaging for chronic ankle pain. Images were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus for size and location of ganglia, lesions of ligaments of the ankle and the tarsal sinus, tendon abnormalities, osteoarthritis, osseous erosions and bone marrow abnormalities. Medical records were reviewed for patient history and clinical findings. Results: Ganglia were associated with the interosseus ligament in 81%, the cervical ligament in 31% and the retinacula in 46% of cases. Signal alterations suggesting degeneration were found in 85%, 50% and 63% in case of the interosseus ligament, the cervical ligament and the retinacula, respectively. Scarring of the anterior talofibular ligament and the fibulocalcaneal ligament was found in 68% and 72% of the patients, respectively, while only 27% of the patients recalled ankle sprains. Ganglia at the retinacula were highly associated with synovitis and tendinosis of the posterior tibial tendon (p < 0.05). Conclusion: All patients with ganglia in the tarsal sinus presented with another pathology at the ankle, suggesting that degeneration of the tarsal sinus may be a secondary phenomenon, due to pathologic biomechanics at another site of the hind foot. Thus, in patients with degenerative changes of the tarsal sinus, one should be alerted and search for underlying pathology, which may be injury of the lateral collateral ligaments in up to 70%.

  8. Deep Brain Stimulation for Movement Disorders of Basal Ganglia Origin: Restoring Function or Functionality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Thomas; DeLong, Mahlon R

    2016-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is highly effective for both hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders of basal ganglia origin. The clinical use of DBS is, in part, empiric, based on the experience with prior surgical ablative therapies for these disorders, and, in part, driven by scientific discoveries made decades ago. In this review, we consider anatomical and functional concepts of the basal ganglia relevant to our understanding of DBS mechanisms, as well as our current understanding of the pathophysiology of two of the most commonly DBS-treated conditions, Parkinson's disease and dystonia. Finally, we discuss the proposed mechanism(s) of action of DBS in restoring function in patients with movement disorders. The signs and symptoms of the various disorders appear to result from signature disordered activity in the basal ganglia output, which disrupts the activity in thalamocortical and brainstem networks. The available evidence suggests that the effects of DBS are strongly dependent on targeting sensorimotor portions of specific nodes of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical motor circuit, that is, the subthalamic nucleus and the internal segment of the globus pallidus. There is little evidence to suggest that DBS in patients with movement disorders restores normal basal ganglia functions (e.g., their role in movement or reinforcement learning). Instead, it appears that high-frequency DBS replaces the abnormal basal ganglia output with a more tolerable pattern, which helps to restore the functionality of downstream networks.

  9. The Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus as a Motor and Cognitive Interface between the Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Fumika; Okada, Ken-Ichi; Nomura, Taishin; Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    As an important component of ascending activating systems, brainstem cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) are involved in the regulation of motor control (locomotion, posture and gaze) and cognitive processes (attention, learning and memory). The PPTg is highly interconnected with several regions of the basal ganglia, and one of its key functions is to regulate and relay activity from the basal ganglia. Together, they have been implicated in the motor control system (such as voluntary movement initiation or inhibition), and modulate aspects of executive function (such as motivation). In addition to its intimate connection with the basal ganglia, projections from the PPTg to the cerebellum have been recently reported to synaptically activate the deep cerebellar nuclei. Classically, the cerebellum and basal ganglia were regarded as forming separated anatomical loops that play a distinct functional role in motor and cognitive behavioral control. Here, we suggest that the PPTg may also act as an interface device between the basal ganglia and cerebellum. As such, part of the therapeutic effect of PPTg deep brain stimulation (DBS) to relieve gait freezing and postural instability in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) patients might also involve modulation of the cerebellum. We review the anatomical position and role of the PPTg in the pathway of basal ganglia and cerebellum in relation to motor control, cognitive function and PD.

  10. Aberrant functional connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Michal; Griffanti, Ludovica; Szewczyk-Krolikowski, Konrad; Menke, Ricarda A L; Wilcock, Gordon K; Filippini, Nicola; Zamboni, Giovanna; Hu, Michele T M; Mackay, Clare E

    2015-01-01

    Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) has been previously shown to be a promising tool for the assessment of early Parkinson's disease (PD). In order to assess whether changes within the basal ganglia network (BGN) are disease specific or relate to neurodegeneration generally, BGN connectivity was assessed in 32 patients with early PD, 19 healthy controls and 31 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Voxel-wise comparisons demonstrated decreased connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with PD, when compared to patients with AD and healthy controls. No significant changes within the BGN were seen in AD, when compared to healthy controls. Moreover, measures of functional connectivity extracted from regions within the basal ganglia were significantly lower in the PD group. Consistent with previous radiotracer studies, the greatest change when compared to the healthy control group was seen in the posterior putamen of PD subjects. When combined into a single component score, this method differentiated PD from AD and healthy control subjects, with a diagnostic accuracy of 81%. Rs-fMRI can be used to demonstrate the aberrant functional connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with early PD. These changes are likely to be representative of patho-physiological basal ganglia dysfunction and are not associated with generalised neurodegeneration seen in AD. Further studies are necessary to ascertain whether this method is sensitive enough to detect basal ganglia dysfunction in prodromal PD, and its utility as a potential diagnostic biomarker for premotor and early motoric disease.

  11. Aberrant functional connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Rolinski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI has been previously shown to be a promising tool for the assessment of early Parkinson's disease (PD. In order to assess whether changes within the basal ganglia network (BGN are disease specific or relate to neurodegeneration generally, BGN connectivity was assessed in 32 patients with early PD, 19 healthy controls and 31 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Voxel-wise comparisons demonstrated decreased connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with PD, when compared to patients with AD and healthy controls. No significant changes within the BGN were seen in AD, when compared to healthy controls. Moreover, measures of functional connectivity extracted from regions within the basal ganglia were significantly lower in the PD group. Consistent with previous radiotracer studies, the greatest change when compared to the healthy control group was seen in the posterior putamen of PD subjects. When combined into a single component score, this method differentiated PD from AD and healthy control subjects, with a diagnostic accuracy of 81%. Rs-fMRI can be used to demonstrate the aberrant functional connectivity within the basal ganglia of patients with early PD. These changes are likely to be representative of patho-physiological basal ganglia dysfunction and are not associated with generalised neurodegeneration seen in AD. Further studies are necessary to ascertain whether this method is sensitive enough to detect basal ganglia dysfunction in prodromal PD, and its utility as a potential diagnostic biomarker for premotor and early motoric disease.

  12. The subdiaphragmatic part of the phrenic nerve - morphometry and connections to autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Du Plessis, Maira; Louis, Robert G; Tubbs, R Shane; Wartmann, Christopher T; Apaydin, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    Few anatomical textbooks offer much information concerning the anatomy and distribution of the phrenic nerve inferior to the diaphragm. The aim of this study was to identify the subdiaphragmatic distribution of the phrenic nerve, the presence of phrenic ganglia, and possible connections to the celiac plexus. One hundred and thirty formalin-fixed adult cadavers were studied. The right phrenic nerve was found inferior to the diaphragm in 98% with 49.1% displaying a right phrenic ganglion. In 22.8% there was an additional smaller ganglion (right accessory phrenic ganglion). The remaining 50.9% had no grossly identifiable right phrenic ganglion. Most (65.5% of specimens) exhibited plexiform communications with the celiac ganglion, aorticorenal ganglion, and suprarenal gland. The left phrenic nerve inferior to the diaphragm was observed in 60% of specimens with 19% containing a left phrenic ganglion. No accessory left phrenic ganglia were observed. The left phrenic ganglion exhibited plexiform communications to several ganglia in 71.4% of specimens. Histologically, the right phrenic and left phrenic ganglia contained large soma concentrated in their peripheries. Both phrenic nerves and ganglia were closely related to the diaphragmatic crura. Surgically, sutures to approximate the crura for repair of hiatal hernias must be placed above the ganglia in order to avoid iatrogenic injuries to the autonomic supply to the diaphragm and abdomen. These findings could also provide a better understanding of the anatomy and distribution of the fibers of that autonomic supply. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. KYNA analogue SZR72 modifies CFA-induced dural inflammation- regarding expression of pERK1/2 and IL-1β in the rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukács, M; Warfvinge, K; Kruse, L S

    2016-01-01

    modify the neurogenic inflammatory response in the trigeminal ganglion. METHODS: Inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion was induced by local dural application of Complete Freunds Adjuvant (CFA). Levels of phosphorylated MAP kinase pERK1/2 and IL-1β expression in V1 region of the trigeminal ganglion were...... investigated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with one dose of SZR72 abolished the CFA-induced pERK1/2 and IL-1β activation in the trigeminal ganglion. No significant change was noted in case of repeated treatment with SZR72 as compared to a single dose. CONCLUSIONS......: This is the first study that demonstrates that one dose of KYNA analog before application of CFA can give anti-inflammatory response in a model of trigeminal activation, opening a new line for further investigations regarding possible effects of KYNA derivates....

  14. A Comparative Study between Oxcarbazepine and Gabapentin Regarding Therapeutic Efficiency and Tolerability in the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakir Mohan Debta

    2010-01-01

    Recently two newer anticonvulsant oxcarbazepine (OXC a ketoderivative of carbamazepine and gabapentin (GBP has been trailed in trigeminal neuralgia in different open clinical trial as monotherapy with encouraging results. These drugs have convenient dosage and surprisingly fewer side effects. These facts that trigeminal neuralgia responds to newer anticonvulsant (oxcarbazepine, gabapentin in a better perspective, enabled me to conduct the present clinical trial on 54 patients (both in newly diagnosed TN patient and refractive patient of trigeminal neuralgia who were made two randomized group for separate monotherapy study for a period of six months. The therapeutic effect of OXC and gabapentin (GBP in relation to reduction in number of attacks of pain and severity of pain were evaluated. All the scoring data showed OXC is more therapeutic efficacious cost-effective and well-tolerated profile than gabapentin and an emerging as a drug for treatment of TN in both new and refractive patients.

  15. [Pure trigeminal motor neuropathy presenting with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction in a patient with HIV and HCV infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, M; Echaniz-Laguna, A; Rey, D; Tranchant, C

    2006-01-01

    Pure trigeminal motor neuropathy (PTMN) is a rarely described condition. We report the case of a 41-year-old woman infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV1) and hepatitis C virus who presented with weakness of left temporalis and masseter muscles and painful left temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) a few months after cerebral toxoplasmosis revealing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed severe wasting and fat replacement of the left temporalis, pterygoid and masseter muscles and showed neither abnormalities in the left motor nucleus of the trigeminal nerve nor compression of the left trigeminal nerve. Electromyographic examination gave evidence of denervation in the left temporalis, masseter and pterygoid muscles and blink reflex studies were normal, confirming the diagnosis of PTMN which was probably secondary to HIV and HCV co-infection.

  16. The Role of Nav1.9 Channel in the Development of Neuropathic Orofacial Pain Associated with Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulz, Ana Paula; Kopach, Olga; Santana-Varela, Sonia; Wood, John N

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is accompanied by severe mechanical, thermal and chemical hypersensitivity of the orofacial area innervated by neurons of trigeminal ganglion (TG). We examined the role of the voltage-gated sodium channel subtype Nav1.9 in the development of trigeminal neuralgia. We found that Nav1.9 is required for the development of both thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CION). The CION model does not induce change on Nav1.9 mRNA expression in the ipsilateral TG neurons when evaluated 9 days after surgery. These results demonstrate that Nav1.9 channels play a critical role in the development of orofacial neuropathic pain. New routes for the treatment of orofacial neuropathic pain focussing on regulation of the voltage-gated Nav1.9 sodium channel activity should be investigated. © 2015 Luiz et al.

  17. Is there a difference between hare syphilis and rabbit syphilis? Cross infection experiments between rabbits and hares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lumeij, J.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073286826; Mikalová, L.; Smajs, D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cross infection of rabbits and hares with Treponema paraluiscuniculi from rabbits and the related microorganism from hares, which was provisionally named "Treponema paraluisleporis", revealed that T. paraluiscuniculi affects rabbits clinically, but only causes seroconversion in hares

  18. Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Found Inline with the Fields of Repeat Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Recurrent Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Aldo; Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2018-01-12

    A case of an extremely healthy, active, 96-year-old patient, nonsmoker, is reviewed. He was initially treated for left V1, V2, and V3 trigeminal neuralgia in 2001, at age 80, with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with a dose of 80 Gy to the left retrogasserian trigeminal nerve. He remained asymptomatic for nine years until his trigeminal pain recurred in 2010. He was first treated medically but was intolerant to increasing doses of carbamazepine and gabapentin. He underwent a second SRS in 2012 with a dose of 65.5 Gy to the same retrogasserian area of the trigeminal nerve, making the total cumulative dose 125.5 Gy. In late 2016, four years after the 2 nd SRS, he was found to have invasive keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma in the left posterior mandibular oral mucosa. Keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma is seen primarily in smokers or associated with the human papillomavirus, neither of which was found in this patient. A review of his two SRS plans shows that the left lower posterior mandibular area was clearly within the radiation fields for both SRS treatments. It is postulated that his cancer developed secondary to the long-term radiation effect with a very localized area being exposed twice to a focused, cumulative, high-dose radiation. There are individual reports in the literature of oral mucositis immediately after radiation for trigeminal neuralgia and the delayed development of malignant tumors, including glioblastoma found after SRS for acoustic neuromas, but there are no reports of delayed malignant tumors developing within the general radiation field. Using repeat SRS is an accepted treatment for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, but physicians and patients should be aware of the potential effects of higher cumulative radiation effects within the treatment field when patients undergo repeat procedures.

  19. Fetal alcohol exposure reduces responsiveness of taste nerves and trigeminal chemosensory neurons to ethanol and its flavor components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, John I; Tang, Joyce; Morales Allende, Ana Paula; Bryant, Bruce P; Youngentob, Lisa; Youngentob, Steven L

    2017-08-01

    Fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) leads to increased intake of ethanol in adolescent rats and humans. We asked whether these behavioral changes may be mediated in part by changes in responsiveness of the peripheral taste and oral trigeminal systems. We exposed the experimental rats to ethanol in utero by administering ethanol to dams through a liquid diet; we exposed the control rats to an isocaloric and isonutritive liquid diet. To assess taste responsiveness, we recorded responses of the chorda tympani (CT) and glossopharyngeal (GL) nerves to lingual stimulation with ethanol, quinine, sucrose, and NaCl. To assess trigeminal responsiveness, we measured changes in calcium levels of isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons during stimulation with ethanol, capsaicin, mustard oil, and KCl. Compared with adolescent control rats, the adolescent experimental rats exhibited diminished CT nerve responses to ethanol, quinine, and sucrose and GL nerve responses to quinine and sucrose. The reductions in taste responsiveness persisted into adulthood for quinine but not for any of the other stimuli. Adolescent experimental rats also exhibited reduced TG neuron responses to ethanol, capsaicin, and mustard oil. The lack of change in responsiveness of the taste nerves to NaCl and the TG neurons to KCl indicates that FAE altered only a subset of the response pathways within each chemosensory system. We propose that FAE reprograms development of the peripheral taste and trigeminal systems in ways that reduce their responsiveness to ethanol and surrogates for its pleasant (i.e., sweet) and unpleasant (i.e., bitterness, oral burning) flavor attributes. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Pregnant mothers are advised to avoid alcohol. This is because even small amounts of alcohol can alter fetal brain development and increase the risk of adolescent alcohol abuse. We asked how fetal alcohol exposure (FAE) produces the latter effect in adolescent rats by measuring responsiveness of taste nerves and trigeminal

  20. Activation properties of trigeminal motoneurons in participants with and without bruxism

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Jessica M.; Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Saraçoğlu, Ahmet; Atiş, Elif Sibel; Türker, Kemal S.

    2013-01-01

    In animals, sodium- and calcium-mediated persistent inward currents (PICs), which produce long-lasting periods of depolarization under conditions of low synaptic drive, can be activated in trigeminal motoneurons following the application of the monoamine serotonin. Here we examined if PICs are activated in human trigeminal motoneurons during voluntary contractions and under physiological levels of monoaminergic drive (e.g., serotonin and norepinephrine) using a paired motor unit analysis technique. We also examined if PICs activated during voluntary contractions are larger in participants who demonstrate involuntary chewing during sleep (bruxism), which is accompanied by periods of high monoaminergic drive. In control participants, during a slowly increasing and then decreasing isometric contraction, the firing rate of an earlier-recruited masseter motor unit, which served as a measure of synaptic input to a later-recruited test unit, was consistently lower during derecruitment of the test unit compared with at recruitment (ΔF = 4.6 ± 1.5 imp/s). The ΔF, therefore, is a measure of the reduction in synaptic input needed to counteract the depolarization from the PIC to provide an indirect estimate of PIC amplitude. The range of ΔF values measured in the bruxer participants during similar voluntary contractions was the same as in controls, suggesting that abnormally high levels of monoaminergic drive are not continually present in the absence of involuntary motor activity. We also observed a consistent “onion skin effect” during the moderately sized contractions (motor units discharged at slower rates (by 4–7 imp/s) compared with motor units with relatively lower thresholds. The presence of lower firing rates in the more fatigue-prone, higher threshold trigeminal motoneurons, in addition to the activation of PICs, likely facilitates the activation of the masseter muscle during motor activities such as eating, nonnutritive chewing, clenching, and yawning

  1. Microvascular Decompression for Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia in Patient with Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, John P; Van Gompel, Jamie J; Link, Michael J; Carlson, Matthew L

    2018-05-01

    Secondary trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is uncommon. When a space-occupying lesion with mass effect is identified, the associated TN is often exclusively attributed to the tumor. This report illustrates the importance of considering coexistent actionable pathology when surgically treating secondary TN. A 51-year-old woman presented with abrupt-onset TN of the V2 and V3 nerve divisions with hypesthesia. She denied changes in hearing, balance, or facial nerve dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 1.6-cm contrast-enhancing cerebellopontine angle tumor that effaced the trigeminal nerve, consistent with a vestibular schwannoma. In addition, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery abutted the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve on T2-weighted thin-slice magnetic resonance imaging. Intraoperative electrical stimulation of the tumor elicited a response from the facial nerve at low threshold over the entire accessible tumor surface, indicating that the tumor was a facial nerve schwannoma. Considering the patient's lack of facial nerve deficit and that the tumor exhibited no safe entry point for intracapsular debulking, tumor resection was not performed. Working between the tumor and tentorium, a branch of the superior cerebellar artery was identified and decompressed with a Teflon pad. At last follow-up, the patient exhibited resolution of her TN. Her hearing and facial nerve function remained intact. Despite obstruction from a medium-sized tumor, it is still possible to achieve microvascular decompression of the fifth cranial nerve. This emphasizes the importance of considering other actionable pathology during surgical management of presumed tumor-induced TN. Further, TN is relatively uncommon with medium-sized vestibular schwannomas and coexistent causes should be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Early Corneal Innervation and Trigeminal Alterations in Parkinson Disease: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Alessandro; Rania, Laura; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Postorino, Elisa Imelde; Mormina, Enricomaria; Gaeta, Michele; Marino, Silvia; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Quartarone, Angelo; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Puzzolo, Domenico; Aragona, Pasquale

    2018-04-01

    To describe corneal innervation and trigeminal alterations in drug-naive patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A case series study was conducted by recruiting 3 early drug-naive patients with PD, 2 men and 1 woman (age: 72, 68, and 66, respectively). Ophthalmologic assessment included Ocular Surface Disease Index questionnaire, visual acuity by the logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution score, pupillary light reflexes, extrinsic ocular movements, corneal sensitivity, and slit-lamp examination. Corneal innervation parameter changes were evaluated in vivo using the Confoscan 4 confocal microscope, and they were compared with a control data set. The Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 3 (HRT3) has been used to assess retinal alterations in our patients, if compared with normal range values provided by the HRT3. Moreover, 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis of water diffusion property changes of trigeminal nerves was performed. All data were analyzed and compared with 2 control data sets made by 14 age-matched controls. Patients with PD showed profound alterations of corneal innervation and of trigeminal diffusion MRI parameters, compared with controls. Strong differences (PD vs. controls) were found for deep nerve tortuosity (Kallinikos mean 19.94 vs. 2.13) and the number of beadings (mean 34.2 vs. 15.5). HRT3 retinal evaluation revealed less structural changes compared with the normal range. Diffusion MRI showed profound changes of white matter diffusion properties (PD vs. controls), with fractional anisotropy decrement (mean 0.3029 vs. 0.3329) and mean diffusivity increment (mean 0.00127 vs. 0.00106). Corneal innervation changes might occur earlier in patients with PD than in retinal ones. Confocal corneal innervation analysis might provide possible early biomarkers for a better PD evaluation and for its earlier diagnosis.

  3. Antinociceptive Effects of Transcytosed Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Trigeminal Nociception in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Geun-Woo; Kim, Min-Ji; Yang, Kui-Ye; Kim, Seong-Taek; Bae, Yong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of peripherally or centrally administered botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) on orofacial inflammatory pain to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of BoNT-A and its underlying mechanisms. The experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the formalin-induced nociceptive response in the second phase. Both subcutaneous (1 or 3 U/kg) and intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) injection of BoNT-A increased the latency of head withdrawal response in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated rats. Intracisternal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evoked nociceptive behavior via the activation of trigeminal neurons, which was attenuated by the subcutaneous or intracisternal injection of BoNT-A. Intracisternal injection of NMDA up-regulated c-Fos expression in the trigeminal neurons of the medullary dorsal horn. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly reduced the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in the NMDA-treated rats. These results suggest that the central antinociceptive effects the peripherally or centrally administered BoNT-A are mediated by transcytosed BoNT-A or direct inhibition of trigeminal neurons. Our data suggest that central targets of BoNT-A might provide a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of orofacial chronic pain conditions. PMID:26170739

  4. Intravenous dextromethorphan/quinidine inhibits activity of dura-sensitive spinal trigeminal neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, A Y; Lyubashina, O A; Berkovich, R R; Panteleev, S S

    2015-09-01

    Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by episodes of throbbing headaches. Practically all medications currently used in migraine prophylaxis have a number of substantial disadvantages and use limitations. Therefore, the further search for principally new prophylactic antimigraine agents remains an important task. The objective of our study was to evaluate the effects of a fixed combination of dextromethorphan hydrobromide and quinidine sulphate (DM/Q) on activity of the spinal trigeminal neurons in an electrophysiological model of trigemino-durovascular nociception. The study was performed in 15 male Wistar rats, which were anaesthetized with urethane/α-chloralose and paralysed using pipecuronium bromide. The effects of cumulative intravenous infusions of DM/Q (three steps performed 30 min apart, 15/7.5 mg/kg of DM/Q in 0.5 mL of isotonic saline per step) on ongoing and dural electrical stimulation-induced neuronal activities were tested in a group of eight rats over 90 min. Other seven animals received cumulative infusion of equal volumes of saline and served as control. Cumulative administration of DM/Q produced steady suppression of both the ongoing activity of the spinal trigeminal neurons and their responses to electrical stimulation of the dura mater. It is evident that the observed DM/Q-induced suppression of trigeminal neuron excitability can lead to a reduction in nociceptive transmission from meninges to higher centres of the brain. Since the same mechanism is believed to underlie the pharmacodynamics of many well-known antimigraine drugs, results of the present study enable us to anticipate the potential efficacy of DM/Q in migraine. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  5. Neurons within the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus encode for the kinematic parameters of the whisker pad macrovibrissae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, Ombretta; Caria, Marcello A; Biagi, Francesca; Zedda, Marco; Farina, Vittorio

    2017-05-01

    It has been recently shown in rats that spontaneous movements of whisker pad macrovibrissae elicited evoked responses in the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus (Me5). In the present study, electrophysiological and neuroanatomical experiments were performed in anesthetized rats to evaluate whether, besides the whisker displacement per se, the Me5 neurons are also involved in encoding the kinematic properties of macrovibrissae movements, and also whether, as reported for the trigeminal ganglion, even within the Me5 nucleus exists a neuroanatomical representation of the whisker pad macrovibrissae. Extracellular electrical activity of single Me5 neurons was recorded before, during, and after mechanical deflection of the ipsilateral whisker pad macrovibrissae in different directions, and with different velocities and amplitudes. In several groups of animals, single or multiple injections of the tracer Dil were performed into the whisker pad of one side, in close proximity to the vibrissae follicles, in order to label the peripheral terminals of the Me5 neurons innervating the macrovibrissae (whisking-neurons), and therefore, the respective perikaria within the nucleus. Results showed that: (1) the whisker pad macrovibrissae were represented in the medial-caudal part of the Me5 nucleus by a single cluster of cells whose number seemed to match that of the macrovibrissae; (2) macrovibrissae mechanical deflection elicited significant responses in the Me5 whisking-neurons, which were related to the direction, amplitude, and frequency of the applied deflection. The specific functional role of Me5 neurons involved in encoding proprioceptive information arising from the macrovibrissae movements is discussed within the framework of the whole trigeminal nuclei activities. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  6. Refractory epilepsy and basal ganglia: the role of seizure frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilleret, V.; Trebossen, R.; Mantzerides, M.; Semah, F.; Ribeiro, M.J. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, I2BM/DSV, CEA, 91 - Orsay (France); Bouilleret, V. [CHU Bicetre, Unite de Neurophysiologie et d' Epileptologie, AP-HP, 75 - Paris (France); Chassoux, F. [Hopital Saint Anne, Service de Neurochirurgie, 75 - Paris (France); Biraben, A. [CHU, Service de Neurologie, Hopital Pontchaillou, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2008-02-15

    Objectives. - A decrease of [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA uptake in basal ganglia (B.G.) was recently reported in medically refractory epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to assess the involvement of dopaminergic neurotransmission in refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy (T.L.E.) and its relationship to glucose metabolism and morphological changes. Methods. - Twelve T.L.E. patients were studied using [{sup 18}F]FDG PET, [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA PET and MRI and compared with healthy control volunteers. Morphological cerebral changes were assessed using Voxel-Based Morphometry (V.B.M.). Student t test statistical maps of functional and morphological differences between patients and controls were obtained using a general linear model. Results. - In T.L.E. patients, [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA uptake was reduced to the same extent in caudate and putamen in both cerebral hemispheres as well as in the substantia nigra (S.N.). These dopaminergic functional alterations occurred without any glucose metabolism changes in these areas. The only mild morphological abnormality was found in striatal regions without any changes in the S.N.. Conclusion. - The present study provides support for dopaminergic neurotransmission involvement in T.L.E.. The discrepancies between G.M.V. atrophy and the pattern of [{sup 18}F]Fluoro-L-DOPA suggest that B.G. involvement is not related to structural subcortical abnormalities. A functional decrease can be ruled out as there was no change of the glycolytic pathway metabolism in these areas. (authors)

  7. Potential mechanisms for imperfect synchronization in parkinsonian basal ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choongseok Park

    Full Text Available Neural activity in the brain of parkinsonian patients is characterized by the intermittently synchronized oscillatory dynamics. This imperfect synchronization, observed in the beta frequency band, is believed to be related to the hypokinetic motor symptoms of the disorder. Our study explores potential mechanisms behind this intermittent synchrony. We study the response of a bursting pallidal neuron to different patterns of synaptic input from subthalamic nucleus (STN neuron. We show how external globus pallidus (GPe neuron is sensitive to the phase of the input from the STN cell and can exhibit intermittent phase-locking with the input in the beta band. The temporal properties of this intermittent phase-locking show similarities to the intermittent synchronization observed in experiments. We also study the synchronization of GPe cells to synaptic input from the STN cell with dependence on the dopamine-modulated parameters. Earlier studies showed how the strengthening of dopamine-modulated coupling may lead to transitions from non-synchronized to partially synchronized dynamics, typical in Parkinson's disease. However, dopamine also affects the cellular properties of neurons. We show how the changes in firing patterns of STN neuron due to the lack of dopamine may lead to transition from a lower to a higher coherent state, roughly matching the synchrony levels observed in basal ganglia in normal and parkinsonian states. The intermittent nature of the neural beta band synchrony in Parkinson's disease is achieved in the model due to the interplay of the timing of STN input to pallidum and pallidal neuronal dynamics, resulting in sensitivity of pallidal output to the phase of the arriving STN input. Thus the mechanism considered here (the change in firing pattern of subthalamic neurons through the dopamine-induced change of membrane properties may be one of the potential mechanisms responsible for the generation of the intermittent synchronization

  8. Multiple Frequencies in the Basal Ganglia in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. Davidson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the authors have developed what appears to be a very successful phenomenological model for analyzing the role of deep brain stimulation (DBS in alleviating the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we extend the scope of the model by using it to predict the generation of new frequencies from networks tuned to a specific frequency, or indeed not self-oscillatory at all. We have discussed two principal cases: firstly where the constituent systems are coupled in an excitatory-excitatory fashion, which we designate by ``+/+''; and secondly where the constituent systems are coupled in an excitatory-inhibitory fashion, which we designate ``+/-''. The model predicts that from a basic system tuned to tremor frequency we can generate an unlimited range of frequencies. We illustrate in particular, starting from systems which are initially non-oscillatory, that when the coupling coefficient exceeds a certain value, the system begins to oscillate at an amplitude which increases with the coupling strength. Another very interesting feature, which has been shown by colleagues of ours to arise through the coupling of complicated networks based on the physiology of the basal ganglia, can be illustrated by the root locus method which shows that increasing and decreasing frequencies of oscillation, existing simultaneously, have the property that their geometric mean remains substantially constant as the coupling strength is varied. We feel that with the present approach, we have provided another tool for understanding the existence and interaction of pathological oscillations which underlie, not only Parkinson's disease, but other conditions such as Tourette's syndrome, depression and epilepsy.

  9. Field-testing of the ICHD-3 beta diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Sørensen, Morten Togo; Gozalov, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We aimed to field-test the beta version of the third edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) diagnostic criteria for classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The proposed beta draft of the 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases...... (ICD-11 beta) is almost exclusively based on the ICHD-3 beta classification structure although slightly abbreviated. We compared sensitivity and specificity to ICHD-2 criteria, and evaluated the needs for revision. METHODS: Clinical characteristics were systematically and prospectively collected from...

  10. Intractable trigeminal neuralgia: A single institution experience in 26 patients treated with stereotactic gamma knife radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, Rufus J.; Duma, Christopher M.; Jacques, Dean B.; Kopyov, Oleg V.; Copcutt, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In patients with trigeminal neuralgia, severe pain can persist, or recur despite aggressive medical management and open surgery. Recently, Gamma Knife radiosurgery has been used with promising results. We report on our series of 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia treated with stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Materials and Methods: Between 1991 and 1995, 26 patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia were treated at our institution using stereotactic Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Medical management had failed in all cases. In addition, 13 patients underwent a total of 20 open surgeries, with transient, or no pain relief. There were 19 females, and 7 males. Patient ages ranged from 37 to 87 years, with a median of 74 years. All patients were treated with a 201 source Cobalt-60 Gamma Knife unit. All patients underwent placement of the Leksell frame, followed by MRI scanning and computer treatment planning. The target in all patients was the fifth cranial nerve root entry zone into the brainstem. Twenty-five patients received between 64.3 to 70 Gy prescribed to Dmax in one shot. One patient received 120 Gy to Dmax in one shot. The 4 mm collimator was used in 22 cases, and the 8 mm in 4 cases. Follow-up ranged from 5 to 55 months, with a median of 19 months. Complete resolution (CR) of pain was scored when the patient reported being pain free off all medication. Partial resolution (PR) was scored when the patient reported > 50% pain reduction after Gamma Knife treatment. Results: At last follow-up, 84.6% ((22(26))) reported CR or PR of pain after Gamma Knife treatment. Forty-two percent ((11(26))) of patients reported CR, and 42%((11(26))) reported PR of pain. There was a dose response. In patients receiving < 70 Gy, 25% ((3(12))) reported CR, while 57% ((8(14))) of those receiving ≥ 70 Gy reported CR. Complications occurred in two (8%) patients. One patient developed transient numbness of the face after 70 Gy, and a second patient

  11. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  12. Prolonged vertigo and ataxia after mandibular nerve block for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind; Dash, Hh

    2011-07-01

    Common complications of neurolytic mandibular nerve block are hypoesthesia, dysesthesia, and chemical neuritis. We report a rare complication, prolonged severe vertigo and ataxia, after neurolytic mandibular blockade in a patient suffering from trigeminal neuralgia. Coronoid approach was used for right sided mandibular block. After successful test injection with local anesthetic, absolute alcohol was given for neurolytic block. Immediately after alcohol injection, patient developed nausea and vomiting along with severe vertigo, ataxia and hypertension. Neurological evaluation was normal except for the presence of vertigo and ataxia. Computerised tomography scan brain was also normal. Patient was admitted for observation and symptomatic treatment was given. Vertigo and ataxia gradually improved over 24 hours.

  13. Pharmacological versus microvascular decompression approaches for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: clinical outcomes and direct costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Laurinda Lemos1,2, Carlos Alegria3, Joana Oliveira3, Ana Machado2, Pedro Oliveira4, Armando Almeida11Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS, School of Health Sciences, Campus de Gualtar, University of Minho, Braga, Portugal; 2Hospital Center of Alto Ave, Unit of Fafe, Fafe, Portugal; 3Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital São Marcos; 4Products and Systems Engineering, Campus de Azurém, University of Minho, Guimarães, PortugalAbstract: In idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (TN the neuroimaging evaluation is usually normal, but in some cases a vascular compression of trigeminal nerve root is present. Although the latter condition may be referred to surgery, drug therapy is usually the first approach to control pain. This study compared the clinical outcome and direct costs of (1 a traditional treatment (carbamazepine [CBZ] in monotherapy [CBZ protocol], (2 the association of gabapentin (GBP and analgesic block of trigger-points with ropivacaine (ROP (GBP+ROP protocol, and (3 a common TN surgery, microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve (MVD protocol. Sixty-two TN patients were randomly treated during 4 weeks (CBZ [n = 23] and GBP+ROP [n = 17] protocols from cases of idiopathic TN, or selected for MVD surgery (n = 22 due to intractable pain. Direct medical cost estimates were determined by the price of drugs in 2008 and the hospital costs. Pain was evaluated using the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS and number of pain crises; the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sickness Impact Profile, and satisfaction with treatment and hospital team were evaluated. Assessments were performed at day 0 and 6 months after the beginning of treatment. All protocols showed a clinical improvement of pain control at month 6. The GBP+ROP protocol was the least expensive treatment, whereas surgery was the most expensive. With time, however, GBP+ROP tended to be the most and MVD the least expensive. No sequelae resulted in any patient after drug

  14. Dysfunctions of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system produce motor tics in Tourette syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Caligiore

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Motor tics are a cardinal feature of Tourette syndrome and are traditionally associated with an excess of striatal dopamine in the basal ganglia. Recent evidence increasingly supports a more articulated view where cerebellum and cortex, working closely in concert with basal ganglia, are also involved in tic production. Building on such evidence, this article proposes a computational model of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system to study how motor tics are generated in Tourette syndrome. In particular, the model: (i reproduces the main results of recent experiments about the involvement of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system in tic generation; (ii suggests an explanation of the system-level mechanisms underlying motor tic production: in this respect, the model predicts that the interplay between dopaminergic signal and cortical activity contributes to triggering the tic event and that the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical pathway may support the involvement of the cerebellum in tic production; (iii furnishes predictions on the amount of tics generated when striatal dopamine increases and when the cortex is externally stimulated. These predictions could be important in identifying new brain target areas for future therapies. Finally, the model represents the first computational attempt to study the role of the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical links. Studying this non-cortex-mediated basal ganglia-cerebellar interaction could radically change our perspective about how these areas interact with each other and with the cortex. Overall, the model also shows the utility of casting Tourette syndrome within a system-level perspective rather than viewing it as related to the dysfunction of a single brain area.

  15. Dysfunctions of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system produce motor tics in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiore, Daniele; Mannella, Francesco; Arbib, Michael A; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2017-03-01

    Motor tics are a cardinal feature of Tourette syndrome and are traditionally associated with an excess of striatal dopamine in the basal ganglia. Recent evidence increasingly supports a more articulated view where cerebellum and cortex, working closely in concert with basal ganglia, are also involved in tic production. Building on such evidence, this article proposes a computational model of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system to study how motor tics are generated in Tourette syndrome. In particular, the model: (i) reproduces the main results of recent experiments about the involvement of the basal ganglia-cerebellar-thalamo-cortical system in tic generation; (ii) suggests an explanation of the system-level mechanisms underlying motor tic production: in this respect, the model predicts that the interplay between dopaminergic signal and cortical activity contributes to triggering the tic event and that the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical pathway may support the involvement of the cerebellum in tic production; (iii) furnishes predictions on the amount of tics generated when striatal dopamine increases and when the cortex is externally stimulated. These predictions could be important in identifying new brain target areas for future therapies. Finally, the model represents the first computational attempt to study the role of the recently discovered basal ganglia-cerebellar anatomical links. Studying this non-cortex-mediated basal ganglia-cerebellar interaction could radically change our perspective about how these areas interact with each other and with the cortex. Overall, the model also shows the utility of casting Tourette syndrome within a system-level perspective rather than viewing it as related to the dysfunction of a single brain area.

  16. Viral skin diseases of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Anna L

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the viral skin diseases affecting the domestic rabbit, the most important being myxomatosis. Transmission and pathogenesis, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment, and control are described and the article will be of interest to veterinary practitioners who treat rabbits. Shope fibroma virus, Shope papilloma virus, and rabbitpox are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rabbit Oncology : Diseases, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zeeland, Yvonne

    Neoplasia has long been reported as a rare finding in rabbits, but over the past decades the number of reports on neoplastic disease in rabbits has risen considerably. Similar to other animals, neoplastic changes may occur in any organ system, but the rate in which the organ systems are affected

  18. The digastric muscle is less involved in pharyngeal swallowing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Yamada, Aki; Nakamura, Yuki; Fukuhara, Takako; Yamamura, Kensuke; Inoue, Makoto

    2012-06-01

    The swallowing reflex is centrally programmed by the lower brain stem, the so-called swallowing central pattern generator (CPG), and once the reflex is initiated, many muscles in the oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal, and esophageal regions are systematically activated. The mylohyoid (MH) muscle has been considered to be a "leading muscle" according to previous studies, but the functional role of the digastric (DIG) muscle in the swallowing reflex remains unclear. In the present study, therefore, the activities of single units of MH and DIG neurons were recorded extracellularly, and the functional involvement of these neurons in the swallowing reflex was investigated. The experiments were carried out on eight adult male Japanese white rabbits anesthetized with urethane. To identify DIG and MH neurons, the peripheral nerve (either DIG or MH) was stimulated to evoke action potentials of single motoneurons. Motoneurons were identified as such if they either (1) responded to antidromic nerve stimulation of DIG or MH in an all-or-none manner at threshold intensities and (2) followed stimulation frequencies of up to 0.5 kHz. As a result, all 11 MH neurons recorded were synchronously activated during the swallowing reflex, while there was no activity in any of the 7 DIG neurons recorded during the swallowing reflex. All neurons were anatomically localized ventromedially at the level of the caudal portion of the trigeminal motor nucleus, and there were no differences between the MH and DIG neuron sites. The present results strongly suggest that at least in the rabbit, DIG motoneurons are not tightly controlled by the swallowing CPG and, hence, the DIG muscle is less involved in the swallowing reflex.

  19. Association between neurovascular contact on MRI and response to gamma knife radiosurgery in trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbay, Sami H.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.; Gupta, Punita; O'Callaghan, Mark; Yun, Eric; Oljeski, Steven; Riesenburger, Ron

    2006-01-01

    Treatment with gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) provides adequate short-term pain control in about 70% of the patients with intractable trigeminal neuralgia (TN). The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether the presence of neurovascular contact (NVC) at the root entry zone of the trigeminal nerve on pre-gamma knife MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS.We studied 40 consecutive patients who underwent GKRS for treatment of intractable TN. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the side of symptoms analyzed pre-treatment constructive interference in steady state (CISS) images to determine the presence of NVC by consensus. An adequate response was defined as freedom from pain with or without reduced need for medical therapy. Adequate short-term response to GKRS was seen in 29 (72.5%) of 40 patients. NVC was seen in 30 of the 40 patients. Twenty-five (83.3%) of 30 patients with NVC had adequate short-term response to GKRS. Only four (40%) of the 10 patients without NVC had adequate response to GKRS (X 2 =7.06; P<0.01). Patients with NVC were seven times more likely to have an adequate response to GKRS than those without NVC (odds ratio =7.5).The presence of NVC on pre-treatment MR imaging predicts an increased likelihood of an adequate response to GKRS. (orig.)

  20. SU-E-T-420: Failure Effects Mode Analysis for Trigeminal Neuralgia Frameless Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, J [Associates In Medical Physics, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority number was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery.

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic errors in trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and hemicrania continua: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias (TACs) and hemicrania continua (HC) are relatively rare but clinically rather well-defined primary headaches. Despite the existence of clear-cut diagnostic criteria (The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition - ICHD-II) and several therapeutic guidelines, errors in workup and treatment of these conditions are frequent in clinical practice. We set out to review all available published data on mismanagement of TACs and HC patients in order to understand and avoid its causes. The search strategy identified 22 published studies. The most frequent errors described in the management of patients with TACs and HC are: referral to wrong type of specialist, diagnostic delay, misdiagnosis, and the use of treatments without overt indication. Migraine with and without aura, trigeminal neuralgia, sinus infection, dental pain and temporomandibular dysfunction are the disorders most frequently overdiagnosed. Even when the clinical picture is clear-cut, TACs and HC are frequently not recognized and/or mistaken for other disorders, not only by general physicians, dentists and ENT surgeons, but also by neurologists and headache specialists. This seems to be due to limited knowledge of the specific characteristics and variants of these disorders, and it results in the unnecessary prescription of ineffective and sometimes invasive treatments which may have negative consequences for patients. Greater knowledge of and education about these disorders, among both primary care physicians and headache specialists, might contribute to improving the quality of life of TACs and HC patients. PMID:23565739

  2. Oxcarbazepine: a new drug in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewska, J M; Patsalos, P N

    1989-01-01

    The efficacy and tolerability of oxcarbazepine, a keto derivative of carbamazepine, has been assessed in six patients (two males, four females; mean age 61 years, range 42-77), with trigeminal neuralgia refractory to carbamazepine therapy, over a period of 6 months. An excellent therapeutic response to oxcarbazepine was seen in all patients with pain control correlating well with serum drug concentrations of oxcarbazepine and its primary active metabolite 10-OH-carbazepine. Onset of the effect was observed within 24 hours in all cases. An overall serum therapeutic concentration range, in the six patients, of 50-110 mumol/l of 10-OH-carbazepine corresponding to a daily effective dose range of 1200-2400 mg (14.6-35.6 mg/kg body weight) oxcarbazepine, was observed. There was a significant correlation between oxcarbazepine dose and serum oxcarbazepine (r = 0.695, p less than 0.05) and 10-OH-carbazepine (r = 0.957, p less than 0.001) concentrations. Oxcarbazepine was well tolerated and no significant side effects were identified, though a mild hyponatraemia was observed during high doses (greater than 28 and greater than 35 mg/kg/day) in two patients. It is concluded that oxcarbazepine has potent antineuralgic properties in the absence of significant side effects and therefore may be useful in the management of intractable trigeminal neuralgia. Images PMID:2738589

  3. SU-E-T-420: Failure Effects Mode Analysis for Trigeminal Neuralgia Frameless Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Functional radiosurgery has been used successfully in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia but presents significant challenges to ensuring the high prescription dose is delivered accurately. A review of existing practice should help direct the focus of quality improvement for this treatment regime. Method: Failure modes and effects analysis was used to identify the processes in preparing radiosurgery treatment for TN. The map was developed by a multidisciplinary team including: neurosurgeon, radiation oncology, physicist and therapist. Potential failure modes were identified for each step in the process map as well as potential causes and end effect. A risk priority number was assigned to each cause. Results: The process map identified 66 individual steps (see attached supporting document). Corrective actions were developed for areas of high risk priority number. Wrong site treatment is at higher risk for trigeminal neuralgia treatment due to the lack of site specific pathologic imaging on MR and CT – additional site specific checks were implemented to minimize the risk of wrong site treatment. Failed collision checks resulted from an insufficient collision model in the treatment planning system and a plan template was developed to address this problem. Conclusion: Failure modes and effects analysis is an effective tool for developing quality improvement in high risk radiotherapy procedures such as functional radiosurgery

  4. Dose and diameter relationships for facial, trigeminal, and acoustic neuropathies following acoustic neuroma radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Lunsford, L. Dade

    1996-01-01

    Purpose and objective: To define the relationships between dose and tumor diameter for the risks of developing trigeminal, facial, and acoustic neuropathies after acoustic neuroma radiosurgery, a large single-institution experience was analyzed. Materials and methods: Two hundred and thirty-eight patients with unilateral acoustic neuromas who underwent Gamma knife radiosurgery between 1987-1994 with 6-91 months of follow-up (median 30 months) were studied. Minimum tumor doses were 12-20 Gy (median 15 Gy). Transverse tumor diameter varied from 0.3-5.5 cm (median 2.1 cm). The relationships of dose and diameter to the development of cranial neuropathies were delineated by multivariate logistic regression. Results: The development of post-radiosurgery neuropathies affecting cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII were correlated with minimum tumor dose and transverse tumor diameter (P min for VIII where P=0.10). A comparison of the dose-diameter response curves showed the acoustic nerve to be the most sensitive to doses of 12-16 Gy and the facial nerve to be the least sensitive. Conclusion: The risks of developing trigeminal, facial, and acoustic neuropathies following acoustic neuroma radiosurgery can be predicted from the transverse tumor diameter and the minimum tumor dose using models constructed from data presently available

  5. The role of trigeminal function in the sensation of nasal obstruction in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Joe; Fnais, Naif; Tomaszewski, Marcel; Carriere, Junie S; Frenkiel, Saul; Frasnelli, Johannes; Tewfik, Marc A

    2016-05-01

    Trigeminal sensation (TS) within the nasal cavity is important for the perception of nasal airflow. The objective of this study is to examine whether impaired TS contributes to the sensation of nasal obstruction in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Prospective case-control study conducted in a tertiary referral rhinology clinic. Cases consisted of CRS patients with subjective nasal obstruction, not previously treated with oral corticoids. Controls consisted of patients without CRS. Neither group demonstrated obvious anatomical obstructions. Both groups underwent peak nasal inspiratory flows (PNIF), olfactory testing (quick eight-item odor identification test), and trigeminal testing (lateralization task using eucalyptol and odorless solvent). A total of 28 subjects (14 CRS patients and 14 controls) were recruited. Analyses revealed no statistical differences in age (P = .93), gender (P = .47), or PNIF (P = .82) between the two groups, but they differed in Lund-Mackay scores (P sensation of nasal obstruction in CRS. 3b. Laryngoscope, 126:E174-E178, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. Changes in basal ganglia processing of cortical input following magnetic stimulation in Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Hadass; Moran, Anan; Belelovsky, Katya; Bronfeld, Maya; Korngreen, Alon; Bar-Gad, Izhar

    2012-12-01

    Parkinsonism is associated with major changes in neuronal activity throughout the cortico-basal ganglia loop. Current measures quantify changes in baseline neuronal and network activity but do not capture alterations in information propagation throughout the system. Here, we applied a novel non-invasive magnetic stimulation approach using a custom-made mini-coil that enabled us to study transmission of neuronal activity throughout the cortico-basal ganglia loop in both normal and parkinsonian primates. By magnetically perturbing cortical activity while simultaneously recording neuronal responses along the cortico-basal ganglia loop, we were able to directly investigate modifications in descending cortical activity transmission. We found that in both the normal and parkinsonian states, cortical neurons displayed similar multi-phase firing rate modulations in response to magnetic stimulation. However, in the basal ganglia, large synaptically driven stereotypic neuronal modulation was present in the parkinsonian state that was mostly absent in the normal state. The stimulation-induced neuronal activity pattern highlights the change in information propagation along the cortico-basal ganglia loop. Our findings thus point to the role of abnormal dynamic activity transmission rather than changes in baseline activity as a major component in parkinsonian pathophysiology. Moreover, our results hint that the application of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in human patients of different disorders may result in different neuronal effects than the one induced in normal subjects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anatomy of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Adam; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that the aortic plexus is a network of pre- and post-ganglionic nerves overlying the abdominal aorta, which is primarily involved with the sympathetic innervation to the mesenteric, pelvic and urogenital organs. Because a comprehensive anatomical description of the aortic plexus and its connections with adjacent plexuses are lacking, these delicate structures are prone to unintended damage during abdominal surgeries. Through dissection of fresh, frozen human cadavers (n = 7), the present study aimed to provide the first complete mapping of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males. Using standard histochemical procedures, ganglia of the aortic plexus were verified through microscopic analysis using haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase stains. All specimens exhibited four distinct sympathetic ganglia within the aortic plexus: the right and left spermatic ganglia, the inferior mesenteric ganglion and one previously unidentified ganglion, which has been named the prehypogastric ganglion by the authors. The spermatic ganglia were consistently supplied by the L1 lumbar splanchnic nerves and the inferior mesenteric ganglion and the newly characterized prehypogastric ganglion were supplied by the left and right L2 lumbar splanchnic nerves, respectively. Additionally, our examination revealed the aortic plexus does have potential for variation, primarily in the possibility of exhibiting accessory splanchnic nerves. Clinically, our results could have significant implications for preserving fertility in men as well as sympathetic function to the hindgut and pelvis during retroperitoneal surgeries. PMID:25382240

  8. Do basal Ganglia amplify willed action by stochastic resonance? A model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Srinivasa Chakravarthy

    Full Text Available Basal ganglia are usually attributed a role in facilitating willed action, which is found to be impaired in Parkinson's disease, a pathology of basal ganglia. We hypothesize that basal ganglia possess the machinery to amplify will signals, presumably weak, by stochastic resonance. Recently we proposed a computational model of Parkinsonian reaching, in which the contributions from basal ganglia aid the motor cortex in learning to reach. The model was cast in reinforcement learning framework. We now show that the above basal ganglia computational model has all the ingredients of stochastic resonance process. In the proposed computational model, we consider the problem of moving an arm from a rest position to a target position: the two positions correspond to two extrema of the value function. A single kick (a half-wave of sinusoid, of sufficiently low amplitude given to the system in resting position, succeeds in taking the system to the target position, with high probability, only at a critical noise level. But for suboptimal noise levels, the model arm's movements resemble Parkinsonian movement symptoms like akinetic rigidity (low noise and dyskinesias (high noise.

  9. Pleural fluid exchange in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stashenko, Gregg J; Robichaux, Amy; Lee, Y C Gary; Sanders, Jonathan R; Roselli, Robert J; Light, Richard W

    2007-07-01

    The study was designed to better characterize pleural fluid absorption in rabbits with the following two objectives: to determine the relative absorption of saline versus high-protein solutions, and to identify the relative rates of absorption of dextran molecules of varying sizes. Twenty New Zealand white rabbits received a 12-mL intrapleural injection of saline solution and a 10% protein solution on opposite sides, each solution containing dextran molecules with varying MWs. At sacrifice at 1, 4, 8, 18 and 24 h, the volume of pleural fluid and the concentrations of the dextran molecules were determined. Saline was absorbed faster than the high-protein fluid (P higher than those in the protein solution at all times after injection (P = 0.005; P higher-MW dextrans were cleared more slowly than the lower-MW dextrans in a continuously graded manner. Saline was absorbed faster than a solution with a high protein content. There was a continuous spectrum in the rate of absorption of the dextran molecules, with the larger molecules being absorbed more slowly.

  10. Effect of peripherally and cortically evoked swallows on jaw reflex responses in anesthetized rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Taku; Yoshihara, Midori; Sakai, Shogo; Tsuji, Kojun; Nagoya, Kouta; Magara, Jin; Tsujimura, Takanori; Inoue, Makoto

    2018-05-03

    This study aimed to investigate whether the jaw-opening (JOR) and jaw-closing reflexes (JCR) are modulated during not only peripherally, but also centrally, evoked swallowing. Experiments were carried out on 24 adult male Japanese white rabbits. JORs were evoked by trigeminal stimulation at 1 Hz for 30 sec. In the middle 10 sec, either the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) or cortical swallowing area (Cx) was simultaneously stimulated to evoke swallowing. The peak-to-peak JOR amplitude was reduced during the middle and late 10-sec periods (i.e., during and after SLN or Cx stimulation), and the reduction was dependent on the current intensity of SLN/Cx stimulation: greater SLN/Cx stimulus current resulted in greater JOR inhibition. The reduction rate was significantly greater during Cx stimulation than during SLN stimulation. The amplitude returned to baseline 2 min after 10-sec SLN/Cx stimulation. The effect of co-stimulation of SLN and Cx was significantly greater than that of SLN stimulation alone. There were no significant differences in any parameters of the JCR between conditions. These results clearly showed that JOR responses were significantly suppressed, not only during peripherally evoked swallowing but also during centrally evoked swallowing, and that the inhibitory effect is likely to be larger during centrally compared with peripherally evoked swallowing. The functional implications of these results are discussed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Repeat Gamma-Knife Radiosurgery for Refractory or Recurrent Trigeminal Neuralgia with Consideration About the Optimal Second Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Kwon, Do Hoon; Lee, Do Hee; Lee, Jung Kyo

    2016-02-01

    To investigate adequate radiation doses for repeat Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS) for trigeminal neuralgia in our series and meta-analysis. Fourteen patients treated by ipsilateral repeat GKS for trigeminal neuralgia were included. Median age of patients was 65 years (range, 28-78), the median target dose, 140-180). Patients were followed a median of 10.8 months (range, 1-151) after the second gamma-knife surgery. Brainstem dose analysis and vote-counting meta-analysis of 19 studies were performed. After the second gamma-knife radiosurgeries, pain was relieved effectively in 12 patients (86%; Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score I-III). Post-gamma-knife radiosurgery trigeminal nerve deficits were mild in 5 patients. No serious anesthesia dolorosa was occurred. The second GKS radiation dose ≤ 60 Gy was significantly associated with worse pain control outcome (P = 0.018 in our series, permutation analysis of variance, and P = 0.009 in the meta-analysis, 2-tailed Fisher's exact test). Cumulative dose ≤ 140-150 Gy was significantly associated with poor pain control outcome (P = 0.033 in our series and P = 0.013 in the meta-analysis, 2-tailed Fisher's exact test). A cumulative brainstem edge dose >12 Gy tended to be associated with trigeminal nerve deficit (P = 0.077). Our study suggests that the second GKS dose is a potentially important factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf

    2015-01-01

    , following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. METHODS: In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface...

  13. Dural administration of inflammatory soup or Complete Freund's Adjuvant induces activation and inflammatory response in the rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukács, M; Haanes, K A; Majláth, Zs

    2015-01-01

    induces inflammatory activation in the trigeminal ganglion. METHODS: We performed topical administration of inflammatory soup (IS) or Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) onto an exposed area of the rat dura mater in vivo for 20 min. The window was closed and the rats were sacrificed after 4 h and up to 7...

  14. Facial injections of pruritogens and algogens excite partly overlapping populations of primary and second-order trigeminal neurons in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, T; Carstens, M Iodi; Carstens, E

    2010-11-01

    Intradermal cheek injection of pruitogens or algogens differentially elicits hindlimb scratching or forelimb wiping, suggesting that these behaviors distinguish between itch and pain. We studied whether pruritogens and algogens excite separate or overlapping populations of primary afferent and second-order trigeminal neurons in mice. Calcium imaging of primary sensory trigeminal ganglion (TG) cells showed that 15.4% responded to histamine, 5.8% to the protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2 agonist, 13.4% to allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), and 36.7% to capsaicin. AITC and/or capsaicin activated the vast majority of histamine- and PAR-2 agonist-sensitive TG cells. A chemical search strategy identified second-order neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) responsive to histamine, the PAR-2 agonist, or AITC. A minority of histamine or PAR-2 agonist-responsive Vc neurons responded to the other pruritogen, whereas a large majority of puritogen-responsive Vc neurons responded to capsaicin and/or AITC. A minority of AITC-responsive Vc neurons responded to pruritogens, whereas most responded to capsaicin. These data indicate that most primary and higher-order trigeminal sensory neurons are activated by both pruritic and algesic stimuli, although a minority exhibit selectivity. The results are discussed in terms of population codes for itch and pain that result in distinct behavioral responses of hindlimb scratching and forelimb wiping that are mediated at lumbar and cervical segmental levels, respectively.

  15. Safety and efficacy of a Nav1.7 selective sodium channel blocker in patients with trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M; Palmer, Joanne; Morisset, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current standard of care for trigeminal neuralgia is treatment with the sodium channel blockers carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, which although effective are associated with poor tolerability and the need for titration. BIIB074, a Nav1.7-selective, state-dependent sodium-channel blocker...

  16. Atrophic changes in the trigeminal nerves of patients with trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression and their association with the severity of compression and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Paulo Roberto Lacerda; Barbier, Charlotte; Hermier, Marc; Souza, Miguel Angelo; Cristino-Filho, Gerardo; Sindou, Marc

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate atrophic changes in trigeminal nerves (TGNs) using measurements of volume (V) and cross-sectional area (CSA) from high-resolution 3-T MR images obtained in patients with unilateral trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and to correlate these data with patient and neurovascular compression (NVC) characteristics and with clinical outcomes. Anatomical TGN parameters (V and CSA) were obtained in 50 patients (30 women and 20 men; mean age 56.42 years, range 22-79 years) with classic TN before treatment with microvascular decompression (MVD). Parameters were compared between the symptomatic (ipsilateralTN) and asymptomatic (contralateralTN) sides of the face. Twenty normal control subjects were also included. Two independent observers blinded to the side of pain separately analyzed the images. Measurements of V (from the pons to the entrance of the nerve into Meckel's cave) and CSA (at 5 mm from the entry of the TGN into the pons) for each TGN were performed using imaging software and axial and coronal projections, respectively. These data were correlated with patient characteristics (age, duration of symptoms before MVD, side of pain, sex, and area of pain distribution), NVC characteristics (type of vessel involved in NVC, location of compression along the nerve, site of compression around the circumference of the root, and degree of compression), and clinical outcomes at the 2-year follow-up after surgery. Comparisons were made using Bonferroni's test. Interobserver variability was assessed using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The mean V of the TGN on the ipsilateralTN (60.35 ± 21.74 mm(3)) was significantly smaller (p controls (78.62 ± 24.62 mm(3) and 89.09 ± 14.72 mm(3), respectively). The mean CSA of the TGN on the ipsilateralTN (4.17 ± 1.74 mm(2)) was significantly smaller than those for the contralateralTN and controls (5.41 ± 1.89 mm(2) and 5.64 ± 0.85 mm(2), respectively). The ipsilateralTN with NVC Grade III

  17. Do carbamazepine, gabapentin, or other anticonvulsants exert sufficient radioprotective effects to alter responses from trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, John C; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C

    2012-07-15

    Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age ≤70 years, and Type 1 typical

  18. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flickinger, John C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); College of Arts and Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kano, Hideyuki [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Niranjan, Ajay [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Flickinger, John C., E-mail: flickingerjc@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up {>=}6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6-153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with age

  19. Chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the medullary dorsal horn are involved in trigeminal neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhi-Jun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain in the trigeminal system is frequently observed in clinic, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In addition, the function of immune cells and related chemicals in the mechanism of pain has been recognized, whereas few studies have addressed the potential role of chemokines in the trigeminal system in chronic pain. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that chemokine C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2-chemokine C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 signaling in the trigeminal nucleus is involved in the maintenance of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Methods The inferior alveolar nerve and mental nerve transection (IAMNT was used to induce trigeminal neuropathic pain. The expression of ATF3, CCL2, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and CCR2 were detected by immunofluorescence histochemical staining and western blot. The cellular localization of CCL2 and CCR2 were examined by immunofluorescence double staining. The effect of a selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 on pain hypersensitivity was checked by behavioral testing. Results IAMNT induced persistent (>21 days heat hyperalgesia of the orofacial region and ATF3 expression in the mandibular division of the trigeminal ganglion. Meanwhile, CCL2 expression was increased in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH from 3 days to 21 days after IAMNT. The induced CCL2 was colocalized with astroglial marker GFAP, but not with neuronal marker NeuN or microglial marker OX-42. Astrocytes activation was also found in the MDH and it started at 3 days, peaked at 10 days and maintained at 21 days after IAMNT. In addition, CCR2 was upregulated by IAMNT in the ipsilateral medulla and lasted for more than 21 days. CCR2 was mainly colocalized with NeuN and few cells were colocalized with GFAP. Finally, intracisternal injection of CCR2 antagonist, RS504393 (1, 10 μg significantly attenuated IAMNT-induced heat hyperalgesia. Conclusion The data suggest that CCL2-CCR

  20. Do Carbamazepine, Gabapentin, or Other Anticonvulsants Exert Sufficient Radioprotective Effects to Alter Responses From Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiosurgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Kim, Hyun; Kano, Hideyuki; Greenberger, Joel S.; Arai, Yoshio; Niranjan, Ajay; Lunsford, L. Dade; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Laboratory studies have documented radioprotective effects with carbamazepine. We sought to determine whether carbamazepine or other anticonvulsant/neuroleptic drugs would show significant radioprotective effects in patients undergoing high-dose small-volume radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective review of 200 patients undergoing Gamma Knife (Elekta Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia between February 1995 and May 2008. We selected patients treated with a maximum dose of 80 Gy with 4-mm diameter collimators, with no previous microvascular decompression, and follow-up ≥6 months (median, 24 months; range, 6–153 months). At the time of radiosurgery, 28 patients were taking no anticonvulsants, 62 only carbamazepine, 35 only gabapentin, 21 carbamazepine plus gabapentin, 17 carbamazepine plus other anticonvulsants, and 9 gabapentin plus other anticonvulsants, and 28 were taking other anticonvulsants or combinations. Results: Pain improvement developed post-radiosurgery in 187 of 200 patients (93.5%). Initial complete pain relief developed in 84 of 200 patients (42%). Post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy developed in 27 of 200 patients (13.5%). We could not significantly correlate pain improvement or initial complete pain relief with use of carbamazepine, gabapentin, or use of any anticonvulsants/neuroleptic drugs or other factors in univariate or multivariate analysis. Post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias correlated with the use of gabapentin (1 of 36 patients with gabapentin vs. 7 of 28 without, p = 0.017). In multivariate analysis, decreasing age, purely typical pain, and use of gabapentin correlated (p = 0.008, p = 0.005, and p = 0.021) with lower risks of developing post-radiosurgery trigeminal neuropathy. New post-radiosurgery numbness/paresthesias developed in 3% (1 of 36), 5% (4 of 81), and 13% (23 of 187) of patients on gabapentin alone, with

  1. Welfare aspects in rabbit rearing and transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Cavani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The review starts with the description of the rabbits’ (Oryctolagus cuniculus main habits and the current situation concerning the rabbit husbandry and management systems, as well as their effects on the welfare of these animals. As far as the intensive rabbit husbandry systems are concerned, the main problems are related to the time since rabbits have been domesticated and their adaptive capacity and coping styles as respects the farming environment and management systems. Both these aspects have implications in the present and future of rabbit rearing for different purposes. Examples are given on the effects of different housing and management systems on rabbit welfare, as well as examples of the ethological, physiological and productive indicators used to evaluate these effects. Transportation and, more generally, preslaughter phases including catching, fasting and lairage at the abattoir are considered major stressors for farmed rabbits and might have deleterious effects on health, well-being, performance, and finally, product quality. A general statement of the recent scientific studies considering the effects of pre-slaughter factors on physiological and productive measurements are reported. Finally, some indications in order to improve rabbit welfare, already present at the European level, are also outlined, together with the European Food Safety Authority opinions.

  2. Parasitic infections of wild rabbits and hares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the most important parasitic infections of wild rabbits and hares, which harmful effect in this animal population is manifested as a gradual weakening of the immune system, reduction in fertility, weight loss and constant exhaustion. Order of Lagomorpha (hares or lagomorphs belongs to superorder of higher mammals which includes the family of rabbits (Leporidae which are represented in Europe as well as the family of whistleblowers (Ochotonidae which live only in North America and Northern regions of Asia. The most important representatives of Leporidae family are European hare (Lepus europeus and wild rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus. The most important endoparasitosis of hares and wild rabbits are: coccidiosis, encephalitozoonosis (nosemosis, toxoplasmosis, sarcocystosis, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, protostrongylosis, trichostrngylodosis, passalurosis, anoplocephalidosis, cysticercosis and fasciolosis. The most frequent ectoparasites of rabbits and wild hares are fleas, lice and ticks. Reduction in hare population, which is noticed in whole Europe including Serbia, is caused by changed living conditions, quantitatively and qualitatively insufficient nutrition, increased use of herbicides as well as various infectious diseases and the diseases of parasitic etiology. Since wild rabbits and hares pose a threat to health of domestic rabbits and people, knowledge of parasitic fauna of these wild animals is of extreme epizootiological and epidemiological importance.

  3. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Large Bilateral Thalamic and Basal Ganglia Arteriovenous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in the basal ganglia and thalamus have a more aggressive natural history with a higher morbidity and mortality than AVMs in other locations. Optimal treatment—complete obliteration without new neurological deficits—is often challenging. We present a patient with a large bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic AVM successfully treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (HFSRS with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Methods. The patient was treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery to 30 Gy at margin in 5 fractions of 9 static fields with a minimultileaf collimator and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Results. At 10 months following treatment, digital subtraction angiography showed complete obliteration of the AVM. Conclusions. Large bilateral thalamic and basal ganglia AVMs can be successfully treated with complete obliteration by HFSRS with IMRT with relatively limited toxicity. Appropriate caution is recommended.

  4. Prevalences of CT detected calcification in the basal ganglia in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illum, F.; Dupont, E.; Aarhus Univ.; Aarhus Univ.

    1985-01-01

    Sixteen patients with idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP) and eight patients with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) were examined by CT scan of the brain. Calcification in the basal ganglia was observed in 11 patients with IHP (69%) and in all eight patients with PHP. Of the 19 patients with basal ganglia calcification, nine had calcifications in the cerebral cortex (47%), and four had calcifications in the cerebellum (21%). Observation of basal ganglia calcification on CT gave rise to suspicion of IHP or PHP in three patients (12%). The remaining patients were examined at varying time after diagnosis. Since arrest in growth of calcifications after institution of treatment has never been proven, the reported prevalences of calcifications may not be valid to the situation at the time of diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Chronological changes in nonhaemorrhagic brain infarcts with short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Osaka City General Hospital, Miyakojima-Hondouri, Miyakojima, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Our purpose was to investigate nonhaemorrhagic infarcts with a short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia. We carried out repeat MRI on 12 patients with infarcts in the cerebellum or basal ganglia with a short T1. Cerebellar cortical lesions showed high signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images beginning at 2 weeks, which became prominent from 3 weeks to 2 months, and persisted for as long as 14 months after the ictus. The basal ganglia lesions demonstrated slightly high signal from a week after the ictus, which became more intense thereafter. Signal intensity began to fade gradually after 2 months. High signal could be seen at the periphery until 5 months, and then disappeared, while low or isointense signal, seen in the central portion from day 20, persisted thereafter. (orig.)

  6. Chronological changes in nonhaemorrhagic brain infarcts with short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, M.; Nakajima, H.; Nishikawa, M.; Yasui, T.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate nonhaemorrhagic infarcts with a short T1 in the cerebellum and basal ganglia. We carried out repeat MRI on 12 patients with infarcts in the cerebellum or basal ganglia with a short T1. Cerebellar cortical lesions showed high signal on T1-weighted spin-echo images beginning at 2 weeks, which became prominent from 3 weeks to 2 months, and persisted for as long as 14 months after the ictus. The basal ganglia lesions demonstrated slightly high signal from a week after the ictus, which became more intense thereafter. Signal intensity began to fade gradually after 2 months. High signal could be seen at the periphery until 5 months, and then disappeared, while low or isointense signal, seen in the central portion from day 20, persisted thereafter. (orig.)

  7. Cross-Excitation in Peripheral Sensory Ganglia Associated with Pain Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Omoto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the absence of synaptic contacts, cross-excitation of neurons in sensory ganglia during signal transmission is considered to be chemically mediated and appears increased in chronic pain states. In this study, we modulated neurotransmitter release in sensory neurons by direct application of type A botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT/A to sensory ganglia in an animal model of neuropathic pain and evaluated the effect of this treatment on nocifensive. Unilateral sciatic nerve entrapment (SNE reduced the ipsilateral hindpaw withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation and reduced hindpaw withdrawal latency to thermal stimulation. Direct application of BoNT/A to the ipsilateral L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG was localized in the cell bodies of the DRG and reversed the SNE-induced decreases in withdrawal thresholds within 2 days of BoNT/A administration. Results from this study suggest that neurotransmitter release within sensory ganglia is involved in the regulation of pain-related signal transmission.

  8. Single-photon-emission-computed-tomography (SPECT) in basal ganglia disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsch, K.

    1997-01-01

    In the past, SPECT investigations of regional cerebral blood flow have played a minor role in the diagnostic work-up of patients with basal ganglia disorders. More recently, however, interest in nuclear medicine procedures has dramatically increased since with the development of selective receptor ligands diagnostic tools have been provided which address the pathology in basal ganglia disorders more specifically than other diagnostic modalities. Evaluations of the pre- and postsynaptic aspects of the dopaminergic system, for example, deliver not only interesting data from the scientific point of view but also for the daily routine work. This paper summarizes some of the experience reported in the literature on SPECT investigations in basal ganglia disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, parkinsonian syndromes of other etiology, Wilson's and Huntington's disease, focal dystonias, and schizophrenia under treatment with neuroleptics. (orig.) [de

  9. Cocoa Enriched Diets Enhance Expression of Phosphatases and Decrease Expression of Inflammatory Molecules in Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Ryan J.; Durham, Paul L.

    2010-01-01

    Activation of trigeminal nerves and release of neuropeptides that promote inflammation are implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. The overall response of trigeminal nerves to peripheral inflammatory stimuli involves a balance between enzymes that promote inflammation, kinases, and those that restore homeostasis, phosphatases. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of a cocoa-enriched diet on the expression of key inflammatory proteins in trigeminal ganglion neurons under basal and inflammatory conditions. Rats were fed a control diet or an isocaloric diet enriched in cocoa for 14 days prior to an injection of noxious stimuli to cause acute or chronic excitation of trigeminal neurons. In animals fed a cocoa-enriched diet, basal levels of the mitogen-activated kinase (MAP) phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 were elevated in neurons. Importantly, the stimulatory effects of acute or chronic peripheral inflammation on neuronal expression of the MAPK p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) were significantly repressed in response to cocoa. Similarly, dietary cocoa significantly suppressed basal neuronal expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as well as stimulated levels of the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proteins implicated in the underlying pathology of migraine and TMJ disorders. To our knowledge, this is first evidence that a dietary supplement can cause upregulation of MKP, and that cocoa can prevent inflammatory responses in trigeminal ganglion neurons. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that cocoa contains biologically active compounds that would be beneficial in the treatment of migraine and TMJ disorders. PMID:20138852

  10. Attenuated frontal and sensory inputs to the basal ganglia in cannabis users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Pujol, Jesus; Harrison, Ben J; Macià, Dídac; Batalla, Albert; Nogué, Santiago; Torrens, Marta; Farré, Magí; Deus, Joan; Martín-Santos, Rocío

    2017-07-01

    Heavy cannabis use is associated with reduced motivation. The basal ganglia, central in the motivation system, have the brain's highest cannabinoid receptor density. The frontal lobe is functionally coupled to the basal ganglia via segregated frontal-subcortical circuits conveying information from internal, self-generated activity. The basal ganglia, however, receive additional influence from the sensory system to further modulate purposeful behaviors according to the context. We postulated that cannabis use would impact functional connectivity between the basal ganglia and both internal (frontal cortex) and external (sensory cortices) sources of influence. Resting-state functional connectivity was measured in 28 chronic cannabis users and 29 controls. Selected behavioral tests included reaction time, verbal fluency and exposition to affective pictures. Assessments were repeated after one month of abstinence. Cannabis exposure was associated with (1) attenuation of the positive correlation between the striatum and areas pertaining to the 'limbic' frontal-basal ganglia circuit, and (2) attenuation of the negative correlation between the striatum and the fusiform gyrus, which is critical in recognizing significant visual features. Connectivity alterations were associated with lower arousal in response to affective pictures. Functional connectivity changes had a tendency to normalize after abstinence. The results overall indicate that frontal and sensory inputs to the basal ganglia are attenuated after chronic exposure to cannabis. This effect is consistent with the common behavioral consequences of chronic cannabis use concerning diminished responsiveness to both internal and external motivation signals. Such an impairment of the fine-tuning in the motivation system notably reverts after abstinence. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Global dysrhythmia of cerebro-basal ganglia-cerebellar networks underlies motor tics following striatal disinhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCairn, Kevin W; Iriki, Atsushi; Isoda, Masaki

    2013-01-09

    Motor tics, a cardinal symptom of Tourette syndrome (TS), are hypothesized to arise from abnormalities within cerebro-basal ganglia circuits. Yet noninvasive neuroimaging of TS has previously identified robust activation in the cerebellum. To date, electrophysiological properties of cerebellar activation and its role in basal ganglia-mediated tic expression remain unknown. We performed multisite, multielectrode recordings of single-unit activity and local field potentials from the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and primary motor cortex using a pharmacologic monkey model of motor tics/TS. Following microinjections of bicuculline into the sensorimotor putamen, periodic tics occurred predominantly in the orofacial region, and a sizable number of cerebellar neurons showed phasic changes in activity associated with tic episodes. Specifically, 64% of the recorded cerebellar cortex neurons exhibited increases in activity, and 85% of the dentate nucleus neurons displayed excitatory, inhibitory, or multiphasic responses. Critically, abnormal discharges of cerebellar cortex neurons and excitatory-type dentate neurons mostly preceded behavioral tic onset, indicating their central origins. Latencies of pathological activity in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex substantially overlapped, suggesting that aberrant signals may be traveling along divergent pathways to these structures from the basal ganglia. Furthermore, the occurrence of tic movement was most closely associated with local field potential spikes in the cerebellum and primary motor cortex, implying that these structures may function as a gate to release overt tic movements. These findings indicate that tic-generating networks in basal ganglia mediated tic disorders extend beyond classical cerebro-basal ganglia circuits, leading to global network dysrhythmia including cerebellar circuits.

  12. Pulmonary vein region ablation in experimental vagal atrial fibrillation: role of pulmonary veins versus autonomic ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemola, Kristina; Chartier, Denis; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Dubuc, Marc; Cartier, Raymond; Armour, Andrew; Ting, Michael; Sakabe, Masao; Shiroshita-Takeshita, Akiko; Comtois, Philippe; Nattel, Stanley

    2008-01-29

    Pulmonary vein (PV) -encircling radiofrequency ablation frequently is effective in vagal atrial fibrillation (AF), and there is evidence that PVs may be particularly prone to cholinergically induced arrhythmia mechanisms. However, PV ablation procedures also can affect intracardiac autonomic ganglia. The present study examined the relative role of PVs versus peri-PV autonomic ganglia in an experimental vagal AF model. Cholinergic AF was studied under carbachol infusion in coronary perfused canine left atrial PV preparations in vitro and with cervical vagal stimulation in vivo. Carbachol caused dose-dependent AF promotion in vitro, which was not affected by excision of all PVs. Sustained AF could be induced easily in all dogs during vagal nerve stimulation in vivo both before and after isolation of all PVs with encircling lesions created by a bipolar radiofrequency ablation clamp device. PV elimination had no effect on atrial effective refractory period or its responses to cholinergic stimulation. Autonomic ganglia were identified by bradycardic and/or tachycardic responses to high-frequency subthreshold local stimulation. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia overlying all PV ostia suppressed the effective refractory period-abbreviating and AF-promoting effects of cervical vagal stimulation, whereas ablation of only left- or right-sided PV ostial ganglia failed to suppress AF. Dominant-frequency analysis suggested that the success of ablation in suppressing vagal AF depended on the elimination of high-frequency driver regions. Intact PVs are not needed for maintenance of experimental cholinergic AF. Ablation of the autonomic ganglia at the base of the PVs suppresses vagal responses and may contribute to the effectiveness of PV-directed ablation procedures in vagal AF.

  13. Market Driving to Develop Rabbit Meat Products in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Atien Priyanti; Yono Cahyo Rahadjo

    2012-01-01

    Rabbit meat is a nutritional food containing high protein and low cholesterol, fat and sodium. Current research in rabbit production is aimed for developing production strategies to increase the nutritional and economic values of rabbit meat products as functional food. Nowadays, producing rabbit is a popular farming activity in many parts of Indonesia as a small and medium scale operation for food security and cash income. Rabbit farming is to produce meat, skin and hides, fur, organic ferti...

  14. Comparative quantitative monitoring of rabbit haemorrhagic disease viruses in rabbit kittens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaei, Markus; Kerr, Peter J; Read, Andrew J; Hick, Paul; Haboury, Stephanie; Wright, John D; Strive, Tanja

    2014-06-09

    Only one strain (the Czech CAPM-v351) of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has been released in Australia and New Zealand to control pest populations of the European rabbit O. cuniculus. Antigenic variants of RHDV known as RHDVa strains are reportedly replacing RHDV strains in other parts of the world, and Australia is currently investigating the usefulness of RHDVa to complement rabbit biocontrol efforts in Australia and New Zealand. RHDV efficiently kills adult rabbits but not rabbit kittens, which are more resistant to RHD the younger they are and which may carry the virus without signs of disease for prolonged periods. These different infection patterns in young rabbits may significantly influence RHDV epidemiology in the field and hence attempts to control rabbit numbers. We quantified RHDV replication and shedding in 4-5 week old rabbits using quantitative real time PCR to assess their potential to shape RHDV epidemiology by shedding and transmitting virus. We further compared RHDV-v351 with an antigenic variant strain of RHDVa in kittens that is currently being considered as a potential RHDV strain for future release to improve rabbit biocontrol in Australia. Kittens were susceptible to infection with virus doses as low as 10 ID50. Virus growth, shedding and transmission after RHDVa infection was found to be comparable or non-significantly lower compared to RHDV. Virus replication and shedding was observed in all kittens infected, but was low in comparison to adult rabbits. Both viruses were shed and transmitted to bystander rabbits. While blood titres indicated that 4-5 week old kittens mostly clear the infection even in the absence of maternal antibodies, virus titres in liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph node were still high on day 5 post infection. Rabbit kittens are susceptible to infection with very low doses of RHDV, and can transmit virus before they seroconvert. They may therefore play an important role in RHDV field epidemiology, in

  15. Clinical observation of hemocoagulase combined with aminomethylbenzoic acid in the treatment of basal ganglia hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min SU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cerebral hemorrhage in basal ganglia were treated with hemocoagulase combined with aminomethylbenzoic acid from May 2010 to April 2013 in our hospital, and hematoma volume and neurological impairment were compared with the control group before and after treatment. This study confirmed that hemocoagulase combined with aninomethylbenzoic acid is a safe and effective method for cerebral hemorrhage in basal ganglia. It can effectively prevent the hematoma enlargement and improve neurological function and prognosis. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.07.014

  16. Phenotypic spectrum of probable and genetically-confirmed idiopathic basal ganglia calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Pottier, Cyril; Charbonnier, Camille; Guyant-Maréchal, Lucie; Le Ber, Isabelle; Pariente, Jérémie; Labauge, Pierre; Ayrignac, Xavier; Defebvre, Luc; Maltête, David; Martinaud, Olivier; Lefaucheur, Romain; Guillin, Olivier; Wallon, David; Chaumette, Boris; Rondepierre, Philippe; Derache, Nathalie; Fromager, Guillaume; Schaeffer, Stéphane; Krystkowiak, Pierre; Verny, Christophe; Jurici, Snejana; Sauvée, Mathilde; Vérin, Marc; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Rouaud, Olivier; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Rousseau, Stéphane; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier

    2013-11-01

    Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification is characterized by mineral deposits in the brain, an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance in most cases and genetic heterogeneity. The first causal genes, SLC20A2 and PDGFRB, have recently been reported. Diagnosing idiopathic basal ganglia calcification necessitates the exclusion of other causes, including calcification related to normal ageing, for which no normative data exist. Our objectives were to diagnose accurately and then describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification. First, calcifications were evaluated using a visual rating scale on the computerized tomography scans of 600 consecutively hospitalized unselected controls. We determined an age-specific threshold in these control computerized tomography scans as the value of the 99th percentile of the total calcification score within three age categories: 60 years. To study the phenotype of the disease, patients with basal ganglia calcification were recruited from several medical centres. Calcifications that rated below the age-specific threshold using the same scale were excluded, as were patients with differential diagnoses of idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, after an extensive aetiological assessment. Sanger sequencing of SLC20A2 and PDGFRB was performed. In total, 72 patients were diagnosed with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, 25 of whom bore a mutation in either SLC20A2 (two families, four sporadic cases) or PDGFRB (one family, two sporadic cases). Five mutations were novel. Seventy-one per cent of the patients with idiopathic basal ganglia calcification were symptomatic (mean age of clinical onset: 39 ± 20 years; mean age at last evaluation: 55 ± 19 years). Among them, the most frequent signs were: cognitive impairment (58.8%), psychiatric symptoms (56.9%) and movement disorders (54.9%). Few clinical differences appeared between SLC20A2 and PDGFRB mutation carriers. Radiological analysis

  17. Computed tomography of basal ganglia calcifications in pseudo- and idiopathic hypoparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunaga, Masao; Otsuka, Nobuaki; Ono, Shimato; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Nishishita, Soichi; Morita, Rikushi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Torizuka, Kanji.

    1987-12-01

    It is well known that patients with pseudo (PHP)- and idiopathic (IHP) hypoparathyroidism are frequently associated with intracranial calcifications. The relative sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) and conventional skull radiography in detecting basal ganglia calcifications was studied in two patients with PHP and six with IHP. CT was more sensitive: the detection rate was 71 % (5/7) for CT and 14 % (1/7) for skull radiography. Furthermore, patients with more prolonged hypocalcemia showed a higher incidence of calcifications. Thus, CT was useful as a diagnostic technique in the early detection of calcified basal ganglia.

  18. Computed tomography of basal ganglia calcifications in pseudo- and idiopathic hypoparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunaga, Masao; Otsuka, Nobuaki; Ono, Shimato; Kajihara, Yasumasa; Nishishita, Soichi; Morita, Rikushi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Torizuka, Kanji.

    1987-01-01

    It is well known that patients with pseudo (PHP)- and idiopathic (IHP) hypoparathyroidism are frequently associated with intracranial calcifications. The relative sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) and conventional skull radiography in detecting basal ganglia calcifications was studied in two patients with PHP and six with IHP. CT was more sensitive: the detection rate was 71 % (5/7) for CT and 14 % (1/7) for skull radiography. Furthermore, patients with more prolonged hypocalcemia showed a higher incidence of calcifications. Thus, CT was useful as a diagnostic technique in the early detection of calcified basal ganglia. (author)

  19. Cavitary Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia and abnormalities of the Basal Ganglia Case presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, Enrique; Mora, Alfonso Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia (COP) is a pulmonary disorder with a wide spectrum of radiological features. A case of a young patient of 16 years old is shown with CAT appearance of multiple cavitary nodules in both lungs that responded with a complete resolution after corticosteroid therapy. This patient also reveals abnormalities of the basal ganglia as the result of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy associated with the acute presentation of this disorder. We justify the inclusion of COP in the differential diagnosis of multiple cavitary nodules, and it is discussed the differential diagnosis of her abnormalities of the basal ganglia

  20. Basal ganglia calcification on CT in adult patients with Down's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Hironobu; Yoshimasu, Fumio; Higashi, Yuji.

    1987-01-01

    Fourteen adult cases with Down's syndrome were examined on cranial CT scan, and 5 of them (35.7 %) showed basal ganglia calcification (BGC). The incidence of BGC in the present cases was very high in comparison with the one in general population (0.3 ∼ 1.5 %). Abnormalities of calcium metabolism or dysfunctions of the basal ganglia were absent in each case with BGC. Calcifications were exclusively located in globus pallidus. It is considered that BGC found in the present cases may be due to the premature aging process in Down's syndrome. (author)

  1. Consensus Paper: Towards a Systems-Level View of Cerebellar Function: the Interplay Between Cerebellum, Basal Ganglia, and Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiore, Daniele; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Baldassarre, Gianluca; Bostan, Andreea C; Strick, Peter L; Doya, Kenji; Helmich, Rick C; Dirkx, Michiel; Houk, James; Jörntell, Henrik; Lago-Rodriguez, Angel; Galea, Joseph M; Miall, R Chris; Popa, Traian; Kishore, Asha; Verschure, Paul F M J; Zucca, Riccardo; Herreros, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    Despite increasing evidence suggesting the cerebellum works in concert with the cortex and basal ganglia, the nature of the reciprocal interactions between these three brain regions remains unclear. This consensus paper gathers diverse recent views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system across a range of motor and cognitive functions. The paper includes theoretical and empirical contributions, which cover the following topics: recent evidence supporting the dynamical interplay between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortical areas in humans and other animals; theoretical neuroscience perspectives and empirical evidence on the reciprocal influences between cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex in learning and control processes; and data suggesting possible roles of the cerebellum in basal ganglia movement disorders. Although starting from different backgrounds and dealing with different topics, all the contributors agree that viewing the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and cortex as an integrated system enables us to understand the function of these areas in radically different ways. In addition, there is unanimous consensus between the authors that future experimental and computational work is needed to understand the function of cerebellar-basal ganglia circuitry in both motor and non-motor functions. The paper reports the most advanced perspectives on the role of the cerebellum within the cerebello-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical system and illustrates other elements of consensus as well as disagreements and open questions in the field.

  2. Basal ganglia dysfunction in idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder parallels that in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Michal; Griffanti, Ludovica; Piccini, Paola; Roussakis, Andreas A; Szewczyk-Krolikowski, Konrad; Menke, Ricarda A; Quinnell, Timothy; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; Klein, Johannes C; Mackay, Clare E; Hu, Michele T M

    2016-08-01

    SEE POSTUMA DOI101093/AWW131 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging dysfunction within the basal ganglia network is a feature of early Parkinson's disease and may be a diagnostic biomarker of basal ganglia dysfunction. Currently, it is unclear whether these changes are present in so-called idiopathic rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, a condition associated with a high rate of future conversion to Parkinson's disease. In this study, we explore the utility of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging to detect basal ganglia network dysfunction in rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder. We compare these data to a set of healthy control subjects, and to a set of patients with established early Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, we explore the relationship between resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging basal ganglia network dysfunction and loss of dopaminergic neurons assessed with dopamine transporter single photon emission computerized tomography, and perform morphometric analyses to assess grey matter loss. Twenty-six patients with polysomnographically-established rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 48 patients with Parkinson's disease and 23 healthy control subjects were included in this study. Resting state networks were isolated from task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging data using dual regression with a template derived from a separate cohort of 80 elderly healthy control participants. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging parameter estimates were extracted from the study subjects in the basal ganglia network. In addition, eight patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder, 10 with Parkinson's disease and 10 control subjects received (123)I-ioflupane single photon emission computerized tomography. We tested for reduction of basal ganglia network connectivity, and for loss of tracer uptake in rapid eye movement sleep

  3. Carcass traits of four rabbit genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajda Kermauner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy-three rabbits of four genotypes (A - SIKA maternal line; C - SIKA sire line; AxC - hybrids between line A and C; AxCal - crossbreds between line A and the Californian breed were used to evaluate the effect of genotype on carcass traits. Rabbits were weaned at 35 days and slaughtered at 93 days of age. Rabbits were fed standard feed mixture ad libitum. The highest live weight at slaughter and dressing percentage was achieved by line C, and the lowest in line A. Hybrids between line A and C exhibited slightly worse carcass traits than rabbits in line C, but the differences were not statistically significant. The Californian breed gave worse results than crossbreeding with line C, though in most cases the differences between AxC and AxCal were not significant. The differences between genotypes in hind leg tissue composition, pH and meat colour were not statistically significant.

  4. Cilostazol induces C-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis and behavioural changes suggestive of headache with the migraine-like feature photophobia in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S L; Petersen, Steffen; Sørensen, Dorte B

    2018-01-01

    -like behaviours and c-fos expression in rats. In order to evaluate the predictive validity of the model, we examined the response to the migraine specific drug sumatriptan. Methods The effect of cilostazol (125 mg/kg p.o.) in female Sprague Dawley rats was evaluated on a range of spontaneous behavioural...... parameters, light sensitivity and mechanical sensitivity thresholds. We also measured c-fos expression in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Results Cilostazol increased light sensitivity and grooming behaviour. These manifestations were not inhibited by sumatriptan. Cilostazol also induced c-fos expression...... in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Furthermore, trigeminal - but not hind paw hyperalgesia was observed. Conclusion The altered behaviours are suggestive of cilostazol induced headache with migraine-like features, but not specific. The presence of head specific hyperalgesia and the c-fos response in the trigeminal...

  5. Trigeminal neuralgia--a prospective systematic study of clinical characteristics in 158 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Gozalov, Aydin; Olesen, Jes

    2014-01-01

     = .043. It affected solely the second and/or third trigeminal branch in 109 (69%) while the first branch alone was affected in only 7 (4%). Notably, 78 (49%) had concomitant persistent pain in addition to paroxysmal stabbing pain. Autonomic symptoms were present in 48 (31%). Patients who had...... not undergone surgery for TN had sensory abnormalities in 35 (29%). CONCLUSIONS: This, the first study in a series of papers focusing on the clinical, radiological, and etiological aspects of TN, revealed that the symptomatology of TN includes a high percentage of concomitant persistent pain, autonomic symptoms......, and sensory abnormalities. These findings offer new insights to the prevailing clinical impression of the clinical characteristics in TN....

  6. [Activity of glial cells in trigeminal nervous system in rats with experimental pulpitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bin; Liu, Na; Liu, Hongchen

    2014-04-29

    To observe the activity change of astrocyte in related nucleus caused by acute pulpitis in rats. Rat acute pulpitis model was induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPS). And, according to processing time, a total of 30 rats were divided into 5 groups of control, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were employed to detect the dynamic expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in spinal nucleus of trigeminal nerve (Vc). The relative gray value of ipsilateral Vc GFAP expression in experimental groups was 153 ± 11 at 12 h. And it significantly increased versus the control group (100 ± 4)(P pulpitis model, activated glial cells are probably involved in the processes of pulpitis and hyperalgesia.

  7. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A when utilized in animals with trigeminal sensitization induced a antinociceptive effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio J Piovesan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose of the study was evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A in an experimental model of trigeminal neuralgia. Method Neuropathic pain was induced by surgical constriction of the infraorbital nerve in rats. A control group underwent a sham procedure consisting of surgical exposure of the nerve. Subgroups of each group received either BoNT/A or isotonic saline solution. The clinical response was assessed with the -20°C test. Animals that underwent nerve constriction developed sensitization; the sham group did not. Results The sensitization was reversed by BoNT/A treatment evident 24 hours following application. Pronociceptive effect was observed in the sham group following BoNT/A. Conclusion BoNT/A has an antinociceptive effect in sensitized animals and a pronociceptive effect in non-sensitized animals.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal schwannomas extending into both the middle and posterior cranial fossa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐启武; 车晓明; 胡杰; 杨伯捷

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trigeminal schwannomas (TSs) account for 0.1%-0.4% of all intracranial tumors and 1%-8% of intracranial schwannomas.1,2 Yoshida and Kawase3 classified TSs into 6 types according to their locations: M (TS involving the middle cranial fossa), P (TS involving the posterior cranial fossa), E (TS located at extracranial space), MP (TS involving both the middle and the posterior cranial fossa), ME (TS involving the middle cranial fossa and the extracranial space), and MPE (TS involving the the middle and the posterior cranial fossa and the extracranial space). Of these types, MP is the commonest, but is difficult to be totally removed. Between January 1984 and June 2003, we surgically treated 28 patients with TSs of type MP and obtained satisfactory results. To make a correct diagnosis of TS, to select appropriate surgical approach, and to improve surgical outcome of TS of type MP, we analysed the related clinical data and experiences.

  9. Cadmium effect on the structure of supra- and subpharyngeal ganglia and the neurosecretory processes in earthworm Dendrobaena veneta (Rosa)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siekierska, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Cadmium adversely affected ganglia of the earthworm Dendrobaena veneta. - Cadmium effects on the supra- and subpharyngeal ganglia, neurosecretion and RNA content in the neurosecretory cells were tested in earthworms Dendrobaena veneta exposed to 10 and 50 mg Cd kg -1 in soil after 20 days of the experiment. Accumulation of cadmium in the ganglia of nervous system was also measured using AAS method. Cadmium was accumulated in the nervous system. The accumulated amount was proportional to Cd soil concentration and the exposure time. A considerable fall in neurosecretion and RNA content in the neurosecretory cells and neurosecretion in the neuropile (the axons) of both tested ganglia was induced by 50 mg Cd kg -1 . It seemed that neurosecretion synthesis and its axonal transport could be suppressed. Cadmium caused degenerative changes as vacuolization of the neurosecretory cells and neuropile in both tested ganglia

  10. Effect of bradykinin antagonists on bradykinin-induced plasma extravasation, venoconstriction, prostaglandin E2 release, nociceptor stimulation and contraction of the iris sphincter muscle in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbacher, T.; Lembeck, F.

    1987-01-01

    1 The inhibition of the bradykinin-induced plasma extravasation by six bradykinin (Bk) antagonists was tested on rabbit skin. All of them showed inhibitory effects without an agonistic action in the does used. B4310 (Lys-Lys-3-Hyp-5,8-Thi-7-DPhe-Bk) was the most active antagonist and was therefore used in the subsequent experiments. 2 B4310 (5-500 nM) antagonized the bradykinin-induced reduction of the venous outflow from the rabbit isolated ear in dose-dependent manner without affecting the arterial vasoconstriction induced by angiotensin II. 3 The bradykinin-induced release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from the perfused rabbit ear was reduced by 63% when B4310 (800 nM) was infused before, during and after the bradykinin injection. 4 Bradykinin was injected into the ear artery of anaesthetized rabbits and the reflex hypotensive response was used as indicator of the nociception. The response was antagonized by a local infusion of B4310 (50 and 500 nM). The antagonism was dose-dependent and reversible. The parallel shift of the dose-response curve to bradykinin suggests a competitive inhibition. However, B4310 did not antagonize acetylcholine-induced nociceptor stimulation. 5 B4310 inhibited bradykinin-induced stimulation of the trigeminal nerve which results in a substance P-mediated contraction of the iris sphincter muscle. A pA2 of 7.59 was calculated. B4310 did not inhibit capsaicin-induced contractions. 6 It is concluded that B4310 inhibits specifically five different actions of bradykinin which are related to its possible pathophysiological role. PMID:3479223

  11. International Conference on Immunogenetics of the Rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-09

    Md. 20205 We have recently described a method for the direct removal of T lymphocytes by " panning " of rabbit splenocytes on plastic dishes coated...Research University of Illinois Washington, DC 20012 Chicago, IL 60612 Hammadi Ayadi Linda Cook Institut Jacques Monod University of Illinois, Chicago...other species and tested for its ability to inhibit a rabbit Id-anti-Id reaction. Guinea pigs, mice, goats, and chickens were immunized with al IgG and

  12. INFECTIOUS MYXOMATOSIS (SANARELLI) IN PREGNANT RABBITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprunt, Douglas H.

    1932-01-01

    Pregnancy in rabbits alters the reactivity of the tissues to the virus of infectious myxomatosis. The livers of pregnant animals with the myxoma have a central acidophilic necrosis. Secondary lesions in the lungs are much more numerous and larger in the pregnant than in the non-gravid animals. In like manner the lesions in the spleen are more extensive in the pregnant rabbit. On the other hand the skin lesions of the pregnant animal are decreased in size. PMID:19870088

  13. Gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia. Analysis of a multi institutional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, Masami; Ozaki, Yoshimaru; Satou, Kenichi; Oikawa, Mitsuteru; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Fukuoka, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    A multi-institutional study was conducted to evaluate the results of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Eleven hundred and thirty-five patients at 39 centers were analyzed. Three hundred and sixty-nine patients had undergone percutaneous nerve block and 173 patients had undergone microvascular decompression (MVD) prior to GKRS. GKRS was performed for 69.4% of patients targeted at the nerve root entry zone (REZ) and for 20.4% of patients targeted at the retrogasserian region (RGR). The target dose of the GKRS used in the current study varied from 70 to 90 Gy (mean: 77.8 Gy). The median follow-up period after GKRS was 21.1 months (range 1 to 125 months). Six hundred and eighty-nine patients (66%) responded with excellent or good control (pain free), 157 (15%) obtained fair control (more than 50% relief), and 192 (19%) experienced treatment failure. After 3 years, 64% of cases were pain free and 80% had more than 50% pain relief. After 4 years, 37 patients underwent additional GKRS, 36 MVD and 36 percutaneous nerve block. Tolerable hypoesthesia or paresthesia occurred in 129 patients (11%), whereas bothersome symptoms developed in 8 patients (1%). But no patient developed deafferentation pain. Nine patients (1%) complained of dry eye, but no other abnormalities of the cornea and conjunctiva were found on ophthalmological examination. Higher maximum radiosurgical dose was associated with a significantly greater factor of complete pain relief (p=0.0101). GKRS is a safe and effective alternative treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, and is a minimally invasive treatment. In addition it provided benefit to a patient population unwilling or unable to undergo more invasive surgical approaches. (author)

  14. Trigeminal Nerve Stimulation for Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian A; Abrams, Michelle; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2016-04-01

    External stimulation of the trigeminal nerve (eTNS) is an emerging neuromodulation therapy for epilepsy and depression. Preliminary studies suggest it has an excellent safety profile and is associated with significant improvements in seizures and mood. Neuroanatomical projections of the trigeminal system suggest eTNS may alter activity in structures regulating mood, anxiety, and sleep. In this proof-of-concept trial, the effects of eTNS were evaluated in adults with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comorbid unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for these commonly co-occurring conditions. Twelve adults with PTSD and MDD were studied in an eight-week open outpatient trial (age 52.8 [13.7 sd], 8F:4M). Stimulation was applied to the supraorbital and supratrochlear nerves for eight hours each night as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy. Changes in symptoms were monitored using the PTSD Patient Checklist (PCL), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS-17), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-C), and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (Q-LES-Q). Over the eight weeks, eTNS treatment was associated with significant decreases in PCL (p = 0.003; median decrease of 15 points; effect size d 1.5), HDRS-17 (p depression severity were achieved in the eight weeks of acute eTNS treatment. This novel approach to wearable brain stimulation may have use as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy in these disorders if efficacy and tolerability are confirmed with additional studies. © 2016 International Neuromodulation Society.

  15. Central syntropic effects elicited by trigeminal proprioceptive equilibrium in Alzheimer’s disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Cicco Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The presented patient, affected by Alzheimer’s disease, underwent neuropsychological evaluation and functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation under occlusal proprioceptive un-balance and re-balance conditions. Saccadic and pupillometric video-oculographic examinations were performed in order to detect connected trigeminal proprioceptive motor patterns able to interfere with reticular formation cerebellum functions linked to visual and procedural processes prematurely altered in Alzheimer’s disease. Case presentation A 66-year-old Caucasian man, affected by Alzheimer’s disease and with a neuropsychological evaluation issued by the Alzheimer’s Evaluation Unit, underwent an electromyographic investigation of the masseter muscles in order to assess their functional balance. The patient showed a bilateral lack of all inferior molars. The extreme myoelectric asymmetry in dental occlusion suggested the rebalancing of masseter muscular functions through concurrent transcutaneous stimulation of the trigeminal nerve supramandibular and submandibular motor branches. The above-mentioned method allows detection of symmetric craniomandibular muscular relation that can be kept constant through the use of a cusp bite modeled on the inferior dental arch, called orthotic-syntropic bite. A few days later, the patient underwent a new neuropsychological investigation, together with a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, and saccadic, pupillometric video-oculographic examinations in occlusal un-balance and re-balance conditions. Conclusions Comparative data analysis has shown that a re-balanced occlusal condition can improve a patient’s cognitive-attentive functions. Moreover, the saccadic and pupillometric video-oculographic investigations have proven useful both in analyzing reticulo-cerebellar subcortical systems, prematurely altered in Alzheimer’s disease, and in implementing neurological evaluations.

  16. Neurochemical dynamics of acute orofacial pain in the human trigeminal brainstem nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Hock, Andreas; Wyss, Michael; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2017-11-15

    The trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex is the first central relay structure mediating orofacial somatosensory and nociceptive perception. Animal studies suggest a substantial involvement of neurochemical alterations at such basal CNS levels in acute and chronic pain processing. Translating this animal based knowledge to humans is challenging. Human related examining of brainstem functions are challenged by MR related peculiarities as well as applicability aspects of experimentally standardized paradigms. Based on our experience with an MR compatible human orofacial pain model, the aims of the present study were twofold: 1) from a technical perspective, the evaluation of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 T regarding measurement accuracy of neurochemical profiles in this small brainstem nuclear complex and 2) the examination of possible neurochemical alterations induced by an experimental orofacial pain model. Data from 13 healthy volunteers aged 19-46 years were analyzed and revealed high quality spectra with significant reductions in total N-acetylaspartate (N-acetylaspartate + N-acetylaspartylglutamate) (-3.7%, p = 0.009) and GABA (-10.88%, p = 0.041) during the pain condition. These results might reflect contributions of N-acetylaspartate and N-acetylaspartylglutamate in neuronal activity-dependent physiologic processes and/or excitatory neurotransmission, whereas changes in GABA might indicate towards a reduction in tonic GABAergic functioning during nociceptive signaling. Summarized, the present study indicates the applicability of 1 H-MRS to obtain neurochemical dynamics within the human trigeminal brainstem sensory nuclear complex. Further developments are needed to pave the way towards bridging important animal based knowledge with human research to understand the neurochemistry of orofacial nociception and pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Usefulness of a Virtual Reality Percutaneous Trigeminal Rhizotomy Simulator in Neurosurgical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakur, Sophia F; Luciano, Cristian J; Kania, Patrick; Roitberg, Ben Z; Banerjee, P Pat; Slavin, Konstantin V; Sorenson, Jeffrey; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2015-09-01

    Simulation-based training may be incorporated into neurosurgery in the future. To assess the usefulness of a novel haptics-based virtual reality percutaneous trigeminal rhizotomy simulator. A real-time augmented reality simulator for percutaneous trigeminal rhizotomy was developed using the ImmersiveTouch platform. Ninety-two neurosurgery residents tested the simulator at American Association of Neurological Surgeons Top Gun 2014. Postgraduate year (PGY), number of fluoroscopy shots, the distance from the ideal entry point, and the distance from the ideal target were recorded by the system during each simulation session. Final performance score was calculated considering the number of fluoroscopy shots and distances from entry and target points (a lower score is better). The impact of PGY level on residents' performance was analyzed. Seventy-one residents provided their PGY-level and simulator performance data; 38% were senior residents and 62% were junior residents. The mean distance from the entry point (9.4 mm vs 12.6 mm, P = .01), the distance from the target (12.0 mm vs 15.2 mm, P = .16), and final score (31.1 vs 37.7, P = .02) were lower in senior than in junior residents. The mean number of fluoroscopy shots (9.8 vs 10.0, P = .88) was similar in these 2 groups. Linear regression analysis showed that increasing PGY level is significantly associated with a decreased distance from the ideal entry point (P = .001), a shorter distance from target (P = .05), a better final score (P = .007), but not number of fluoroscopy shots (P = .52). Because technical performance of percutaneous rhizotomy increases with training, we proposed that the skills in performing the procedure in our virtual reality model would also increase with PGY level, if our simulator models the actual procedure. Our results confirm this hypothesis and demonstrate construct validity.

  18. Sensitization of trigeminal brainstem pathways in a model for tear deficient dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mostafeezur; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Katagiri, Ayano; Bereiter, David A

    2015-05-01

    Chronic dry eye disease (DE) is associated with an unstable tear film and symptoms of ocular discomfort. The characteristics of symptoms suggest a key role for central neural processing; however, little is known about central neuroplasticity and DE. We used a model for tear deficient DE and assessed effects on eye blink behavior, orbicularis oculi muscle activity (OOemg), and trigeminal brainstem neural activity in male rats. Ocular-responsive neurons were recorded at the interpolaris/caudalis transition (Vi/Vc) and Vc/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) regions under isoflurane, whereas OOemg activity was recorded under urethane. Spontaneous tear volume was reduced by ∼50% at 14 days after exorbital gland removal. Hypertonic saline-evoked eye blink behavior in awake rats was enhanced throughout the 14 days after surgery. Saline-evoked neural activity at the Vi/Vc transition and in superficial and deep laminae at the Vc/C1 region was greatly enhanced in DE rats. Neurons from DE rats classified as wide dynamic range displayed enlarged convergent periorbital receptive fields consistent with central sensitization. Saline-evoked OOemg activity was markedly enhanced in DE rats compared with controls. Synaptic blockade at the Vi/Vc transition or the Vc/C1 region greatly reduced hypertonic saline-evoked OOemg activity in DE and sham rats. These results indicated that persistent tear deficiency caused sensitization of ocular-responsive neurons at multiple regions of the caudal trigeminal brainstem and enhanced OOemg activity. Central sensitization of ocular-related brainstem circuits is a significant factor in DE and likely contributes to the apparent weak correlation between peripheral signs of tear dysfunction and symptoms of irritation.

  19. Neuronavigator-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation in the treatment of intractable trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu-jun; Zhang, Wen-hua; Chen, Teng; Wu, Cheng-yuan; Zhou, Mao-de

    2006-09-20

    Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the trigeminal ganglion (PRTTG) is regarded as the first choice for most patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) because of its safety and feasibility. However, neuronavigator-guided PRTTG has been seldom reported. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of neuronavigator-guided PRTTG for the treatment of intractable TN. Between January 2000 and December 2004, 54 patients with intractable TN were enrolled into this study and were randomly divided into two groups. The patients in navigation group (n = 26) underwent PRTTG with frameless neuronavigation, and those in control group (n = 28) received PRTTG without neuronavigation. Three months after the operation, the efficacy, side effects, and complications of the surgery were recorded. The patients in the control group were followed up for 10 to 54 months (mean, 34 +/- 5), and those in the navigation group were followed up for 13 to 58 months (mean, 36 +/- 7). Kaplan-Meier analyses of the pain-free survival curves were used for the censored survival data, and the log-rank test was used to compare survival curves of the two groups. The immediate complete pain-relief rate of the navigation group was 100%, whereas it was 95% in the control. The proportion of sustained pain-relief rates at 12, 24 and 36 months after the procedure were 85%, 77%, and 62% in the navigation group, and 54%, 40%, and 35% in the control. Recurrences in the control group were more common than that in the navigation group. Annual recurrence rate in the first and second years were 15% and 23% in the navigation group, and 46%, 60% in the control group. No side-effect and complication was noted in the navigation group except minimal facial hypesthesia. Neuronavigator-guided PRTTG is a safe and promising method for treatment of intractable TN with better short- and long-term outcomes and lower complication rate than PRTTG without neuronavigation.

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal pain secondary to recurrent malignant skull base tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Jack; Pollard, Courtney; Brown, Paul D; Guha-Thakurta, Nandita; Garden, Adam S; Rosenthal, David I; Fuller, Clifton D; Frank, Steven J; Gunn, G Brandon; Morrison, William H; Ho, Jennifer C; Li, Jing; Ghia, Amol J; Yang, James N; Luo, Dershan; Wang, He C; Su, Shirley Y; Raza, Shaan M; Gidley, Paul W; Hanna, Ehab Y; DeMonte, Franco

    2018-04-27

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to assess outcomes after Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) re-irradiation for palliation of patients with trigeminal pain secondary to recurrent malignant skull base tumors. METHODS From 2009 to 2016, 26 patients who had previously undergone radiation treatment to the head and neck received GKRS for palliation of trigeminal neuropathic pain secondary to recurrence of malignant skull base tumors. Twenty-two patients received single-fraction GKRS to a median dose of 17 Gy (range 15-20 Gy) prescribed to the 50% isodose line (range 43%-55%). Four patients received fractionated Gamma Knife Extend therapy to a median dose of 24 Gy in 3 fractions (range 21-27 Gy) prescribed to the 50% isodose line (range 45%-50%). Those with at least a 3-month follow-up were assessed for symptom palliation. Self-reported pain was evaluated by the numeric rating scale (NRS) and MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Head and Neck (MDASI-HN) pain score. Frequency of as-needed (PRN) analgesic use and opioid requirement were also assessed. Baseline opioid dose was reported as a fentanyl-equivalent dose (FED) and PRN for breakthrough pain use as oral morphine-equivalent dose (OMED). The chi-square and Student t-tests were used to determine differences before and after GKRS. RESULTS Seven patients (29%) were excluded due to local disease progression. Two experienced progression at the first follow-up, and 5 had local recurrence from disease outside the GKRS volume. Nineteen patients were assessed for symptom palliation with a median follow-up duration of 10.4 months (range 3.0-34.4 months). At 3 months after GKRS, the NRS scores (n = 19) decreased from 4.65 ± 3.45 to 1.47 ± 2.11 (p control.

  1. Altered regional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity in idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Yanping Wang,1,2 Xiaoling Zhang,2 Qiaobing Guan,2 Lihong Wan,2 Yahui Yi,2 Chun-Feng Liu1 1Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, 2Department of Neurology, The Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The pathophysiology of idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia (ITN has conventionally been thought to be induced by neurovascular compression theory. Recent structural brain imaging evidence has suggested an additional central component for ITN pathophysiology. However, far less attention has been given to investigations of the basis of abnormal resting-state brain activity in these patients. The objective of this study was to investigate local brain activity in patients with ITN and its correlation with clinical variables of pain. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 17 patients with ITN and 19 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were analyzed using regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis, which is a data-driven approach used to measure the regional synchronization of spontaneous brain activity. Patients with ITN had decreased ReHo in the left amygdala, right parahippocampal gyrus, and left cerebellum and increased ReHo in the right inferior temporal gyrus, right thalamus, right inferior parietal lobule, and left postcentral gyrus (corrected. Furthermore, the increase in ReHo in the left precentral gyrus was positively correlated with visual analog scale (r=0.54; P=0.002. Our study found abnormal functional homogeneity of intrinsic brain activity in several regions in ITN, suggesting the maladaptivity of the process of daily pain attacks and a central role for the pathophysiology of ITN. Keywords: trigeminal neuralgia, resting fMRI, brain, chronic pain, local connectivity

  2. Outcome of radiosurgery treatment with a linear accelerator in patients with trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero Tous, N; Cruz Sabido, J de la; Román Cutillas, A M; Saura Rojas, E J; Jorques Infante, A M; Olivares Granados, G

    2017-04-01

    An overview of the effectiveness of radiosurgery in patients diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia with an analysis of potential predictors of good outcome. All patients treated with linear accelerator radiosurgery between 2004 and 2011 were analysed. A dose of 60Gy dose was administered 1 to 2mm from the root entry zone with a maximum isodose of 20% delivered to the brainstem. Clinical results for pain control and any side effects were analysed at 12 and 36 months (BNI score). The study included 71 patients (mean follow-up 50.5 months). Pain improvement at 12 months was observed in 68.11% of the total (28.98% with BNI score i-ii; 39.12% with BNI score iii) and at 36 months in 58.21% (23.88% BNI score i-ii; 34.32% BNI score iii). Average recovery time was 3.69 months and the relapse rate was 44.68%. Patients with typical pain displayed statistically significant differences in improvement rates at 12 and at 36 months (P<047 and P<.002). Onset of improvement was analysed using Kaplan-Meyer plots. Statistically significant differences were observed between patients with typical and atypical pain at 36 months (P<.012) in Kaplan-Meyer plots. Side effects were recorded in 15 patients (20.89%), including 9 cases of facial numbness (13.43%); only 2 cases were clinically relevant (2.98%). According to our results, radiosurgery is an effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, with few side effects. Typical pain seems to be a good predictor of pain relief. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. A case of trigeminal hypersensitivity after administration of intrathecal sufentanil and bupivacaine for labor analgesia

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    Adriano Bechara de Souza Hobaika

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rostral spread of intrathecal drugs and sensitization of supraspinal sites may provoke several adverse effects. This case describes a patient with right hemifacial paresthesia, trismus and dysphasia on the trigeminal nerve distribution after intrathecal sufentanil administration. Primigravida, 34 years, 39 weeks of pregnancy, with hypothyroidism and pregnancy induced hypertension. Allergic to latex. In the use of puran T4, 50 μg /day. When the patient presented cervical dilatation of 4 cm, she requested analgesia. She was placed in the sitting position and a spinal puncture was performed with a 27G needle pencil point in L4/L5 (1.5 mg of bupivacaine plus 7.5 μg of sufentanil. Next, was performed an epidural puncture in the same space. It was injected bupivacaine 0.065%, 10 ml, to facilitate the passage of the catheter. After 5 min lying down in the lateral upright position, she complained of perioral and right hemifacial paresthesia, mainly maxillary and periorbital, as well as trismus and difficulty to speak. The symptoms lasted for 30 min and resolved spontaneously. After 1 h, patient requested supplementary analgesia (12 ml of bupivacaine 0.125% and a healthy baby girl was born. Temporary mental alterations have been described with the use of fentanyl and sufentanil in combined epidural-spinal analgesia, such as aphasia, difficulty of swallowing, mental confusion and even unconsciousness. In this patient, facial areas with paresthesia indicated by patient appear in clear association with the ophthalmic and maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve and the occurrence of trismus and dysphagia are in association with the mandibular motor branch. The exact mechanism of rostral spread is not known, but it is speculated that after spinal drug administration, a subsequent epidural dose may reduce the intratecal space and propel the drug into the supraspinal sites.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaseki, Yoshishige; Horikoshi, Tohru; Omata, Tomohiro; Sugita, Masao; Nukui, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Hajime; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Hideo; Tsuji, Reizou.

    1991-01-01

    We show how neurosurgical planning can benefit from the better visualization of the precise vascular compression of the nerve provided by the oblique-sagittal and gradient-echo method (OS-GR image) using magnetic resonance images (MRI). The scans of 3 patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and of 15 with hemifacial spasm (HFS) were analyzed for the presence and appearance of the vascular compression of the nerves. Imaging sequences consisted of an OS-GR image (TR/TE: 200/20, 3-mm-thick slice) cut along each nerve shown by the axial view, which was scanned at the angle of 105 degrees taken between the dorsal line of the brain stem and the line corresponding to the pontomedullary junction. In the OS-GR images of the TN's, the vascular compressions of the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve were well visualized as high-intensity lines in the 2 cases whose vessels were confirmed intraoperatively. In the other case, with atypical facial pain, vascular compression was confirmed at the rostral distal site on the fifth nerve, apart from the REZ. In the 15 cases of HFS, twelve OS-GR images (80%) demonstrated vascular compressions at the REZ of the facial nerves from the direction of the caudoventral side. During the surgery for these 12 cases, in 11 cases (excepting the 1 case whose facial nerve was not compressed by any vessels), vascular compressions were confirmed corresponding to the findings of the OS-GR images. Among the 10 OS-GR images on the non-affected side, two false-positive findings were visualized. It is concluded that OS-GR images obtained by means of MRI may serve as a useful planning aid prior to microvascular decompression for cases of TN and HFS. (author)

  5. Microvascularization in trigeminal ganglion of the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongstaponkit, S; Pradidarcheep, W; Toutip, S; Chunhabundit, P; Somana, R

    1997-01-01

    Since there is only a limited number of studies of the blood supply to the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in mammalian species, the TG from 16 common tree shrews (Tupaia glis) were investigated by light microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the corrosion cast technique in conjunction with scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that the TG contained clusters of neurons in the peripheral region whereas the bundles of nerve fibers were located more centrally. Each ganglionic neuron had a concentric nucleus and was ensheathed by satellite cells. It was noted that blood vessels of a continuous type were predominantly found in the area where the neurons were densely located and were much less frequently observed in the area occupied by nerve fibers. With TEM, the TG was shown to be mainly associated with large neurons containing big nuclei and prominent nucleoli. The blood supply of the TG is derived from the most rostral branch of the pontine artery, from the stapedial artery or sometimes from the supraorbital artery, and from the accessory meningeal artery which is a branch of the maxillary artery passing through the foramen ovale. These arteries give off branches and become capillary networks in the ganglion before draining blood to the peripheral region. The veins at the medial border drained into the cavernous sinus directly or through the inferior hypophyseal vein, while those at the lateral side of the ganglion carried the blood into the pterygoid plexus via an accessory meningeal vein. The veins along the trigeminal nerve root joined the posterior part of the cavernous sinus. These studies establish a unique anatomical distribution of the TG blood supply in the tree shrew and the utility of the cast/SEM technique in discerning detailed features of the blood supply in the nervous system.

  6. Light colour preference of growing rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Szendrő

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the experiment was to evaluate the light colour preference of growing rabbits placed in a free-choice cage. The experiment was carried out on 128 Pannon White growing rabbits weaned at the age of 5 weeks and placed into blocks (2m2 of four cages. The rabbits could move freely among the four cages (0.5m2 each through swing doors. The cages differed only in the colour of the light applied (white, yellow, green or blue. The lighting schedule was 16L: 8D. From 6 until 10 weeks of age, infrared video recording was performed once a week (24 hours. The number of rabbits in each cage was counted every 15 minutes. Feed consumption was measured weekly. Between 6 and 10 weeks of age the rabbits significantly preferred white light (28.0%. The preference order was the following: yellow (26.3%, blue (23.4% and green (22.3% (P<0.001. No significant differences were recorded in the feed consumption among the cages. In conclusion, the cage preference of the rabbits was slightly affected by the light colour.

  7. Activity of the basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease estimated by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohye, Chihiro

    1995-01-01

    Positron emission tomographic (PET) studies on the local cerebral blood flow, oxygen metabolic rate, glucose metabolic rate in the basal ganglia of Parkinson's disease are reviewed. PET has demonstrated that blood flow was decreased in the cerebral cortex, especially the frontal region, of Parkinson's disease and that specific change in blood flow or metabolic rate in the basal ganglia was detected only in patients with hemi-parkinsonism. In authors' study on PET using 18 FDG in patients with tremor type and rigid type Parkinson's disease, changes in blood flow and metabolic rate were minimal at the basal ganglia level in tremor type patients, but cortical blood flow was decreased and metabolic rate was more elevated in the basal ganglia in rigid type patients. These findings were correlated with depth micro-recordings obtained by stereotactic pallidotomy. PET studies have also revealed that activity in the nerve terminal was decreased with decreasing dopamine and that dopamine (mainly D 2 ) activity was remarkably increased. PET studies with specific tracers are promising in providing more accurate information about functional state of living human brain with minimal invasion to patients. (N.K.)

  8. The Role of the Basal Ganglia in Implicit Contextual Learning: A Study of Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asselen, Marieke; Almeida, Ines; Andre, Rui; Januario, Cristina; Goncalves, Antonio Freire; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Implicit contextual learning refers to the ability to memorize contextual information from our environment. This contextual information can then be used to guide our attention to a specific location. Although the medial temporal lobe is important for this type of learning, the basal ganglia might also be involved considering its role in many…

  9. Intramuscular ganglia arising from the superior tibiofibular joint: CT and MR evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, S.; Abdelwahab, I.F.; Kenan, S.; Zwass, A.; Ricci, G.; Palomba, G.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of intramuscular ganglia (IMG) that arise from the superior tibiofibular joint (STFJ). Our series consisted of three men and three women. Four patients were studied by MRI, one by CT only, and two by both modalities. Contrast was used in one of the two patients studied by CT. MRI was obtained in at least two orthogonal planes to demonstrate the relation of the ganglia to STFJ. The MR and CT appearance of these ganglia was basically that of a well-defined soft tissue mass with low attenuation on CT images consistent with the presence of fluid. On MR studies, they had an isointense signal on T1-weighted images and a homogenous high-intensity signal on T2-weighted images. MRI demonstrated the attachment of these ganglia to the STFJ. CT and MRI were effective, noninvasive modalities in the evaluation of IMG. The imaging features on both modalities were consistent with the presence of fluid-containing lesions that had close proximity and were attached to the STFJ. The combination of location and the fluid consistency of these lesions facilitated the diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Basal ganglia structure in Tourette's disorder and/or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forde, N.J.; Zwiers, M.P.; Naaijen, J.; Akkermans, S.E.A.; Openneer, T.J.; Visscher, F.; Dietrich, A.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Hoekstra, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tourette's disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder often co-occur and have both been associated with structural variation of the basal ganglia. However, findings are inconsistent and comorbidity is often neglected. METHODS: T1-weighted magnetic resonance images from

  11. The inhibitory microcircuit of the substantia nigra provides feedback gain control of the basal ganglia output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jennifer; Pan, Wei-Xing; Dudman, Joshua Tate

    2014-05-21

    Dysfunction of the basal ganglia produces severe deficits in the timing, initiation, and vigor of movement. These diverse impairments suggest a control system gone awry. In engineered systems, feedback is critical for control. By contrast, models of the basal ganglia highlight feedforward circuitry and ignore intrinsic feedback circuits. In this study, we show that feedback via axon collaterals of substantia nigra projection neurons control the gain of the basal ganglia output. Through a combination of physiology, optogenetics, anatomy, and circuit mapping, we elaborate a general circuit mechanism for gain control in a microcircuit lacking interneurons. Our data suggest that diverse tonic firing rates, weak unitary connections and a spatially diffuse collateral circuit with distinct topography and kinetics from feedforward input is sufficient to implement divisive feedback inhibition. The importance of feedback for engineered systems implies that the intranigral microcircuit, despite its absence from canonical models, could be essential to basal ganglia function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02397.001. Copyright © 2014, Brown et al.

  12. Alterations in Neuronal Activity in Basal Ganglia-Thalamocortical Circuits in the Parkinsonian State

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    Adriana eGalvan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials, electroencephalograms or electrocorticograms. Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation therapy.

  13. Alterations in neuronal activity in basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuits in the parkinsonian state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Adriana; Devergnas, Annaelle; Wichmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In patients with Parkinson’s disease and in animal models of this disorder, neurons in the basal ganglia and related regions in thalamus and cortex show changes that can be recorded by using electrophysiologic single-cell recording techniques, including altered firing rates and patterns, pathologic oscillatory activity and increased inter-neuronal synchronization. In addition, changes in synaptic potentials or in the joint spiking activities of populations of neurons can be monitored as alterations in local field potentials (LFPs), electroencephalograms (EEGs) or electrocorticograms (ECoGs). Most of the mentioned electrophysiologic changes are probably related to the degeneration of diencephalic dopaminergic neurons, leading to dopamine loss in the striatum and other basal ganglia nuclei, although degeneration of non-dopaminergic cell groups may also have a role. The altered electrical activity of the basal ganglia and associated nuclei may contribute to some of the motor signs of the disease. We here review the current knowledge of the electrophysiologic changes at the single cell level, the level of local populations of neural elements, and the level of the entire basal ganglia-thalamocortical network in parkinsonism, and discuss the possible use of this information to optimize treatment approaches to Parkinson’s disease, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. PMID:25698937

  14. Ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of the basal ganglia and related structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, B.R.; Temel, Y.; Roebroeck, A.; Uludag, K.; Ivanov, D.; Kuijf, M.L.; ter Haar Romeny, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a treatment for Parkinson's disease and other related disorders, involving the surgical placement of electrodes in the deeply situated basal ganglia or thalamic structures. Good clinical outcome requires accurate targeting. However, due to limited visibility of the target

  15. The Differential Effects of Thalamus and Basal Ganglia on Facial Emotion Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Crystal C. Y.; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Yip, James T. H.; King, Kristin E.; Li, Leonard S. W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined if subcortical stroke was associated with impaired facial emotion recognition. Furthermore, the lateralization of the impairment and the differential profiles of facial emotion recognition deficits with localized thalamic or basal ganglia damage were also studied. Thirty-eight patients with subcortical strokes and 19 matched…

  16. Acute movement disorder with bilateral basal ganglia lesions in diabetic uremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusidheshwar M Wali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute movement disorder associated with symmetrical basal ganglia lesions occurring in the background of diabetic end stage renal disease is a recently described condition. It has distinct clinico-radiological features and is commonly described in Asian patients. We report the first Indian case report of this potentially reversible condition and discuss its various clinico-radiological aspects.

  17. Effects of Focal Basal Ganglia Lesions on Timing and Force Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, P.; Diedrichsen, J.; Ivry, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of basal ganglia dysfunction in humans have generally involved patients with degenerative disorders, notably Parkinson's disease. In many instances, the performance of these patients is compared to that of patients with focal lesions of other brain structures such as the cerebellum. In the present report, we studied the performance of…

  18. The role of inhibition in generating and controlling Parkinson's disease oscillations in the basal ganglia

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    Arvind eKumar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Movement disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD are commonly associated with slow oscillations and increased synchrony of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia. The neural mechanisms underlying this dynamic network dysfunction, however, are only poorly understood. Here, we show that the strength of inhibitory inputs from striatum to globus pallidus external (GPe is a key parameter controlling oscillations in the basal ganglia. Specifically, the increase in striatal activity observed in PD is sufficient to unleash the oscillations in the basal ganglia. This finding allows us to propose a unified explanation for different phenomena: absence of oscillation in the healthy state of the basal ganglia, oscillations in dopamine-depleted state and quenching of oscillations under deep brain stimulation (DBS. These novel insights help us to better understand and optimize the function of DBS protocols. Furthermore, studying the model behaviour under transient increase of activity of the striatal neurons projecting to the indirect pathway, we are able to account for both motor impairment in PD patients and for reduced response inhibition in DBS implanted patients.

  19. Motor phenotype and magnetic resonance measures of basal ganglia iron levels in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzeck, Nico; Singh-Curry, Victoria; Eckart, Cindy; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Perry, Richard J; Bain, Peter G; Düzel, Emrah; Husain, Masud

    2013-12-01

    In Parkinson's disease the degree of motor impairment can be classified with respect to tremor dominant and akinetic rigid features. While tremor dominance and akinetic rigidity might represent two ends of a continuum rather than discrete entities, it would be important to have non-invasive markers of any biological differences between them in vivo, to assess disease trajectories and response to treatment, as well as providing insights into the underlying mechanisms contributing to heterogeneity within the Parkinson's disease population. Here, we used magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether Parkinson's disease patients exhibit structural changes within the basal ganglia that might relate to motor phenotype. Specifically, we examined volumes of basal ganglia regions, as well as transverse relaxation rate (a putative marker of iron load) and magnetization transfer saturation (considered to index structural integrity) within these regions in 40 individuals. We found decreased volume and reduced magnetization transfer within the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between tremulous motor phenotype and transverse relaxation rate (reflecting iron load) within the putamen, caudate and thalamus. Our findings suggest that akinetic rigid and tremor dominant symptoms of Parkinson's disease might be differentiated on the basis of the transverse relaxation rate within specific basal ganglia structures. Moreover, they suggest that iron load within the basal ganglia makes an important contribution to motor phenotype, a key prognostic indicator of disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Interaction of synchronized dynamics in cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Zauber, S Elizabeth; Worth, Robert M; Witt, Thomas; Rubchinsky, Leonid L

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease pathophysiology is marked by increased oscillatory and synchronous activity in the beta frequency band in cortical and basal ganglia circuits. This study explores the functional connections between synchronized dynamics of cortical areas and synchronized dynamics of subcortical areas in Parkinson's disease. We simultaneously recorded neuronal units (spikes) and local field potentials (LFP) from subthalamic nucleus (STN) and electroencephalograms (EEGs) from the scalp in parkinsonian patients, and analysed the correlation between the time courses of the spike-LFP synchronization and inter-electrode EEG synchronization. We found the (non-invasively obtained) time course of the synchrony strength between EEG electrodes and the (invasively obtained) time course of the synchrony between spiking units and LFP in STN to be weakly, but significantly, correlated with each other. This correlation is largest for the bilateral motor EEG synchronization, followed by bilateral frontal EEG synchronization. Our observations suggest that there may be multiple functional modes by which the cortical and basal ganglia circuits interact with each other in Parkinson's disease: not only may synchronization be observed between some areas in cortex and the basal ganglia, but also synchronization within cortex and within basal ganglia may be related, suggesting potentially a more global functional interaction. More coherent dynamics in one brain region may modulate or activate the dynamics of another brain region in a more powerful way, causing correlations between changes in synchrony strength in the two regions. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. MRI volume measurement of basal ganglia volumes in patients with Tourette's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Jie; Li Kuncheng; Cao Yanxiang; Zhang Miao; Sui Xin; Zhang Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate MRI measurement of basal ganglia volumes in patients with Tourette's syndrome. Methods: Ten patients with Tourette's syndrome (TS) and 10 healthy volunteers were studied. Volumes of bilateral caudate, putamen and pallidum were measured, and the results were analyzed using paired t test. The basal ganglia volume was normalized according to individual brain volume. The basal ganglia volumes of TS patients were compared with normal control group using independent-sample t test. Results: In 10 healthy volunteers, volumes of the left caudate, putamen, pallidum were significantly larger compared with those of the right side (P 0.05) in TS patients. After normalized processing, the volumes of the left caudate (7.06 ± 0.48) cm 3 , putamen (8.81±1.01) cm 3 , pallidum (2.64± 0.38) cm 3 were smaller than those of control group [caudate (11.05±1.86) cm 3 , putamen (9.97± 1.11) cm 3 , pallidum (3.04±0.37) cm 3 ] (t=-6.577, -2.457, -2.376, P 3 in TS patients was significantly smaller compared with the control group (9.81±1.83) cm 3 (t=-4.258, P 0.05). Conclusion: The basal ganglia volumes were significantly decreased in patients with TS. MRI volumetric measurement was an important tool for evaluating pathologic changes of TS. (authors)

  2. Psychological Assessment of Patients With Biotin-Thiamine-Responsive Basal Ganglia Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadhel, Majid; Al-Bluwi, Amal

    2017-01-01

    Biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease is a devastating autosomal recessive inherited neurological disorder. We conducted a retrospective chart review of all patients with biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease who underwent a formal psychological assessment. Six females and 3 males were included. Five patients (56%) had an average IQ, two patients (22%) had mild delay, and two (22%) had severe delay. A normal outcome was directly related to the time of diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Early diagnosis and immediate commencement of treatment were associated with a favorable outcome and vice versa. The most affected domain was visual motor integration, while understanding and mathematical problem-solving were the least affected. In summary, this is the first study discussing the psychological assessment of patients with biotin-thiamine-responsive basal ganglia disease. The results of this study alert clinicians to consider prompt initiation of biotin and thiamine in any patient presenting with neuroregression and a basal ganglia lesion on a brain magnetic resonance imaging.

  3. Respiratory Responses to Stimulation of Branchial Vagus Nerve Ganglia of a Teleost Fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballintijn, C.M.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of electrical stimulation of epibranchial vagus ganglia upon respiration of the carp were investigated. Single shocks evoked fast twitch responses in a number of respiratory muscles with latencies around 18 msec to the beginning and 30-35 msec to the peak of activity. Shocks given during

  4. Ictal and peri-ictal oscillations in the human basal ganglia in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rektor, I.; Kuba, R.; Brázdil, M.; Halámek, Josef; Jurák, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2011), s. 512-517 ISSN 1525-5050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : basal ganglia * oscillations * epilepsy * ictal Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2011

  5. Hereditary haemochromatosis: a case of iron accumulation in the basal ganglia associated with a parkinsonian syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J.E.; Jensen, L. Neerup; Krabbe, K.

    1995-01-01

    . A patient is reported with hereditary haemochromatosis and a syndrome of dementia, dysarthria, a slowly progressive gait disturbance, imbalance, muscle weakness, rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor, ataxia, and dyssynergia. The findings on MRI of a large signal decrease in the basal ganglia, consistent...

  6. Homeobox gene expression in adult dorsal root ganglia: Is regeneration a recapitulation of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, C.F.

    2003-01-01

    Neurons of the peripheral nervous system are able to regenerate their peripheral axons after injury, leading to complete recovery of sensory and motor function. The sciatic nerve crush model is frequently used to study peripheral nerve regeneration. Sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs)

  7. MRI of enlarged dorsal ganglia, lumbar nerve roots, and cranial nerves in polyradiculoneuropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, M.; Mukherji, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the MRI findings in four patients with a clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic polyradiculoneuropathies. In two examination of the lumbar spine showed enlarged nerve roots and dorsal ganglia, and similar findings were present in the cervical spine in a third. The cisternal portions of the cranial nerves were enlarged in another patient. MRI allows identification of enlarged nerves in hypertrophic polyradiculopathies. (orig.)

  8. How may the basal ganglia contribute to auditory categorization and speech perception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Joo eLim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeners must accomplish two complementary perceptual feats in extracting a message from speech. They must discriminate linguistically-relevant acoustic variability and generalize across irrelevant variability. Said another way, they must categorize speech. Since the mapping of acoustic variability is language-specific, these categories must be learned from experience. Thus, understanding how, in general, the auditory system acquires and represents categories can inform us about the toolbox of mechanisms available to speech perception. This perspective invites consideration of findings from cognitive neuroscience literatures outside of the speech domain as a means of constraining models of speech perception. Although neurobiological models of speech perception have mainly focused on cerebral cortex, research outside the speech domain is consistent with the possibility of significant subcortical contributions in category learning. Here, we review the functional role of one such structure, the basal ganglia. We examine research from animal electrophysiology, human neuroimaging, and behavior to consider characteristics of basal ganglia processing that may be advantageous for speech category learning. We also present emerging evidence for a direct role for basal ganglia in learning auditory categories in a complex, naturalistic task intended to model the incidental manner in which speech categories are acquired. To conclude, we highlight new research questions that arise in incorporating the broader neuroscience research literature in modeling speech perception, and suggest how understanding contributions of the basal ganglia can inform attempts to optimize training protocols for learning non-native speech categories in adulthood.

  9. ERK-GluR1 phosphorylation in trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neurons is involved in pain associated with dry tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yuka; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Shinoda, Masamichi; Kubo, Asako; Chen, Jui Yen; Noma, Noboru; Batbold, Dulguun; Imamura, Yoshiki; Sessle, Barry J; Iwata, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Dry mouth is known to cause severe pain in the intraoral structures, and many dry mouth patients have been suffering from intraoral pain. In development of an appropriate treatment, it is crucial to study the mechanisms underlying intraoral pain associated with dry mouth, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying pain related to dry mouth, the dry-tongue rat model was developed. Hence, the mechanical or heat nocifensive reflex, the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phosphorylated GluR1-IR immunohistochemistries, and the single neuronal activity were examined in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold to mechanical, but not heat, stimulation of the tongue was significantly decreased on day 7 after tongue drying. The mechanical, but not heat, responses of trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis nociceptive neurons were significantly enhanced in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells was also significantly increased in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis following noxious stimulation of the tongue in dry-tongue rats compared to sham rats on day 7. The decrement of the mechanical head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWT) was reversed during intracisternal administration of the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 inhibitor, PD98059. The trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis neuronal activities and the number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-immunoreactive cells following noxious mechanical stimulation of dried tongue were also significantly decreased following intracisternal administration of PD98059 compared to vehicle-administrated rats. Increased number of the phosphorylated GluR1-IR cells was observed in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis of dry-tongue rats, and the number of phosphorylated GluR1-IR cells

  10. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous ozone injection of the Gasserian ganglion for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An JX

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jian-Xiong An,1,2 Hui Liu,1 Ruo-Wen Chen,1,2 Yong Wang,1 Wen-Xing Zhao,1 Derek Eastwood,3 John P Williams4 1Department of Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine & Critical Care Medicine, Aviation General Hospital of China Medical University & Beijing Institute of Translational Medicine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Weifang Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pain Services, Wirral University Teaching Hospital, Wirral, Merseyside, UK; 4Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of computed tomography (CT-guided percutaneous ozone injection for refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Design: A retrospective evaluation was performed in the study. Setting: The study was conducted at a university hospital pain center. Patients and methods: A total of 29 patients with a clinical diagnosis of refractory trigeminal neuralgia were enrolled. All patients were treated with a percutaneous ozone injection and one patient was excluded. There were 21 patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (group A and seven patients with painful trigeminal neuropathy caused by post-herpetic neuralgia (group B. The percutaneous injection was an oxygen–ozone mixture at an ozone concentration of 30 mg/­mL into the Gasserian ganglion performed under CT guidance. The number of ­procedures performed varied from one to as many as 16. Outcomes were evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS pain scores. Results: The combined VAS scores were 7.11 ± 1.23 pretreatment, 2.86 ± 1.69 posttreatment (P < 0.05 and 3.25 ± 2.01 after 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05. In group A, the VAS scores were 7.10 ± 1.04 pretreatment and 2.90 ± 1.84 posttreatment (P < 0.05. In group B, the VAS scores were 7.14 ± 1.77 pretreatment and 2.71 ± 1.25 posttreatment (P < 0.05. After 6-months follow-up, the VAS score was 3.38

  11. Assessment of neurovascular compression in patients with trigeminal neuralgia with a boundary fusion three-dimensional magnetic resonance cisternogram/angiogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Toru; Omi, Megumi; Ohsako, Chika; Onoda, Keisuke; Date, Isao

    2007-01-01

    Precise assessment of the complex nerve-vessel relationship at the root entry zone (REZ) of the trigeminal nerve is useful for the planning of the microvascular decompression (MVD) in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. We have applied a boundary imaging of fusion three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) cisternogram/angiogram. The boundary imaging allows virtual assessment of the spatial relationship of the neurovascular compression at the REZ of the trigeminal nerve. The boundary images depicted complex anatomical relationship of the offending vessels to the trigeminal nerve REZ. The presence of offending vessels, compressive site, and degree of neurovascular compression were assessed from various viewpoints in the cistern and virtually through the brainstem and trigeminal nerve per se. The 3D visualization of the nerve-vessel relationship with fusion images was consistent with the intraoperative findings. The boundary fusion 3D MR cisternogram/angiogram may prove a useful adjunct for the diagnosis and decision-marking process to execute the MVD in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. (author)

  12. Epidermoid cyst in the cerebellopontine angle cistern presenting as trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnostic values of the orbicularis oculi reflex and metrizamide CT cisternography - case report -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takashi; Goya, Tomokazu; Kinoshita, Kazuo (Miyazaki Medical College, Miyazaki (Japan)); Fukui, Masashi

    1983-05-01

    This 29-year-old male had been suffering from left trigeminal neuralgia one year prior to admission. Admission was prompted by the development of pain in the third division of the left trigeminal nerve. Physical and neurological examinations were not remarkable except for the facial pain. The orbicularis oculi reflex showed delayed latency of R/sub 1/ on the affected side. CT scans performed pre- and post-contrast enhancement revealed a low density area in the left cerebellopontine angle cistern. Metrizamide CT cisternography clearly revealed the margin of the lesion as the contrast media did not enter into the low density area. A left suboccipital craniectomy was performed. The trigeminal nerve was surrounded by a thin-capsulated mass and cholesteatoma materials. Histological diagnosis was epidermoid cyst. Since this surgical procedure, the trigeminal neuralgia has not recurred for one year. Without objective neurological deficits, it is difficult to distinguish symptomatic trigeminal from idiopathic neuralgia. Therefore, minor change of the orbicularis oculi reflex should help in objectively detecting dysfunction of the trigeminal nerve. Metrizamide CT cisternography is also useful in diagnosis of cystic lesions.

  13. Proposal for evaluating the quality of reports of surgical interventions in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia: the Surgical Trigeminal Neuralgia Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Harith; Mirza, Bilal; Kitchen, Neil; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to design a checklist with a scoring system for reporting on studies of surgical interventions for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and to validate it by a review of the recent literature. A checklist with a scoring system, the Surgical Trigeminal Neuralgia Score (STNS), was devised partially based on the validated STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) criteria and customized for TN after a literature review and then applied to a series of articles. These articles were identified using a prespecified MEDLINE and Embase search covering the period from 2008 to 2010. Of the 584 articles found, 59 were studies of interventional procedures for TN that fulfilled the inclusion criteria and 56 could be obtained in full. The STNS was then applied independently by 3 of the authors. The maximum STNS came to 30, and was reliable and reproducible when used by the 3 authors who performed the scoring. The range of scores was 6-23.5, with a mean of 14 for all the journals. The impact factor scores of the journals in which the papers were published ranged from 0 to 4.8. Twenty-four of the studies were published in the Journal of Neurosurgery or in Neurosurgery. Studies published in neurosurgical journals ranked higher on the STNS scale than those published in nonneurosurgical journals. There was no statistically significant correlation between STNS and impact factors. Stereotactic radiosurgery (n = 25) and microvascular decompression (n = 15) were the most commonly reported procedures. The diagnostic criteria were stated in 35% of the studies, and 4 studies reported subtypes of TN. An increasing number of studies (46%) used the recommended Kaplan-Meier methodology for pain survival outcomes. The follow-up period was unclear in 8 studies, and 26 reported follow-ups of more than 5 years. Complications were reported fairly consistently but the temporal course was not always indicated. Direct interview, telephone conversation

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of ganglia in the rat stomach serosa, containing neurons immunoreactive for gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier; Holst, J J

    1987-01-01

    Ganglia, not previously described, were identified in the rat stomach serosa along the minor curvature. The ganglia consisted of varying number of cell bodies lying in clusters along or within nerve bundles. The ganglia were shown to contain GRP and VIP immunoreactive nerve fibers and cell bodies...

  15. Basal ganglia germinoma in children with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozelame, Rodrigo V.; Shroff, Manohar; Wood, Bradley; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Drake, James M.; Hawkins, Cynthia; Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    Germinoma is the most common and least-malignant intracranial germ cell tumor, usually found in the midline. Germinoma that arises in the basal ganglia, called ectopic germinoma, is a rare and well-documented entity representing 5% to 10% of all intracranial germinomas. The association of cerebral and/or brain stem atrophy with basal ganglia germinoma on CT and MRI is found in 33% of the cases. To review the literature and describe the CT and MRI findings of basal ganglia germinoma in children, known as ectopic germinoma, with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy. Three brain CT and six brain MRI studies performed in four children at two institutions were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were male (case 1, 14 years; case 2, 13 years; case 3, 9 years; case 4, 13 years), with pathologically proved germinoma arising in the basal ganglia, and associated ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy on the first imaging study. It is important to note that three of these children presented with cognitive decline, psychosis and slowly progressive hemiparesis as their indication for imaging. Imaging results on initial scans were varied. In all patients, the initial study showed ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy, representing Wallerian degeneration. All patients who underwent CT imaging presented with a hyperdense or calcified lesion in the basal ganglia on unenhanced scans. Only one of these lesions had a mass effect on the surrounding structures. In one of these patients a large, complex, heterogeneous mass appeared 15 months later. Initial MR showed focal or diffusely increased T2 signal in two cases and heterogeneous signal in the other two. (orig.)

  16. Basal ganglia and cortical networks for sequential ordering and rhythm of complex movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery G. Bednark

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary actions require the concurrent engagement and coordinated control of complex temporal (e.g. rhythm and ordinal motor processes. Using high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA, we sought to determine the degree to which these complex motor processes are dissociable in basal ganglia and cortical networks. We employed three different finger-tapping tasks that differed in the demand on the sequential temporal rhythm or sequential ordering of submovements. Our results demonstrate that sequential rhythm and sequential order tasks were partially dissociable based on activation differences. The sequential rhythm task activated a widespread network centered around the SMA and basal-ganglia regions including the dorsomedial putamen and caudate nucleus, while the sequential order task preferentially activated a fronto-parietal network. There was also extensive overlap between sequential rhythm and sequential order tasks, with both tasks commonly activating bilateral premotor, supplementary motor, and superior/inferior parietal cortical regions, as well as regions of the caudate/putamen of the basal ganglia and the ventro-lateral thalamus. Importantly, within the cortical regions that were active for both complex movements, MVPA could accurately classify different patterns of activation for the sequential rhythm and sequential order tasks. In the basal ganglia, however, overlapping activation for the sequential rhythm and sequential order tasks, which was found in classic motor circuits of the putamen and ventro-lateral thalamus, could not be accurately differentiated by MVPA. Overall, our results highlight the convergent architecture of the motor system, where complex motor information that is spatially distributed in the cortex converges into a more compact representation in the basal ganglia.

  17. Localization of Basal Ganglia and Thalamic Damage in Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R; Waugh, Jeff L

    2016-01-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy affects 15%-20% of patients with cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury is associated with dyskinetic cerebral palsy, but the patterns of injury within the basal ganglia predisposing to dyskinetic cerebral palsy are unknown, making treatment difficult. For example, deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus interna improves dystonia in only 40% of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury heterogeneity may explain this variability. To investigate this, we conducted a qualitative systematic review of basal ganglia and thalamic damage in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Reviews and articles primarily addressing genetic or toxic causes of cerebral palsy were excluded yielding 22 studies (304 subjects). Thirteen studies specified the involved basal ganglia nuclei (subthalamic nucleus, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, or lentiform nuclei, comprised by the putamen and globus pallidus). Studies investigating the lentiform nuclei (without distinguishing between the putamen and globus pallidus) showed that all subjects (19 of 19) had lentiform nuclei damage. Studies simultaneously but independently investigating the putamen and globus pallidus also showed that all subjects (35 of 35) had lentiform nuclei damage (i.e., putamen or globus pallidus damage); this was followed in frequency by damage to the putamen alone (70 of 101, 69%), the subthalamic nucleus (17 of 25, 68%), the thalamus (88 of 142, 62%), the globus pallidus (7/35, 20%), and the caudate (6 of 47, 13%). Globus pallidus damage was almost always coincident with putaminal damage. Noting consistent involvement of the lentiform nuclei in dyskinetic cerebral palsy, these results could suggest two groups of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy: those with putamen-predominant damage and those with panlenticular damage involving both the putamen and the globus pallidus. Differentiating between these groups could help predict response to therapies such as deep brain

  18. Neuroanatomical correlates of intelligence in healthy young adults: the role of basal ganglia volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Cosima; Mühle, Christiane; Richter-Schmidinger, Tanja; Alexopoulos, Panagiotis; Doerfler, Arnd; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In neuropsychiatric diseases with basal ganglia involvement, higher cognitive functions are often impaired. In this exploratory study, we examined healthy young adults to gain detailed insight into the relationship between basal ganglia volume and cognitive abilities under non-pathological conditions. We investigated 137 healthy adults that were between the ages of 21 and 35 years with similar educational backgrounds. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, and volumes of basal ganglia nuclei in both hemispheres were calculated using FreeSurfer software. The cognitive assessment consisted of verbal, numeric and figural aspects of intelligence for either the fluid or the crystallised intelligence factor using the intelligence test Intelligenz-Struktur-Test (I-S-T 2000 R). Our data revealed significant correlations of the caudate nucleus and pallidum volumes with figural and numeric aspects of intelligence, but not with verbal intelligence. Interestingly, figural intelligence associations were dependent on sex and intelligence factor; in females, the pallidum volumes were correlated with crystallised figural intelligence (r = 0.372, p = 0.01), whereas in males, the caudate volumes were correlated with fluid figural intelligence (r = 0.507, p = 0.01). Numeric intelligence was correlated with right-lateralised caudate nucleus volumes for both females and males, but only for crystallised intelligence (r = 0.306, p = 0.04 and r = 0.459, p = 0.04, respectively). The associations were not mediated by prefrontal cortical subfield volumes when controlling with partial correlation analyses. The findings of our exploratory analysis indicate that figural and numeric intelligence aspects, but not verbal aspects, are strongly associated with basal ganglia volumes. Unlike numeric intelligence, the type of figural intelligence appears to be related to distinct basal ganglia nuclei in a sex-specific manner. Subcortical brain structures thus may contribute substantially to

  19. Basal ganglia germinoma in children with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozelame, Rodrigo V.; Shroff, Manohar; Wood, Bradley; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Drake, James M.; Hawkins, Cynthia; Blaser, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Germinoma is the most common and least-malignant intracranial germ cell tumor, usually found in the midline. Germinoma that arises in the basal ganglia, called ectopic germinoma, is a rare and well-documented entity representing 5% to 10% of all intracranial germinomas. The association of cerebral and/or brain stem atrophy with basal ganglia germinoma on CT and MRI is found in 33% of the cases. To review the literature and describe the CT and MRI findings of basal ganglia germinoma in children, known as ectopic germinoma, with associated ipsilateral cerebral and brain stem hemiatrophy. Three brain CT and six brain MRI studies performed in four children at two institutions were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were male (case 1, 14 years; case 2, 13 years; case 3, 9 years; case 4, 13 years), with pathologically proved germinoma arising in the basal ganglia, and associated ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy on the first imaging study. It is important to note that three of these children presented with cognitive decline, psychosis and slowly progressive hemiparesis as their indication for imaging. Imaging results on initial scans were varied. In all patients, the initial study showed ipsilateral cerebral and/or brain stem hemiatrophy, representing Wallerian degeneration. All patients who underwent CT imaging presented with a hyperdense or calcified lesion in the basal ganglia on unenhanced scans. Only one of these lesions had a mass effect on the surrounding structures. In one of these patients a large, complex, heterogeneous mass appeared 15 months later. Initial MR showed focal or diffusely increased T2 signal in two cases and heterogeneous signal in the other two. (orig.)

  20. Some factors affecting rabbit production under egyptian environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nessim, M.Z.

    1994-01-01

    The present work was carried out in the rabbit of the department of animal production, faculty of agriculture, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt, Blood biochemical analysis and hormonal assay were conducted in tracer bio climatology Unit., Department of radiobiology, nuclear research centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt. Eighty male New Zealand white (NZW) and 80 male californian (Cal) rabbits aged 5-6 weeks were used. The animals were housed in rabbit building, naturally ventilated. Rabbits cages were provided with automatic nipple drinkers and drinking and drinking water ad libitum.Rabbits were fed ad libitum on balanced growing pelted rabbit ration. 21 tabs.,13 figs.,158 refs

  1. Persistent trigeminal artery/persistent trigeminal artery variant and coexisting variants of the head and neck vessels diagnosed using 3 T MRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, M.; Guo, Q.; Li, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To report the prevalence and characteristic features of persistent trigeminal artery (PTA), PTA variant (PTAV), and other variants of the head and neck vessels, identified using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Materials and methods: The three-dimensional (3D) time of flight (TOF) MRA and 3D contrast-enhanced (CE) MRA images of 6095 consecutive patients who underwent 3 T MRA at Liaocheng People's Hospital from 1 September 2008 through 31 May 2012 were retrospectively reviewed and analysed. Thirty-two patients were excluded because of suboptimal image quality or internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion. Results: The prevalence of both PTA and PTAV was 0.63% (PTA, 26 cases; PTAV, 12 cases). The prevalence of coexisting variants of the head and neck vessels in cases of PTA/PTAV was 52.6% (20 of 38 cases). The vascular variants that coexisted with cases of PTA/PTAV were as follows: the intracranial arteries varied in 10 cases, the origin of the supra-aortic arteries varied in nine cases, the vertebral artery (VA) varied in 14 cases, and six cases displayed fenestrations. Fifteen of the 20 cases contained more than two types of variants. Conclusion: The prevalence of both PTA and PTAV was 0.63%. Although PTA and PTAV are rare vascular variants, they frequently coexist with other variants of the head and neck vessels. Multiple vascular variations can coexist in a single patient. Recognizing PTA, PTAV, and other variants of the head and neck vessels is crucial when planning a neuroradiological intervention or surgery. Recognizing the medial PTA is very important in clinical practice when performing trans-sphenoidal surgery on the pituitary as failure to do so could result in massive haemorrhage

  2. Quantitative sensory testing in classical trigeminal neuralgia-a blinded study in patients with and without concomitant persistent pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Younis, Samaira; Maarbjerg, Stine; Reimer, Maren

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic criteria of the third International Classification of Headache Disorders state that there should be no neurological deficits in patients with classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) at clinical examination. However, studies demonstrating sensory abnormalities at bedside examination in TN...... scores were calculated to process frequency analyses and Z-profiles. We found increased mechanical detection threshold on the symptomatic side (47.2% vs 0%, P = 0.008), asymptomatic side (33.3% vs 0%, P = 0.011), and hand (36% vs 0%, P ... increased mechanical detection threshold on the symptomatic side compared with the asymptomatic side (-2.980 vs -2.166, P = 0.040). Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was detected bilaterally in the face and the hand. Trigeminal neuralgia patients with concomitant persistent pain tended to have higher mean...

  3. Neuronal vacuolation of the trigeminal nuclei in goats caused by ingestion of Prosopis juliflora pods (mesquite beans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabosa, I M; Souza, J C; Graça, D L; Barbosa-Filho, J M; Almeida, R N; Riet-Correa, F

    2000-06-01

    Three groups of 6 goats each were fed a ration containing 30, 60, or 90%, on a dry matter base, of Prosopis juliflora pods. A control group of 4 goats ingested only the basic ration. Two hundred and ten days after the start of the experiment 3 goats that ingested 60% pods in and 4 that ingested 90% had mandibular tremors, mainly during chewing. All animals were killed after 270 d of ingestion. No gross lesions were observed. Histologic lesions were characterized by fine vacuolation of the pericaryon of neurons from the trigeminal nuclei. Occasionally neurons of the oculomotor nuclei were also affected. Wallerian degeneration was occasionally observed in the mandibular and trigeminal nerves. Denervation atrophy of the masseter, temporal, hypoglossus, genioglossus, styloglossus, medial pterygoid and lateral pterygoid muscles was seen. The clinical signs from feeding the P juliflora pods were caused by a selective toxicity to neurons of some cranial nerve nuclei.

  4. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia: comments on a series of 250 cases, including 10 patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broggi, G; Ferroli, P; Franzini, A; Servello, D; Dones, I

    2000-01-01

    To examine surgical findings and results of microvascular decompression (MVD) for trigeminal neuralgia (TN), including patients with multiple sclerosis, to bring new insight about the role of microvascular compression in the pathogenesis of the disorder and the role of MVD in its treatment. Between 1990 and 1998, 250 patients affected by trigeminal neuralgia underwent MVD in the Department of Neurosurgery of the "Istituto Nazionale Neurologico C Besta" in Milan. Limiting the review to the period 1991-6, to exclude the "learning period" (the first 50 cases) and patients with less than 1 year follow up, surgical findings and results were critically analysed in 148 consecutive cases, including 10 patients with multiple sclerosis. Vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve was found in all cases. The recurrence rate was 15.3% (follow up 1-7 years, mean 38 months). In five of 10 patients with multiple sclerosis an excellent result was achieved (follow up 12-39 months, mean 24 months). Patients with TN for more than 84 months did significantly worse than those with a shorter history (p<0.05). There was no mortality and most complications occurred in the learning period. Surgical complications were not related to age of the patients. Aetiopathogenesis of trigeminal neuralgia remains a mystery. These findings suggest a common neuromodulatory role of microvascular compression in both patients with or without multiple sclerosis rather than a direct causal role. MVD was found to be a safe and effective procedure to relieve typical TN in patients of all ages. It should be proposed as first choice surgery to all patients affected by TN, even in selected cases with multiple sclerosis, to give them the opportunity of pain relief without sensory deficits.

  5. Patterns of neurovascular compression in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia: A high-resolution MRI-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzoni, José; David, Philippe; Levivier, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the anatomical characteristics and patterns of neurovascular compression in patients suffering classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN), using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: The analysis of the anatomy of the trigeminal nerve, brain stem and the vascular structures related to this nerve was made in 100 consecutive patients treated with a Gamma Knife radiosurgery for CTN between December 1999 and September 2004. MRI studies (T1, T1 enhanced and T2-SPIR) with axial, coronal and sagital simultaneous visualization were dynamically assessed using the software GammaPlan™. Three-dimensional reconstructions were also developed in some representative cases. Results: In 93 patients (93%), there were one or several vascular structures in contact, either, with the trigeminal nerve, or close to its origin in the pons. The superior cerebellar artery was involved in 71 cases (76%). Other vessels identified were the antero-inferior cerebellar artery, the basilar artery, the vertebral artery, and some venous structures. Vascular compression was found anywhere along the trigeminal nerve. The mean distance between the nerve compression and the origin of the nerve in the brainstem was 3.76 ± 2.9 mm (range 0–9.8 mm). In 39 patients (42%), the vascular compression was located proximally and in 42 (45%) the compression was located distally. Nerve dislocation or distortion by the vessel was observed in 30 cases (32%). Conclusions: The findings of this study are similar to those reported in surgical and autopsy series. This non-invasive MRI-based approach could be useful for diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in CTN, and it could help to understand its pathogenesis.

  6. Experimental inflammation following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant or inflammatory soup does not alter brain and trigeminal microvascular passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundblad, Cornelia; Haanes, Kristian A; Grände, Gustaf; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a paroxysmal, disabling primary headache that affects 16 % of the adult population. In spite of decades of intense research, the origin and the pathophysiology mechanisms involved are still not fully known. Although triptans and gepants provide effective relief from acute migraine for many patients, their site of action remains unidentified. It has been suggested that during migraine attacks the leakiness of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is altered, increasing the passage of anti-migraine drugs. This study aimed to investigate the effect of experimental inflammation, following dural application of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or inflammatory soup (IS) on brain and trigeminal microvascular passage. In order to address this issue, we induced local inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley-rats dura mater by the addition of CFA or IS directly on the dural surface. Following 2, 24 or 48 h of inflammation we calculated permeability-surface area product (PS) for [(51)Cr]-EDTA in the trigeminal ganglion (TG), spinal trigeminal nucleus, cortex, periaqueductal grey and cerebellum. We observed that [(51)Cr]-EDTA did not pass into the central nervous system (CNS) in a major way. However, [(51)Cr]-EDTA readily passed the TG by >30 times compared to the CNS. Application of CFA or IS did not show altered transfer constants. With these experiments we show that dural IS/CFA triggered TG inflammation, did not increase the BBB passage, and that the TG is readily exposed to circulating molecules. The TG could provide a site of anti-migraine drug interaction with effect on the trigeminal system.

  7. Inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission in the trigeminal motor nucleus by the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose, Inés; Silveira, Valentina; Morales, Francisco R

    2011-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) suppressed glutamatergic synaptic transmission to trigeminal motoneurons in brain stem slices of neonatal rats. Histological studies showed guanylate cyclase (GC) containing fibers in the trigeminal motor pool. Glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded from neonatal trigeminal motoneurons in response to stimulation of the supratrigeminal nucleus (SuV). The NO donors DETA/NONOate (DETA/NO), at a concentration which released 275.1 nM of NO, and Spermine/NONOate (Sper/NO) reduced the amplitude of the EPSC to 52.7±0.6% and 60.1±10.8% of control values, respectively. These actions were not blocked by the GC inhibitors, ODQ or NS-2028. However, in the presence of YC-1 or BAY41-2272, modulators of GC that act as NO sensitizers, lower and otherwise ineffective concentrations of DETA/NO induced a reduction of the EPSC to 60.6±5.2%. Moreover, NO effects were mimicked by 8BrcGMP and by Zaprinast, an inhibitor of Phosphodiesterase 5. Glutamatergic currents evoked by exogenous glutamate were not reduced by DETA/NO nor 8BrcGMP. Paired-pulse facilitation was increased by NO donors. Under "minimal stimulation" conditions NO donors and cGMP increased the failure rate of evoked EPSCs. Protein kinase inhibitors antagonized cGMP effects. The results suggest that NO, through the synthesis of cGMP, presynaptically inhibits glutamatergic synaptic transmission on trigeminal motoneurons. We propose that NO has complex actions on motor pools; specific studies are needed to elucidate their physiological significance in the behaving animal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Astringency is a trigeminal sensation that involves the activation of G protein-coupled signaling by phenolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöbel, Nicole; Radtke, Debbie; Kyereme, Jessica; Wollmann, Nadine; Cichy, Annika; Obst, Katja; Kallweit, Kerstin; Kletke, Olaf; Minovi, Amir; Dazert, Stefan; Wetzel, Christian H; Vogt-Eisele, Angela; Gisselmann, Günter; Ley, Jakob P; Bartoshuk, Linda M; Spehr, Jennifer; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns

    2014-07-01

    Astringency is an everyday sensory experience best described as a dry mouthfeel typically elicited by phenol-rich alimentary products like tea and wine. The neural correlates and cellular mechanisms of astringency perception are still not well understood. We explored taste and astringency perception in human subjects to study the contribution of the taste as well as of the trigeminal sensory system to astringency perception. Subjects with either a lesion or lidocaine anesthesia of the Chorda tympani taste nerve showed no impairment of astringency perception. Only anesthesia of both the lingual taste and trigeminal innervation by inferior alveolar nerve block led to a loss of astringency perception. In an in vitro model of trigeminal ganglion neurons of mice, we studied the cellular mechanisms of astringency perception. Primary mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons showed robust responses to 8 out of 19 monomeric phenolic astringent compounds and 8 polymeric red wine polyphenols in Ca(2+) imaging experiments. The activating substances shared one or several galloyl moieties, whereas substances lacking the moiety did not or only weakly stimulate responses. The responses depended on Ca(2+) influx and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, but not on transient receptor potential channels. Responses to the phenolic compound epigallocatechin gallate as well as to a polymeric red wine polyphenol were inhibited by the Gαs inactivator suramin, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ, and the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem and displayed sensitivity to blockers of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Dynamic Regulation of Delta-Opioid Receptor in Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons by Lipopolysaccharide-induced Acute Pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin; Lv, Yiheng; Fu, Yunjie; Ren, Lili; Wang, Pan; Liu, Baozhu; Huang, Keqiang; Bi, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Delta-opioid receptor (DOR) and its endogenous ligands distribute in trigeminal system and play a very important role in modulating peripheral inflammatory pain. DOR activation can trigger p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) and Akt signaling pathways, which participate in anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. In this study, our purpose was to determine the dynamic changes of DOR in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons during the process of acute dental pulp inflammation and elucidate its possible mechanism. Forty rats were used to generate lipopolysaccharide-induced acute pulpitis animal models at 6, 12, and 24 hours and sham-operated groups. Acute pulpitis was confirmed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and TG neuron activation was determined by anti-c-Fos immunohistochemistry. DOR protein and gene expression in TG was investigated by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction, and DOR expression in trigeminal nerves and dental pulp was also determined by immunohistochemistry. To further investigate the mechanism of DOR modulating acute inflammation, the change of pErk1/2 and pAkt in TG was examined by immunohistochemistry. Lipopolysaccharide could successfully induce acute pulpitis and activated TG neurons. Acute pulpitis could dynamically increase DOR protein and gene expression at 6, 12, and 24 hours in TG, and DOR dimerization was significantly increased at 12 and 24 hours. Acute pulpitis also induced the dynamic change of DOR protein in trigeminal nerve and dental pulp. Furthermore, ERK1/2 and Akt signaling pathways were inhibited in TG after acute pulpitis. Increased DOR expression and dimerization may play important roles in peripheral acute inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A relationship between bruxism and orofacial-dystonia? A trigeminal electrophysiological approach in a case report of pineal cavernoma

    OpenAIRE

    Frisardi, Gianni; Iani, Cesare; Sau, Gianfranco; Frisardi, Flavio; Leornadis, Carlo; Lumbau, Aurea; Enrico, Paolo; Sirca, Donatella; Staderini, Enrico Maria; Chessa, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In some clinical cases, bruxism may be correlated to central nervous system hyperexcitability, suggesting that bruxism may represent a subclinical form of dystonia. To examine this hypothesis, we performed an electrophysiological evaluation of the excitability of the trigeminal nervous system in a patient affected by pineal cavernoma with pain symptoms in the orofacial region and pronounced bruxism. Methods: Electrophysiological studies included bilateral electrical transcrania...

  11. A Proposed Neurologic Pathway for Scalp Acupuncture: Trigeminal Nerve-Meninges-Cerebrospinal Fluid-Contacting Neurons-Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuya; Liu, Kun; Wang, Yuan; Wang, Shuyou; He, Xun; Cui, Xiang; Gao, Xinyan; Zhu, Bing

    2017-10-01

    Objective: Scalp acupuncture is a somatic stimulation therapy that produces prominent clinical effects when used to treat cerebral diseases. However, this acupuncture's therapeutic mechanisms have not yet been well-addressed. Scalp acupoints are innervated by the trigeminal nerve, which is coincident with the intracranial sensory afferents as well as with the meningeal vessels. In recent years, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons have been found and proved to transmit allergic substances between brain the parenchyma and meninges, representing a possible network between scalp acupuncture and the brain. The aim of the current study was to observe the connections between scalp acupoints and the meninges and to establish a possible mechanism for scalp acupuncture. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the present study. Evans Blue dye (Sigma Chemical Co, St. Louis, MO) was injected though each rat's caudal vein after trigeminal stimulation for plasma extravasation observation. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) values of the rat's brain surface were measured at different timepoints before and after electroacupuncture (EA) on GB 15 ( Toulinqi ) or ST 36 ( Zusanli ). Results: These preliminary studies indicated that neurogenic plasma extravasation on a rat's skin and dura mater after mechanical or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerves is a reliable way to show the pathologic connection between scalp acupoints and the meninges. Moreover, CBF of the rat's brain surface is increased significantly after EA stimulation at GB 15 ( Toulinqi ), which is located in the receptive field of the supraorbital nerve. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the mechanism of scalp acupuncture might lie in the specific neurologic pathway that could be termed as trigeminal nerve-meninges-cerebrospinal fluid-contacting neurons-brain , which is a possible shortcut to brain functional regulation and cerebral disease treatment.

  12. [Linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. Nine years' experience in a single institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Rubio, A A; Martinez-Manrique, J J; Revuelta-Gutierrez, R; Gomez-Amador, J L; Martinez-Anda, J J; Ponce-Gomez, J A; Moreno-Jimenez, S

    2014-09-16

    INTRODUCTION. Pharmacological treatment is the first therapeutic step towards controlling pain in trigeminal neuralgia, but 25-50% of patients become medication resistant. There are currently several surgical alternatives for treating these patients. AIM. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery for the treatment of patients with trigeminal neuralgia. PATIENTS AND METHODS. A follow-up study was conducted on 30 patients who underwent radiosurgery using a Novalis linear accelerator. Eighty per cent of the dosage was calculated at the isocentre, the entry zone of the root of the trigeminal nerve. The mean follow-up time was 27.5 months (range: 1-65 months). RESULTS. The mean age was 66 years (range: 36-87 years), with a time to progression of 7.1 years (range: 4-27 years). The distribution of the pain was from the right side (63.3%). Of the 30 patients, 27 experienced an improvement (90%) 1.6 months (range: 1 week-4 months) after the treatment; 10 patients (33.3%) scored grade I, and 17 patients (56.6%) obtained a score of grade II. During the follow-up, four patients (14.2%) suffered a relapse; two underwent re-irradiation. Time without recurrence was 62.7 months (range: 54.6-70.8 months). The rate of side effects was 76.7% and only three patients developed facial anaesthesia with loss of the corneal reflex. CONCLUSIONS. The use of the linear accelerator is an effective therapeutic option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, since it provides adequate long-term control of the pain, reduces the use of medication and improves the quality of life.

  13. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED uptake mimicking lymph node metastasis in coeliac ganglia: an important pitfall in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krohn, Thomas; Vogg, Andreas; Heinzel, Alexander; Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pufe, Thomas [RWTH University Aachen, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Aachen (Germany); Neuhuber, Winfried [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Anatomy I, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-09-24

    To determine the frequency of seemingly pathological retroperitoneal uptake in the location of the coeliac ganglia in patients undergoing [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED PET/CT. The study included 85 men with prostate cancer referred for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED PET/CT. The PET/CT scans were evaluated for the local finding in the prostate and the presence of lymph node metastases, distant metastases and coeliac ganglia. The corresponding standardized uptake values (SUV) were determined. SUVmax to background uptake (gluteal muscle SUVmean) ratios were calculated for the ganglia and lymph node metastases. Immunohistochemistry was performed on the ganglia. In 76 of the 85 patients (89.4 %) at least one ganglion with tracer uptake was found. For the ganglia, SUVmax and SUVmax to background SUVmean ratios were 2.97 ± 0.88 and 7.98 ± 2.84 (range 1.57-6.38 and 2.83-30.6), respectively, and 82.8 % of all ganglia showed an uptake ratio of >5.0. For lymph node metastases, SUVmax and SUVmax to background SUVmean ratios were 8.5 ± 7.0 and 23.31 ± 22.23 (range 2.06-35.9 and 5.25-115.8), respectively. In 35 patients (41.2 %), no lymph node metastases were found but tracer uptake was seen in the ganglia. Immunohistochemistry confirmed strong PSMA expression in the ganglia. Coeliac ganglia show a relevant [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED uptake in most patients and may mimic lymph node metastases. (orig.)

  14. Bi-modal radiofrequency treatment for coexisting neuralgia and neuropathy in adjacent divisions of the trigeminal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatjiwale, M; Bhatjiwale, M; Naik, L D; Chopade, P

    2018-05-29

    Trigeminal neuralgia and deafferentation neuropathic pain, or trigeminal neuropathy, are different symptomatologies, rarely reported to present together. The case of a 65-year-old gentleman suffering from trigeminal neuralgia of the maxillary and mandibular division is reported. He first underwent an infraorbital neurectomy that was complicated by deafferentation neuropathic pain, whilst his mandibular neuralgia continued. He was treated successfully for both the neuropathic and neuralgic symptoms in the same session using ultra-extended euthermic pulsed radiofrequency treatment for the maxillary division (V2) and radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the mandibular division (V3). This report is novel in describing the use of dual modalities in the same session for two distinct coexisting clinical entities in two different divisions of the same cranial nerve. The use of ultra-extended pulsed radiofrequency treatment for neuropathic pain in this case is also unique. Nearly 2years after the procedure, the patient continues to have complete pain relief. Copyright © 2018 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the trigeminal vascular system and other brain structures related to pain in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Ploug, Kenneth Beri; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2010-01-01

    to measure the respective levels of mRNA and protein for nNOS and eNOS in peripheral and central tissues involved in migraine pain: dura mater, pial arteries, trigeminal ganglion (TG) trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC), periaqueductal grey (PAG), thalamus, hypothalamus, cortex, pituitary gland, hippocampus...... and cerebellum. iNOS was excluded from the present study because it was not induced. In the trigeminal vascular system we found the highest expression of nNOS mRNA in pial arteries. However, protein expression of nNOS was maximum in TNC. Among other brain structures, nNOS mRNA and protein expression...... was remarkably higher in the cerebellum than in any other tissues. Regarding eNOS in the trigeminovascular system, the highest mRNA expression was found in pial arteries. In the other brain structures, eNOS mRNA expression was similar but with lowest mRNA concentration in the pituitary gland and the highest...

  16. Occlusal splint versus modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint in bruxism therapy: a randomized, controlled trial using surface electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalewski, B; Chruściel-Nogalska, M; Frączak, B

    2015-12-01

    An occlusal splint and a modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint (AMPS, anterior deprogrammer, Kois deprogrammer, Lucia jig, etc.) are commonly and quite frequently used in the treatment of masticatory muscle disorders, although their sustainable and long-lasting effect on these muscles' function is still not very well known. Results of scant surface electromyography studies in patients with temporomandibular disorders have been contradictory. The aim of this study was to evaluate both devices in bruxism therapy; EMG activity levels during postural activity and maximum voluntary contraction of the superficial temporal and masseter muscles were compared before and after 30 days of treatment. Surface electromyography of the examined muscles was performed in two groups of bruxers (15 patients each). Patients in the first group used occlusal splints, while those in the second used modified nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splints. The trial was randomized, controlled and semi-blind. Neither device affected the asymmetry index or postural activity/maximum voluntary contraction ratio after 1 month of treatment. Neither the occlusal nor the nociceptive trigeminal inhibition splint showed any significant influence on the examined muscles. Different scientific methods should be considered in clinical applications that require either direct influence on the muscles' bioelectrical activity or a quantitative measurement of the treatment quality. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Loss of Axon Bifurcation in Mesencephalic Trigeminal Neurons Impairs the Maximal Biting Force in Npr2-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gohar Ter-Avetisyan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Bifurcation of axons from dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cranial sensory ganglion (CSG neurons is mediated by a cGMP-dependent signaling pathway composed of the ligand C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP, the receptor guanylyl cyclase Npr2 and the cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (cGKI. Here, we demonstrate that mesencephalic trigeminal neurons (MTN which are the only somatosensory neurons whose cell bodies are located within the CNS co-express Npr2 and cGKI. Afferents of MTNs form Y-shaped branches in rhombomere 2 where the ligand CNP is expressed. Analyzing mouse mutants deficient for CNP or Npr2 we found that in the absence of CNP-induced cGMP signaling MTN afferents no longer bifurcate and instead extend either into the trigeminal root or caudally in the hindbrain. Since MTNs provide sensory information from jaw closing muscles and periodontal ligaments we measured the bite force of conditional mouse mutants of Npr2 (Npr2flox/flox;Engr1Cre that lack bifurcation of MTN whereas the bifurcation of trigeminal afferents is normal. Our study revealed that the maximal biting force of both sexes is reduced in Npr2flox/flox;Engr1Cre mice as compared to their Npr2flox/flox littermate controls. In conclusion sensory feedback mechanisms from jaw closing muscles or periodontal ligaments might be impaired in the absence of MTN axon bifurcation.

  18. Trigeminofacial reflex: a means of detecting proximity to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the trigeminal nerve during surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMasri, Omar A; Brown, Emma E; Forster, Alan; Kamel, Mahmoud H

    2014-11-01

    The aim in this paper was to localize and detect incipient damage to the ophthalmic and maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve during tumor surgery. This was an observational study of patients with skull base, retroorbital, or cavernous sinus tumors warranting dissection toward the cavernous sinus at a university hospital. Stimuli were applied as normal during approach to the cavernous sinus to localize cranial nerves (CNs) III, IV, and VI. Recordings were also obtained from the facial muscles to localize CN VII. The trigeminofacial reflex was sought simply by observing a longer time base routinely. Clear facial electromyography responses were reproduced when stimuli were applied to the region of V1, V2, and V3. Response latency was increased compared with direct CN VII stimuli seen in some cases. Responses gave early warning of approach to these sensory trigeminal branches. The authors submit this as a new technique, which may improve the chances of preserving trigeminal sensory branches during surgery in this region.

  19. Does increased nerve length within the treatment volume improve trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery? a prospective double-blind, randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, John C.; Pollock, Bruce E.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Phuong, Loi K.; Foote, Robert L.; Stafford, Scott L.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that increasing the nerve length within the treatment volume for trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery would improve pain relief. Methods and Materials: Eighty-seven patients with typical trigeminal neuralgia were randomized to undergo retrogasserian gamma knife radiosurgery (75 Gy maximal dose with 4-mm diameter collimators) using either one (n=44) or two (n=43) isocenters. The median follow-up was 26 months (range 1-36). Results: Pain relief was complete in 57 patients (45 without medication and 12 with low-dose medication), partial in 15, and minimal in another 15 patients. The actuarial rate of obtaining complete pain relief (with or without medication) was 67.7%±5.1%. The pain relief was identical for one- and two-isocenter radiosurgery. Pain relapsed in 30 of 72 responding patients. Facial numbness and mild and severe paresthesias developed in 8, 5, and 1 two-isocenter patients vs. 3, 4, and 0 one-isocenter patients, respectively (p=0.23). Improved pain relief correlated with younger age (p=0.025) and fewer prior procedures (p=0.039) and complications (numbness or paresthesias) correlated with the nerve length irradiated (p=0.018). Conclusions: Increasing the treatment volume to include a longer nerve length for trigeminal neuralgia radiosurgery does not significantly improve pain relief but may increase complications

  20. Electroacupuncture analgesia in a rabbit ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmen, Valentin

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of electroacupuncture analgesia (EAA) at local and paravertebral acupoints for a rabbit undergoing an ovariohysterectomy. Twelve clinically healthy New Zealand white rabbits were chosen and divided into two groups: the control group (5 rabbits) and the experimental group (7 rabbits). A neuroleptanalgesic (ketamine + xylazine) was administered to the control group (NLA group); the experimental group received EAA treatment (EAA group). The EAA treatment includes one acupuncture formula for local stimulation at the incision site and systemic stimulation. Results of clinical research have shown postoperative analgesia using EAA treatment to be superior to that using NLA. The average postoperative recovery time was 5.2 times longer in the NLA group than in the EAA group. Because consciousness was maintained, EAA presented an advantage in thermoregulation. Animals administered NLA had prolonged thermal homeostasis because of neurovegetative disconnection. For the EAA group, the operative times were characterized as excellent (28%, p = 0.28) or good (72%, p = 0.72). Local stimulation at the incision site provided excellent analgesia of the abdominal wall (100%). In conclusion, EA can provide general analgesia with a considerable analgesic effect for a rabbit undergoing an ovariohysterectomy, resulting in a short postoperative recovery time. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Hypercholesterolemia Impaired Sperm Functionality in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclus, Maria A.; Cabrillana, Maria E.; Clementi, Marisa A.; Espínola, Leandro S.; Cid Barría, Jose L.; Vincenti, Amanda E.; Santi, Analia G.; Fornés, Miguel W.

    2010-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia represents a high risk factor for frequent diseases and it has also been associated with poor semen quality that may lead to male infertility. The aim of this study was to analyze semen and sperm function in diet-induced hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twelve adult White New Zealand male rabbits were fed ad libitum a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.05% cholesterol. Rabbits under cholesterol-enriched diet significantly increased total cholesterol level in the serum. Semen examination revealed a significant reduction in semen volume and sperm motility in hypercholesterolemic rabbits (HCR). Sperm cell morphology was seriously affected, displaying primarily a “folded head”-head fold along the major axe-, and the presence of cytoplasmic droplet on sperm flagellum. Cholesterol was particularly increased in acrosomal region when detected by filipin probe. The rise in cholesterol concentration in sperm cells was determined quantitatively by Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analyses. We also found a reduction of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in sperm incubated under capacitating conditions from HCR. Interestingly, the addition of Protein Kinase A pathway activators -dibutyryl-cyclic AMP and iso-butylmethylxanthine- to the medium restored sperm capacitation. Finally, it was also reported a significant decrease in the percentage of reacted sperm in the presence of progesterone. In conclusion, our data showed that diet-induced hypercholesterolemia adversely affects semen quality and sperm motility, capacitation and acrosomal reaction in rabbits; probably due to an increase in cellular cholesterol content that alters membrane related events. PMID:20976152

  2. Accumulation of 125I-factor XI in atheroma of rabbit with hereditary hyperlipidemia (WHHL-rabbit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komiyama, Y.; Masuda, M.; Murakami, T.; Nishikado, H.; Egawa, H.; Nishimura, T.; Morii, S.; Murata, K.

    1989-01-01

    We have studied the turnover and accumulation of rabbit factor XI (F.XI) in atherosclerotic lesion in Watanabe-hereditable hyperlipidemic rabbit (WHHL rabbit) to reveal the participation of blood coagulation in atherosclerotic lesion. Rabbit F.XI was iodinated and administered intravenously to WHHL rabbits and Japanese white rabbits. The turnover of 125 I-rabbit F.XI was significantly faster in WHHL rabbits (T1/2 = 2.84 +/- 0.44 days) than in normal rabbits (T1/2 = 4.44 +/- 0.42 days). The thoracic aorta of WHHL rabbit was strongly labelled with 125 I-rabbit F.XI, in sections obtained after 5 days by en-face autoradiography, whereas no radioactivity was detected in normal aorta. By an immunohistochemical study of WHHL rabbit aorta, we confirmed that many F.XI- and fibrin-related compounds existed in the atheroma, whereas albumin did not in these area. These results suggest that the activation of F.XI proceeds on the atherosclerotic lesions of WHHL rabbits

  3. Environmental Bacteria Associated With an Institutional Rabbit House

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Dr Olaleye

    associated with rabbit houses was undertaken to determine the occurrence of bacteria in rabbit ... biomedical research since these latent organisms may produce clinical conditions when .... frequently incriminated in bovine mastitis by. Jones ...

  4. Performance characteristics of growing rabbits fed diet based on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conventional ingredient. ... Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa ... groups of 8 rabbits each and the groups were assigned randomly to the three diets with each rabbit serving as a replicate in a Complete Randomized Design experiment.

  5. Reproductive performance of rabbits fed maize-milling waste based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    The influence of maize-milling waste on the reproductive performance of rabbits was assessed. The .... stored in air-tight polythene bags prior to use in the experimental .... Nutrient digestibility and effect of heat treatment, J. Appl. Rabbit Res.

  6. Synergy as a new and sensitive marker of basal ganglia dysfunction: A study of asymptomatic welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mechelle M; Lee, Eun-Young; Jo, Hang Jin; Du, Guangwei; Park, Jaebum; Flynn, Michael R; Kong, Lan; Latash, Mark L; Huang, Xuemei

    2016-09-01

    Multi-digit synergies, a recently developed, theory-based method to quantify stability of motor action, are shown to reflect basal ganglia dysfunction associated with parkinsonian syndromes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that multi-digit synergies may capture early and subclinical basal ganglia dysfunction. We chose asymptomatic welders to test the hypothesis because the basal ganglia are known to be most susceptible to neurotoxicity caused by welding-related metal accumulation (such as manganese and iron). Twenty right-handed welders and 13 matched controls were invited to perform single- and multi-finger pressing tasks using the fingers of the right or left hand. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and Grooved Pegboard scores were used to gauge gross and fine motor dysfunction, respectively. High-resolution (3T) T1-weighted, T2-weighted, T1 mapping, susceptibility, and diffusion tensor MRIs were obtained to reflect manganese, iron accumulation, and microstructural changes in basal ganglia. The synergy index stabilizing total force and anticipatory synergy adjustments were computed, compared between groups, and correlated with estimates of basal ganglia manganese [the pallidal index, R1 (1/T1)], iron [R2* (1/T2*)], and microstructural changes [fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity]. There were no significant differences in Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (total or motor subscale) or Grooved Pegboard test scores between welders and controls. The synergy index during steady-state accurate force production was decreased significantly in the left hand of welders compared to controls (p=0.004) but did not reach statistical significance in the right hand (p=0.16). Anticipatory synergy adjustments, however, were not significantly different between groups. Among welders, higher synergy indices in the left hand were associated significantly with higher fractional anisotropy values in the left globus pallidus (R=0.731, psynergy metrics may serve

  7. Basal ganglia impairments in autism spectrum disorder are related to abnormal signal gating to prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Chantel S; Stocco, Andrea; Neuhaus, Emily; Kleinhans, Natalia M

    2016-10-01

    Research on the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder has yielded a list of brain abnormalities that are arguably as diverse as the set of behavioral symptoms that characterize the disorder. Among these are patterns of abnormal cortical connectivity and abnormal basal ganglia development. In attempts to integrate the existing literature, the current paper tests the hypothesis that impairments in the basal ganglia's function to flexibly select and route task-relevant neural signals to the prefrontal cortex underpins patterns of abnormal synchronization between the prefrontal cortex and other cortical processing centers observed in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We tested this hypothesis using a Dynamic Causal Modeling analysis of neuroimaging data collected from 16 individuals with ASD (mean age=25.3 years; 6 female) and 17 age- and IQ-matched neurotypical controls (mean age=25.6, 6 female), who performed a Go/No-Go test of executive functioning. Consistent with the hypothesis tested, a random-effects Bayesian model selection procedure determined that a model of network connectivity in which basal ganglia activation modulated connectivity between the prefrontal cortex and other key cortical processing centers best fit the data of both neurotypicals and individuals with ASD. Follow-up analyses suggested that the largest group differences were observed for modulation of connectivity between prefrontal cortex and the sensory input region in the occipital lobe [t(31)=2.03, p=0.025]. Specifically, basal ganglia activation was associated with a small decrease in synchronization between the occipital region and prefrontal cortical regions in controls; however, in individuals with ASD, basal ganglia activation resulted in increased synchronization between the occipital region and the prefrontal cortex. We propose that this increased synchronization may reflect a failure in basal ganglia signal gating mechanisms, resulting in a non-selective copying

  8. Effects of Sex and Stress on Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain-Like Behavior in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczeniewska, Olga Anna; Khan, Junad; Tao, Yuanxiang; Eliav, Eli; Benoliel, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects and interactions of sex and stress (provoked by chronic restraint [RS]) on pain-like behavior in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. The effects of sex and RS (carried out for 14 days as a model for stress) on somatosensory measures (reaction to pinprick, von Frey threshold) in a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain were examined. The study design was 2 × 4, with surgery (pain) and sham surgery (no pain) interacting with male restrained (RS) and unrestrained (nRS) rats and female RS and nRS rats. A total of 64 Sprague Dawley rats (32 males and 32 females) were used. Half of the animals in each sex group underwent RS, and the remaining half were left unstressed. Following the RS period, trigeminal neuropathic pain was induced by unilateral infraorbital nerve chronic constriction injury (IOCCI). Half of the animals in the RS group and half in the nRS group (both males and females) were exposed to IOCCI, and the remaining halves to sham surgery. Elevated plus maze (EPM) assessment and plasma interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels were used to measure the effects of RS. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to assess the effects of stress, sex, and their interactions on plasma IFN-γ levels, changes in body weight, EPM parameters, tactile allodynia, and mechanohyperalgesia. Pairwise comparisons were performed by using Tukey post hoc test corrected for multiple comparisons. Both male and female RS rats showed significantly altered exploratory behavior (as measured by EPM) and had significantly lower plasma IFN-γ levels than nRS rats. Rats exposed to RS gained weight significantly slower than the nRS rats, irrespective of sex. Following RS but before surgery, RS rats showed significant bilateral reductions in von Frey thresholds and significantly increased pinprick response difference scores compared to nRS rats, irrespective of sex. From 17 days postsurgery, RSIOCCI rats showed significantly reduced von Frey thresholds and

  9. Serological Survey for RHD Antibodies in Rabbits from Two Types of Rabbit Breeding Farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzner, A; Niedbalski, W

    2016-09-01

    Seroprevalence studies of RHDV antibodies in domestic rabbits were conducted between 2008-2014. A total of 12,169 sera from the provinces of central, southern and south-east Poland, including 7,570 samples collected from mixed-breed rabbits reared in smallholder farms and nearly 4,600 sera taken mainly from unvaccinated rabbits kept in industrial farms, were examined using ELISA tests. Additionally, cross-reactivity of selected tested and control archival sera using both classic RHDV and RHDVa antigens was determined by HI assay. The overall seroprevalence was 13.3%. In rabbits with unkown history of immunisation or RHD infection which came from small farms, RHDV antibodies were detected in 6.1% ranging between 1.0% to 17.2% of animals. In rabbits of the same group, but with a declared vaccination status, or confirmed exposure to an infectious virus, or coming from exposed females, the seroprevalence ranged from 83% to 100%. Among unvaccinated meat rabbits aged 71 to 90 days from industrial farms, low (1.85%, 4.17%, 11%), medium (34%, 54%) or high rates (98.7%) of seropositivity were detected. The seroconversion recorded in adult vaccinated females from industrial farms was 70% and 95%. Generally, the antibody levels examined by ELISAs and HI were comparable. However, a number of sera from the rabbits from small farms, as well as archival sera, showed clear differences. Several-fold differences in antibody titers, evidenced mainly in the postoutbreak sera, indictaed the contact of animals with RHDVa antigen. The overall results of the survey revealed a great proportion of seronegative rabbits potentially highly susceptible to RHD infection. In combination with the emergence of a novel pathogenic RHD virus type (RHDV2), it poses a severe risk of a next wave of fatal disease cases spreading in the native population of domestic rabbits, especially in farms with a traditional system of husbandry.

  10. Spatial–temporal signature of resting-state BOLD signals in classic trigeminal neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yanping Wang,1 Congying Xu,1 Liping Zhai,1 Xudong Lu,1 Xiaoqiang Wu,1 Yahui Yi,2 Ziyun Liu,1 Qiaobing Guan,1 Xiaoling Zhang1 1Department of Neurology, the Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, 2Department of Radiology, the Second Hospital of Jiaxing City, Jiaxing, Zhejiang, China Abstract: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI signals are spatiotemporally organized. R-fMRI studies in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia (CTN have suggested alterations in functional connectivity. However, far less attention has been given to investigations of the local oscillations and their frequency-specific changes in these patients. The objective of this study was to address this issue in patients with CTN. R-fMRI data from 17 patients with CTN and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HCs were analyzed using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF. The ALFF was computed across different frequencies (slow-4: 0.027–0.073 Hz; slow-5: 0.01–0.027 Hz; and typical band: 0.01–0.08 Hz in patients with CTN compared to HCs. In the typical band, patients with CTN showed increases of ALFF in bilateral temporal, occipital, and left middle frontal regions and in the left middle cingulate gyrus, as well as decreases of ALFF in the right inferior temporal region and in regions (medial prefrontal regions of default mode network. These significant group differences were identified in different sub-bands, with greater brainstem findings in higher frequencies (slow-4 and extensive default mode network and right postparietal results in lower frequencies (slow-5. Furthermore, significant relationships were found between subjective pain ratings and both amplitudes of higher frequency (slow-4 blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signals in pain localization brain regions and lower frequencies (slow-5 in pain signaling/modulating brain regions in the patients, and decreased ALFF within the prefrontal regions was significantly

  11. Multimodal Image-Based Virtual Reality Presurgical Simulation and Evaluation for Trigeminal Neuralgia and Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shujing; Zhang, Jiashu; Zhao, Yining; Hou, Yuanzheng; Xu, Xinghua; Zhang, Zhizhong; Kikinis, Ron; Chen, Xiaolei

    2018-05-01

    To address the feasibility and predictive value of multimodal image-based virtual reality in detecting and assessing features of neurovascular confliction (NVC), particularly regarding the detection of offending vessels, degree of compression exerted on the nerve root, in patients who underwent microvascular decompression for nonlesional trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm (HFS). This prospective study includes 42 consecutive patients who underwent microvascular decompression for classic primary trigeminal neuralgia or HFS. All patients underwent preoperative 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with T2-weighted three-dimensional (3D) sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions, 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and 3D T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced sequences in combination, whereas 2 patients underwent extra experimental preoperative 7.0-T MRI scans with the same imaging protocol. Multimodal MRIs were then coregistered with open-source software 3D Slicer, followed by 3D image reconstruction to generate virtual reality (VR) images for detection of possible NVC in the cerebellopontine angle. Evaluations were performed by 2 reviewers and compared with the intraoperative findings. For detection of NVC, multimodal image-based VR sensitivity was 97.6% (40/41) and specificity was 100% (1/1). Compared with the intraoperative findings, the κ coefficients for predicting the offending vessel and the degree of compression were >0.75 (P < 0.001). The 7.0-T scans have a clearer view of vessels in the cerebellopontine angle, which may have significant impact on detection of small-caliber offending vessels with relatively slow flow speed in cases of HFS. Multimodal image-based VR using 3D sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts by using different flip angle evolutions in combination with 3D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography sequences proved to be reliable in detecting NVC

  12. REPLACEMENT IN RABBIT HERDS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim F.M. Marai

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Doe rabbit's replacement constitutes the annual renewal rate of new breeders that must be incorporated into the production stock. Criterion for culling non-productive animals differs significantly among fryer production colonies, foundation stocks and a colony with continuous enzootic disease or continuous malnourishment. In commercial rabbit production, good management improves the health and productivity of the entire herd, by reducing the all-time high replacement rates and improving economic viability. In the present article, a comprehensive review of numerous experiences in the rabbit production field of different countries, was presented. Basic recommendations for professional breeders were h