WorldWideScience

Sample records for ra patients osteoarthritis

  1. Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Haq, I; Murphy, E; Dacre, J

    2003-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disorder characterised by cartilage loss. It is extremely prevalent in society and is a major cause of disability. It is important to treat osteoarthritis effectively using a multidisciplinary approach tailored to the patient's needs. This paper reviews current thinking on the aetiology, pathogenesis, investigations, and management of osteoarthritis. The paper also discusses the challenges for developing good quality outcome measures for use in large s...

  2. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Siddharth Kumar; Farooqi, Abid

    2008-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by cartilage loss. Its prevalence is high, and it is a major cause of disability. The cause of OA is not known; however, current evidence indicates that it is multifactorial. Major risk factors for osteoarthritis are age, female sex, obesity, geographic factors, occupational knee-bending, physical labour, genetic factors and race, joint trauma, vitamin D deficiency, and chondrocalcinosis. Osteoarthritis causes joint pain, stiffness, and limitation of joint function. Knee involvement is the commonest presentation of this disease all over the world. Given the absence of a curative treatment, it is important to treat osteoarthritis as effectively as possible using a multidisciplinary approach tailored to the patient's needs. This article reviews current thinking on the epidemiology, clinical presentation, lifestyle, genetic epidemiology, and management of osteoarthritis in developing countries.

  4. THE IMMUNOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTIC OF RA PATIENTS WITH ANAEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Sizikov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the investigation was to study the immunological characteristics of RA patients with anaemia. Clinical and laboratory data including the percentage of the main lymphocyte subclasses, phagocyte and DTH-effector activity, serum concentration of immunoglobulins, the percentage of cells producing IFNγ and/or IL-4 and percent of monocytes producing TNF. We revealed some significant clinical, laboratory and immunological differences between RA patients and healthy donors and between patients with and without anaemia. Our data demonstrate RA anemic patients to have more severe disorders than patients without anaemia. We also revealed some significant immunological differences between RA patients and healthy donors and between patients with and without anaemia, including percent of cells producing IFNγ and/or IL-4. Our data permit to conclude that RA patients have many different immunological disturbances, more severe in anaemic patients.

  5. Standing Stability in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. Karimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Being prevalent in the more than 40 years old persons, the knee osteoarthritis is one of the main factors in the function system failure mainly affecting their life. There is a type of instability in the persons with knee osteoarthritis, which is an increase in the domain and frequency of body pressure center. The aim of the present study was to compare the standing stability parameters in persons with knee osteoarthritis and healthy persons. Instrument & Methods: In this case-control, 15 patients with knee osteoarthritis referred to the physiotherapy clinic of the rehabilitation center and Al-Zahra hospital were studied in the muscle-skeletal research center of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2015. The subjects were selected via stratified sampling method. As control group, 15 healthy persons were also studied in Isfahan. Total path length and the domain and frequency of pressure center in different directions were measured to assess the stability. Data was analyzed by SPSS 19 software using descriptive statistics and paired T test. Findings: There were increases in the mean movement domain and the frequency of pressure center in the anterior-posterior and the internal-external directions, as well as in the total path proceeded by the pressure center in the internal-external direction, in the persons with knee osteoarthritis than the healthy persons (p0.05. Conclusion: Standing stability and balance in persons with knee osteoarthritis decreases compared to healthy persons.

  6. Pedobarographic findings in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kul-Panza, Evren; Berker, Nadire

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate pedobarographic findings and balance in knee osteoarthritis. A total of 48 patients with knee osteoarthritis and 30 controls were included in this study. Pedobarographic measures were obtained from all patients and controls. Pain intensity of patients was measured using the Visual Analog Scale. The percentage of pressure on forefoot and hindfoot was measured using static pedobarography, and the peak pressures at forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot were measured using dynamic pedobarography. The center-of-pressure sway length and width were measured for evaluation of balance. The percentage of right hindfoot pressure (P pressure of the right forefoot during walking were lower in the osteoarthritic group than in the controls (P Visual Analog Scale score at rest was negatively correlated with peak pressures of both right and left hindfeet in the osteoarthritic group (P pressures that change because of disturbed weightbearing and balance problems in knee osteoarthritis.

  7. Increased expression of interferon (IFN)-gamma together with IFN-gamma receptor in the rheumatoid synovial membrane compared with synovium of patients with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolhain, R.J.E.M.; Haar, N.T. ter; Hoefakker, S.; Tak, P.P.; Ley, M. de; Claassen, E.; Breedveld, F.C.; Miltenburg, A.M.M.

    1996-01-01

    Data concerning the presence of T-cell-derived cytokines in the rheumatic joint are conflicting, challenging the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a T-cell-mediated disease. In this study synovial tissue specimens of 11 patients with RA and eight patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were

  8. Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... live with osteoarthritis. A joint with severe osteoarthritis (representation) Osteoarthritis is a disease that damages the slippery ... into the skin at specific points on the body. Psychologists or social workers, who help with social ...

  9. Pain Treatment for patients with osteoarthritis and central sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Lluch Girbés, Enrique; Nijs, Jo; Torres Cueco, Rafael; Lopez Cubas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent, disabling, and costly pathologies of modern society. Among the main aims of osteoarthritis management are pain control and functional ability improvement. The exact cause of osteoarthritis pain remains unclear. In addition to the pathological changes in articular structures, changes in central pain processing or central sensitization appear to be involved in osteoarthritis pain. The latter calls for a broader approach to the management of patients w...

  10. Productivity loss due to absenteeism and presenteeism by different instruments in patients with RA and subjects without RA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman-Jansen, Louise Marie Antoinette; Kuper, Ina H.; van de Laar, Mart A F J; Taal, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the impact of at-work productivity loss on the total productivity cost by different instruments in patients recently diagnosed with RA and controls without RA. Methods. Cross-sectional data were collected from outpatients with RA between December 2007 and February 2008. The

  11. Plasma and synovial fluid adipocytokines in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Samir M; Hamdy, Maha S; Amer, Nehad

    2008-01-01

    Adipocytokines are hormone and cytokine like substances produced mainly from white adipose tissue. A relation between plasma adipocytokines and many inflammatory disorders including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had been investigated. This work was done to investigate the systemic behavior of the main adipocytokines at the plasma level as well as its local behavior at the synovial fluid level in patients with RA and osteoarthritis (OA). The study had been conducted on 32 patients with RA and 18 patients with OA. Paired blood and synovial fluid samples had been collected from all patients and level of plasma and synovial fluid (SF) leptin, adiponectin and resistin had been quantitated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results had been compared between RA group and OA group. Adipocytokines had also been compared in patients with erosive and non-erosive disease and had been related to clinical and laboratory markers of activity. Plasma resistin and BMI-corrected plasma leptin were significantly higher in RA group. Female patients showed significantly higher plasma leptin, even after correction to BMI. Studied SF adipocytokines were significantly higher in RA group and correlated positively with synovial fluid WBCs. Comparing plasma and SF results showed a significant increase in SF resistin especially in RA group and a significant drop of SF adiponectin especially in OA group. In conclusion, Adipocytokines are probably involved in inflammatory and degenerative articular disease. The different behavior between plasma and SF would suggest a pro-inflammatory role for resistin and chondro-protective role for adiponectin.

  12. Pulmonary cryptococcosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients: Comparison of imaging characteristics among RA, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and immunocompetent patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagawa, Noriyo, E-mail: noriyo_yana@ybb.ne.jp [Departments of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, 3-8-22, Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan); Sakai, Fumikazu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka-shi, Saitama 350-1298 (Japan); Takemura, Tamiko [Department of Pathology, Japanese Red Cross Medical Center, 4-1-22 Hiroo, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo 150-8935 (Japan); Ishikawa, Satoru [Department of Respiratory Medicine, National Hospital Organization Chiba-East-Hospital, 673 Nitona-cho, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 260-8712 (Japan); Takaki, Yasunobu [Departments of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, 3-8-22, Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan); Hishima, Tsunekazu [Department of Pathology, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, 3-8-22, Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan); Kamata, Noriko [Departments of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Diseases Center Komagome Hospital, 3-8-22, Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8677 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The imaging characteristics of cryptococcosis in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were analyzed by comparing them with those of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and immunocompetent patients, and the imaging findings were correlated with pathological findings. Methods: Two radiologists retrospectively compared the computed tomographic (CT) findings of 35 episodes of pulmonary cryptococcosis in 31 patients with 3 kinds of underlying states (10 RA, 12 AIDS, 13 immunocompetent), focusing on the nature, number, and distribution of lesions. The pathological findings of 18 patients (8 RA, 2 AIDS, 8 immunocompetent) were analyzed by two pathologists, and then correlated with imaging findings. Results: The frequencies of consolidation and ground glass attenuation (GGA) were significantly higher, and the frequency of peripheral distribution was significantly lower in the RA group than in the immunocompetent group. Peripheral distribution was less common and generalized distribution was more frequent in the RA group than in the AIDS group. The pathological findings of the AIDS and immunocompetent groups reflected their immune status: There was lack of a granuloma reaction in the AIDS group, and a complete granuloma reaction in the immunocompetent group, while the findings of the RA group varied, including a complete granuloma reaction, a loose granuloma reaction and a hyper-immune reaction. Cases with the last two pathologic findings were symptomatic and showed generalized or central distribution on CT. Conclusion: Cryptococcosis in the RA group showed characteristic radiological and pathological findings compared with the other 2 groups.

  13. Posturography in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, B; Czerwosz, L; Hallay-Suszek, M; Sadura-Sieklucka, T; Księżopolska-Orłowska, K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the paper was to investigate the usefulness of posturographic analysis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). RA is a chronic inflammatory disorder responsible for destruction of active and passive components of joints. It is the most common autoimmune disease, and the second most common form of arthritis after OA. OA is a chronic disorder characterized by irreversible changes in the joint structure developing with advancing age. Both diseases lead to the destruction of many parts of the motor system, cause pain, weakness, and damage of ligaments, muscles, bones, and articular cartilage. The etiology of the diseases remains unknown. In the present study, evaluation of body balance in the standing position was performed by means of Pro-Med force plate system. Three posturographic tests were applied: with eyes open, closed, and with the biofeedback--under conscious visual control of body movements. The following posturographic parameters were measured: the radius of sways, the developed area, and the total length of posturograms, and also two directional components of sways: the length of left-right (in frontal plane) and forward-backward (in sagittal plane) motions. The results demonstrate that the biofeedback test is most useful in the evaluation of instability in rheumatic patients; it is more powerful than the other posturographic tests evaluated.

  14. Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allen, Kelli D; Choong, Peter F; Davis, Aileen M

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a leading cause of pain and disability worldwide. Despite the existence of evidence-based treatments and guidelines, substantial gaps remain in the quality of OA management. There is underutilization of behavioral and rehabilitative strategies to prevent and treat OA as well...... as a lack of processes to tailor treatment selection according to patient characteristics and preferences. There are emerging efforts in multiple countries to implement models of OA care, particularly focused on improving nonsurgical management. Although these programs vary in content and setting, key...

  15. Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis. It causes pain, swelling, and reduced motion in your ... it affects your hands, knees, hips or spine. Osteoarthritis breaks down the cartilage in your joints. Cartilage ...

  16. Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is nowadays one of the most frequent chronic diseases and, with the increase in life expectancy, both its prevalence and incidence is expected to rise. This condition is progressive and leads to functional decline and loss in quality of life, with important health care and society costs. A review of relevant and recent literature on osteoarthritis was performed in PubMed. The purpose of this study is to understand important aspects about osteoarthritis estimates, burden of dise...

  17. Taping reduces pain and disability in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, E. van den

    2004-01-01

    Question: Is taping of the knee effective in improving pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee? Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting University and private practices in Melbourne, Australia. Patients: Volunteers who responded to advertisements in local newspapers.

  18. Productivity loss due to absenteeism and presenteeism by different instruments in patients with RA and subjects without RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakman-Jansen, Louise M A; Taal, Erik; Kuper, Ina H; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2012-02-01

    To explore the impact of at-work productivity loss on the total productivity cost by different instruments in patients recently diagnosed with RA and controls without RA. Cross-sectional data were collected from outpatients with RA between December 2007 and February 2008. The control group was formed by subjects without RA matched on age and gender. Absenteeism and presenteeism were estimated by the Quantity and Quality (QQ) Questionnaire, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire General Health V2.0 (WPAI-GH) and Health and Labor Questionnaire (HLQ) questionnaires. Differences between groups were tested by Mann-Whitney U-test. Costs were valued by the human capital approach. Data were available from 62 patients with a paid job and 61 controls. QQ- and WPAI-GH scores of presenteeism were moderately correlated (r = 0.61) while the HLQ presenteeism score correlated poorly with the other instruments (r = 0.34). The contribution of presenteeism on total productivity costs was estimated at ∼70% in the RA group. The mean costs per person per week due to presenteeism varied between €79 and €318 per week in the RA group, dependent on the instrument used. The costs due to presenteeism were about two to four times higher in the RA group compared with the control group. This study indicates that the impact of presenteeism on the total productivity costs in patients with RA is high. However, work productivity in individuals without RA was not optimal either, which implies a risk of overestimation of cost when a normal score is not taken into account. Finally, different presenteeism instruments lead to different results.

  19. Taping reduces pain and disability in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    van den Ende, Els

    2004-01-01

    Question: Is taping of the knee effective in improving pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee? Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting University and private practices in Melbourne, Australia. Patients: Volunteers who responded to advertisements in local newspapers. Inclusion criteria were symptoms of knee osteoarthritis as defined by the American College of Rheumatology. Exclusion criteria included allergy to tape, or history of joint replacement, symptoms or sig...

  20. Differences in zinc status between patients with osteoarthritis and osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ovesen, Janne; Møller-Madsen, Bjarne; Nielsen, Poul Torben

    2009-01-01

    Zinc has been suggested to play an important role in the development of osteoporosis, whereas the influence of zinc on osteoarthritis has attracted much less attention. The aim of the study was to investigate and compare the zinc status and bone turnover, density, and biomechanical properties...... of osteoarthritic and osteoporotic patients. The study comprised 40 women who underwent hip replacement due to osteoarthritis or osteoporosis. Serum and urine zinc content, and bone resorption markers and serum bone formation markers were determined. The unaffected hip and the exarticulated affected femoral head...... that osteoporosis and osteoarthritis rarely occur in the same individual....

  1. Human Endogenous Retrovirus W Activity in Cartilage of Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signy Bendiksen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of viruses in osteoarthritis remains controversial because the prevalence of viral nucleic acid sequences in peripheral blood or synovial fluid from osteoarthritis patients and that in healthy control subjects are similar. Until now the presence of virus has not been analyzed in cartilage. We screened cartilage and chondrocytes from advanced and non-/early osteoarthritis patients for parvovirus B19, herpes simplex virus-1, Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpes virus-6, hepatitis C virus, and human endogenous retroviruses transcripts. Endogenous retroviruses transcripts, but none of the other viruses, were detected in 15 out the 17 patients. Sequencing identified the virus as HERV-WE1 and E2. HERV-W activity was confirmed by high expression levels of syncytin, dsRNA, virus budding, and the presence of virus-like particles in all advanced osteoarthritis cartilages examined. Low levels of HERV-WE1, but not E2 envelope RNA, were observed in 3 out of 8 non-/early osteoarthritis patients, while only 3 out of 7 chondrocytes cultures displayed low levels of syncytin, and just one was positive for virus-like particles. This study demonstrates for the first time activation of HERV-W in cartilage of osteoarthritis patients; however, a causative role for HERV-W in development or deterioration of the disease remains to be proven.

  2. [Quality of life in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernad-Pineda, M; de Las Heras-Sotos, J; Garcés-Puentes, M V

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of life in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis through self-assessment and those made by the physician. An observational and cross-sectional multicenter study in which 628 traumatologists or rheumatologists evaluated 1,849 patients with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis, aged ≥ 50 years old, and representative of 49 Spanish provinces. Each researcher evaluated three patients and also completed the SF-12v2 health questionnaire. The patients completed the WOMAC and SF-12v2 questionnaires. The patients were 68.5 ± 9.5 years old, 61.5% had knee osteoarthritis, 19% had hip osteoarthritis, and 19.5% in both locations. Older patients and those who had both knee and hip osteoarthritis had a poorer quality of life, according to patients and researchers. Physical health perceived by the researchers was better than patients reported (36.74 ± 8.6 and 35.21 ± 8.53; respectively, p<0.001), and the mental health score was similar between physicians and patients. Kellgren/Lawrence scale and test Timed Up & Go predict better the quality of life, assessed by WOMAC and SF-12v2 questionnaires. This is the Spanish study on quality of life in osteoarthritis of the knee and hip of larger amplitude and number of patients. These results could be considered as reference values of Spanish population aged ≥ 50 years with knee or hip osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Generation of disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaecheol; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Diecke, Sebastian; Kim, Juryun; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Jung, Seung Min; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Yong Goo; Park, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2014-02-04

    Since the concept of reprogramming mature somatic cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was demonstrated in 2006, iPSCs have become a potential substitute for embryonic stem cells (ESCs) given their pluripotency and "stemness" characteristics, which resemble those of ESCs. We investigated to reprogram fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) to generate iPSCs using a 4-in-1 lentiviral vector system. A 4-in-1 lentiviral vector containing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc was transduced into RA and OA FLSs isolated from the synovia of two RA patients and two OA patients. Immunohistochemical staining and real-time PCR studies were performed to demonstrate the pluripotency of iPSCs. Chromosomal abnormalities were determined based on the karyotype. SCID-beige mice were injected with iPSCs and sacrificed to test for teratoma formation. After 14 days of transduction using the 4-in-1 lentiviral vector, RA FLSs and OA FLSs were transformed into spherical shapes that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Colonies were picked and cultivated on matrigel plates to produce iPSC lines. Real-time PCR of RA and OA iPSCs detected positive markers of pluripotency. Immunohistochemical staining tests with Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, Tra-1-80, Tra-1-60, and SSEA-4 were also positive. Teratomas that comprised three compartments of ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm were formed at the injection sites of iPSCs. Established iPSCs were shown to be compatible by karyotyping. Finally, we confirmed that the patient-derived iPSCs were able to differentiate into osteoblast, which was shown by an osteoimage mineralization assay. FLSs derived from RA and OA could be cell resources for iPSC reprogramming. Disease- and patient-specific iPSCs have the potential to be applied in clinical settings as source materials for molecular diagnosis and regenerative therapy.

  4. Optimization of scAAVIL-1ra In Vitro and In Vivo to Deliver High Levels of Therapeutic Protein for Treatment of Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie R Goodrich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA affects over 40 million people annually. We evaluated interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra gene transfer in an equine model based on IL-1ra protein therapy which inhibits inflammation through blocking IL-1. Using the self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAVIL-1ra equine gene as a starting construct, we optimized the transgene cassette by analyzing promoters (cytomegalovirus (CMV versus chicken β-actin hybrid (CBh, coding sequences (optimized versus unoptimized, vector capsid (serotype 2 versus chimeric capsid, and biological activity in vitro. AAV serotypes 2 and 2.5 CMV scAAVoptIL-1ra were tested in equine joints. We evaluated two doses of scAAVIL-1ra, scAAVGFP, and saline. We developed a novel endoscopy procedure and confirmed vector-derived transgene expression (GFP in chondrocytes 6 months post-injection. AAVIL-1ra therapeutic protein levels were 200–800 ng/ml of synovial fluid over 23 and 186 days, respectively. No evidence of intra-articular toxicity was detected and no vector genomes were found in contralateral joints based on GFP fluorescence microscopy and quantitative PCR. Finally, we assayed vector-derived IL-1ra activity based on functional assays which supported anti-inflammatory activity of our protein. These studies represent the first large animal intra-articular gene transfer approach with a therapeutic gene using scAAV and demonstrate high levels of protein production over extended time supporting further clinical investigation using scAAV gene therapy for OA.

  5. Energy efficient LoRa GPS tracker for dementia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadwen, Tim; Smallbon, Vanessa; Qing Zhang; D'Souza, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    Continuous GPS tracking devices always suffer short battery life when used by caregivers to reduce the risk of wandering to dangerous areas by dementia patients. Currently the best existing tracker for dementia patients on the market only supports less than 10 hours battery life with a gigantic battery. It not only requires daily battery charging from patients/caregivers, but also becomes a very restrictive device. In this paper we inspected individual energy consumption of the components in a GPS tracker and proposed a novel energy efficient, small wristband by integrating the latest LoRa communication and GPS duty cycling technologies. We verify our prototype's communication distance and energy efficiency through extensive experiments in the real world. Our model and data show the GPS wristband is able to support up to 40 hours continuous GPS tracking with a frequent 60 seconds location update rate. Its range also spans 3km, effectively monitoring patient locations.

  6. Radiation exposure of relatives of patients treated with Ra-223 dichloride; Strahlenexposition von Angehoerigen bei Therapie mit Ra-223-Dichlorid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, C.; Szermerski, B.; Solle, A.; Geworski, L. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany). Stabsstelle Strahlenschutz und Abt. Medizinische Physik; Pinkert, J. [Bayer Vital GmbH, Leverkusen (Germany); Kranert, W.T. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Andreeff, M. [Universitaetsklinikum ' ' Carl Gustav Carus' ' TU Dresden (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2015-07-01

    Since November 2013, a radiopharmaceutical containing Ra-223 dichloride as active substance is approved in the European Union for patients with castration resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases and no known visceral metastases. Ra-223 (T{sub 1/2} = 11.43 d) decays via a chain of 4 alpha and 2 beta decays. This therapy is presently the only application of an alpha emitter in clinical routine therapy. To show that the exposure of relatives and caregivers of patients treated with Ra-223 dichloride in an outpatient setting does not exceed a value of 1 mSv, the multicenter study ''RAPSODY'' was conducted. As Ra-223 and most of its progeny emit alpha particles, the internal exposure had to be evaluated in particular. Within this study, measurements of the radiation emitted from the patient were performed using standard dose-rate meters. Wipe-tests were taken in the patients' homes to identify significant contaminations and evaluated by liquid scintillation counting. Samples of saliva and sweat were taken and measured using gamma spectrometry. Ra-223 disintegrates to the noble gas Rn-219 and was measured in the exhaled breath from the patients using conventional Radon Monitors. Furthermore, a computational fluid dynamics simulation (CFD) was performed to assess the radioactivity in the air, which could be inhaled by persons close to the patient. Conclusions: The potential exposure of relatives and caregivers by external irradiation and incorporation of radioactivity exhaled or excreted by the patient with saliva or sweat is well below 1 mSv. No objections are seen regarding outpatient treatment. This paper summarizes contents of a poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  7. Clinical pattern of knee osteoarthritis in patients seen at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical pattern of knee osteoarthritis in patients seen at rheumatology clinic of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Northwestern Nigeria. ... Forty per cent of the patients had history of knee swelling, with a median duration of 24 months (range 1-120) before presentation. Majority of the patients (92%) had morning stiffness, with ...

  8. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis is a chronic disease affecting the lives of patients and their families, with the family characteristics moderating the illness course. The perceived social support received by a patient helps in determining the health and functionality of the patient. Methods: A cross-sectional study was ...

  9. [Risk factors for osteoporotic fractures of spine in RA patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Liu, Qiming; Zhao, Qinghua; Zhang, Jian; Li, Feng; Zhang, Ke

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the risk factors of osteoporotic fractures (OPF) in patients with RA. From February 2011 to March 2015, 244 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were treated in Department of Orthopedics, Huaibei People's Hospital, according to the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures (OPF) into the OPF group (n=31) and the non OPF group (n=213), observed two groups general information, glucocorticoid usinge, -28 joint disease activity score (DAS28), health status Questionnaire (HAQ), C-reactive protein (CRP), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), etc. OPF group the mean age and disease duration for (64.3±10.9) years and (9.0±3.3) years were significantly higher than that of non OPF group (57.4±11.2) years and (6.0±2.7) years (POPF group and non OPF group ESR, CRP, anti CCP, HAQ and DAS28 difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05); OPF group sharp score (56.0±18.4), hormone use time (785 d), and hormone cumulant (7,100 mg·d) were significantly higher than that in non OPF group [sharp score (86.1±17.1), hormone use time (191 d), and hormone cumulant (1,900 mg·d)], the difference was statistically significant (POPF femoral neck, Ward area, total femur area and thoracic spine 2-3 bone mineral density T value significantly lower than non OPF group (P<0.05). Age and osteoporosis are risk factors for the occurrence of osteoporotic fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, so patients should conduct a risk assessment to guide rational drug use.

  10. Development of key performance indicators to evaluate centralized intake for patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Claire E; Patel, Jatin N; Woodhouse, Linda; Smith, Christopher; Weiss, Stephen; Homik, Joanne; LeClercq, Sharon; Mosher, Dianne; Christiansen, Tanya; Howden, Jane Squire; Wasylak, Tracy; Greenwood-Lee, James; Emrick, Andrea; Suter, Esther; Kathol, Barb; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Grant, Sean; Campbell-Scherer, Denise; Phillips, Leah; Hendricks, Jennifer; Marshall, Deborah A

    2015-11-14

    Centralized intake is integral to healthcare systems to support timely access to appropriate health services. The aim of this study was to develop key performance indicators (KPIs) to evaluate centralized intake systems for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Phase 1 involved stakeholder meetings including healthcare providers, managers, researchers and patients to obtain input on candidate KPIs, aligned along six quality dimensions: appropriateness, accessibility, acceptability, efficiency, effectiveness, and safety. Phase 2 involved literature reviews to ensure KPIs were based on best practices and harmonized with existing measures. Phase 3 involved a three-round, online modified Delphi panel to finalize the KPIs. The panel consisted of two rounds of rating and a round of online and in-person discussions. KPIs rated as valid and important (≥7 on a 9-point Likert scale) were included in the final set. Twenty-five KPIs identified and substantiated during Phases 1 and 2 were submitted to 27 panellists including healthcare providers, managers, researchers, and patients in Phase 3. After the in-person meeting, three KPIs were removed and six were suggested. The final set includes 9 OA KPIs, 10 RA KPIs and 9 relating to centralized intake processes for both conditions. All 28 KPIs were rated as valid and important. Arthritis stakeholders have proposed 28 KPIs that should be used in quality improvement efforts when evaluating centralized intake for OA and RA. The KPIs measure five of the six dimensions of quality and are relevant to patients, practitioners and health systems.

  11. Pain distribution in primary care patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Erik; Overgaard, Søren; Vestergaard, Jacob T

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common diagnosis in primary care adult patients presenting with hip pain but pain location and pain distribution in primary care patients with hip OA have been reported inadequately. OBJECTIVE: To describe pain location and pain distribution...

  12. Drugs or disease: evaluating salivary function in RA patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Regina TORRES

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral complications of RA may include temporomandibular joint disorders, mucosa alterations and symptoms of dry mouth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the salivary gland function of subjects with rheumatoid arthritis (RA comparing it to healthy controls. Subjects with other systemic conditions known to affect salivary functions were excluded. A questionnaire was applied for the evaluation of xerostomia. Resting and chewing-stimulated salivary flow rates (SFR were obtained under standard conditions. There were 145 subjects included of the study (104 RA and 38 controls. About 66.7% of the RA subjects and 2.4% in control group presented xerostomia. The median resting SFR were 0.24 ml/min for RA subjects and 0.40 mL/min for controls (p = 0.04. The median stimulated SFR were 1.31 mL/min for RA subjects and 1.52 ml/min for controls (p = 0.33. No significant differences were found between resting and stimulated SFR of RA subjects not using xerogenic medications and controls. There was significantly higher number of subjects presenting hyposalivation in the RA group than among controls, even when subjects using xerogenic medications were eliminated from the analysis. In conclusion, hyposalivation and xerostomia were more frequent among RA subjects not using xerogenic medication than among controls, although there were no significant differences in the median SFR between groups.

  13. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA

  14. Sensorimotor changes and functional performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, Michael V.; Scott, David L; Rees, Joanne; Newham, Di J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Muscles are essential components of our sensorimotor system that help maintain balance and perform a smooth gait, but it is unclear whether arthritic damage adversely affects muscle sensorimotor function. Quadriceps sensorimotor function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) was investigated, and whether these changes were associated with impairment of functional performance. METHODS: Quadriceps strength, voluntary activation, and proprioceptive acuity (joint position sense acu...

  15. Treatment modalities for patients with varus medial knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Duivenvoorden (Tijs)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most common joint disorders in the Western population, which causes pain, stiffness, loss of function and disability. In patients with OA the cartilage, located at the ends of long bones, is damaged. OA is most prevalent in the knee

  16. Sonographic Imaging of Meniscal Subluxation in Patients with Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hung Ko

    2007-09-01

    Conclusion: Meniscal subluxation is a prominent feature on weight-bearing sonographic imaging in patients with radiographic osteoarthritis and could be considered as a risk factor for the development of knee osteoarthritis. By using musculoskeletal ultrasonography, one can detect this occult meniscal derangement early before the appearance of radiographic signs of osteoarthritis.

  17. Factors Related to Standing Balance in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Hye Jeong; Ko, Saebyuk; Hong, Hyeon Mi; Ok, Eunjae; Lee, Jong In

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess factors related to standing balance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods In total, 37 female patients with painful knee OA were included. Pain, knee alignment, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade were evaluated accordingly. Static standing balance was measured with a force-platform system under two different conditions: static standing with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) for 30 seconds. The mean speed (mm/s) of movement of the center of pressure in the anter...

  18. Follow-up study of late effects in /sup 224/Ra treated ankylosing spondylitis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, R.R.; Goessner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Fifteen hundred thirty-one patients treated with /sup 224/Ra from 14 hospitals in the F.R.G. and 267 control patients with ankylosing spondylitis not treated with any form of ionizing radiation are being followed. Since 1970 three cases of malignant tumour in the skeleton have been found among /sup 224/Ra-treated patients with skeletal doses below 90 rad compared with 0.4-0.6 expected. Two of these three cases were tumours of the bone marrow. An effect of /sup 224/Ra on the haematopoietic system cannot be excluded. Also, seven cases of cataract were found among 274 /sup 224/Ra patients. The mean time since /sup 224/Ra treatment was 26 yr. The mean age at diagnosis was 66 yr. The cataract incidence was not unusual for people of this age.

  19. Secretory activity of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in male patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis - association with clinical and laboratory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontny, Ewa; Zielińska, Agnieszka; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna; Głuszko, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue exerts widespread effects on the metabolism and immune system, but its activity differs between the genders. In the general population low-grade adipose tissue inflammation contributes to development of diseases of affluence. Little is known about the systemic impact of peripheral fat tissue in osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), characterized by chronic, low- and high-grade systemic inflammation, respectively. To clarify this we evaluated the secretory activity of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAAT) obtained from male patients affected with RA (n = 21) and OA (n = 13), and assessed its association with body mass and composition, demographic, clinical and laboratory data. Basal and interleukin (IL)-1β-triggered secretion of selected adipocytokines from SAAT explants was measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Patients' body composition was evaluated by bioelectric impendence technique. Rheumatoid SAAT secreted more adiponectin and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) than respective osteoarthritis tissue. In both RA and OA patient groups, stimulation of SAAT explants with IL-1β (1 ng/ml/100 mg tissue) significantly up-regulated release of pro-(IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor - TNF) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines but had no effect on the secretion of adiponectin, leptin, MIF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Compared with RA, patients with OA were more obese. In RA patients SAAT-released adiponectin and TNF inversely correlated with body mass index (BMI) and visceral fat rating (FVSC). In addition, SAAT-secreted adiponectin and leptin positively correlated with DAS28 and disease duration, respectively. In the OA group tissue-released TNF positively correlated with patients' age. We conclude that in RA male patients adipocytokines originating from SAAT are of clinical importance because: (i) adiponectin and TNF may contribute to maintenance of normal body composition and mass, (ii

  20. The rate of hip osteoarthritis in patients with proximal femoral fractures versus hip contusion

    OpenAIRE

    Robstad, B.; Frihagen, F.; Nordsletten, L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We found no difference in the rate of radiological hip osteoarthritis in the injured hip when comparing 349 patients with proximal femoral fractures and 112 patients with hip contusion. There was, however, a tendency for more osteoarthritis in patients with trochanteric fractures than in patients with femoral neck fractures. Introduction Osteoarthritis (OA) and osteoporotic fractures are two age-related disorders associated with considerable morbidity. There is a clinical impression o...

  1. Gender differences in gait kinematics for patients with knee osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Sean T Osis; Blayne A Hettinga; Kobsar, Dylan; Ferber, Reed

    2016-01-01

    Background Females have a two-fold risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) as compared to their male counterparts and atypical walking gait biomechanics are also considered a factor in the aetiology of knee OA. However, few studies have investigated sex-related differences in walking mechanics for patients with knee OA and of those, conflicting results have been reported. Therefore, this study was designed to examine the differences in gait kinematics (1) between male and female subjects ...

  2. Specificities of anti-neutrophil autoantibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, J; Halberg, P; Jacobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize antigens recognized by neutrophil-specific autoantibodies from patients with RA. Sera from 62 RA patients were screened by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). Positive sera were further tested by ELISAs for antibodies against various granule proteins......D from nuclei. In conclusion, anti-neutrophil autoantibodies from RA patients recognize different antigens in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Lactoferrin is one of the common antigens recognized, but also unknown nuclear antigens of 25-35 kD mol. wt are involved....

  3. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B; Lohmander, Stefan; Christensen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology...... of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus...... lesion and mild/no knee osteoarthritis, is greater after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than following sham surgery....

  4. Osteoblastic potential of infrapatellar fat pad-derived mesenchymal stem cells from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalska, Urszula; Prochorec-Sobieszek, Monika; Kontny, Ewa

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the osteoblastic potential of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) from infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP) of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients in comparison to osteoarthritis (OA) patients, as well as the influence of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) on osteoblastic ASC differentiation in vitro. ASCs were isolated from IPFP of RA and OA patients. After expansion, cells were cultured in osteogenic medium with or without TNFα. After 2 weeks, expression of BMP-2, Runx-2, osterix (Osx), collagen 1a1 (Col1a1) and osteopontin (OPN) messenger RNA (mRNA) was assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and calcium deposition by alizarin red staining. Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) protein concentrations were measured in culture supernatants using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both RA- and OA-ASCs cultured in osteogenic medium showed calcium deposition. The expression of Runx2 and OPN mRNA was increased in RA-ASCs. These cells expressed significantly more Osx and OPN than OA-ASCs. TNFα potentiated calcium deposition, up-regulated Runx2 and BMP-2 but down-regulated Col1a1 and OPN expression. In osteogenic cultures DKK-1 concentration was increased but that of OPG decreased, whereas TNFα elevated secretion of both cytokines. RA-ASCs have comparable or slightly stronger osteogenic potential than OA-ASCs. RA-ASCs seem to be more sensitive to TNFα treatment. TNFα exerts complex effects on ASC osteoblastogenesis, enhances expression of early osteogenic markers and calcium deposition, inhibits expression of mRNA coding for non-mineral bone components and alters ASC secretory activity. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Obese and non-obese patients with osteoarthritis: a comparison of functioning and outcome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Dekker, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of obesity among patients with osteoarthritis is high. To find the optimal treatment it is interesting to study in which aspects obese patients with osteoarthritis differ from non-obese patients. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of obesity on (i)

  6. Self-reported knee instability and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis: results of the Amsterdam osteoarthritis cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Esch, M.; Knoop, J.; van der Leeden, M.; Voorneman, R.; Gerritsen, M.; Reiding, D.; Romviel, S.; Knol, D.L.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.; Roorda, L.D.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether self-reported knee instability is associated with activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), in addition to knee pain and muscle strength. A cohort of 248 patients diagnosed with knee OA was examined. Self-reported knee

  7. The association between radiographic severity and pre-operative function in patients undergoing primary knee replacement for osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowsey, Michelle M; Dieppe, Paul; Lohmander, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    To determine the association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and pre-operative function in patients undergoing primary knee replacement.......To determine the association between radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) and pre-operative function in patients undergoing primary knee replacement....

  8. Orthopedic communication about osteoarthritis treatment: Does patient race matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Leslie R M; Hanusa, Barbara H; Kresevic, Denise M; Zickmund, Susan; Ling, Bruce S; Gordon, Howard S; Kwoh, C Kent; Mor, Maria K; Hannon, Michael J; Cohen, Peter Z; Grant, Richard; Ibrahim, Said A

    2011-05-01

    To understand racial disparities in the use of total joint replacement, we examined whether there were racial differences in patient-provider communication about treatment of chronic knee and hip osteoarthritis in a sample of African American and white patients referred to Veterans Affairs orthopedic clinics. Audio recorded visits between patients and orthopedic surgeons were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System and the Informed Decision-Making model. Racial differences in communication outcomes were assessed using linear regression models adjusted for study design, patient characteristics, and clustering by provider. The sample (n = 402) included 296 white and 106 African American patients. Most patients were men (95%) and ages 50-64 years (68%). Almost half (41%) reported an income <$20,000. African American patients were younger and reported lower incomes than white patients. Visits with African American patients contained less discussion of biomedical topics (β = -9.14; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] -16.73, -1.54) and more rapport-building statements (β = 7.84; 95% CI 1.85, 13.82) than visits with white patients. However, no racial differences were observed with regard to length of visit, overall amount of dialogue, discussion of psychosocial issues, patient activation/engagement statements, physician verbal dominance, display of positive affect by patients or providers, or discussion related to informed decision making. In this sample, communication between orthopedic surgeons and patients regarding the management of chronic knee and hip osteoarthritis did not, for the most part, vary by patient race. These findings diminish the potential role of communication in Veterans Affairs orthopedic settings as an explanation for well-documented racial disparities in the use of total joint replacement. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  9. Assessing Medication Adherence in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    the moat useful method Jn the dnlcal aetting The Morisky Medle1tion Adherence Scale ( MMAS ) waa developed to UHH medlcebon adherence Intent 1nd hll...been v1Ud11ed in sever.I common dl1HM but not In RA There ue several v1ri1tion1 of the MMAS but we used the MMA $a8 which hll eight qu11tion1 The...than 1 minute 1IO oomplei. lh• MMAS -3 OBJECTIVES The p.n.m1ry cbjec:trve i i to dtt1rm1ne tf there 11 a conellt>on between the COR Uil, COR5, and

  10. Polymorphism analysis of IL17RA gene to the IL17RA concentration and chronicity differences in nefritis lupus NL patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahrus Ismail

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nefritis lupus (NL is autoimmune disease and one of serious complication from Systemic Eritematosus Lupus (LES. Clinical manifestation of NL was variated, there are hematuria microscopic asymptomatic until renal failure. In addition of clinical manifestation, the NL disorder degree also measured from histopathological grade. Although, the mechanism that mixed up with pathogenesis of NL was known, however the cytokine also play a role to the disease process. The cytokine that assumpted have a role to the inflammation is IL-17RA, the increase production of IL-17RA influenced to the in-flammation and NL chronicity degree. The aim of this study to analyzed the relationship between polymorphism of IL-17RA gene, blood IL-17RA con-centration with the NL disorder degree. These studies were used cross sectional with control case design. The sample were used 40 patients consist NL pa-tients and Lupus patient without nephritis as a control. The polymorphisms of IL-17RA gene were investigated by using PCR method and gene sequence analysis. The alterations of allele frequency of IL-17RA gene were analyzed by bioinformatics method. The bloods IL-17RA concentration were in-vestigated by ELISA method. The NL chronicity degrees were investigated by NL histopathological grade. The hypothesis were proofed by data normality test and homogeneity test, Chi-square and Odds ratio, Spearman correlation by using SPSS 17.0 for windows. The result of showed that there are sig-nificantly different between IL-17RA gene mutant genotype frequency of NL patient (NL with the control patient with value OR 8.48. There are sig-nificantly different between G allele of IL-17RA gene of NL patient (case with the control patient with the value OR 4.17. There are no significantly di-fferent between IL-17RA concentrations of NL patient (case with the different chronicity value. There are positive correlation with the OR value 4.17 bet-ween IL-17RA concentrations with the chronicity value

  11. Health care costs in US patients with and without a diagnosis of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le TK

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available T Kim Le1, Leslie B Montejano2, Zhun Cao2, Yang Zhao1, Dennis Ang31Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, 2Thomson Reuters, Washington, DC, 3Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: Osteoarthritis is a chronic and costly condition affecting 14% of adults in the US, and has a significant impact on patient quality of life. This retrospective cohort study compared direct health care utilization and costs between patients with osteoarthritis and a matched control group without osteoarthritis.Methods: MarketScan® databases were used to identify adult patients with an osteoarthritis claim (ICD-9-CM, 715.xx in 2007, and the date of first diagnosis served as the index. Patients were excluded if they did not have 12 months of continuous health care benefit prior to and following the index date, were aged <18 years, or lacked a second diagnosis code for osteoarthritis between 15 and 365 days pre-index or post-index. Osteoarthritis patients were matched 1:1 to patients without osteoarthritis for age group, gender, geographic region, health plan type, and Medicare eligibility. Multivariate analyses were conducted to assess for differences in utilization and costs, controlling for differences between cohorts.Results: The study sample included 258,237 patients with osteoarthritis and 258,237 matched controls without osteoarthritis. Most patients were women and over 55 years of age. Patients with osteoarthritis had significantly higher pre-index rates of comorbidity than controls. Mean total adjusted direct costs for osteoarthritis patients were more than double those for the control group at US$18,435 (95% confidence interval [CI]: US$18,318–US$18,560 versus US$7494 (95% CI: US$7425–US$7557. Osteoarthritis patients incurred significantly higher inpatient costs at US$6668 (95% CI: US$6587–US$6744 versus US$1756 (95% CI: US$1717–US$1794, outpatient costs at US$7840 (95% CI: US$7786–US$7902 versus US$3675 (95% CI: US

  12. A Young Patient with Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Alajbeg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a case of a young patient who sought help because of pain in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ. She also reported increasing of pain during chewing. Clinical examination revealed limited mouth opening with uncorrected deviation to the ipsilateral side. Palpation of the lateral pole of the right condyle discovered crepitus, and maximum assisted opening elicited a report of “familiar pain”. The diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the TMJ (RDC / TMD criteria, Axis I, Group III was confirmed by CBCT of TMJ. There is no “gold standard” for the management of TMD, but the need for TMD treatment has to be based on precise indications related to the presence of pain, limitation in function of the lower jaw and signs of degenerative joint disease. Conservative, reversible therapeutic procedures are considered as the first choice for TMD treatment and their task is to improve the function of the entire masticatory system. In this case patient was treated with the combination of physical therapy and stabilization splint, in order to reduce the pain and restore the normal function of the lower jaw. At 6 months’ follow-up symptoms have almost completely disappeared, while 3 years later, the patient still has no significant subjective symptoms. In the present case non-invasive therapy was sufficient to bring, otherwise recurrent nature of osteoarthritis, in complete remission and keep it like that for years.

  13. Study of P53 in peripheral blood and synovial mononuclear cells of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients and its relation to the degree of disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Shousha, Seham A; Salah, Eman; Wagdy, Eman

    2005-01-01

    Over expression of P53 has been described in many inflammatory conditions including rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) as a protective mechanism to induce apoptosis of synovial cells. Lack of P53 function through mutation in human synoviocytes increases the development of normal synovial fibroblasts into transformed aggressive synovial fibroblasts. P53 levels were determined in supernatant of cultured mononuclear cells (MCs) isolated from peripheral blood (PBMCs) of patients with RA (n = 10) and OA (n = 10) as well as 10 normal healthy controls (C). P53 levels were also determined in supernatants of MCs isolated from synovial fluid (SFMCs) of RA and OA patients. Results of this work revealed that P53 level was significantly higher in PBMCs supernatant of RA group than those of both (C) and (OA) groups (P = 0.022). P53 level was non-significantly higher in SFMCs supernatant of RA than OA group. Significantly higher levels of P53 was detected in SFMCs culture supernatant than that of PBMCs within each RA (P = 0.003) and OA (P = 0.001) group. Results also showed a significantly positive correlation between P53 levels (in both PBMCs and SFMCs) and the disease activity score (DAS) in RA group (P = 0.01, P = 0.02 respectively) while insignificantly positive correlations between P53 level (in both PBMCs and SFMCs) and radiological grading of OA group were obtained. These results indicate that mutations and consequent dysfunction of P53 gene may result in chronic inflammation and hyperplasia in RA patients. In conclusion, gene therapy targeting P53-dependent pathway could be a promising therapy for RA and OA diseases.

  14. Long-term clinical investigation of patients with ankylosing spondylitis treated with /sup 224/Ra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, E. (Universitatsklinik Friedrichsheim, Frankfurt, West Germany); Ruckbeil, C.; Wick, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Between 1952 and 1980 about 250 patients with ankylosing spondylitis were treated with /sup 224/Ra at the Orthopaedic University Hospital of Frankfurt/M. In 1970, 119 of them were examined and X-rayed as was another group of 40 patients in 1980. The results of those examined could be compared with a group of 40 patients treated without /sup 224/Ra. Patients with /sup 224/Ra demonstrated a long-lasting period of subjective improvement after the treatment, with reduced consumption of antirheumatoid and analgesic drugs, on the average. Blood examinations show inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the ankylosing spondylitis proceeded. In the final stages of the disease, neither the clinical aspects nor the X-rays showed any specific changes. We observed no case of malignant bone tumor. Of the 169 examined patients, 22 had a total of 32 children after the treatment with /sup 224/Ra. Among these was a set of twins with cerebral palsy and diabetes insipidus renalis. In conclusion, /sup 224/Ra in ankylosing spondylitis is a recommended treatment without higher risk compared to the common therapy with drugs.

  15. The association between obesity and functioning of patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Pisters, M.F.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between obesity and functioning of patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee. Relevance: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common joint disorder, which has a major impact on functioning in daily life. OA accounts for more disability among the elderly than any other

  16. A randomized controlled trial of aquatic and land-based exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Weile, Ulla; Christensen, Robin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of aquatic exercise and a land-based exercise programme vs control in patients with knee osteoarthritis. METHODS: Primary outcome was change in pain, and in addition Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS). Standing balance and strength...

  17. Exercise induced effects on muscle function and range of motion in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, Theresa; Siersma, Volkert; Magnusson, S Peter

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with hip osteoarthritis have impairments in muscle function (muscle strength and power) and hip range of motion (ROM), and it is commonly believed that effective clinical management of osteoarthritis should address these impairments to reduce pain and disability. ...

  18. Knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: the effect of self-reported instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Jonathan A.; Robinson, Megan E.; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Tashman, Scott; Farrokhi, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Background Knee osteoarthritis has been previously associated with a stereotypical knee-stiffening gait pattern and reduced knee joint motion variability due to increased antagonist muscle co-contractions and smaller utilized arc of motion during gait. However, episodic self-reported instability may be a sign of excessive motion variability for a large subgroup of patients with knee osteoarthritis. The objective of this work was to evaluate the differences in knee joint motion variability during gait in patients with knee osteoarthritis with and without self-reported instability compared to a control group of older adults with asymptomatic knees. Methods Forty-three subjects, 8 with knee osteoarthritis but no reports of instability (stable), 11 with knee osteoarthritis and self-reported instability (unstable), and 24 without knee osteoarthritis or instability (control) underwent Dynamic Stereo X-ray analysis during a decline gait task on a treadmill. Knee motion variability was assessed using parametric phase plots during the loading response phase of decline gait. Findings The stable group demonstrated decreased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control group (p=0.04), while the unstable group demonstrated increased sagittal-plane motion variability compared to the control (p=0.003) and stable groups (pknee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis without self-reported instability supports previous research. However, presence of self-reported instability is associated with increased knee motion variability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and warrants further investigation. PMID:25796536

  19. A Combined Patient and Provider Intervention for Management of Osteoarthritis in Veterans: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Yancy, William S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Datta, Santanu K; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Oddone, Eugene Z

    2016-01-19

    Management of osteoarthritis requires both medical and behavioral strategies, but some recommended therapies are underused. To examine the effectiveness of a combined patient and provider intervention for improving osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized clinical trial with assignment to osteoarthritis intervention and usual care groups. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01130740). Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. 30 providers (clusters) and 300 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to primary care providers through the electronic medical record. The primary outcome was total score on the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were WOMAC function and pain subscale scores, physical performance (Short Physical Performance Battery), and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-8). Linear mixed models that were adjusted for clustering of providers assessed between-group differences in improvement in outcomes. At 12 months, WOMAC scores were 4.1 points lower (indicating improvement) in the osteoarthritis intervention group versus usual care (95% CI, -7.2 to -1.1 points; P = 0.009). WOMAC function subscale scores were 3.3 points lower in the intervention group (CI, -5.7 to -1.0 points; P = 0.005). WOMAC pain subscale scores (P = 0.126), physical performance, and depressive symptoms did not differ between groups. Although more patients in the osteoarthritis intervention group received provider referral for recommended osteoarthritis treatments, the numbers who received them did not differ. The study was conducted in a single Veterans Affairs medical center. The combined patient and provider intervention resulted in

  20. Clinical gait evaluation of patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Liu, Yancheng; Yan, Songhua; Cao, Guanglei; Wang, Shasha; Lester, D Kevin; Zhang, Kuan

    2017-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is the most common osteoarthritis in lower limbs, and gait measurement is important to evaluate walking function of KOA patients before and after treatment. The third generation Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA3) is a portable gait analysis system to evaluate gaits. This study is to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of IDEEA3 for gait measurement of KOA patients. Meanwhile, gait differences between KOA patients and healthy subjects are examined. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited for measurement comparison of gait cycle (GC), cadence, step length, velocity and step counts between a motion analysis system and a high-speed camera (GoPro Hero3). Twenty-three KOA patients were recruited for measurement comparison of former five parameters between GoPro Hero3 and IDEEA3. Paired t-test, Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC) and Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) were used for data analysis. All p-values of paired t-tests for GC, cadence, step length and velocity were greater than 0.05 while all CCC and ICC results were above 0.95. The measurements of GC, cadence, step length, velocity and step counts by motion analysis system are highly consistent with the measurements by GoPro Hero3. The measurements of former parameters by GoPro Hero3 are not statistically different from the measurements by IDEEA3. IDEEA3 can be effectively used for the measurement of GC, cadence, step length, velocity and step counts in KOA patients. The KOA patients walk with longer GC, lower cadence, shorter step length and slower speed compared with healthy subjects in natural speed with flat shoes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Treatment of patients with hand osteoarthritis : outcome measures, patient satisfaction, and economic evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the limitations in daily life, outcome measures, clinical outcomes with the emphasis on patient satisfaction, and economic aspects of the treatment of hand osteoarthritis (OA). Patients with hand OA report severe restrictions in daily life, in particular in

  2. The effect on comorbidity and pain in patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkness, Carmen S; Yu, Junhua; Asche, Carl V

    2008-01-01

    Comorbidities can affect how patients experience pain associated with chronic disease. Despite numerous studies on the association of pain with chronic conditions, few account for the multiple comorbidities associated with the highly prevalent chronic disease osteoarthritis (OA). OA generally is not lethal but it greatly impacts health care utilization and costs mainly primarily due to pain and disability. This paper describes how comorbidities impact OA pain reporting. We identified the common comorbidities associated with OA and examined the comorbidity measures utilized to identify the comorbidities. Using the identified comorbidities, we related how they may contribute to the pain experience for OA patients. We describe how OA treatment and multiple comorbidities may impact on treatment decisions.

  3. Efficacy and safety of ginger in osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E M; Folmer, V N; Bliddal, Henning

    2015-01-01

    oral ginger treatment with placebo in OA patients aged >18 years. Outcomes were reduction in pain and reduction in disability. Harm was assessed as withdrawals due to adverse events. The efficacy effect size was estimated using Hedges' standardized mean difference (SMD), and safety by risk ratio (RR......The aim of this study was to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of oral ginger for symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) by carrying out a systematic literature search followed by meta-analyses on selected studies. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing......). Standard random-effects meta-analysis was used, and inconsistency was evaluated by the I-squared index (I(2)). Out of 122 retrieved references, 117 were discarded, leaving five trials (593 patients) for meta-analyses. The majority reported relevant randomization procedures and blinding, but an inadequate...

  4. Higher incidence of rheumatoid arthritis in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis or osteoarthritis-related surgery: a nationwide, population-based, case-control study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Chi; Liu, Keng-Chang; Lai, Ning-Sheng; Koo, Malcolm

    2015-12-18

    To investigate the risk of incident rheumatoid arthritis in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis or osteoarthritis-related surgery using a nationwide health claims database. A nationwide, population-based, case-control study. Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 1147 patients (aged 20-100 years) with rheumatoid arthritis and 5735 controls who were frequency-matched for sex, 10-year age interval and year of catastrophic illness certificate application date (index year) were identified. All participants were retrospectively traced, up to 14 years prior to their index year, for diagnosis of osteoarthritis or osteoarthritis-related surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to quantify the association between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The risks of rheumatoid arthritis were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis (adjusted OR=5.24, posteoarthritis-related surgery (adjusted OR=2.27, prisk of rheumatoid arthritis in Taiwanese patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis. Our findings were consistent with the hypothesis that osteoarthritis might be a triggering factor of rheumatoid arthritis in environment-sensitised and genetically susceptible individuals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Spa therapy for elderly: a retrospective study of 239 older patients with osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Dişçi, Rian; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2016-10-01

    Very few studies tested the effectiveness of spa therapy in older patients with osteoarthritis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the short-term effects of spa therapy in patients aged 65 years and older with generalized, knee, hip, and cervical and lumbar spine osteoarthritis. In an observational retrospective study design at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Medical Faculty, we analyzed the records of 239 patients aged over 65 years with the diagnosis of all types of osteoarthritis who were prescribed a spa therapy course in some spa resorts in Turkey between 7 March 2002 and 31 December 2012. They travelled to a spa resort where they stayed at a thermal spa hotel and followed the usual therapy packages for 2 weeks. Patients were assessed by an experienced physician within a week before the spa journey and within a week after the completion of the spa therapy. Compared with baseline in whole sample, statistically significant improvements were observed in pain (visual analog scale, VAS), patient and physician global assessments (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI), Lequesne algofunctional index (LAFI) for knee, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities index (WOMAC), Waddell disability index (WDI), and Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD). According to Outcome Measures in Rheumatology—Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) Set of Responder Criteria, responder rate were 63.8 % (51/80) in generalized, 52 % (13/25) in knee, 50 % (2/4) in hip, 66.7 % (8/12) in lumbar, and 100 % (6/6) in cervical osteoarthritis subgroups. Spa therapy improved pain and physical functional status in older patients with osteoarthritis, especially generalized osteoarthritis and multiple joint osteoarthritis with involvement of knee. This improvement was clinically important in majority of the patients. To confirm the results of this preliminary study, there is a need of a randomized controlled clinical study

  6. The Relationship between Chondromalacia Patella, Medial Meniscal Tear and Medial Periarticular Bursitis in Patients with Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resorlu, Mustafa; Doner, Davut; Karatag, Ozan; Toprak, Canan Akgun

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa) in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears. Radiological findings of 100 patients undergoing magnetic resonance imaging with a preliminary diagnosis of knee pain were retrospectively evaluated by two radiologists. The first radiologist assessed all patients in terms of osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tear. The second radiologist was blinded to these results and assessed the presence of bursitis in all patients. Mild osteoarthritis (grade I and II) was determined in 55 patients and severe osteoarthritis (grade III and IV) in 45 cases. At retropatellar cartilage evaluation, 25 patients were assessed as normal, while 29 patients were diagnosed with mild chondromalacia patella (grade I and II) and 46 with severe chondromalacia patella (grade III and IV). Medial meniscus tear was determined in 51 patients. Severe osteoarthritis and chondromalacia patella were positively correlated with meniscal tear (p chondromalacia patella (p = 0.023 and p = 0.479, respectively). Evaluation of lateral compartment bursae revealed lateral collateral ligament bursitis in 2 patients and iliotibial bursitis in 5 patients. We observed a greater prevalence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee in patients with severe osteoarthritis and medial meniscus tear.

  7. Quadriceps femoris muscle fatigue in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elboim-Gabyzon M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available M Elboim-Gabyzon,1 N Rozen,2 Y Laufer11Physical Therapy Department, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel; 2Emek Medical Center, Afula, IsraelAbstract: The purpose of this study was to characterize quadriceps femoris muscle fatigue of both lower extremities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Sixty-two subjects (mean age 68.2 years, standard deviation [SD] ± 7.9 years with knee OA participated in the study. Significantly higher knee pain was reported in the involved knee than in the contralateral knee, as determined by a visual analog scale. Significant differences were demonstrated between the lower extremities in terms of maximal voluntary isometric contraction, in favor of the less involved leg (P = 0.0001. In contrast, the degree of fatigue of the quadriceps femoris muscle, as measured by the decrement in force production following ten repeated contractions, was significantly higher in the contralateral leg (P = 0.0002. Furthermore, normalization of the fatigue results to the first contraction yielded a similar result (P < 0.0001. Similar results were noted when analysis was performed separately for subjects whose involvement was unilateral or bilateral. The results indicate that, irrespective of the initial strength of contraction, the rate of muscle fatigue in the contralateral leg is significantly higher than in the involved leg. Hypotheses for these unexpected results are suggested. Rehabilitation of patients with knee OA should focus on increasing quadriceps muscle strength and endurance for both lower extremities.Keywords: knee, osteoarthritis, fatigue, quadriceps femoris muscle

  8. Significance of increased leptin expression in osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Zhong, Zhi-Hong; Yu, Hao-Tao; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in leptin expression contributes to the progression of various diseases, including cancers. This meta-analysis investigated the clinical significance of leptin levels in osteoarthritis (OA) patients, with the goal of building a leptin-based diagnostic criterion for OA. Multiple scientific databases in English and Chinese languages, such as the Cochrane Library Database, CINAHL, Chinese Biomedical (CBM), EMBASE, PubMed, and Web of Science, were exhaustively searched, without any language restrictions, to identify high-quality studies relevant to leptin and OA. Version 12.0 STATA software was used for data analysis. We used odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to test the correlation between serum leptin levels and OA progression. A total of 11 clinical studies were finally selected for their high quality and relevance to the topic in this meta-analysis. The 11 case-control studies contained a combined total of 3,625 subjects. The meta-analysis results showed that leptin expression was significantly increased in OA patients, compared with the controls (SMD = 0.87, 95%CI: 0.72-1.02, P leptin expression levels and gender (SMD = 8.55, 95%CI: 4.74-12.35, P leptin expression levels in females and in OA patients (all P leptin expression levels are associated with disease severity in OA patients, especially among the female OA patients. Based on our results, we propose that leptin level may be a useful biomarker for the assessment of the clinical status in OA patients.

  9. Sensorimotor changes and functional performance in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, M V; Scott, D L; Rees, J; Newham, D J

    1997-11-01

    Muscles are essential components of our sensorimotor system that help maintain balance and perform a smooth gait, but it is unclear whether arthritic damage adversely affects muscle sensorimotor function. Quadriceps sensorimotor function in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) was investigated, and whether these changes were associated with impairment of functional performance. Quadriceps strength, voluntary activation, and proprioceptive acuity (joint position sense acuity) were assessed in 103 patients with knee OA and compared with 25 healthy control subjects. In addition, their postural stability, objective functional performance (the aggregate time for four activities of daily living), and disabilities (lequesne index) were also investigated. Compared with the control subjects, the patients with knee OA had weaker quadriceps (differences between group mean 100N, CI 136, 63N), poorer voluntary activation (20% CI 13, 25%) that was associated with quadriceps weakness, and impaired acuity of knee joint position sense (1.28 degrees, CI 0.84, 1.73 degrees). As a group the patients were more unstable (p = 0.0017), disabled (10, CI 7, 11), and had poorer functional performance (19.6 seconds, CI 14.3, 24.9 seconds). The most important predictors of disability were objective functional performance and quadriceps strength. In patients with knee OA, articular damage may reduce quadriceps motoneurone excitability, which decreases voluntary quadriceps activation thus contributing to quadriceps weakness, and diminishes proprioceptive acuity. The arthrogenic impairment in quadriceps sensorimotor function and decreased postural stability was associated with reduced functional performance of the patients.

  10. Rheumatologists' knowledge, attitude and current management of fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repping-Wuts, H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Achterberg, T. van

    2008-01-01

    To describe rheumatologists' knowledge, attitude and current management of fatigue in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a postal questionnaire was sent to all rheumatologists (N = 204) and trainees (N = 49), members of the Dutch Society of Rheumatology. The overall response rate was 44% (N =

  11. The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC in Persian Speaking Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad H Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis of the knee is the most common chronic joint disease that involves middle aged and elderly persons. There are different clinical instruments to quantify the health status of patients with knee osteoarthritis and one example is the WOMAC score that has been translated and adapted into different languages. The purpose of this study was cultural adaptation, validation and reliability testing of the Persian version of the WOMAC index in Iranians with knee osteoarthritis.   Methods: We translated the original WOMAC questionnaire into Persian by the forward and backward technique, and then its psychometric study was done on 169 native Persian speaking patients with knee degenerative joint disease. Mean age of patients was 53.9 years. The SF-36 and KOOS were used to assess construct validity. Results: Reliability testing resulted in a Cronbach’s alpha of 0.917, showing the internal consistency of the questionnaire to be a reliable tool. Inter-correlation matrix among different scales of the Persian WOMAC index yielded a highly significant correlation between all subscales including stiffness, pain, and physical function. In terms of validity, Pearson`s correlation coefficient was significant between three domains of the WOMAC with PF, RP, BP, GH, VT, and PCS dimensions of the SF-36 health survey (P

  12. Body Mass Index and Western Ontario & McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung in November 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainna Binti Mohamad Dat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoarthritis is one of the major disabilities among elderly. One of its well-recognized potent risk factors is obesity. The aim of this study was to identify the body mass index and severity of knee osteoarthritis patients who were treated in Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out to 9 patients of the Medical Rehabilitation Policlinic at Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung in November 2012. Patients were diagnosed as having knee Osteoarthritis based on American College of Rheumatology clinical classification. Exclusion criteria were patient having previous trauma in spine and lower limb, having bleeding disorder like hemophilia, incomplete data in medical records and incomplete data in questionnaire. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC was used to measure the intensity of pain, stiffness, and functional difficulty. The weight (kg and height (cm of the patients were measured and the Body Mass Index was calculated by Weight (kg/Height² (m. The data were analyzed using frequency distribution. Results: The patients who came to the Medical Rehabilitation Policlinic had ranged in age from 57 to78 years, mostly female with knee Osteoarthritis bilateral. Out of 9 patients, 5 patients were overweight, followed by normal BMI and obese type I. Patient with obese type 1 had the highest WOMAC score. Conclusions: Most of the patients with knee osteoarthritis bilateral are overweight and the patient with obese type 1 has the highest WOMAC score.

  13. Unloader knee braces for osteoarthritis: do patients actually wear them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squyer, Emily; Stamper, Daniel L; Hamilton, Deven T; Sabin, Janice A; Leopold, Seth S

    2013-06-01

    Unloader braces are a nonsurgical approach for predominantly unicompartmental knee arthritis. Although noninvasive, braces are expensive and it is unclear whether clinical factors, if any, will predict regular brace use. We asked: (1) Do patients continue to use the unloader brace more than 1 year after it is prescribed? (2) Do any clinical or radiographic factors predict continued use of the unloader brace after the first year? (3) What are the most common subjective reasons that patients give for discontinuing the brace? We administered 110 surveys to all patients who were fitted for unloader knee braces for predominantly unicompartmental osteoarthritis 12 to 40 months before administration of the survey. Standardized indications and fitting protocols were used. The following parameters were tested for association with ongoing brace use: alignment, arthritis severity, compartment involved, BMI, weight, age, gender, pain and function, number of refittings, and problems with the brace. The survey response rate was 81% (89 of 110). Of the 89 responders, 28% reported regular brace use (twice per week, an hour at a time, or more); at 2 years, 25% used the brace regularly. No clinical or radiographic factors considered were associated with ongoing brace use. Patients reported lack of symptomatic relief, brace discomfort, poor fit, and skin irritation as reasons for discontinuing the brace. Surgeons and patients need to balance the benefits and absence of complications of bracing against cost and the low likelihood of ongoing use 1 year or more after the prescription of the brace.

  14. Effect of a 16 weeks weight loss program on osteoarthritis biomarkers in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Else Marie; Christensen, R; Christensen, Pia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Changes in biomarkers for bone and cartilage in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) may reflect changes in tissue turnover induced by interventions. The aim of this study was to assess the effect on osteoarthritis biomarkers of an intensive weight loss intervention in obese KOA patients. METHODS...... and after 16 weeks. Patient-reported symptoms were assessed by the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) Questionnaire without the sports and recreation score (KOOS-4). Change from baseline was analyzed using Analysis of CoVariance (ANCOVA) adjusting for sex, age, and body mass index (BMI.......028), but not to change in KOOS-4 (r = -0.13, P = 0.091). uCTX-II increased significantly, mean 69 (95% CI: 31-106) ng/mmol creatinine, with no relation to weight loss (P = 0.14). Change in uCTX-II was reversely related to change in KOOS-4 (r = -0.28, P = 0.0003). uCTX-I increased, mean 67 (95% CI: 47-87) μg...

  15. Do vitamin D levels affect the clinical prognoses of patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Gokhan; Akgol, Gurkan

    2017-01-01

    Although vitamin D deficiency has been associated with osteoporosis, as well as fractures, in elderly men and women, the role of vitamin D deficiency in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) remains controversial. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of vitamin D deficiency on the functional status and disease prognosis of patients with knee osteoarthritis. Our study comprised 100 patients that met the American College of Rheumatology criteria for a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Each patient underwent knee radiography, the results of which were graded according to Kellgren and Lawrence radiographic grading scale; those that met the diagnostic criteria were included in the study. The visual analog scale (VAS), Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and Lequesne Knee Osteoarthritis Index were used to assess patients' pain, function and quality of life. Complete blood counts, sedimentation rates and serum C-reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid and thyroid hormone levels were routinely recorded for each patient. Vitamin D levels were analyzed in winter (between November and February) using high performance liquid chromatography. Patients were divided into two groups, Group 1 and Group 2, according to the presence or absence of vitamin D deficiency. The groups did not differ significantly in terms of age, disease duration, sex distribution, presence of osteoporosis or radiographic stage of knee osteoarthritis (p = 0.793, 0.092, 0.250, 0.835 and 0.257, respectively). However, the NHP pain, physical activity, fatigue, social isolation, and emotional reactions subsets, WOMAC pain and physical function subsets and total score, Lequesne knee osteoarthritis index, and patient/physician VAS scores were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p vitamin D

  16. The efficacy of shock wave therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis and popliteal cyamella

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Tien-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chia-Ling; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Jen; Lin, Tz-Yan; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    This randomized, controlled study was performed to compare the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and ultrasound on the rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis with popliteal cyamella. One hundred and twenty patients with bilateral moderate knee osteoarthritis (Altman III) and popliteal cyamella were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (GI–GIV). Patients in Groups I–III received isokinetic muscular strengthening exercises three times weekly for 8 weeks. Group II receiv...

  17. Serum and bone pentosidine in patients with low impact hip fractures and in patients with advanced osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaculík, Jan; Braun, Martin; Dungl, Pavel; Pavelka, Karel; Stepan, Jan J

    2016-07-22

    Femoral neck fractures are a common occurrence in patients suffering from osteoporosis, while intracapsular hip fracture is rare in cases of osteoarthritis of the hip. Previous histomorphometric studies have emphasized the association between bone microarchitecture and the risk of low-impact fractures in osteoarthritis and osteoporosis patients. However, the strength of bone material is also a function of composition of organic bone matrix. In order to compare tissue material properties in these two clinical conditions, serum and bone pentosidine, a non-enzymatic collagen crosslinking element, was measured in patients who suffered a low-impact fracture, and in patients with advanced osteoarthritis. The patient population consisted of 70 patients who underwent hemiarthroplasty surgery for a femoral neck fracture, and 41 patients with advanced hip joint osteoarthritis without a history of low- impact fracture, who were indicated for total hip joint replacement. Pentosidine content was analyzed in bone samples and in serum obtained from fracture and osteoarthritis patients using high performance liquid chromatography. Serum and bone concentrations of pentosidine were higher in subjects with hip fractures compared with osteoarthritis after adjustment for age, sex, weight, serum creatinine, and diabetes. A significant positive correlation was found between bone and serum pentosidine in fractured cases. A comparable relationship was also demonstrated for pentosidine levels in serum and bone relative to differentiation of fracture and osteoarthritis cases. Serum pentosidine can be considered a potential biomarker for identification of subjects with impaired bone quality and bone strength.

  18. Effects of Intermittent Traction in Patients With Cervical Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akbari

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Osteoarthritis(OA is the most common joint disease occuring after middle age.Because of the high mobility of the neck, OA is common in the cervical spine. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effects of intermittent traction on patients with mild and moderate cervical OA. Therefore, 32 patients with cervical OA were recruited.Methods:Aclinical trial study was designed for patients with cervical OA that were randomly assigned in two equal groups.Control group received a routine physical therapy protocol which included moist heat, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, and an exercise for neck and shoulder girdle. Experimental group received a routine physical therapy protocol plus intermittent traction (IT.Results: Pain and mobility improved in both groups.There was significant difference in interaction of the improvement of cervical pain between the two groups,the rate of pain reduction; sleep ease, medicine taking and range of motion (ROM improvement in the experimental group were higher than that of the control group.Conclusion: The results justify the efficacy of IT, therefore it can be concluded that the IT is an effective modality for patients with mild and moderate cervical OA.  

  19. Safety and biodistribution assessment of sc-rAAV2.5IL-1Ra administered via intra-articular injection in a mono-iodoacetate-induced osteoarthritis rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gensheng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1 (IL-1 plays an important role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA, and gene transfer of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra holds promise for OA treatment. A preclinical safety and biodistribution study evaluated a self-complementary adeno-associated viral vector carrying rat IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5rIL-1Ra at 5 × 108, 5 × 109, or 5 × 1010 vg/knee, or human IL-1Ra transgene (sc-rAAV2.5hIL-1Ra at 5 × 1010 vg/knee, in Wistar rats with mono-iodoacetate (MIA–induced OA at days 7, 26, 91, 180, and 364 following intra-articular injection. The MIA-induced OA lesions were consistent with the published data on this model. The vector genomes persisted in the injected knees for up to a year with only limited vector leakage to systemic circulation and uptake in tissues outside the knee. Low levels of IL-1Ra expression and mitigation of OA lesions were observed in the vector-injected knees, albeit inconsistently. Neutralizing antibodies against the vector capsid developed in a dose-dependent manner, but only the human vector induced a small splenic T-cell immune response to the vector capsid. No local or systemic toxicity attributable to vector administration was identified in the rats as indicated by clinical signs, body weight, feed consumption, clinical pathology, and gross and microscopic pathology through day 364. Taken together, the gene therapy vector demonstrated a favorable safety profile.

  20. Secretory activity of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in male patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis – association with clinical and laboratory data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Kontny

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adipose tissue exerts widespread effects on the metabolism and immune system, but its activity differs between the genders. In the general population low-grade adipose tissue inflammation contributes to development of diseases of affluence. Little is known about the systemic impact of peripheral fat tissue in osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, characterized by chronic, low- and high-grade systemic inflammation, respectively. To clarify this we evaluated the secretory activity of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAAT obtained from male patients affected with RA (n = 21 and OA (n = 13, and assessed its association with body mass and composition, demographic, clinical and laboratory data. Material and methods: Basal and interleukin (IL-1β-triggered secretion of selected adipocytokines from SAAT explants was measured by specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA. Patients’ body composition was evaluated by bioelectric impendence technique. Results : Rheumatoid SAAT secreted more adiponectin and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF than respective osteoarthritis tissue. In both RA and OA patient groups, stimulation of SAAT explants with IL-1β(1 ng/ml/100 mg tissue significantly up-regulated release of pro-(IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor – TNF and anti-inflammatory (IL-10 cytokines but had no effect on the secretion of adiponectin, leptin, MIF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Compared with RA, patients with OA were more obese. In RA patients SAAT-released adiponectin and TNF inversely correlated with body mass index (BMI and visceral fat rating (FVSC. In addition, SAAT-secreted adiponectin and leptin positively correlated with DAS28 and disease duration, respectively. In the OA group tissue-released TNF positively correlated with patients’ age. Conclusions : We conclude that in RA male patients adipocytokines originating from SAAT are of clinical importance because: (i adiponectin and TNF

  1. Significance of increased leptin expression in osteoarthritis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    Full Text Available Alterations in leptin expression contributes to the progression of various diseases, including cancers. This meta-analysis investigated the clinical significance of leptin levels in osteoarthritis (OA patients, with the goal of building a leptin-based diagnostic criterion for OA.Multiple scientific databases in English and Chinese languages, such as the Cochrane Library Database, CINAHL, Chinese Biomedical (CBM, EMBASE, PubMed, and Web of Science, were exhaustively searched, without any language restrictions, to identify high-quality studies relevant to leptin and OA. Version 12.0 STATA software was used for data analysis. We used odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI to test the correlation between serum leptin levels and OA progression.A total of 11 clinical studies were finally selected for their high quality and relevance to the topic in this meta-analysis. The 11 case-control studies contained a combined total of 3,625 subjects. The meta-analysis results showed that leptin expression was significantly increased in OA patients, compared with the controls (SMD = 0.87, 95%CI: 0.72-1.02, P < 0.001, and there was also a strong association between leptin expression levels and gender (SMD = 8.55, 95%CI: 4.74-12.35, P < 0.001. In ethnicity-stratified subgroup analysis, all the study populations, irrespective of ethnicity, showed remarkably high leptin expression levels in females and in OA patients (all P < 0.05, compared to their respective counterparts.The present study revealed that increased leptin expression levels are associated with disease severity in OA patients, especially among the female OA patients. Based on our results, we propose that leptin level may be a useful biomarker for the assessment of the clinical status in OA patients.

  2. Osteoarthritis treatment update. Minimizing pain while limiting patient risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, T J

    1993-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic disease that has exacerbations and remissions. Pain is the symptom that patients want addressed. It is important to remember, however, that simple alleviation of pain does not alter the underlying problem. Attention must be directed toward using physical therapy and other physical measures in conjunction with pharmacologic intervention for symptom relief. Use of simple analgesic agents is the safest initial approach, perhaps in conjunction with topical treatment with a compound such as capsaicin (Zostrix). If pain relief is inadequate, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents should be considered, with careful monitoring of gastrointestinal symptoms and renal status, particularly in the elderly. For flares of disease, intra-articular injection of a corticosteroid may give short-term relief. Relief of pain and restoration of function can be accomplished in some patients with early disease, particularly if an integrated approach to treatment is used. Advanced disease can be made more tolerable but may eventually require surgical intervention, which generally provides excellent results.

  3. Electromyographic power spectrum of jaw muscles during clenching in unilateral temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, I H; McCall, W D; Chung, J W

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joints (TMJ) osteoarthritis and masticatory muscle disorders is poorly understood. The data are sparse, the results are conflicting, and electromyographic (EMG) power spectrum analysis has not been used. The aims of this study were to compare the differences in EMG power spectrum during, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before and after, sustained clenching in patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis and healthy control subjects. Nineteen patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis without masticatory muscle pain and 20 control subjects were evaluated. We measured EMG amplitudes at maximum voluntary contraction, median frequency from the EMG power spectrum during sustained clenching at 70% and PPTs before and after the clenching in both temporalis and masseter muscles. There were no significant differences in PPT decrease between muscles or between groups during sustained clenching. There were no significant differences in maximum voluntary contraction EMG activity ratios of affected to unaffected sides between groups, or of masseter to temporalis muscles between affected and unaffected side of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis. Median frequencies decreased from the beginning to the end of the sustained clench, and the interaction between group and clench was significant: the median frequency decrease was larger in the osteoarthritis group. Our results suggested that masticatory muscles of patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis are more easily fatigued during sustained clenching than normal subjects. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Receipt of physical therapy among osteoarthritis patients and its influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Huan-Jui; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Yang, Nan-Ping; Huang, Nicole

    2015-06-01

    To explore major patient and provider characteristics influencing the receipt of physical therapy (PT) among patients newly diagnosed with osteoarthritis. A population-based, cross-sectional study on outpatient PT for patients newly diagnosed with osteoarthritis within the period of 2005 to 2010. Sample of 1 million National Health Insurance enrollees. People aged ≥18 years with an incidence of osteoarthritis and receiving initial outpatient treatment. A total of 29,012 patients were included (N=29,012). Not applicable. The outcome variable of interest was the probability of receiving PT within 1 year of osteoarthritis diagnosis. Both individual and provider characteristics were investigated to determine their influence on PT receipt. Of the 29,012 included patients with osteoarthritis, only 24.8% of them received PT within the first year of diagnosis. Men and older adults were less likely to receive PT. In addition, low-income patients with osteoarthritis were less likely to receive PT. Furthermore, PT receipt was increased in patients treated by physicians who were women and by physicians who specialized in rehabilitation medicine. In addition, we observed a pattern indicating that the lower the accreditation level of the practice setting, the greater the probability of receiving PT. Because of the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan, direct medical costs of PT have been substantially reduced; however, variations are still observed among different patient and provider characteristics. The major role of providers in PT receipt for patients with osteoarthritis should not be ignored. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Procarti Forte in the Complex Treatment of Patients with Early-Stage Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Burianov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of the treatment of osteoarthritis. The review of current recommendations on the feasibility of using glucosamine sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, using of SYSADOA drugs, metabolic drugs was performed. The study on the efficacy and safety of using combination drug Procarti Forte in the system of treatment of patients with early-stage osteoarthritis is presented.

  6. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  7. Altered visual and feet proprioceptive feedbacks during quiet standing increase postural sway in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Jørgensen, Tanja Schjødt; Rosager, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The objective was to investigate how postural control in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients, with different structural severities and pain levels, is reorganized under different sensory conditions....

  8. Health service utilization patterns of primary care patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laux Gunter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess factors associated with visits to GPs, orthopaedists, and non-physician practitioners of complementary medicine (alternative practitioners by primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA. Methods Cross-sectional survey among 1250 consecutively addressed patients from 75 primary care practices in Germany. All patients suffered from OA of the knee or hip according to ACR criteria. They received questionnaires collecting sociodemographic data, data about health service utilisation, prescriptions, comorbidities. They also included established instruments as the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS2-SF to assess disease-specific quality of life and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 to assess depression. Hierarchical stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to reveal significant factors influencing health service utilization. Results 1021 of 1250 (81.6% questionnaires were returned. Nonrespondents did not differ from participants. Factors associated with health service use (HSU varied between providers of care. Not being in a partnership, achieving a high score on the PHQ-9, increased pain severity reflected in the “symptom” scale of the AIMS2-SF, and an increased number of drug prescriptions predicted a high frequency of GP visits. The PHQ-9 score was also a predictor for visits to orthopaedists, as were previous GP contacts, a high score in the "symptom" scale as well as a high score in the "lower limb scale" of the AIMS2-SF. Regarding visits to alternative practitioners, a high score in the AIMS -"social" scale was a positive predictor as older people were less likely to visit them. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for awareness of psychological factors contributing to the use of health care providers. Addressing the revealed factors associated with HSU appropriately may lead to decreased health care utilization. But further research is needed to assess how this can be done

  9. Clock gene expression in different synovial cells of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Tatjana; Tohidast-Akrad, Makiyeh; Humpeler, Susanne; Gerlag, Danielle M.; Kiener, Hans-Peter; Zenz, Peter; Steiner, Günter; Ekmekcioglu, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) show modulated circadian rhythms of inflammatory cytokines and cortisol, which may be associated with a modified expression of clock genes. The expression of major clock genes was previously studied in synovial tissues and fibroblasts of patients with RA and

  10. Evolution of topical NSAIDs in the guidelines for treatment of osteoarthritis in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstein, Paul M

    2012-07-01

    Increasing age is the primary predictor of osteoarthritis, the most prevalent painful condition in the US. Because there are no disease-modifying therapies for osteoarthritis, relief of symptoms and maintenance of quality of life through improving joint function become the focus of management. Although highly effective for pain relief, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with systemic adverse reactions that are sometimes treatment limiting, especially for older patients. Thus, osteoarthritis management in elderly populations is shifting away from traditional NSAIDs to therapies that provide comparable pain relief with improved safety. Since the approval by the US Food and Drug Administration of the use of topical NSAIDs to manage osteoarthritis pain, current treatment guidelines put forth by several professional societies have begun to recommend topical NSAIDs as an alternative therapy and, most recently, as first-line therapy for osteoarthritis management in the elderly. This review provides an overview of the various treatment guidelines that are available to assist prescribers in making safe and effective decisions in the treatment of osteoarthritis in this high-risk patient population.

  11. Prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors among the general population and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Yun, Jae Moon; Chang, Chong Bum; Piao, Heng; Yu, Su Jong; Shin, Dong Wook

    2016-12-28

    To assess the prevalence of possible risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) and their age-group specific trend among the general population and osteoarthritis patients. We utilized data from the National Health Insurance Service that included claims data and results of the national health check-up program. Comorbid conditions (peptic ulcer, diabetes, liver disease, chronic renal failure, and gastroesophageal reflux disease), concomitant drugs (aspirin, clopidogrel, cilostazol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid, anticoagulants, and SSRI), personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) were considered as possible UGIB risk factors. We randomly imputed the prevalence of infection in the data considering the age-specific prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in Korea. The prevalence of various UGIB risk factors and the age-group specific trend of the prevalence were identified. Prevalence was compared between osteoarthritis patients and others. A total of 801926 subjects (93855 osteoarthritis patients) aged 20 and above were included. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors became higher as the age increased. The prevalence of each comorbid condition and concomitant drug were higher in osteoarthritis patients. Thirty-five point zero two percent of the overall population and 68.50% of osteoarthritis patients had at least one or more risk factors of UGIB. The prevalence of individual and concurrent multiple risk factors in younger age groups were also substantial. Furthermore, when personal habits (smoking, and alcohol consumption) and H. pylori infection were included, the prevalence of concurrent multiple risk factors increased greatly even in younger age groups. Prevalence of UGIB risk factors was high in elderly population, but was also considerable in younger population. Patient with osteoarthritis was at higher UGIB risk than those without osteoarthritis. Physicians should consider

  12. Spa therapy for elderly: a retrospective study of 239 older patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Dişçi, Rian; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2016-10-01

    Very few studies tested the effectiveness of spa therapy in older patients with osteoarthritis. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the short-term effects of spa therapy in patients aged 65 years and older with generalized, knee, hip, and cervical and lumbar spine osteoarthritis. In an observational retrospective study design at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Medical Faculty, we analyzed the records of 239 patients aged over 65 years with the diagnosis of all types of osteoarthritis who were prescribed a spa therapy course in some spa resorts in Turkey between 7 March 2002 and 31 December 2012. They travelled to a spa resort where they stayed at a thermal spa hotel and followed the usual therapy packages for 2 weeks. Patients were assessed by an experienced physician within a week before the spa journey and within a week after the completion of the spa therapy. Compared with baseline in whole sample, statistically significant improvements were observed in pain (visual analog scale, VAS), patient and physician global assessments (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index (HAQ-DI), Lequesne algofunctional index (LAFI) for knee, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities index (WOMAC), Waddell disability index (WDI), and Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD). According to Outcome Measures in Rheumatology-Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OMERACT-OARSI) Set of Responder Criteria, responder rate were 63.8 % (51/80) in generalized, 52 % (13/25) in knee, 50 % (2/4) in hip, 66.7 % (8/12) in lumbar, and 100 % (6/6) in cervical osteoarthritis subgroups. Spa therapy improved pain and physical functional status in older patients with osteoarthritis, especially generalized osteoarthritis and multiple joint osteoarthritis with involvement of knee. This improvement was clinically important in majority of the patients. To confirm the results of this preliminary study, there is a need of a randomized controlled clinical

  13. Osteoprotegerin expression in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthropathies and osteoarthritis and normal controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, D. R.; Barg, E.; Crotti, T. N.; Holding, C.; Weedon, H.; Atkins, G. J.; Zannetino, A.; Ahern, M. J.; Coleman, M.; Roberts-Thomson, P. J.; Kraan, M.; Tak, P. P.; Smith, M. D.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To demonstrate the expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand (RANKL) in synovial tissue from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, establish the cell lineage expressing OPG and compare the expression of OPG in RA, spondyloarthropathies,

  14. Prevalence of TTV DNA and GBV-C RNA in patients with systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis does not differ from that in healthy blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemayer, C A; Viazov, S; Neidhart, M; Brühlmann, P; Michel, B A; Gay, R E; Roggendorf, M; Gay, S

    2001-08-01

    To determine the prevalence of GB virus-C (GBV-C) RNA and TT virus (TTV) DNA in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and osteoarthritis (OA) as well as to compare the autoantibody pattern in patients with SSc with and without evidence of viral infection. The study included 168 patients (84 SSc, 41 RA, and 43 OA) diagnosed according to the American College of Rheumatology criteria and 122 volunteer blood donors. The presence of GBV-C RNA and TTV DNA in serum was assessed by nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and semi-nested PCR, respectively. Autoantibodies in patients with SSc were determined by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Hep-2 immunofluorescence. TTV-DNA was detected in 10/84 (12%) patients with SSc, 9/41 (22%) patients with RA, 3/43 (7%) patients with OA, and 16/122 (13%) blood donors. GBV-C RNA was present in 4/84 (5%) patients with SSc, 2/43 (5%) patients with OA, and 5/122 (4%) blood donors. No patient with RA was positive for GBV-C RNA. One patient with SSc and one patient with OA showed a double infection with GBV-C and TTV. 74/84 (88%) patients with SSc were positive for at least one autoantibody species tested: 18/84 (21%) showed anticentromeric autoantibodies, 55/84 (66%) a speckled (36/84 (43%) fine, 19/84 (23%) coarse), and 20/84 (24%) a homogeneous nuclear Hep-2 pattern, and 21/84 (25%) had antinucleolar autoantibodies. Anti-Scl-70 antibodies were found in 31/84 (37%) and anti-RNP antibodies in 5/84 (6%) patients with SSc. No differences in the autoantibody pattern in patients with SSc with or without viral infection could be detected. The prevalence of GBV-C RNA and TTV DNA in serum samples from patients with SSc, RA, and OA was low and comparable with that in blood donors. A continuing infection with TTV and or GBV-C was not associated with a significant change in the autoantibody pattern in patients with SSc. These data provide no evidence for an association between GBV

  15. Association between genetic polymorphisms and pain sensitivity in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne E; Nielsen, Lecia M; Feddersen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1, and OPRD1), and the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) influenced the pain phenotype in patients with osteoarthritis. METHODS: The frequencies of seventeen polymorphisms were examined. Pain sensitivity was assessed pre-operatively by: 1) hip rotation; 2) contact......BACKGROUND: Factors such as age, gender and genetic polymorphisms may explain individual difference in pain phenotype. Genetic associations to pain sensitivity have previously been investigated in osteoarthritis patients with focus on the P2X7, TRPV1 and TACR1 genes. However, other genes may play...... heat stimulation; 3) conditioned pain modulation effect and 4) pressure stimulation at the tibia in both the affected and the unaffected leg. RESULTS: Ninety-two patients (mean age 66 years) with unilateral hip osteoarthritis were included in the study. Carriage of the OPRM1 rs589046T allele was found...

  16. [Control study for muscle force and component of body of female patients with knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Jian; Cao, Yue-long; Shi, Yin-yu; Zhou, Ji-wei; Wang, Xiang; Shi, Ying

    2008-11-01

    To understand the information of female patients with knee osteoarthritis regarding muscle force, constitution parameter. Thirty-seven cases diagnosed as knee osteoarthritis and 37 controls were examined by MES. T-test was used to analysis two groups differences of muscle force, constitution parameter, et al. Compared between affected limbs and controls limbs in patients revealed that the lower limb muscle distribution index of the affected limbs was higher than the control limbs (Pmuscle force, muscle functional index and muscle force of unit volume of the affected limbs were lower than the control limbs (Pmuscle force of both lower limbs, muscle functional index and muscle force of unit volume were lower than control group (Pmuscle force of lower limbs of female patients with knee osteoarthritis is weaker than healthy female. Muscle function disorder instead of muscle atrophy is the key cause of the weakness.

  17. Patients with osteoarthritis should be encouraged to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-11

    Osteoarthritis (OA) has a major effect on quality of life. It is associated with loss of cartilage and changes in underlying bone with bony outgrowths, called osteophytes, being formed as the bone tries to repair itself. There is often inflammation within the synovial lining of the joint and weakness of the supporting muscles and ligaments.

  18. Muscle strength, pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M. P.; Dekker, J.; van Baar, M. E.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    2001-01-01

    Reduced muscle strength is regarded as a risk factor for pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA). Currently, various indices for muscle strength are used when assessing determinants of pain and disability. The goal of the present study was to evaluate these indices of muscle strength. Isometric

  19. Knee osteoarthritis and perceived social support amongst patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Temitope Ilori

    2016-06-29

    Jun 29, 2016 ... Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MPSS) was used to assess perceived social support by the respondents, ... Keywords: family support, functional health, health status, knee osteoarthritis, perceived social support ..... social participation and self-rated health by sex and age: A cross-.

  20. Knee Fat Pad Volumes in Patients with Hemophilia and Their Relationship with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette von Drygalski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophilic arthropathy is a progressive, disabling condition with poorly understood pathobiology. Since there is an emerging interest to study the role of intra-articular fat pad size and biology in arthritic conditions, we explored fat pad volume changes in hemophilic arthropathy and to what extent they differed from osteoarthritis. We matched a cohort of 13 adult patients with hemophilic arthropathy of the knee with age- and gender-matched cohorts without osteoarthritis (“control cohort” and with the same degree of radiographic osteoarthritis (“OA cohort” in 1 : 2 fashion. Infrapatellar fat pad (IPFP and suprapatellar fat pad (SPFP volumes were calculated based on magnetic resonance imaging and differences in fat pad volumes, demographics, height, weight, and osteoarthritis scores were evaluated. Fat pad volumes were positively associated with body size parameters in all three cohorts but were unaffected by the degree of osteoarthritis. While IPFP volumes did not differ between cohorts, SPFP volumes expanded disproportionally with weight in hemophilia patients. Our observations indicate that IPFPs and SPFPs behave biologically differently in response to different arthritic stimuli. The exaggerated expansion of the SPFP in hemophilia patients highlights the importance of further studying the implications of fat pad biology for progression of hemophilic arthropathy.

  1. Assessment of readiness to change in patients with osteoarthritis. Development and application of a new questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, P.H.T.G.; Bie, R.A. de; Dijkstra, A.; Aretz, K.; Vlaeyen, J.W.S.; Schouten, H.J.A.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Weel, C. van; Schayck, C.P. van

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a self-report measure for assessment of the stage of change in patients with osteoarthritis, in order to identify patients who would benefit from a self-management programme. Methods: According to the 'stages of change' model a questionnaire was developed with three groups of

  2. Influence of the instrumented force shoe on gait pattern in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Noort, J.C.; van den Noort, Josien; van der Esch, Martin; Steultjens, Martijn P.; Dekker, Joost; Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee is associated with alterations in gait. As an alternative to force plates, instrumented force shoes (IFSs) can be used to measure ground reaction forces. This study evaluated the influence of IFS on gait pattern in patients with knee OA. Twenty patients with knee OA

  3. Development of comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, M.; van der Leeden, M.; Avezaat, E.; Hakkinen, A.; Klaver, R.; Maas, T.; Peter, W.F.; Roorda, L.D.; Lems, W.F.; Dekker, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exercise therapy is generally recommended for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Comorbidity, which is highly prevalent in OA, may interfere with exercise therapy. To date, there is no evidence-based protocol for the treatment of patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Special

  4. Assessment of readiness to change in patients with osteoarthritis. Development and application of a new questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, PHTG; de Bie, RA; Dijkstra, A; Aretz, K; Vlaeyen, JW; Schouten, HJA; Hopman-Rock, M; van Weel, C; van Schayck, CP; van Schayk, O.C P

    Objective: To develop a self- report measure for assessment of the stage of change in patients with osteoarthritis, in order to identify patients who would benefit from a self- management programme. Methods: According to the ' stages of change' model a questionnaire was developed with three groups

  5. Assessment of readiness to change in patients with osteoarthritis. development and application of a new questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuts, P.H.T.G.; Bie, R.A. de; Dijkstra, A.; Aretz, K.; Vlaeyen, J.W.S.; Schouten, H.J.; Hopman-Rock, M.; Weel, C. van; Schayck, C.P. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a self-report measure for assessment of the stage of change in patients with osteoarthritis, in order to identify patients who would benefit from a self-management programme. METHODS: According to the 'stages of change' model a questionnaire was developed with three groups of

  6. The impact of ankle osteoarthritis. The difference of opinion between patient and orthopedic surgeon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Angelique G. H.; Hofstad, Cheriel J.; Breslau, Mark J.; Blankevoort, Leendert; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Outcome measures for ankle osteoarthritis (OA) are created by physicians with little input of the target patient group. The aim of this study was to determine the difference in opinion between patients and orthopedic surgeons concerning the importance of specific symptoms of ankle OA and its impact

  7. Development of a Decision Support System to Predict Physicians' Rehabilitation Protocols for Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawamdeh, Ziad M.; Alshraideh, Mohammad A.; Al-Ajlouni, Jihad M.; Salah, Imad K.; Holm, Margo B.; Otom, Ali H.

    2012-01-01

    To design a medical decision support system (MDSS) that would accurately predict the rehabilitation protocols prescribed by the physicians for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) using only their demographic and clinical characteristics. The demographic and clinical variables for 170 patients receiving one of three treatment protocols for knee…

  8. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Lund, Hans; Guyatt, GH

    2010-01-01

    Title A hierarchy of patient-reported outcome measures for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials: empirical evidence from a survey of high impact journals Objective To develop a prioritized list for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for meta......-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A systematic literature search was conducted in high impact factor journals. Eligible were randomized controlled trials, using two or more PROs measuring pain or disability. A prioritized list was developed based on the capacity to discriminate between intervention...

  9. Efficacy and safety of diacerein in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Alekseeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diacerein (D belongs to a class of symptomatic slow-acting agents, has an original mechanism of action, and is widely used as a diseasemodifying antirheumatic drug to treat osteoarthritis (OA in Russia and many countries of the world. The ability of the drug to affect the main symptoms and progression of OA has been shown in a number of well-organized clinical trials.Objective: to evaluate the efficacy and safety of D in patients with knee OA.Patients and methods. An open-label trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of D (diaflex in patients with knee OA was conducted in accordance with the multicenter program «Osteoarthrosis: Assessment of Progression in Real Clinical Practice». The trial included 80 patients of both sexes with Stage II–III knee OA; mean age, 60.8±6.8 years (47–75 years; mean body mass index, 31.8±5.9 kg/m2; disease duration, 10.3±5.7 years (2–30 years. The duration of the trial was 9 months (6 months of therapy and 3 months of follow-up.Results. There was a statistically significant reduction in visual analog scale pain on walking just 1 month after therapy initiation (57.1±9.7 and 44.7±13.9 mm; p<0.0001 and a further significant improvement throughout the 6-month therapy. Pain did not increase after the drug was discontinued (the follow-up period was 3 months. The same pattern was observed in the assessment of the WOMAC index (pain during early therapy, 243.8±73.9; pain at the end of therapy, 137.5±78.9; stiffness, 97.8±41.1 and 57.7±38.6; functional failure, 875.8±250.4 and 525±305.7 respectively; p<0.0001. Statistically significantly improved quality of life indicators measured by EQ-5D were noted throughout the follow-up period: 0.43±0.23 at the beginning of therapy, 0.61±0.14 at its end, and 0.63±0.11 at 3 months following treatment completion (p<0.0001. By the time of therapy completion, 71.3% of the patients completely refused to take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Both

  10. A grounded patient-centered approach generated the personal and societal burden of osteoarthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busija, Lucy; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    To develop a conceptual model to describe the burden of osteoarthritis in individuals with this condition and on the broader community. Six concept mapping workshops were undertaken: three with patients (n = 26) and three with health professionals (n = 27) in Australia and Sweden. The participants were asked to generate statements describing how osteoarthritis affects individuals with this condition and those around them. The results were used to construct an integrated theoretical model of the personal burden of osteoarthritis (PBO) and its extended version, the personal and societal burden of osteoarthritis (PSBO) model. We identified eight potentially independent aspects of PBO, including physical distress, fatigue, physical limitations, psychosocial distress, physical deconditioning, financial hardship, sleep disturbances, and lost productivity. Physical distress and impaired physical function combined to produce psychosocial problems, reduced work productivity, financial difficulties, and loss of physical fitness at the individual level, and increased health and welfare cost at the societal level. The PBO and PSBO models were developed directly from the views of patients and clinicians and provide new insights for managing the individual and societal burden of osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of bone marrow-derived stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangzhi; Chen, Yong; Wang, Qiang; Fang, Chaoyong; Sun, Yu; Yuan, Tao; Wang, Yuebei; Bao, Rongni; Zhao, Ningjian

    2016-02-01

    Increasing numbers of individuals are suffering from osteoarthritis every year, and the directed intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells has provided a promising treatment strategy for osteoarthritis. Although a number of studies have demonstrated that intra-articular injection of bone marrow stem cells produced desirable results, the mechanism underlying this effect has not been elucidated. In the current study, the effect of bone marrow stem cells on chondrocytes from patients with osteoarthritis was observed in a co-culture system. Human chondrocytes were obtained from patients with osteoarthritis who underwent surgical procedures and bone marrow stem cells were obtained from bone marrow aspirates, and then the chondrocytes were then cultured alone or cocultured with bone marrow stem cells in 0.4-µm Transwell inserts. The differentiation and biological activity of chondrocytes in the culture system were measured, and the inflammatory factors and OA-associated markers were also measured. The results indicated that coculture with human bone marrow stem cells increases cell proliferation of chondrocytes and inhibits inflammatory activity in osteoarthritis.

  12. Subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of whole-body cryotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Chruściak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: One of the treatments for osteoarthritis (OA is whole-body cryotherapy (WBC. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of whole-body cryotherapy on the clinical status of patients with osteoarthritis (OA, according to their subjective feelings before and after the application of a 10-day cold treatment cycle. The aim is also to assess the reduction of intensity and frequency of pain, the reduction of the painkiller medication used, and to assess the possible impact on physical activity. Material and methods : The study involved 50 people, including 30 women (60% and 20 men (40%. Thirty-one patients had spondyloarthritis (62% of respondents, 10 had knee osteoarthritis (20%, and 9 hip osteoarthritis (18%. The overall average age was 50.1 ±10.9 years; the youngest patient was 29 years old and the oldest 73 years old. The average age of the women was 6 years higher. The study used a questionnaire completed by patients, and consisted of three basic parts. The modified Laitinen pain questionnaire contained questions concerning the intensity and frequency of pain, frequency of painkiller use and the degree of limited mobility. The visual analogue scale (VAS was used in order to subjectively evaluate the therapy after applying the ten-day treatment cycle. Results: According to the subjective assessment of respondents, after the whole-body cryotherapy treatments, a significant improvement occurred in 39 patients (78%, an improvement in 9 patients (18%, and no improvement was only declared by 2 patients (4%. Conclusions : Whole-body cryotherapy resulted in a reduction in the frequency and degree of pain perception in patients with osteoarthritis. WBC reduced the number of analgesic medications in these patients. It improved the range of physical activity and had a positive effect on the well-being of patients.

  13. Subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of whole-body cryotherapy in patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściak, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    One of the treatments for osteoarthritis (OA) is whole-body cryotherapy (WBC). The aim of this study is to assess the effect of whole-body cryotherapy on the clinical status of patients with osteoarthritis (OA), according to their subjective feelings before and after the application of a 10-day cold treatment cycle. The aim is also to assess the reduction of intensity and frequency of pain, the reduction of the painkiller medication used, and to assess the possible impact on physical activity. The study involved 50 people, including 30 women (60%) and 20 men (40%). Thirty-one patients had spondyloarthritis (62% of respondents), 10 had knee osteoarthritis (20%), and 9 hip osteoarthritis (18%). The overall average age was 50.1 ±10.9 years; the youngest patient was 29 years old and the oldest 73 years old. The average age of the women was 6 years higher. The study used a questionnaire completed by patients, and consisted of three basic parts. The modified Laitinen pain questionnaire contained questions concerning the intensity and frequency of pain, frequency of painkiller use and the degree of limited mobility. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used in order to subjectively evaluate the therapy after applying the ten-day treatment cycle. According to the subjective assessment of respondents, after the whole-body cryotherapy treatments, a significant improvement occurred in 39 patients (78%), an improvement in 9 patients (18%), and no improvement was only declared by 2 patients (4%). Whole-body cryotherapy resulted in a reduction in the frequency and degree of pain perception in patients with osteoarthritis. WBC reduced the number of analgesic medications in these patients. It improved the range of physical activity and had a positive effect on the well-being of patients.

  14. Patient, Provider, and Combined Interventions for Managing Osteoarthritis in Primary Care: A Cluster Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kelli D; Oddone, Eugene Z; Coffman, Cynthia J; Jeffreys, Amy S; Bosworth, Hayden B; Chatterjee, Ranee; McDuffie, Jennifer; Strauss, Jennifer L; Yancy, William S; Datta, Santanu K; Corsino, Leonor; Dolor, Rowena J

    2017-03-21

    A single-site study showed that a combined patient and provider intervention improved outcomes for patients with knee osteoarthritis, but it did not assess separate effects of the interventions. To examine whether patient-based, provider-based, and patient-provider interventions improve osteoarthritis outcomes. Cluster randomized trial with assignment to patient, provider, and patient-provider interventions or usual care. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01435109). 10 Duke University Health System community-based primary care clinics. 537 outpatients with symptomatic hip or knee osteoarthritis. The telephone-based patient intervention focused on weight management, physical activity, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involved electronic delivery of patient-specific osteoarthritis treatment recommendations to providers. The primary outcome was the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total score at 12 months. Secondary outcomes were objective physical function (Short Physical Performance Battery) and depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire). Linear mixed models assessed the difference in improvement among groups. No difference was observed in WOMAC score changes from baseline to 12 months in the patient (-1.5 [95% CI, -5.1 to 2.0]; P = 0.40), provider (2.5 [CI, -0.9 to 5.9]; P = 0.152), or patient-provider (-0.7 [CI, -4.2 to 2.8]; P = 0.69) intervention groups compared with usual care. All groups had improvements in WOMAC scores at 12 months (range, -3.7 to -7.7). In addition, no differences were seen in objective physical function or depressive symptoms at 12 months in any of the intervention groups compared with usual care. The study involved 1 health care network. Data on provider referrals were not collected. Contrary to a previous study of a combined patient and provider intervention for osteoarthritis in a Department of Veterans Affairs medical center, this study found no statistically

  15. Exercise adherence improving long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.G.; Twisk, J.W.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D.H. de

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence within the prescribed physical therapy treatment period and after physical therapy discharge on patients' outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or

  16. Immediate Efficacy of Neuromuscular Exercise in Patients with Severe Osteoarthritis of the Hip or Knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS) and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaire. The secondary outcomes were the HOOS/KOOS subscales Pain, Symptoms, Sport and Recreation, and Joint-related Quality of Life. Exploratory outcomes were functional performance measures and lower limb...... muscle power. RESULTS: Included were 165 patients, 56% female, average age 67 years (SD ± 8), and a body mass index of 30 (SD ± 5), who were scheduled for primary hip or knee replacement. The postintervention difference between mean changes in ADL was 7.2 points (95% CI 3.5 to 10.9, p = 0.0002) in favor...

  17. Anti-gravity treadmill can promote aerobic exercise for lower limb osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawae, Toshihiro; Mikami, Yukio; Fukuhara, Kouki; Kimura, Hiroaki; Adachi, Nobuo

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] The anti-gravity treadmill (Alter-G®) allows the load on the lower limbs to be adjusted, which is considered useful for patients with lower limb osteoarthritis. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of aerobic exercise using an anti-gravity treadmill in patients with lower limb osteoarthritis by using a cardiopulmonary exercise load monitoring system. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 patients with lower limb osteoarthritis. These subjects walked naturally for 8 minutes and then walked on the Alter-G for 8 minutes at their fastest speed at a load where lower limb pain was alleviated. [Results] Subjective and objective exercise intensity did not differ significantly between level ground walking and Alter-G walking neither before nor after walking. Pain before walking did not differ significantly between level ground walking and Alter-G walking, but pain after walking was significantly greater with level ground walking than with Alter-G walking. [Conclusion] Exercise therapy using an anti-gravity treadmill was useful for patients with lower limb osteoarthritis in terms of cardiopulmonary function, which suggested that this could become a new form of exercise therapy.

  18. Factors associated with physical activity of patients with osteoarthritis of the lower limb.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Kuehlein, T.; Laux, G.; Szecsenyi, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with osteoarthritis (OA), moderate physical activity (PA) can reduce the progress of joint damage. PA is therefore an important target of in the non-surgical treatment of OA. To know about factors associated with PA can increase the success of interventions aiming at

  19. A Telephone-based Physiotherapy Intervention for Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesola C Odole

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effects of a 6-week telephone based intervention on the pain intensity and physical function of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA, and compared the results to physiotherapy conducted in the clinic. Fifty randomly selected patients with knee OA were assigned to one of two treatment groups: a clinic group (CG and a tele-physiotherapy group (TG. The CG received thrice-weekly physiotherapist administered osteoarthritis-specific exercises in the clinic for six weeks. The TG received structured telephone calls thrice-weekly at home, to monitor self-administered osteoarthritis-specific exercises. Participants’ pain intensity and physical function were assessed at baseline, two, four, and six weeks, in the clinic environment. Within group comparison showed significant improvements across baseline, and at weeks two, four, and six for both TG and CG’s pain intensity and physical function. Between-group comparison of CG and TG’s pain intensity and physical function at baseline and weeks two, four, and six showed no significant differences. This study demonstrated that a six-week course of structured telephone calls thrice-weekly to patients at their home, to monitor self-administered osteoarthritis-specific exercises for patients with knee OA (i.e., tele-physiotherapy achieved comparable results to physiotherapy conducted in the clinic.   12.00 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  20. Satisfactory cross cultural equivalence of the Dutch WOMAC in patients with hip osteoarthritis waiting for arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roorda, L.D.; Jones, C.A.; Waltz, M.; Lankhorst, G.J.; Bouter, L.M.; van der Eijken, J.W.; Willems, W.J.; Heyligers, I.C.; Voaklander, D.C.; Kelly, K.D.; Suarez-Almazor, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Cross cultural validity is of vital importance for international comparisons. Objective: To investigate the validity of international Dutch-English comparisons when using the Dutch translation of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC). Patients and

  1. Predictors of depression in a sample of 1,021 primary care patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Backenstrass, M.; Joest, K.; Rosemann, A.; Szecsenyi, J.; Laux, G.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although there is a strong relationship between depression, chronic pain, and physical activity, there are few findings regarding the prevalence and predictors of depression in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). The goal of the present study was to assess the prevalence and severity of

  2. Clinical outcomes of kinesio taping applied in patients with knee osteoarthritis: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğdu, Onur; Sari, Zübeyir; Yurdalan, S Ufuk; Polat, M Gülden

    2017-09-22

    The aim of this study was to compare kinesio taping along with conventional treatment to conventional treatment alone and to report the results of both a single and repetitive kinesio taping application applied on quadriceps femoris and hamstring muscles on pain, range of motion, muscle strength, and functional status in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Fifty-four patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly allocated to two groups. A total of 28 patients were included in kinesio taping group, others were included in the control group. Before and after intervention, pain was measured with visual analog scale, range of motion was measured with universal goniometer, muscle strength was measured with dynamometer, and functional status was measured with Knee Injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. There were statistically significant improvements in measures of pain, range of motion, quadriceps muscle strength and functional status between pre- and post-treatment in both groups (p 0.05). It was also found that significant difference was observed in terms of range of motion, pain, functional status between pre-treatment and post-taping in intervention group (ptaping has significant immediate effects after a single kinesio taping application on range of motion, pain and functional status in patients with knee osteoarthritis. We could also report that KT in addition to conventional treatment is not superior to conventional treatment alone in terms of clinical outcomes over 3 weeks later.

  3. Negative affect, pain and disability in osteoarthritis patients: the mediating role of muscle weakness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, J.; Tola, P.; Aufdemkampe, G.; Winckers, M.

    1993-01-01

    Negative affect has been shown to be associated with high levels of pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. As an explanation of this association, it was hypothesized that muscle weakness is a mediating factor between negative affect, pain and disability. Accordingly, negative affect

  4. Quadriceps femoris muscle weakness and activation failure in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewek, Michael D; Rudolph, Katherine S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Quadriceps weakness is common in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and has been attributed to failure of voluntary activation. Methodological differences may have contributed to previous reports of extensive failure of voluntary activation in patients with osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of quadriceps muscle weakness and activation failure in middle aged patients with symptomatic medial knee osteoarthritis using maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and a burst superimposition technique. Measurements of quadriceps MVIC and extent of voluntary activation were made in 12 subjects with knee OA and 12 similarly aged uninjured subjects. Voluntary activation was tested by superimposing a train of electrical stimulation on a maximal effort volitional contraction of the quadriceps muscle. The group of subjects with knee OA had significantly less quadriceps strength relative to body mass index (BMI) than the group of control subjects (p=0.010). No difference in voluntary activation was observed (p=0.233), however, 50% of the OA group, and only 25% of the control group failed to fully activate the quadriceps. The finding of quadriceps weakness is consistent with past literature. Providing adequate instruction, feedback, and several attempts to maximally contract the muscle likely yielded greater volitional activation (thus less activation failure) than had been reported previously. This finding has implications for the rehabilitation of weakened quadriceps in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  5. [Follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. Coordinated management and criteria for referral between healthcare levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Pol, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    The correct management of osteoarthritis requires an accurate diagnosis, evaluation of its spread and functional repercussions, and the application of comprehensive and effective individually-tailored treatment aimed at relieving pain and improving physical function with a consequent improvement in quality of life; treatment should also aim to prevent or delay disease progression and its effects. In the National Health Service, primary care is the basic level and the first point of access to healthcare; this level guarantees the continuity of care, coordinates patients, and regulates clinical workflow. Family physicians coordinate the healthcare processes related to chronic diseases and are responsible for the management, diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of patients with osteoarthritis. The clinical practice guidelines internationally accepted as the standard of care for the management of osteoarthritis should be adapted by both Spanish health planning strategies and clinical practice guidelines to the Spanish healthcare setting. The comprehensive assessment of osteoarthritis includes evaluation of its effects on the patient's physical function and quality of life; formulating a treatment plan in collaboration with the patient and adapted to his or her comorbidities; providing advice on basic treatments and their risks and benefits; and carrying out an individually-tailored periodic review. Referral criteria are based on diagnostic confirmation, poor treatment response, and surgical evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. A hierarchy of patient-reported outcomes for meta-analysis of knee osteoarthritis trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Carsten; Lund, Hans; Roos, Ewa M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a prioritised list based on responsiveness for extracting patient-reported outcomes (PROs) measuring pain and disability for performing meta-analyses in knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods. A systematic search was conducted in 20 highest impact factor general and rheumatology...

  7. Strength and voluntary activation in relation to functioning in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. D.M. van Leeuwen

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain, and problems with activities of daily life, especially if the hip or knee joint is affected. The aim of this project was to study associations between strength, voluntary activation and physical functioning in elderly patients with OA. People with OA of

  8. Stages of change, barriers, benefits, and preferences for exercise in RA patients: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchoz, Y; Zufferey, P; So, A

    2013-01-01

    To determine the distribution of exercise stages of change in a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohort, and to examine patients' perceptions of exercise benefits, barriers, and their preferences for exercise. One hundred and twenty RA patients who attended the Rheumatology Unit of a University Hospital were asked to participate in the study. Those who agreed were administered a questionnaire to determine their exercise stage of change, their perceived benefits and barriers to exercise, and their preferences for various features of exercise. Eighty-nine (74%) patients were finally included in the analyses. Their mean age was 58.4 years, mean RA duration 10.1 years, and mean disease activity score 2.8. The distribution of exercise stages of change was as follows: precontemplation (n = 30, 34%), contemplation (n = 11, 13%), preparation (n = 5, 6%), action (n = 2, 2%), and maintenance (n = 39, 45%). Compared to patients in the maintenance stage of change, precontemplators exhibited different demographic and functional characteristics and reported less exercise benefits and more barriers to exercise. Most participants preferred exercising alone (40%), at home (29%), at a moderate intensity (64%), with advice provided by a rheumatologist (34%) or a specialist in exercise and RA (34%). Walking was by far the preferred type of exercise, in both the summer (86%) and the winter (51%). Our cohort of patients with RA was essentially distributed across the precontemplation and maintenance exercise stages of change. These subgroups of patients exhibit psychological and functional differences that make their needs different in terms of exercise counselling.

  9. Weight loss for overweight patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Hansen, Julie Bolvig; Lund, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This is a protocol for a Cochrane Review (Intervention). The objectives are as follows:  To determine the benefits and harms associated with weight loss in overweight individuals with knee or hip osteoarthritis in terms of pain, physical function, quality of life, and safety.  Further we will have...... an explicit focus on quality of the weight loss intervention (including magnitude and intensity) (Herbert 2005), to see whether there is a dose-response relationship at the trial (i.e. group) level....

  10. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the French version of the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) in knee osteoarthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ornetti, P; Parratte, S; Gossec, L

    2008-01-01

    to ensure content validity. KOOS data were then obtained in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). The translated questionnaire was evaluated in two knee OA population groups, one with no indication for joint replacement (medicine), and the other waiting for joint replacement (surgery......OBJECTIVE: To adapt the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) into French and to evaluate the psychometric properties of this new version. METHODS: The French version of the KOOS was developed according to cross-cultural guidelines by using the "translation-back translation" method......). The psychometric properties evaluated were feasibility: percentage of responses, floor and ceiling effects; construct validity: internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, correlations with osteoarthritis knee and hip quality of life domains using Spearman's rank test, and known group comparison between medicine...

  11. Exercise adherence improves long-term patient outcome in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.; Veenhof, C.; Schellevis, F.; Twisk, J.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of patient exercise adherence, within the prescribed physiotherapy treatment period and after discharge, on patients’ outcome on pain, physical function and patient self-perceived effect in individuals with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. Relevance: The

  12. An 8-Week Neuromuscular Exercise Program for Patients With Mild to Moderate Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Brian; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Roos, Ewa M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:   To describe the feasibility of a neuromuscular exercise (NEMEX) program in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis (KOA). BACKGROUND:   Neuromuscular exercise has been increasingly used in patients with osteoarthritis to achieve sensorimotor control and improved daily...... to increased (n = 2) or persisting (n = 1) knee pain. However, their pain ratings did not show worsening symptoms. UNIQUENESS:   This NEMEX-KOA program was designed for physically active middle-aged patients with mild to moderate KOA; therefore, it involved exercises and difficulty levels that were more...... challenging than a previously described NEMEX program for patients eligible for total joint replacement. CONCLUSIONS:   In patients with baseline mild to severe pain with activity, the NEMEX-KOA program was feasible. Progression was achieved with few incidents of clinically relevant increases in pain...

  13. [Comparison of the effectiveness of isokinetic vs isometric therapeutic exercise in patients with osteoarthritis of knee].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Uganet Hernández; Velásquez Tlapanco, Jorge; Lara Maya, Catalina; Villarreal Ríos, Enrique; Martínez González, Lidia; Vargas Daza, Emma Rosa; Galicia Rodríguez, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic joint disease; isometric exercise leads to the development of mechanical work and isokinetic exercise leads to better joint mobility. To compare the effectiveness of isometric versus isokinetic therapeutic exercises in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Quasiexperimental study in a population of 45 to 75 year old patients with a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Group 1 (experimental) was put under isokinetic exercises and group 2 (control) under isometric exercises. The sample size was of 33 patients per group; the allocation to the experimentation or control group was nonrandom, but stratified by degrees of knee osteoarthritis. The effectiveness of the exercise was measured in three dimensions: muscle strength, joint range and pain. The intervention lasted eight weeks and the physical activity was carried out every third day. The statistical analysis included averages, standard deviation, percentage, Chi square test, z test for two populations, t test for two independent populations and twin t test. The analysis of muscle strength comparing the categories independently demonstrates differences at 8 weeks; 33.3% of the isokinetic exercise is in the normal category and 15.2% in the isometric exercise (p= 0.04). There was not difference of joint range between groups, despite finding a stage I range in 100.0% of the isokinetic group and 97.0% in the isometric (p> 0.05) group. Pain was milder in the isokinetic exercise group at 8 weeks (p= 0.01) Isokinetic exercises have a greater effectiveness than isometric exercises for muscle strength and pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, other studies with randomized designs are needed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of psychological interventions for patients with osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Fu, Ting; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Yin, Rulan; Zhu, Li; He, Yan; Fu, Wenting; Shen, Biyu

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of psychological interventions (e.g. cognitive restructuring, relaxation) on physiological and psychological health in osteoarthritis patients. A systematic literature search was done using PubMed, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang Database through November 2016. Studies were included if they used a randomized controlled trial designed to explore the effects of psychological interventions in osteoarthritis patients. Two independent authors assessed the methodological quality of the trials using criteria outlined by Jadad et al. Meta-analysis was done with the Revman5.0. Twelve randomized controlled trials, including 1307 osteoarthritis patients, met the study inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis showed that psychological interventions could reduce the levels of pain [standard mean difference (SMD) -0.28, 95% CI -0.48, -0.08, P-value 0.005)] and fatigue (SMD -0.18, 95% CI -0.34, -0.01, P-value 0.04). In addition, psychological interventions significantly improved osteoarthritis patients' self-efficacy (SMD 0.58, 95% CI 0.40, 0.75, P-value 0.00) and pain coping (MD 1.64, 95% CI 0.03, 3.25, P-value 0.05). Although the effects on physical function, anxiety, depression, psychological disability were in the expected direction, they were not statistically significant. In conclusion, the role of psychological interventions in the management of osteoarthritis remains equivocal. Some encouraging results were seen with regard to pain, pain coping, self-efficacy, and fatigue. We believe that more methodologically rigorous large-scale randomized controlled trials are necessary to answer this study question.

  15. Specificities of anti-neutrophil autoantibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brimnes, J; Halberg, P; Jacobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    neutrophils showed IgG reactions at 25-35 kD, in the 55-kD region, at 80 kD, and at 110 kD. Most sera reacted with more than one band. Except for the 55-kD antigen, none of the antigens appeared in lymphocytes. The most notable reactivity in subcellular fractions was with lactoferrin and with bands of 25-35 k......D from nuclei. In conclusion, anti-neutrophil autoantibodies from RA patients recognize different antigens in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Lactoferrin is one of the common antigens recognized, but also unknown nuclear antigens of 25-35 kD mol. wt are involved....

  16. Comparing the efficacy of aquatic exercises and land-based exercises for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tsae-Jyy; Lee, Shu-Chiung; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Tung, Heng-Hsin; Wu, Shu-Fang V; Lin, Yu-Ping

    2011-09-01

    care professionals may consider suggesting well-designed aquatic or land-based exercise classes for patients with osteoarthritis, based on their preferences and convenience. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A comparison of the OARSI response criteria with patient's global assessment in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip treated with a non-pharmacological intervention.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Breedveld, F.C.; Ronday, H.K.; Dekker, J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI) response criteria for clinical trials with patient's global assessment in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip receiving a non-pharmacological intervention, i.e., manual therapy or exercise therapy. Methods: Data

  18. Early vascular alterations in SLE and RA patients--a step towards understanding the associated cardiovascular risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Santos

    Full Text Available Accelerated atherosclerosis represents a major problem in both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients, and endothelial damage is a key feature of atherogenesis. We aimed to assess early endothelial changes in SLE and RA female patients (127 SLE and 107 RA without previous CV events. Biomarkers of endothelial cell activation (intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1, thrombomodulin (TM, and tissue factor (TF were measured and endothelial function was assessed using peripheral artery tonometry. Reactive hyperemia index (RHI, an indicator of microvascular reactivity, and augmentation index (AIx, a measure of arterial stiffness, were obtained. In addition, traditional CV risk factors, disease activity and medication were determined. Women with SLE displayed higher sICAM-1 and TM and lower TF levels than women with RA (p = 0.001, p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. These differences remained significant after controlling for CV risk factors and medication. Serum levels of vascular biomarkers were increased in active disease and a moderate correlation was observed between sVCAM-1 levels and lupus disease activity (rho = 0.246 and between TF levels and RA disease activity (rho = 0.301. Although RHI was similar across the groups, AIx was higher in lupus as compared to RA (p = 0.04. Also in active SLE, a trend towards poorer vasodilation was observed (p = 0.06. In conclusion, women with SLE and RA present with distinct patterns of endothelial cell activation biomarkers not explained by differences in traditional CV risk factors. Early vascular alterations are more pronounced in SLE which is in line with the higher CV risk of these patients.

  19. MiRNA expression in the cartilage of patients with osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kopa?ska, Marta; Szala, Dariusz; Czech, Joanna; Gab?o, Natalia; Gargasz, Krzysztof; Trzeciak, Mateusz; Zawlik, Izabela; Snela, S?awomir

    2017-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA), the most prevalent disease of articulating joints, is a complex multifactorial disease caused by genetic, mechanical, and environmental factors. In this research, we evaluated miRNA expression in OA. Methods Forty tissue samples from 29 patients undergoing joint replacement for OA were evaluated. Tissue from two control patients undergoing hip replacement not related to OA was used as a control. Total RNA (containing miRNA species) from cartilage was isolated u...

  20. Negative affect, pain and disability in osteoarthritis patients: the mediating role of muscle weakness.

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, J.; Tola, P; Aufdemkampe, G.; Winckers, M.

    1993-01-01

    Negative affect has been shown to be associated with high levels of pain and disability in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. As an explanation of this association, it was hypothesized that muscle weakness is a mediating factor between negative affect, pain and disability. Accordingly, negative affect enhances the patient's tendency to avoid pain-related activities; a low activity level induces muscle weakness, instability of joints and thus pain and disability. This theory leads to the prediction...

  1. Pes Anserine Bursitis in Symptomatic Osteoarthritis Patients: A Mesotherapy Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggini, Raoul; Di Stefano, Alexandra; Dodaj, Ira; Scarcello, Laura; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia

    2015-08-01

    Pes anserine bursitis strongly affects quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis. Treatment includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses; recovery can take 10 days to 36 months. Mesotherapy is a minimally invasive technique consisting of subcutaneous injections of bioactive substances. The goal is to modulate the pharmacokinetics of the injected substance and prolong the effects at a local level. To evaluate the effects of mesotherapy with diclofenac for anserine bursitis associated with knee osteoarthritis. One hundred and seventeen patients with anserine bursitis associated with grade II Kellgren-Lawrence knee osteoarthritis, assessed by clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic examination, were evaluated and treated. They were randomly divided into two groups (A, mesotherapy; B, control). Group A completed nine sessions of mesotherapy with sodium diclofenac (25 mg/1 mL; Akis®, IBSA, Lugano, Switzerland), 1 mL for each session, three times per week. Group B received 21 oral administrations of sodium diclofenac (50 mg; Voltaren®, Novartis, Parsippany, NJ), once a day for 3 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain intensity assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), along with ability to perform activities of daily living, ability to participate in sports, level of pain, symptoms, and quality of life, as assessed by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. These measures were performed before and after the treatment period and at 30 and 90 days' follow up. In both groups pain level decreased significantly after the treatment period. Ultrasonography showed a reduction of the hypoechoic area related to anserine bursitis only in group A. Administration of conventional NSAIDs (diclofenac) by mesotherapy is effective in managing anserine bursitis in knee osteoarthritis in the short term and mid-term. These observations could be of interest for efforts

  2. Pes Anserine Bursitis in Symptomatic Osteoarthritis Patients: A Mesotherapy Treatment Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Alexandra; Dodaj, Ira; Scarcello, Laura; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pes anserine bursitis strongly affects quality of life in patients with osteoarthritis. Treatment includes nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses; recovery can take 10 days to 36 months. Mesotherapy is a minimally invasive technique consisting of subcutaneous injections of bioactive substances. The goal is to modulate the pharmacokinetics of the injected substance and prolong the effects at a local level. Objective: To evaluate the effects of mesotherapy with diclofenac for anserine bursitis associated with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: One hundred and seventeen patients with anserine bursitis associated with grade II Kellgren-Lawrence knee osteoarthritis, assessed by clinical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic examination, were evaluated and treated. They were randomly divided into two groups (A, mesotherapy; B, control). Group A completed nine sessions of mesotherapy with sodium diclofenac (25 mg/1 mL; Akis®, IBSA, Lugano, Switzerland), 1 mL for each session, three times per week. Group B received 21 oral administrations of sodium diclofenac (50 mg; Voltaren®, Novartis, Parsippany, NJ), once a day for 3 weeks. Primary outcome measures were pain intensity assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), along with ability to perform activities of daily living, ability to participate in sports, level of pain, symptoms, and quality of life, as assessed by the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. These measures were performed before and after the treatment period and at 30 and 90 days' follow up. Results: In both groups pain level decreased significantly after the treatment period. Ultrasonography showed a reduction of the hypoechoic area related to anserine bursitis only in group A. Conclusion: Administration of conventional NSAIDs (diclofenac) by mesotherapy is effective in managing anserine bursitis in knee osteoarthritis in the short term and

  3. [Study of the role of miRNA in mesenchymal stem cells isolated from osteoarthritis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero-Esteban, P; Hoyas, J A; Villafuertes, E; Garcia-Bullón, I; Moro, E; Fernández-Gutiérrez, B; Marco, F

    2014-01-01

    MiRNAs act as gene silencers that are involved in the regulation of essential cell functions. miR-335 is involved in regulating cell differentiation processes in progenitor cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are progenitor cells of chondrocytes and osteoblasts responsible for homeostatic maintenance of cartilage and bone. The aim of this study was to determine a possible relationship between the expression of miR-335 and osteoarthritis. MSCs obtained from the bone marrow of 3 osteoarthritic patients and 3 controls with no clinical signs of osteoarthritis or osteoporosis were cultured and phenotypically and functionally characterised in a 3-step culture. Expression levels of miR-335 and the mesoderm-specific transcript gene -MEST- that controls its expression were determined by quantitative PCR. Differences in the expression levels of miR-335 and MEST (median [interquartile range]: 1.69 [0.85-1.74], and 3.85 [3.20-5.67] were detected between MSCs isolated from patients with osteoarthritis and controls. Although the differences detected did not reach statistical significance (P=.1), a clear trend towards lower expression of miR-335 in osteoarthritis MSCs was observed. Given that miR-335 has the different genes involved in the Wnt signalling pathway as potential targets, the observed trend may help to ascertain, at least partially, some of the alterations which determine the onset or progression of osteoarthritis, and can therefore serve for the design of future therapeutic targets for the treatment of this disease. Copyright © 2013 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Early detection of aging cartilage and osteoarthritis in mice and patient samples using atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Martin; Gottardi, Riccardo; Raiteri, Roberto; Miot, Sylvie; Martin, Ivan; Imer, Raphaël; Staufer, Urs; Raducanu, Aurelia; Düggelin, Marcel; Baschong, Werner; Daniels, A. U.; Friederich, Niklaus F.; Aszodi, Attila; Aebi, Ueli

    2009-03-01

    The pathological changes in osteoarthritis-a degenerative joint disease prevalent among older people-start at the molecular scale and spread to the higher levels of the architecture of articular cartilage to cause progressive and irreversible structural and functional damage. At present, there are no treatments to cure or attenuate the degradation of cartilage. Early detection and the ability to monitor the progression of osteoarthritis are therefore important for developing effective therapies. Here, we show that indentation-type atomic force microscopy can monitor age-related morphological and biomechanical changes in the hips of normal and osteoarthritic mice. Early damage in the cartilage of osteoarthritic patients undergoing hip or knee replacements could similarly be detected using this method. Changes due to aging and osteoarthritis are clearly depicted at the nanometre scale well before morphological changes can be observed using current diagnostic methods. Indentation-type atomic force microscopy may potentially be developed into a minimally invasive arthroscopic tool to diagnose the early onset of osteoarthritis in situ.

  5. [Effect of articular cavity injection for patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis at different ages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Li, Gang

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a course of 5 weeks of joint lavage combined with sodium hyaluronate injection on temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients at different ages. Forty-seven patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis were selected and divided into 3 groups including young group (65 years old). All the patients underwent a course of 5 weeks of joint lavage combined with sodium hyaluronate injection. Non-assisted maximum opening degree of mouth, the joint pain at rest and during chewing and the joint movement disorders were measured in each group at baseline and 1, 3, 6 months after treatment. The patients were measured for the quality of life at baseline and 6 months after treatment by using OHIP-14 scale. The data was processed by using SPSS 18.0 software package. The qualities of life were significantly improved for each group of patients (P65 years old) were significantly better than those before treatment (Ptemporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is related to the age and the elderly patients can obtain better overall efficacy.

  6. The role of hyaluronic acid in patients affected by glenohumeral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacomo, G; De Gasperis, N

    2015-01-01

    Persistent shoulder pain is a highly prevalent problem, due to different pathologies, that is frequently associated with limited range of motion and decreased function. The correct diagnosis can lead to the best treatment for each pathology. In this study we tried to understand what could be the role of hyaluronic acid and its effective benefit in patients affected by mild-to-moderate glenohumeral osteoarthritis. From January 2013 to June 2014, we prospectively followed-up 61 consecutive patients with shoulder osteoarthritis degrees I, II, and III. We divided the patients into 2 homogeneous groups: 31 patients in the first group treated with 5 intra-articular injections of Hyalgan 20mg/2ml and a specific physiotherapy program, and 30 patients in the second group treated only with physical therapy. The mean follow-up examination was carried out 5.2 months after the beginning of the therapy for both groups. The statistical analysis revealed a significant difference (P less than 0.05) between the two groups in terms of pain reduction and improvement in the activities of daily living. The present study demonstrates the greater and long-lasting efficacy of a five-injection treatment with hyaluronic acid (Hyalgan 20mg/2ml) combined with a physical therapy program in comparison with physical therapy only in patients affected by glenohumeral osteoarthritis degree I, II or III.

  7. Efficacy and safety of Meriva®, a curcumin-phosphatidylcholine complex, during extended administration in osteoarthritis patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belcaro, Gianni; Cesarone, Maria Rosaria; Dugall, Mark; Pellegrini, Luciano; Ledda, Andrea; Grossi, Maria Giovanna; Togni, Stefano; Appendino, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In a previous three-month study of Meriva, a proprietary curcumin-phosphatidylcholine phytosome complex, decreased joint pain and improvement in joint function were observed in 50 osteoarthritis (OA) patients...

  8. The influence of sport participation on physical function in patients with osteoarthritis during and after exercise therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhof, C.; Perry, S.; Lucas, C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The objectives of this study were to investigate 1) in which sports activities patients with osteoarthritis (OA) participate, 2) the cross sectional differences in functional outcome between sports participants and nonsports participants and 3) the influence of regular sports

  9. Signs of knee osteoarthritis common in 620 patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for meniscal tear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Kenneth; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L. Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose - Recent evidence has questioned the effect of arthroscopic knee surgery for middle-aged and older patients with degenerative meniscal tears with or without concomitant radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated the prevalence of early or more established knee OA...... and patients' characteristics in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery for a meniscal tear. Patients and methods - 641 patients assigned for arthroscopy on suspicion of meniscus tear were consecutively recruited from February 2013 through January 2015. Of these, 620 patients (mean age 49 (18...

  10. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve...... the neuromuscular function and thereby optimize the positive and minimize the negative performance factors in relation to an exercise program. METHODS: In a cross-over design, 19 patients with knee osteoarthritis, mean age of 73.1 years (SD: 9.4; range 56 to 88 years), recruited from the local department...... before and immediately after the 10 min massage and control sessions. Data were analyzed by using paired t-test. RESULTS: No significant change in JRE was observed (95% CI: -0.62 degrees to 0.85 degrees, p = 0.738). CONCLUSION: Massage has no effect on the immediate joint repositioning error in patients...

  11. The efficacy of non-surgical treatment on pain and sensitization in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Søren T; Roos, Ewa M; Simonsen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    in patients with knee osteoarthritis not eligible for total knee replacement. METHOD: A pre-defined ancillary analysis of the results at 3 months of a randomized controlled trial of 100 patients randomized to MEDIC-treatment or usual care. Outcomes were sensitization assessed at the knee, the lower leg......-surgical treatment program is more efficacious in reducing pain-related measures than usual care, while both are equally efficacious in reducing sensitization, indicating that mechanisms other than pain sensitization contribute to the perceived pain. The patients did not have severe symptomatic knee osteoarthritis......OBJECTIVE: To report the efficacy of a 3-month treatment program consisting of neuromuscular exercise, education, diet, insoles and pain medication (MEDIC-treatment) compared to usual care (two leaflets with information and treatment advice) in reducing pain-related measures and sensitization...

  12. Effects of activity modification on the patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, M A; Taslim, Md Abu; Hossain, Md Shahadat

    2007-08-01

    A prospective randomized clinical trial was conducted on 162 patients of osteoarthritis of knee were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups- Group A and Group B. The Group A was treated with shortwave diathermy, exercise, naproxen and activity modification and the Group B was treated with shortwave diathermy, exercise and naproxen. Improvement was found more in Group A than Group B after 4th week (95% CI was -2.59 to 6.56). Then it was found that the improvement was gradually increased in Group A than Group B and finally, it was found that there was highly significant improvement in Group A than Group B after 6th week (95% CI was -3.45 to -0.70). This study suggests that activity modification play an important role for the treatment of the patients with osteoarthritis of knee.

  13. A Mutation in IL4RA Is Associated with the Degree of Pathology in Human TB Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, Christoph; Heitmann, Lisa; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Horstmann, Rolf D; Meyer, Christian G; Ehlers, Stefan; Thye, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of interleukin- (IL-) 4 receptor-alpha- (Rα-) dependent events in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis (TB) is controversial. We have recently shown IL-13 overexpression in mice to cause recrudescent Mtb replication and centrally necrotizing granulomas strongly resembling pathology of human TB. A deletion of IL-4Rα completely abrogates TB tissue pathology in these mice. To validate our results in human TB patients, we here determined the association of distinct variants of the IL4, IL13, IL4RA, IL13RA1, and IL13RA2 genes with cavity formation in a large Ghanaian cohort of HIV-negative individuals with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB. In fact, the structural variant of the IL4RA I50V, previously shown to result in enhanced signal transduction, was significantly associated with greater cavity size, and a variant of IL13RA2 was associated with disease in females. To evaluate whether the human-like TB pathology in IL-13-overexpressing mice is specifically mediated through the IL-4Rα subunit, we analyzed IL-13 transgenic mice with a genetic ablation of the IL-4Rα. In these mice, the IL-13-mediated increased susceptibility, human-like pathology of collagen deposition around centrally necrotizing granulomas, and alternative macrophage activation were abolished. Together, our genetic association study in human TB patients further supports the assumption that IL-13/IL-4Rα-dependent mechanisms are involved in mediating tissue pathology of human TB.

  14. The association of fatigue, comorbidity burden, disease activity, disability and gross domestic product in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Results from 34 countries participating in the Quest-RA program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Kathrine Lederballe; Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim is to assess the prevalence of comorbidities and to further analyse to which degree fatigue can be explained by comorbidity burden, disease activity, disability and gross domestic product (GDP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Nine thousands eight hundred...... [VAS] [10=worst]), disease activity in 28 joints (DAS28), and physical disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire score [HAQ]) were assessed. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the association between fatigue and comorbidities, disease activity, disability...... and GDP. RESULTS: Overall, patients reported a median of 2 comorbid conditions of which hypertension (31.5%), osteoporosis (17.6%), osteoarthritis (15.5%) and hyperlipidaemia (14.2%) were the most prevalent. The majority of comorbidities were more common in high-GDP countries. The median fatigue score...

  15. Changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects.......To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects....

  16. Clinical characteristics of pain originating from intra-articular structures of the knee joint in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Izumi, Masashi; Aso, Koji; Sugimura, Natsuki; Tani, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although disease progression of osteoarthritis has been well documented, pain pathophysiology is largely unknown. This study was designed with two purposes: 1) to characterize patients with knee pain predominantly originating from intra-articular structures and 2) to describe the location and pattern of their pain. Materials and methods 103 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis underwent an intra-articular injection of local anesthetics (joint block). At least 70% pain relief was d...

  17. The efficacy of shock wave therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis and popliteal cyamella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Wen Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This randomized, controlled study was performed to compare the effects of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT and ultrasound on the rehabilitation of knee osteoarthritis with popliteal cyamella. One hundred and twenty patients with bilateral moderate knee osteoarthritis (Altman III and popliteal cyamella were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (GI–GIV. Patients in Groups I–III received isokinetic muscular strengthening exercises three times weekly for 8 weeks. Group II received pulse ultrasound treatment for popliteal cyamella three times weekly for 8 weeks, Group III received weekly shock wave therapy for popliteal cyamella for the first 6 weeks, and Group IV acted as controls. The therapeutic effects were evaluated by changes in the arthritic knees range of motion (ROM, visual analogue scale, Lequesne's index, and muscle peak torques after treatment and at follow-up 6 months later. Each treated group exhibited increased muscle peak torques and significantly reduced pain and disability after treatment and at follow-ups. However, only patients in Groups II and III showed significant improvements in ROM after treatment, and only participants in Group III showed immediate improvement in ROM after each treatment. Patients in Group III also showed the greatest increase in muscular strength and the greatest decrease in disability after treatment and at the follow-ups. ESWT is better than pulse ultrasound in rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis and popliteal cyamella results in more functional improvements.

  18. Characterization of multinucleated giant cells in synovium and subchondral bone in knee osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Prieto-Potin, Iv?n; Largo, Raquel; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Herrero-Beaumont, Gabriel; Walsh, David A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multinucleated giant cells have been noticed in diverse arthritic conditions since their first description in rheumatoid synovium. However, their role in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) still remains broadly unknown. We aimed to study the presence and characteristics of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) both in synovium and in subchondral bone tissues of patients with OA or RA. Methods: Knee synovial and subchondral bone samples were...

  19. CASE REPORT : OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Imayati

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease in which the affected joint is usually the largejoint and unilateral. Prevalence of osteoarthritis in Indonesia, 15.5% in men and 12.7% inwomen, where the incidence is increasing with age. Osteoarthritis is more common anidiopathic disease or unknown cause although there is also a secondary cause such astrauma, infection, neurological or metabolic disorders. The usual complaints  that perceivedby osteoarthritis patients is pain in the affected joint, especially after the load on the joint.Therapy in osteoarthritis is usually symptomatic, which include the control of risk factors,physiotherapy and pharmacological.

  20. Further validation of the 5-item Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions (PEPPI-5) scale in patients with osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Klooster, Peter M.; Oostveen, J.C.M.; Oostveen, Johanna C.M.; Zandbelt, Linda C.; Taal, Erik; Drossaert, Constance H.C.; Harmsen, Etelka J.; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the structural validity, internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and construct validity of the 5-item Perceived Efficacy in Patient–Physician Interactions (PEPPI-5) scale in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A cross-sectional sample of 224 outpatients with OA

  1. Incidence of metabolic bone disease in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, K C; Revell, P A; Beer, M; Boucher, B J; Cohen, R D; Currey, H L

    1984-01-01

    Bone biopsy specimens from the iliac crest were obtained during surgical operations from 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 41 with osteoarthritis (OA). Control material was obtained from 20 cases of sudden death due to cardiovascular disease. By both conventional histology and image analysis techniques about a quarter of all patients showed some osteoporosis. This was equally common among the OA and RA patients. It was more common among those with transparent skin and those taking corticosteroids. The only case showing mild osteomalacia suffered from OA. No gross differences were apparent between the groups in relation to plasma biochemical studies, diet, or exposure to sunlight. These results are in striking contrast to the high incidence of osteomalacia in RA reported from the west of England; moreover they do not confirm reports of hypercalcaemia among rheumatoid subjects. We conclude that the differences regarding osteomalacia are due to selection of cases. We find no evidence that osteomalacia is specifically associated with RA. PMID:6742898

  2. Middle-aged patients with an MRI-verified medial meniscal tear report symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer B.; Stefan Lohmander, L.; Kise, Nina Jullum

    2017-01-01

    with early radiographic signs of knee osteoarthritis. Patients and methods — We included individual baseline items from the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score collected in 2 randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment for an MRI-verified degenerative medial meniscal tears in 199 patients aged...... 35–65 years. Each item was scored as no, mild, moderate, severe, extreme, and at least “mild” considering the symptoms present. Early radiographic signs of osteoarthritis, defined as a Kellgren and Lawrence grade of at least 1, were seen in 70 patients. Results — At least monthly knee pain, pain...... with a degenerative medial meniscus tear reported symptoms commonly associated with knee osteoarthritis. Frequent knee pain, presence of lack of confidence in the knee, and clicking did not distinguish those with a meniscal tear alone from those with early radiographic knee OA. Our findings support the notion...

  3. Effectiveness of aquatic exercise for obese patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jae-Young; Tchai, Esther; Jang, Soong-Nang

    2010-08-01

    To design an aquatic exercise (AQE) and land-based exercise (LBE) program to enhance knee function and reduce body fat in patients with obesity and knee osteoarthritis and to investigate the effectiveness of AQE and LBE on body fat, functional fitness, and functional status. Outpatient clinic at a Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Obese patients with knee osteoarthritis were recruited from patients who visited the rehabilitation, orthopedic surgery, and geriatric outpatient clinics at the hospital. Study participants were limited to those who met the following criteria: body mass index more than 25 kg/m(2), abdominal circumference more than 90 cm (men) or 85 cm (women), clinically diagnosed osteoarthritis with Kellgren-Lawrence scale 2 or higher on radiographic studies, and independent ambulation state. Participants were randomly allocated into 3 groups: AQE (n = 26), LBE (n = 25), and the control group (n = 24). Exercise interventions were conducted 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Body fat analysis, brief pain inventory, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities' osteoarthritis index, Short Form-36 questionnaire, and knee isokinetic tests were evaluated to assess changes in body fat composition, pain, physical function, and quality of life before and after the exercise program. Although no significant difference was found in general characteristics among the 3 groups before exercise, body fat proportion in the AQE group decreased significantly (mean +/- SD, from 34.4 +/- 4.7 to 33.3 +/- 4.7; P = .031) after intervention. The body mass index was slightly reduced after intervention, but it was not statistically significant. The AQE group showed significant improvements in pain, disability, and quality of life. Notably, the change in pain interference in the AQE group (mean +/- SD, from 25.8 +/- 15.1 to 18.8 +/- 13.1; P = .009) was greater than that of the LBE group. Both exercise groups showed significant improvements in Western Ontario and Mc

  4. Efficacy benefit of an NK1 receptor antagonist (NK1RA) in patients receiving carboplatin: supportive evidence with NEPA (a fixed combination of the NK1 RA, netupitant, and palonosetron) and aprepitant regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Karin; Gralla, Richard; Rizzi, Giada; Kashef, Kimia

    2016-11-01

    Antiemetic guideline recommendations are inconsistent as to whether a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist (NK1 RA) should be administered with a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5HT3) RA + dexamethasone (DEX) in patients receiving carboplatin. Patients receiving cisplatin routinely receive an NK1 RA-containing regimen with a resulting 14-22 % benefit in no emesis rates over a 5-HT3 RA/DEX control. Recent studies suggest a similar benefit in patients receiving carboplatin. NEPA is the first fixed antiemetic combination agent and comprises the highly selective NK1 RA, netupitant, and pharmacologically distinct 5-HT3 RA, palonosetron (PALO). This paper presents the efficacy of NEPA in the subset of patients receiving carboplatin in a phase 3 trial (NCT01376297), in the context of aprepitant (APR) data in the carboplatin setting. One hundred ninety-six patients (47 % of all study patients: n = 145 NEPA + DEX; n = 51 APR + PALO + DEX) received carboplatin in a multinational, double-blind, randomized phase 3 study. Complete response (CR: no emesis/rescue) and no significant nausea (NSN: score ≤25 on 100 mm visual analog scale) rates were calculated. Cycle 1-4 overall (0-120 h) CR rates were similar for NEPA (80, 91, 92, and 93 %) and APR (82, 88, 88, and 90 %). Overall NSN rates were also similar (NEPA 84-96 %; APR 82-90 %). Response rates for NEPA and APR regimens were similar and consistent with prior studies evaluating the contribution of adding NK1 RAs in patients receiving carboplatin. Considering such evidence, guideline groups/practitioners should consider giving a NK1 RA antiemetic triplet in patients receiving carboplatin.

  5. Clinical descriptors for the recognition of central sensitization pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lluch, Enrique; Nijs, Jo; Courtney, Carol A

    2017-01-01

    and its association with structural joint changes, pain distribution, behavior of knee pain, presence of neuropathic-like or centrally mediated symptoms and responsiveness to previous treatment. The latter includes assessment of response to clinical test, mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, thermal......BACKGROUND: Despite growing awareness of the contribution of central pain mechanisms to knee osteoarthritis pain in a subgroup of patients, routine evaluation of central sensitization is yet to be incorporated into clinical practice. AIM: The objective of this perspective is to design a set...... of clinical descriptors for the recognition of central sensitization in patients with knee osteoarthritis that can be implemented in clinical practice. METHODS: A narrative review of original research papers was conducted by nine clinicians and researchers from seven different countries to reach agreement...

  6. Neuromuscular versus quadriceps strengthening exercise in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis and varus malalignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennell, Kim L; Kyriakides, Mary; Metcalf, Ben

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of neuromuscular exercise (NEXA) and quadriceps strengthening (QS) on the knee adduction moment (an indicator of mediolateral distribution of knee load), pain, and physical function in patients with medial knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) and varus malalignment...... component. Primary outcomes were peak external knee adduction moment (3-dimensional gait analysis), pain (visual analog scale), and self-reported physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index). RESULTS: Eighty-two patients (38 [76%] of 50 in the NEXA group and 44 [88......%] of 50 in the QS group) completed the trial. There was no significant between-group difference in the change in the peak knee adduction moment (mean difference 0.13 Nm/[body weight × height]% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) -0.08, 0.33]), pain (mean difference 2.4 mm [95% CI -6.0, 10.8]), or physical...

  7. A randomized controlled trial of aquatic and land-based exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H.; Weile, U.; Christensen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of aquatic exercise and a land-based exercise programme vs control in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Primary outcome was change in pain, and in addition Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS). Standing balance and strength...... was also measured after and at 3-month follow-up. Seventy-nine patients (62 women), with a mean age of 68 years (age range 40-89 years) were randomized to aquatic exercise (n = 27), land-based exercise (n = 25) or control (n = 27). Results: No effect was observed immediately after exercise cessation (8...... weeks). At 3-month follow-up a reduction in pain was observed only in the land-based exercise group compared with control (-8.1 mm, (95% confidence interval -15.4 to -0.4; p = 0. 039), but no differences between groups were observed for KOOS; and no improvement following aquatic exercise. Eleven...

  8. Ottawa Panel Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for Patient Education in the Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Wells, George A.; Tugwell, Peter; Egan, Mary; Dubouloz, Claire-Jehanne; Welch, Vivian A.; Trafford, Laura; Sredic, Danjiel; Pohran, Kathryn; Smoljanic, Jovana; Vukosavljevic, Ivan; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne; McEwan, Jessica; Bell, Mary; Finestone, Hillel M.; Lineker, Sydney; King, Judy; Jelly, Wilma; Casimiro, Lynn; Haines-Wangda, Angela; Russell-Doreleyers, Marion; Laferriere, Lucie; Lambert, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: The objective of this article is to create guidelines for education interventions in the management of patients ([greater than] 18 years old) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: The Ottawa Methods Group identified and synthesized evidence from comparative controlled trials using Cochrane Collaboration methods. The…

  9. Value of body mass index in the diagnosis of obesity according to DEXA in well-controlled RA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Winniczuk, Nina; Vega-Morales, David; García-Hernandez, Pedro A; Esquivel-Valerio, Jorge A; Garza-Elizondo, Mario A; Arana-Guajardo, Ana C

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has an indirect effect on body composition. Body mass index (BMI) is not a valid predictor of body fat in RA patients. To evaluate the accuracy of BMI in identifying obesity diagnosed according to dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in well-controlled RA patients. An observational, cross-sectional, descriptive, analytical study. We used 3 different cutoffs for obesity as determined by DXA: >35% total fat, >40% total fat, and >35% central fat mass (central obesity). One hundred one patients were included. We found that 35% total fat corresponded to a BMI of 24kg/m2, with a sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 75% (area under the curve [AUC] 0.917); 40% total fat to a BMI of 25kg/m2, with a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 39% (AUC 0.822); and 35% central fat mass to a BMI of 22kg/m2, with a sensitivity of 97% and specificity of 84% (AUC 0.951). Obesity according to DXA was underdiagnosed when the classic BMI cutoffs were used in well-controlled RA patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  10. Our Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Factors and Relationship with Osteoarhritis-Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nadide Torlak Koca; Vesile Sepici; Aliye Kapukıran Tosun; Gökhan Koca

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease, that developes as a result of the impairment of formation and destruction processes in cartilage and sinovial tissues, with the effect of various traumatic, biomechanic, inflammatory and genetic factors. Material and Methods: In this study, risk factors and relation between OA and OP (osteoporosis) is evaluated in 127 patients with knee OA. Age, gender, obesity, menopause, ligamentous laxity, DM, injury of joint, genetic predisposition an...

  11. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Nielsen, Thomas Graven; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease...... progression. This study investigated changes in knee moments during walking following experimental knee pain in healthy volunteers, and whether these changes replicated the joint moments observed in medial knee OA patients....

  12. Relationship between weight loss in obese knee osteoarthritis patients and serum biomarkers of cartilage breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, E M; Henrotin, Y; Bliddal, H

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore effects of weight loss and maintenance on serum cartilage biomarkers denaturation neoepitope for Collagen2 (Coll2-1) and Fibulin3 fragment (Fib3-2), as well as correlations between Coll2-1 and Fib3-2 and symptomatic improvement, in a knee osteoarthritis (KOA) population...... patients was not associated with decrease in markers of cartilage breakdown Coll2-1 or Fib3-2, even with indications of a slightly negative effect....

  13. Therapy of patients with osteoarthritis with low energy laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Vasiljeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess influence oflow energy laser radiation (LELR on glycosaminoglycan (GAG and vitamin С level in pts with osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods. 82 pts with primary OA and 25 healthy volunteers signed informed consent were included in an open randomized prospective 12-month study. Inclusion criteria: unsatisfactory effect of previous drug therapy (DT, stable NSAID dose 3-5 days before and during LELR course, absence of comorbid hepatic and kidney diseases in stage of functional decompensation, malignant diseases, exclusion therapy influencing microcirculation, exercise therapy, physical therapy. Intra-articular injections were not done during 3 months before the study. Pts were divided into 2 groups. Group 1 received complex DT and LELR, group 2 - DT. clinical and laboratory parameters were used as efficacy measures. Statistical analysis was performed on personal computer IBM PC (OS — Windows EP Home Edition with Microsoft office and STATISTICA 6.0 programs. Results. Analysis of the results showed significant improvement of most measures in comparison with traditional DT. LELR administration allowed to decrease chondroprotector and NSAID doses. Vitamin С decrease in serum of OA pts may be a risk factor of development and progression of this disease.

  14. Physical Management of Patient with Osteoarthritis of Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Moniruzzaman Khan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA, is by far the most common form of arthritis. It shows a strong association with ageing and is a major cause of pain and disability in the elderly. Pathologically, it may be defined as a condition of synovial joints characterized by focal loss of articular hyaline cartilage with proliferation of new bone and remodelling of joint contour. Inflammation is not a prominent feature, OA preferentially targets the weight bearing joint mainly knee & hip. There is no single cause of OA; it results from a disparity between the stress applied to the articular cartilage and the ability of the cartilage to withstand that stress. The initial or early OA treatment aimed at relieve of pain, restoration of joint movement and rest of the joint with the support of analgesic and NSAIDS. Shortwave diathermy (SWD and ultrasound therapy is also helpful in relieving pain and joint stiffness. For long term management full explanation of the nature of OA and advice and instruction on appropriate exercise program is essential. Reduction of any adverse mechanical factors - these includes weight loss if obese, shock -absorbing footwear, use of walking stick or walker. DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i2.4770 BSMMU J 2009; 2(2: 95-98

  15. Early recognition improves prognosis in elderly onset RA. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoescu, Andra; Ostör, Andrew J K

    2014-01-01

    Although commonly diagnosed in the third to fifth decades of life, the incidence and prevalence of RA continue to increase up to the ninth decade. Age at onset is particularly relevant as the presentation may differ in elderly onset RA (EORA) compared with young onset RA (YORA). Patients with EORA frequently report a more acute presentation, especially if positive for rheumatoid factor (RF). Fever, fatigue and weight loss appear to be more common in EORA. Although small joints are most frequently involved in the RA population overall, there is common involvement of large joints in EORA and these proximal symptoms may mimic polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR). In YORA, approximately 80% of patients are seropositive for RF however a lower frequency has been reported in EORA. Anti-CCP antibodies have been detected in over 70% of patients with RA and are highly specific for RA. The value of anti-CCP antibodies is even higher in patients with an atypical presentation (e.g. PMR-like symptoms), or those who are RF negative. X-rays of the hands and feet should always be performed in patients with a suspected inflammatory arthritis. Baseline joint erosions are present in a similar proportion in patients with YORA and EORA. In the elderly, the differential diagnosis of RA is extensive as many conditions present in a similar way e.g. PMR, osteoarthritis, polyarticular gout, pseudogout and malignancy. Anti-CCP antibodies are very useful for identifying EORA patients with a polymyalgic onset. Ultrasonography or MRI can also be helpful in differentiating PMR from EORA.

  16. Patient-reported outcome and risk of revision after shoulder replacement for osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Polk, Anne; Brorson, Stig

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: We used patient-reported outcome and risk of revision to compare hemiarthroplasty (HA) with total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) and stemmed hemiarthroplasty (SHA) with resurfacing hemiarthroplasty (RHA) in patients with glenohumeral osteoarthritis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included all...... and 1096 HAs (837 RHAs and 259 SHAs). Patients treated with TSA generally had a better WOOS, exceeding the predefined minimal clinically important difference, at 1 year (mean difference 10, p SHA (mean difference 5, p = 0.02), but the difference did not exceed...

  17. Is Telephysiotherapy an Option for Improved Quality of Life in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesola C. Odole

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated effect of a 6-week telephysiotherapy programme on quality of life (QoL of patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Fifty patients with knee OA were randomly and equally assigned into two treatment groups: clinic group (CG and telephysiotherapy group (TG. The CG received physiotherapist-administered osteoarthritis-specific exercises in the clinic thrice weekly for 6 weeks while the TG received structured telephone monitoring with self-administered osteoarthritis-specific exercises for the same duration at home. Participants’ QoL was assessed using WHOQoL-Bref at baseline, second, fourth, and sixth week of intervention. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and independent Student’s t-test. Within-group comparison showed significant improvements in physical health domain (P=0.00* for TG and CG and psychological domain (P=0.02* for TG; P=0.00* for CG of WHOQoL following six-week intervention. However, there were no significant differences (P>0.05 in TG and CG’s social relationship and environment domains. Between-group comparison showed no significant differences (P>0.05 between CG and TG’s physical health, psychological, and social relationships domains of WHOQoL following 6-week intervention. However, there was significant difference in the environment domain (P<0.05. Telephysiotherapy using telephone medium improved QoL in patients with knee OA comparable to clinic based treatment.

  18. Test-retest reliability of quadriceps muscle function outcomes in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehli, Severin; Glatthorn, Julia F; Casartelli, Nicola; Maffiuletti, Nicola A

    2010-12-01

    Quadriceps muscle weakness and the underlying neuromuscular deficits have been increasingly studied over the last few years in patients with knee osteoarthritis, but the applied methodologies have never been validated for this specific population. The aim of this study was to investigate test-retest reliability of several quadriceps muscle function outcomes in patients with knee osteoarthritis both before and after knee arthroplasty surgery. Ten preoperative and 20 postoperative patients participated in two identical testing sessions. A series of voluntary and/or electrically stimulated contractions of the involved quadriceps with concomitant torque and electromyographic recordings were used to characterize muscle strength, muscle activation and muscle contraction properties. Vastus lateralis morphology (thickness and fascicle pennation angle) was also assessed using ultrasonography. Overall, good reliability scores were observed for the majority of the 13 assessed variables (nine variables with intraclass correlation coefficients >0.75, 12 variables with coefficients of variation knee osteoarthritis would entail the assessment of (1) isometric maximal voluntary torque for evaluating muscle strength, with (2) simultaneous vastus lateralis electromyographic activity for evaluating muscle activation, (3) potentiated (resting) doublet peak torque for evaluating muscle contractility, and (4) vastus lateralis thickness for evaluating muscle size. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of repetitive shortwave diathermy for reducing synovitis in patients with knee osteoarthritis: an ultrasonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mei-Hwa; Chai, Huei-Ming; Wang, Chung-Li; Lin, Yeong-Fwu; Tsai, Li-Ying

    2006-02-01

    Shortwave (SW) diathermy can be used to improve vascular circulation and reduce inflammation and pain for patients with osteoarthritis. However, reduction in synovial inflammation has never been explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether repetitive SW diathermy, using ultrasonographic examination, could reduce synovitis in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Thirty subjects with 44 osteoarthritic knees participated in this study. Eleven subjects received SW, and 10 subjects received SW and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Nine subjects received no treatment and served as a control group. Synovial sac thickness superior, medial, and lateral to the patella was measured using ultrasonography. The sum of these 3 measurements was taken as the total synovial sac thickness. Subjects in the treatment groups underwent ultrasonographic examination before and after 10, 20, and 30 treatments, whereas control subjects underwent ultrasonographic examination before the experiment and then once every 2 or 3 weeks for a total of 3 follow-up measurements. After 10 SW diathermy treatments, the total synovial sac thickness in both treatment groups was significantly less than the initial thickness, and the synovial sac continued to become significantly thinner with 20 sessions of treatment. These observations were not made in the control subjects. The results indicate that SW diathermy in patients with knee osteoarthritis can significantly reduce both synovial thickness and knee pain. Such reductions of synovial sac thickness and pain index continue over treatment sessions.

  20. Center of pressure profiles in unilateral compared to bilateral end-stage ankle osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladish, Jonathan R; Powell, Douglas W; Allison, Lindsey E; Queen, Robin M

    2017-04-27

    Ankle osteoarthritis (OA) compromises ankle joint stability in regards to static balance. Unilateral and bilateral osteoarthritis patients often exhibit different limb-loading patterns during static balance tasks. Symmetrical loading has been posited to improve balance performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify balance performance in both ankle osteoarthritis patient groups. Twenty-two unilateral and twenty-one bilateral ankle osteoarthritis patients performed three 10-s quiet standing trials with their feet together. Ground reaction force data were collected from force platforms with one under each foot. Center of pressure excursion in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions as well as the resultant center of pressure were calculated using custom Matlab software. A 2 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA with Cohen's d were used to analyze the differences between groups (unilateral vs. bilateral) and between limbs (affected vs. unaffected) (α = 0.05). No significant differences were found between limbs or groups in either the anteroposterior or mediolateral direction for any measured variable. Though not statistically different, moderate to large effect sizes were observed for mean resultant distance between unilateral and bilateral (d = 0.096, d: 1.0) as well as anteroposterior excursion (p = 0.077, d: 1.731) and mean velocity (p = 0.084, d: 1.50) between affected and unaffected limbs. These large effect sizes suggested clinically relevant differences may exist, particularly in the anteroposterior direction. These findings may suggest that center of pressure is a better measure of postural strategy while center of mass measures may be more representative of postural steadiness. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan epitopes induce proinflammatory autoreactive T-cell responses in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, H. de; Berlo, S.E.; Hombrink, P.; Otten, H.G.; Eden, W. van; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.; Heurkens, A.H.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Glant, T.T.; Prakken, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore potential T-cell epitopes of the core protein of human cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan (PG) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis. METHODS: Peptide-specific T-cell proliferation and cytokine/chemokine production in response to PG-specific peptides were

  2. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in elderly patients with advanced osteoarthritis scheduled for total knee replacement associated with poorer preoperative functional state

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, JA; Haddad, FS

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been reported previously in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total hip arthroplasty. We found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in elderly patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis scheduled for total knee replacement and also a significant association with a lower preoperative functional state. A review of the literature is given on vitamin D deficiency in patients with knee osteoarthritis and the association with lower outcome scores after arthroplas...

  3. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in elderly patients with advanced osteoarthritis scheduled for total knee replacement associated with poorer preoperative functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, J A; Haddad, F S

    2013-11-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been reported previously in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total hip arthroplasty. We found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in elderly patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis scheduled for total knee replacement and also a significant association with a lower preoperative functional state. A review of the literature is given on vitamin D deficiency in patients with knee osteoarthritis and the association with lower outcome scores after arthroplasty is discussed.

  4. Nonlinear relationship between isokinetic muscle strength and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis: Results of the Amsterdam-Osteoarthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelaar, Lisa M; van Dieën, Jaap H; van der Esch, Martin; Roorda, Leo D; Dekker, Joost; Lems, Willem F; van der Leeden, Marike

    2017-07-07

    To investigate whether relationships between upper leg muscle strength and activity limitations are non-linear in patients with knee osteoarthritis, and, if so, to determine muscle strength thresholds for limitations in daily activities. Baseline data were used for 562 patients with knee osteoarthritis in the Amsterdam-Osteoarthritis cohort. Upper leg muscle strength (Nm/kg) was measured isokinetically. Activity limitations were measured with the timed Get Up and Go test and timed Stair Climb Test, subdivided into stair-ascent and stair-descent. Linear and non-linear relationships between muscle strength and activity limitations were evaluated, and thresholds were determined. Non-linear models improved model fit compared with linear models. The improvement in percentage variance accounted for was 5.9, 8.2 and 5.2 percentage points for the timed Get Up and Go, stair-ascent and stair-descent times, respectively. Muscle strength thresholds were 0.93 Nm/kg (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.82-1.04), 0.89 Nm/kg (95% CI 0.77-1.02) and 0.97 Nm/kg (95% CI 0.85-1.11) for relationships with timed Get Up and Go, stair-ascent and stair-descent times, respectively. In patients with knee osteoarthritis, relationships between muscle strength and activity limitations are non-linear. Patients with muscle strength below the described thresholds might benefit more from muscle strength training to reduce limitations in daily activities than would patients with muscle strength above the thresholds. Further research is needed to assess the clinical value of the thresholds determined.

  5. Coronal tibiofemoral subluxation is not an independent risk factor for total knee arthroplasty in patients with moderate to severe varus-osteoarthritis: data from the "Osteoarthritis Initiative".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadler, Paul; Kasparek, Max; Boettner, Fritz; Sgroi, Mirco; Faschingbauer, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Only few prognostic factors for progression of knee osteoarthritis are well established, including varus malalignment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether coronal tibiofemoral subluxation is a predictor for total knee arthroplasty. Patients from the progression subcohort of the longitudinal database "Osteoarthritis Initiative" with moderate to severe osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of greater than 3 degrees were included. Patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were matched with patients treated conservatively. Subluxation was measured on full limb length X-rays. Cox regression analysis was performed to retrospectively evaluate subluxation as a risk factor for total knee arthroplasty and check for a possible association between subluxation and pain at the beginning of the observation period in this study. A total of 215 patients were included. Cox regression demonstrated that varus malalignment increased the hazard to undergo surgery by 16% (HR 1.158, p = 0.008) while subluxation did not (HR 1.12, p = 0.11). Furthermore, subluxation was neither associated with poor WOMAC (OR 1.13, p = 0.194) nor KOOS (OR 1.11, p = 0.256) knee pain scores at the beginning of the observation period. The results presented show that subluxation is neither an independent risk factor for total knee arthroplasty, nor for poor pain scores. III.

  6. Validation of the Chinese (Mandarin) Version of the Oxford Knee Score in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai; Bao, Liangxiao; Wang, Jian; Fujita, Kimie; Makimoto, Kiyoko; Liao, Xiaoyan

    2017-12-01

    With the increasing number of patients with knee osteoarthritis undergoing TKAs in China, there is a clear need for a valid, short, joint-specific patient-reported outcome measure such as the Oxford Knee Score (OKS). To test the translated and cross-culturally adapted Chinese (Mandarin) version of the Oxford Knee Score (OKS-CV) and its (1) reliability, (2) construct validity, (3) dimensionality, and (4) responsiveness. Three native Chinese bilingual translators (a professional English translator, an experienced orthopaedic surgeon, an advanced-practice nursing specialist) translated the English-language OKS into Mandarin Chinese. A consensus panel created a synthesis of those efforts, which then was back-translated by two bilingual nonmedical, professional English-language translators. The OKS-CV was developed according to the guidelines of copyright holders. Between March 2013 and March 2015, 253 patients underwent TKAs. Among them, 114 Mandarin-speaking patients with knee osteoarthritis underwent primary unilateral TKA (age, 67 ± 7 years; range, 55-84 years; female, 80%; preoperatively 54% had moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis), completed the preoperative questionnaires, and were followed up, with a mean postoperative followup of 2.7 years (SD, 0.5 years). Eligibility criteria were (1) patients with knee osteoarthritis who were scheduled to have a primary unilateral TKA, (2) patients who were fluent in Mandarin, and (3) consent to participate. The exclusion criteria were: (1) lack of understanding of Mandarin, and (2) inability to comprehend the questionnaires owing to cognitive impairment. To evaluate test-retest reliability, another group of 35 Mandarin-speaking outpatients with knee osteoarthritis (age, 61 ± 10 years; range, 44-84 years; female, 77%) was recruited to complete the OKS-CV twice at a 1-week interval. Reliability was tested using Cronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Construct validity was evaluated using Spearman

  7. Examining the Minimal Important Difference of Patient-reported Outcome Measures for Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Kathryn A G; Naylor, Justine M; Eyles, Jillian P

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the influence of different analytical methods, baseline covariates, followup periods, and anchor questions when establishing a minimal important difference (MID) for individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Second, to propose MID for improving and worsening on the Knee...... injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). METHODS: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from 272 patients with knee OA undergoing a multidisciplinary nonsurgical management strategy. The magnitude and rate of change as well as the influence of baseline covariates were examined...... for 5 KOOS subscales over 52 weeks. The MID for improving and worsening were investigated using 4 anchor-based methods. RESULTS: Waitlisted for joint replacement and exhibiting unilateral/bilateral symptoms influenced change in KOOS over time. Generally, low correlations between anchors and KOOS change...

  8. Rapid Hip Osteoarthritis Development in a Patient with Anterior Acetabular Cyst with Sagittal Alignment Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Homma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly destructive coxarthrosis (RDC is rare and develops unusual clinical course. Recent studies suggest multiple possible mechanisms of the development of RDC. However the exact mechanism of RDC is still not clear. The difficulty of the study on RDC is attributed to its rareness and the fact that the data before the onset of RDC is normally unavailable. In this report, we presented the patient having the radiographic data before the onset who had rapid osteoarthritis (OA development after contralateral THA, which meets the current criteria of RDC. We thought that the increased posterior tilt of the pelvis after THA reinforced the stress concentration at pre-existed anterior acetabular cyst, thereby the destruction of the cyst was occurred. As a result the rapid OA was developed. We think that there is the case of rapid osteoarthritis developing due to alternating load concentration by posterior pelvic tilt on preexisting anterior acetabular cyst such as our patient among the cases diagnosed as RDC without any identifiable etiology. The recognition of sagittal alignment changes and anterior acetabular cyst may play important role in prediction and prevention of the rapid hip osteoarthritis development similar to RDC.

  9. [Neuromuscular and architectural alterations of the vastus lateralis muscle in elderly patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairet, S; Maïsetti, O; Rolland, E; Portero, P

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms involved in muscle weakness in elderly patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis. We investigated 7 patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis. We measured knee position sense and isometric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the knee extensors. Electromyographic (EMG) measurement of biceps femoris (BF), rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL) and vastus medialis (VM) involved different levels of contraction (25, 50, 75 and 100% MVC). Neuromuscular efficiency of quadriceps was also calculated (MVC/EMG). Ultrasonography was used to investigate the VL architectural parameters at the median part of the VL for different levels of contraction (25, 50, and 75% MVC). All tests were performed on the osteoarthritic and healthy knees. The quadriceps MVC of the affected knee was reduced by 30%. The VL thickness of the affected knee was 10% smaller than that of the unaffected knee. VL activity seen on EMG did not differ between knees, but RF, VM and BF activity was greater in the unaffected than affected knee. Neuromuscular efficiency was higher (26%) in the unaffected knee. Knee position sense was reduced by 33% in the affected knee. Quadriceps weakness associated with knee osteoarthritis seems to be related to changes in muscle rather than pennation angle and changes in fascicule length.

  10. Effect of Weight Losing on the Improving Clinical Statement of Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Alireza; Rad, Zahra Abbaspour; Sajedi, Behnam; Heydari, Amir Hossein; Akbarieh, Samira; Jafari, Behzad

    2017-11-01

    Osteoarthritis causes severe pain and disability in joints, one of the most prevalent involved joints is the knee joint. There are several therapeutics ways to control pain and disability, but almost none of them are definite treatment. In this article, we tried to reveal the effect of weight loss on improving symptoms of knee osteoarthritis as an effective and permanent therapeutic approach. We chose 62 patients with grade 1-2 (mild to moderate) knee osteoarthritis and divided them equally into case and control groups. Patients should not had used NSAIDs at least for 6 months before study initiation. Symptoms severity was measured by WOMAC and VAS questionnaires before and after 3 months follow up. Weight and BMI were recorded too. Case group was suggested to have weight loss diet of less fat and carbohydrates and control group did not have any limitation. Comparison of variables' average of case and control groups was not logistically meaningful at the initiation and after the end of the study. But there was a meaningful correlation between variables' changes and lifestyle change in both groups, especially in WOMAC and VAS scores. All variables in case group had statistically meaningful differences between their amounts at the beginning and after the end of the study, on the contrary of the control group. In the comparison of our study with similar studies in the world. We deduced that weight loss can improve symptoms of knee osteoarthritis even in short time weight loss diet (3 months). ZUMS.REC.1394.94. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  11. Neuromuscular exercise improves functional performance in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Allan; Overgaard, Søren; Larsen, Anders Holsgaard

    Purpose. Exercise is regarded a cornerstone in the treatment of mild to moderate osteoarthritis (OA). However, little is known of the effects in patients with advanced and end-stage OA. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of neuromuscular exercise in patients with severe hip OA. Methods. Design....... Randomized controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01003756). 84 patients, 51% female, mean age 68.6±7.8 years, BMI 28.7±4.7 scheduled for total hip replacement at Svendborg Community Hospital, Odense University Hospital, Denmark were included. Intervention. Participants were randomized...

  12. Intrarticular Sodium Hyaluronate for the Treatment of Osteoarthritis of the Knee. A Retrospective Review of 45 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoga R

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Intrarticular Hyaluronic Acid was administered to 45 patients with various grades of osteoarthritis in the knee. Following 3 fortnightly injections, these patients were reviewed at 6 weeks and 3 months with regard to their knee pain. We found that most patients (84.4% had decreased knee pain following these injections. Patients who had severe grade osteoarthritis based on knee radiographs before the injections were less likely to have pain reduction compared to those with milder grade osteoarthritis. Only 4 (8.9% patients showed no improvement and were subsequently considered for surgery. Many patients did not require any further treatment (24.4% and the remaining were given analgesia (64.4% to aid in their pain. One patient required another course of this injection. There were no complications recorded in this study. We concluded that intrarticular Hyaluronic Acid is an easy and safe method to treat osteoarthritis. The short-term outcome with regard to knee pain is good in patients with milder grades of osteoarthritis.

  13. Therapeutic Effectiveness and Safety of Mesotherapy in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of mesotherapy by comparing it with the classic systematic therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA. Methods. Sixty patients were included and classified into two groups based on the existence of contraindications for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. These patients were treated with oral NSAIDs (Group A or mesotherapy (Group B. After completing the treatment, the patients were followed up for 6 months. Their clinical features, laboratory results, and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC scores were evaluated. Results. A total of 50 patients completed treatment and follow-up. The patients in Group B had significantly fewer gastric acid-related complaints and requested less supplementary treatment for recurrent pain (p<0.05. The patients in both groups exhibited decreased blood viscosity after treatment (p<0.05. WOMAC scores, specifically those for pain and stiffness, were found to be significantly improved after either type of treatment (p<0.05. Mesotherapy also ameliorated physical function (p<0.05. Furthermore, Group B presented with better outcomes than Group A (p<0.05 or p<0.01. Conclusion. Our results suggest that mesotherapy is an effective and safe treatment for patients with OA. Clinicians should consider mesotherapy as an alternative therapy for patients with contraindications for NSAID use.

  14. Can balneotherapy modify microRNA expression levels in osteoarthritis? A comparative study in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, C.; De Palma, A.; Pascarelli, N. A.; Cheleschi, S.; Giordano, N.; Galeazzi, M.; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the whole-blood levels of miR-155, miR-223, miR-181a, miR-146a, and miR-let-7e in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) after a cycle of mud-bath therapy (MBT). Thirty-two patients with knee OA defined by the ACR criteria were included. Twenty-one patients (MBT group) were daily treated with a combination of local mud-packs at 42 °C and baths in mineral water, at 37 °C for 15 min, for 12 applications over a period of 2 weeks, in addition to standard therapy; 11 patients (control group) continued their conventional treatment alone. Global pain score evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), WOMAC subscores, and microRNA expression were evaluated at baseline and after 2 weeks. Peripheral whole blood was collected into PAXgene™ Blood RNA tubes, stored at - 80 °C, and total RNA was extracted. The expression of miR-155, miR-223, miR-181a, miR-146a, and miR-let-7e was determined by qRT-PCR. After MBT, we observed a statistically significant improvement of clinical parameters and a significant decrease of miR-155, miR-181a, miR-146a (p < 0.001), and miR-223 (p < 0.01) expression levels. No clinical and biochemical modifications were detected in the control group. No significant variations of miR-let-7e were shown in both groups after 2 weeks. In conclusion, MBT can modify the expression of miR-155, miR-181a, miR-146a, and miR-223, which are upregulated in OA. It could be due to the heat stress and the hydrostatic pressure, since some miRNAs were found to be temperature- and mechano-responsive. Further studies are needed to better explain the mechanism of action of MBT and the role of miRNAs in OA.

  15. Can balneotherapy modify microRNA expression levels in osteoarthritis? A comparative study in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, C.; De Palma, A.; Pascarelli, N. A.; Cheleschi, S.; Giordano, N.; Galeazzi, M.; Fioravanti, Antonella

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the whole-blood levels of miR-155, miR-223, miR-181a, miR-146a, and miR-let-7e in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) after a cycle of mud-bath therapy (MBT). Thirty-two patients with knee OA defined by the ACR criteria were included. Twenty-one patients (MBT group) were daily treated with a combination of local mud-packs at 42 °C and baths in mineral water, at 37 °C for 15 min, for 12 applications over a period of 2 weeks, in addition to standard therapy; 11 patients (control group) continued their conventional treatment alone. Global pain score evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), WOMAC subscores, and microRNA expression were evaluated at baseline and after 2 weeks. Peripheral whole blood was collected into PAXgene™ Blood RNA tubes, stored at - 80 °C, and total RNA was extracted. The expression of miR-155, miR-223, miR-181a, miR-146a, and miR-let-7e was determined by qRT-PCR. After MBT, we observed a statistically significant improvement of clinical parameters and a significant decrease of miR-155, miR-181a, miR-146a ( p < 0.001), and miR-223 ( p < 0.01) expression levels. No clinical and biochemical modifications were detected in the control group. No significant variations of miR-let-7e were shown in both groups after 2 weeks. In conclusion, MBT can modify the expression of miR-155, miR-181a, miR-146a, and miR-223, which are upregulated in OA. It could be due to the heat stress and the hydrostatic pressure, since some miRNAs were found to be temperature- and mechano-responsive. Further studies are needed to better explain the mechanism of action of MBT and the role of miRNAs in OA.

  16. A novel method predicting clinical response using only background clinical data in RA patients before treatment with infliximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Fumihiko; Honne, Kyoko; Minota, Seiji; Okada, Masato; Ogawa, Noriyoshi; Mimura, Toshihide

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to generate a novel method for predicting the clinical response to infliximab (IFX), using a machine-learning algorithm with only clinical data obtained before the treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. We obtained 32 variables out of the clinical data on the patients from two independent hospitals. Next, we selected both clinical parameters and machine-learning algorithms and decided the candidates of prediction method. These candidates were verified by clinical variables on different patients from two other hospitals. Finally, we decided the prediction method to achieve the highest score. The combination of multilayer perceptron algorithm (neural network) and nine clinical parameters shows the best accuracy performance. This method could predict the good or moderate response to IFX with 92% accuracy. The sensitivity of this method was 96.7%, while the specificity was 75%. We have developed a novel method for predicting the clinical response using only background clinical data in RA patients before treatment with IFX. Our method for predicting the response to IFX in RA patients may have advantages over the other previous methods in several points including easy usability, cost-effectiveness and accuracy.

  17. Combining valgus knee brace and lateral foot wedges reduces external forces and moments in osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarnezhadgero, Amir Ali; Oliveira, Anderson S; Mousavi, Seyed Hamed; Madadi-Shad, Morteza

    2018-01-01

    Osteoarthritis progression can be related to the external knee adduction and flexion moments during walking. Lateral foot wedges and knee braces have been used as treatment for osteoarthritis, but little is known about their influence on knee joint moments generated in the sagittal and frontal planes. Therefore, the aim of the present study was determine the effects of the isolated and combined use of valgus knee brace and lateral wedge foot orthotic on peak forces and moments during gait in knee osteoarthritis patients. Twenty four males (age: 62.1±2.0years) with varus alignment, symptomatic medial compartment knee osteoarthritis participated in this study. Subjects walked over ground at preferred speed in four conditions: (1) no assistive device (control); (2) using lateral wedges, (3) using knee braces, and (4) using both lateral wedges and knee braces. Ground reaction forces (GRF) and moments, as well as lower limb kinematics were recorded. Peak GRF, vertical loading rate, free moment, external knee adduction and flexion moments were compared across conditions. The concurrent use of lateral wedge and knee brace reduced the first peak GRF in the vertical (6%, p=0.002), anterior-posterior (30%, p=0.028) and medial-lateral directions (44%, p=0.029). Moreover, the use of these devices reduced the peak external knee adduction moment (25%, p=0.019), but not the external flexion moment and free moment (p>0.05). The combined use of lateral wedges and knee braces can reduce medial-lateral knee joint loading, but despite reduced peak forces in the sagittal plane, these device do not reduce joint moments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measuring the Validity and Reliability of the Persian Version of Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire in Iranian Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mobini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reliability and validity of health assessment questioner have been shown for rheumatoid arthritis but not osteoarthritis in Iranian patients. Having an instrument for measuring of pain and disability is needed for evaluation of patients and disease course in studies. So this study was designed for evaluating of validity and reliability of Persian HAQ in osteoarthritis. Materials and Methods: From 177 patients with hand and/or knee osteoarthritis, 100 patients were chosen according HADS score equal or less than 7. Short Form of Health Survey (SF-36, pain and disability according Visual analogue scale (VAS and Persian version of Health assessment questioner (HAQ were completed. HAQ was re-evaluated after one week. Correlation between Persian HAQ, SF 36 and VAS and test-retest reliability were evaluated by Spearman correlation coefficient and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Results: Correlation coefficient for HAQ 1 and VAS for pain was (r=0.75, p=0.001 and for SF 36 was (r=0.70, p=0.001. Correlation coefficient for HAQ 1 and HAQ 2 was 0.93 for hand OA, 0.96 for knee OA and 0.94 for all patients (r= 0.92, p=0.001. HAQ had a good internal consistency in osteoarthritis (Cronbach's alpha coefficient=0.87. Criterion and structure validity used in study. Conclusion: This study has shown good validity reliability for Persian HAQ in Iranian patients with osteoarthritis.

  19. Vitamin D Supplementation Improves Quality of Life and Physical Performance in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoy, Pacharee; Yuktanandana, Pongsak; Tanavalee, Aree; Anomasiri, Wilai; Ngarmukos, Srihatach; Tanpowpong, Thanathep; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2017-07-26

    (1) Background: Lower levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) are common in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. However, the effect of vitamin D supplementation on muscle strength and physical performance remains unclear. This study will investigate the effects of vitamin D₂ supplementation on muscle strength and physical performance in knee OA patients; (2) Methods: One hundred and seventy-five primary knee OA patients with low levels of serum 25(OH)D (vitamin D₂ (ergocalciferol) per week for six months. Body composition, muscle strength, physical performance, serum 25(OH)D level, leptin, interlukin-6 (IL-6), parathyroid hormone (PTH), protein carbonyl, and metabolic profile were analyzed; (3) Results: Baseline mean serum 25(OH)D levels in knee OA patients was 20.73 ng/mL. Regarding baseline vitamin D status, 58.90% of patients had vitamin D insufficiency, and 41.10% had vitamin D deficiency. After vitamin D₂ supplementation for six months, mean serum 25(OH)D level was 32.14 ng/mL. For post-supplementation vitamin D status, 57.10% of patients had vitamin D sufficiency and 42.90% had vitamin D insufficiency. From baseline to six months, there was a significant increase in mean serum 25(OH)D level (p vitamin D₂ supplementation (p Vitamin D₂ supplementation for six months reduced oxidative protein damage, decreased pain (VAS), improved quality of life, and improved grip strength and physical performance in osteoarthritis patients.

  20. An OMERACT reliability exercise of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis using ultrasound assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruyn, George Aw; Naredo, Esperanza; Damjanov, Nemanja

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ultrasonography (US) is reliable for the evaluation of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirteen patients with early knee OA were examined by 11 experienced sonographers during 2 days. Dichotomous and semiqu......OBJECTIVE: To assess whether ultrasonography (US) is reliable for the evaluation of inflammatory and structural abnormalities in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Thirteen patients with early knee OA were examined by 11 experienced sonographers during 2 days. Dichotomous...

  1. Comparing two low-energy diets for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis symptoms in obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, B.F.; Christensen, R.; Christensen, Pia

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate in a prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT), symptom response among obese knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients following a feasible, intensive weight-loss program for 16 weeks. METHODS: Eligible patients were obese [body mass index (BMI)>30kg/m(2)]; >50 years old......, with primary knee OA. Participants were randomized to either a very-low-energy diet (VLED) or a low-energy diet (LED) (415kcal/day and 810kcal/day, respectively), using commercially available formula foods - only for the first 8 weeks, managed by dieticians. Followed by an additional 8-week period of a hypo...

  2. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve...... before and immediately after the 10 min massage and control sessions. Data were analyzed by using paired t-test. RESULTS: No significant change in JRE was observed (95% CI: -0.62 degrees to 0.85 degrees, p = 0.738). CONCLUSION: Massage has no effect on the immediate joint repositioning error in patients...

  3. [Оptimization of stable angina standard therapy in patients with concomitant osteoarthritis and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslenko, Iu V

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to optimize standard therapy in patients with stable angina pectoris (SAP) associated with osteoarthritis (OA) and obesity through a combined, concomitant therapy of OA and obesity. To address this goal, on a background of standard therapy of stable angina was carried concomitant therapy of osteoarthritis and obesity, which included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, a selective COX-2 inhibitors, chondro-protective agents, anti-diabetic drug from the group of biguanides (metformin), a drug that affects the centers of hunger and reduces appetite in obese patients "Tsefamadar" (active ingredient Trituration Madara D4 - 250 mg), as well as diet with reduced energetic properties, number 8, and its modification: 8a (for obese patients with I-II degree), 80 (for obese patients III degree). As a result of the proposed method of treatment had improved the clinical course of CCH due to lower body weight, body mass index (BMI) and abdominal obesity indexes (AOI), which were characterized by decreasing the duration and frequency of angina attacks, reducing the number of nitroglycerin tablets taken, and also increased exercise tolerance (ET). Correction of carbohydrate metabolism on the background of metformin treatment, helped to improve lipid metabolism, suggesting greater efficiency of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in patients with SAP on a background of the proposed method. The decrease in CRP levels in patients with SAP, combined with OA and obesity with concomitant therapy by the proposed method, indicates a decrease in systemic inflammation.

  4. Association of IL-1ra and adiponectin with C-peptide and remission in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C.; Hansen, L.; Herder, C.

    2008-01-01

    with recent-onset type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Serum was obtained from 256 newly diagnosed patients (122 males and 134 females, median age 9.6 years). Stimulated C-peptide, blood glucose, and A1C were determined in addition to circulating concentration of cytokines at 1, 6, and 12 months...... after diagnosis. Analyses were adjusted for sex, age, and BMI percentile. RESULTS: Anti-inflammatory IL-1ra was positively associated with C-peptide after 6 (P = 0.0009) and 12 (P = 0.009) months. The beneficial association of IL-1ra on beta-cell function was complemented by the negative association...... of IL-1 beta with C-peptide after 1 month (P = 0.009). In contrast, anti-inflammatory adiponectin was elevated in patients with poor metabolic control after 6 and 12 months (P

  5. Satisfaction of osteoarthritis patients with provided care is not related to the disease-specific quality of life.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosemann, T.J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Szecsenyi, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) has a high prevalence in primary care. Patient satisfaction is an important indicator for the quality of care provided to OA patients. Little is known about satisfaction of patients with this condition in a primary care setting in Germany. The aim of the study was to

  6. Investigating mental health in patients with osteoarthritis and its relationship with some clinical and demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarinasab, Masoumeh; Motamedfar, Azim; Moqadam, Azin Eskandari

    2017-01-01

    The reduction in the level of mental health, particularly depression is associated with outcome of treatment in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). There is no broader research into mental health or mental health care for OA patients. The purpose of the present study was to determine mental health and its relationship with some clinical and demographic factors among patients with OA. 94 patients with osteoarthritis were included in presented study. Patients were referred to hospital during the year of 2016, 30 male patients (31.9%) and 64 female (68.1%), female/male ratio was about 2 : 1. All patients were evaluated in the term of mental health through demographic questionnaire and SCL-90R questionnaire and the obtained data were analyzed using version 22 of SPSS Software. The results showed that 58.5% of patients with osteoarthritis had mental health disorders. Among all studied patients mental health disorders were found in 55 patients (58.5%), including both isolated and complex disorders such as: psychological discomfort in the form of somatic symptoms disorder (n = 45), obsessive compulsive disorders (n = 43), interpersonal sensitivity (n = 44), depression (n = 47), anxiety (n = 41), aggression (n = 52), phobia (n = 42), paranoid psychosis (n = 32), psychosis (n = 3). In addition, the prevalence of mental health problems in patients with OA was significantly higher at the age range of 18 to 20 years old (p = 0.002). Also revealed that the greater risk of mental health disorders is in the first months of diagnosis of OA compare to the patients with longer disease duration more than six months (p = 0.01) and patients taking corticosteroids were significantly higher risk of mental health disorders development (p = 0.00). In presented study although the prevalence of OA is higher in group of older people, but psychiatric disorders is more common in OA patients with age range below 20 years. In addition, patients in the early months of OA are at greater risk of

  7. The association between cubital tunnel morphology and ulnar neuropathy in patients with elbow osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Yohei; Miyake, Junichi; Omori, Shinsuke; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Shimada, Kozo

    2014-07-01

    Morphologic changes in the cubital tunnel during elbow motion in patients with elbow osteoarthritis have not been examined in vivo. We examined changes in cubital tunnel morphology during elbow motion and characteristics of medial osteophyte development to elucidate whether cubital tunnel area and medial osteophyte size are factors contributing to cubital tunnel syndrome in patients with elbow osteoarthritis. We performed computed tomography of 13 primary osteoarthritic elbows in patients with cubital tunnel syndrome (group A) and 25 primary osteoarthritic elbows in patients without cubital tunnel syndrome (group B) at full extension, 90° of flexion, and full flexion. Cubital tunnel area, humeral and ulnar osteophyte area, and proportion of osteophytes within the cubital tunnel were analyzed at each position. Humeral osteophytes and osteophyte proportion within the cubital tunnel were larger at full flexion (24.7 mm(2) and 49.9% in group A; 18.7 mm(2) and 39% in group B) and 90° of elbow flexion (20.3 mm(2) and 45.3% in group A; 10.2 mm(2) and 30.2% in group B) than at full extension (9.0 mm(2) and 31.3% in group A; 2.3 mm(2) and 12.5% in group B). These parameters were significantly greater in group A than in group B at full extension and 90° of flexion. The effect of medial osteophytes on the ulnar nerve, especially on the humeral side, rather than narrowing of the cubital tunnel, may be a causative factor for cubital tunnel syndrome with elbow osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Knee joint stabilization therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoop, J; Dekker, J; van der Leeden, M; van der Esch, M; Thorstensson, C A; Gerritsen, M; Voorneman, R E; Peter, W F; de Rooij, M; Romviel, S; Lems, W F; Roorda, L D; Steultjens, M P M

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether an exercise program, initially focusing on knee stabilization and subsequently on muscle strength and performance of daily activities is more effective than an exercise program focusing on muscle strength and performance of daily activities only, in reducing activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) and instability of the knee joint. A single-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving 159 knee OA patients with self-reported and/or biomechanically assessed knee instability, randomly assigned to two treatment groups. Both groups received a supervised exercise program for 12 weeks, consisting of muscle strengthening exercises and training of daily activities, but only in the experimental group specific knee joint stabilization training was provided. Outcome measures included activity limitations (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index - WOMAC physical function, primary outcome), pain, global perceived effect and knee stability. Both treatment groups demonstrated large (∼20-40%) and clinically relevant reductions in activity limitations, pain and knee instability, which were sustained 6 months post-treatment. No differences in effectiveness between experimental and control treatment were found on WOMAC physical function (B (95% confidence interval - CI) = -0.01 (-2.58 to 2.57)) or secondary outcome measures, except for a higher global perceived effect in the experimental group (P = 0.04). Both exercise programs were highly effective in reducing activity limitations and pain and restoring knee stability in knee OA patients with instability of the knee. In knee OA patients suffering from knee instability, specific knee joint stabilization training, in addition to muscle strengthening and functional exercises, does not seem to have any additional value. Dutch Trial Register (NTR) registration number: NTR1475. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier

  9. Effects of Different Stretching Techniques on the Outcomes of Isokinetic Exercise in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Weng

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We recruited 132 subjects with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (Altman Grade II to compare the effects of different stretching techniques on the outcomes of isokinetic muscle strengthening exercises. Patients were randomly divided into four groups (I–IV. The patients in Group I received isokinetic muscular strengthening exercises, Group II received bilateral knee static stretching and isokinetic exercises, Group III received proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF stretching and isokinetic exercises, and Group IV acted as controls. Outcomes were measured by changes in Lequesne's index, range of knee motion, visual analog pain scale, and peak muscle torques during knee flexion and extension. Patients in all the treated groups experienced significant reductions in knee pain and disability, and increased peak muscle torques after treatment and at follow-up. However, only patients in Groups II and III had significant improvements in range of motion and muscle strength gain during 60°/second angular velocity peak torques. Group III demonstrated the greatest increase in muscle strength gain during 180°/second angular velocity peak torques. In conclusion, stretching therapy could increase the effectiveness of isokinetic exercise in terms of functional improvement in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PNF techniques were more effective than static stretching.

  10. The Influence of Radiographic Severity on the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Joint Loading in Obese Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning; Alkjær, Tine

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between knee muscle strength and the external knee adduction moment during walking in obese knee osteoarthritis patients and whether disease severity influences this relationship. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 136 elderly obese (BMI > 30......) adults with predominant medial knee osteoarthritis. Muscle strength, standing radiographic severity as measured by the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, and the peak external knee adduction moment were measured at self-selected walking speed. Results. According to radiographic severity, patients were...... strength and dynamic medial knee joint loading. Severe patients had higher peak knee adduction moment and more varus malalignment (P loading in the medial compartment. No such relationship existed...

  11. Pretreatment insulin-like growth factor-I concentrations predict radiographic osteoarthritis in acromegalic patients with long-term cured disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermasz, N R; Wassenaar, M J E; van der Klaauw, A A; Pereira, A M; Smit, J W A; Roelfsema, F; Wolterbeek, R; Kroon, H M; Kloppenburg, M; Romijn, J A

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify factors influencing the development of osteoarthritis during long-term control of acromegaly, focusing on disease-specific parameters, GH and IGF-I concentrations, and duration of disease, adjusted for the well-known determinants of primary osteoarthritis. We conducted a follow-up study. We studied 67 patients with adequate biochemical control of acromegaly for a mean of almost 13 yr. Study parameters were the results of radiological assessment of the spine, hip, knee, and hand. Osteoarthritis was defined as radiological osteoarthritis using the scoring system developed by Kellgren and Lawrence. Correlations between potential factors of influence and osteoarthritis were performed by analysis of covariance and adjusted for age, gender, and body mass index. Patients with pretreatment IGF-I sd scores in the highest tertile had an almost 4-fold increased risk for radiological osteoarthritis of the hip when compared with patients in the lowest tertile. After adjustment for age, gender, BMI, and disease duration, pretreatment IGF-I sd scores predicted radiographic osteoarthritis in all joint sites. Osteoarthritis was not predicted by other factors, including pretreatment GH levels, type of treatment, and duration of follow-up. This is the first study to document pretreatment IGF-I concentration as a predictor of radiographic osteoarthritis in acromegalic patients with long-term disease control.

  12. Discontinuation of infliximab after attaining low disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: RRR (remission induction by Remicade in RA) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Takeuchi, T; Mimori, T; Saito, K; Nawata, M; Kameda, H; Nojima, T; Miyasaka, N; Koike, T

    2010-07-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors enable tight control of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Discontinuation of TNF inhibitors after acquisition of low disease activity (LDA) is important for safety and economic reasons. To determine whether infliximab might be discontinued after achievement of LDA in patients with RA and to evaluate progression of articular destruction during the discontinuation. 114 patients with RA who had received infliximab treatment, and whose Disease Activity Score, including a 28-joint count (DAS28) was 24 weeks by infliximab treatment, the drug was discontinued and DAS28 in 102 patients was evaluated at year 1. Fifty-six patients (55%) continued to have DAS28Remicade in RA (RRR) failed: disease in 29 patients flared within 1 year and DAS28 was >3.2 at year 1 in 17 patients. Yearly progression of mTSS (DeltaTSS) remained 1 year without progression of radiological articular destruction.

  13. Validation of the Chinese version 10-item Perceived Efficacy in Patient-Physician Interactions scale in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao HW

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Huiwen Zhao,1 Wen Luo,1 Rose C Maly,2 Jun Liu,1 Junyi Lee,1 Yaning Cui1 1Joint Department, The 2nd Ward of Joint Surgery, Tianjin Hospital, Tianjin, the People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Family Medicine David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Objectives: This study aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the 10-item Perceived Efficacy in Patient–Physician Interaction (PEPPI-10 scale in hospitalized patients with severe knee osteoarthritis in the People’s Republic of China. Methods: Between January and March 2015, the Chinese versions of PEPPI, self-efficacy for exercise scale, osteoporosis self-efficacy scale, and modified fall efficacy scale were applied to assess 110 severe knee osteoarthritis patients who were hospitalized in the second ward of the department of arthroplasty surgery of Tianjin Hospital. Results: The Chinese version of the PEPPI-10 scale had a high coefficient of internal consistency (Cronbach’s α coefficient, 0.907. The score of the Chinese version of PEPPI was weakly correlated with the scores of the Chinese versions of self-efficacy for exercise scale, osteoporosis self-efficacy scale, and modified fall efficacy scale. Conclusion: The Chinese version of the PEPPI-10 scale exhibits sufficient internal consistency and convergent validity in hospitalized patients with severe knee osteoarthritis in the People’s Republic of China. Keywords: assessment of osteoarthritis, patient–physician communication, self-efficacy, instrument validation

  14. "Beating osteoARThritis": development of a stepped care strategy to optimize utilization and timing of non-surgical treatment modalities for patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smink, Agnes J; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; Swierstra, Bart A; Kortland, Joke H; Bijlsma, Johannes W J; Voorn, Theo B; Schers, Henk J; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; Dekker, Joost

    2011-12-01

    Inadequacies in health care practices have been reported despite existing guidelines to manage hip or knee osteoarthritis. To facilitate guideline implementation and improve utilization of non-surgical treatment options a care strategy should be developed. This study describes the development of an evidence-based, multidisciplinary, patient-centered, stepped care strategy. A national, multidisciplinary, steering group developed the strategy in three phases: (1) consensus among steering group members (first draft); (2) written consultation of 23 representatives of patient organizations and professional associations involved in osteoarthritis care (second draft); (3) consensus of the final draft after discussion in two rounds during a conference with representatives from the different disciplines. The final stepped care strategy presents, in three tiers, the optimal order for non-surgical treatment modalities. It recommends that more advanced options should only be considered if options listed in previous steps failed to produce satisfactory results. Hence, the first step treatment options can be offered to all patients but may also be provided through self care (education, life style advice, and acetaminophen). The second step (exercise therapy, dietary therapy, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and third step treatment options (multidisciplinary care, intra-articular injections, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) can be considered for people with persisting complaints. Trough a consensus procedure, we succeeded to develop a multidisciplinary, patient-centered, stepped care strategy based on national guidelines. This strategy provides a framework for health care providers and patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis to discuss the optimal timing of the various treatment options.

  15. Comparing two low-energy diets for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis symptoms in obese patients: a pragmatic randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, Birgit Falk; Christensen, R; Christensen, Pia

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate in a prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT), symptom response among obese knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients following a feasible, intensive weight-loss program for 16 weeks.......To evaluate in a prospective, randomized clinical trial (RCT), symptom response among obese knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients following a feasible, intensive weight-loss program for 16 weeks....

  16. Reliability, Validity, and Responsiveness of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index for Elderly Patients with a Femoral Neck Fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Paul T. P. W.; Poolman, Rudolf W.; van Bakel, Theodorus M. J.; Tuinebreijer, Wim E.; Zielinski, Stephanie M.; Bhandari, Mohit; Patka, Peter; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Devereaux, P. J.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Einhorn, Thomas A.; Thabane, Lehana; Schemitsch, Emil H.; Koval, Kenneth J.; Frihagen, Frede; Tetsworth, Kevin; Guerra-Farfan, Ernesto; Walter, Stephen D.; Sprague, Sheila; Swinton, Marilyn; Scott, Taryn; McKay, Paula; Madden, Kim; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Buckingham, Lisa; Duraikannan, Aravin; Silva, Heather; Heetveld, Martin J.; Burgers, T. P. W.; Zura, Robert D.; Avram, Victoria; Manjoo, Ajay; Williams, Dale; Antoniou, John; Ramsay, Tim; Bogoch, Earl R.; Trentholm, Andrew; Lyman, Stephen; Mazumdar, Madhu; Bozic, Kevin J.; Luborsky, Mark; Goodman, Stuart; Murray, Susan; Korley, Rob; Buckley, Richard; Duffy, Paul; Puloski, Shannon; Carcary, Kimberly; Lorenzo, Melissa; McKee, Michael D.; Hall, Jeremy A.; Nauth, Aaron; Whelan, Daniel; Daniels, Timothy R.; Waddell, James P.; Ahn, Henry; Vicente, Milena R.; Hidy, Jennifer T.; MacNevin, Melanie T.; Kreder, Hans; Axelrod, Terry; Jenkinson, Richard; Nousiainen, Markku; Stephen, David; Wadey, Veronica; Kunz, Monica; Milner, Katrine; Cagaanan, Ria; Macnevin, Melanie; O'Brien, Peter J.; Blachut, Piotr A.; Broekhuyse, Henry M.; Guy, Pierre; Lefaivre, Kelly A.; Slobogean, Gerard P.; Johal, Raman; Leung, Irene; Coles, Chad; Leighton, Ross; Richardson, C. Glen; Biddulph, Michael; Gross, Michael; Dunbar, Michael; Amirault, J. David; Alexander, David; Coady, Catherine; Glazebrook, Mark; Johnston, David; Oxner, William; Reardon, Gerald; Wong, Ivan; Trask, Kelly; MacDonald, Shelley; Furey, Andrew; Stone, Craig; Parsons, Minnie; Stone, Trevor; Zomar, Mauri; McCormack, Robert; Apostle, Kelly; Boyer, Dory; Moola, Farhad; Perey, Bertrand; Viskontas, Darius; Moon, Karyn; Moon, Raely; Laflamme, Yves; Benoit, Benoit; Ranger, Pierre; Malo, Michel; Fernandes, Julio; Tardif, Karine; Fournier, Julie; Vendittoli, Pascal André; Massé, Vincent; Roy, Alain G.; Lavigne, Martin; Lusignan, Daniel; Davis, Craig; Stull, Philip; Weinerman, Stewart; Weingarten, Peter; Lindenbaum, Steven; Hewitt, Michael; Danielwicz, Rebecca; Baker, Janell; Mont, Michael; Deloanois, Donald E.; Kapadia, Bhaveen; Issa, Kimona; Mullen, Marylou; Sems, Andrew; Foreman, Barb; Parvizi, Javad; Morrison, Tiffany; Lewis, Courtland; Caminiti, Stephanie; Tornetta, Paul; Creevy, William R.; Lespasio, Michelle J.; Carlisle, Hope; Marcantonio, Andrew; Kain, Michael; Specht, Lawrence; Tilzey, John; Garfi, John; Mehta, Samir; Esterhai, John L.; Ahn, Jaimo; Donegan, Derek; Horan, Annamarie; McGinnis, Kelly; Roberson, James; Bradbury, Thomas; Erens, Greg; Webb, Kyle; Mullis, Brian; Shively, Karl; Parr, Andrew; Ertl, Janos; Worman, Ripley; Webster, Mark; Cummings, Judd; Frizzell, Valda; Moore, Molly; Jones, Clifford B.; Ringler, James R.; Sietsema, Debra L.; Walker, Jane E.; Kanlic, Enes; Abdelgawad, Amr; Shunia, Juan; DePaolo, Charles; Sutherland, Susan; Alosky, Rachel; Zura, Robert; Manson, Maria; Strathy, Gregg; Peter, Kathleen; Johnson, Paul; Morton, Meaghan; Shaer, James; Schrickel, Tyson; Hileman, Barbara; Hanes, Marina; Chance, Elisha; Heinrich, E. Matthew; Dodgin, David; LaBadie, Michele; Zamorano, David; Tynan, Martin; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Scolaro, John A.; Gupta, Ranjan; Bederman, Samuel; Bhatia, Nitin; Hoang, Bang; Kiester, Douglas; Jones, Neil; Rafijah, Gregory; Alavekios, Damon; Lee, Jason; Mehta, Akshay; Schroder, Steven; Chao, Tom; Colin, Vincent; Dang, Phuc Phil; Heng, Stephen Keun; Lopez, Gregory; Galle, Samuel; Pahlavan, Sohrab; Phan, Duy L.; Tapadia, Minal; Bui, Christopher; Jain, Nickul; Moore, Tyler; Moroski, Nathan; Pourmand, Deeba; Kubiak, Erik N.; Gililland, Jeremy; Rothberg, David; Peters, Christopher; Pelt, Christopher; Stuart, Ami R.; Corbey, Kirby; Shuler, Franklin D.; Day, James; Garabekyan, Tigran; Cheung, Felix; Oliashirzai, Ali; Salava, Jonathon; Morgan, Linda; Wilson-Byrne, Timothy; Cordle, Mary Beth; Elmans, Leon H. G. J.; van den Hout, Joost A. A. M.; Joosten, Adrianus J. P.; van Beurden, Ad F. A.; Bolder, Stefan B. T.; Eygendaal, Denise; Moonen, Adrianus F. C. M.; van Geenen, Rutger C. I.; Hoebink, Eric A.; Wagenmakers, Robert; van Helden, Wouter; van Jonbergen, Hans-Peter W.; Roerdink, Herbert; Reuver, Joost M.; Barnaart, Alexander F. W.; Flikweert, Elvira R.; Krips, Rover; Mullers, J. Bernard; Schüller, Hans; Falke, Mark L. M.; Kurek, Frans J.; Slingerland, Adrianus C. H.; van Dijk, Jan P.; van Helden, Wouter H.; Bolhuis, Hugo W.; Bullens, Pieter H. J.; Hogervorst, Mike; de Kroon, Karen E.; Jansen, Rob H.; Steenstra, Ferry; Raven, Eric E. J.; Fontiijne, W. Peter; Wiersma, Saskia C.; Boetes, Bastiaan; ten Holder, Edgar J. T.; van der Heide, Huub J. L.; Nagels, Jochem; van der Linden-van der Zwaag, Enrike H. M. J.; Keizer, Stefan B.; Swen, Jan-Willem A.; den Hollander, Peter H. C.; Thomassen, Bregje J. W.; Molekamp, Willem Jan Kleyn; de Meulemeester, Frank R. A. J.; Kleipool, Arthur E. B.; Haverlag, Robert; Simons, Maaarten P.; Mutsaerts, Eduard L. A. R.; Kooijman, Rob; Postema, Roelf R.; Bleker, René J. T. M.; Lampe, Harald I. H.; Schuman, Lein; Cheung, John; van Bommel, Frank; Winia, W. Paul C. A.; Haverkamp, Daniel; van der Vis, Harm; Nolte, Peter A.; van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; de Jong, Tjitte; van Noort, Arthur; Vergroesen, Diederik A.; Schutte, Bernard G.; van der Vis, Harm M.; Beimers, Lijkele; de Vries, Jasper; Zurcher, Arthur W.; Albers, G. H. Rob; Rademakers, Maarten; Breugem, Stefan; van der Haven, Ibo; Damen, Pieter Jan; Bulstra, Gythe H.; Campo, Martin M.; Somford, Mathijs P.; Liew, Susan; Bedi, Harvinder; Carr, Ashley; Cscongvay, Steve; Donohue, Craig; Doig, Stephen; Edwards, Elton; Esser, Max; Freeman, Richard; Gong, Andrew; Li, Doug; Miller, Russell; Ton, Lu; Wang, Otis; Young, Ian; Dowrick, Adam; Murdoch, Zoe; Sage, Claire; Page, Richard; Bainbridge, David; Angliss, Richard; Miller, Ben; Thomson, Andrew; Brown, Graeme; Williams, Simon; Eng, Kevin; Bowyer, David; Skelley, John; Goyal, Chatar; Beattie, Sally; Guerado, Enrique; Cruz, Enarnacion; Cano, Juan Ramon; Froufe, Miguel Angel; Marull Serra, Lluis; Al-dirra, Samer; Martinez, Cristina; Tarazona Santabalbina, Francisco José; Teixidor Serra, Jordi; Hernandez, Jordi Thomas; Garcia, Marc Aguilar; Garcia, Vicente Molero; Barrera, Sergi; Garrido, Miriam; Nordsletten, Lars; Clarke-Jenssen, John; Hjorthaug, Geir; Brekke, Anne Christine; Vesterhaus, Elise Berg; Skaugrud, Ingunn; Tripathi, Pradeep; Katiyar, Sandesh; Shukla, Preksha; Swiontkowski, Marc; Guyatt, Gordon; Jeray, Kyle; Walter, Stephen; Viveiros, Helena; Truong, Victoria; Koo, Kaitlin; Zhou, Qi; Maddock, Deborah; Simunovic, Nicole; Agel, Julie; Rangan, Amar; Hanusch, Birgit C.; Kottam, Lucksy; Clarkson, Rachel; Della Rocca, Gregory J.; Slobogean, Gerard; Katz, Jeffrey; Gillespie, Brenda; Greendale, Gail A.; Hartman, Curtis; Rubin, Craig; Waddell, James; Lemke, H. Michael; Oatt, Amber; Buckley, Richard E.; Korley, Robert; Johnston, Kelly; Powell, James; Sanders, David; Lawendy, Abdel; Tieszer, Christina; Murnaghan, John; Nam, Diane; Yee, Albert; Whelan, Daniel B.; Wild, Lisa M.; Khan, Ryan M.; Coady, Cathy; Amirault, David; Richardson, Glen; Trenholm, Andrew; Wong, Ian; Dobbin, Gwen; Bicknell, Ryan; Yach, Jeff; Bardana, Davide; Wood, Gavin; Harrison, Mark; Yen, David; Lambert, Sue; Howells, Fiona; Ward, Angela; Zalzal, Paul; Brien, Heather; Naumetz, V.; Weening, Brad; Wai, Eugene K.; Papp, Steve; Gofton, Wade T.; Liew, Allen; Kingwell, Stephen P.; Johnson, Garth; O'Neil, Joseph; Roffey, Darren M.; Borsella, Vivian; Oliver, Todd M.; Jones, Vicki; Endres, Terrence J.; Agnew, Samuel G.; Jeray, Kyle J.; Broderick, J. Scott; Goetz, David R.; Pace, Thomas B.; Schaller, Thomas M.; Porter, Scott E.; Tanner, Stephanie L.; Snider, Rebecca G.; Nastoff, Lauren A.; Bielby, Shea A.; Switzer, Julie A.; Cole, Peter A.; Anderson, Sarah A.; Lafferty, Paul M.; Li, Mengnai; Ly, Thuan V.; Marston, Scott B.; Foley, Amy L.; Vang, Sandy; Wright, David M.; Marfcantonio, Andrew J.; Kain, Michael S. H.; Iorio, Richard; Specht, Lawrence M.; Tilzey, John F.; Lobo, Margaret J.; Garfi, John S.; Vallier, Heather A.; Dolenc, Andrea; Robinson, Chalitha; Prayson, Michael J.; Laughlin, Richard; Rubino, L. Joseph; May, Jedediah; Rieser, Geoffrey Ryan; Dulaney-Cripe, Liz; Gayton, Chris; Gorcyca, John T.; Gross, Jonathan M.; Humphrey, Catherine A.; Kates, Stephen; Noble, Krista; McIntyre, Allison W.; Pecorella, Kaili; Davis, Craig A.; Lindenbaum, Stephen; Schwappach, John; Baker, Jannel K.; Rutherford, Tori; Newman, Heike; Lieberman, Shane; Finn, Erin; Robbins, Kristin; Hurley, Meghan; Lyle, Lindsey; Mitchell, Khalis; Browner, Kieran; Whatley, Erica; Payton, Krystal; Reeves, Christina; Cannada, Lisa K.; Karges, David; Hill, Leslie; Esterhai, John; Horan, Annamarie D.; Kaminski, Christine A.; Kowalski, Brynn N.; Keeve, Jonathan P.; Anderson, Christopher G.; McDonald, Michael D.; Hoffman, Jodi M.; Tarkin, Ivan; Siska, Peter; Gruen, Gary; Evans, Andrew; Farrell, Dana J.; Irrgang, James; Luther, Arlene; Cross, William W.; Cass, Joseph R.; Sems, Stephen A.; Torchia, Michael E.; Scrabeck, Tyson; Jenkins, Mark; Dumais, Jules; Romero, Amanda W.; Sagebien, Carlos A.; Butler, Mark S.; Monica, James T.; Seuffert, Patricia; Hsu, Joseph R.; Ficke, James; Charlton, Michael; Napierala, Matthew; Fan, Mary; Tannoury, Chadi; Archdeacon, Michael; Finnan, Ryan; Le, Toan; Wyick, John; Hess, Shelley; Brennan, Michael L.; Probe, Robert; Kile, Evelyn; Mills, Kelli; Clippper, Lydia; Yu, Michelle; Erwin, Katie; Horwitz, Daniel; Strohecker, Kent; Swenson, Teresa K.; Schmidt, Andrew H.; Westberg, Jerald R.; Aurang, Kamran; Zohman, Gary; Peterson, Brett; Huff, Roger B.; McBeth, Jessica; Ertl, Janos P.; Parr, J. Andrew; Moore, Molly M.; Tobias, Erin; Thomas, Emily; DePaolo, Charles J.; Shell, Leslie E.; Hampton, Lynne; Shepard, Stephanie; Nanney, Tracy; Cuento, Claudine; Hammerberg, E. Mark; Stahel, Philip; Hak, David; Maurffrey, Cyril; Gibula, Douglas; Gissel, Hannah; Henderson, Corey; Zamorano, David P.; Tynan, Martin C.; Lawson, Deanna; Crist, Brett D.; Murtha, Yvonne M.; Anderson, Linda K.; Linehan, Colleen; Pilling, Lindsey; Lewis, Courtland G.; Sullivan, Raymond J.; Roper, Elizabeth; Obremskey, William; Kregor, Philip; Richards, Justin E.; Stringfellow, Kenya; Dohm, Michael P.; Zellar, Abby; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Zijl, Jacco A. C.; Verhoeven, Bart; Smits, Anke B.; de Vries, Jean Paul P. M.; Fioole, Bram; van der Hoeven, Henk; Theunissen, Evert B. M.; de Vries Reilingh, Tammo S.; Govaert, Lonneke; Wittich, Philippe; de Brauw, Maurits; Wille, Jan; Go, Peter M. N. Y.; Ritchie, Ewan D.; Wessel, Ronald N.; Hammacher, Eric R.; Visser, Gijs A.; Stockmann, Heyn; Silvas, Rob; Snellen, Jaap P.; Rijbroek, Bram; Scheepers, J. G.; Vermeulen, Erik G. J.; Siroen, Michiel P. C.; Vuylsteke, Ronald; Brom, Hans L. F.; Rijna, Herman; de Rijcke, Piet A. R.; Koppert, Cees L.; Buijk, Steven E.; Groenendijk, Richard P. R.; Dawson, Imro; Tetteroo, Geert W. M.; Bruijninckx, Milko M. M.; Doornebsoch, Pascal G.; de Graaf, Eelco J. R.; van der Elst, Maarten; van der Pol, Carmen C.; van't Riet, Martijne; Karsten, Tom M.; de Vries, Mark R.; Stassen, Laurents P. S.; Schep, Niels W. L.; Schmidt, G. Ben; Hoffman, W. H.; Simons, Maarten P.; van der Heijden, Frank H. W. M.; Willems, W. Jaap; van der Hart, Cor P.; Turckan, Kahn; Festen, Sebastiaan; de Nies, Frank; Out, Nico J. M.; Bosma, Jan; van Kampen, Albert; Biert, Jan; van Vugt, Arie B.; Edwards, Michael J. R.; Blokhuis, Taco J.; Frölke, Jan Paul; Geeraedts, Leo M. G.; Gardeniers, Jean W. M.; Tan, Edward T. C. H.; Poelhekke, Lodewijk M. S. J.; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C.; Schreurs, Bart; Roukema, Gert R.; Josaputra, Hong A.; Keller, Paul; de Rooij, Peter D.; Kuiken, Hans; Boxma, Han; Cleffken, Berry I.; Liem, Ronald; Rhemrev, Steven J.; Bosman, Coks H. R.; de Mol van Otterloo, Alexander; Hoogendoorn, Jochem; de Vries, Alexander C.; Meylaerts, Sven A. G.; Verhofstad, Michiel H. J.; Meijer, Joost; van Egmond, Teun; van der Brand, Ignor; Eversdijk, Martin G.; Peters, Rolf; Hartog, Dennis Den; van Waes, Oscar J. F.; Oprel, Pim; Verhagen, Ronald; Albers, G. H. Robert; Simmermacher, Rogier K. J.; van Mulken, Jeroen; van Wessem, Karlijn; van Gaalen, Steven M.; Leenen, Luke P. H.; Bronkhorst, Maarten W. G. A.; Guicherit, Onno R.; Goslings, J. Carel; Ponsen, Kees Jan; Bhatia, Mahesh; Arora, Vinod; Tyagi, Vivek; Gupta, Ajay; Jain, Neeraj; Khan, Farah; Sharma, Ateet; Sanghavi, Amir; Trivedi, Mittal; Rai, Anil; Subash, N. N.; Rai, Kamal; Yadav, Vineet; Singh, Sanjay; Prasad, Amal Shankar; Mishra, Vimlesh; Sundaresh, D. C.; Khanna, Angshuman; Cherian, Joe Joseph; Olakkengil, Davy J.; Sharma, Gaurav; Dadi, Akhil; Palla, Naveen; Ganguly, Utsav; Rai, B. Sachidananda; Rajakumar, Janakiraman; Hull, Peter; Lewis, Sophie; Evans, Simone; Nanda, Rajesh; Logishetty, Rajanikanth; Anand, Sanjeev; Bowler, Carol; Jennings, Andrew; Chuter, Graham; Rose, Glynis; Horner, Gillian; Clark, Callum; Eke, Kate; Reed, Mike; Herriott, Chris; Dobb, Christine; Curry, Hamish; Chia, Andrew; Csongvay, Steve; Etherington, Greg; Jain, Arvind; Moaveni, Ash; Russ, Matthias; Donald, Geoff; Weinrauch, Patrick; Pincus, Paul; yang, Steven; Halliday, Brett; Gervais, Trevor; Holt, Michael; Flynn, Annette; Pirpiris, Marinis; Love, David; Bucknill, Andrew; Farrugia, Richard J.; Ianssen, Torben; Amundsen, Asgeir; Brattgierd, Jan Egil; Borch, Tor; Bøe, Berthe; Flatøy, Bernhard; Hasselund, Sondre; Haug, Knut Jørgen; Hemlock, Kim; Hoseth, Tor Magne; Jomaas, Geir; Kibsgård, Thomas; Lona, Tarjei; Moatshe, Gilbert; Müller, Oliver; Molund, Marius; Nicolaisen, Tor; Nilsen, Fredrik; Rydinge, Jonas; Smedsrud, Morten; Stødle, Are; Trommer, Axel; Ugland, Stein; Karlsten, Anders; Ekås, Guri; Vesterhus, Elise Berg; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Knobe, Matthias; Pfeifer, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) has been extensively evaluated in groups of patients with osteoarthritis, yet not in patients with a femoral neck fracture. This study aimed to determine the reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness of

  17. Effects of proprioceptive circuit exercise on knee joint pain and muscle function in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Sung-Bum; Park, Gi Duck; Kim, Sang-Soo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study applied proprioceptive circuit exercise to patients with degenerative knee osteoarthritis and examined its effects on knee joint muscle function and the level of pain. [Subjects] In this study, 14 patients with knee osteoarthritis in two groups, a proprioceptive circuit exercise group (n = 7) and control group (n = 7), were examined. [Methods] IsoMed 2000 (D&R Ferstl GmbH, Hemau, Germany) was used to assess knee joint muscle function, and a Visual Analog Scale was used to measure pain level. [Results] In the proprioceptive circuit exercise group, knee joint muscle function and pain levels improved significantly, whereas in the control group, no significant improvement was observed. [Conclusion] A proprioceptive circuit exercise may be an effective way to strengthen knee joint muscle function and reduce pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis. PMID:26357422

  18. [Correlations Between Joint Proprioception, Muscle Strength, and Functional Ability in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yoa; Yu, Yong; He, Cheng-qi

    2015-11-01

    To establish correlations between joint proprioception, muscle flexion and extension peak torque, and functional ability in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty-six patients with symptomatic knee OA were recruited in this study. Both proprioceptive acuity and muscle strength were measured using the isomed-2000 isokinetic dynamometer. Proprioceptive acuity was evaluated by establishing the joint motion detection threshold (JMDT). Muscle strength was evaluated by Max torque (Nm) and Max torque/weight (Nm/ kg). Functional ability was assessed by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function (WOMAC-PF) questionnaire. Correlational analyses were performed between proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability. A multiple stepwise regression model was established, with WOMAC-PF as dependent variable and patient age, body mass index (BMI), visual analogue scale (VAS)-score, mean grade for Kellgren-Lawrance of both knees, mean strength for quadriceps and hamstring muscles of both knees, and mean JMDT of both knees as independent variables. Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was negatively correlated with muscle strength (Pproprioception (high JMDT) and joint pain (WOMAC pain score), and between knee proprioception (high JMDT) and joint stiffness (WOMAC stiffness score). Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was correlated with limitation in functional ability (WOMAC physical function score r=0.659, Pproprioception is associated with poor muscle strength and limitation in functional ability. Patients with symptomatic OA of knees commonly endure with moderate to considerable dysfunction, which is associated with poor proprioception (high JMDT) and high VAS-scale score.

  19. Early results with the thrust plate prosthesis in young patients with osteoarthritis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Verma, Gopalkrishna; Draviraj, Kingsley Paul; Bhamra, Manjit

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of the Thrust Plate Prosthesis as a treatment option for osteoarthritis of the hip in young patients. Of the fifty patients (63 hips) reviewed, 31 (62%) were males and 19 (38%) females. Pre-operative diagnosis included primary osteoarthritis (23), developmental dysplasia (8), avascular necrosis (7), Perthes (4), post-traumatic arthritis (3), rheumatoid arthritis (2), ankylosing spondylitis (1), psoriatic arthropathy (1) and slipped upper femoral epiphysis (1). All components were implanted uncemented with metal-on-metal articulation. The average follow-up was 4.04 years (range 12 months-8.5 years). The mean age of the patients was 42.3 years (range 21-57 years). The mean pre-operative Harris Hip Score was 41.9 (range 12-89) and at final follow-up 89.91 (range 41-100). In 25 hips with > or = 5 yr follow-up, the average HHS at final follow-up was 84.5 (range 50-100). Complications included dislocation (2), transient sciatic nerve palsy (1), discomfort from lateral strap (2), implantation of wrong femoral head (1), revision (3 = 4.76%) and implant loosening (4) (6.35%). The thrust plate prosthesis is a useful alternative in young patients with hip arthritis and the results are comparable with other uncemented hip replacements. The added advantage is preservation of the proximal femoral bone stock, which can prove useful in future revisions.

  20. Association between Patient History and Physical Examination and Osteoarthritis after Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ochten, John M; de Vries, Anja D; van Putte, Nienke; Oei, Edwin H G; Bindels, Patrick J E; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2017-09-01

    Structural abnormalities on MRI are frequent after an ankle sprain. To determine the association between patient history, physical examination and early osteoarthritis (OA) in patients after a previous ankle sprain, 98 patients with persistent complaints were selected from a cross-sectional study. Patient history taking and physical examination were applied and MRI was taken. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to test possible associations. Signs of OA (cartilage loss, osteophytes and bone marrow edema) were seen in the talocrural joint (TCJ) in 40% and the talonavicular joint (TNJ) in 49%. Multivariable analysis showed a significant positive association between swelling (OR 3.58, 95%CI 1.13;11.4), a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.01;1.18) and bone edema in the TCJ. A difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.07, 95%CI 1.00;1.15) and pain at the end range of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion (OR 5.23, 95%CI 1.88;14.58) were associated with osteophytes in the TNJ. Pain at the end of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion, a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion and swelling seem to be associated with features of OA (bone marrow edema, osteophytes) in the TCJ and TNJ. Our findings may guide physicians to predict structural joint abnormalities as signs of osteoarthritis. 1b. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Gait analysis of patients with knee osteoarthritis before and after Chinese massage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingguang, Zhu; Min, Fang; Li, Gong; Shuyun, Jiang; Wuquan, Sun; Jianhua, Li; Yong, Li

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Chinese massage therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) by measuring lower-limb gait parameters. We recruited 20 women with knee OA, who then underwent Chinese massage therapy three times per week for 2 weeks. The patients underwent gait evaluation using a six-camera infrared motion analysis system. They completed Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index questionnaires before and after treatment. We calculated the forward speed, step width, step length, total support time percentage, initial double support time percentage, and single support time percentage. We also measured the angles at the knee, hip, and ankle during the stance phase of walking. The results showed statistically significant mean differences in knee pain relief, alleviation of stiffness, and physical function enhancement after therapy (P step width, and increased total support time percentage after the Chinese massage therapy (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the range of motion or initial contact angles of the knee, hip, or ankle during the stance phase of walking. We concluded that Chinese massage is a beneficial complementary treatment and an alternative therapy choice for patients with knee OA for short-term pain relief. Chinese massage may improve walking ability for these patients.

  2. The impact of self-efficacy on physical activity maintenance in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Nanna Maria; Bieler, Theresa; Beyer, Nina Ann-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding motivational factors related to physical activity (PA) maintenance is essential in promoting long-term exercise benefits. This study explored the impact of self-efficacy (SE) on post-intervention PA maintenance in patients with hip osteoarthritis. Method: An SE-theory based...... from incorporating the self-efficacy theory in the planning and execution of exercise interventions to promote post-intervention physical activity maintenance and long term health benefits. •Post-intervention physical activity maintenance may be increased by focussing on the patients’ exercise self...

  3. Impact of exercise on the functional capacity and pain of patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Aline Mizusaki Imoto de; Peccin, Maria Stella; Silva, Kelson Nonato Gomes da; Teixeira, Lucas Emmanuel Pedro de Paiva; Trevisani, Virgínia Fernandes Moça

    2012-12-01

    Muscle weakness, especially of the quadriceps muscle, is one of the major musculoskeletal effects of knee osteoarthritis. Exercises are considered one of the main interventions in the conservative treatment of those patients. To assess the effectiveness of quadriceps strengthening exercises on functional capacity and symptoms related of knee osteoarthritis by use of the Timed Up and Go test (TUG), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and the Lequesne Index. One hundred patients were randomized into two groups: 1) Exercise Group (n = 50), which included stationary bicycle, hamstrings stretching, and quadriceps strengthening; 2) Instruction Group (n = 50), which received a manual with information about knee osteoarthritis and instructions on how to deal with knee symptoms in daily activities. The manual did not include exercise instructions. The Exercise Group showed statistically significant improvement regarding the TUG test, the WOMAC aspects of pain, function, and stiffness, and the Lequesne Index, as compared with the Instruction Group. Quadriceps strengthening exercises for eight weeks are effective to improve pain, function, and stiffness in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  4. Effects of toe-in angles on knee biomechanics in cycling of patients with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jacob K; Zhang, Songning; Liu, Hairui; Klipple, Gary; Stewart, Candice; Milner, Clare E; Asif, Irfan M

    2015-03-01

    Cycling is commonly prescribed for knee osteoarthritis, but previous literature on biomechanics during cycling and the effects of acute intervention on osteoarthritis patients does not exist. Due to their altered knee kinematics, osteoarthritis patients may be at greater risk of osteoarthritis progression or other knee injuries during cycling. This study investigated the effects of reduced foot progression (toe-in) angles on knee joint biomechanics in subjects with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Thirteen osteoarthritis and 11 healthy subjects participated in this study. A motion analysis system and custom instrumented pedal was used to collect 5 pedal cycles of kinematic and kinetic data in 1 neutral and 2 toe-in conditions (5° and 10°) at 60 RPM and 80W. For peak knee adduction angle, there was a 61% (2.7°) and a 73% (3.2°) decrease in the 5° and 10° toe-in conditions compared to neutral in the osteoarthritis group and a 77% (1.7°) and 109% (2.4°) decrease in the healthy group for the 5° and 10° conditions, respectively. This finding was not accompanied by a decrease in pain or peak knee abduction moment. A simple linear regression showed a positive correlation between Kelgren-Lawrence score and both peak knee adduction angle and abduction moment. For individuals who cycle with increased knee adduction angles, decreasing the foot progression angle may be beneficial for reducing the risk of overuse knee injuries during cycling by resulting in a frontal plane knee alignment closer to a neutral position. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Patient and provider interventions for managing osteoarthritis in primary care: protocols for two randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Kelli D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA of the hip and knee are among the most common chronic conditions, resulting in substantial pain and functional limitations. Adequate management of OA requires a combination of medical and behavioral strategies. However, some recommended therapies are under-utilized in clinical settings, and the majority of patients with hip and knee OA are overweight and physically inactive. Consequently, interventions at the provider-level and patient-level both have potential for improving outcomes. This manuscript describes two ongoing randomized clinical trials being conducted in two different health care systems, examining patient-based and provider-based interventions for managing hip and knee OA in primary care. Methods / Design One study is being conducted within the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA health care system and will compare a Combined Patient and Provider intervention relative to usual care among n = 300 patients (10 from each of 30 primary care providers. Another study is being conducted within the Duke Primary Care Research Consortium and will compare Patient Only, Provider Only, and Combined (Patient + Provider interventions relative to usual care among n = 560 patients across 10 clinics. Participants in these studies have clinical and / or radiographic evidence of hip or knee osteoarthritis, are overweight, and do not meet current physical activity guidelines. The 12-month, telephone-based patient intervention focuses on physical activity, weight management, and cognitive behavioral pain management. The provider intervention involves provision of patient-specific recommendations for care (e.g., referral to physical therapy, knee brace, joint injection, based on evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes are collected at baseline, 6-months, and 12-months. The primary outcome is the Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (self-reported pain, stiffness, and function, and

  6. Assessment of radiological changes involving the articular surface of the temporomandibular joint in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis using computed tomography scan: A prospective clinico-radiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnaveni Buduru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The purpose of the present study was to assess the radiological changes involving the articular surfaces of temporomandibular joints (TMJs in patients with osteoarthritis (OA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA using computed tomography (CT scans. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients with OA and 20 patients with RA were subjected to a detailed examination, routine radiography, and CT imaging of the TMJs. CT scanning was carried out for the direct axial view and reconstructed to coronal and sagittal planes with contiguous slice thickness of 2 mm using bone window. All the images were evaluated for the presence of osteophytes, flattening of the articular surfaces, sclerosis, and narrowing of the joint space and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: The female to male ratio of the study group for OA and RA was 2:1, respectively. Of all the CT findings, namely, osteophytes, flattening of the articular surfaces, sclerosis, and narrowing of the joint space, statistically significant values (P = 0.056 for osteophytes were obtained. Flattening and narrowing of joint space were seen in both types of arthritides, however, a relatively higher percentage of such patients was seen in RA group. Conclusion: OA and RA of the TMJ are the two most commonly seen conditions which can impair the functional capacity of the entire masticatory system. Their in-depth clinical and radiological evaluation is a must to assess the disease activity. Likewise, CT is a valuable tool in assessing osseous abnormalities and should be used in cases where osseous involvement of the TMJs is suspected.

  7. Chemokines and inflammation in osteoarthritis: Insights from patients and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanzello, Carla R

    2017-04-01

    Evidence has been building that the pathologic drive for development of osteoarthritis (OA) involves more than simple mechanical "wear and tear." Inflammatory mechanisms play an important role in the tissue response to joint injury, and are involved in development of post-traumatic OA. Inflammation also appears integral to the progression of OA, whether post-traumatic or spontaneous, contributing to the evolution of joint tissue degradation and remodeling as well as joint pain. Both patient-based studies and in vivo models of disease have shed light on a number of inflammatory pathways and mediators that impact various aspects of this disease, both structurally and symptomatically. Recent work in this field has implicated inflammatory chemokines in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. Expression of multiple chemokines and their receptors is modulated during disease in both patients and animal models. Although best known for their effects on leukocyte migration and trafficking within the immune system, chemokines can have a wide variety of effects on both motile and non-motile cell types, impacting proliferation, differentiation, and activation of cellular responses. Their role in OA models has also demonstrated diverse effects on disease that exemplify their wide-ranging effects. Understanding how these important mediators of inflammation impact joint disease, and whether they can be targeted therapeutically, is actively being investigated by many groups in this field. This narrative review focuses on evidence published within the last 5 years highlighting chemokine-mediated pathways with mechanistic involvement in osteoarthritis and joint tissue repair. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:735-739, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Coping styles and disability in patients with hand osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rani; Damman, Wendy; Kaptein, Adrian A; Rosendaal, Frits R; Kloppenburg, Margreet

    2016-03-01

    Coping responses have been shown to determine health outcomes in chronic diseases. The aim of the study was to examine the role of joint-specific factors and coping styles on disability in patients with hand OA. Primary hand OA patients who consulted secondary care, underwent physical examination to assess the number of joints with bony joint enlargements, pain upon palpation, soft tissue swelling, deformities and limitations in motion. Coping styles were assessed with Coping with Rheumatic Stressors. Disability (score ≥5) was assessed by the Functional Index for Hand OA (possible score 0-30) cross-sectionally and after 1 year. With multivariate logistic regression, joint-specific variables and coping styles were associated with disability cross-sectionally and after 1 year, adjusted for age, sex and BMI. A total of 314 patients (88% women, mean age 61.4 years) were included in the cross-sectional analyses; 68% were considered as disabled. Longitudinal data after 1 year were available in 173 patients (71% disabled). In multivariate analysis including all joint-specific factors, only painful joints and joints with limitations in motion were associated with disability. Disadvantageous scores for the coping scales (comforting cognitions, decreasing activity and pacing) were positively associated with disability cross-sectionally. Disability after 1 year was only associated with the coping scales decreasing activity and pacing. Joint-specific factors were also associated with disability, independent of coping styles. In patients with hand OA, joint-specific factors and coping styles decreasing activity and pacing were both associated with disability. Our results suggest that interventions should aim at joint-specific complaints as well as changing coping styles to improve functional outcome. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Instruments to assess physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a systematic review of measurement properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwee, C.B.; Bouwmeester, W.; van Elsland, S.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is no consensus on the best approach for measuring physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. The aims of this study were (1) to identify all physical activity measures that have been validated in patients with OA of the hip or knee and to

  10. Pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee: the relationship with articular, kinesiological, and psychological characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekkers, J.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine to what extent articular, kinesiological, and psychological factors each contribute to pain and disability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), after controlling for other factors. Methods: Cross sectional study among 200 patients with OA of the hip or knee. Dependent

  11. Long-term effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Ostelo, R.W.; Bakker, D. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term effectiveness (= 6 months after treatment) of exercise therapy on pain, physical function and patient global assessment of effectiveness in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. METHODS: An extensive literature search in PubMed, Embase, CINAHL,

  12. Long-term effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Ostelo, R.W.; Bakker, D.H. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the long-term effectiveness (>/=6 months after treatment) of exercise therapy on pain, physical function, and patient global assessment of effectiveness in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee. METHODS: We conducted an extensive literature search in

  13. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T.B.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were

  14. Responsiveness of observational and self-report methods for assessing disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Roorda, L.D.; Dekker, J.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish the responsiveness of observational and self-report methods for the assessment of disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Data from 186 patients with hip OA of knee OA were used. Data from 1 observational method and 4 self-report methods for the

  15. Internal consistency and validity of an observational method for assessing disability in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, M.P.M.; Dekker, J.; Baar, M.E. van; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish the internal consistency of validity of an observational method for assessing diasbility in mobility in patients with osteoarthritis (OA), Methods: Data were obtained from 198 patients with OA of the hip or knee. Results of the observational method were compared with results

  16. The evolution of osteoarthritis in 103 patients with ACL reconstruction at 17 years follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aït Si Selmi, T; Fithian, D; Neyret, P

    2006-10-01

    To evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of a bone-tendon-bone anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, at long-term follow-up. A retrospective study of 148 patients, of which 103 were available for long-term follow-up. Complete functional and radiological evaluation (International Knee Documentation Committee scale) were performed in 89 out of the 103 patients [Anderson AF. Rating scales. In: Fu FH, Harner CD, Vince KG, (Eds.). Knee Surgery, Baltimore, Williams and Wilkins vol. 1, 1994; 12, pp. 275-296]. The mean follow-up time was 17.4 years. Subjectively, 88% of the patients were very satisfied or satisfied. According to the IKDC score 55% had type A symptoms, 29% type B, 12% type C, and 4% type D. The IKDC ligament evaluation showed 14.9% type A, 44.8% type B, 35.8% type C, and 4.5% type D. At the review 22.7% had a narrowing 50% (D). Onset of osteoarthritis showed an association with the status of the medial meniscus. Knees with a preserved (healthy or sutured) medial meniscus had a significantly (p radiological outcome. Among these, 9% had a joint space narrowing 50% (D). Medial meniscectomy, residual laxity, and femoral chondral defects were associated with osteoarthritis. The outcome of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction plus extra-articular tenodesis is good in the very long term, particularly in knees with a preserved medial meniscus.

  17. Leptin levels are negatively correlated with 2-arachidonoylglycerol in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Nicholson

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence in humans that peripheral endocannabinoid signaling is disrupted in obesity. However, little is known about the corresponding central signaling. Here, we have investigated the relationship between gender, leptin, body mass index (BMI and levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of primarily overweight to obese patients with osteoarthritis.Patients (20 females, 15 males, age range 44-78 years, BMI range 24-42 undergoing total knee arthroplasty for end-stage osteoarthritis were recruited for the study. Endocannabinoids were quantified by liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry. AEA and 2-AG levels in the serum and CSF did not correlate with either age or BMI. However, 2-AG levels in the CSF, but not serum, correlated negatively with CSF leptin levels (Spearman's ρ -0.48, P=0.0076, n=30. No such correlations were observed for AEA and leptin.In the patient sample investigated, there is a negative association between 2-AG and leptin levels in the CSF. This is consistent with pre-clinical studies in animals, demonstrating that leptin controls the levels of hypothalamic endocannabinoids that regulate feeding behavior.

  18. Leptin levels are negatively correlated with 2-arachidonoylglycerol in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, James; Azim, Syed; Rebecchi, Mario J; Galbavy, William; Feng, Tian; Reinsel, Ruth; Rizwan, Sabeen; Fowler, Christopher J; Benveniste, Helene; Kaczocha, Martin

    2015-01-01

    There is compelling evidence in humans that peripheral endocannabinoid signaling is disrupted in obesity. However, little is known about the corresponding central signaling. Here, we have investigated the relationship between gender, leptin, body mass index (BMI) and levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of primarily overweight to obese patients with osteoarthritis. Patients (20 females, 15 males, age range 44-78 years, BMI range 24-42) undergoing total knee arthroplasty for end-stage osteoarthritis were recruited for the study. Endocannabinoids were quantified by liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry. AEA and 2-AG levels in the serum and CSF did not correlate with either age or BMI. However, 2-AG levels in the CSF, but not serum, correlated negatively with CSF leptin levels (Spearman's ρ -0.48, P=0.0076, n=30). No such correlations were observed for AEA and leptin. In the patient sample investigated, there is a negative association between 2-AG and leptin levels in the CSF. This is consistent with pre-clinical studies in animals, demonstrating that leptin controls the levels of hypothalamic endocannabinoids that regulate feeding behavior.

  19. Evaluation of the degree of knee joint osteoarthritis in patients with early gray hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Behrooz; Ashraf, Alireza; Namazi, Mohammad Reza; Zarei, Fariba; Foruzi, Shima

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and one of the causes of pain and disability. The hair graying characteristic correlates strictly with chronological aging and take places to varying degrees in all individuals, disregarding gender or race. Comparison of the degrees of clinical and radiologic severity of the knee OA in individuals with early hair graying compared to ordinary individuals. A total of 60 patients with knee OA and similar demographic characteristics were enrolled in this study. All patients were classified in to 3 age subgroups in each of the case and control groups (30-40 year, 41-50 year, 51-60 year). In the case group, the patients must had early hair graying, too. Knee OA were classified using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading scale. Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) was applied to assess clinical severity of the knee OA. The mean ± SD of WOMAC index in the case group was 60.7 ± 15.9 and in the control group was 55.3 ± 15.3 (P = 0.1). The mean rank of KL scale in case group was 35.3 and in the control group was 25.6 (P = 0.02). Even at the same age of OA onset, the rate of progression of radiological findings and the grade of joint destruction in individuals with early hair graying are greater than normal individuals. However, clinical and functional relevant remain unclear.

  20. The association between submaximal quadriceps force steadiness and the knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tina Juul; Langberg, Henning; Aaboe, Jens

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between quadriceps force steadiness and knee adduction moment during walking in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). BACKGROUND: Studies have shown that quadriceps force steadiness is impaired in patients with knee......, and knee pain was assessed using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) pain subscale and a visual analog scale. RESULTS: Regression analyses showed that quadriceps force steadiness did not predict the peak knee adduction moment (adjusted R2 = 0.05, P = .41). Inclusion of covariates did...

  1. The performance of matrices in daily clinical practice to predict rapid radiologic progression in patients with early RA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, D; Vanderschueren, G; Meyfroidt, S; Joly, J; Van der Elst, K; Westhovens, R; Verschueren, P

    2014-04-01

    To compare in daily clinical practice the reliability of matrices that forecast rapid radiologic progression (RRP) at year one, at year two, and over 2 years in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Overall, 74 early RA patients with X-rays of hands and feet at baseline, year one, and year two were included. Initial DMARD combination therapy with steroids (ICTS) or DMARD monotherapy (IMT) was initiated according to patients' RA severity, based on rheumatologist opinion. The images were scored via the modified Sharp/van der Heijde (SvH) method. A total Sharp score progression of equal or higher than five per year was considered RRP. Six matrices were tested: ASPIRE CRP/ESR matrices, the BEST matrix, two SWEFOT matrices, and the ESPOIR matrix. Patients were placed in each of them yielding a RRP probability. The performance was tested by Area Under the Curve analysis reflecting the predictive value. Four patients developed RRP in year one, five in year two, and four over 2 years. With regard to face validity, the predicted probability did not correspond to the risk in reality: the one ICTS patient who developed RRP over 2 years was always found in the lowest RRP categories of all matrices. The ASPIRE CRP matrix yielded at least a moderate predicting value for the three time points. The other matrices showed moderate to no predicting value. The performance of all matrices was disappointing and it is impossible to fully rely on the existing matrices in daily clinical practice. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-05-20

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP). 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Large country differences in work outcomes in patients with RA - an analysis in the multinational study COMORA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee-Neuen, Antje; Putrik, Polina; Ramiro, Sofia; Keszei, Andras P; Hmamouchi, Ihsane; Dougados, Maxime; Boonen, Annelies

    2017-09-29

    We aimed to explore whether country of residence or specific country characteristics are associated with work outcomes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data from the 17 countries participating in the Comorbidities in RA (COMORA) study were used. Work outcomes were measured by the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire, addressing employment (yes/no), absenteeism (percentage of time; 3 categories) and presenteeism (percentage of at-work productivity restrictions; 4 categories). Contribution of country of residence, gross domestic product (GDP), Human Development Index (HDI), unemployment rate, social protection expenditures (SPE) or world region to work outcomes was investigated in adjusted (ordered) logistic regressions. The patients (n = 2395) were younger than 60 years; mean age 48 (SD 9.2) years, 1972 (84%) female and 1065 (45%) employed. Large country differences were found. Taking the country with the best work outcome as reference, Moroccan patients had the lowest odds of being employed (OR 0.2 (95% CI 0.1; 0.3) vs. Germany) and highest odds of absenteeism (OR 13.2 (3.6; 48.3) vs. Japan). Patients in Taiwan had the highest odds of presenteeism (OR 13.0 (5.5; 30.9) vs. Venezuela). All country indices except SPE were associated with work outcomes. For example, patients in low-GDP countries had lower odds of employment (OR 0.6 (0.5; 0.8)), higher odds of absenteeism (OR 2.8 (2.0; 4.1)), but lower odds of presenteeism (OR 0.5 (0.4; 0.7)) compared to higher-GDP countries. Substantial differences in work outcomes among patients with RA were observed between countries. Lower economic wealth and human development of countries were associated with worse employment and higher absenteeism, but lower presenteeism.

  4. Reduced FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis are associated with IL2RA gene polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebode, Marcial; Peiseler, Moritz; Franke, Björn; Schwinge, Dorothee; Schoknecht, Tanja; Wortmann, Frederike; Quaas, Alexander; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Ellinghaus, Eva; Baron, Udo; Olek, Sven; Wiegard, Christiane; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Lohse, Ansgar W; Herkel, Johannes; Schramm, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Recently, genome wide association studies in primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) revealed associations with gene polymorphisms that potentially could affect the function of regulatory T cells (Treg). The aim of this study was to investigate Treg in patients with PSC and to associate their numbers with relevant gene polymorphisms. Treg frequency in blood was assessed by staining for CD4(+)CD25(high)FOXP3(+)CD127(low) lymphocytes and determination of Treg-specific FOXP3 gene locus demethylation. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the interleukin-2 receptor alpha (IL2RA), the interleukin-2 (IL2) and interleukin-21 (IL21) gene locus were analysed. Liver biopsies taken at the time of diagnosis were stained for FOXP3 and CD3. Treg function was assessed in a CFSE-based suppression assay. The frequency of Treg in peripheral blood of PSC patients was significantly decreased. We confirmed this finding by demonstrating a reduction of non-methylated DNA in the Treg-specific demethylated FOXP3 gene region of peripheral blood cells in PSC patients. Reduced peripheral Treg numbers were significantly associated with homozygosity for the major allele of the SNP "rs10905718" in the IL2RA gene. Intrahepatic FOXP3(+) cell numbers at the time of initial diagnosis were decreased in PSC as compared to PBC. In addition to reduced numbers, the suppressive capacity of Treg isolated from PSC patients seemed to be impaired as compared to healthy controls. Our findings indicate that Treg impairment may play a role in the immune dysregulation observed in PSC. Reduced Treg numbers in patients with PSC are associated with polymorphisms in the IL2RA gene. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Moderating effects of immunosuppressive medications and risk factors for post-operative joint infection following total joint arthroplasty in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Elizabeth; Wiggins, Amanda T; Rayens, Mary Kay; Morris, Brent J; Mannino, David; Hoellein, Andrew; Donegan, Ryan P; Crofford, Leslie J

    2017-02-01

    Inconclusive findings about infection risks, importantly the use of immunosuppressive medications in patients who have undergone large-joint total joint arthroplasty, challenge efforts to provide evidence-based perioperative total joint arthroplasty recommendations to improve surgical outcomes. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe risk factors for developing a post-operative infection in patients undergoing TJA of a large joint (total hip arthroplasty, total knee arthroplasty, or total shoulder arthroplasty) by identifying clinical and demographic factors, including the use of high-risk medications (i.e., prednisone and immunosuppressive medications) and diagnoses [i.e., rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), gout, obesity, and diabetes mellitus] that are linked to infection status, controlling for length of follow-up. A retrospective, case-control study (N = 2212) using de-identified patient health claims information from a commercially insured, U.S. dataset representing 15 million patients annually (from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2009) was conducted. Descriptive statistics, t-test, chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and multivariate logistic regression were used. Male gender (OR = 1.42, p < 0.001), diagnosis of RA (OR = 1.47, p = 0.031), diabetes mellitus (OR = 1.38, p = 0.001), obesity (OR = 1.66, p < 0.001) or gout (OR = 1.95, p = 0.001), and a prescription for prednisone (OR = 1.59, p < 0.001) predicted a post-operative infection following total joint arthroplasty. Persons with post-operative joint infections were significantly more likely to be prescribed allopurinol (p = 0.002) and colchicine (p = 0.006); no significant difference was found for the use of specific disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs and TNF-α inhibitors. High-risk, post-operative joint infection groups were identified allowing for precautionary clinical measures to be taken. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of eccentric isokinetic strengthening in the rehabilitation of patients with knee osteoarthritis: Isogo, a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegu, Anne-Gaëlle; Pereira, Bruno; Andant, Nicolas; Coudeyre, Emmanuel

    2014-04-02

    Femorotibial knee osteoarthritis is associated with muscle weakness in the lower limbs, particularly in the quadriceps, which results in disease progression. The interest of having muscular strengthening as part of the therapeutic arsenal for the medical treatment of knee osteoarthritis is now well established.The functional disability induced by knee osteoarthritis manifests itself principally when walking, notably downhill, during which the muscles are called upon to contract eccentrically.We can therefore think that eccentric muscular strengthening could bring a functional benefit that is superior to concentric muscular strengthening. This is a prospective, randomized, bicenter, parallel-group, international study. Eighty patients aged from 40 to 75 years old, suffering from medical-stage knee osteoarthritis, will undertake 6 weeks of isokinetic muscular strengthening. Randomization determines the mode of muscular strengthening: either exclusively eccentric or exclusively concentric.The principal objective is to demonstrate the superiority of the improvement in the quadriceps isokinetic torque after isokinetic muscular strengthening by the eccentric mode compared to the concentric mode.The following parameters are also evaluated: the variations in the level of pain, the parameters of walking (maximum speed over 10 and 200 meters, analysis on a computerized Gaitrite™ treadmill), static equilibrium (on a FUSYO™ force platform), and the functional status of the patient using the Western Ontario and MacMaster Universities osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) questionnaire after the strengthening period and at 6 months. A better knowledge of the most effective mode of muscular strengthening is needed to optimize the functional benefits to the patients. In case of superiority in terms of efficacy of the eccentric mode, the latter could be given priority in the rehabilitation treatment of knee osteoarthritis patients. Clinical trials.gov number: NCT01586130.

  7. PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE LEVELS AND INDEXES OF ENDOTHELIAL FUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH OSTEOARTHRITIS IS DEPENDENT ON THE PAIN INTENSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Aleksenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of hypertension in patients with osteoarthritis is rather high. According to published data, a combination of osteoarthritis and hypertension is registered in 45 to 80% of the patients, dependent on the age group. Pathogenesis of arterial hypertension developing in patients with osteoarthritis is of sufficient interest to the clinicians. We studied systolic and diastolic blood pressure, levels of some cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, TNFα and markers of endothelial function (EDN1, vWF activity in 83 patients (mean age 45.7±6.3 years with osteoarthritis of knee and hip joints (radiographic stage II-III accompanied by chronic pain. Local pain intensity over last month was evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale. According to the data obtained, the patients were divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 27 patients with mild pain (the pain index ≤ 3 points, the 2nd group included 34 persons with moderate pain (3 to 7 points, and the 3rd group consisted of 22 people with highest pain ratings (pain index ≥ 7. Increased pain intensity correlated with elevation of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Meanwhile, higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and increased activity of EDN1 and vWF were observed in patients with moderate osteoarthritis and severe pain syndrome. Minimal values of cytokines were observed in patients with mild pain, whereas maximal levels, in the patients with severe pain and arterial hypertension. Inflammatory mediators are able to induce activation and injury of endothelium causing its dysfunction. vWF activity and EDN1 contents increased in all the studied groups, along with increased pain intensity. Higher EDN1 concentration and vWF activity may be considered objective signs of endotheliosis in the osteoarthritis patients. In turn, endothelial dysfunction is among major pathophysiological mechanisms of arterial hypertension. This may suggest a sufficient contribution of pain to occurrence and

  8. Exercises with partial vascular occlusion in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryk, Flavio Fernandes; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Fingerhut, Deborah; Araujo, Thomas; Schutzer, Marcela; Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Duarte, Aires; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether women with knee osteoarthritis performing a rehabilitation programme consisting of low-load exercises combined with PVO exhibited the same results in changes in quadriceps strength, pain relief, and functional improvement when compared to women receiving a programme consisting of high-load exercises without PVO. Thirty-four women (mean age, 61 years) with a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned to a conventional or occlusion group. The women in the conventional group (n = 17) performed a 6-week quadriceps strengthening and stretching programme using a load around 70 % of the 1-repetition maximum (RM). The women in the occlusion group (n = 17) performed the same programme, however, only using a load around 30 % of the 1-RM, while PVO was induced. The PVO was achieved using a pressure cuff applied to the upper third of the thigh and inflated to 200 mmHg during the quadriceps exercise. An 11-point Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), the Lequesne questionnaire, the Timed-Up and Go (TUG) test, and muscle strength measurement using a hand-held dynamometer were used as outcome measures at baseline (pretreatment) and at the end of the 6-week of treatment. Pain, using the NPRS, was also assessed when performing the quadriceps exercises during the exercise sessions. At baseline, demographic, strength, pain, and functional assessment data were similar between groups. Patients from both the conventional and occlusion groups had a higher level of function (Lequesne and TUG test), less pain (NPRS), and higher quadriceps strength at the 6-week evaluation when compared to baseline (all P knee discomfort during the treatment sessions than those in the high-load exercise group (P knee osteoarthritis. However, the use of PVO combined with low-load exercise resulted in less anterior knee pain during the training sessions. I.

  9. Sagittal alignment of the spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W. J.; Liu, F.; Zhu, Y.W.; Sun, M.H.; Qiu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Normal sagittal spine-pelvis-lower extremity alignment is crucial in humans for maintaining an ergonomic upright standing posture, and pathogenesis in any segment leads to poor balance. The present study aimed to investigate how this sagittal alignment can be affected by severe knee osteoarthritis (KOA), and whether associated changes corresponded with symptoms of lower back pain (LBP) in this patient population. Methods Lateral radiograph films in an upright standing position were obtained from 59 patients with severe KOA and 58 asymptomatic controls free from KOA. Sagittal alignment of the spine, pelvis, hip and proximal femur was quantified by measuring several radiographic parameters. Global balance was accessed according to the relative position of the C7 plumb line to the sacrum and femoral heads. The presence of chronic LBP was documented. Comparisons between the two groups were carried by independent samples t-tests or chi-squared test. Results Patients with severe KOA showed significant backward femoral inclination (FI), hip flexion, forward spinal inclination, and higher prevalence of global imbalance (27.1% versus 3.4%, p 10° (n = 36) presented with significant pelvic anteversion and hip flexion. A total of 39 patients with KOA (66.1%) suffered from LBP. There was no significant difference in sagittal alignment between KOA patients with and without LBP. Conclusions The sagittal alignment of spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis was significantly influenced by severe KOA. The lumbar spine served as the primary source of compensation, while hip flexion and pelvic anteversion increased for further compensation. Changes in sagittal alignment may not be involved in the pathogenesis of LBP in this patient population. Cite this article: W. J. Wang, F. Liu, Y.W. Zhu, M.H. Sun, Y. Qiu, W. J. Weng. Sagittal alignment of the spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis: A radiographic study. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:198–205

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Malay Language Version of Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS Questionnaire among Knee Osteoarthritis Patients: A Confirmatory Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkifli MM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to cross-culturally adapt a Malay version of Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS and to evaluate its psychometric properties in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The English version KOOS was translated into a Malay version using forward and backward translation process, followed by face validity and content validity. Two hundred and twenty-six knee OA patients attending the Outpatient and Orthopaedic Clinics, Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital, completed the Malay version KOOS. Construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis and internal reliability assessment were performed. RESULTS: The results showed that the original five-factor model with 42 items failed to achieve acceptable values of the goodness of fit indices, indicating poor model fit. A new five-factor model of 26 items demonstrated acceptable level of goodness of fit (comparative fit index= 0.929, incremental fit index= 0.930, Tucker Lewis fit index= 0.920, root mean square error of approximation= 0.073 and Chisquared/ degree of freedom= 2.183 indices to signify a model fit. The Cronbach’s alpha value for the new model ranged from 0.776 to 0.946. The composite reliability values of each construct ranged between 0.819 and 0.921, indicating satisfactory to high level of convergent validity. CONCLUSION: The five-factor model with 26 items in the Malay version of KOOS questionnaire demonstrated a good degree of goodness of fit and was found to be valid, reliable and simple as an assessment tool for symptoms, pain, activity of daily living, sports and recreational activity and quality of life for Malaysian adults suffering from knee osteoarthritis.

  11. Impulse-forces during walking are not increased in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impulsive forces in the knee joint have been suspected to be a co-factor in the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis. We thus evaluated the impulsive sagittal ground reaction forces (iGRF), shock waves and lower extremity joint kinematics at heel strike during walking......) at the tibial tuberosity and sacrum. Sagittal lower extremity joint angles at heel strike were extracted from the gait analyses. As OA is painful and pain might alter movement strategies, the patient group was also evaluated following pain relief by intraarticular lidocaine injections. RESULTS: The two groups...... parameters were within their normal ranges. INTERPRETATION: OA patients and healthy subjects show similar impulse-forces and joint kinematics at heel strike. Following pain relief in the patient group, changes in tibial PA and in hip and knee joint angles were observed but these were still within the normal...

  12. The Association Between Serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D Level and Upper Leg Strength in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: Results of the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeckhoven, Esmee; van der Leeden, Marike; Roorda, Leo D; van Schoor, Natasja M; Lips, Paul; de Zwart, Arjan; Dekker, Joost; van der Esch, Martin; Lems, Willem F

    2016-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency, which is common among elderly people, has been linked to muscle weakness. In patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the association between muscle strength and serum 25-hydroxy Vitamin D [25(OH)D] level has not been studied comprehensively. The aim of our study was to examine the association between serum 25(OH)D level and muscle strength in patients with knee OA. Data of the Amsterdam Osteoarthritis cohort from 319 participants with knee OA were used in a cross-sectional study. Serum 25(OH)D level (nmol/l) was measured by a competitive electrochemiluminescence method. Muscle strength (nm/kg) of the upper leg was measured isokinetically. Univariable and multivariable linear regression analyses were used to calculate the association between serum 25(OH)D level and muscle strength. Serum 25(OH)D level was significantly associated with muscle strength (B = 0.036, 95% CI 0.017-0.054, p Vitamin D level, muscle strength, and adiposity in patients with knee OA.

  13. MTHFR Gene C677T Mutation and ACE Gene I/D Polymorphism in Turkish Patients with Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inanir, Ahmet; Yigit, Serbulent; Tural, Sengul; Cecen, Osman; Yildirim, Eren

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disorder resulting in destruction of articular cartilage, osteophyte formation, and subchondral bone sclerosis. In recent years, numerous genetic factors have been identified and implicated in osteoarthritis. The aim of the current study was to examine the influence of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene C677T mutation and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) variations on the risk of osteoarthritis. Genomic DNA is obtained from 421 persons (221 patients with osteoarthritis and 200 healthy controls). ACE gene I/D polymorphism genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction using I and D allele-specific primers. The MTHFR C677T mutation was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) methods. We found significant difference between the groups with respect to both ACE and MTHFR genotype distributions (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively). Our study suggests that ACE gene DD genotype and MTHFR gene CC genotype could be used as genetic markers in osteoarthritis in Turkish study populations. PMID:23089924

  14. The Modified painDETECT Questionnaire for Patients with Hip or Knee Osteoarthritis : Translation into Dutch, Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Reliability Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rienstra, Wietske; Blikman, Tim; Mensink, Frans B.; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Dijkstra, Baukje; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Stevens, Martin; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence that alteration in pain processing by the peripheral and central nervous system play a role in osteoarthritis pain, leading to neuropathic-like symptoms. It is essential to identify knee and hip osteoarthritis patients with a neuropathic pain profile in order to

  15. Effects of sesame seed supplementation on clinical signs and symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar Sadat, Bina; Khadem Haghighian, Mahdieh; Alipoor, Beitollah; Malek Mahdavi, Aida; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Moghaddam, Abdolvahab

    2013-10-01

    Up to now there have been no human studies to evaluate the effect of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) in osteoarthritis patients; this study was designed to assess the effect of administration of sesame on clinical signs and symptoms in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Fifty patients with knee OA referred to the only specialty and subspecialty orthopedic centers in the north-west of Iran, were selected and divided into two groups, namely control and sesame groups. Twenty-five patients in the control group received standard treatment while 25 patients in the sesame group received 40 g/day sesame by oral administration during 2 months of the study along with standard drug therapy. The KOOS Questionnaire, Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) tests were used for clinical assessments. There was significant difference in pain intensity between the two groups (P = 0.004) after treatment. The mean score of the KOOS Questionnaire in both treatment and control groups was significantly increased (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively) compared with baseline. The mean score of the TUG Questionnaire in both treatment and control groups was significantly decreased (P = 0.001 and P = 0.001, respectively) compared with baseline. There was significant difference in post-treatment scores of the KOOS Questionnaire (P = 0.009) and TUG (P = 0.002) between the two groups. The present study showed a positive effect of sesame in improving clinical signs and symptoms in patients with knee OA and indicated the fact that sesame might be a viable adjunctive therapy in treating OA. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. [Oral osmotic hydromorphone (OROS) in patients with chronic severe pain due to osteoarthritis under daily routine conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Blimke, B; Hesselbarth, S; Giesecke, T

    2014-04-17

    Objective of this prospective, non-interventional study was to obtain data under a therapy with oral osmotic hydromorphone (OROS) in patients with chronic severe pain due to osteoarthritis under daily routineconditions. Using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) patients assessed pain relief as well as the impact of pain on activities of daily living. Pain control, treatment satisfaction (by patient and investigator), physical therapy capability and the WOMAC-Index (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis) were additionally evaluated. Adverse events were continuously monitored throughout the study. 206 patients with chronic severe pain due to osteoarthritis and an initial pain intensity of 6 (NRS 0-10) received oral OROS-hydromorphone for three months. Under this treatment pain relief as well as the impact of pain on activities of daily living improved significantly. At the last examination, the patients reported a mean pain reduction of 2.5 (rest)/3.0 (movement) by day and of 2.6 (rest)/3.1 (movement) bynight (p treatment satisfaction and an improved sleep quality. Physical therapy capability improved in 77.9% of the patients, the WOMAC index as indicator of pain and function in osteoarthritis decreased significantly from 13.3 (baseline) to 7.5 (V6). The most frequently reported adverse events were obstipation, nausea, dizziness and fatigue. 17.5% of the patients cut the study short because of adverse events. The treatment of patients with chronic pain due to osteoarthritis with oral osmotic hydromorphone resulted in a significant reduction of all documented pain related assessments.

  17. Assessment of clinical and MRI outcomes after mesenchymal stem cell implantation in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y S; Choi, Y J; Lee, S W; Kwon, O R; Suh, D S; Heo, D B; Koh, Y G

    2016-02-01

    Cartilage regenerative procedures using the cell-based tissue engineering approach involving mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been receiving increased interest because of their potential for altering the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) by repairing cartilage lesions. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) outcomes of MSC implantation in OA knees and to determine the association between clinical and MRI outcomes. Twenty patients (24 knees) who underwent arthroscopic MSC implantation for cartilage lesions in their OA knees were evaluated at 2 years after surgery. Clinical outcomes were evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score and the Tegner activity scale, and cartilage repair was assessed according to the MRI Osteoarthritis Knee Score (MOAKS) and Magnetic Resonance Observation of Cartilage Repair Tissue (MOCART) score. The clinical outcomes significantly improved (P Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Balneological outpatient treatment for patients with knee osteoarthritis; an effective non-drug therapy option in daily routine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkuk, Kağan; Gürdal, Hatice; Karagülle, Mine; Barut, Yasemin; Eröksüz, Rıza; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-04-01

    This study aims to compare the effects of balneological treatments applied at consecutive and intermittent sessions without interfering with their daily routine in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This is a randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial. Fifty patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis were included. The patients were divided into two groups. All patients were given a total of ten sessions of balneological treatment consisting of hydrotherapy and mud pack therapy. Group 1 received consecutive treatment for 2 weeks, while group 2 received intermittent treatment for 5 weeks. Local peloid packs at 45 °C were applied for 20 min, after a tap water (38 °C) bath. Evaluations were conducted before, after treatment, and at 12th week of post-treatment by Pain (VAS), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), and Short Form-36 (SF-36). Both balneological treatment regimens of knee osteoarthritis had statistically significant clinical effects as well as effects on the quality of life. Patients' well-being continued at 3 months, except for joint stiffness (WOMAC), role-emotional (SF-36), and vitality (SF-36) in group 1 and for mental health (SF-36) in both groups. Both patient groups had improved compared to baseline. However, at 3 months after the treatment, the well-being of group 2 was unable to be maintained in terms of role-physical (SF-36) parameter, while the well-being of group 1 was unable to be maintained in terms of pain, WOMAC (pain, physical functions, total), and SF-36 (physical functioning, role-physical, pain, role-emotional, and mental health) variables, compared to data obtained immediately after treatment. Our study suggests that traditional and intermittent balneological therapies have similar efficacy in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Comparison of the effectivity of oral and intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbas, Mesut; Simsek, Tuncer; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Sahin, Hasan; Toman, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Tenoxicam is widely used in osteoarthritis treatment and we aimed to compare the effectivity of oral and intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in osteoarthritis treatment. This study was performed between 2011 and 2012 by retrospectively analyzing and comparing the findings of 60 patients who were clinically and radiologically diagnosed with knee degenerative osteoarthritis in Bünyan state hospital pain policlinic. 60 patients included in the study were divided into two groups. The first group (tenoxicam IA, n=30) included patient findings of those subjected to intra-articular injection of 20mg tenoxicam to the knee once a week for three weeks and the second group (oral tenoxicam, n=30) included patients who were administered 20mg oral tenoxicam once a day for three weeks. All patients were clinically evaluated pre-treatment and in the 1st week, 1st month and 3rd month post-treatment according to specified criteria. Twenty two of 60 patients included in the study were male and 38 were female. In both groups significant improvements were detected in all of the observed parameters: visual analog scale, Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (pain, physical activity, knee stiffness) and Lequesne index scores and in the evaluations performed in 1st week, 1st month and 3rd month with respect to pre-treatment values. Besides, a better compliance to treatment and gastrointestinal system tolerability in tenoxicam IA group was also observed. Intra-articular tenoxicam administration could be thought as an alternative treatment method in patients with knee osteoarthritis who cannot use oral tenoxicam especially due to systemic gastrointestinal system side effects and those who have difficulties in adapting to treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. [Comparison of the effectivity of oral and intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in patients with knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbas, Mesut; Simsek, Tuncer; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Sahin, Hasan; Toman, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Tenoxicam is widely used in osteoarthritis treatment and we aimed to compare the effectivity of oral and intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in osteoarthritis treatment. This study was performed between 2011 and 2012 by retrospectively analyzing and comparing the findings of 60 patients who were clinically and radiologically diagnosed with knee degenerative osteoarthritis in Bünyan state hospital pain policlinic. 60 patients included in the study were divided into two groups. The first group (tenoxicam IA, n=30) included patient findings of those subjected to intra-articular injection of 20mg tenoxicam to the knee once a week for three weeks and the second group (oral tenoxicam, n=30) included patients who were administered 20mg oral tenoxicam once a day for three weeks. All patients were clinically evaluated pre-treatment and in the 1st week, 1st month and 3rd month post-treatment according to specified criteria. 22 of 60 patients included in the study were male and 38 were female. In both groups significant improvements were detected in all of the observed parameters: visual analog scale, Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (pain, physical activity, knee stiffness) and Lequesne index scores and in the evaluations performed in 1st week, 1st month and 3rd month with respect to pre-treatment values. Besides, a better compliance to treatment and gastrointestinal system tolerability in tenoxicam IA group was also observed. Intra-articular tenoxicam administration could be thought as an alternative treatment method in patients with knee osteoarthritis who cannot use oral tenoxicam especially due to systemic gastrointestinal system side effects and those who have difficulties in adapting to treatment. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Accelerometer and gyroscope based gait analysis using spectral analysis of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Wieland; Hottowitz, Ralf; Sohns, Christian; Sohns, Jan Martin; Gilbert, Fabian; Menke, Jan; Niklas, Andree; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] A wide variety of accelerometer tools are used to estimate human movement, but there are no adequate data relating to gait symmetry parameters in the context of knee osteoarthritis. This study's purpose was to evaluate a 3D-kinematic system using body-mounted sensors (gyroscopes and accelerometers) on the trunk and limbs. This is the first study to use spectral analysis for data post processing. [Subjects] Twelve patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis (OA) (10 male) and seven age-matched controls (6 male) were studied. [Methods] Measurements with 3-D accelerometers and gyroscopes were compared to video analysis with marker positions tracked by a six-camera optoelectronic system (VICON 460, Oxford Metrics). Data were recorded using the 3D-kinematic system. [Results] The results of both gait analysis systems were significantly correlated. Five parameters were significantly different between the knee OA and control groups. To overcome time spent in expensive post-processing routines, spectral analysis was performed for fast differentiation between normal gait and pathological gait signals using the 3D-kinematic system. [Conclusions] The 3D-kinematic system is objective, inexpensive, accurate and portable, and allows long-term recordings in clinical, sport as well as ergonomic or functional capacity evaluation (FCE) settings. For fast post-processing, spectral analysis of the recorded data is recommended.

  2. A comprehensive review of the effectiveness of different exercise programs for patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Yvonne M; Allen, Kelli D; Caine, Dennis J

    2012-11-01

    Exercise is recommended as a first-line conservative intervention approach for osteoarthritis (OA). A wide range of exercise programs are available and scientific evidence is necessary for choosing the optimal strategy of treatment for each patient. The purpose of this review is to discuss the effectiveness of different types of exercise programs for OA based on trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses in the literature. Publications from January 1997 to July 2012 were searched in 4 electronic databases using the terms osteoarthritis, exercise, exercise program, effectiveness, and treatment outcome. Strong evidence supports that aerobic and strengthening exercise programs, both land- and water-based, are beneficial for improving pain and physical function in adults with mild-to-moderate knee and hip OA. Areas that require further research include examination of the long-term effects of exercise programs for OA, balance training for OA, exercise programs for severe OA, the effect of exercise programs on progression of OA, the effectiveness of exercise for joint sites other than the knee or hip, and the effectiveness of exercise for OA by such factors as age, sex, and obesity. Efforts to improve adherence to evidence-based exercise programs for OA and to promote the dissemination and implementation of these programs are crucial.

  3. Preferences for heat, cold, or contrast in patients with knee osteoarthritis affect treatment response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R Denegar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Craig R Denegar, Devon R Dougherty, Jacob E Friedman, Maureen E Schimizzi, James E Clark, Brett A Comstock, William J KraemerHuman Performance Laboratory and Physical Therapy Program, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USAObjective: This investigation assessed preferences for, and effects of, 5 days of twice daily superficial heat, cold, or contrast therapy applied with a commercially available system ­permitting the circulation of water through a wrap-around garment, use of an electric heating pad, or rest for patients with level II–IV osteoarthritis (OA of the knee.Methods: We employed a within subject, randomized order design to study 34 patients ­receiving each treatment in 1-week blocks. A knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS questionnaire and visual analog pain scale was completed at baseline, and twice each week. Treatment preferences were assessed in the last week of the study.Results: Treatment with the device set to warm was preferred by 48% of subjects. Near equal preferences were observed for cold (24% and contrast (24%. Pain reduction and improvements in KOOS subscale measures were demonstrated for each treatment but responses were (P < 0.05 greater with preferred treatments. Most patients preferred treatment with the water circulating garment system over a heating pad.Conclusions: We recommend that when superficial heat or cold is considered in the management of knee OA that patients experiment to identify the intervention that offers them the greatest relief and that contrast is a treatment option.Keywords: pain scales, KOOS, therapeutic agents, knee, patient preferences

  4. Evaluation of unipodal stance in knee osteoarthritis patients using knee accelerations and center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcot, K; Hagemeister, N; de Guise, J A; Aissaoui, R

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to compare knee joint instability and postural impairments during the performance of a unipodal stance task between patients having knee osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy elderly subjects using knee accelerations and center of pressure (COP) measurements. Twenty patients with medial knee OA and nine healthy individuals participated in this study. Three-dimensional (3D) knee joint accelerations and COP were measured during unipodal stance. The range and the root mean square (RMS) were extracted from medial lateral (ML) and anterior-posterior (AP) knee accelerations, whereas sway area, velocity, and ML and AP ranges were measured from the COP. The average parameters of three trials for each subject were compared between groups. Results show that knee OA patients exhibited a significantly higher range of knee acceleration in both ML (0.22±0.08 g vs 0.15±0.05 g) and AP (0.17±0.06 g vs 0.06±0.01 g) directions and a lower COP velocity (136.6±22.3 mm/s vs 157.6±18.4 mm/s) than did the healthy age-matched group. Significant correlations between the COP and knee acceleration parameters were also obtained. This study confirmed that patients with knee OA displayed greater body sway than did able-bodied subjects. Moreover, using an accelerometric-based method, this study highlighted the higher knee joint instability in the frontal and sagittal planes in knee OA patients compared with able-bodied subjects during a unipodal standing task. Copyright © 2010 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Yields and chondrogenic potential of primary synovial mesenchymal stem cells are comparable between rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Yuji; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Ozeki, Nobutake; Katano, Hisako; Komori, Keiichiro; Fujii, Shizuka; Otabe, Koji; Horie, Masafumi; Koga, Hideyuki; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Matsumoto, Mikio; Kaneko, Haruka; Takazawa, Yuji; Muneta, Takeshi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2017-05-16

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from the synovial membrane (synovial MSCs) are a candidate cell source for regenerative medicine of cartilage and menisci due to their high chondrogenic ability. Regenerative medicine can be expected for RA patients with the inflammation well-controlled as well as OA patients and transplantation of synovial MSCs would also be a possible therapeutic treatment. Some properties of synovial MSCs vary dependent on the diseases patients have, and whether or not the pathological condition of RA affects the chondrogenesis of synovial MSCs remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare the properties of primary synovial MSCs between RA and OA patients. Human synovial tissue was harvested during total knee arthroplasty from the knee joints of eight patients with RA and OA respectively. Synovial nucleated cells were cultured for 14 days. Total cell yields, surface markers, and differentiation potentials were analyzed for primary synovial MSCs. Nucleated cell number per 1 mg synovium was 8.4 ± 3.9 thousand in RA and 8.0 ± 0.9 thousand in OA. Total cell number after 14-day culture/1 mg synovium was 0.7 ± 0.4 million in RA and 0.5 ± 0.3 million in OA, showing no significant difference between in RA and OA. Cells after 14-day culture were mostly positive for CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, negative for CD45 both in RA and OA. There was no significant difference for the cartilage pellet weight and sGAG content per pellet between in RA and OA. Both oil red O-positive colony rate and alizarin red-positive colony rate were similar in RA and OA. Yields, surface markers and chondrogenic potential of primary synovial MSCs in RA were comparable to those in OA. Synovium derived from RA patients can be the cell source of MSCs for cartilage and meniscus regeneration.

  6. Toward a clinical definition of early osteoarthritis: onset of patient-reported knee pain begins on stairs. Data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Dube, Bright; Kingsbury, Sarah R; Tennant, Alan; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-01-01

    Early detection of osteoarthritis (OA) would increase the chances of effective intervention. We aimed to investigate which patient-reported activity is first associated with knee pain. We hypothesized that pain would occur first during activities requiring weight bearing and knee bending. Data were obtained from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI), a multicenter, longitudinal prospective observational cohort of people who have or are at high risk of OA. Participants completed the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC; Likert scale) annually for up to 7 years. Rasch analysis was used to rank the WOMAC pain questions (activities) in order of affirmation as the pain score increased from 0. For each total WOMAC score category (0-20) we selected 25 individuals at random based on their maximum score across all visits. Fit to the Rasch model was assessed in this subset; stability of question ranking over successive visits was confirmed in the full OAI. WOMAC data on 4,673 people were included, with 491 selected for subset analysis. The subset data showed good fit to the Rasch model (χ(2) = 43.31, P = 0.332). In the full OAI, the "using stairs" question was the first to score points as the total pain score increased from 0 (baseline logit score ± 95% confidence interval -4.74 ± 0.07), then "walking" (-2.94 ± 0.07), "standing" (-2.65 ± 0.07), "lying/sitting" (-2.00 ± 0.08), and finally "in bed" (-1.32 ± 0.09). This ordering was consistent over successive visits. Knee pain is most likely to first appear during weight-bearing activities involving bending of the knee, such as using stairs. First appearance of this symptom may identify a group suitable for early intervention strategies. © 2015 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  7. A 2-year prospective study of patient-relevant outcomes in patients operated on for knee osteoarthritis with tibial osteotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toksvig-Larsen Sören

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tibial osteotomy is a treatment for younger and/or physically active patients suffering from uni-compartmental knee osteoarthritis. The open wedge osteotomy by the hemicallotasis technique includes the use of external fixation. The use of external fixation has several advantages, as early mobilization and the opportunity for optimal correction. However, the hemicallotasis technique has also been described as a cumbersome procedure for the patient. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate patient-relevant outcomes during the first 2 post-operative years. Especially the treatment period, during which external fixation was used, was closely monitored. Methods In an uncontrolled study, fifty-eight consecutive patients, 30 men and 28 women (mean age 54 years were operated on by the hemicallotasis technique were evaluated with the patient-relevant outcome measure Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS preoperatively, during the treatment with external fixation, one week after removal of the external fixation, at 6 months, and at one and two years postoperatively. Results At the 2-year postoperative follow-up, all subscales of the KOOS were improved (p Conclusion Tibial osteotomy by the hemicallotasis technique yields large improvement in self-rated pain, function and quality of life, which persists over two years. Surprisingly, large improvements occurred already during the immediate post-operative period when the external fixation was still used.

  8. The course of limitations in activities in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis: risk factors for future functional decline.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Dijk, G.M. van; Heymans, M.W.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dekker, J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the course of limitations in activities over five years follow-up and identify predictors of future limitations in activities in elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Relevance: Although cross sectional research on determinants of limitations in

  9. Valgus bracing in patients with medial compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. A gait analysis study of a new brace.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaasbeek, R.D.A.; Groen, B.E.; Hampsink, B.; Heerwaarden, R.J. van; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    A new valgus brace was evaluated in 15 patients with medial osteoarthritis of the knee and a varus leg axis. Significant improvement of pain and function were found after 6 weeks of brace treatment. Gait analysis showed that the brace had a tendency of lowering the peak varus moment about the knee.

  10. Efficacy of a Combined Rosemary and Lavender Topical Ointment in the Treatment of Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Ghannadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the preservative treatments of knee osteoarthritis is the use of topical medications. This study is aimed to clinically evaluate the effect of topical products containing essential oils of rosemary and lavender herbs on the treatment of patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Materials and Methods: Rosemary and lavender essential oils were prepared by steam distillation method and inserted into the ointment with the hydrophilic base. In this study, 15 patients with knee osteoarthritis were treated with this ointment for three months. The results were assessed using WOMAC and Lequesne indices and were evaluated by the Wilcoxon statistical test.Results: At the week of admission to the hospital, mean WOMAC index was equal to 71.4, mean Lequesne index was equal to 18 and the average time of passing through the distance of fifty feet by patients was equal to 19.4. After 4, 8 and 12 weeks, all these indices significantly decreased (p≤ 0.05. The WOMAC questionnaire denotative survey also showed that the pain and physical function at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks were significantly less than the first week of admission (p≤ 0.05, but there was no significant difference as far as joint stiffness is concerned.Conclusion: Topical application of essential oils of rosemary and lavender herbs in a hydrophilic ointment base can be useful as a preservative treatment for the patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  11. Course and predictors of pain and physical functioning in patients with hip osteoarthritis : Systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Heymans, Martijn W; Holla, Jasmijn F M; Häkkinen, Arja; Lems, Willem F; Roorda, Leo D; Veenhof, Cindy; Sanchez-Ramirez, Diana C; de Vet, Henrica C W; Dekker, Joost

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically summarize the literature on: (i) the course of pain and physical functioning; and (ii) predictors of deterioration of pain and physical functioning in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. METHODS: A literature search was conducted in PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, PsychINFO

  12. Osteoarthritis treatment using autologous conditioned serum after placebo: Patient considerations and clinical response in a non-randomized case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, M.; Creemers, L.B.; Yang, K.G.A.; Raijmakers, N.J.H.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Autologous conditioned serum (ACS) is a disease-modifying drug for treatment of knee osteoarthritis, and modest superiority over placebo was reported in an earlier randomized controlled trial (RCT). We hypothesized that when given the opportunity, placebo-treated patients from

  13. Compensatory Trunk Movements in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis Accuracy and Reproducibility of a Body-Fixed Sensor-Based Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reininga, Inge H. F.; Stevens, Martin; Wagenmakers, Robert; Boerboom, Alexander L.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Bulstra, Sjoerd K.; Zijlstra, Wiebren

    Reininga IHF, Stevens M, Wagenmakers R, Boerboom AL, Groothoff JW, Bulstra SK, Zijlstra W: Compensatory trunk movements in patients with hip osteoarthritis; Accuracy and reproducibility of a body-fixed sensor-based assessment. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2011;90:681-687. This study examined the accuracy

  14. Pain and sensitisation after total knee replacement or non-surgical treatment in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Simonsen, Ole; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study is a secondary analysis of 12-month follow-ups from two parallel, randomised controlled trials (RCT) in painful knee osteoarthritis patients. RCT1: Total knee replacement (TKR) followed by non-surgical treatment compared with non-surgical treatment. RCT2: Non-surgical treat...

  15. Physical activity and exercise adherence in physical therapy exercise treatment in patients with osteoarthritis of hip or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisters, M.F.; Veenhof, C.; Bakker, D. de; Schellevis, F.G.; Dekker, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: a lack of regular physical activity in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip and/or knee is an important risk factor for functional decline. The ultimate goal of exercise therapy is to improve the overall physical function and to help individuals meet the demands of daily living.

  16. A blended intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis in the physical therapy practice: development and a pilot study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossen, D.; Kloek, C.; Snippe, H.W.; Dekker, J.; Bakker, D. de; Veenhof, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise therapy in patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis is effective in reducing pain, increasing physical activity and physical functioning, but costly and a burden for the health care budget. A web-based intervention is cheap in comparison to face-to-face

  17. The influence of sport participation on physical function in patients with osteoarthritis during and after exercise therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perry, S.; Lucas, C.; Veenhof, C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were 1. to investigate in which sports activities patients with osteoarthritis (OA) participate, 2. the cross sectional differences in functional outcome between sport participators (SP) and non-sport participators (N-SP) and 3. the influence of sport

  18. Design and testing a web-based physical activity intervention for patients with osteoarthritis in hip and/or knee.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossen, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Due to elevated fear of pain, catastrophizing thoughts and joint stiffness, a large group of patients with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA) remain sedentary. Although inactivity may enhance in short-term pain reduction, prolonged inactivity may augment functional decline. Therefore, we

  19. The Gait Deviation Index Is Associated with Hip Muscle Strength and Patient-Reported Outcome in Patients with Severe Hip Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenlund, Signe; Holsgaard-Larsen, Anders; Overgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Gait Deviation Index summarizes overall gait 'quality', based on kinematic data from a 3-dimensional gait analysis. However, it is unknown which clinical outcomes may affect the Gait Deviation Index in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. The aim of this study......) and with severe primary hip osteoarthritis underwent 3-dimensional gait analysis. Mean Gait Deviation Index, pain after walking and maximal isometric hip muscle strength (flexor, extensor, and abductor) were recorded. All patients completed the 'Physical Function Short-form of the Hip disability...... was to investigate associations between Gait Deviation Index as a measure of gait 'quality' and hip muscle strength and between Gait Deviation Index and patient-reported outcomes in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis. METHOD: Forty-seven patients (34 males), aged 61.1 ± 6.7 years, with BMI 27.3 ± 3.4 (kg/m2...

  20. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve...... of rheumatology, were randomly allocated to either receive massage and a week later, act as controls or vice versa. The applied massage consisted of stimulating massage of the quadriceps femoris, sartorious, gracilus, and hamstrings muscles for 10 min on the affected leg. Participants had their JRE measured...... before and immediately after the 10 min massage and control sessions. Data were analyzed by using paired t-test. RESULTS: No significant change in JRE was observed (95% CI: -0.62 degrees to 0.85 degrees, p = 0.738). CONCLUSION: Massage has no effect on the immediate joint repositioning error in patients...

  1. Movement detection impaired in patients with knee osteoarthritis compared to healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, H; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit; Hansen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify whether osteoarthritis (OA) patients have a localized or a generalized reduction in proprioception. Twenty one women with knee OA (mean age [SD]: 57.1 [12.0] years) and 29 healthy women (mean age [SD]: 55.3 [10.1] years) had their joint position sense (JPS......) and threshold to detection of a passive movement (TDPM) measured in both knees and elbows. JPS was measured as the participant's ability to actively reproduce the position of the elbow and knee joints. TDPM was measured as the participant's ability to recognize a passive motion of the elbow and knee joints...... that there is an increase in threshold to detection of a passive motion in knees and elbows for patients with knee OA. This indicates that OA may be associated with a generalized defect in proprioception with possible implications for the pathogenesis of the joint degeneration....

  2. Exercise & NSAID: Effect on muscle protein synthesis in knee osteoarthritis patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.G.; Miller, Ben F; Hansen, M

    2011-01-01

    the exercise-induced response of muscle contractile protein FSR. However, we cannot exclude that a minor inhibition of muscle sarcoplasmic proteins may have been present with NSAID treatment. This study suggests that muscle hypertrophy after long-term training is not influenced by NSAIDs.......PURPOSE:The purpose of this study was to determine muscle and tendon protein fractional synthesis rates (FSR) at rest and after a one-legged kicking exercise in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) receiving either placebo or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).METHODS:Twenty patients...... the contralateral leg remained rested. Twenty-four hours after exercise, we determined circulating concentrations of inflammatory parameters and measured FSR of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein fractions of vastus lateralis muscle and patellar tendon collagen protein by the direct incorporation method using...

  3. Comparison of the effectivity of oral and intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Erbas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:Tenoxicam is widely used in osteoarthritis treatment and we aimedto compare the effectivity of oral and intra-articular administration of tenoxicam in osteoarthri-tis treatment.METHODS: This study was performed between 2011 and 2012 by retrospectively analyzing andcomparing the findings of 60 patients who were clinically and radiologically diagnosed with kneedegenerative osteoarthritis in Bünyan state hospital pain policlinic. 60 patients included in thestudy were divided into two groups. The first group (tenoxicam IA, n = 30 included patientfindings of those subjected to intra-articular injection of 20 mg tenoxicam to the knee oncea week for three weeks and the second group (oral tenoxicam, n = 30 included patients whowere administered 20 mg oral tenoxicam once a day for three weeks. All patients were clini-cally evaluated pre-treatment and in the 1st week, 1st month and 3rd month post-treatmentaccording to specified criteria.RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Twenty two of 60 patients included in the study were male and 38were female. In both groups significant improvements were detected in all of the observedparameters: visual analog scale, Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (pain, physicalactivity, knee stiffness and Lequesne index scores and in the evaluations performed in 1st week,1st month and 3rd month with respect to pre-treatment values. Besides, a better complianceto treatment and gastrointestinal system tolerability in tenoxicam IA group was also observed.Intra-articular tenoxicam administration could be thought as an alternative treatment methodin patients with knee osteoarthritis who cannot use oral tenoxicam especially due to systemicgastrointestinal system side effects and those who have difficulties in adapting to treatment.

  4. Association between circulating adipokines, radiographic changes, and knee cartilage volume in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S; Xu, J; Xu, S; Zhang, M; Huang, S; He, F; Yang, X; Xiao, H; Zhang, H; Ding, C

    2016-01-01

    To explore the associations between serum adipokine levels, radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) severity, and articular cartilage volume in patients with knee OA. A cross-sectional sample of 205 patients (aged 45-74 years) with knee OA were consecutively recruited to the Anhui Osteoarthritis (AHOA) study. ROA was assessed using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) grading system (grades 0-4). Knee cartilage volume was determined using fat-saturated T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Serum levels of the adipokines leptin, adiponectin, and resistin were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum adiponectin, but not serum leptin or resitin, was significantly associated with reduced ROA severity in univariable analyses and this association remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and disease duration [β = -0.012, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.021 to -0.002]. In ROA patients, leptin was significantly and positively associated with knee cartilage volume at patellar and medial tibial sites in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses (β = 0.006, 95% CI 0.02-0.010 for medial tibia and β = 0.009, 95% CI 0.001-0.018 for patella sites) but adiponectin and resistin had no significant associations with cartilage volume. In non-ROA patients, leptin, adiponectin, and resistin were not significantly associated with cartilage volume at any site. Serum levels of leptin are independently associated with increased knee cartilage volume. In addition, serum adiponectin is significantly and negatively associated with ROA severity, suggesting a potentially protective effect.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for knee osteoarthritis: 5 years follow-up of three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatchi, Fereydoun; Sadeghi Abdollahi, Bahar; Mohyeddin, Mandana; Nikbin, Behrooz

    2016-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease characterized by the destruction of joint cartilage. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are found in low numbers in normal cartilage, mainly in the superficial layer, acting as repairing agents. In OA, MSCs are seen in larger numbers, but act chaotic and are unable to repair the cartilage. The synovial membrane becomes inflamed and interacts with the cartilage. Transplanted MSC have the ability to normalize them, redirecting them to their normal function. In a preliminary study, we showed that MSC could improve knee OA in four patients at 6 months. This report shows their long-term follow-up at 5 years. One patient was lost to follow-up at 2 years and three were followed for 5 years. They were aged 55, 57, 65 and 54 years, and had moderate to severe knee osteoarthritis. The worse knee of each patient was injected with 8-9 × 10(6) MSC. As previously reported, all parameters improved in transplant knees at 6 months (walking time, stair climbing, gelling pain, patella crepitus, flection contracture and the visual analogue score on pain). Then, they started gradually to deteriorate, but at 5 years they were still better than at baseline. PGA (Patient Global Assessment) improved from baseline to 5 years. The better knee at baseline (no MSC), continued its progression toward aggravation and at 5 years became the worse knee. Transplant knees were all in a rather advanced stage of OA. Earlier transplantation may give better results in long-term follow-up. This is what future studies have to demonstrate. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Effects of condylar head surface changes on mandibular position in patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yoo-Jin; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Yong-Il; Ok, Soo-Min; Kim, Seong-Sik; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated condylar surface changes in patients after temporomandibular (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) treatment, and used cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to investigate the relationship between condylar surface and mandibular position changes. Thirty-six patients diagnosed with TMJ OA and receiving non-surgical treatments for TMJ OA were enrolled in this study. Patients were assigned to study groups according to the affected side. Those in the unilateral osteoarthritis (OAU) group (n = 20; 8 males and 12 females; aged 22.0 ± 11.5 years) had a unilateral condyle with TMJ OA, and those in the OAB group had bilateral TMJ OA (n = 16; 1 male and 15 females; aged 25.7 ± 6.4 years). Condylar surface and mandibular position changes were investigated by the superimposition of three-dimensional reconstructed images and CBCT data, respectively. For condylar surface changes, the average absolute deviation was 0.32 ± 0.08 mm for the OA side and 0.18 ± 0.03 mm for the non-OA side, a significant difference between sides (p mandibular position changes, measurement points that moved more than 2 mm were Pog, Me, and Mental foramen in both groups. The study results show that the mandible with both condyles affected moved backward and downward after TMJ OA treatment. In the patient ngroup with unilateral TMJ OA, there was deviation on the affected side and downward movement (p < 0.05). Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelissen Jessica

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA. The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of both interventions. Methods/Design In this randomized, single blind, clinical trial with active controls, we aim to include 170 patients with GOA. The experimental intervention consist of six self-management group sessions provided by a multi-disciplinary team (occupational therapist, physiotherapist, dietician and specialized nurse. The active control group consists of two group sessions and four sessions by telephone, provided by a specialized nurse and physiotherapist. Both therapies last six weeks. Main study outcome is daily functioning during the first year after the treatment, assessed on the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, specific complaints, fatigue, and costs. Illness cognitions, global perceived effect and self-efficacy, will also be assessed for a responder analysis. Outcome assessments are performed directly after the intervention, after 26 weeks and after 52 weeks. Discussion This article describes the design of a randomized, single blind, clinical trial with a one year follow up to compare the costs and effectiveness of two non-pharmacological interventions with different modes of delivery for patients with GOA. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2137

  8. Non-pharmacological care for patients with generalized osteoarthritis: design of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeboom, Thomas J; Stukstette, Mirelle J P M; de Bie, Rob A; Cornelissen, Jessica; den Broeder, Alfons A; van den Ende, Cornelia H M

    2010-07-01

    Non-pharmacological treatment (NPT) is a useful treatment option in the management of hip or knee osteoarthritis. To our knowledge however, no studies have investigated the effect of NPT in patients with generalized osteoarthritis (GOA). The primary aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of two currently existing health care programs with different intensity and mode of delivery on daily functioning in patients with GOA. The secondary objective is to compare the cost-effectiveness of both interventions. In this randomized, single blind, clinical trial with active controls, we aim to include 170 patients with GOA. The experimental intervention consist of six self-management group sessions provided by a multi-disciplinary team (occupational therapist, physiotherapist, dietician and specialized nurse). The active control group consists of two group sessions and four sessions by telephone, provided by a specialized nurse and physiotherapist. Both therapies last six weeks. Main study outcome is daily functioning during the first year after the treatment, assessed on the Health Assessment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are health related quality of life, specific complaints, fatigue, and costs. Illness cognitions, global perceived effect and self-efficacy, will also be assessed for a responder analysis. Outcome assessments are performed directly after the intervention, after 26 weeks and after 52 weeks. This article describes the design of a randomized, single blind, clinical trial with a one year follow up to compare the costs and effectiveness of two non-pharmacological interventions with different modes of delivery for patients with GOA. Dutch Trial Register NTR2137.

  9. Patient education and basic body awareness therapy in hip osteoarthritis - a qualitative study of patients' movement learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Aarid Liland; Strand, Liv Inger; Skjaerven, Liv Helvik; Sundal, Mary-Anne; Magnussen, Liv Heide

    2017-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with pain, dysfunction and reduced quality of life. Patient education (PE) followed by 12 weekly sessions of Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) was offered to patients with hip OA, aiming to strengthen their ability to move and act functionally in daily life. To explore how patients described their experiences and outcome from participating in PE and BBAT. Individual, semi-structured interviews with five patients, aged 52-78 years, were performed after PE and BBAT at four and ten months. Interview data were analyzed by systematic text condensation. Three main themes emerged. "Becoming motivated and involved" reflected experiences of encouragement and support from information given and communication with group members. In "Movement awareness learning" patients described becoming aware of and improving functional movement, alleviating symptoms and increasing daily functioning. "Movement and disease in a long-term perspective" reflected patientś experience of increased self-awareness and taking better care of themselves at 10 months after baseline. Practicing basic movement principles, they felt empowered to handle daily life challenges in more functional and energy-economical ways. PE followed by BBAT in groups may be beneficial to patients with hip OA, and provide lasting benefits regarding daily life function. Implications for Rehabilitation Insight into disease process and relationship to functional movement gained through patient education may empower patients with hip osteoarthritis in management of daily life Movement awareness and exploration of movement quality using principles from Basic Body Awareness Therapy was found to support patients in finding resources for functional movement, implemented in daily actions Movement strategies characterized by adjustment rather than force was experienced by the patients to support their general functioning, despite of prevailing hip pain Implementing group therapeutic factors (Yalom

  10. Real life Dosages and Costs of TNFα inhibitor therapy for RA patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela; Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2009-01-01

    about the true long run cost. Taking the actual medication practice into account is important for the evaluation of the costs and optimal sequencing of new and existing biological treatments. Objectives: To investigate the drug cost of TNF-inhibitors in the treatment of RA using real-life data from...... of treatment. Cost estimates based on short term observational data or on instruction leaflets from manufacturers may provide wrong cost assessments of TNF-alpha therapy. It is important to take the long term cost structure into account to arrive at unbiased treatment cost estimates.......Background: When estimating the cost of biological treatment many analyses rely on cross sectional data or standard consumption patterns indicated in the manufacturers' instruction leaflet. Unless such consumption patterns truly reflect routine clinical practice they may result in wrong assumptions...

  11. Illness uncertainty, partner caregiver burden and support, and relationship satisfaction in fibromyalgia and osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, John W; Olmsted, Maureen E; van Puymbroeck, Christina M

    2006-02-15

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterized by uncertainty in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. This study assessed the role of uncertainty of illness in relationship satisfaction in patients with FMS and osteoarthritis (OA). A total of 51 patients with FMS responded to self-report instruments assessing their uncertainty about their illness, functional ability, average pain, and relationship satisfaction. Their partners independently reported on their sense of caregiver burden and their supportiveness toward the patients. Thirty-two patients with OA and their partners served as a control group. Patients' functional ability and pain were related to partner caregiver burden. Partner caregiver burden was related to lower levels of partner supportiveness for the FMS dyads, but not for the OA dyads. Relationship satisfaction of patients with FMS was related to their higher levels of uncertainty of illness in interaction with their functional disability and pain and their partners' supportiveness. Under high levels of uncertainty of illness, low levels of partner supportiveness were related to lower patient relationship satisfaction, whereas low levels of uncertainty of illness were significant interacting variables in the OA sample. The results suggest that uncertainty of illness is a prominent feature affecting patients with FMS in their relationships with their partners. Suggestions for additional research to explore the role of uncertainty of illness in social relationships are presented, and the therapeutic implications for patient/partner relationships are explored.

  12. Effectiveness of Different Pain Control Methods in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis after Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lain Ming

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with knee osteoarthritis has increased in tandem with population aging. Consequently, the number of knee arthroplasties has also risen. The postoperative pain is the biggest challenge faced by patients soon after knee arthroplasty; therefore, this study is among different methods for post-knee arthroplasty pain control. A prospective longitudinal research design was employed; 177 adult patients who proposed for primary knee arthroplasty were enrolled and recruited. The patients were divided into conventional Group 1 (n=120 and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA Group 2 (n=57 according to the treatment methods they received. All patients experience the highest pain level on the day of their surgery; women complained of higher pain levels than men did, while the PCA group had lower postoperative pain. Meanwhile, patients with general anesthesia experienced more pain than those with spinal anesthesia in postoperative period. Patients with a higher postoperative pain index have a smaller optimal knee flexion angle. The PCA group had lower postoperative pain; all patients experienced the highest pain level on the day of their surgery. The results of this study could serve as a reference for nurses where PCA ensures a better postoperative pain control and therefore facilitates recovery and improves the quality of nursing.

  13. Scintigraphic, radiological and clinical results after /sup 224/Ra therapy in patients with Bechterew's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redecker, S.; Crone-Muenzebrock, W.; Weh, L.; Montz, R. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1982-04-01

    53 patients with ancylosing spondylitis (clinical stages II and III) were treated with 1 MBq Ra 224 over a period of ten weeks. In 44 patients the orthopaedic findings were improved, in 9 patients they remained unchanged. An iridocyclitis developed in 3 patients, in 1 case an uveitis could be observed 33 patients were reexamined clinically, radiologically including total body scan and by laboratory means after an average period of 7.1 years. The stiftness of the spine was slightly improved compared with the pre-therapeutical status. Radiologically the spine findings were unchanged in 7 patients, progradient in 16, and clearly deteriorated in 8 cases. Scintiscanning of the skeleton of 21 patients showed a normal activity in 6 patients, 8 patients had a slight increase of the activity, mainly in the sacroiliac region 7 patients revealed a highly increased activity in the sacro-iliac region and lumbovertebral spine. Differential blood count and electrophoresis were unchanged before and after therapy. In 60% of the cases the erythrocyte sedimentation rate was diminished compared with pretherapy findings, in 40% the rate was unchanged or increased. Subjectively 10% of the patients reported no pain symptoms, 50% felt better, 30% were unchanged and 10% felt more poorly than before.

  14. Modulation of Physical Activity to Optimize Pain Sensation following an Intra-Articular Corticosteroid Injection in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoann Dessery

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Intra-articular corticosteroid injection is often used to relieve pain caused by knee osteoarthritis. This study aims to assess the impact after an intra-articular corticosteroid injection treatment on objective and subjective measurement of physical function in knee osteoarthritis patients. Methods. Fourteen patients with unilateral knee osteoarthritis participated in this open-label uncontrolled trial. The intra-articular corticosteroid injection was given at the end of the second week. Physical activity was objectively measured by an accelerometer worn by the participants for eight weeks. Symptoms, quality of life and spatiotemporal parameters of gait were assessed every two weeks. Results. From the injection until six weeks later, pain and stiffness were reduced by approximately 60%. Patients’ daily physical activity time was significantly improved after injection: participation in light and moderate physical activities increased during four and two weeks, respectively. Conclusions. The beneficial effects after the intra-articular corticosteroid injection are visible in the duration and intensity of the knee osteoarthritis patients’ daily physical activity. However, these effects declined gradually two weeks after injection. Modulating the intensity and duration of physical activity would allow patients to optimize pain sensation over a longer period following an intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Trial Registration. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials: NCT02049879.

  15. Kinesio Taping Improves Perceptions of Pain and Function of Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis. A Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahlf, Anna Lina; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Zech, Astrid

    2018-02-21

    Although increasingly used for therapeutic treatment only limited evidence exists regarding the effects of kinesio taping on patients with knee osteoarthritis. To determine the effects of kinesio taping on pain, function, gait and neuromuscular control concerning patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Randomized sham-controlled trial. University laboratory. 141 Patients (65.1±7.0 years) with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Kinesio tape, sham tape or no tape for 3 consecutive days. Self-reported pain, stiffness and function were measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC). Further tests included the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS-Test), 10-m Walk Test (10MWT), the maximum voluntary isometric contraction force (MVIC) of the quadriceps femoris and knee active range of motion (active ROM). At baseline, there were no differences in all outcomes between groups except for knee flexion. Significant effects were found for WOMAC pain (tape vs. sham p=0.053; tape vs. control p=0.047), stiffness (tape vs. sham p=0.012; tape vs. control p≤0.001) and physical function (tape vs. sham p=0.034; tape vs. control p=0.004). No interactions were found for balance, muscle strength, walking speed or active ROM. Wearing kinesio tape for three consecutive days had beneficial effects regarding self-reported clinical outcomes of pain, joint stiffness and function. This emphasizes that kinesio taping might be an adequate conservative treatment for the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis.

  16. Sensory-motor training versus resistance training among patients with knee osteoarthritis: randomized single-blind controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Bassoli Gomiero

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis of the knee is defined as a progressive disease of the synovial joints and is characterized by failure of joint damage repair. The objective here was to compare the effectiveness of sensory-motor training versus resistance training among patients with knee osteoarthritis. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized, single-blinded controlled trial conducted at the outpatient service of the University of Santo Amaro. METHODS: A total of 64 patients were randomly assigned to sensory-motor training or resistance training. The evaluations were performed at baseline and 16 weeks after the intervention and included pain evaluation on a visual analogue scale, isometric quadriceps femoris force measurement using a dynamometer, Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti balance scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index, and the SF-36 quality-of-life questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using analysis of variance with repeated measurements and Cohen’s effect size. RESULTS: Sensory-motor training may be a plausible alternative and showed a small effect on pain and a medium effect on maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Resistance training showed a small effect on balance and a medium effect on mobility. CONCLUSION: Resistance training and sensory motor training for the lower limbs among patients with knee osteoarthritis seemed to present similar effects on pain and function. However, because there was a considerable risk of type 2 error, further randomized clinical trials are still needed to provide a sound conclusion.

  17. Muscle strength, gait, and balance in 20 patients with hip osteoarthritis followed for 2 years after THA

    OpenAIRE

    Rasch, Anton; Dal?n, Nils; Berg, Hans E

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) have muscular weakness, impaired balance, and limp. Deficits in the different limb muscles and their recovery courses are largely unknown, however. We hypothesized that there is persisting muscular weakness in lower limb muscles and an impaired balance and gait 2 years after THA. Patients and methods 20 elderly patients with unilateral OA were assessed before, and 6 and 24 months after surgery for maximal voluntary isometric strength of hip and...

  18. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization as a Treatment for Medial Knee Pain in Patients with Mild to Moderate Osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Yuji, E-mail: how-lowlow@yahoo.co.jp [Edogawa Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Japan); Korchi, Amine Mohamed, E-mail: amine.korchi@gmail.com [Geneva University Hospitals, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Shinjo, Takuma, E-mail: shin.takuma@a7.keio.jp [Keio University, Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, School of Medicine (Japan); Kato, Shojiro, E-mail: shojiro7@yahoo.co.jp [Edogawa Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeOsteoarthritis is a common cause of pain and disability. Mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis that is resistant to nonsurgical options and not severe enough to warrant joint replacement represents a challenge in its management. On the basis of the hypothesis that neovessels and accompanying nerves are possible sources of pain, previous work demonstrated that transcatheter arterial embolization for chronic painful conditions resulted in excellent pain relief. We hypothesized that transcatheter arterial embolization can relieve pain associated with knee osteoarthritis.MethodsTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis using imipenem/cilastatin sodium or 75 μm calibrated Embozene microspheres as an embolic agent has been performed in 11 and three patients, respectively. We assessed adverse events and changes in Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores.ResultsAbnormal neovessels were identified within soft tissue surrounding knee joint in all cases by arteriography. No major adverse events were related to the procedures. Transcatheter arterial embolization rapidly improved WOMAC pain scores from 12.2 ± 1.9 to 3.3 ± 2.1 at 1 month after the procedure, with further improvement at 4 months (1.7 ± 2.2) and WOMAC total scores from 47.3 ± 5.8 to 11.6 ± 5.4 at 1 month, and to 6.3 ± 6.0 at 4 months. These improvements were maintained in most cases at the final follow-up examination at a mean of 12 ± 5 months (range 4–19 months).ConclusionTranscatheter arterial embolization for mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis was feasible, rapidly relieved resistant pain, and restored knee function.

  19. Wrist osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulan, J; Marteau, E; Bacle, G

    2015-02-01

    Painful wrist osteoarthritis can result in major functional impairment. Most cases are related to posttraumatic sequel, metabolic arthropathies, or inflammatory joint disease, although wrist osteoarthritis occurs as an idiopathic condition in a small minority of cases. Surgery is indicated only when conservative treatment fails. The main objective is to ensure pain relief while restoring strength. Motion-preserving procedures are usually preferred, although residual wrist mobility is not crucial to good function. The vast array of available surgical techniques includes excisional arthroplasty, limited and total fusion, total wrist denervation, partial and total arthroplasty, and rib-cartilage graft implantation. Surgical decisions rest on the cause and extent of the degenerative wrist lesions, degree of residual mobility, and patient's wishes and functional demand. Proximal row carpectomy and four-corner fusion with scaphoid bone excision are the most widely used surgical procedures for stage II wrist osteoarthritis secondary to scapho-lunate advanced collapse (SLAC) or scaphoid non-union advanced collapse (SNAC) wrist. Proximal row carpectomy is not indicated in patients with stage III disease. Total wrist denervation is a satisfactory treatment option in patients of any age who have good range of motion and low functional demands; furthermore, the low morbidity associated with this procedure makes it a good option for elderly patients regardless of their range of motion. Total wrist fusion can be used not only as a revision procedure, but also as the primary surgical treatment in heavy manual labourers with wrist stiffness or generalised wrist-joint involvement. The role for pyrocarbon implants, rib-cartilage graft implantation, and total wrist arthroplasty remains to be determined, given the short follow-ups in available studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The concept of physical limitations in knee osteoarthritis: as viewed by patients and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokker, Louise; Osborne, Richard; Wæhrens, Eva E; Norgaard, Ole; Bandak, Elisabeth; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2015-10-01

    To comprehensively identify components of the physical limitation concept in knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to rate the clinical importance of these using perspectives of both patients and health professionals. Concept mapping, a structured group process, was used to identify and organize data in focus groups (patients) and via a global web-based survey (professionals). Ideas were elicited through a nominal group technique and then organized using multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, participant validation, rating of clinical importance, and thematic analyses to generate a conceptual model of physical limitations in knee OA. Fifteen Danish patients and 200 international professionals contributed to generating the conceptual model. Five clusters emerged: 'Limitations/physical deficits'; 'Everyday hurdles'; 'You're not the person you used to be'; 'Need to adjust way of living'; and 'External limitations,' each with sub-clusters. Patients generally found their limitations more important than the professionals did. Patients and professionals agreed largely on the physical limitation concept in knee OA. Some limitations of high importance to patients were lower rated by the professionals, highlighting the importance of including patients when conceptualizing patient outcomes. These data offer new knowledge to guide selection of clinically relevant outcomes and development of outcome measures in knee OA.

  1. Pain profiling of patients with temporomandibular joint arthralgia and osteoarthritis diagnosed with different imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Simple Futarmal; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Hansen, Lars Bolvig; Bang, Niels; Sørensen, Leif Hovgaard; Eskildsen, Helle Wulf; Svensson, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Clinical differentiation between pain mechanisms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia and osteoarthritis (OA) is challenging. The aims were to compare somatosensory function at the TMJs and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) effects between TMJ arthralgia and OA patients diagnosed clinically and based on different imaging techniques and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 41). Patients (n = 58) underwent standard clinical examination and three different TMJ imaging modalities. After each examination, they were classified into arthralgia or OA based on the findings. TMJ region somatosensory testing was performed in all participants. Z-scores were calculated for patients based on healthy reference data. CPM was tested by comparing pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at TMJ and thenar (control) before, during and after the application of painful and nonpainful cold stimuli. Data were analyzed using analyses of variance. Somatosensory abnormalities were commonly detected in both patient groups. Assessment of somatosensory function at the TMJ revealed that arthralgia patients were less sensitive to warmth, cold and tactile stimuli than OA patients (P painful cold application in all groups (P Pain profiles including somatosensory function differed between TMJ arthralgia and OA patients although CPM effects were similar in patients and controls. Thus, different TMJ pain conditions may share common pain mechanisms but the present study for the first time also indicated that differential pain mechanisms could be involved.

  2. Chiropractic care of a 70-year-old female patient with hip osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Richard G.; Hanses, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the response to chiropractic care of a geriatric patient with left hip pain, a history of repetitive falls, poor balance, myofascial dysfunction, and hip osteoarthritis. Clinical Features A 70-year-old, white, female patient presented for chiropractic care with a chief complaint of left hip pain of 1 year's duration and a history of 2 falls within the past 5 years. The patient's initial Lower Extremity Functional Index score was 42%. Important initial examination findings include a body mass index of 45.0, a One Leg Standing Test of 4 seconds, a Timed Up and Go test of 17 seconds, decreased active range of motion findings, and degenerative radiological findings of the left hip joint. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic treatment primarily consisted of hip and spinal manipulation, mobilization, and passive stretching. The patient was seen 16 times over a 12-week period. After 12 weeks of care, the patient had a significant decrease on the Lower Extremity Functional Index and had demonstrated improvements in left hip internal rotation and in Timed Up and Go and One Leg Standing Test times. The Patient Global Impression of Change scale indicated that the patient was “very much better.” Conclusion This case illustrates a patient who had increased range of motion, improved balance and gait speed, and decreased disability after a 12-week course of chiropractic care. PMID:22027209

  3. Development of a brief multidisciplinary education programme for patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moe Rikke H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a prevalent progressive musculoskeletal disorder, leading to pain and disability. Patient information and education are considered core elements in treatment guidelines for OA; however, there is to our knowledge no evidence-based recommendation on the best approach, content or length on educational programmes in OA. Objective: to develop a brief, patient oriented disease specific multidisciplinary education programme (MEP to enhance self-management in patients with OA. Method Twelve persons (80% female mean age 59 years diagnosed with hand, hip or knee OA participated in focus group interviews. In the first focus group, six participants were interviewed about their educational needs, attitudes and expectations for the MEP. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and thereafter condensed. Based on results from focus group interviews, current research evidence, clinical knowledge and patients' experience, a multidisciplinary OA team (dietist, nurse, occupational therapist, pharmacist, physical therapist and rheumatologist and a patient representative developed a pilot-MEP after having attended a work-shop in health pedagogics. Finally, the pilot-MEP was evaluated by a second focus group consisting of four members from the first focus group and six other experienced patients, before final adjustments were made. Results The focus group interviews revealed four important themes: what is OA, treatment options, barriers and coping strategies in performing daily activities, and how to live with osteoarthritis. Identified gaps between patient expectations and experience with the pilot-programme were discussed and adapted into a final MEP. The final MEP was developed as a 3.5 hour educational programme provided in groups of 6-9 patients. All members from the multidisciplinary team are involved in the education programme, including a facilitator who during the provision of the programme ensures that the individual

  4. Use of Condition-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Clinical Trials among Patients with Wrist Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. McPhail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This paper aimed to identify condition-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in clinical trials among people with wrist osteoarthritis and summarise empirical peer-reviewed evidence supporting their reliability, validity, and responsiveness to change. Methods. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials among people with wrist osteoarthritis was undertaken. Studies reporting reliability, validity, or responsiveness were identified using a systematic reverse citation trail audit procedure. Psychometric properties of the instruments were examined against predefined criteria and summarised. Results. Thirteen clinical trials met inclusion criteria. The most common patient-reported outcome was the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand questionnaire (DASH. The DASH, the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ, the Patient Evaluation Measure (PEM, and the Patient-Reported Wrist Evaluation (PRWE had evidence supporting their reliability, validity, and responsiveness. A post-hoc review of excluded studies revealed the AUSCAN Osteoarthritis Hand Index as another suitable instrument that had favourable reliability, validity, and responsiveness. Conclusions. The DASH, MHQ, and AUSCAN Osteoarthritis Hand Index instruments were supported by the most favourable empirical evidence for validity, reliability, and responsiveness. The PEM and PRWE also had favourable empirical evidence reported for these elements. Further psychometric testing of these instruments among people with wrist osteoarthritis is warranted.

  5. Preoperative predictors for outcomes after total hip replacement in patients with osteoarthritis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Gademan, Maaike G J; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J

    2016-05-17

    This systematic review examines which patient related factors influence functional and clinical outcomes after total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). We performed a systematic review according to the PRISMA guidelines. We searched databases and trial registries for prospective studies including OA patients who underwent primary THA. Studies with preoperative measurements on predictors, with at least 1 year follow-up were included. Risk of bias and confounding was assessed for two domains: follow-up rate and looking at independent effects. Thirty-five studies were included (138,039 patients). Only nine studies (29 %) had low risk of bias for all domains thus suggesting an overall low quality of evidence. Studies were heterogeneous in the predictors tested and in the observed directions of the associations. Overall, preoperative function (13 studies (37 %), 2 with low risk of bias) and radiological OA (6 studies (17 %), 1 with low risk of bias) were predictors with the most consistent findings. Worse preoperative function and more severe radiological OA were associated with larger postoperative improvement. However, these patients never reached the level of postoperative functioning as patients with better preoperative function or less severe radiological OA. For age, gender, comorbidity, pain and quality of life the results of studies were conflicting. For BMI, some studies (n = 5, 2 with low risk of bias) found worse outcomes for patients with higher BMI. However, substantial improvement was still achieved regardless of their BMI. There is not enough evidence to draw succinct conclusions on preoperative predictors for postoperative outcome in THA, as results of studies are conflicting and the methodological quality is low. Results suggest to focus on preoperative function and radiological osteoarthritis to decide when THA will be most effective. The present mapping of current evidence on the relationship between patient

  6. Patient preference and willingness to pay for knee osteoarthritis treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posnett J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available John Posnett,1 Sanjeev Dixit,2 Brooks Oppenheimer,2 Sven Kili,3 Nazanin Mehin4 1HERONTM Commercialization, PAREXEL® International, London, UK; 2Reason Research, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Sanofi Biosurgery, Oxford, UK; 4Sanofi, Paris, France Purpose: To review treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK received by patients across five European countries, and to obtain patients’ perceptions and willingness to pay for current treatments.Patients and methods: A prospective, internet-based, double-blind survey of adults with OAK was conducted in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. The questionnaire included questions about diagnosis, treatment history, and perceptions of OAK treatments, followed by a discrete choice-based conjoint exercise to identify preferred attributes of OAK treatments, evaluating 14 sets of four unbranded products.Results: Two thousand and seventy-three patients with self-reported OAK completed the survey; 17.4% of patients rated their knee pain as drastically affecting their ability to perform normal daily activities, and 39.3% of employed patients reported that they had lost work time because of OAK. The most common treatments were exercise (69.7%, physical therapy (68.2%, and nonprescription oral pain medication (73.9%. Treatments perceived as most effective were: viscosupplement injections (74.1%, narcotics (67.8%, and steroid injection (67.6%. Patient co-pay, duration of pain relief, and type of therapy exhibited the largest impact on patient preference for OAK treatments. The average patient was willing to pay €35 and €64 more in co-pay for steroid and viscosupplement injections, respectively, over the cost of oral over-the-counter painkillers (per treatment course, per knee (each P<0.05.Conclusion: OAK is a debilitating condition that affects normal daily activities. In general, treatments most commonly offered to patients are not those perceived as being the most effective. Patients are

  7. A study on indirect and intangible costs for patients with knee osteoarthritis in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Thumboo, Julian; Fong, Kok-Yong; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Yang, Kuang-Ying; Li, Shu-Chuen

    2008-03-01

    To estimate indirect costs through human capital approach and intangible costs through willingness-to-pay (WTP), and identify factors potentially affecting these costs in multiethnic Asian patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Data were collected through face-to-face interviews among knee OA patients. Human capital approach was used to estimate indirect costs by multiplying: 1) days of absence from work because of OA, with average earnings per capita per day for working patients; or 2) productivity loss with the market price of housekeeping for retirees/homemakers. A closed-ended iterative bidding contingent valuation method was used to elicit willingness-to-pay for a hypothetical cure of OA as a proxy for intangible costs. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis H-tests were performed in univariate analyzes, and linear regression in multivariate analyses. Indirect costs per year and intangible costs were estimated at US$1008 and US$1200, accounting for 2.8% and 3.3% of annual household income, respectively. The indirect costs were significantly higher for male or working patients, while intangible costs were higher for Chinese, working patients, with higher income, or worse global well-being. This study demonstrated that eliciting indirect costs through human capital approach and intangible costs through WTP are acceptable and feasible in Asian patients with knee OA. Besides the direct costs, the indirect and intangible costs for the OA patients could be substantial.

  8. Vitamin D status in patients with knee or hip osteoarthritis in a Mediterranean country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Thomais; Kouskoukis, Alexandros; Drosos, Georgios; Tselepis, Alexandros-Savvas; Ververidis, Athanasios; Valkanis, Christos; Zisimopoulos, Athanasios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in bone mineralization, remodeling, and maintenance and therefore its deficiency may be implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Vitamin D status was evaluated in patients with knee or hip OA scheduled for joint replacement. The impact of anthropometric parameters such as gender, age, and body mass index on vitamin D levels was also examined. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean country (Greece). We included 164 patients with knee or hip OA scheduled for joint replacement in this study. Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (vitamin D) were measured in routine blood samples taken from the patients at their pre-admission visit, a week before the operation, using radioimmunoassay. The majority of patients were vitamin D deficient (81.7 %); 15.2 % of them were vitamin D insufficient (hypovitaminosis). Only 3 % of patients were vitamin D sufficient. There was a significantly positive association between vitamin D levels and male gender. These findings indicate a large percentage of vitamin D deficient patients with knee or hip OA, which is unexpected considering the high annual insolation in northern Greece. Many other possible predisposing factors for OA should be taken into consideration. Whether treatment with vitamin D supplements may provide beneficial effects to these patients and the stage of disease in which this treatment should commence remains an issue for further scientific investigation. Level IV.

  9. Glucosamine but not iboprofen alters cartilage turnover in osteoarthritis patients in response to physical training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, S.G.; Saxne, T; Heinegard, D

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in levels of serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and urine c-telopeptide of type-2 collagen (CTX-II) as markers for cartilage turnover in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, in response to muscle strength training in combination...... (n=12) during 12 weeks of strength training of both legs with focus on the quadriceps muscle. Strength tests (5 repetition maximum), blood and urine sampling were performed before and after the training period. Serum COMP and urinary CTX-II were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA......). RESULTS: All three groups increased their muscle strength following 12 weeks of strength training (Ptraining period (P=0.012), whereas they did not change in the two other groups. Glucosamine reduced COMP statistically...

  10. Effect of weight maintenance on symptoms of knee osteoarthritis in obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Henriksen, Marius; Leeds, Anthony R

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare results of obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who, after an intensive weight loss regimen, received 1 year of either Dietary support (D), knee-Exercise program (E), or Control (C) "no attention". Methods Randomized, two-phase, parallel-group trial. 192 obese...... participants with knee OA were enrolled; mean age 62.5 y, 81% women with a mean entry weight of 103.2 kg. In phase-1, all participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups and began a dietary regimen of 400-810 and 1250 kcal/d for 8+8 weeks to achieve a major weight loss. Phase-2: 52 weeks maintenance......%), 26 (41%), and 33 (52%) participants responded to treatment, in D, E, and C groups, respectively; with no statistically significant difference in the number of responders (P=.41). Conclusion A significant weight reduction with a 1-year maintenance program improves knee OA symptoms irrespective...

  11. Clinical significance and implications of genetic and genomic studies in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muoh O

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ogechi Muoh,1 Charles J Malemud,1,2 Ali D Askari1 1Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatic Diseases, 2Department of Anatomy, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, USA Abstract: Idiopathic or primary osteoarthritis is a progressive musculoskeletal disease of diarthrodial synovial joints, whereas secondary osteoarthritis generally arises from an antecedent traumatic injury or abnormal synovial joint development. Presently, the medical therapy of osteoarthritis is limited, and focuses on alleviating the major clinical symptoms of osteoarthritis, which include pain, swelling, and reduced range of joint motion. The end-stage of the osteoarthritic process often requires joint replacement surgery. Although the pathogenetic components of human osteoarthritis remain to be completely elucidated, rodent and canine models of osteoarthritis have indicated that, at least in the early stages of development, osteoarthritis involves articular chondrocyte hypermetabolism, followed by an imbalance between chondrocyte anabolic and catabolic pathways, and limited cartilage repair. Mutations arising in several cartilage collagen isoforms, the proteoglycans aggrecan and asporin, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, and matrilin-3 can be associated with precocious and age-related osteoarthritis, as well as chondrodysplasias. Whole genome scanning of blood cells from individuals with osteoarthritis in Iceland, the United Kingdom, and the United States indicated the strong likelihood of osteoarthritis gene susceptibility loci on chromosome regions, 7q34–7q36.3, 11p12–11q13.4, 6p21.1–6q15, 2q31.1–2q34, and 15q21.3–15q26.1. Genetic analyses of non-extracellular matrix proteins have suggested an association of osteoarthritis with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes encoding growth and differentiation factor-5, secreted Frizzle-related protein-3, deiodinase-2, and calmodulin

  12. Synovial deposition of wild-type transthyretin-derived amyloid in knee joint osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanashi, Tetsuo; Matsuda, Masayuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Yamazaki, Hideshi; Nawata, Masashi; Katagiri, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2013-09-01

    To investigate histological features of deposited amyloid in the synovial tissue and its clinical significance in knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) patients. We prospectively enrolled 232 consecutive patients who underwent arthroplasty or total replacement of the knee joint for treatment of OA. Congo red staining and immunohistochemistry were performed in the synovial tissue obtained at surgery. When transthyretin (TTR)-derived amyloid was positive, we analyzed all 4 exons of the TTR gene using the direct DNA sequencing method in order to detect mutations. We analyzed 322 specimens in this study. Twenty-six specimens (8.1%) obtained from 21 patients (5 men and 16 women; mean, 79.0 ± 4.6 years) showed deposition of amyloid, which was positively stained with the anti-TTR antibody. Eighteen patients showed inhomogeneous accumulations of amyloid in the loose connective tissue under the synovial epithelia sometimes with nodule formation, while in the remaining three, small vessels in the adipose tissue were involved. Medical records of these patients revealed nothing remarkable in the clinical course, laboratory data or macroscopic intraarticular findings at surgery. No mutations were detectable in the TTR gene analysis. Wild-type TTR-derived amyloid may affect the synovial tissue as a result of long-term mechanical stress or as a part of senile systemic amyloidosis in approximately 8% of knee joint OA patients. No obvious clinical significance was found in synovial deposition of amyloid.

  13. Use of NSAIDs for osteoarthritis amongst older-aged primary care patients: engagement with information and perceptions of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milder, Tamara Y; Williams, Kenneth M; Ritchie, Jan E; Lipworth, Wendy L; Day, Richard O

    2011-03-01

    non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used commonly to treat osteoarthritis in older patients. to explore the understandings of risk that older-aged primary care patients have in the context of the use of oral NSAIDs to treat osteoarthritis. semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 patients who were recruited from four general practices located in Sydney, Australia. Patients were aged at least 65 years and were currently taking, or in the past 2 years had taken, an NSAID for osteoarthritis. Emergent themes were identified from the transcripts and were compared within and across transcripts to develop more abstract concepts. patients demonstrated three key 'modes of disengagement' from medication-specific risk information, each of which could also be a mode of modulating a sense of danger and each of which would demand a unique clinical response. These were: 'transference of responsibility'-transferring the responsibility to their GP, 'general versus specific risk'-considering the risk of taking medicine in general as opposed to the specific risk of taking an NSAID, and 'personal immunity'-some patients with a long history of NSAID use without apparent toxicity believed they were, therefore, not at risk of future adverse effects, while a few patients believed they were immune to adverse effects of drugs in general. there is a need for greater recognition of these 'modes of disengagement'/'hazard modulation' in order to attain a clinical response leading to safer, more effective and more ethical use of medicines.

  14. Long-Term Effect of Exercise Therapy and Patient Education on Impairments and Activity Limitations in People With Hip Osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svege, Ida; Fernandes, L.; Nordsletten, L

    2016-01-01

    Background. The effect of exercise on specific impairments and activity limitations in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA) is limited. Objective. The study objective was to evaluate the long-term effect of exercise therapy and patient education on range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, physical ...... results for ROM, muscle strength, physical fitness, and walking capacity, but exercise in addition to patient education resulted in less pain during walking in the long term. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association....

  15. Relationship between Physical Impairments and Movement Patterns During Gait in Patients With End-stage Hip Osteoarthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Zeni, Joseph; POZZI, FEDERICO; Abujaber, Sumayah; Miller, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Patients with hip osteoarthritis demonstrate limited range of motion, muscle weakness and altered biomechanics; however, few studies have evaluated the relationships between physical impairments and movement asymmetries. The purpose of this study was to identify the physical impairments related to movement abnormalities in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. We hypothesized that muscle weakness and pain would be related to greater movement asymmetries. Fifty-six subjects who were awaiti...

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total hip replacement: a cause for concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawabi, D H; Chin, K F; Keen, R W; Haddad, F S

    2010-04-01

    We measured the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D(3) (25(OH)D(3)) levels in 62 consecutive Caucasian patients undergoing total hip replacement for osteoarthritis. The patients were divided into two groups based on whether they were vitamin D sufficient or deficient. The groups were matched for age, gender and the American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) grade. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in our patients was comparable with recent population-based studies performed in the United Kingdom. Patients with vitamin D deficiency had lower pre-operative Harris hip scores (Mann-Whitney test, p = 0.018) and were significantly less likely to attain an excellent outcome from total hip replacement (chi-squared test, p = 0.038). Vitamin D levels were found to positively correlate with both pre- and post-operative Harris hip scores. These results warrant further study of vitamin D deficiency in patients undergoing joint replacement as it is a risk factor for a suboptimal outcome which is relatively simple and cheap to correct.

  17. Muscle contributions to knee extension in the early stance phase in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogaya, Shinya; Kubota, Ryo; Chujo, Yuta; Hirooka, Eiko; Kwang-Ho, Kim; Hase, Kimitaka

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze individual muscle contributions to knee angular acceleration using a musculoskeletal simulation analysis and evaluate knee extension mechanics in the early stance phase in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). The subjects comprised 15 patients with medial knee OA and 14 healthy elderly individuals. All participants underwent gait performance test using 8 infrared cameras and two force plates to measure the kinetic and kinematic data. The simulation was driven by 92 Hill-type muscle-tendon units of the lower extremities and a trunk with 23° of freedom. We analyzed each muscle contribution to knee angular acceleration in the 5%-15% and 15%-25% periods of the stance phase (% SP) using an induced acceleration analysis. We compared accelerations by individual muscles between the two groups using an analysis of covariance for controlling gait speed. Patients with knee OA had a significantly lesser knee extension acceleration by the vasti muscles and higher knee acceleration by hip adductors than those in controls in 5-15% SP. In addition, knee OA resulted in significantly lesser knee extension acceleration by the vasti muscles in 15-25% SP. These results indicate that patients with knee OA have decreased dependency on the vasti muscles to control knee movements during early stance phase. Hip adductor muscles, which mainly control mediolateral motion, partly compensate for the weak knee extension by the vasti muscles in patients with knee OA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Corticospinal and intracortical excitability of the quadriceps in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelson, Andrew J; Thomas, Abbey C; Kluger, Benzi M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2014-12-01

    Deficits in voluntary activation of the quadriceps muscle are characteristic of knee osteoarthritis (OA), contributing to the quadriceps weakness that is also a hallmark of the disease. The mechanisms underlying this central activation deficit (CAD) are unknown, although cortical mechanisms may be involved. Here, we utilize transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal and intracortical excitability in patients with knee OA and in a comparably aged group of healthy older adults, to quantify group differences, and to examine associations between TMS measures and pain, quadriceps strength, and CAD. Seventeen patients with knee OA and 20 healthy controls completed testing. Motor evoked potentials were measured at the quadriceps by superficial electromyographic recordings. Corticospinal excitability was assessed by measuring resting motor threshold (RMT) to TMS stimulation of the quadriceps representation at primary motor cortex, and intracortical excitability was assessed via paired-pulse paradigms for short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF). No statistically significant differences between patients with knee OA and healthy controls were found for RMT, SICI or ICF measures (p > 0.05). For patients with knee OA, there were significant associations observed between pain and RMT, as well as between pain and ICF. No associations were observed between CAD and measures of corticospinal or intracortical excitability. These data suggest against direct involvement of corticospinal or intracortical pathways within primary motor cortex in the mechanisms of CAD. However, pain is implicated in the neural mechanisms of quadriceps motor control in patients with knee OA.

  19. [Effect of Chinese massage (Tui Na) on isokinetic muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingguang; Li, Jianhua; Fang, Min; Gong, Li; Sun, Wuquan; Zhou, Nan

    2016-06-01

    Chinese massage (Tui Na) is one of the most popular Traditional Chinese Medicine remedies for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Several studies have subjectively evaluated the effect of Chinese massage on knee OA through self-assessment questionnaires; however, very few studies have objectively assessed the effect by measuring knee muscle strength. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of Chinese massage in improving knee extensor and flexor muscle strength in patients with knee OA. Thirty patients with knee OA received Chinese massage therapy three times per week for 2 weeks. Patients completed pre- and post-treatment Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain questionnaires, and pre- and post-treatment knee muscle strength was evaluated using the Biodex Multi-Joint System 3. Isokinetic muscle strength measurements were performed at 60 degrees/s and 180 degrees/s. The peak torque (PT), peak torque/body weight(PT/BW), total work (TW), average power (AP), hamstring/quadriceps (H/Q), and range of motion (ROM) values were recorded separately for flexors and extensors. Chinese massage therapy significantly improved knee pain as assessed by the VAS in patients with knee OA (P massage therapy decreased pain and may improve extensor muscle strength in patients with knee OA, but does not appear to improve ROM.

  20. Metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courties, Alice; Sellam, Jérémie; Berenbaum, Francis

    2017-03-01

    Interest in the metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis phenotype is increasing. Here, we summarize recently published significant findings. Meta-analyses confirmed an association between type 2 diabetes and osteoarthritis and between cardiovascular diseases and osteoarthritis. Recent advances in the study of metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis have focused on a better understanding of the role of metabolic diseases in inducing or aggravating joint damage. In-vivo models of obesity, diabetes, or dyslipidemia have helped to better decipher this association. They give emerging evidence that, beyond the role of common pathogenic mechanisms for metabolic diseases and osteoarthritis (i.e., low-grade inflammation and oxidative stress), metabolic diseases have a direct systemic effect on joints. In addition to the impact of weight, obesity-associated inflammation is associated with osteoarthritis severity and may modulate osteoarthritis progression in mouse models. As well, osteoarthritis synovium from type 2 diabetic patients shows insulin-resistant features, which may participate in joint catabolism. Finally, exciting data are emerging on the association of gut microbiota and circadian rhythm and metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis. The systemic role of metabolic syndrome in osteoarthritis pathophysiology is now better understood, but new avenues of research are being pursued to better decipher the metabolic syndrome-associated osteoarthritis phenotype.

  1. Long-term results of an unloader brace in patients with unicompartmental knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Becky; Rankin, Heather; Barnes, C Lowry

    2011-08-08

    Previously, we reported a prospective study of 30 patients with unicompartmental osteoarthritis of the knee treated nonoperatively with an unloader brace and average follow-up of 2.7 years. Although the initial study suggested short-term benefit according to pain and function measures, the objective of the current study was to evaluate these same patients via telephone questionnaire to determine the status of their brace use and any surgical procedures on the affected limb. Because we noted that even at 2.7 years, some patients opted for surgical management despite good response to bracing, our hypothesis was that these patients would not opt for long-term brace wear. Twenty-four of 30 patients were available for reporting based on telephone interview; in addition, we talked with family members of 5 patients who had died. When evaluated at 2.7 years, 41% of the 30 patients were still using the brace, 35% had discontinued brace use, and 24% had undergone arthroplasty. When contacted for the follow-up survey at an average of 11.2 years, 17 (58.6%) of the 29 patients had undergone arthroplasty. The mean interval between initial evaluation and arthroplasty was 3.9 years. In addition, 7 patients had undergone arthroscopic surgery. Importantly, none of the patients were still wearing the brace. The use of an unloader brace is effective in providing short-term pain relief and improved function; however, most patients subsequently opt for total knee replacement on the symptomatic knee. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Identification of a HERV-K env surface peptide highly recognized in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) patients: a cross-sectional case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, G; Erre, G L; Caggiu, E; Mura, S; Cossu, D; Bo, M; Cadoni, M L; Piras, A; Mundula, N; Colombo, E; Buscetta, G; Passiu, G; Sechi, L A

    2017-07-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (HERV) are believed to be pathogenic in several autoimmune diseases. Among them, HERV-K viruses have been reported recently to be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study we have explored the role of humoral immune response against HERV-K as a potential pathogenetic mechanism in RA. Four different peptides from the extracellular portion of the env protein of HERV-K (env-su19-37 , env-su109-126 , env-su164-186 , env-su209-226 ) were selected by bioinformatic analysis on the basis of their putative immunogenicity. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was then carried out to quantify antibodies against those peptides on blood samples of 70 consecutive RA patients and 71 healthy controls (HC). Differences between the two groups were analysed using the Mann-Whitney test. Potential correlations between RA laboratory, clinical descriptors and immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels were explored by bivariate regression analysis. Serum autoantibodies against one of four tested peptides of HERV-K (env-su19-37 ) were significantly higher in RA than in HC (19 versus 3%, P = 0·0025). Subgroup analysis showed no association between anti-HERV-K peptide humoral response and clinical, serological and clinimetric RA disease descriptors. Serum from RA patients in our series reacted significantly against HERV-K env-su19-37 peptide in comparison to the general population suggesting a role for the HERV-K- related, secondary antigenic-driven immune response in the pathogenesis of RA. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to explore the role of this HERV-K surface peptide as a potential therapeutic target. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  3. Increased CD45RA+ FoxP3(low regulatory T cells with impaired suppressive function in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujun Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Treg in the control of the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE has not been well defined. Therefore, we dissect the phenotypically heterogeneous CD4(+FoxP3(+ T cells into subpopulations during the dynamic SLE development. METHODLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate the proliferative and suppressive capacities of different CD4(+ T cell subgroups between active SLE patients and healthy donors, we employed CD45RA and CD25 as surface markers and carboxyfluorescein diacetatesuccinimidyl ester (CFSE dilution assay. In addition, multiplex cytokines expression in active SLE patients was assessed using Luminex assay. Here, we showed a significant increase in the frequency of CD45RA(+FoxP3(low naive Treg cells (nTreg cells and CD45RA(-FoxP3(low (non-Treg cells in patients with active SLE. In active SLE patients, the increased proportions of CD45RA(+FoxP3(low nTreg cells were positively correlated with the disease based on SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI and the status of serum anti-dsDNA antibodies. We found that the surface marker combination of CD25(+CD45RA(+ can be used to defined CD45RA(+FoxP3(low nTreg cells for functional assays, wherein nTreg cells from active SLE patients demonstrated defective suppression function. A significant correlation was observed between inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-12 and TNFα, and the frequency of nTreg cells. Furthermore, the CD45RA(+FoxP3(low nTreg cell subset increased when cultured with SLE serum compared to healthy donor serum, suggesting that the elevated inflammatory cytokines of SLE serum may promote nTreg cell proliferation/expansion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that impaired numbers of functional CD45RA(+FoxP3(low naive Treg cell and CD45RA(-FoxP3(low non-suppressive T cell subsets in inflammatory conditions may contribute to SLE development. Therefore, analysis of subsets of FoxP3(+ T cells, using a

  4. Efficacy of the Flinders chronic condition management program in obese patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis: A study rationale and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Sahafi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the relative efficacy of the Flinders chronic condition self-management program versus treatment as usual in obese patients with hip or knee osteoarthritis on a knee/hip joint replacement waiting list

  5. Poor psychological health status among patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases and osteoarthritis in multidisciplinary rehabilitation: need for a routine psychological assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriezekolk, J.; Eijsbouts, A.; Evers, A.W.M.; Stenger, A.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine psychological health status among patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases (i.e. rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis) and osteoarthritis in multidisciplinary rehabilitation, and to describe changes in psychological distress, illness

  6. Measuring the impact and distress of osteoarthritis from the patients' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conaghan Philip G

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To assess the internal construct validity of the Perceived Impact of Problem Profile (PIPP, a patient based outcome measure based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, which assesses impact and distress, in an osteoarthritis (OA cohort. Methods A questionnaire comprising the 23-item PIPP, which assesses five domains (mobility, participation, self care, psychological well being and relationships, the Western Ontario McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC, the General Well-Being Index (GWBI, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS was posted to people with clinician diagnosed OA. Assessment of the internal construct validity of the PIPP was undertaken using Rasch analysis performed with RUMM2020 software and concurrent validity through comparator measures. Results Two hundred and fifty-nine participants with OA responded. Analysis of the five individual domains of the PIPP indicated that there was good fit to the Rasch model, with high person separation reliability. One item required removal from the Mobility subscale and the Participation subscale. There were strong correlations between the PIPP Mobility scores and the WOMAC disability and pain subscales (rho = .73 and rho = .68, and between the PIPP Psychological well-being and HADS Depression (rho = .71 and GWBI (rho = -.69. High inter-correlations between the impact and distress subscales for each domain (range rho = .85 to .96, suggested redundancy of the latter. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the PIPP has good psychometric properties in an OA population. The PIPP, using just the impact subscales, provides a brief, reliable and valid means of assessing the impact of OA from the individual's perspective and operationalizing the bio-psychosocial model by the application of a single multi-domain questionnaire.

  7. Prostaglandin E2 role in inhibition of joint cartilage collagen destruction in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E V Chetina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 role in inhibition of articular cartilage collagen degradation in patients with osteoarthritis. Objective. To assess prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 role in inhibition of type II collagen digestion in explants of articular cartilage of pts with osteoarthritis (OA. Material and methods. Explants of articular cartilage of pts with OA were cultured with PGE2 1pg to 10 ng/ml. Type II collagen digestion was assessed with immuno-enzyme assay. Gene expression was evaluated with PCR in real time. Results. PGE2 10 pg/ml as well as transforming growth factor β2 (TGFβ2 suppressed type II collagen digestion in explants of articular cartilage of pts with OA. This concentration of PGE2 did not suppress proteoglycan (aggrecan degradation. Gene expression analysis in 5 OA pts showed that PGE2 10 pg/ml suppressed metallomonooxigenase (MMP-13, MMP-1 and marker of chondrocyte hypertrophy type X collagen (COL10A1 as well as proinflammatory cytokines interleukine (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα. Naproxen, nonselective cyclooxygenase(COX-2 and 1 inhibitor concentration from 5 to 30 mcg/ml blocked TGFβ2 induced collagen digestion inhibition proving that PGE2 mediate influence of this growth factor. Naproxen concentration 5 mcg/ml increased collagen degradation. Conclusion. The study showed that PGE2 is a chondroprotector because it is able to suppress selectively OA pts cartilage collagen degradation. Beside that cartilage chondrocyte hypertrophy in OA connected functionally with increased collagen digestion is also regulated by low concentrations of PGE2

  8. Factors associated with influenza and pneumococcal vaccine uptake among rheumatoid arthritis patients in Denmark invited to participate in a pneumococcal vaccine trial (Immunovax_RA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, MTT; Lindegaard, H.; Hendricks, O.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates predictors of influenza and pneumococcal vaccine coverage among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and explores possible differences according to type of RA therapy. Method: RA patients from two clinics in the region of Southern Denmark were informed about...... the survey during scheduled follow-up visits. The questionnaire included questions concerning previous influenza and pneumococcal vaccine uptake, attitudes about vaccination, and socio-demographic factors. Factors associated with recalled vaccine uptake were assessed by multivariate logistic regression......-rheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). Self-reported uptake of vaccination against seasonal influenza ever was 59% overall; 57% among patients receiving cDMARDs and 61% in patients receiving bDMARDs. Self-reported vaccine uptake against pneumococcal diseases was only 6% overall. Older age, educational level, and information...

  9. Pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Signe; Jørgensen, Peter Bo; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: During movement tasks, patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis use compensatory strategies to minimise the joint load of the affected leg. Movement strategies of the knees and trunk have been investigated, but less is known about movement strategies of the pelvis during...... advancing functional tasks, and how these strategies are associated with leg extension power. The aim of the study was to investigate pelvic movement strategies and leg extension power in patients with end-stage medial compartment knee osteoarthritis compared with controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 57...... patients (mean age 65.6 years) scheduled for medial uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty, and 29 age and gender matched controls were included in this cross-sectional study. Leg extension power was tested with the Nottingham Leg Extension Power-Rig. Pelvic range of motion was derived from an inertia...

  10. Elektra prosthesis for trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klahn, A; Nygaard, Mads; Gvozdenovic, R

    2012-01-01

    We present a prospective follow-up of 39 Elektra prostheses in 37 patients (32 women and five men), with a mean age of 56.5 (range 46-71) years; 34 patients had osteoarthritis and three had rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were followed using clinical examination, including measurement of pain...... be the key problem in treating trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis using a total prosthesis....

  11. Relationship between serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin and hyaluronan levels in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Kiyohito; Watari, Taiji; Obayashi, Osamu; Katsube, Sadanobu; Nagaoka, Isao; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2012-05-01

    Serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin (s-ucOC) is a marker for vitamin K metabolism (deficiency). The aim of this study was to investigate the serum levels of ucOC in patients with bilateral knee osteoarthritis (K-OA), and the correlation between ucOC and other biomarkers for K-OA. A total of 25 patients (22 women, 3 men, mean age 76.0±7.8, range 54-88 years, mean BMI 24.9±4.7) with a Kellgren-Lawrence grade of 3 or 4 for bilateral knee were enrolled in this study. The levels of s-ucOC and other biomarkers were measured. The levels of s-ucOC (5.66±4.70 ng/ml) as well as other cartilage metabolism markers, were elevated in the patients; however, bone metabolism markers were within the normal ranges. Of interest, there was a significant correlation between s-ucOC and serum hyaluronan (a marker for synovitis) (Pvitamin K metabolism may be associated with synovitis in patients with K-OA, and s-ucOC could be a biomarker for K-OA.

  12. Meriva®+Glucosamine versus Condroitin+Glucosamine in patients with knee osteoarthritis: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, G; Dugall, M; Luzzi, R; Ledda, A; Pellegrini, L; Cesarone, M R; Hosoi, M; Errichi, M

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a major cause of physical disability and impaired quality of life. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the most used treatment for OA, but they are frequently associated to adverse events. Alternative therapies are under investigation for the treatment of OA. Meriva® is a lecithin delivery form of curcumin, a powerful promoter of anti-oxidant response studied in a number of conditions related to chronic inflammation and pain. This 4-month observational study, conducted in a 'real-life' scenario, compares the association of Meriva and glucosamine (n=63) with chondroitin sulphate+glucosamine (n=61) in 124 patients with grade 1-2 OA of the knee. Patients treated with Meriva+glucosamine had significantly higher Karnofsky Index and WOMAC score (both in the physical and emotional domains), compared to those in the chondroitin+glucosamine group. Noteworthy, the walking distance at the treadmill test after 1 month was also significantly higher in the meriva+glucosamine group; this advantage was sustained until the end of the study. Although the need for concomitant drugs and medical attention decreased in both groups, this reduction was more evident for patients treated with Meriva+glucosamine. Taken together, the results of this study shows that the 4-month administration of the association of Meriva and glucosamine can result in a faster onset of action and improved outcomes than the administration of an association of chondroitin sulphate and glucosamine in patients with OA.

  13. Posture-cognition interaction during quiet standing in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negahban, Hossein; Karimi, Mehrnoosh; Goharpey, Shahin; Mehravar, Mohammad; Namnik, Neda

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of cognitive task (silent backward counting) on postural control in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) (n = 25) as compared with asymptomatic controls (n = 25). Static postural control during quiet standing was assessed under different conditions including: (1) rigid surface-open eyes; (2) rigid surface-closed eyes; (3) foam surface-open eyes; and (4) foam surface-closed eyes. Dependent variables were center of pressure (COP) parameters and cognitive score. The results of this study showed that for most COP parameters, the patients with knee OA had greater postural sway than asymptomatic control subjects. Moreover, while cognitive loading affects postural sway in dual-task compared to single-task conditions, the pattern of change was not different between the two groups. Cognitive loading caused decreased postural sway in both groups. Future studies should select patients with more disability, choose more attention demanding cognitive tasks, and expose the subjects to dynamic balance situations to further explore the effect of cognitive loading on postural performance in this specific patient population.

  14. Evaluation of patients' and physicians' expectations and attributes of osteoarthritis treatment using Kano methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Ampuero, J; Darder, A; Santillana, J; Caloto, M T; Nocea, G

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate expectations regarding osteoarthritis (OA) treatment of patients (PT) and physicians (PH) (Orthopedic Surgeons) in Spain. Multicenter, cross-sectional study in adult patients with OA with at least 1 year of disease progression and with at least one prescription of anti-inflammatory drugs within the last year. Sociodemographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics as well as patient-reported outcomes were obtained by phone interview. Using a treatment expectations questionnaire and applying Kano methodology, treatment attributes were classified as: must-be; one-directional; attractive; indifferent; reverse or questionable. A total of 965 adult patients with OA [mean age: 64 years (SD: 11); 75% women] and 383 PH [mean age: 47 years (SD: 10); 14% women] were surveyed. None of the treatment attributes showed a dominant "must-be" characteristic. The attributes that led to a greater dissatisfaction when absent were non-occurrence of long-term adverse effects, no discomfort upon administration, and achievement of symptoms relief. The two attributes that were considered most important by PT were as follows: achievement of both total disappearance of the symptoms and lasting symptom relief. Conversely, for PH, the two most important attributes were related to short- and long-term safety. A clear different perspective regarding treatment expectation was noted among PT (effectiveness) and PH (safety). Therefore, when selecting the most appropriate treatment for OA, PH should invite PT to participate in the decision making.

  15. Short-term effects of neurodynamic mobilization in 15 patients with secondary thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Silva, Guillermo B; Fernandez-Carnero, Josue

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether neurodynamic mobilization of the median nerve improves pressure pain threshold (PPT) and pinch and grip strength in patients with secondary thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (TCOA). Fifteen patients with secondary TCOA (13 women and 2 men) between 70 and 90 years old were received by neurodynamic therapy. All patients received median nerve mobilization of the dominant hand by sliding technique during 4 sessions over 2 weeks. The outcome measures of this case series were monitored by using PPT measured by algometry as PPT at the trapeziometacarpal (TM) joint, tubercle of the scaphoid bone, and the unciform apophysis of the hamate bone. Tip and tripod pinch strength was also measured. Grip strength was measured by a grip dynamometer. These variables were measured at pretreatment, 5 minutes posttreatment, 1 week (first follow-up [FU]) and 2 weeks after treatment (second FU). Pressure pain threshold in the TM joint was 3.54 ± 0.04 kg/cm(2). After treatment, it increased to 4.38 ± 0.04 kg/cm(2) (P mobilization decreased pain in the TM joint and increased grip strength in this group of patients with TCOA. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of meteorological elements on balance control and pain in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peultier, Laetitia; Lion, Alexis; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Loeuille, Damien; Zhang, Zheng; Rat, Anne-Christine; Gueguen, René; Paysant, Jean; Perrin, Philippe P.

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to determine if pain and balance control are related to meteorological modifications in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred and thirteen patients with knee OA (mean age = 65 ± 9 years old, 78 women) participated in this study. Static posturography was performed, sway area covered and sway path traveled by the center of foot pressure being recorded under six standing postural conditions that combine three visual situations (eyes open, eyes closed, vision altered) with two platform situations (firm and foam supports). Knee pain score was assessed using a visual analog scale. Balance control and pain measurements recorded in the morning were correlated with the meteorological data. Morning and daily values for temperature, precipitation, sunshine, height of rain in 1 h, wind speed, humidity, and atmospheric pressure were obtained from the nearest data collecting weather station. The relationship between postural control, pain, and weather variations were assessed for each patient on a given day with multiple linear regressions. A decrease of postural stability was observed when atmospheric pressure and maximum humidity decreased in the morning ( p knee pain was more enhanced when it is warmer in the morning ( p < 0.05) and when it is wetter and warmer within a day ( p < 0.05). The relationship between weather, pain, and postural control can help patients and health professionals to better manage daily activities.

  17. Intra-rater reliability and agreement of muscle strength, power and functional performance measures in patients with hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Theresa; Magnusson, S Peter; Kjaer, Michael; Beyer, Nina

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the reliability and agreement of measures of lower extremity muscle strength, power and functional performance in patients with hip osteoarthritis at different time intervals, and to compare these with the same measures in healthy peers. Intra-rater test-retest separated by 1, 2, or 2.5 weeks in patients, and 1 week in healthy peers. Patients with hip osteoarthritis (age range 61-83 years) with 1 (n = 37), 2 (n = 35), or 2.5 weeks (n = 15) between tests, and 35 healthy peers (age range 63-82 years). Maximal isometric hip and thigh strength, leg extensor power, and functional performance (8-foot Up & Go, stair climbing, chair stand and 6-min walk) were measured in patients, and quadriceps strength, leg extensor power and functional performance were measured in healthy peers. Systematic error, reliability and agreement were calculated. Most hip strength measurements for the most symptomatic extremity, and nearly all strength measurements for the least symptomatic lower extremity, declined after 1 week (p strength was unchanged. Regardless of the time interval, leg extensor power was unchanged, while functional performances improved at retest for all participants. In patients with hip osteoarthritis leg extensor power is unaffected by the time interval between tests, in contrast to muscle strength and functional performance.

  18. Does Kinesio Taping of the Knee Improve Pain and Functionality in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis?: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya Mutlu, Ebru; Mustafaoglu, Rustem; Birinci, Tansu; Razak Ozdincler, Arzu

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of Kinesio taping on the functionality, pain, range of motion (ROM), and muscle strength in patients with knee osteoarthritis compared with a placebo Kinesio tape (KT) application. Forty-two consecutive patients were randomized to a KT group and a placebo taping group. The assessments were performed at baseline, after the initial KT application, the third KT application, and 1 month later. The functional status of patients was evaluated using the Aggregated Locomotor Function score and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis scale. Pain level, muscle strength, and active ROM were measured using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), a handheld dynamometer, and digital goniometer, respectively. Patients receiving the KT application demonstrated large decrease in VAS activity and walking task scores compared with the placebo taping group from the initial taping application to after the third taping application (P = 0.009 and P Kinesio taping resulted in superior short-term effects on walking task, pain, and knee-flexion ROM compared with placebo taping in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  19. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Persian Version of the Oxford Knee Score in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hosein Ebrahimzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Oxford Knee Score (OKS is a short patient-reported outcome instrument that measures pain and physical activity related to knee osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate, construct validity and consistent reliability of the Persian version of the OKS. Methods: The case series consisted of 80 patients who were clinically diagnosed with having knee osteoarthritis. All patients were requested to fill-in the Persian OKS and Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36. Correlation analysis between the Persian versions of these two instruments was then carried out. The scores of the Persian SF-36 were used to evaluate convergent and divergent validity of the 12-item Persian OKS. Results: From a total of 80 patients, 63 were female (79% and the remaining 17 were male (21% with a mean age of 52.2 years. In the present study, high Cronbach’s alpha of 0.95 confirms excellent internal consistency of the Persian OKS scale similar to previous investigations. The results confirm that the Persian version of this instrument is valid and reliable, similar to its English index and its subsequent translations in different languages. Conclusion: The Persian OKS is a reliable instrument to evaluate knee function in patients with knee osteoarthritis and is a useful tool for outcome measurement in clinical research.

  20. New treatments for osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelter, Elizabeth; Hochberg, Marc C

    2013-05-01

    To review new data on pharmacologic treatment of osteoarthritis for the years 2011-2012. Duloxetine was approved for the treatment of chronic knee pain due to osteoarthritis and has been conditionally recommended by the American College of Rheumatology. Strontium ranelate was found to significantly decrease the rate of decline in joint space width as well as improve pain scores compared with placebo in a large multicenter study in patients with symptomatic knee osteoarthritis. Nerve growth factor (NGF) monoclonal antibody therapy has shown much promise with regard to improvement in pain; however, clinical development studies were stopped out of concern for adverse events in 2010. After a review by the Food and Drug Administration, this hold may be lifted and further studies may resume in 2013. The biologic agents interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and antitumor necrosis factor antibodies have not been shown to be efficacious nor to alter the course of osteoarthritis. Much research surrounding intra-articular injections of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has not produced clear evidence that this therapy is efficacious in osteoarthritis. There are presently studies using mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis. Duloxetine, strontium ranelate, and NGF antibodies are promising therapies for symptomatic osteoarthritis. At this time, MSCs and PRP require more investigation.

  1. Varus-valgus motion and functional ability in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Esch, M; Steultjens, M; Harlaar, J; Wolterbeek, N; Knol, D; Dekker, J

    2008-04-01

    To assess the relationship between knee varus-valgus motion and functional ability, and the impact of knee varus-valgus motion on the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Sixty-three patients with knee OA were tested. Varus-valgus motion was assessed by optoelectronic recording and three-dimensional motion analysis. Functional ability was assessed by observation, using a 100 m walking test, a Get Up and Go test, and WOMAC questionnaire. Muscle strength was measured by a computer-driven isokinetic dynamometer. Regression analyses were performed to assess the relationships between varus-valgus motion and functional ability, and to assess the impact of varus-valgus motion on the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability. In patients with high varus-valgus range of motion, muscle weakness was associated with a stronger reduction in functional ability (ie, longer walking time and Get Up and Go time) than in patients with low varus-valgus range of motion. A pronounced varus position and a difference between the left and right knees in varus-valgus position were related with reduced functional ability. In patients with knee OA with high varus-valgus range of motion, muscle weakness has a stronger impact on functional ability than in patients with low varus-valgus range of motion. Patients with knee OA with more pronounced varus knees during walking show a stronger reduction in functional ability than patients with less pronounced varus knees or with valgus knees.

  2. Pregabalin Improves Pain Scores in Patients with Fibromyalgia Irrespective of Comorbid Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argoff, Charles E; Emir, Birol; Whalen, Ed; Ortiz, Marie; Pauer, Lynne; Clair, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain disorder with patients frequently suffering from comorbid conditions, including osteoarthritis (OA). Data on how FM patients with comorbid OA respond to recommended therapies (such as pregabalin) could help their treatment. This was a pooled exploratory analysis of three randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials of pregabalin in FM patients to assess the impact of comorbid OA on the response to pregabalin. Patients were divided into those with and without comorbid OA. Difference in change in least squares (LS) mean pain score at endpoint (assessed by 0-10 numeric rating scale, controlled for baseline pain score) with pregabalin (300 mg/day and 450 mg/day) vs placebo was assessed. Changes in Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) responders and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) total score were also assessed. There were 1665 patients in the analysis set (558, placebo; 552, pregabalin 300 mg/day; 555, pregabalin 450 mg/day), including 296 with comorbid OA. Pregabalin 450 mg/day significantly improved the LS mean (95% confidence interval) difference in pain score vs placebo in patients with (0.99 [0.44, 1.55], P pregabalin 300 mg/day with (0.31 [-0.25, 0.86], P = 0.276) and without (0.51 [0.25, 0.76], P pregabalin 450mg/day with significant improvements in pain intensity scores. These data could provide guidance to healthcare professionals treating these patients. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Risk of leukaemia following intravenous treatment with {sup 224}Ra - results of a long term follow-up study of ankylosing spondylitis patients; Leukaemierisiko nach intravenoeser {sup 224}Ra-Behandlung - Ergebnisse einer Langzeitstudie an Bechterew-Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, R.R. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenbiologie; Chmelevsky, D. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz; Goessner, W. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    1993-12-31

    In an epidemiological study of the somatic late effects risk following incorporation of a short lived {alpha}-emitter, 1473 ankylosing spondylitis patients treated with repeated intravenous injections of {sup 224}Ra in the years 1948 - 75, have been observed in the GSF. The usual therapeutic plan consisted of a total of 10 - 12 injections of 1.036 MBq (28 {mu}Ci) of {sup 224}Ra each, given at weekly intervals; this would result in an cumulative {alpha}-dose of 0.56 - 0.67 Gy to the marrow-free skeleton of a 70-kg-man (standard man). These patients have been followed together with a control group of ankylosing spondylitis patients not treated with radioactive drugs and/or X-rays. Until May 1993 (mean follow-up time 19.9 yr), 595 patients of the exposure group and 722 patients of the control group have died, causes of death have been ascertained for 578, resp. 668 patients. Among others we observed in the exposure group 10 cases of leukaemia (vs. 2.7 - 2.8 cases expected, p < 0.001) and 6 cases of leukaemia in the control group (vs. 3.3 - 3.5 exp., p = 0.14). Subclassification of the leukaemias shows a clear preference for chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) in the exposure group (4 cases obs. vs. 0.8 cases exp., p = 0.009), whereas in the control group the observed cases of CML are within the range of expectancy. Similar observations have not been made in another group of patients, now observed by Spiess and co-workers, who have been treated at a higher dose/dose rate range. This increased incidence of leukaemias in our exposure group is in one line with results from animal experiments with bone seeking {alpha}-emitters given at low dose rates. The induction of myeloid leukaemia has been demonstrated in mice down to dose rates of only a few mGy/day also for {sup 239}Pu, an {alpha}-emitter which like {sup 224}Ra deposits preferentially on the bone surface. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen einer epidemiologischen Studie zum somatischen Strahlenspaetschadenrisiko nach

  4. Educating patients about the benefits of physical activity and exercise for their hip and knee osteoarthritis. Systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, C; Chabaud, A; Guilley, E; Coudeyre, E

    2016-06-01

    Highlight the role of patient education about physical activity and exercise in the treatment of hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA). Systematic literature review from the Cochrane Library, PubMed and Wiley Online Library databases. A total of 125 items were identified, including 11 recommendations from learned societies interested in OA and 45 randomized controlled trials addressing treatment education and activity/exercise for the treatment of hip and knee osteoarthritis. In the end, 13 randomized controlled trials and 8 recommendations were reviewed (1b level of evidence). Based on the analysis, it was clear that education, exercise and weight loss are the pillars of non-pharmacological treatments. These treatments have proven to be effective but require changes in patient behaviour that are difficult to obtain. Exercise and weight loss improve function and reduce pain. Education potentiates compliance to exercise and weight loss programs, thereby improving their long-term benefits. Cost efficiency studies have found a reduction in medical visits and healthcare costs after 12 months because of self-management programs. Among non-surgical treatment options for hip and knee osteoarthritis, the most recent guidelines focus on non-pharmacological treatment. Self-management for general physical activity and exercise has a critical role. Programs must be personalized and adjusted to the patient's phenotype. This development should help every healthcare professional adapt the care they propose to each patient. Registration number for the systematic review: CRD42015032346. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of muscle strength and pain on hand function in patients with trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantero-Téllez, Raquel; Martín-Valero, Rocío; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    To assess the relationship between muscle strength (Jama), and pain (VAS) levels with hand function (DASH) in patients with trapeziometarcapal osteoarthritis. Cross-sectional study. Sample of 72 patients with osteoarthritis stage 2-3 (Eaton) and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis. Patients were recruited when they came to the Hand Surgery Unit. Grip strength, pinch, pain and hand function were measured, and correlation and regression coefficients between them were obtained. For function, the most significant model (R(2)=0.83) included pain and strength. But it is tip to tip pinch force which has a stronger relationship with DASH (Standardized B: -57) questionnaire. Pain also influenced strength measured with the dynamometer but it was tip to tip pinch force that was the most affected. Findings confirm that there is a significant correlation between function referred by the patient and variables that can be measured in the clinic such as grip strength and pinch. The correlation between pain intensity and function was also significant, but tip to tip pinch strength had the greatest impact on the function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  6. A comparison of obesity related adipokine concentrations in knee and shoulder osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Rajiv; Kapoor, Mohit; Mahomed, Nizar N; Perruccio, Anthony V

    2015-01-01

    The ratio between the serum and knee synovial fluid (SF) adipokine level has been correlated to osteoarthritis (OA) severity. No study has examined the relative concentration of adipokines in shoulder OA. However, in this study, we document serum and SF concentrations, and serum/SF ratios, of leptin and adiponectin among individuals with end stage shoulder OA, and compare ratios with a sample of individuals with end stage knee OA. Thirty-five patients with end stage knee and shoulder OA were surveyed prior to surgery for demographic data and body mass index (BMI). Synovial fluid (SF) and serum samples were analyzed for leptin and adiponectin. Serum/SF ratios were calculated and compared across cohorts. Knee and shoulder cohorts were matched, without clinical differences for age, gender, and BMI. Serum and SF leptin levels are consistently higher in knee OA patients as compared to shoulder OA patients. Further, serum/SF adiponectin ratios are greater than that for leptin across both joints. Our findings may help, in part, explain the findings that obesity has a stronger association to knee OA than shoulder OA. Whether this reflects a difference in local production of adipokines, capsular permeability, or both must be further studied. Copyright © 2015 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of Prolotherapy With Hypertonic Dextrose Versus Prolozone (Intraarticular Ozone) in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Masoud; Jalili, Parviz; Mennati, Shirin; Koosha, Alireza; Rohanifar, Ramin; Madadi, Firouz; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Taheri, Farinaz

    2015-10-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is a common disabling disease. Limited studies have demonstrated that prolotherapy with dextrose or with prolozone can be helpful in the treatment of patients with KOA. In the current study, we compared the results between these two treatment methods. In the current randomized clinical trial, 80 patients with mild to moderate KOA were randomly assigned equally into two groups (ozone group and dextrose group). In each group, injections were repeated three times with 10-day intervals. Before the treatment and 3 months after the injections, the pain intensity was measured by using a visual analogue scale and the Western Ontario and McMaster university arthritis index scores. Finally, the results were compared between the two groups. In the two groups, the pain intensity and WOMAC scores significantly decreased and increased, respectively (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups. Prolotherapy with dextrose and with prolozone result in the same pain relief or functional improvement in patients with mild to moderate KOA.

  8. Therapeutic modalities and postural balance of patients with knee osteoarthritis: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Silva

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective The objective of this review was to evaluate the evidence of the influence of therapeutic modalities on postural balance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA.Methods A search for published papers on therapeutic modalities was conducted using the Pubmed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases. The keywords “knee” and “balance” in combination with “osteoarthritis” were used as the search strategy. Randomized controlled clinical trials published in the last 10 years in either English or Portuguese were selected. The PEDro scale was applied to assess the quality of the selected clinical trials.Results A total of 46 studies of patients with knee OA were found, of which seven were analyzed in full and 39 were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the seven studies reviewed, six were considered to have a high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Several therapeutic modalities were found (physical exercise, hydrotherapy, electrotherapy and manual therapy, and postural balance improved in only three studies.Conclusion The studies included in this systematic review had a high methodological quality, so it can be concluded that the therapeutic modalities used in those studies improved postural balance in patients with knee OA.

  9. Immediate effects of hip mobilization with movement in patients with hip osteoarthritis: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beselga, Carlos; Neto, Francisco; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Hall, Toby; Oliveira-Campelo, Natália

    2016-04-01

    Mobilization with movement (MWM) has been shown to reduce pain, increase range of motion (ROM) and physical function in a range of different musculoskeletal disorders. Despite this evidence, there is a lack of studies evaluating the effects of MWM for hip osteoarthritis (OA). To determine the immediate effects of MWM on pain, ROM and functional performance in patients with hip OA. Randomized controlled trial with immediate follow-up. Forty consenting patients (mean age 78 ± 6 years; 54% female) satisfied the eligibility criteria. All participants completed the study. Two forms of MWM techniques (n = 20) or a simulated MWM (sham) (n = 20) were applied. pain recorded by numerical rating scale (NRS). hip flexion and internal rotation ROM, and physical performance (timed up and go, sit to stand, and 40 m self placed walk test) were assessed before and after the intervention. For the MWM group, pain decreased by 2 points on the NRS, hip flexion increased by 12.2°, internal rotation by 4.4°, and functional tests were also improved with clinically relevant effects following the MWM. There were no significant changes in the sham group for any outcome variable. Pain, hip flexion ROM and physical performance immediately improved after the application of MWM in elderly patients suffering hip OA. The observed immediate changes were of clinical relevance. Future studies are required to determine the long-term effects of this intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Walking speed affects instrumental activities of daily living in patients with hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shigeharu; Matsumoto, Shinsuke; Kawashima, Takaki; Mitani, Shigeru; Miura, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    The symptoms of hip osteoarthritis (OA) influence instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). Evidence form previous studies suggest that body functions and walking speed are important etiological factors for IADL. However, no studies have investigated which factors that have the greatest influence on IADL. The aims of this study were (1) to analyze factors related to IADL in patients with hip OA, including 10 m walking speed (10 mWS), and (2) to establish cut-off values for factors that predict maintenance of IADL. Forty-eight patients participated in this study. IADL was treated as dependent variable. Range of motion (ROM), muscle strength of the hips and knees, and 10 mWS were measured as independent variables. Other potential confounding factors were also measured. Data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression and Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. The hip flexion ROM on the affected side and 10 mWS were selected as significant variables in this study. The cut-off values obtained were 92.5 degrees for the hip flexion ROM on the affected side and 42.3 m/min for 10 mWS. The suggested target associated with maintaining IADL in patients with hip OA is the cut-off value of 42.3 m/min for 10 mWS found in this study.

  11. The effect of patient characteristics on variability in pain and function over two years in early knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradowski, Przemyslaw T; Englund, Martin; Lohmander, L Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Large variations in pain and function are seen over time in subjects at risk for and with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that this variation may be related not only to knee OA but also to patient characteristics. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence...... of age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) on clinically relevant change in pain and function over two years in subjects at high risk for or with knee OA.......Large variations in pain and function are seen over time in subjects at risk for and with radiographic knee osteoarthritis (OA). We hypothesized that this variation may be related not only to knee OA but also to patient characteristics. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence...

  12. Objective assessment of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in knee osteoarthritis patients - beyond daily steps and total sedentary time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliepen, Maik; Mauricio, Elsa; Lipperts, Matthijs; Grimm, Bernd; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2018-02-23

    Knee osteoarthritis patients may become physically inactive due to pain and functional limitations. Whether physical activity exerts a protective or harmful effect depends on the frequency, intensity, time and type (F.I.T.T.). The F.I.T.T. dimensions should therefore be assessed during daily life, which so far has hardly been feasible. Furthermore, physical activity should be assessed within subgroups of patients, as they might experience different activity limitations. Therefore, this study aimed to objectively describe physical activity, by assessing the F.I.T.T. dimensions, and sedentary behaviour of knee osteoarthritis patients during daily life. An additional goal was to determine whether activity events, based on different types and durations of physical activity, were able to discriminate between subgroups of KOA patients based on risk factors. Clinically diagnosed knee osteoarthritis patients (according to American College of Rheumatology criteria) were monitored for 1 week with a tri-axial accelerometer. Furthermore, they performed three functional tests and completed the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score. Physical activity levels were described for knee osteoarthritis patients and compared between subgroups. Sixty-one patients performed 7303 mean level steps, 319 ascending and 312 descending steps and 601 bicycle crank revolutions per day. Most waking hours were spent sedentary (61%), with 4.6 bouts of long duration (> 30 min). Specific events, particularly ascending and descending stairs/slopes, brief walking and sedentary bouts and prolonged walking bouts, varied between subgroups. From this sample of KOA patients, the most common form of activity was level walking, although cycling and stair climbing activities occurred frequently, highlighting the relevance of distinguishing between these types of PA. The total active time encompassed a small portion of their waking hours, as they spent most of their time sedentary, which was exacerbated by

  13. Measuring physiotherapy performance in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Inger

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with knee osteoarthritis [OA] are commonly treated by physiotherapists in primary care. Measuring physiotherapy performance is important before developing strategies to improve quality. The purpose of this study was to measure physiotherapy performance in patients with knee OA by comparing clinical practice to evidence from systematic reviews. Methods We developed a data-collection form and invited all private practitioners in Norway [n = 2798] to prospectively collect data on the management of one patient with knee OA through 12 treatment session. Actual practice was compared to findings from an overview of systematic reviews summarising the effect of physiotherapy interventions for knee OA. Results A total of 297 physiotherapists reported their management for patients with knee OA. Exercise was the most common treatment used, provided by 98% of the physiotherapists. There is evidence of high quality that exercise reduces pain and improves function in patients with knee OA. Thirty-five percent of physiotherapists used acupuncture, low-level laser therapy or transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is evidence of moderate quality that these treatments reduce pain in knee OA. Patient education, supported by moderate quality evidence for improving psychological outcomes, was provided by 68%. Physiotherapists used a median of four different treatment modalities for each patient. They offered many treatment modalities based on evidence of low quality or without evidence from systematic reviews, e.g. traction and mobilisation, massage and stretching. Conclusion Exercise was used in almost all treatment sessions in the management of knee OA. This practice is desirable since it is supported by high quality evidence. Physiotherapists also provide several other treatment modalities based on evidence of moderate or low quality, or no evidence from systematic reviews. Ways to promote high quality evidence into

  14. Development of comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Avezaat, Ellis; Häkkinen, Arja; Klaver, Rob; Maas, Tjieu; Peter, Wilfred F; Roorda, Leo D; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Exercise therapy is generally recommended for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Comorbidity, which is highly prevalent in OA, may interfere with exercise therapy. To date, there is no evidence-based protocol for the treatment of patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Special protocols adapted to the comorbidity may facilitate the application of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA and one or more comorbidities. The purpose of this study was to develop comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Several steps were undertaken to develop comorbidity-adapted protocols: selection of highly prevalent comorbidities in OA, a literature search to identify restrictions and contraindications for exercise therapy for the various comorbid diseases, consultation of experts on each comorbid disease, and field testing of the protocol in eleven patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Based on literature and expert opinion, comorbidity-adapted protocols were developed for highly prevalent comorbidities in OA. Field testing showed that the protocols provided guidance in clinical decision making in both the diagnostic and the treatment phase. Because of overlap, the number of exercise protocols could be reduced to three: one for physiological adaptations (coronary disease, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes type 2, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, obesity), one for behavioral adaptations (chronic a-specific pain, nonspecific low back pain, depression), and one for environmental adaptations (visual or hearing impairments). Evaluation of patient outcome after treatment showed significant (Pexercise protocols for patients with knee OA were developed, providing guidance in clinical reasoning with regard to diagnostics and treatment. To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment in line with our protocols, a randomized clinical trial should be performed.

  15. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie N Hofstede

    Full Text Available International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA recommend to start with (a combination of non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands.We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments.Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included "People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery" (facilitator for education about OA, and "Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving" (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice. For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were "Lack of knowledge about guideline" (barrier for lifestyle advice, "Agreements/ deliberations with primary care" and "Easy communication with a dietician" (facilitators for dietary therapy. Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription.Strategies to improve non-surgical treatment use in orthopaedic

  16. Patients Less Likely to Lose Weight Following a Knee Replacement: Results From the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Christine A; Song, Jing; Semanik, Pamela A; Chang, Rowland W; Lee, Jungwha; Gilbert, Abigail L; Pinto, Daniel; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Dunlop, Dorothy D

    2017-10-01

    Knee replacement typically results in reduced pain and improved function, but it is unclear if these improvements lead to weight loss. The purpose of this study was to examine weight change patterns preoperatively and postoperatively among overweight/obese knee replacement patients. The study evaluated 210 overweight/obese patients from the Osteoarthritis Initiative who underwent a knee replacement during an 8-year longitudinal study. Average annual weight changes during 1- to 2-year intervals prior to, including, and subsequent to knee replacement were categorized as loss (≥-2.5%), maintain (>-2.5% to <2.5%), and gain (≥2.5%). Weight changes across time intervals were compared using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations, adjusting for demographic, health, and knee factors. On average, patients lost -0.6 kg/y during the interval when the surgery was performed, but weight gain (0.9 kg/y) in the initial postoperative interval represented an overall net weight gain (0.3 kg/y) compared with presurgery. Continued weight gain (0.3 kg/y) was also seen among patients with additional follow-ups. Patients were significantly less likely to have a meaningful weight loss in the time interval immediately following the surgery compared with the interval in which the surgery took place (odds ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.18-0.79). Overweight and obese patients initially lost weight during the interval including knee replacement; however, they were less likely to lose more than 2.5% of their weight in the 1 to 2 years immediately after the surgery. Knee replacement patients may benefit from weight management interventions both preoperatively and postoperatively.

  17. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; van den Ende, Cornelia H M; Nelissen, Rob G H H; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included "People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery" (facilitator for education about OA), and "Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving" (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were "Lack of knowledge about guideline" (barrier for lifestyle advice), "Agreements/ deliberations with primary care" and "Easy communication with a dietician" (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Strategies to improve non-surgical treatment use in orthopaedic practice

  18. Predictors of response to physical therapy intervention in patients with primary hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexis A; Cook, Chad E; Flynn, Timothy W; Baxter, G David; Abbott, J Haxby

    2011-04-01

    Few studies have investigated or identified common clinical tests and measures as being associated with progression of hip osteoarthritis (OA); fewer still are longitudinal studies exploring prognostic variables associated with long-term outcome following physical therapy treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine a set of prognostic factors that maximize the accuracy of identifying patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA) likely to demonstrate a favorable response to physical therapy intervention. This was a prognostic study. Ninety-one patients with a clinical diagnosis of hip OA were analyzed to determine which clinical measures, when clustered together, were most predictive of a favorable response to physical therapy intervention. Responders were determined based on OMERACT-OARSI response criteria, which included percent and absolute changes in pain, function, and global rating of change over 1 year. These data served as the reference standard for determining the predictive validity of baseline clinical examination variables. Using multivariate regression analyses and calculations for sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios, a cluster was identified. Five baseline variables (unilateral hip pain, age of ≤58 years, pain of ≥6/10 on a numeric pain rating scale, 40-m self-paced walk test time of ≤25.9 seconds, and duration of symptoms of ≤1 year) were retained in the final model. Failure to exhibit a condition of 1 of the 5 predictor variables decreased the posttest probability of responding favorably to physical therapy intervention from 32% to physical therapy intervention from 32% to 65% (positive likelihood ratio=3.99, 95% confidence interval=2.66-4.48), and having 3 or more of 5 predictor variables increased the posttest probability of success to 99% or higher. A comparison with a control group that did not receive physical therapy further substantiated the cluster. The small sample size and the number of variables

  19. T1rho MRI of menisci and cartilage in patients with osteoarthritis at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ligong, E-mail: ligong.wang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Chang, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.chang@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Xu, Jian, E-mail: jian.xu.sz@siemens.com [Siemens HealthCare, New York, NY (United States); Vieira, Renata L.R., E-mail: Renata.Vieira@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Krasnokutsky, Svetlana, E-mail: Svetlana.Krasnokutsky@nyumc.org [Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Abramson, Steven, E-mail: StevenB.Abramson@nyumc.org [Division of Rheumatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Regatte, Ravinder R., E-mail: Ravinder.Regatte@nyumc.org [Quantitative Multinuclear Musculoskeletal Imaging Group (QMMIG), Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To assess and compare subregional and whole T1rho values (median ± interquartile range) of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in patients with doubtful (Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grade 1) to severe (KL4) osteoarthritis (OA) at 3T. Materials and methods: 30 subjects with varying degrees of OA (KL1–4, 13 females, 17 males, mean age ± SD = 63.9 ± 13.1 years) were evaluated on a 3T MR scanner using a spin-lock-based 3D GRE sequence for T1rho mapping. Clinical proton density (PD)-weighted fast spin echo (FSE) images in sagittal (without fat saturation), axial, and coronal (fat-saturated) planes were acquired for cartilage and meniscus Whole-organ MR imaging score (WORMS) grading. Wilcoxon rank sum test was performed to determine whether there were any statistically significant differences between subregional and whole T1rho values of femorotibial cartilage and menisci in subjects with doubtful to severe OA. Results: Lateral (72 ± 10 ms, median ± interquartile range) and medial (65 ± 10 ms) femoral anterior cartilage subregions in moderate–severe OA subjects had significantly higher T1rho values (P < 0.05) than cartilage subregions and whole femorotibial cartilage in doubtful–minimal OA subjects. There were statistically significant differences in meniscus T1rho values of the medial posterior subregion of subjects with moderate–severe OA and T1rho values of all subregions and the whole meniscus in subjects with doubtful–minimal OA. When evaluated based on WORMS, statistically significant differences were identified in T1rho values between the lateral femoral anterior cartilage subregion in patients with WORMS5–6 (advanced degeneration) and whole femorotibial cartilage and all cartilage subregions in patients with WORMS0–1 (normal). Conclusion: T1rho values are higher in specific meniscus and femorotibial cartilage subregions. These findings suggest that regional damage of both femorotibial hyaline cartilage and menisci may be associated with

  20. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee - a randomized controlled exploratory trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teut, Michael; Kaiser, Stefan; Ortiz, Miriam; Roll, Stephanie; Binting, Sylvia; Willich, Stefan N; Brinkhaus, Benno

    2012-10-12

    Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4) and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control). Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity) and Quality of Life (SF-36) 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2) and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8). After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3) compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1) in the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2) vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3) p = 0.032), however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed Paracetamol tablets between both groups (mean 9

  1. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4) and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control). Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity) and Quality of Life (SF-36) 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2) and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8). After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3) compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1) in the control group (p = 0.001). After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2) vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3) p = 0.032), however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed Paracetamol tablets

  2. Pulsatile dry cupping in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee – a randomized controlled exploratory trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teut Michael

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cupping is used in various traditional medicine forms to relieve pain in musculoskeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of cupping in relieving the symptoms of knee osteoarthritis (OA. Methods In a two-group, randomized controlled exploratory pilot study patients with a clinically and radiological confirmed knee OA (Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale: 2-4 and a pain intensity > 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS were included. 40 Patients were randomized to either 8 sessions of pulsatile dry cupping within 4 weeks or no intervention (control. Paracetamol was allowed on demand for both groups. Outcomes were the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC score, the pain intensity on a VAS (0 mm = no pain to 100 mm = maximum intensity and Quality of Life (SF-36 4 and 12 weeks after randomization. Use of Paracetamol was documented within the 4-week treatment period. Analyses were performed by analysis of covariance adjusting for the baseline value for each outcome. Results 21 patients were allocated to the cupping group (5 male; mean age 68 ± SD 7.2 and 19 to the control group (8 male; 69 ± 6.8. After 4 weeks the WOMAC global score improved significantly more in the cupping group with a mean of 27.7 (95% confidence interval 22.1; 33.3 compared to 42.2 (36.3; 48.1 in the control group (p = 0.001. After 12 weeks the WOMAC global score were still significantly different in favor for cupping (31.0 (24.9; 37.2 vs. 40.8 (34.4; 47.3 p = 0.032, however the WOMAC subscores for pain and stiffness were not significant anymore. Significantly better outcomes in the cupping group were also observed for pain intensity on VAS and for the SF-36 Physical Component Scale compared to the control group after 4 and 12 weeks. No significant difference was observed for the SF-36 Mental Component Scale and the total number of consumed

  3. Quantitative wear particle analysis for osteoarthritis assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Meizhai; Lord, Megan S; Peng, Zhongxiao

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis is a degenerative joint disease that affects millions of people worldwide. The aims of this study were (1) to quantitatively characterise the boundary and surface features of wear particles present in the synovial fluid of patients, (2) to select key numerical parameters that describe distinctive particle features and enable osteoarthritis assessment and (3) to develop a model to assess osteoarthritis conditions using comprehensive wear debris information. Discriminant analysis was used to statistically group particles based on differences in their numerical parameters. The analysis methods agreed with the clinical osteoarthritis grades in 63%, 50% and 61% of particles for no osteoarthritis, mild osteoarthritis and severe osteoarthritis, respectively. This study has revealed particle features specific to different osteoarthritis grades and provided further understanding of the cartilage degradation process through wear particle analysis - the technique that has the potential to be developed as an objective and minimally invasive method for osteoarthritis diagnosis.

  4. Factors associated with stair climbing ability in patients with knee osteoarthritis and knee arthroplasty: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitchelo, Tara; McClelland, Jodie A; Webster, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) report ongoing limitations in climbing stairs, even after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The aim of this systematic review was to synthesise the available evidence of factors affecting stair climbing ability in patients with knee OA before and after TKA. A systematic search was conducted of common electronic databases. All English language abstracts where stair-climbing was assessed in patients with either knee OA or at least 6 months after TKA, and a relationship to any physical, psychological or demographic factors was reported. Thirteen studies were included in the final review, nine investigated a knee OA population, and four investigated a TKA population. For patients with knee OA there was consistent and convincing evidence that greater stair-climbing ability was related to stronger lower limb muscles and less knee pain. For patients with TKA there was much less research, and no conclusions could be reached. For people with knee OA there is evidence that some physical, demographic and psychosocial factors are related to stair-climbing ability. However, the evidence for similar relationships in the TKA population is scarce and needs more extensive research. Implications for Rehabilitation People with knee osteoarthritis experience difficulty when climbing stairs, and this remains challenging even after knee replacement. For people with knee osteoarthritis, a range of physical, demographic and psychosocial factors contribute to stair-climbing ability, however, evidence for similar relationships in the TKA population is scarce. Rehabilitation that is multi-faceted may be the best approach to improve stair-climbing in people with knee osteoarthritis.

  5. Synovial fluid and plasma selenium, copper, zinc, and iron concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, M; Sarban, S; Kocyigit, A; Isikan, U E

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, a great number of studies have investigated the possible role of trace elements in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoartritis (OA). We studied synovial fluid and plasma concentrations of selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and iron (Fe) in patients with RA and OA and compared them with sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. Plasma albumin levels were measured as an index of nutritional status. Plasma Se, Cu, and Zn concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and Fe concentrations were determined by the colorimetric method. Although plasma and synovial fluid Se concentration were found to be significantly lower (p 0.05). On the other hand, synovial fluid Cu and Fe concentrations were significantly higher in patients with OA than those of healthy subjects (p < 0.05). There was a significantly positive correlation between synovial fluid Se-Cu values and Zn-Fe values in patients with RA. Our results showed that synovial fluid and plasma trace element concentrations, excluding Zn, change in inflammatory RA, but not in OA. These alterations in trace element concentrations in inflammatory RA might be a result of the changes of the immunoregulatory cytokines.

  6. Potential Influence of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Gene Polymorphism on Knee Osteoarthritis Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menha Swellam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Genes encoding for cytokines have been associated with susceptibility for joint osteoarthritis (OA and interleukin (IL-1 gene is supposed to be involved in the cartilage destruction process. In this regard, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA competing with IL-1 for binding to its receptor may act as an inhibitor of cartilage breakdown. We assessed the association of primary knee OA with IL-1RA region as a putative factor of susceptibility to knee OA in Egyptian patients.

  7. The effect of self-administered superficial local hot and cold application methods on pain, functional status and quality of life in primary knee osteoarthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aciksoz, Semra; Akyuz, Aygul; Tunay, Servet

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the self-administered superficial local hot and cold applications on pain, and the functional status and the quality of life in primary knee osteoarthritis patients. Superficial local hot and cold application is used as a nonpharmacological method for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. However, various guidelines for the management of knee osteoarthritis have conflicting recommendation for hot and cold therapy. A randomised clinical trial design. The sample consisted of patients (n = 96) who were diagnosed with primary knee osteoarthritis. During the application stage, patients were designated to the hot and cold application groups and administered hot and cold application twice a day for 3 weeks together with standard osteoarthritis treatment. The control group only used standard osteoarthritis treatment. The data were collected with a Descriptive Information Form, a Pain Scale, the WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and a Patient Satisfaction Evaluation Form. Outcome measures included pain intensity, functional status and quality of life. We found decreased primary measurement pain scores and improved functional status scores and quality of life scores after the application programme compared to the pre-application stage in both the hot and cold application groups. Once the application was completed, the pain scores, functional status scores and quality-of-life scores on the second measurements were found to be still statistically lower than the pre-application scores but higher than the first measurement ([p  .05). It was found that both hot and cold application resulted in a mild improvement in pain, functional status and quality of life, but this improvement was not sufficient to create a significant difference between the groups. This study contributes to the literature on hot and cold application methods as self-management strategies for patients with knee osteoarthritis. © 2017 John Wiley

  8. Influence of a valgus knee brace on muscle activation and co-contraction in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini Pagani, Cynthia H; Willwacher, Steffen; Kleis, Barbara; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the effect of a valgus knee orthosis designed for patients with knee osteoarthritis on the electromyographic activity (EMG) of seven muscles of the lower limb during gait. Twelve patients with medial knee osteoarthritis walked on a treadmill in three different conditions: without orthosis, with a knee orthosis in 4° valgus adjustment and with an orthosis in a neutral flexible adjustment. Root-mean-square (RMS) was analysed in each condition during a 150 ms pre-activation phase and during the stance phase of gait, which was divided in four sub-phases. In addition, co-contraction ratios (CCRs) were calculated between extensor/flexor, medial/lateral muscles and between agonist and antagonist muscle pairs. Significant decreases in muscle activity and CCRs were observed with the use of the knee orthosis in both adjustments compared to the condition without orthosis. Using the valgus brace, medial/lateral CCR decreased significantly during the late stance and the flexor/extensor CCR decreased significantly during the loading phase and late stance. Decreases of muscle pairs CCRs were observed with the neutral flexible adjustment. The results support the theory of a possible beneficial effect of knee braces in reducing knee loading by decreasing muscle activation and co-contraction levels, which could contribute to decelerate disease progression in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Patients' views toward knee osteoarthritis exercise therapy and factors influencing adherence - a survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhiwei; Hou, Yunfei; Lin, Jianhao; Wang, Kai; Liu, Qiang

    2018-01-16

    To understand the views toward exercise therapy for knee osteoarthritis (KOA) in China and to analyze factors affecting treatment adherence. A survey-based study, which included multiple choice and open-ended questions on knee OA exercise therapy was conducted in a Chinese population. The content included the respondents' attitudes and beliefs, willingness to receive treatment, and reasons why they could or could not adhere to the treatment. We used Chi-squared tests to compare cognitive differences between the patients and non-patient groups. A total of 1,069 people responded to the questionnaire, and the response rate was 81.8%. A total of 93.6% of the patients thought that they could adhere to the exercise treatment if they received professional advice and prescriptions. The following questionnaire items achieved consensus: 'Increasing the strength of the muscles around the knee stops the knee pain from getting worse,' 'It is the person's own responsibility to continue doing their exercise program,' 'How helpful the exercise program will be determines how well a person sticks to it,' 'Health professionals should educate patients with knee pain about how to change their lifestyle for the better,' and 'Exercise for knee pain is most helpful when it is designed for each person, to suit their own particular needs.' Patient adherence was affected by multiple factors, and some negative factors included 'forgetfulness,' 'getting joint symptoms improved after therapy,' 'professional guidance, subsequent monitoring and supervision,' 'willing to enhance overall health and quality of life,' 'having no time,' 'occupational factors,' 'considering that the pain would worsen while/after exercise,' and 'family factors.' A general Chinese population accepted exercise therapy for treating KOA in our survey. Education is necessary because patients were uncertain and had misunderstandings regarding the potential benefits of exercise therapy. Some factors related to treatment

  10. Ultrastructure and innervation of thumb carpometacarpal ligaments in surgical patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobargha, Nathalie; Ludwig, Cassie; Ladd, Amy L; Hagert, Elisabet

    2014-04-01

    The complex configuration of the thumb carpometacarpal (CMC-1) joint relies on musculotendinous and ligamentous support for precise circumduction. Ligament innervation contributes to joint stability and proprioception. Evidence suggests abnormal ligament innervation is associated with osteoarthritis (OA) in large joints; however, little is known about CMC-1 ligament innervation characteristics in patients with OA. We studied the dorsal radial ligament (DRL) and the anterior oblique ligament (AOL), ligaments with a reported divergent presence of mechanoreceptors in nonosteoarthritic joints. This study's purposes were (1) to examine the ultrastructural architecture of CMC-1 ligaments in surgical patients with OA; (2) to describe innervation, specifically looking at mechanoreceptors, of these ligaments using immunohistochemical techniques and compare the AOL and DRL in terms of innervation; and (3) to determine whether there is a correlation between age and mechanoreceptor density. The AOL and DRL were harvested from 11 patients with OA during trapeziectomy (10 women, one man; mean age, 67 years). The 22 ligaments were sectioned in paraffin and analyzed using immunoflourescent triple staining microscopy. In contrast to the organized collagen bundles of the DRL, the AOL appeared to be composed of disorganized connective tissue with few collagen fibers and little innervation. Mechanoreceptors were identified in CMC-1 ligaments of all patients with OA. The DRL was significantly more innervated than the AOL. There was no significant correlation between innervation of the DRL and AOL and patient age. The dense collagen structure and rich innervation of the DRL in patients with OA suggest that the DRL has an important proprioceptive and stabilizing role. Ligament innervation may correlate with proprioceptive and neuromuscular changes in OA pathophysiology and consequently support further investigation of innervation in disease prevention and treatment strategies.

  11. Development of comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Mariëtte; van der Leeden, Marike; Avezaat, Ellis; Häkkinen, Arja; Klaver, Rob; Maas, Tjieu; Peter, Wilfred F; Roorda, Leo D; Lems, Willem F; Dekker, Joost

    2014-01-01

    Background Exercise therapy is generally recommended for patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Comorbidity, which is highly prevalent in OA, may interfere with exercise therapy. To date, there is no evidence-based protocol for the treatment of patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Special protocols adapted to the comorbidity may facilitate the application of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA and one or more comorbidities. Purpose The purpose of this study was to develop comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Method Several steps were undertaken to develop comorbidity-adapted protocols: selection of highly prevalent comorbidities in OA, a literature search to identify restrictions and contraindications for exercise therapy for the various comorbid diseases, consultation of experts on each comorbid disease, and field testing of the protocol in eleven patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Results Based on literature and expert opinion, comorbidity-adapted protocols were developed for highly prevalent comorbidities in OA. Field testing showed that the protocols provided guidance in clinical decision making in both the diagnostic and the treatment phase. Because of overlap, the number of exercise protocols could be reduced to three: one for physiological adaptations (coronary disease, heart failure, hypertension, diabetes type 2, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, obesity), one for behavioral adaptations (chronic a-specific pain, nonspecific low back pain, depression), and one for environmental adaptations (visual or hearing impairments). Evaluation of patient outcome after treatment showed significant (Ptreatment. To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment in line with our protocols, a randomized clinical trial should be performed. PMID:24868151

  12. Barriers and Facilitators Associated with Non-Surgical Treatment Use for Osteoarthritis Patients in Orthopaedic Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; van den Ende, Cornelia H. M.; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti

    2016-01-01

    Introduction International evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) recommend to start with (a combination of) non-surgical treatments, and using surgical intervention only if a patient does not respond sufficiently to non-surgical treatment options. Despite these recommendations, there are strong indications that non-surgical treatments are not optimally used in orthopaedic practice. To improve the adoption of non-surgical treatments, more insight is needed into barriers and facilitators of these treatments. Therefore, this study assessed which barriers and facilitators are associated with the use and prescription of different non-surgical treatments before hip and knee OA in orthopaedic practice among patients and orthopaedic surgeons in the Netherlands. Materials and Methods We performed two internet-based surveys among 172 orthopaedic surgeons and 174 OA patients. Univariate association and multivariable regression techniques are used to identify barriers and facilitators associated with the use of non-surgical treatments. Results Most barriers and facilitators among patients were associated with the use of physical therapy, lifestyle advice and dietary therapy. Among orthopaedic surgeons, most were associated with prescription of acetaminophen, dietary therapy and physical therapy. Examples of barriers and facilitators among patients included “People in my environment had positive experiences with a surgery” (facilitator for education about OA), and “Advice of people in my environment to keep on moving” (facilitator for lifestyle and dietary advice). For orthopaedic surgeons, examples were “Lack of knowledge about guideline” (barrier for lifestyle advice), “Agreements/ deliberations with primary care” and “Easy communication with a dietician” (facilitators for dietary therapy). Also the belief in the efficacy of these treatments was associated with increased prescription. Conclusions

  13. Treatment in patients with osteoarthritis at different sites: Place of slow-acting drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Chichasova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of osteoarthritis (OA treatment is to perform rational analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy, to slow down the progression of the disease, and to preserve quality of life in patients. The performance of analgesic therapy in the elderly is impeded by the presence of a concomitant disease, primarily that of the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract. A group of experts has elaborated the algorithm for managing OA patients, which tracks a careful approach to using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and confirms the efficacy of slow-acting agents (chondroitin sulfate (CS and glucosamine and intraarticular hyaluronate. The experts have concluded that the use of symptomatic slow-acting drugs for the treatment of OA (SYSADOA, if need be, in combination with short-term paracetanol cycles as basic therapy for this condition is safer and more effective. The 2003 EULAR guidelines identify CS and glucosamine as chondroprotectors. Many studies have shown that CS and glucosamine have a moderate or significant effect on joint pain syndrome and functional mobility in OA; they are safe and characterized by minimal side effects. Long-term qualitative randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that CS and glucosamine are able to slow down the progression of joint space narrowing in OA. It is also shown that the use of a combination of glucosamine and CS allows cartilage loss to be prevented.

  14. The relationship between chondromalacia patella, medial meniscal tear and medial periarticular bursitis in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resorlu Mustafa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of bursitis in the medial compartment of the knee (pes anserine, semimembranosus-tibial collateral ligament, and medial collateral ligament bursa in osteoarthritis, chondromalacia patella and medial meniscal tears.

  15. Arthroscopic Ankle Arthrodesis for Treating Osteoarthritis in a Patient with Kashin-Beck Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenjiro Iwasa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kashin-Beck disease (KBD is an endemic degenerative osteoarthritis. Death of cartilage and growth plate is the pathologic feature; therefore, KBD involves skeletal deformity and often results in osteoarthritis. Deficiency of selenium, high humic acid levels in water, and fungi on storage gains are considered the cause of KBD. The most frequently involved joints are ankles, knees, wrists, and elbows and symptoms are pain and limited motions of those joints. The main treatments for KBD are rehabilitation and osteotomy to correct the deformities because preventive treatment has not been established. In this report, we present a case of ankle osteoarthritis due to KBD and first describe arthroscopic ankle arthrodesis for treating osteoarthritis of KBD.

  16. Kinesio taping improves pain, range of motion, and proprioception in older patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwi-young; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Junesun; Yoon, Young Wook

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the short-term effects of Kinesio taping (KT) on various types of pain, active range of motion (AROM), and proprioception in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Forty-six older participants (mean [SD], 57.9 [4.4] yrs) with osteoarthritis were randomly allocated to two groups: the KT group or the placebo-KT group. Taping with tension (KT application) or without tension (placebo-KT application) was applied to the quadriceps of the participants in both groups. Before and after intervention, pain intensity was measured using a visual analog scale at rest and during walking, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed using an algometer in the quadriceps and the tibialis anterior. In addition, pain-free AROM and proprioception were measured. The KT group showed attenuation of pain during walking (effect size [ES], 1.97), PPT in the quadriceps (ES, 2.58), and PPT in the tibialis anterior (ES, 2.45). This group also showed significantly improved AROM (ES, 2.01) and proprioception (ES, 1.73-1.89; P proprioception. There were significant differences between the two groups in pain during walking and PPT. In addition, pain during walking showed a significant correlation with AROM and proprioception, and a significant correlation was found between PPT and AROM. These results demonstrated that KT application with proper tension to the quadriceps effectively attenuates various types of pain and improves AROM and proprioception in osteoarthritis patients. Thus, KT may be a suitable intervention to improve pain, AROM, and proprioception in patients with osteoarthritis in clinics.

  17. Differences in characteristics and patient-reported questionnaire responses in patients who choose non-surgical versus surgical treatment for severe hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Mads; Overgaard, Søren; Jensen, Carsten

    Background: Preoperative patient characteristics may influence patient choice for participating in RCT’s. Purpose / Aim of Study: This study aimed to compare patient characteristics, level of pain, physical function and joint space width in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis (OA) who accepted......, analgesic use, exercise habits), the radiographic hip OA state and their responses to Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS, 0-100) and European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaires. Findings / Results: The between-group HOOS scores were significantly different in three out...... problems in all the dimensions except for the EQanxity/depression responses. The surgical patients had significantly reduced joint space width (1.2 ± 1.0 mm vs. 1.8 ± 1.2 mm, p = 0.004) and both cohorts had values below the defined 2 mm cut-off (Jacobsen et al.). Conclusions: Patients, who choose surgical...

  18. HIP OSTEOARTHRITIS AND WORK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E Clare; Coggon, David

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points strongly to a hazard of hip osteoarthritis from heavy manual work. Harmful exposures may be reduced by elimination or redesign of processes and use of mechanical aids. Reducing obesity might help to protect workers whose need to perform heavy lifting cannot be eliminated. Particularly high relative risks have been reported in farmers, and hip osteoarthritis is a prescribed occupational disease in the UK for long-term employees in agriculture. Even where it is not attributable to employment, hip osteoarthritis impacts importantly on capacity to work. Factors that may influence work participation include the severity of disease, the physical demands of the job, age, and the size of the employer. Published research does not provide a strong guide to the timing of return to work following hip arthroplasty for osteoarthritis, and it is unclear whether patients should avoid heavy manual tasks in their future employment. PMID:26612242

  19. [Physical therapy in osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjidić, Zoja

    2010-01-01

    Physical therapy has an important role in treating rheumatic diseases; its goal is to reduced pain, swelling and to keep joints mobile. The properly manage osteoarthritis is nonpharmacological and pharmacological modalities. Physical therapy applied as a remedy for osteoarthritis is a part of multimodal therapy. The basis for physical therapy management is determined by the recommendation of the physical therapeutic science and evidence-based medicine. When making a decision about application of different methods of treatment in physical therapy, it is important to correctly diagnose a structural transformation and functional problem. Systematic review of the scientific, evidence-based, international concensus recommendations for the management of the osteoarthritis published between 2000 and 2010 were identified high-quality evidence therapy practice that is efficient and effective in increasing movement capability function, and reduce pain, disability, medical intake and improved physical function for patients with osteoarthritis

  20. The foot: still the most important reason for walking incapacity in rheumatoid arthritis: distribution of symptomatic joints in 1,000 RA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondal, Lollo; Tengstrand, Birgitta; Nordmark, Birgitta; Wretenberg, Per; Stark, Andre

    2008-04-01

    Our knowledge of frequency of foot involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is still often based on a study from Finland in 1956. Great changes in the treatment of RA may have led to a different situation. We investigated the distribution of joint involvement in RA patients today, with special attention given to the feet and subjective walking ability. 1,000 RA patients answered a questionnaire concerning joints affected, joint surgery, foot problems, and subjectively experienced reasons for walking incapacity. In 45% of the patients, the forefoot was involved at the start of the disease. In 17%, the hindfoot/ankle was involved at the start. Only hand symptoms were commoner. 80% of patients reported current foot problems, 86% in the forefoot and 52% in the hindfoot/ankle. Difficulty in walking due to the feet was reported by 71%. For 41% of patients, the foot was the most important part of the lower extremity causing reduced walking capacity, and for 32% it was the only part. After the hand, the foot was the most frequently symptomatic joint complex at the start of the disease, but also during active medical treatment. The foot caused walking disability in three-quarters of the cases and-4 times as often as the knee or the hip-it was the only joint to subjectively impair gait.

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity of the Arabic version of the reduced Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghadir, Ahmad; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Iqbal, Zaheen Ahmed; Alsanawi, Hisham Abdulaziz

    2016-01-01

    We adapted the reduced Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) index for the Arabic language and tested its metric properties in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). One hundred and twenty-one consecutive patients who were referred for physiotherapy to the outpatient department were asked to answer the Arabic version of the reduced WOMAC index (ArWOMAC). After the completion of the ArWOMAC, the intensity of knee pain and general health status were assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and the 12-item short form health survey (SF-12), respectively. A second assessment was performed at least 48 h after the first session to assess test-retest reliability. The test-retest reliability was quantified using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and Cronbach's alpha was calculated to assess the internal consistency of the Arabic questionnaire. The construct validity was assessed using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. The total ArWOMAC scale and pain and function subscales were internally consistent with Cronbach's coefficient alpha of 0.91, 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. Test-retest reliability was good to excellent with ICC of 0.91, 0.89 and 0.90, respectively. SF-12 and VAS score significantly correlated with ArWOMAC index (p total scale was 2.94, based on repeated measurements for test-retest. The minimum detectable change based on the SEM for test-retest was 8.15. The ArWOMAC index is a reliable and valid instrument for evaluating the severity of knee OA, with metric properties in agreement with the original version. Although, the reduced WOMAC index has been clinically utilized within the Saudi population, the Arabic version of this instrument is not validated for an Arab population to measure lower limb functional disability caused by OA. The Arabic version of reduced WOMAC (ArWOMAC) index is a reliable and valid scale to measure lower limb functional disability in patients with knee OA. The ArWOMAC index could be

  2. Effectiveness of a Home Based Progressive Resistance Training Program in Reducing Pain and Disability in Patients with Osteoarthritis of Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. ISHANKA PRANEETH MUNUGODA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of a home-based progressive resistance training (PRT program in reducing pain and disability in patients with Osteoarthritis of knee. This randomized controlled trial, conducted for 30 days, included 60 subjects, diagnosed with Osteoarthritis of a single knee, recruited from a clinical setting in Colombo. The subjects were randomized to experimental (EG and control groups (CG (n=30 and received their general treatments. The EG received a PRT program to be performed at home and regular telephone contacts. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire under four domains ; Perceived pain, Perceived stiffness, Level of Activities of Daily Living (ADL and Quality Of Life (QOL. The results showed that 50 (83.33% subjects completed the study. Pain was reduced by 7.18% for EG and 0.46% for CG. Stiffness for EG was decreased by 15%, but was increased by 2.6%, for CG. This trend was observed in levels of QOL and ADL for both these groups as well. Statistically significant improvements (p < 0.05 for four domains were present for EG, and the between group differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05. The introduced PRT program with the scientific approach and compliance strategy were effective in reducing pain and disability in patients with knee Osteoarthritis.

  3. Foot center of pressure manipulation and gait therapy influence lower limb muscle activation in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryachev, Yulia; Debbi, Eytan M; Haim, Amir; Rozen, Nimrod; Wolf, Alon

    2011-10-01

    Foot center of pressure (COP) manipulation has been associated with improved gait patterns. The purpose of this study was to determine lower limb muscle activation changes in knee osteoarthritis patients, both immediately after COP manipulation and when COP manipulation was combined with continuous gait therapy (AposTherapy). Fourteen females with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis underwent EMG analyzes of key muscles of the leg. In the initial stage, trials were carried out at four COP positions. Following this, gait therapy was initiated for 3 months. The barefoot EMG was compared before and after therapy. The average EMG varied significantly with COP in at least one phase of stance in all examined muscles of the less symptomatic leg and in three muscles of the more symptomatic leg. After training, a significant increase in average EMG was observed in most muscles. Most muscles of the less symptomatic leg showed significantly increased peak EMG. Activity duration was shorter for all muscles of the less symptomatic leg (significant in the lateral gastrocnemius) and three muscles of the more symptomatic leg (significant in the biceps femoris). These results were associated with reduced pain, increased function and improved spatiotemporal parameters. COP manipulation influences the muscle activation patterns of the leg in patients with knee osteoarthritis. When combined with a therapy program, muscle activity increases and activity duration decreases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of sensorimotor training on balance in elderly patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal F. Ahmed

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic disabling disease that generates many impairments of functional health status. Impairments of balance are recognized in patients with knee OA. This study investigated the short term effect of sensorimotor training on balance in elderly patients with knee OA, and whether these changes were associated with impairment of functional performance. In addition the possible independent predictors of impaired balance were determined. Forty female patients with knee OA were divided into two equal groups. The control group received a traditional exercise programme and the study group received sensorimotor training in addition to traditional exercises. Blind assessment was conducted at the beginning of the study and after 6 weeks of training to measure balance [in the form of overall stability index (OSI, medial/lateral stability index (MLSI, anterior/posterior stability index (APSI], perceived pain, proprioception acuity, knee extensor muscle torque, and functional disability. For the sensorimotor group, statistically significant improvements were recorded in all measured parameters, while the traditional exercise group recorded significant improvement only on measures of perceived pain, proprioception acuity, muscle torque, and functional disability, and non-significant changes on all balance measurements. Furthermore, the sensorimotor group produced significantly better improvement than the traditional group. The main predictor of balance was proprioception. The classic traditional exercise programme used in the management of knee OA is not enough for improving balance. Addition of sensorimotor training to the rehabilitation programme of these patients could produce more positive effects on balance and functional activity levels. The association between balance, proprioception and functional activity should be considered when treating knee OA.

  5. The colour of pain: can patients use colour to describe osteoarthritis pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylde, Vikki; Wells, Victoria; Dixon, Samantha; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore patients' views on the acceptability and feasibility of using colour to describe osteoarthritis (OA) pain, and whether colour could be used to communicate pain to healthcare professionals. Six group interviews were conducted with 17 patients with knee OA. Discussion topics included first impressions about using colour to describe pain, whether participants could associate their pain with colour, how colours related to changes to intensity and different pain qualities, and whether they could envisage using colour to describe pain to healthcare professionals. The group interviews indicated that, although the idea of using colour was generally acceptable, it did not suit all participants as a way of describing their pain. The majority of participants chose red to describe high-intensity pain; the reasons given were because red symbolized inflammation, fire, anger and the stop signal in a traffic light system. Colours used to describe the absence of pain were chosen because of their association with positive emotional feelings, such as purity, calmness and happiness. A range of colours was chosen to represent changes in pain intensity. Aching pain was consistently identified as being associated with colours such as grey or black, whereas sharp pain was described using a wider selection of colours. The majority of participants thought that they would be able to use colour to describe their pain to healthcare professionals, although issues around the interpretability and standardization of colour were raised. For some patients, using colour to describe their pain experience may be a useful tool to improve doctor-patient communication. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. [Functional status, self-rated health and level of physical activity of patients with osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val Jiménez, Carmen Llanos; López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; García Atienza, Eva María; Navarro Ruiz, María Soledad; Hernández Cerón, Inmaculada; Moreno de la Rosa, Lorena

    2017-04-01

    To describe the functional status and self-rated health of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in Primary Care, and checking their relationship with the level of physical activity and sociodemographic characteristics. Study of prevalence and cross association. Primary Care Clinics. Adult patients with a diagnosis of OA in any joint in their clinical records. Out of a total of 487 selected, 346 (71.0%) took part in the study. Functional capacity (WOMAC scale), self-rated quality of life (EuroQol- 5D questionnaire), physical activity (IPAQ questionnaire), number of affected joints, pain level, and sociodemographic characteristics. A mean score of 30.2 (SD: 20.8; CI 95% CI: 28.0 to 32.4) was obtained on the WOMAC scale, with pain, stiffness, and functional capacity scores of 6.5 (SD: 4.8), 1.9 (SD: 2.0), and 21.7 (SD: 15.7), respectively. The score showed a linear trend (P<.001) compared to the level of physical activity, being 41.1 (SD: 19.9) in inactive subjects, 24.3 (SD: 18.7) in subjects with moderate activity, and 22.3 (SD: 19.8) in subjects with intense activity. In the multiple linear regression, the score on the WOMAC scale, as well as that obtained in self-rated health status, maintained their association with physical activity level after adjusting for sociodemographic variables and the number of affected joints. In patients with OA, pain and functional capacity are the most affected dimensions. Functional status and self-rated health status are higher in active patients, regardless of the number of joints affected and their demographic characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-hnRNP B1 (RA33 Autoantibodies Are Associated with the Clinical Phenotype in Russian Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Maslyanskiy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs are potent autoantigenic targets in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases (SARD. Loss of tolerance to the RA33 complex consisting of hnRNP A2 and its alternatively spliced variants B1 and B2 has been the interest of rheumatologists. A novel ELISA for the detection of anti-hnRNP B1 autoantibodies has been developed to investigate the prevalence thereof in 397 patients with SARD, including patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, spondyloarthropathy (SPA, juvenile chronic arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, systemic sclerosis (SSc, and Sjögren’s syndrome (SS, in comparison to 174 controls. Anti-hnRNP B1 autoantibodies were significantly more prevalent in patients with SARD than controls (47/397, 11.8% versus 2/174, 1.1%; P<0.001. In particular, anti-hnRNP B1 were found more frequently in the disease cohorts than in the controls and were present in 24/165 (14.5% patients with RA, 6/58 (10.3% SPA, 11/65 (16.9% SSc, and 4/50 (8.0% SLE. In RA patients, anti-hnRNP B1 autoantibodies correlated significantly with C-reactive protein levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, while in patients with SSc it was associated with features of arterial wall stiffness and presence of hypertension. Anti-hnRNP B1 autoantibodies occur in SARD and seem to be correlated with distinct clinical characteristics in patients with RA and SSc.

  8. The effect of two different orthoses on pain, hand function, patient satisfaction and preference in patients with thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis: a multicentre, crossover, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegt, A E van der; Grond, R; Grüschke, J S; Boomsma, M F; Emmelot, C H; Dijkstra, P U; Sluis, C K van der

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the Push Ortho Thumb Brace CMC and a custom-made orthosis in the treatment of patients with primary osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb. Our outcome measures were pain scores, tests of hand function, patient satisfaction and patient preference. A multicentre crossover randomised controlled trial was conducted which included 63 patients (44 women) with primary osteoarthritis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb. Of these, 59 patients with a mean age of 60.1 years (standard deviation 8.2), completed the study. Patients used both orthoses for two weeks with a two-week washout period in-between. Pain was measured on a 10-cm visual analogue scale. Hand function was assessed using the Jebsen Taylor Hand Function test, Nine Hole Peg Test, key grip, pinch grip and Functional Index for Hand Osteoarthritis. Patient preference was assessed using the Dutch version of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology score. Both orthoses resulted in a minor reduction in pain scores without significant difference between the two orthoses. The Push Ortho Thumb Brace CMC interfered less with key grip (p Thumb Brace CMC had a higher patient satisfaction (p thumb, patients may prefer the Push Ortho Thumb Brace CMC. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:237-44. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  9. Development of comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Rooij M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mariëtte de Rooij,1 Marike van der Leeden,1,2 Ellis Avezaat,3 Arja Häkkinen,4 Rob Klaver,1 Tjieu Maas,5 Wilfred F Peter,1 Leo D Roorda,1 Willem F Lems,1,6 Joost Dekker1,71Amsterdam Rehabilitation Research Center, Reade, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2VU University Medical Center Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 3Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Physical Therapy, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 4Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä and Jyväskylä Central Hospital, Jyväskylä, Finland; 5HAN University, Institute of Health, GGM, Institute for Sports and Exercise Studies, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; 6VU University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 7VU University Medical Center, Department of Psychiatry and Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, EMGO Institute, Amsterdam, the NetherlandsBackground: Exercise therapy is generally recommended for patients with osteoarthritis (OA of the knee. Comorbidity, which is highly prevalent in OA, may interfere with exercise therapy. To date, there is no evidence-based protocol for the treatment of patients with knee OA and comorbidity. Special protocols adapted to the comorbidity may facilitate the application of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA and one or more comorbidities.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop comorbidity-adapted exercise protocols for patients with knee OA and comorbidity.Method: Several steps were undertaken to develop comorbidity-adapted protocols: selection of highly prevalent comorbidities in OA, a literature search to identify restrictions and contraindications for exercise therapy for the various comorbid diseases, consultation of experts on each comorbid disease, and field testing of the protocol in eleven patients with knee OA and comorbidity.Results: Based on literature and expert opinion, comorbidity-adapted protocols were developed for highly prevalent

  10. Difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with both lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Junya; Ohtori, Seiji; Kishida, Shunji; Nakamura, Junichi; Takeshita, Munenori; Shigemura, Tomonori; Takazawa, Makoto; Eguchi, Yawara; Inoue, Gen; Orita, Sumihisa; Takaso, Masashi; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Arai, Gen; Miyagi, Masayuki; Kamoda, Hiroto; Suzuki, Miyako; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Kubota, Gou; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2012-12-01

    Case series. To present the difficulty of diagnosing the origin of lower leg pain in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip joint arthritis. Pain arising from a degenerated hip joint is sometimes localized to the lower leg. Patients with lumbar spinal disease may also show radicular pain corresponding to the lower leg area. If patients present with both conditions and only pain at the lower leg, it is difficult to determine the origin of the pain. We reviewed 420 patients who had leg pain with lumbar spinal stenosis diagnosed by myelography, computed tomography after myelography, or magnetic resonance imaging. Pain only at the ipsilateral lateral aspect of the lower leg but slight low back pain or pain around the hip joint was shown in 4 patients who had lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. The symptoms resolved after L5 spinal nerve block, but remained after lidocaine infiltration into the hip joint. We performed decompression and posterolateral fusion surgery for these 4 patients. Leg pain did not resolve after lumbar surgery in all patients. Conservative treatment was not effective from 6 to 12 months, so ultimately we performed ipsilateral total hip replacement for all patients and they became symptom-free. It is difficult to determine the origin of lower leg pain by spinal nerve block and hip joint block in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and hip osteoarthritis. We take this into consideration before surgery.

  11. Long-term weight-loss maintenance in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Pia; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background: A formula low-energy diet (LED) reduces weight effectively in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis, but the role of LED in long-term weight-loss maintenance is unclear.Objective: We aimed to determine the effect of intermittent LED compared with daily meal replacements on weight-loss...... of baseline-carried-forward imputation for missing data.Results: A total of 153 participants (means ± SDs: BMI: 33.3 ± 4.6; age: 63.8 ± 6.3 y; 83% women) were recruited between June and December 2009 and randomly assigned to the IN (n = 76) or RE (n = 77) group. A total of 53 and 56 participants, respectively......% weight-loss and 1-y maintenance, additional use of daily meal replacements or intermittent LED resulted in weight-loss maintenance for 3 y. These results challenge the commonly held assumption that weight regain in the long term is inevitable. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT...

  12. Validating Efficacy of Shea Nut Oil Extract in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San-Pei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine and investigate the efficacy of shea nut oil extract (SheaFlex75 in relation to knee osteoarthritis (OA. Methods. Thirty-three patients (age 63.6±5.8 years with knee OA were recruited. Real-time ultrasound imaging and surface electromyography were used to objectively assess the morphological changes and the activity of vastus medialis oblique (VMO muscles during a 16-week intervention of SheaFlex75. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was calculated to examine the reliability of the interscans. A paired-sample t-test was used to compare the findings in different stages. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationship between the relevant variables of OA and percentage of thickness change of VMO at different contraction levels. Results. The baseline findings showed strong correlation, suggesting that the reliability of interscans at pretest was high. The ability to contract the muscles of the knee to a 30% contraction level showed significant change between the baseline and after 16-week testing, both in terms of morphological changes and muscle activity. Pain scale reported a significant decrease at the 16th week. Conclusion. The results suggest that SheaFlex75 can relieve the symptoms of knee OA and can result in improvement of muscle control of the knee.

  13. PNF and manual therapy treatment results of patients with cervical spine osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maicki, Tomasz; Bilski, Jan; Szczygieł, Elżbieta; Trąbka, Rafał

    2017-09-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of PNF and manual therapy methods in the treatment of patients with cervical spine osteoarthritis, especially their efficacy in reducing pain and improving functionality in everyday life. Long-term results were also compared in order to determine which method of treatment is more effective. Eighty randomly selected females aged 45-65 were included in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups of 40 persons. One group received PNF treatment and the other received manual therapy (MAN.T). To evaluate functional capabilities, the Functional Rating Index was used. To evaluate changes in pain, a shortened version of the McGill Questionnaire was used. The PNF group achieved a greater reduction in pain than the MAN.T group. The PNF group showed a greater improvement in performing daily activities such as sleeping, personal care, travelling, work, recreation, lifting, walking and standing as well as decreased intensity and frequency of pain compared to the MAN.T group. The PNF method proved to be more effective in both short (after two weeks) and long (after three months) term.

  14. A unique drug distribution process for radium Ra 223 dichloride injection and its implication for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansereau, Raymond N

    2014-11-01

    On May 15, 2013, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals announced that it had received marketing approval for the therapeutic radioactive medication radium Ra 223 dichloride injection (Xofigo; Ra 223). The product acquisition and distribution process for hospital-based nuclear pharmacies and nuclear medicine services is unlike any other. The product is distributed as a low-risk compounded sterile preparation through a single compounding nuclear pharmacy located in Denver, Colorado, pursuant to a prescription. This model for drug distribution and delivery to the user institution has implications for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Comparison of indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy and technetium-99m joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uno, Kimiichi; Suguro, Toru; Nohira, Kunichi (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-11-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the use of indium-111-labeled leukocyte ([sup 111]In-WBC) imaging compared with technetium-99m pertechnetate ([sup 99m]TcO[sub 4][sup -]) imaging in 19 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 8 with osteoarthritis. Knee and wrist joints were evaluated for both radionuclides. The results indicated a good correlation of the clinical assessment of pain and swelling with joint uptake ratio (JUR) between [sup 111]In-WBC and [sup 99m]TcO[sub 4][sup -] in RA and osteoarthritis patients. We observed a discrepancy in both imaging in 'burned out' cases. It was concluded that a JUR of [sup 111]In-WBC could distinguish active RA from inactive RA or osteoarthritis at a value of 1.15 and that the use of [sup 111]In-WBC was a more reliable procedure than [sup 99m]TcO[sub 4][sup -]. (author).

  16. [Hand osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šenolt, Ladislav

    Hand osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic disorder causing pain and limitation of mobility of affected joints. The prevalence of hand OA increases with age and more often affects females. Clinical signs obviously do not correlate with radiographic findings - symptomatic hand OA affects approximately 26 % of adult subjects, but radiographic changes can be found in up to two thirds of females and half of males older than 55 years.Disease course differ among individual patients. Hand OA is a heterogeneous disease. Nodal hand OA is the most common subtype affecting interphalangeal joints, thumb base OA affects first carpometacarpal joint. Erosive OA represents a specific subtype of hand OA, which is associated with joint inflammation, more pain, functional limitation and erosive findings on radiographs.Treatment of OA is limited. Analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the only agents reducing symptoms. New insights into the pathogenesis of disease should contribute to the development of novel effective treatment of hand OA.

  17. The Effect of Therapeutic Ultrasound on Pain and Physical Function in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeğin, Tuğba; Altan, Lale; Kasapoğlu Aksoy, Meliha

    2017-01-01

    Osteoartritis (OA) is one of the most frequent causes of pain, loss of function and disability in adults. The prevalence of OA is expected to increase substantially in the future. Knee OA is the most common subset of OA. Therapeutic ultrasound (US) is one of several physical therapy modalities suggested for the management of pain and loss of function due to OA. The purpose of our study was to investigate the efficacy of US therapy in reducing pain and functional loss and improving the quality of life in patients with knee OA in comparison to sham US therapy. The study involved 62 patients. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. The patients in group 1 (n = 30) were administered 1 W/cm2, 1 MHz continuous US, and the patients in group 2 (n = 32) were administered sham US. The US treatment was applied for 8 min to each knee, 16 min in total, 5 d a wk, for a total of 10 sessions during 2 wk. The patients were evaluated immediately after treatment and 1 mo after therapy according to the visual analog scale (VAS), night pain, range of motion, morning stiffness, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), Lequesne and Short Form-36 (SF-36) scales and 6 min walking distance. Improvement in pain and joint functions was observed in both groups according to the evaluation immediately after treatment and at 1 mo after the therapy. According to the evaluation results immediately after treatment, there was significant improvement in all pain scales (VAS, WOMAC, Lequesne, SF-36), morning stiffness and 6 min walking distance in patients receiving real US treatment (p therapy, no significant difference was observed between groups except for improvement in night pain in the real US group. In conclusion, US therapy has been found to be effective in reducing pain and improving physical function in the short term, but this positive effect was not persistent in the long term. However, we believe that the results of our study may

  18. Altered gait biomechanics and increased knee-specific impairments in patients with coexisting tibiofemoral and patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Shawn; O'Connell, Megan; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2015-01-01

    Coexisting patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) is a common finding in patients with tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (TFOA). The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether severity of coexisting PFOA in patients with TFOA is correlated with altered sagittal-plane gait biomechanics and greater knee-specific impairments. One hundred and six patients with radiographic TFOA were stratified into three groups of no PFOA, mild PFOA, and severe PFOA. All patients completed instrumented gait analysis, quantitative quadriceps strength testing and knee range of motion assessment. Compared to patients with no PFOA, those with severe PFOA exhibited reduced loading-response knee flexion excursions (p = 0.002) and increased peak single-leg stance external knee flexion moments (p knee extension range of motion were independently associated with altered sagittal-plane knee biomechanics during gait (p knee flexion excursion during gait may be an attempt to decrease patellofemoral joint loading by patients with severe PFOA but it may increase impact loading of their arthritic tibiofemoral joint. Additionally, the greater external knee flexion moments observed during the single-leg stance phase of gait can lead to an overall increase in patellofemoral joint loading and symptoms in patients with more severe PFOA. Given the association between knee-specific impairments and altered gait biomechanics in our study, addressing quadriceps muscle weakness and limited knee extension range of motion may be indicated in patients with TFOA and severe coexisting PFOA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An economic model of long-term use of celecoxib in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rublee Dale

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evaluations of the cost-effectiveness of the cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib (Celebrex, Pfizer Inc, USA have produced conflicting results. The recent controversy over the cardiovascular (CV risks of rofecoxib and other coxibs has renewed interest in the economic profile of celecoxib, the only coxib now available in the United States. The objective of our study was to evaluate the long-term cost-effectiveness of celecoxib compared with nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs in a population of 60-year-old osteoarthritis (OA patients with average risks of upper gastrointestinal (UGI complications who require chronic daily NSAID therapy. Methods We used decision analysis based on data from the literature to evaluate cost-effectiveness from a modified societal perspective over patients' lifetimes, with outcomes expressed as incremental costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gained. Sensitivity tests were performed to evaluate the impacts of advancing age, CV thromboembolic event risk, different analytic horizons and alternate treatment strategies after UGI adverse events. Results Our main findings were: 1 the base model incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for celecoxib versus nsNSAIDs was $31,097 per QALY; 2 the ICER per QALY was $19,309 for a model in which UGI ulcer and ulcer complication event risks increased with advancing age; 3 the ICER per QALY was $17,120 in sensitivity analyses combining serious CV thromboembolic event (myocardial infarction, stroke, CV death risks with base model assumptions. Conclusion Our model suggests that chronic celecoxib is cost-effective versus nsNSAIDs in a population of 60-year-old OA patients with average risks of UGI events.

  20. Pain Reduction After Laser Acupuncture Treatment in Geriatric Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi R Helianthi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to compare the effectiveness of active laser acupuncture with placebo on reducing pain intensity and improving functional outcome in geriatric patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. Methods: a double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in geriatrics with knee OA at Medical Acupuncture Outpatient Clinic, Integrated Geriatric Outpatient Clinic, Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, during May to October 2015. Sixty two patients with knee OA  were randomly assigned into two groups: active laser acupuncture group or placebo laser acupuncture group. Interventions were carried out using a gallium aluminum arsenide laser device at the ST35 Dubi, ST36 Zusanli, SP9 Yinlingquan, GB34 Yanglingquan and EX - LE - 4 Neixiyan acupuncture points on the affected knee for ten sessions of treatment, i.e. twice a week. Patients were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS and Lequesne index at baseline, after four sessions, after nine sessions and at 2 weeks after the treatment had been stopped. Results: the VAS scores were significantly improved in the active laser acupuncture group compared to the placebo group. The evaluation of VAS scores was carried out after four treatment sessions (mean difference: 0.39; p<0.001, after nine treatment sessions (mean difference: 37.48; p<0.001 and at 2 weeks post intervention (mean difference: 39.15; p<0.001. The evaluation also showed significant improvement of Lequesne index after four treatment sessions (mean difference: 4.68; p<0.001, after nine treatment sessions (mean difference: 5.90; p<0.001 and at 2 weeks post intervention (mean difference: 6.48; p<0.001. Conclusion: active laser acupuncture is effective in reducing pain.

  1. Our Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis Risk Factors and Relationship with Osteoarhritis-Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadide Torlak Koca

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative disease, that developes as a result of the impairment of formation and destruction processes in cartilage and sinovial tissues, with the effect of various traumatic, biomechanic, inflammatory and genetic factors. Material and Methods: In this study, risk factors and relation between OA and OP (osteoporosis is evaluated in 127 patients with knee OA. Age, gender, obesity, menopause, ligamentous laxity, DM, injury of joint, genetic predisposition and proprioceptive defects are the risk factors in knee OA. Results: No relation was observed between radiographic knee OA and scores of tests which evaluate pain and disability such as WOMAC and Lequesne; but there was a significant relation between obesity and WOMAC and Lequesne scores. Thus, obesity is a disability determinant in knee OA. We think that smoking has protective effects on OA, but this claim has to be proven with studies containing large control groups. In accordance with literature, we determined a significant concurrence between hand and knee OA. This relation gets stronger as severity of radiographic disease increases. In our patients with knee OA depriving clinical inflammation signs, CRP values were higher than control group and this was statistically significant. Therefore, we may not deny a chronic inflammatory response in OA. No significant relation observed between serum cholesterol values, lipid values, blood pressure and OA. However, presence of DM accelerates the radiographic progression of OA. Serum uric acid levels were significantly higher in our OA patients than in controls. The literature data, that high serum uric acid levels play role especially in generalised OA’s multifactorial etiology, is also supported by our results. Conclusion: Age, gender, menopause and genetic predisposition seemed to have more effects on the incidence of knee OA; while obesity, period of menopause, ligamantous laxity and DM seemed to have more effects

  2. Generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells from osteoarthritis patient-derived synovial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Son, Myung Jin; Son, Mi-Young; Seol, Binna; Kim, Janghwan; Park, Jongjin; Kim, Jung Hwa; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Park, Su A; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Kang-Sik; Han, Yong-Mahn; Chang, Jae-Suk; Cho, Yee Sook

    2011-10-01

    This study was undertaken to generate and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine whether these cells can be developed into disease-relevant cell types for use in disease modeling and drug discovery. Human synovial cells isolated from two 71-year-old women with advanced OA were characterized and reprogrammed into induced PSCs by ectopic expression of 4 transcription factors (Oct-4, SOX2, Klf4, and c-Myc). The pluripotency status of each induced PSC line was validated by comparison with human embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We found that OA patient-derived human synovial cells had human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-like characteristics, as indicated by the expression of specific markers, including CD14-, CD19-, CD34-, CD45-, CD44+, CD51+, CD90+, CD105+, and CD147+. Microarray analysis of human MSCs and human synovial cells further determined their unique and overlapping gene expression patterns. The pluripotency of established human induced PSCs was confirmed by their human ESC-like morphology, expression of pluripotency markers, gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, normal karyotype, and in vitro and in vivo differentiation potential. The potential of human induced PSCs to differentiate into distinct mesenchymal cell lineages, such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes, was further confirmed by positive expression of markers for respective cell types and positive staining with alizarin red S (osteoblasts), oil red O (adipocytes), or Alcian blue (chondrocytes). Functional chondrocyte differentiation of induced PSCs in pellet culture and 3-dimensional polycaprolactone scaffold culture was assessed by chondrocyte self-assembly and histology. Our findings indicate that patient-derived synovial cells are an attractive source of MSCs as well as induced PSCs and have the potential to advance cartilage tissue engineering and cell-based models of cartilage defects. Copyright © 2011 by the

  3. A Functional Neuroimaging Study of Expectancy Effects on Pain Response in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollub, Randy L; Kirsch, Irving; Maleki, Nasim; Wasan, Ajay D; Edwards, Robert R; Tu, Yiheng; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Kong, Jian

    2018-01-08

    Placebo treatments and healing rituals share much in common, such as the effects of expectancy, and have been used since the beginning of human history to treat pain. Previous mechanistic neuroimaging studies investigating the effects of expectancy on placebo analgesia have used young, healthy volunteers. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we aimed to investigate the neural mechanisms by which expectancy evokes analgesia in older adults living with a chronic pain disorder and determine whether there are interactions with active treatment. In this fMRI study, we investigated the brain networks underlying expectancy in participants with chronic pain due to knee osteoarthritis (OA) after verum (genuine) and sham electroacupuncture (EA) treatment before and after experiencing calibrated experimental heat pain using a well-tested expectancy manipulation model. We found that expectancy significantly and similarly modulates the pain experience in knee OA patients in both verum (n=21, 11 female; mean ± SD age 57±7 years) and sham (n=22, 15 female; mean ± SD age 59±7 years) acupuncture treatment groups. However, there were different patterns of changes in fMRI indices of brain activity associated with verum and sham treatment modalities specifically in the lateral prefrontal cortex. We also found that continuous EA in knee OA patients can evoke significant regional coherence decreases in pain associated brain regions. Our results suggest that expectancy modulates the experience of pain in knee OA patients but may work through different pathways depending on the treatment modality and, we speculate, on pathophysiological states of the participants. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Successful extension of tocilizumab infusion intervals from 4 weeks to 6 or 5 weeks in 90% of RA patients with good response to 4-week intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Osamu; Uda, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    A period of 4 weeks (w) has been recommended as the interval between tocilizumab (TCZ) infusions for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, treating the patients with TCZ (8 mg/kg), we experienced that longer intervals were also effective. We conducted the study to investigate whether the intervals of TCZ infusions could extend from 4w to 5 or 6w. This was a retrospective observational study. RA patients who had shown good response to TCZ infusions at 4w intervals were enrolled, and the intervals of TCZ infusions were extended to 5w. Next, the intervals of TCZ infusion were extended to 6w for the patients who had maintained good response with 5w intervals. The patients who had maintained good response for more than two years were estimated as responders. One hundred patients were enrolled in the present study, and 62 patients maintained good response with 6w-interval infusions, and 28 patients with 5w-interval infusions, indicating that 90% of patients who had shown good response with 4w intervals could extend the intervals from 4w to 5 or 6w. The present study provides evidence that most of RA patients who showed good response to TCZ infusions at 4w could extend the intervals to 6w or 5w. This finding should be of great interest for both financial and labour reasons.

  5. Acne RA-1,2, a novel UV-selective face cream for patients with acne: Efficacy and tolerability results of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cestone, Enza; Michelotti, Angela; Zanoletti, Valentina; Zanardi, Andrea; Mantegazza, Raffaella; Dossena, Maurizia

    2017-06-01

    General skincare measures such as the use of moisturisers and products containing adequate photoprotection are important components of acne patients' management to complement the pharmacological regimen. Acne RA-1,2 is a novel dermato-cosmetic product which contains selective photofilters and active ingredients against the multifactorial pathophysiology of acne. To evaluate the tolerability of Acne RA-1,2 and its effect on the clinical signs of acne. This double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized 40 adult patients with 10-25 comedones per half face to once-daily application of Acne RA-1,2 or placebo for 8 weeks. Evaluations after 4 and 8 weeks included the number of comedones, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), sebum production, and tolerability. In the Acne RA-1,2 group, there was a significant 35% decrease in the mean number of comedones from 26 at baseline to 17 at Week 8 (P<.001), a 7% significant reduction in TEWL (9.32 to 8.66 g/h/m(2) ; P<.001), and a 24% significant reduction in sebum production (154.8 to 117.6 μg/cm(2) ; P<.001). The reductions in TEWL and sebum production were significantly greater than those in the placebo group at Weeks 4 and 8 (P<0.05). There were no adverse events. Acne RA-1,2 was well tolerated and effective at reducing comedones and sebum production and improving epidermal barrier function. These results suggest that Acne RA-1,2 is useful against acne-prone facial skin, particularly as it targets sebum production, which topical pharmacological acne therapies do not address. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Obesity affects the chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin in patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallu, Stéphane; Francin, Pierre-Jean; Guillaume, Cécile; Gegout-Pottie, Pascale; Netter, Patrick; Mainard, Didier; Terlain, Bernard; Presle, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence support the regulatory role of leptin in osteoarthritis (OA). As high circulating concentrations of leptin disrupt the physiological function of the adipokine in obese individuals, the current study has been undertaken to determine whether the elevated levels of leptin found in the joint from obese OA patients also induce changes in the chondrocyte response to leptin. Chondrocytes isolated from OA patients with various body mass index (BMI) were treated with 20, 100 or 500 ng/ml of leptin. The expression of cartilage-specific components (aggrecan, type 2 collagen), as well as regulatory (IGF-1, TGFbeta, MMP-13, TIMP 2) or inflammatory (COX-2, iNOS, IL-1) factors was investigated by real-time PCR to evaluate chondrocyte responsiveness to leptin. Furthermore, the effect of body mass index (BMI) on leptin signalling pathways was analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for STATs activation. Leptin at 20 ng/ml was unable to modulate gene expression in chondrocytes, except for MMP-13 in obese OA patients. Higher leptin levels induced the expression of IGF-1, type 2 collagen, TIMP-2 and MMP-13. However, the activity of the adipokine was shown to be critically dependent on both the concentration and the BMI of the patients with a negative association between the activation of regulated genes and BMI for 100 ng/ml of adipokine, but a positive association between chondrocyte responsiveness and BMI for the highest leptin dose. In addition, the gene encoding MMP-13 was identified as a target of leptin for chondrocytes originated from obese patients while mRNA level of TIMP-2 was increased in leptin-treated chondrocytes collected from normal or overweight patients. The adipokine at 500 ng/ml triggered signal transduction through a STAT-dependent pathway while 100 ng/ml of leptin failed to activate STAT 3 but induced STAT 1alpha phosphorylation in chondrocytes obtained from obese patients. The current study clearly showed that characteristics of OA

  7. Characteristics of sagittal spine-pelvis-leg alignment in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wen-Jie; Wang, Wei-Jun; Wu, Ming-Da; Xu, Zhi-Hong; Xu, Lei-Lei; Qiu, Yong

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between the sagittal alignment of the spine and pelvis and the compensatory mechanism in patients suffering from spinal disorders has been well documented. However, in patients with hip osteoarthritis (HOA), few studies have explored how the hip joint pathology could affect the sagittal alignment of the hip, pelvis and spine, and no reports have investigated whether these changes are involved in the pathogenesis of low back pain in these patients. The aims of this case-control study were to investigate the sagittal spine-pelvis-leg alignment in patients suffering from severe HOA and to understand whether the alignment was related to the occurrence of low back pain and the health-related quality of life in these patients. Fifty-eight patients with severe HOA and 64 asymptomatic controls were studied. Digital lateral X-rays of the spine, pelvis and proximal femur were obtained with the patients placed in upright positions. The following radiographic parameters were measured to examine the sagittal alignment of the pelvis, hip and spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilting (PT), sacral slope (SS), pelvic femoral angle (PFA), femoral inclination (FI), lumbar lordosis (LL), spino-sacral angle (SSA), C7 tilt (C7T) and T1 spinal-pelvic inclination (T1-SPI). The global balance patterns of spinal-pelvic alignment were classified as normal balance, slight unbalance and severe unbalance according to the relative position of the C7 plumb line to the sacrum and femoral heads. Short Form-36 questionnaire was carried out in the patients. Comparisons were carried out between the patients with HOA and the controls and between the HOA patients with or without low back pain. Correlation analysis was used to measure relationships between the HOA patients' parameters. There were no significant differences in the age and gender distribution between the HOA patients and control. Compared with the controls, the patients with HOA showed significantly higher SS and lower

  8. A preliminary assessment of a novel pneumatic unloading knee brace on the gait mechanics of patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Croce, Ugo; Crapanzano, Fausto; Li, Ling; Kasi, Patrick K; Patritti, Benjamin L; Mancinelli, Chiara; Hunter, David J; Stamenović, Dimitrije; Harvey, William F; Bonato, Paolo

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether a knee brace incorporating inflatable air bladders can alter the net peak external knee adduction moment in persons with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Prospective cohort study. Motion analysis laboratory. Subjects (n = 18) diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis as defined by the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Criteria Committee of the American Rheumatism Association. Instrumented gait analysis was performed while subjects walked with and without the knee brace. When subjects wore the knee brace, the air bladders were either uninflated or inflated to 7 psi. The net external knee adduction moment was obtained by subtracting the abduction moment produced by the knee brace (estimated using a finite element analysis model) from the external knee adduction moment (estimated using a camera-based motion analysis system). The net external knee adduction moment was compared across all testing conditions. A 7.6% decrease in net peak external knee adduction moment was observed when subjects wore the knee brace uninflated compared with when they did not wear the brace. Inflation of the bladders to 7 psi led to a 26.0% decrease in net peak external knee adduction moment. The results of the study suggest that the effects of an unloading knee brace may be enhanced by incorporating inflatable air bladders into the design of the brace, thus leading to an improved correction of the excessive peak external knee adduction moment observed in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Effect of tibial re-alignment surgery on single leg standing balance in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Michael A; Birmingham, Trevor B; Jones, Ian C; Vandervoort, Anthony A; Giffin, J Robert

    2009-10-01

    Standing balance is impaired in individuals with knee osteoarthritis and is associated with disease severity. The effects of surgical interventions on standing balance have received little attention. The purpose of the present study was to examine measures of balance during tests of single-limb standing before and after medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy--a lower limb re-alignment procedure for those with varus alignment and knee osteoarthritis. Standing balance was assessed in 49 individuals prior to and 12 months following medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. Participants performed three trials of single-limb balance lasting 10s each while standing on a force platform. Anteroposterior and mediolateral coordinates of the centre of pressure were obtained from the force platform and used to calculate the total centre of pressure path length as well as the range and variability (standard deviation) of the anteroposterior and mediolateral coordinates. Though all centre of pressure measures were lower following high tibial osteotomy, none reached statistical significance (P>0.05) and effect sizes were small (d<0.34). The largest mean improvement was 7.6% (95% confidence interval: -0.7-15.8%). Results indicate that standing balance in individuals with knee osteoarthritis is not significantly different following high tibial osteotomy surgery. Standing balance in this patient population is a complex process not entirely dictated by disease symptoms or structural factors such as alignment.

  10. Proliferatory defect of invariant population and accumulation of non-invariant CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells in the joints of RA patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowska-Owsiak, Danuta; Birchall, Martin A; Moots, Robert J; Christmas, Stephen E; Pazmany, Laszlo

    2014-05-01

    While numerical and functional defects of invariant NKT cells have been demonstrated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the detailed characterization of proliferative and secretory responses following CD1d-mediated presentation is lacking; the presence of non-invariant populations has never been assessed in human autoimmunity. We have evaluated both invariant and non-invariant populations in the blood and synovial fluid from patients to assess feasibility of NKT cell-directed manipulations in RA. NKT cell populations were quantified by anti-CD4/anti-Vα24 staining and/or CD1d tetramers. Proliferation was measured in cultures of mononuclear cells following stimulations with αGalCer and cytokine secretion determined by multi-bead assay. We have confirmed a proliferative defect of iNKT cells in both peripheral blood and synovial fluid from RA patients, but no changes in baseline frequencies. Moreover, we have detected an enlargement of non-invariant cell pool in synovial fluid samples. In addition, we noted an evident Th2 shift following exposure to αGalCer and pronounced IL-6 secretion. While RA patients suffer from defective proliferative responses of invariant NKT cells, non-invariant cells accumulate at the site of inflammation. While stimulation with αGalCer results in reduced TNF-α and increased suppressive IL-10, abundantly produced IL-6 could potentially contribute to the induction of Th17 cells in the joints.

  11. Radiographic signs for detection of femoroacetabular impingement and hip dysplasia should be carefully used in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipach, Ingmar; Rondak, Ina-Christine; Sachsenmaier, Saskia; Buck, Elisabeth; Syha, Roland; Mittag, Falk

    2014-05-08

    During the last years, terms like acetabular retroversion, excessive overcoverage, and abnormal head-neck-junction with the so called "pistol-grip-deformity" has been added to the classical description of hip dysplasia. These anatomical changes could lead to a femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Both kinds of FAI has been indentified as a main reason for hip pain and progressive degenerative changes leading to early osteoarthritis of the hip. A lot of radiographic criteria on pelvic views have been established to detect classical dysplasia and FAI. The present study was initiated to assess the hypothesis that age and severity of osteoarthritis affect measurements of different radiographic parameters. The pelvic radiographs of 1614 patients were measured for head-ratio, CE-angle, roof obliquity, extrusion-index, depth-to-width ratio, CCD-angle, sharp's angle. To evaluate the severity of osteoarthritis of the hip the classification by Kellgren and Lawrence was used. Associations between age and radiographic parameters or severity of osteoarthritis were assessed by Spearman's (ρ) or Kendall's (r) rank correlation coefficient, respectively. 366 (22.7%) patients presented no sign of osteoarthritis, 367 (22.7%) patients presented I° osteoarthritis, 460 (28.5%) patients presented II° osteoarthritis, 307 (19%) III° osteoarthritis and 114 (7.1%) IV° osteoarthritis of the hip. The mean head-ratio of all patients was 1.13 ± 0.26 (0.76 - 2.40), the mean CE-angle 40.05° ± 10.13° (0° - 70°), the mean roof obliquity was 35.27° ± 4.96° (10° - 55°), the mean extrusion-index was 12.99 ± 9.21 (6.20 - 95.2), the mean depth-to-width ratio was 59.30 ± 8.90 (6.30 - 100), the mean CCD-angle was 127.68° ± 7.22° (123° - 162°) and the mean sharp's angle was 9.75° ± 5.40° (1° - 34°) There was a weak association between age and the severity of osteoarthritis of the hips (left: r= 0.291; right: r=0.275; both Pimpact on measurements of different radiographic

  12. Efficacy of strength and aerobic exercise on patient-reported outcomes and structural changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Øiestad, Britt Elin; Østerås, Nina; Frobell, Richard; Grotle, Margreth; Brøgger, Helga; Risberg, May Arna

    2013-01-01

    Open Access Highly Accessed Study protocol Efficacy of strength and aerobic exercise on patient-reported outcomes and structural changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial Britt Elin Øiestad1*, Nina Østerås2, Richard Frobell3, Margreth Grotle4, Helga Brøgger5 and May Arna Risberg16 * Corresponding author: Britt E Øiestad Author Affiliations 1 Norwegian Research Center for Active Rehabilitation ...

  13. Prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome and wrist osteoarthritis in long-term paraplegic patients compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, M; Penzkofer, S; Weber, M A; Bruckner, T; Winterstein, M; Jung, M

    2014-02-01

    We compared functional and structural changes in the hands, in particular the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome, in 56 paraplegic patients who had been wheelchair dependent for over 25 years with a group of able-bodied volunteers (with matching criteria for gender and age). The hands were assessed by clinical examination, electrophysiology, disabilities of the arm shoulder and hand score and magnetic resonance imaging. Hand function was worse and wrist pain was experienced more often in the paraplegic patients, and they also had a significantly higher prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome both clinically and electrophysiologically. The prevalence of wrist and trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis was significantly higher in the right hand.

  14. [Clinical features of atypical refractory anemia (RA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, A; Jinnai, I; Kusumoto, S; Shiramatsu, F; Bessho, M; Saito, M; Hirashima, K

    1991-08-01

    Twenty-three patients with bicytopenia or pancytopenia were retrospectively studied. The patients with underlying disorders, blast count of more than 5% on bone marrow (BM) aspirate, blast count of more than 1% on peripheral blood or ringed sideroblast count of more than 15% on BM aspirate were excluded. According to Yoshida's criteria, 23 patients were classified into 6 subtypes [AA (aplastic anemia)1: typical AA, AA2: atypical AA, MDS (myelodysplastic syndrome)3: typical RA (refractory anemia, MDS4-6: atypical RA], and AA1 7 cases; AA2 2 cases; MDS3 5 cases; MDS4 1 case; MDS5 2 cases; MDS6 6 cases. To clarify the clinical features of atypical RA group (MDS4-6), we investigated ferrokinetics, RBC life span, karyotype, serum Epo (erythropoietin) concentration, response to therapy and prognosis. Results were as follows: 1) all three RA patients who were younger than 30 years old were included in atypical RA group, 2) in ferrokinetics study PID (plasma iron disappearance time) values of MDS4 and MDS6 patients ranged between those of AA1 and those of MDS3 patients (5 of 7 patients), 3) two cases who developed leukemia belonged to typical RA group, 4) patients with atypical RA showed response to therapy and their prognosis were better than those with typical RA. These observations suggest that atypical RA have different clinical features from typical RA.

  15. Effects of spa therapy on serum leptin and adiponectin levels in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Antonella; Cantarini, Luca; Bacarelli, Maria Romana; de Lalla, Arianna; Ceccatelli, Linda; Blardi, Patrizia

    2011-07-01

    Adipocytokine, including leptin and adiponectin, may play an important role in the pathophysiology of osteoarthritis (OA). Spa therapy is one of the most commonly used non-pharmacological approaches for OA, but its mechanisms of action are not completely known. The aim of the present study was to assess whether spa therapy modified plasma levels of leptin and adiponectin in thirty patients with knee OA treated with a cycle of a combination of daily locally applied mud-packs and bicarbonate-sulphate mineral bath water. Leptin and adiponectin plasma levels were assessed at baseline and after 2 weeks, upon completion of the spa treatment period. The concentrations of leptin and adiponectin were measured by ELISA. At basal time, plasma leptin levels were significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI) and gender, but no significant correlation was found with patient age, duration of disease, radiographic severity of knee OA, VAS score or Lequesne index. There was no correlation between plasma adiponectin level and BMI, gender and age, duration of the disease, radiographic severity of knee OA and VAS score. A significant correlation of plasma adiponectin levels was found only with the Lequesne index. At the end of the mud-bath therapy cycle, serum leptin levels showed a slight but not significant increase, while a significant decrease (P leptin and adiponectin concentrations after treatment were not correlated with other clinical parameters. In conclusion, our data show that spa therapy can modify plasma levels of the adipocytokines leptin and adiponectin, important mediators of cartilage metabolism. Whether this effect may play a potential role in OA needs further investigations.

  16. Intra-articular morphine versus bupivacaine for knee motion among patients with osteoarthritis: randomized double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bellini Gazi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Osteoarthritis causes pain and disability in a high percentage of elderly people. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of intra-articular morphine and bupivacaine on the joint flexion and extension angles of patients with knee osteoarthritis. DESIGN AND SETTING: A randomized double-blind study was performed at a pain clinic of Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with pain for more than three months, of intensity greater than three on a numerical scale (zero to 10, were included. G1 patients received 1 mg (1 ml of morphine diluted in 9 ml of saline, intra-articularly, and G2 patients received 25 mg (10 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine without epinephrine. Pain was assessed on a numerical scale and knee flexion and extension angles were measured after administration of the drugs at rest and during movement. The total amount of analgesic supplementation using 500 mg doses of paracetamol was also determined. RESULTS: No significant difference in pain intensity was observed between G1 and G2. Significant decreases in pain at rest and during movement and significant increases in mean flexion and extension angles were observed in both groups, with no significant difference between the two groups. The mean total amount of paracetamol used over a seven-day period was 3578 mg in G1 and 5333 mg in G2 (P = 0.2355; Mann-Whitney test. CONCLUSION: The analgesic effects of 1 mg of morphine and 25 mg of 0.25% bupivacaine were similar among patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

  17. Variations in C-reactive protein, plasma free radicals and fibrinogen values in patients with osteoarthritis treated with Pycnogenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Errichi, S; Zulli, C; Errichi, B M; Vinciguerra, G; Ledda, A; Di Renzo, A; Stuard, S; Dugall, M; Pellegrini, L; Gizzi, G; Ippolito, E; Ricci, A; Cacchio, M; Cipollone, G; Ruffini, I; Fano, F; Hosoi, M; Rohdewald, P

    2008-01-01

    In a previous, double-blind, placebo-controlled study we evaluated the efficacy of a 3-month treatment with Pycnogenol for 156 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Pycnogenol significantly decreased joint pain and improved joint function as evaluated using the WOMAC score and walking performance of patients on a treadmill. In this study, we further investigated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity of Pycnogenol in a subset of the osteoarthritis patients presenting with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and plasma-free radicals. Elevated CRP levels have been suggested to be associated with disease progression in osteoarthritis. In our study, 29 subjects of the Pycnogenol group and 26 patients in the placebo group showed CRP levels higher than 3 mg/l at baseline. Comparison of blood specimens drawn at baseline and after 3-month treatment showed that Pycnogenol significantly decreased plasma free radicals to 70.1% of baseline values. Plasma CRP levels decreased from baseline 3.9 mg/l to 1.1 mg/l in the Pycnogenol group whereas the control group had initial values of 3.9 mg/l which decreased to 3.6 mg/l. The CRP decrease in the Pycnogenol was statistical significant as compared to the control group (P Pycnogenol. No significant changes for plasma free radicals, CRP and fibrinogen were found in the placebo-treated group. The decrease of systemic inflammatory markers suggests that Pycnogenol may exert anti-inflammatory activity in osteoarthritic joints and patients did not present with other ailments or infections. The nature of the anti-inflammatory effects of Pycnogenol with regard to CRP warrants further investigation.

  18. Effects of short-wave therapy in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiming; Zhang, Chi; Gao, Chengfei; Zhu, Siyi; Yang, Lijie; Wei, Quan; He, Chengqi

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-wave therapy with sham or no intervention for the management of patients with knee osteoarthritis. We searched the following databases from their inception up to 26 October 2016: MEDLINE, CENTRAL, EMBASE, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, CINAHL and OpenGrey. Studies included randomized controlled trials compared with a sham or no intervention in patients with knee osteoarthritis. The results were calculated via standardized mean difference (SMD) and risk ratio for continuous variables outcomes as well as dichotomous variables, respectively. Heterogeneity was explored by the I2 test and inverse-variance random effects analysis was applied to all studies. Eight trials (542 patients) met the inclusion criteria. The effect of short-wave therapy on pain was found positive (SMD, -0.53; 95% CI, -0.84 to -0.21). The pain subgroup showed that patients received pulse modality achieved clinical improvement (SMD, -0.83; 95% CI, -1.14 to -0.52) and the pain scale in female patients decreased (SMD, -0.53; 95% CI, -0.98 to -0.08). In terms of extensor strength, short-wave therapy was superior to the control group ( p physical function (SMD, -0.16; 95% CI, -0.36 to 0.05). For adverse effects, there was no significant difference between the treatment and control group. Short-wave therapy is beneficial for relieving pain caused by knee osteoarthritis (the pulse modality seems superior to the continuous modality), and knee extensor muscle combining with isokinetic strength. Function is not improved.

  19. Total knee arthroplasty in motivated patients with knee osteoarthritis and athletic activity approach type goals: a conceptual decision-making model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, John; Kanouse, Zachary; Krupp, Ryan; Caborn, David; Jakob, Rolie

    2011-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis is one of the most common disabling medical conditions. With longer life expectancy the number of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) procedures being performed worldwide is projected to increase dramatically. Patient education, physical activity, bodyweight levels, expectations and goals regarding the ability to continue athletic activity participation are also increasing. For the subset of motivated patients with knee osteoarthritis who have athletic activity approach type goals, early TKA may not be the best knee osteoarthritis treatment option to improve satisfaction, quality of life and outcomes. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to present a conceptual decision-making model designed to improve the knee osteoarthritis treatment intervention outcome for motivated patients with athletic activity approach type goals. The model focuses on improving knee surgeon, patient and rehabilitation clinician dialogue by rank ordering routine activities of daily living and quality of life evoking athletic activities based on knee symptom exacerbation or re-injury risk. This process should help establish realistic patient expectations and goals for a given knee osteoarthritis treatment intervention that will more likely improve self-efficacy, functional independence, satisfaction and outcomes while decreasing the failure risk associated with early TKA.

  20. A Blended Intervention for Patients With Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis in the Physical Therapy Practice: Development and a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossen, Daniël; Kloek, Corelien; Snippe, Harm Wouter; Dekker, Joost; de Bakker, Dinny; Veenhof, Cindy

    2016-02-24

    Blended care, a combination of online and face-to-face care, is seen as a promising treatment option. However, actual use of blended interventions in practice is disappointing. The objective of this study was two folded. The first aim was to develop a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis that matches the values of the users and that can be implemented in the daily routine of physical therapists. The second aim was to investigate the feasibility through interviews and a pilot study. In this paper, we employed the first 3 steps of the CeHRes road map to develop a blended intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. We used interviews, a focus group and discussions with stakeholders to explore the needs, values, and requirements with respect to our to-be-developed blended intervention, which we called e-Exercise. The first version of e-Exercise was tested in a pilot study. Feasibility outcomes, including recruitment rates within each practice, website usage (assignments completed and website visits), and user satisfaction, were measured. In addition, therapists and patients from the pilot study were interviewed to investigate users' experiences. The study captured important information about stakeholders' needs and perspectives. Based on our findings, we created a first version and attuned the application's content, functionality, and structure. Patients and, to lesser extent, physical therapists were satisfied with the e-Exercise intervention. Eight patients were recruited by 8 physical therapists. Of the 8 patients, 6 completed more than 7 of 12 modules. This study outlines the development and feasibility of a blended exercise therapy intervention for patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. E-Exercise offers an alternative approach in the physical therapy treatment of knee and hip osteoarthritis. This study provides valuable information to conduct a further trial to evaluate the (cost) effectiveness of

  1. The role of thermal balneotherapy in the treatment of obese patient with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Vittadini, Filippo; Ferroni, Costanza; Bosco, Anna; Serra, Roberto; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Frizziero, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis clinically characterized by joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life. Several studies have shown a clear link between obesity and higher risk of knee OA. According to the multifactorial OA pathogenesis, the management of this condition requires a multidisciplinary approach. The objective of this study is to evaluate hydrokinesitherapy effects in thermal setting in obese patients with knee OA. Fifty-three patients were assessed for eligibility, of which 33 refused the treatment, while 10 patients dropped out after the enrollment for personal reasons or inability to adhere to the program. Ten patients (8 females, 2 males, mean age of 59.4 years) with obesity (range BMI 30-45 kg/m2) and knee OA (II-III grade of Kellgren-Lawrence scale) treated with hydrokinetic therapy in thermal water (two sessions per week for 8 consecutive weeks) completed the study. Primary outcome measure was pain (VAS). Secondary outcomes were clinical knee evaluation (range of motion—ROM, lower-limb muscle strength), WOMAC, and Lequesne Algofunctional Index. Patellar tendon and peri-articular soft tissue ultrasound evaluation and gait analysis at baseline (T0), at the end of treatment (T1), and at 6 months of follow-up (T2) were performed. Significant decrease on VAS pain during walking on a flat surface and going up/down stairs was reached from baseline at T1 (p = 0.0039; p = 0.0098) and was maintained at T2 (p = 0.00954) exclusively for VAS pain during walking on a flat surface. WOMAC score showed a significant reduction between T0 and T1 (p = 0.0137) and between T0 and T2 (p = 0.006438), as ROM evaluations. Kinematic path assessment did not show significant results in individual gait steps, except for the space-time variables of the average speed and the values of ground reaction force (GRF) obtained with force platforms. Hydrokinesitherapy in thermal environment in obese patients with knee OA may determine pain

  2. The role of thermal balneotherapy in the treatment of obese patient with knee osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Vittadini, Filippo; Ferroni, Costanza; Bosco, Anna; Serra, Roberto; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Frizziero, Antonio

    2018-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis clinically characterized by joint pain, functional limitation, and reduced quality of life. Several studies have shown a clear link between obesity and higher risk of knee OA. According to the multifactorial OA pathogenesis, the management of this condition requires a multidisciplinary approach. The objective of this study is to evaluate hydrokinesitherapy effects in thermal setting in obese patients with knee OA. Fifty-three patients were assessed for eligibility, of which 33 refused the treatment, while 10 patients dropped out after the enrollment for personal reasons or inability to adhere to the program. Ten patients (8 females, 2 males, mean age of 59.4 years) with obesity (range BMI 30-45 kg/m2) and knee OA (II-III grade of Kellgren-Lawrence scale) treated with hydrokinetic therapy in thermal water (two sessions per week for 8 consecutive weeks) completed the study. Primary outcome measure was pain (VAS). Secondary outcomes were clinical knee evaluation (range of motion—ROM, lower-limb muscle strength), WOMAC, and Lequesne Algofunctional Index. Patellar tendon and peri-articular soft tissue ultrasound evaluation and gait analysis at baseline (T0), at the end of treatment (T1), and at 6 months of follow-up (T2) were performed. Significant decrease on VAS pain during walking on a flat surface and going up/down stairs was reached from baseline at T1 ( p = 0.0039; p = 0.0098) and was maintained at T2 ( p = 0.00954) exclusively for VAS pain during walking on a flat surface. WOMAC score showed a significant reduction between T0 and T1 ( p = 0.0137) and between T0 and T2 ( p = 0.006438), as ROM evaluations. Kinematic path assessment did not show significant results in individual gait steps, except for the space-time variables of the average speed and the values of ground reaction force (GRF) obtained with force platforms. Hydrokinesitherapy in thermal environment in obese patients with knee OA may determine

  3. Efficacy of mesenchymal stem cells in treating patients with osteoarthritis of the knee: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Gang-Hua; Wang, Yang Yang; Li, Chang-Jun; Shi, Chen-Hui; Wang, Wei-Shan

    2016-11-01

    To assess the clinical efficacy and safety of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA), a systematic electronic literature search was performed on PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science. Studies published in English from the earliest record to December 2014 were searched using the following keywords: Cartilage defect, cartilage repair, osteoarthritis, KOA, stem cells, MSCs, bone marrow concentrate (BMC), adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells and peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The effect sizes of selected studies were determined by extracting pain scores from the visual analog scale and functional changes from International Knee Documentation Committee and Lysholm and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index before and after MSCs or reference treatments at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The factors were analyzed and the outcomes were modified after comparing the MSC group pooled values with the pretreatment baseline or between different treatment arms. A systematic search identified 18 clinical trials on this topic, including 10 single-arm prospective studies, four quasi-experimental studies and four randomized controlled trials that used BMCs to treat 565 patients with KOA in total. MSC treatment in patients with KOA showed continual efficacy for 24 months compared with their pretreatment condition. Effectiveness of MSCs was improved at 12 and 24 months post-treatment, compared with at 3 and 6 months. No dose-responsive association in the MSCs numbers was demonstrated. However, patients with arthroscopic debridement, activation agent or lower degrees of Kellgren-Lawrence grade achieved improved outcomes. MSC application ameliorated the overall outcomes of patients with KOA, including pain relief and functional improvement from basal evaluations, particularly at 12 and 24 months after follow-up.

  4. Clinical profile, level of affection and therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis in primary care: The Spanish multicenter study EVALÚA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño Carou, Ana; Pita Fernández, Salvador; Pértega Díaz, Sonia; de Toro Santos, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    To determine the clinical profile, degree of involvement and management in patients with knee, hip or hand osteoarthritis. Observational study (health centers from 14 autonomous regions, n=363 primary care physicians), involving patients with clinical and/or radiological criteria for osteoarthritis from the American College of Rheumatology, consecutively selected (n=1,258). Sociodemographic variables, clinical and radiological findings, comorbidity and therapeutic management were analyzed. Mean age was 68.0±9.5 years old; 77.8% were women and 47.6% obese. Distribution by location was: 84.3% knee, 23.4% hip, 14.7% hands. All patients reported pain. The most frequent radiographic Kellgren-Lawrence grade was stage 3 for knee and hip (42.9% and 51.9%, respectively), and 3 (37.2%) and 2 (34.5%) for hip. Time since onset of osteoarthritis symptoms was 9.4±7.5 years, with a mean age at onset of around 60 years old and a family history of osteoarthritis in 66.0%. The most frequent comorbidities were: hypertension (55.1%), depression/anxiety (24.7%) and gastroduodenal diseases (22.9%). A total of 97.6% of the patients received pharmacological treatment, with oral analgesics (paracetamol) (70.5%) and oral NSAIDs (67.9%) being the most frequent drugs. Bilateral osteoarthritis was present in 76.9% of patients with knee osteoarthritis, 59.3% in hip and 94.7% in hands. Female gender and time since onset were associated with bilateral knee and hip osteoarthritis. The profile of the osteoarthritis patient is female, >65 years old, overweight/obese, with comorbidity, frequent symptoms and moderate radiologic involvement. Most of patients had bilateral osteoarthritis, associated with female gender and time since onset of disease. Paracetamol was the most common pharmacological treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Gait Biomechanics and Patient-Reported Function as Predictors of Response to a Hip Strengthening Exercise Intervention in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobsar, Dylan; Osis, Sean T.; Hettinga, Blayne A.; Ferber, Reed

    2015-01-01

    Objective Muscle strengthening exercises have been shown to improve pain and function in adults with mild-to-moderate knee osteoarthritis, but individual response rates can vary greatly. Predicting individuals who respond and those who do not is important in developing a more efficient and effective model of care for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use pre-intervention gait kinematics and patient-reported outcome measures to predict post-intervention response to a 6-week hip strengthening exercise intervention in patients with mild-to-moderate knee OA. Methods Thirty-nine patients with mild-to-moderate knee osteoarthritis completed a 6-week hip-strengthening program and were subgrouped as Non-Responders, Low-Responders, or High-Responders following the intervention based on their change in Knee injury Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Predictors of responder subgroups were retrospectively determined from baseline patient-reported outcome measures and kinematic gait parameters in a discriminant analysis of principal components. A 3–4 year follow-up on 16 of the patients with knee OA was also done to examine long-term changes in these parameters. Results A unique combination of patient-reported outcome measures and kinematic factors was able to successfully subgroup patients with knee osteoarthritis with a cross-validated classification accuracy of 85.4%. Lower patient-reported function in daily living (ADL) scores and hip frontal plane kinematics during the loading response were most important in classifying High-Responders from other sub-groups, while a combination of hip, knee, ankle kinematics were used to classify Non-Responders from Low-Responders. Conclusion Patient-reported outcome measures and objective biomechanical gait data can be an effective method of predicting individual treatment success to an exercise intervention. Measuring gait kinematics, along with patient-reported outcome measures in a clinical setting

  6. Altered Expression of Wnt Signaling Pathway Components in Osteogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Tornero-Esteban

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by altered homeostasis of joint cartilage and bone, whose functional properties rely on chondrocytes and osteoblasts, belonging to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. WNT signaling acts as a hub integrating and crosstalking with other signaling pathways leading to the regulation of MSC functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existence of a differential signaling between Healthy and OA-MSCs during osteogenesis.MSCs of seven OA patients and six healthy controls were isolated, characterised and expanded. During in vitro osteogenesis, cells were recovered at days 1, 10 and 21. RNA and protein content was obtained. Expression of WNT pathway genes was evaluated using RT-qPCR. Functional studies were also performed to study the MSC osteogenic commitment and functional and post-traslational status of β-catenin and several receptor tyrosine kinases.Several genes were downregulated in OA-MSCs during osteogenesis in vitro. These included soluble Wnts, inhibitors, receptors, co-receptors, several kinases and transcription factors. Basal levels of β-catenin were higher in OA-MSCs, but calcium deposition and expression of osteogenic genes was similar between Healthy and OA-MSCs. Interestingly an increased phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2 signaling node was present in OA-MSCs.Our results point to the existence in OA-MSCs of alterations in expression of Wnt pathway components during in vitro osteogenesis that are partially compensated by post-translational mechanisms modulating the function of other pathways. We also point the relevance of other signaling pathways in OA pathophysiology suggesting their role in the maintenance of joint homeostasis through modulation of MSC osteogenic potential.

  7. Altered Expression of Wnt Signaling Pathway Components in Osteogenesis of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero-Esteban, Pilar; Peralta-Sastre, Ascensión; Herranz, Eva; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Mucientes, Arkaitz; Abásolo, Lydia; Marco, Fernando; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Lamas, José Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by altered homeostasis of joint cartilage and bone, whose functional properties rely on chondrocytes and osteoblasts, belonging to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). WNT signaling acts as a hub integrating and crosstalking with other signaling pathways leading to the regulation of MSC functions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existence of a differential signaling between Healthy and OA-MSCs during osteogenesis. MSCs of seven OA patients and six healthy controls were isolated, characterised and expanded. During in vitro osteogenesis, cells were recovered at days 1, 10 and 21. RNA and protein content was obtained. Expression of WNT pathway genes was evaluated using RT-qPCR. Functional studies were also performed to study the MSC osteogenic commitment and functional and post-traslational status of β-catenin and several receptor tyrosine kinases. Several genes were downregulated in OA-MSCs during osteogenesis in vitro. These included soluble Wnts, inhibitors, receptors, co-receptors, several kinases and transcription factors. Basal levels of β-catenin were higher in OA-MSCs, but calcium deposition and expression of osteogenic genes was similar between Healthy and OA-MSCs. Interestingly an increased phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2) signaling node was present in OA-MSCs. Our results point to the existence in OA-MSCs of alterations in expression of Wnt pathway components during in vitro osteogenesis that are partially compensated by post-translational mechanisms modulating the function of other pathways. We also point the relevance of other signaling pathways in OA pathophysiology suggesting their role in the maintenance of joint homeostasis through modulation of MSC osteogenic potential.

  8. Effect of anatomic realignment on muscle function during gait in patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Dan K; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Lewek, Michael; Newcomb, William; Rudolph, Katherine S

    2007-04-15

    Individuals with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) and genu varum use different movement and muscle activation patterns to increase joint stability during gait. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether opening-wedge high-tibial osteotomy (OW-HTO) corrected pathomechanical abnormalities associated with the progression of knee OA. Fifteen patients diagnosed with medial knee OA and genu varum who were scheduled for OW-HTO were tested prior to and 1 year following OW-HTO. Fifteen age- and sex-matched controls were also tested. Frontal plane laxity was measured from stress radiographs. All participants underwent quadriceps strength testing with a burst superimposition technique and gait analysis with surface electromyography to calculate knee joint kinematics and kinetics and muscle co-contraction during the stance phase of gait. Participants rated their knee function and instability using a self-report questionnaire. Static alignment improved following the surgery. Medial laxity (P = 0.003) and instability (P = 0.002) significantly improved, and statistical reductions in the adduction moment resulted in lower levels of vastus medialis-medial gastrocnemius muscle co-contractions (P = 0.089). Despite improvements in global rating of knee function (P = 0.001), the OA group's ratings remained significantly lower than those of the healthy controls (P = 0.001). Quadriceps strength deficits and knee flexion impairments persisted. Persistent quadriceps weakness and impaired knee kinematics after realignment suggest that the movement strategy may perpetuate joint destruction and impede the long-term success of realignment. Rehabilitation should focus on quadriceps strength and improving joint mobility to improve the long-term function of individuals with medial knee OA.

  9. Prospective clinical evaluation of a novel anatomic cuff for forearm crutches in patients with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hügle, Thomas; Arnieri, Ansgar; Bünter, Margerita; Schären, Stefan; Mündermann, Annegret

    2017-03-14

    The use of forearm crutches has been associated with pain and neuropraxia along the ulnar bone. Whilst anatomic grips have improved comfort of crutch walking, to date anatomic forearm cuffs have not been clinically evaluated. The aim of this clinical pilot study was to determine if the use of forearm crutches with anatomic cuffs reduces pain and increases comfort and function in long-term users of forearm crutches during a 4-week period. Prospective study in ten patients suffering from end-stage osteoarthritis of the lower extremity. All participants were long-term users of conventional forearm crutches. Participants used forearm crutches with an anatomically shaped cuff for 4-weeks. General health was assessed using the SF-36, and the crutches were evaluated using a newly developed questionnaire focusing on symptoms along the forearm. Pain and paresthesia along the forearms decreased by 3.3 points (95% confidence interval difference (CI): [-5.0; -1.6], p = .004) and 3.5 points (95%CI: [-5.1; -1.9], p = .002), respectively, after using the crutches with the new anatomic cuff for 4 weeks. Comfort and sense of security of crutch use increased by 3.0 points (95%CI: [1.3; 4.7], p = .007) and 2.4 points (95%CI: [0.7; 4.1], p = .024). Cross-correlation analysis revealed correlations among items in the same item category and no correlations between items of different item categories of the new questionnaires. An anatomically shaped cuff increases comfort of forearm crutches. Further research should confirm long-term clinical improvement. This study was registered retrospectively in ISRCTN (TRN: ISRCTN 11135150 ) on 14/02/2017.

  10. Differences in pain intensity in anti- and pro-nociceptive pain profile subgroups in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossmann, Tanja; Brauner, Torsten; Horstmann, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Facilitated temporal summation is one component of central sensitization. The aim of this exploratory study was to classify pro-, eu- and antinociceptive subgroups based on wind-up ratio cut-off scores in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA).  A total of 56 patients with knee OA met the inclusion criteria. Temporal summation was measured and wind-up ratio was calculated. Reference values of 180 healthy subjects were used to define wind-up ratio cut-off scores. Twenty-seven percent of patients showed a pro-nociceptive pain profile. Sixteen percent of patients showed an anti-nociceptive pain profile. A eu-nociceptive pain profile was present in 57% of patients. Central pain sensitization was present in approximately a third of knee OA patients. The results should be confirmed in larger studies.

  11. Osteoarthritis, obesity and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Leeds, A R; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is widely acknowledged as a risk factor for both the incidence and progression of osteoarthritis, and has a negative influence on outcomes. Loss of at least 10% of body weight, coupled with exercise, is recognized as a cornerstone in the management of obese patients with osteoarthritis......, and can lead to significant improvement in symptoms, pain relief, physical function and health-related quality of life. However, questions still remain surrounding optimal management. Given the significant health, social and economic burden of osteoarthritis, especially in obese patients, it is imperative...... to advance our knowledge of osteoarthritis and obesity, and apply this to improving care and outcomes. This paper overviews what is already known about osteoarthritis and obesity, discusses current key challenges and ongoing hypotheses arising from research in these areas, and finally, postulates what...

  12. Long-term tolerability of topical diclofenac sodium 1% gel for osteoarthritis in seniors and patients with comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peniston JH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available John H Peniston,1 Morris S Gold,2 Matthew S Wieman,3 Lawrence K Alwine41Feasterville Family Health Care Center, Feasterville, PA, 2Clinical Research and Biostatistics, Novartis Consumer Health Inc, Parsippany, NJ, 3Medical Affairs, Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc, Chadds Ford, PA, 4Downingtown Family Medicine, Downingtown, PA, USABackground: Adverse events associated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs used to treat knee and hand osteoarthritis may be more frequent in certain patient populations. Topical NSAIDs, such as diclofenac sodium 1% gel (DSG, have equivalent efficacy and fewer adverse events compared with oral NSAIDs. This post hoc analysis assessed the long-term tolerability of DSG in elderly patients and patients with an elevated risk of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal adverse events.Methods: Patients ≥ 35 years of age with knee osteoarthritis applied DSG (4 g to one or both knees for 12 weeks during either of two primary studies and for 9 months during a long-term extension study. Other patients entered the long-term extension study directly and applied DSG for 12 months. Safety was assessed by reported adverse events. Subpopulations were defined based on age, or the comorbidities of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease.Results: The safety population consisted of 947 patients who received at least one dose of DSG during the primary or extension study. Patients aged < 65 years (68.2% and ≥65 years (67.2% experienced any adverse event at similar rates. The percentage of patients who experienced any adverse event was similar between patients with and without hypertension (65.5% versus 69.7%, respectively, type 2 diabetes mellitus (64.0% versus 68.2%, or cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease (61.9% versus 68.5%. Among the 15 patients with all three comorbidities, the percentage of patients with any adverse event (53.3% was less than that of patients who did not

  13. A comparison of the biomechanical effects of valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard K; Nester, Christopher J; Richards, Jim D; Kim, Winston Y; Johnson, David S; Jari, Sanjiv; Laxton, Philip; Tyson, Sarah F

    2013-03-01

    Increases in the external knee adduction moment (EKAM) have been associated with increased mechanical load at the knee and progression of knee osteoarthritis. Valgus knee braces and lateral wedged insoles are common approaches to reducing this loading; however no study has directly compared the biomechanical and clinical effects of these two treatments in patients with medial tibiofemoral osteoarthritis. A cross-over randomised design was used where each intervention was worn by 28 patients for a two week period. Pre- and post-intervention gait kinematic/kinetic data and clinical outcomes were collected to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical effects on the knee joint. The valgus knee brace and the lateral wedged insole significantly increased walking speed, reduced the early stance EKAM by 7% and 12%, and the knee adduction angular impulse by 8.6 and 16.1% respectively. The lateral wedged insole significantly reduced the early stance EKAM compared to the valgus knee brace (p=0.001). The valgus knee brace significantly reduced the knee varus angle compared to the baseline and lateral wedged insole. Improvements in pain and function subscales were comparable for the valgus knee brace and lateral wedged insole. There were no significant differences between the two treatments in any of the clinical outcomes; however the lateral wedged insoles demonstrated greater levels of acceptance by patients. This is the first study to biomechanically compare these two treatments, and demonstrates that given the potential role of knee loading in osteoarthritis progression, that both treatments reduce this but lateral wedge insoles appear to have a greater effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy and safety of Curcuma domestica extracts compared with ibuprofen in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai; Dajpratham, Piyapat; Taechaarpornkul, Wirat; Buntragulpoontawee, Montana; Lukkanapichonchut, Pranee; Chootip, Chirawan; Saengsuwan, Jittima; Tantayakom, Kesthamrong; Laongpech, Supphalak

    2014-01-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of Curcuma domestica extracts in pain reduction and functional improvement. 367 primary knee osteoarthritis patients with a pain score of 5 or higher were randomized to receive ibuprofen 1,200 mg/day or C. domestica extracts 1,500 mg/day for 4 weeks. The main outcomes were Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total, WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, and WOMAC function scores. Adverse events (AEs) were also recorded. 185 and 182 patients were randomly assigned into C. domestica extracts and ibuprofen groups, respectively. The baseline characteristics were no different between groups. The mean of all WOMAC scores at weeks 0, 2, and 4 showed significant improvement when compared with the baseline in both groups. After using the noninferiority test, the mean difference (95% confidence interval) of WOMAC total, WOMAC pain, and WOMAC function scores at week 4 adjusted by values at week 0 of C. domestica extracts were noninferior to those for the ibuprofen group (P=0.010, P=0.018, and P=0.010, respectively), except for the WOMAC stiffness subscale, which showed a trend toward significance (P=0.060). The number of patients who developed AEs was no different between groups. However, the number of events of abdominal pain/discomfort was significantly higher in the ibuprofen group than that in the C. domestica extracts group (P=0.046). Most subjects (96%-97%) were satisfied with the treatment, and two-thirds rated themselves as improved in a global assessment. C. domestica extracts are as effective as ibuprofen for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. The side effect profile was similar but with fewer gastrointestinal AE reports in the C. domestica extracts group.

  15. Effects of Arctium lappa L. (Burdock) root tea on inflammatory status and oxidative stress in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoumi-Norouzabad, Leila; Alipoor, Beitollah; Abed, Reza; Eftekhar Sadat, Bina; Mesgari-Abbasi, Mehran; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to examine the effect of Burdock root tea on inflammatory markers and oxidative stress indicators in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Thirty-six patients (10 men and 26 women) aged 50-70 years old with knee osteoarthritis referred to the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department of the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences Hospitals, were selected for the study and randomly divided into two groups. Anthropometric measurements, including height, weight and body mass index (BMI) were measured. For all individuals along the 42 days of study period, the same drug treatments, including two lots of 500 mg acetaminophen twice a day and one glucosamine 500 mg once a day,were considered. The intervention group received daily three cups of Burdock root tea (each cup containing 2 g/150 mL boiled water) half-hour after the meal. The control group received three cups containing 150 cc boiled water daily. We assessed inflammatory markers such as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and oxidative stress indicators such as total antioxidants capacity (TAC), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances before and after the intervention. The results showed that burdock root tea significantly decreased the levels of serum IL-6 (P = 0.002), hs-CRP (P = 0.003) and malondialdehyde (P Arctium lappa L. root tea improves inflammatory status and oxidative stress in patients with knee osteoarthritis. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Efficacy and safety of Curcuma domestica extracts compared with ibuprofen in patients with knee osteoarthritis: a multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai; Dajpratham, Piyapat; Taechaarpornkul, Wirat; Buntragulpoontawee, Montana; Lukkanapichonchut, Pranee; Chootip, Chirawan; Saengsuwan, Jittima; Tantayakom, Kesthamrong; Laongpech, Supphalak

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy and safety of Curcuma domestica extracts in pain reduction and functional improvement. Methods 367 primary knee osteoarthritis patients with a pain score of 5 or higher were randomized to receive ibuprofen 1,200 mg/day or C. domestica extracts 1,500 mg/day for 4 weeks. The main outcomes were Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) total, WOMAC pain, WOMAC stiffness, and WOMAC function scores. Adverse events (AEs) were also recorded. Results 185 and 182 patients were randomly assigned into C. domestica extracts and ibuprofen groups, respectively. The baseline characteristics were no different between groups. The mean of all WOMAC scores at weeks 0, 2, and 4 showed significant improvement when compared with the baseline in both groups. After using the noninferiority test, the mean difference (95% confidence interval) of WOMAC total, WOMAC pain, and WOMAC function scores at week 4 adjusted by values at week 0 of C. domestica extracts were noninferior to those for the ibuprofen group (P=0.010, P=0.018, and P=0.010, respectively), except for the WOMAC stiffness subscale, which showed a trend toward significance (P=0.060). The number of patients who developed AEs was no different between groups. However, the number of events of abdominal pain/discomfort was significantly higher in the ibuprofen group than that in the C. domestica extracts group (P=0.046). Most subjects (96%–97%) were satisfied with the treatment, and two-thirds rated themselves as improved in a global assessment. Conclusion C. domestica extracts are as effective as ibuprofen for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis. The side effect profile was similar but with fewer gastrointestinal AE reports in the C. domestica extracts group. PMID:24672232

  17. Associations between weather conditions and clinical symptoms in patients with hip osteoarthritis: a 2-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorleijn, Desirée M J; Luijsterburg, Pim A J; Burdorf, Alex; Rozendaal, Rianne M; Verhaar, Jan A N; Bos, Pieter K; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this study was to assess whether there is an association between ambient weather conditions and patients' clinical symptoms in patients with hip osteoarthritis (OA). The design was a cohort study with a 2-year follow-up and 3-monthly measurements and prospectively collected data on weather variables. The study population consisted of 222 primary care patients with hip OA. Weather variables included temperature, wind speed, total amount of sun hours, precipitation, barometric pressure, and relative humidity. The primary outcomes were severity of hip pain and hip disability as measured with the Western Ontario and McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and function subscales. Associations between hip pain and hip disability and the weather variables were assessed using crude and multivariate adjusted linear mixed-model analysis for repeated measurements. On the day of questionnaire completion, mean relative humidity was associated with WOMAC pain (estimate 0.1; 95% confidence interval=0.0-0.2; P=.02). Relative humidity contributed weather variables were not associated with the WOMAC pain or function score. Our results support the general opinion of OA patients that barometric pressure and relative humidity influence perceived OA symptoms. However, the contribution of these weather variables (< or = 1%) to the severity of OA symptoms is not considered to be clinically relevant. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy with Serum YKL-40 and ultrasonography in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Ümit; Aşık, Gülşah; Ulaşlı, Alper Murat; Sınıcı, Şükrü; Yaman, Fatima; Solak, Özlem; Toktaş, Hasan; Eroğlu, Selma

    2016-03-01

    The use of biomarkers of osteoarthritis (OA) have potential for early diagnosis, evaluation of disease severity and monitoring treatment. Serum and synovial fluid YKL-40 levels are increased in severe knee OA. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy is a novel treatment method for OA. However, studies evaluating the PEMF therapy in treatment of knee OA revealed conflicting results. This study was conducted to objectively assess the effect of PEMF therapy in patients with knee OA, by using ultrasonographic measurements and a novel biomarker, YKL-40. Forty patients were randomized into two treatment groups. Both groups received conventional physical therapy, while Group 1 received additional PEMF therapy. The patients were asked to rate their pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and complete a Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) questionnaire. Serum YKL-40 levels were measured, and knee effusion and cartilage degeneration level were evaluated with ultrasonography before and after treatment. Pre-treatment YKL-40 level was correlated with WOMAC pain subscale (P = 0.032, r = 0.339). VAS and WOMAC scores significantly improved in both treatment groups (P therapy has no additional effect on pain in patients with knee OA. Serum YKL-40 level seems to be unuseful for monitoring the treatment in knee OA. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Osteoarthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Osteoarthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... for those with osteoarthritis. TREATMENT The Diagnosis of Osteoarthritis When diagnosing osteoarthritis, your doctor will ask you ...

  20. Expression of Biomarkers CXCR4, IL11-RA, TFF1, MLF1P in Advanced Breast Cancer Patients with Bone Metastatic: a Diagnostic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosphiadi Irawan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze expression of biomarkers CXCR4, IL11-RA, TFF1 and MLF1P, and clinicopathology in advanced breast cancer patients with bone metastatic. Methods: this is a cross-sectional study. Analysis was done against a total of 92 breast cancer patients, including 46 bone metastatic patients and 46 non-bone metastatic patients. Immunohistochemistry and microarray analysis was performed in 81 formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE samples from 81 patients were used. Data were collected through medical records, immunohistochemistry (IHC, and microarray with nanoString nCounterTM. Results: this article is part one of a two stage reporting research results. In part one we got the results of the IHC analysis, IL11-RA with cut-off ≥103.5 showed OR 3.803 (95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.375-10.581, p=0.010, MLF1P with cut-off ≥83.0 OR 2.784 (95% CI, 1.009-7.681, p=0.048, and ER+ OR 7.640 (95 % CI, 2.599-22.459, p<0.000, were associated with bone metastastic incidences in advanced breast cancer, and were statistically significantly different. A combination of IL-11RA, MLF1P and ER+, showed an accuracy of approaching 80% to discriminate between bone metastatic and non bone metastatic in advanced breast cancer patients. Conclusion: IL11-RA, MLF1P, and ER+ were the determinants that were associated with increasing bone metastasis incidence.

  1. Is Phytalgic (R) a goldmine for osteoarthritis patients or is there something fishy about this nutraceutical?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Robin; Bliddal, Henning

    2010-01-01

    A food supplement containing fish oils, urtica dioica, zinc, and vitamin E (Phytalgic) for osteoarthritis (OA) has now been tested in a placebo-controlled trial for 3 months and according to the authors has a very large clinical effect, considerably larger than that of any other known product. Ev...

  2. Impact of Rehabilitation on Health Related Quality of Life in Patients with Hip Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divjak Ana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hip osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative, progressive musculoskeletal system disease in adult individuals. Both genders demonstrate a similar prevalence at 11.5% for men and 11.6% for women. During the initial stage of hip OA, conservative treatments may significantly decrease pain, provide functional improvement and enhance health related quality of life (HRQoL.

  3. Gait changes in patients with knee osteoarthritis are replicated by experimental knee pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Aaboe, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by pain and associated with abnormal knee moments during walking. The relationship between knee OA pain and gait changes remains to be clarified, and a better understanding of this link could advance the treatment and prevention of disease progress...

  4. Prognostic biomarkers in osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attur, Mukundan; Krasnokutsky-Samuels, Svetlana; Samuels, Jonathan; Abramson, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Identification of patients at risk for incident disease or disease progression in osteoarthritis remains challenging, as radiography is an insensitive reflection of molecular changes that presage cartilage and bone abnormalities. Thus there is a widely appreciated need for biochemical and imaging biomarkers. We describe recent developments with such biomarkers to identify osteoarthritis patients who are at risk for disease progression. Recent findings The biochemical markers currently under evaluation include anabolic, catabolic, and inflammatory molecules representing diverse biological pathways. A few promising cartilage and bone degradation and synthesis biomarkers are in various stages of development, awaiting further validation in larger populations. A number of studies have shown elevated expression levels of inflammatory biomarkers, both locally (synovial fluid) and systemically (serum and plasma). These chemical biomarkers are under evaluation in combination with imaging biomarkers to predict early onset and the burden of disease. Summary Prognostic biomarkers may be used in clinical knee osteoarthritis to identify subgroups in whom the disease progresses at different rates. This could facilitate our understanding of the pathogenesis and allow us to differentiate phenotypes within a heterogeneous knee osteoarthritis population. Ultimately, such findings may help facilitate the development of disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs). PMID:23169101

  5. Efficacy of multimodal, systematic non-surgical treatment of knee osteoarthritis for patients not eligible for a total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Soren Thorgaard; Roos, Ewa M.; Laursen, Mogens Berg

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: It is recommended that non-operative treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) should be individually tailored and include multiple treatment modalities. Despite these recommendations, no one has yet investigated the efficacy of combining several non-surgical treatment modalities...... in a randomised controlled study. The purpose of this randomised controlled study is to examine if an optimised, combined non-surgical treatment programme results in greater improvements in pain, function and quality of life in comparison with usual care in patients with KOA who are not eligible for total knee...

  6. Association of Pain Catastrophizing With Static Balance, Mobility, or Functional Capacity in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Blind Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; Politti, Fabiano; Camillo de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether catastrophizing is associated with static balance, mobility, and functional capacity in patients with knee osteoarthritis. A blind, cross-sectional study was conducted involving 60 volunteers (males and females), ages 40 to 80 years, with a diagnosis of knee osteoarthritis. Patients were recruited from a physical therapy clinic in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The following measures were used for the evaluations: Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale, Functional Reach Test, Timed Up and Go Test, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index. In statistical analysis, histograms were created to determine distribution of data. Spearman's correlation coefficients (rs) were then calculated to determine the strength of the associations among the variables. No significant correlation was found between the Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale score and the other clinical measures employed in the present study: Functional Reach Test (rs = 0.151; P = .249), Timed Up and Go Test (rs = -0.147; P =.264), Lower Extremity Functional Scale (rs = 0.023; P = .860), and Western Ontario and McMaster University Osteoarthritis (rs = -0.222; P = .088). In this study, catastrophizing was not associated with static balance, mobility, or functional capacity in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Identifying compositional and structural changes in spongy and subchondral bone from the hip joints of patients with osteoarthritis using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwald, Tomasz; Niciejewski, Krzysztof; Kozielski, Marek; Szybowicz, Mirosław; Siatkowski, Marcin; Krauss, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Raman microspectroscopy was used to examine the biochemical composition and molecular structure of extracellular matrix in spongy and subchondral bone collected from patients with clinical and radiological evidence of idiopathic osteoarthritis of the hip and from patients who underwent a femoral neck fracture, as a result of trauma, without previous clinical and radiological evidence of osteoarthritis. The objectives of the study were to determine the levels of mineralization, carbonate accumulation and collagen quality in bone tissue. The subchondral bone from osteoarthritis patients in comparison with control subject is less mineralized due to a decrease in the hydroxyapatite concentration. However, the extent of carbonate accumulation in the apatite crystal lattice increases, most likely due to deficient mineralization. The alpha helix to random coil band area ratio reveals that collagen matrix in subchondral bone is more ordered in osteoarthritis disease. The hydroxyapatite to collagen, carbonate apatite to hydroxyapatite and alpha helix to random coil band area ratios are not significantly changed in the differently loaded sites of femoral head. The significant differences also are not visible in mineral and organic constituents' content in spongy bone beneath the subchondral bone in osteoarthritis disease.

  8. Reliability and Validity of the Cross-Culturally Adapted Thai Version of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia in Knee Osteoarthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeudomwong, Pattanasin; Buttagat, Vitsarut

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a cross-culturally adapted Thai version of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK) and investigate its reliability and validity among patients with knee osteoarthritis. The TSK was translated into Thai language and culturally adapted in line with the international standards. The Thai TSK questionnaire was then tested for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and convergent validity by comparing it with the visual analogue scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Timed Up and Go Test. Eighty patients with knee osteoarthritis were included in the study. The Thai version of the TSK was easily comprehended and completed within 6 minutes. The questionnaire showed a good internal consistency (α = 0.90) and high test-retest reliability {ICC (2,1) = 0.934}. Convergent validity showed high correlations with the visual analogue scale, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (r = 0.741, 0.856, and 0.817, respectively). However, there was no significant correlation between the Thai version of the TSK scores and the Timed Up and Go Test results. The Thai version of the TSK has satisfactory reliability and validity for the evaluation of pain-related fear of movement/(re)injury in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

  9. Domains of quality of life affecting elderly patients with hand osteoarthritis: a qualitative study in the Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumboo, Julian; Wu, Li; Leung, Ying Ying

    2017-09-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is common but little is known about how HOA has impact on disability and quality of life (QoL).We aim to identify important domains of concern among participants suffering from symptomatic HOA in Singapore, representing an Asian socio-cultural context. A qualitative study using a focus group technique was performed. We ran focus groups stratified by gender, ethnicity and language. Two independent, trained analysts identified relevant categories and assigned codes to text segments through open coding, with discrepancies resolved through consensus. The final lists of domains and subthemes descriptive of QoL were then compared to the following commonly used HOA specific instruments: Functional Index for Hand Osteoarthritis (FIHOA), Score for Assessment and quantification of Chronic Rheumatic Affections of the Hand (SACRAH), Australian/Canadian Hand Osteoarthritis Index (AUSCAN); and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ). Twenty-six patients (23 women, three men; 24 Chinese and two Malay; mean ± SD age 62.9 ± 7.5 years) with symptomatic HOA according to the American College of Rheumatology Classification Criteria participated in seven focus groups. Two and five focus groups were conducted in Chinese and English, respectively. The qualitative analysis revealed pain, stiffness and functional disability as the main domains. However, psychological consequences, aesthetic concerns, participation in leisure activities, participation in family roles were important concepts from the focus groups which were not covered by existing instruments. Impact on work productivity by HOA and the unmet health care need is revealed. The domains of concepts important to people with HOA in an Asian socio-cultural context are not fully represented in the most commonly used instruments. Further studies on the selection of main domains relevant to HOA patients are necessary. © 2016 The Authors. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases published by Asia

  10. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  11. Low validity of the Sensewear Pro3 activity monitor compared to indirect calorimetry during simulated free living in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Andreas; Ried-Larsen, Mathias; Jensen, Andreas Emil Kryger

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To validate physical activity estimates by the Sensewear Pro3 activity monitor compared with indirect calorimetry during simulated free living in patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the hip pre or post total hip arthroplasty. METHODS: Twenty patients diagnosed with hip osteoarth...

  12. Exposure to potential CYP450 pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions among osteoarthritis patients: incremental risk of multiple prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Labhsetwar, Sumedha A; Puenpatom, R Amy; Joo, Seongjung; Ben-Joseph, Rami; Summers, Kent H

    2011-01-01

    Patients taking more than one drug metabolized through the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system experience a drug-drug exposure (DDE), which puts them at risk for a potential pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction (DDI), defined as two or more drugs interacting in such a way that the effectiveness and/or toxicity of one or all drugs are changed. Any patient subjected to a DDE is at risk for a potentially serious DDI, the epidemiology of which has not been thoroughly studied. Many drugs are metabolized primarily via the CYP450 enzyme system, including certain opioids used to manage moderate to severe chronic pain. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a large commercial claims database and a Medicare database to assess the prevalence of DDEs among patients with osteoarthritis taking CYP450-metabolized opioids. The overall prevalence of DDEs in this population was 26%, with females more likely to experience DDEs than males (28.4% vs. 21.0%, respectively). The number of unique concurrent prescriptions at baseline, gender, age, and Charlson Comorbidity Index were statistically significant predictors of DDEs (P risk of DDE. However, the number of prescriptions the patient received in the 90-day window prior to the index date was a risk factor. For patients taking at least two medications in the 90-day period prior to the index date, every additional prescription taken increased their risk for a DDE during the observation period by 138% (on average). The risk of DDE during the study period was threefold greater for patients with one medication in the 90-day period before index date compared with similar patients with no prescriptions in that same period before the index date. DDEs are more common than may be generally believed in patients with osteoarthritis, regardless of age, and can occur even in patients taking few medications. When selecting an opioid analgesic to treat osteoarthritis, physicians should consider the potential for exposure of these patients to

  13. The effect of pomegranate juice on clinical signs, matrix metalloproteinases and antioxidant status in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoochani, Nasrin; Karandish, Majid; Mowla, Karim; Haghighizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Jalali, Mohammad Taha

    2016-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the commonest forms of musculoskeletal disorders that leads to joint degeneration and has a major impact on patients' quality of life. Experimental and in vitro studies have suggested the protective roles of pomegranate juice (PJ) as a rich antioxidant source for mitigating cartilage inflammation. In this interventional study, 38 patients with knee OA were randomly divided into two groups: PJ or control for 6 weeks to evaluate the effect of this intervention on clinical signs, inflammation and antioxidant status. Significant decreases in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis index (WOMAC) total score (P = 0.01), stiffness score (P = 0.00) and physical function score (P = 0.01) were observed in PJ group after the intervention. The means of serum levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 was significantly decreased (P = 0.02) and glutathione peroxidase was increased in the intervention group compared with the control group after the study period (P = 0.02). According to the findings of this clinical trial, PJ consumption can improve physical function and stiffness, decrease breakdown cartilage enzymes and increase antioxidant status in patients with knee OA. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Relationship between physical impairments and movement patterns during gait in patients with end-stage hip osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeni, Joseph; Pozzi, Federico; Abujaber, Sumayah; Miller, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Patients with hip osteoarthritis demonstrate limited range of motion, muscle weakness, and altered biomechanics; however, few studies have evaluated the relationships between physical impairments and movement asymmetries. The purpose of this study was to identify the physical impairments related to movement abnormalities in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. We hypothesized that muscle weakness and pain would be related to greater movement asymmetries. Fifty-six subjects who were awaiting total hip arthroplasty were enrolled. Pain was assessed using a 0-10 scale, range of motion was assessed with the Harris Hip Score and isometric hip abductor strength was tested using a hand-held dynamometer. Trunk, pelvis and hip angles and moments in the frontal and sagittal planes were measured during walking using three dimensional motion analysis. During gait, subjects had 3.49 degrees less peak hip flexion and 8.82 degrees less extension angles (p muscles were related to greater pelvis (r = -0.291) and trunk (r = -0.332) rotations in the frontal plane. These findings suggest that hip weakness drives abnormal movement patterns at the pelvis and trunk in patients with hip osteoarthritis to a greater degree than hip pain. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Influence of Radiographic Severity on the Relationship between Muscle Strength and Joint Loading in Obese Knee Osteoarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Aaboe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the relationship between knee muscle strength and the external knee adduction moment during walking in obese knee osteoarthritis patients and whether disease severity influences this relationship. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 136 elderly obese (BMI>30 adults with predominant medial knee osteoarthritis. Muscle strength, standing radiographic severity as measured by the Kellgren and Lawrence scale, and the peak external knee adduction moment were measured at self-selected walking speed. Results. According to radiographic severity, patients were classified as “less severe” (KL 1-2, N=73 or “severe” (KL 3-4, N=63. A significant positive association was demonstrated between the peak knee adduction moment and hamstring muscle strength in the whole cohort (P=.047. However, disease severity did not influence the relationship between muscle strength and dynamic medial knee joint loading. Severe patients had higher peak knee adduction moment and more varus malalignment (P<.001. Conclusion. Higher hamstring muscle strength relates to higher estimates of dynamic knee joint loading in the medial compartment. No such relationship existed for quadriceps muscle strength. Although cross sectional, the results suggest that hamstrings function should receive increased attention in future studies and treatments that aim at halting disease progression.

  16. Efficacy of pulsed Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of patients with knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayat, Mohamed Salaheldien Mohamed; Aly, Tarek Helmy Ahmed; Elsayed, Aly Elsayed Mohamed; Fadil, Ammar Suliman Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser plus glucosamine/chondroitin sulfate (GCS) in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA) by examining changes in pain and knee function, as well as synovial thickness (ST) and femoral cartilage thickness (FCT). Sixty-seven male patients participated, with a mean (SD) age of 53.85 (4.39) years, weight of 84.01 (4.70) kg, height of 171.51 (3.96) cm, and BMI of 28.56 (1.22). Group 1 was treated with high-intensity laser therapy (HILT), GCS, and exercises (HILT + GCS + EX). Group 2 was treated with GCS plus exercises (GCS + EX), and group 3 received placebo laser plus exercises (PL + EX). The outcomes measured were pain level and functional disability using the visual analog scale (VAS) and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC), respectively. ST and FCT were measured by ultrasound examination. Statistical analyses were performed to compare differences between baseline and after 6 weeks of treatment and then after 3 months of follow-up. Statistical significance was set at p treatment of KOA patients.

  17. Total ankle replacement in patients with end-stage ankle osteoarthritis: clinical results and kinetic gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselló Añón, Alejandro; Martinez Garrido, Ignacio; Cervera Deval, Juan; Herrero Mediavilla, Daniel; Sánchez González, María; Vicent Carsí, Vicente

    2014-09-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty is being used more frequently as an alternative for arthrodesis in final stages of ankle osteoarthritis. However, there are few studies which describe the biomechanics of gait of these patients. Between March 2006 and May 2011, 17 patients (n=18 ankles) suffering end-stage osteoarthritis of the ankle who underwent an ankle replacement (HINTEGRA) were evaluated retrospectively. We evaluated clinical, radiological and biomechanical gait parameters using the NedAMH/IBV dynamometric platform. At last follow-up (average: 37 months), the AOFAS score improved from 31 to 83 with a high rate of satisfaction (83.3%). Kinetic gait parameters were more similar to a healthy ankle. We detected a radiolucent line in 8 patients (44%) without any subsidence case. Our study showed a high rate of satisfaction and biomechanics of the gait similar to a healthy ankle. The complication rate was analogous to those previously published in the literature. Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Chôra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isar, Nicoletta

    2009-01-01

    , for whom "il y a khôra" (there is chôra), Sallis keeps the definite article (the chôra) as an index of certain differentiation in chôra. This article takes as a point of departure Sallis' thesis regarding the manifestation of the chôra, grounded in the manner in which the chôra is apprehended, that is......, as in a dream. Sallis' interpretation opens up the possibility for a new reading of the dialogue, and offers a tool to examine phenomena occurred in the aftermath of the Platonic cosmogony. One of the most fascinating episodes of the afterlife of the Platonic chôra is the Byzantine chôra, presented...

  19. Good agreement between questionnaire and administrative databases for health care use and costs in patients with osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson M Clare

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estimating costs is essential to the economic analysis of health care programs. Health care costs are often captured from administrative databases or by patient report. Administrative records only provide a partial representation of health care costs and have additional limitations. Patient-completed questionnaires may allow a broader representation of health care costs; however the validity and feasibility of such methods have not been firmly established. This study was conducted to assess the validity and feasibility of using a patient-completed questionnaire to capture health care use and costs for patients with osteoarthritis, and to compare the research costs of the data-capture methods. Methods We designed a patient questionnaire and applied it in a clinical trial. We captured equivalent data from four administrative databases. We evaluated aspects of the questionnaire's validity using sensitivity and specificity, Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (ρc, and Bland-Altman comparisons. Results The questionnaire's response rate was 89%. Acceptable sensitivity and specificity levels were found for all types of health care use. The numbers of visits and the majority of medications reported by patients were in agreement with the database-derived estimates (ρc > 0.40. Total cost estimates from the questionnaire agreed with those from the databases. Patient-reported co-payments agreed with administrative records with respect to GP office transactions, but not pharmaceutical co-payments. Research costs for the questionnaire-based method were less than one-third of the costs for the databases method. Conclusion A patient-completed questionnaire is feasible for capturing health care use and costs for patients with osteoarthritis, and data collected using it mostly agree with administrative databases. Caution should be exercised when applying unit costs and collecting co-payment data.

  20. Differences in Gait Characteristics of Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis (L4 Radiculopathy) and Those with Osteoarthritis of the Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Toribatake, Yasumitsu; Murakami, Hideki; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoneyama, Takeshi; Watanabe, Tetsuyou; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    It is important to differentially diagnose thigh pain from lumbar spinal stenosis (particularly lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy) and osteoarthritis of the hip. In this study, using a treadmill and a motion analysis method, gait characteristics were compared between these conditions. Patients with lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy had increased physiological knee flexion immediately after foot-ground contact, possibly owing to a slight decrease in the muscle strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Patients with osteoarthritis of the hip had decreased range of motion of the hip joint probably due to anatomically limited mobility as well as gait strategy to avoid pain resulting from increased internal pressure on the hip joint during its extension. Our facile and noninvasive method can be useful for the differential diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis from osteoarthritis of the hip.

  1. Differences in Gait Characteristics of Patients with Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis (L4 Radiculopathy and Those with Osteoarthritis of the Hip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriaki Yokogawa

    Full Text Available It is important to differentially diagnose thigh pain from lumbar spinal stenosis (particularly lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy and osteoarthritis of the hip. In this study, using a treadmill and a motion analysis method, gait characteristics were compared between these conditions. Patients with lumbar fourth nerve root radiculopathy had increased physiological knee flexion immediately after foot-ground contact, possibly owing to a slight decrease in the muscle strength of the quadriceps femoris muscle. Patients with osteoarthritis of the hip had decreased range of motion of the hip joint probably due to anatomically limited mobility as well as gait strategy to avoid pain resulting from increased internal pressure on the hip joint during its extension. Our facile and noninvasive method can be useful for the differential diagnosis of lumbar spinal canal stenosis from osteoarthritis of the hip.

  2. Nutritional Status and Physical Activity of Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis Referred to Hospitals Affiliated to the Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agha Amiri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common joint disorder with symptoms found in hands, knees, hips, back and neck. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the correlation between nutritional status and physical activity with osteoarthritis of the knee in patients referred to hospitals affiliated with the Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods The current cross-sectional research was done on 200 people selected by easy sampling and random counting, and included a group of patients and a group of healthy subjects, who served as controls (100 subjects in each group. Data were gathered by a self-made questionnaire. The data were analyzed using the chi-squared and Fisher and Mann-Whitney tests. Results The results showed that the majority of subjects in both groups were in the age group of over 64 years. The majority of individuals in the patient group were females. The majority of subjects in the patient group commonly consumed foods from the bread and cereal group while the healthy group consumed foods from the meat and beans group. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Most individuals within the patient group used less vegetables and salads, had lighter activities in the present and in the past and had never exercised (P < 0.001. Conclusions In our study we found a relationship between nutritional status and physical activity in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Therefore,