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Sample records for quinone redox cycling

  1. Reversible redox chemistry of quinones: impact on biogeochemical cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimiya, Minori; Stone, Alan T

    2009-10-01

    The role of quinone biomolecules and quinone moieties of natural organic matter (NOM) as the electron transfer mediator in essential biogeochemical processes such as iron bioreduction and contaminant degradation has received considerable interests in the past decade. Hypothesized electron shuttling mechanism must be evaluated based on the availability and stability of quinones under a given environmental setting. The goal of this review is to examine the source, reactivity, and fate of potential quinone catalysts with respect to chemical interactions (e.g., with other quinones and nucleophiles) that will inevitably occur in complex environmental media. We will first discuss natural and anthropogenic sources of quinones in aqueous environments, and fundamental transformation pathways including cross reaction, autoxidation, and addition reactions. We will then assess how the described sources (molecular structure) and transformation pathways (stability) will impact the ability of a quinone molecule to catalyze a biogeochemical process. Thermodynamics and kinetics of electron transfer reactions with both the electron donor (e.g., hydrogen sulfide as a bulk reductant) and the terminal electron acceptor (e.g., nitroaromatic explosives in contaminant degradation), and stability towards irreversible side reactions are the key factors determining the geochemical conditions under which the catalysis by a quinone molecule will be operative.

  2. Computation of the Redox and Protonation Properties of Quinones: Towards the Prediction of Redox Cycling Natural Products.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cape, Jonathan L.; Bowman, Michael K.; Kramer, David M.

    2006-08-01

    Quinone metabolites perform a variety of key functions in plants, including pathogen protection, oxidative phosphorylation, and redox signaling. Many of these structurally diverse compounds have been shown to exhibit potent antimicrobial, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties, although the exact mechanisms of action are far from understood. Redox cycling has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action for many quinine species. Experimental determination of the essential thermodynamic data (i.e. electrochemical and pKa values) required to predict the propensity towards redox cycling is often difficult or impossible to obtain due to the experimental limitations. We demonstrate a practical computational approach to obtain reasonable estimates of these parameters.

  3. Widespread ability of fungi to drive quinone redox cycling for biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Martin C; Bergmann, Michael; Schlosser, Dietmar

    2016-06-01

    Wood-rotting fungi possess remarkably diverse extracellular oxidation mechanisms, including enzymes, such as laccase and peroxidases, and Fenton chemistry. The ability to biologically drive Fenton chemistry by the redox cycling of quinones has previously been reported to be present in both ecologically diverging main groups of wood-rotting basidiomycetes. Therefore, we investigated whether it is even more widespread among fungal organisms. Screening of a diverse selection of a total of 18 ascomycetes and basidiomycetes for reduction of the model compound 2,6-dimethoxy benzoquinone revealed that all investigated strains were capable of reducing it to its corresponding hydroquinone. In a second step, depolymerization of the synthetic polymer polystyrene sulfonate was used as a proxy for quinone-dependent Fenton-based biodegradation capabilities. A diverse subset of the strains, including environmentally ubiquitous molds, white-rot fungi, as well as peatland and aquatic isolates, caused substantial depolymerization indicative for the effective employment of quinone redox cycling as biodegradation tool. Our results may also open up new paths to utilize diverse fungi for the bioremediation of recalcitrant organic pollutants.

  4. Transimination of quinone imines: a mechanism for embedding exogenous redox activity into the nucleosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Wenjie; Seneviratne, Uthpala I; Chao, Ming-Wei; Ravindra, Kodihalli C; Wogan, Gerald N; Tannenbaum, Steven R; Skipper, Paul L

    2012-12-17

    Aminophenols can redox cycle through the corresponding quinone imines to generate ROS. The electrophilic quinone imine intermediate can react with protein thiols as a mechanism of immobilization in vivo. Here, we describe the previously unkown transimination of a quinone imine by lysine as an alternative anchoring mechanism. The redox properties of the condensation product remain largely unchanged because the only structural change to the redox nucleus is the addition of an alkyl substituent to the imine nitrogen. Transimination enables targeting of histone proteins since histones are lysine-rich but nearly devoid of cysteines. Consequently, quinone imines can be embedded in the nucleosome and may be expected to produce ROS in maximal proximity to the genome.

  5. Liquid Quinones for Solvent-Free Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Akihiro; Takenaka, Keisuke; Handa, Naoyuki; Nokami, Toshiki; Itoh, Toshiyuki; Yoshida, Jun-Ichi

    2017-09-08

    Liquid benzoquinone and naphthoquinone having diethylene glycol monomethyl ether groups are designed and synthesized as redox active materials that dissolve supporting electrolytes. The Li-ion batteries based on the liquid quinones using LiBF4 /PC show good performance in terms of voltage, capacity, energy efficiency, and cyclability in both static and flow modes. A battery is constructed without using intentionally added organic solvent, and its high energy density (264 W h L(-1) ) demonstrates the potential of solvent-free organic redox flow batteries using liquid active materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Potential role of redox cycling as a mechanism for chemical teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juchau, M.R.; Fantel, A.G.; Harris, C.; Beyer, B.K.

    1986-12-01

    A survey of the literature indicates that several chemicals whose reduced metabolites are capable of undergoing redox cycling in biological systems also possess significant teratogenic properties when tested in vivo. The authors have initiated investigations to determine whether the embryotoxic effects of such chemicals could result from their redox cycling properties and whether redox cycling could be an important mechanism in chemical teratogenesis. In order to obviate the potentially confounding influences of maternal factors, the initial studies have been performed with a whole embryo culture system with redox cycling agents added directly to the culture medium. Several representative redox cycling agents including doxorubicin, paraquat, a series of nitroheterocycles, nitrosofluorene, and diethylstilbestrol (converted metabolically to redox cycling quinone/semiquinone radicals) have been investigated thus far. The nitroheterocycles which bear nitro groups with comparatively high redox potentials produced a striking, asymmetric defect involving primarily the right half of the prosencephalic and mesencephalic regions. The effect was exacerbated under conditions of low O/sub 2/ tension. Accumulated data to date strongly suggest that reduction of the nitro group is an essential feature in the embryotoxic mechanism. Quinones (doxorubicin, paraquat) and compounds metabolically converted to quinones (diethylstilbestrol) appeared to produce embryotoxic effects via mechanisms not associated with redox cycling. Nitrosofluorene embryotoxicity was markedly exacerbated by changes in both intra- and extracellular glutathione levels, but definitive dependence on a radical-mediated effect or redox cycling was not demonstrated.

  7. Water oxidation chemistry of a synthetic dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Koji; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2014-04-21

    We investigated theoretically the catalytic mechanism of electrochemical water oxidation in aqueous solution by a dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands, [Ru2(X)(Y)(3,6-tBu2Q)2(btpyan)](m+) [X, Y = H2O, OH, O, O2; 3,6-tBu2Q = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone; btpyan =1,8-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyrid-4'-yl)anthracene] (m = 2, 3, 4) (1). The reaction involves a series of electron and proton transfers to achieve redox leveling, with intervening chemical transformations in a mesh scheme, and the entire molecular structure and motion of the catalyst 1 work together to drive the catalytic cycle for water oxidation. Two substrate water molecules can bind to 1 with simultaneous loss of one or two proton(s), which allows pH-dependent variability in the proportion of substrate-bound structures and following pathways for oxidative activation of the aqua/hydroxo ligands at low thermodynamic and kinetic costs. The resulting bis-oxo intermediates then undergo endothermic O-O radical coupling between two Ru(III)-O(•) units in an anti-coplanar conformation leading to bridged μ-peroxo or μ-superoxo intermediates. The μ-superoxo species can liberate oxygen with the necessity for the preceding binding of a water molecule, which is possible only after four-electron oxidation is completed. The magnitude of catalytic current would be limited by the inherent sluggishness of the hinge-like bending motion of the bridged μ-superoxo complex that opens up the compact, hydrophobic active site of the catalyst and thereby allows water entry under dynamic conditions. On the basis of a newly proposed mechanism, we rationalize the experimentally observed behavior of electrode kinetics with respect to potential and discuss what causes a high overpotential for water oxidation by 1.

  8. Protonated paramagnetic redox forms of di-o-quinone bridged with p-phenylene-extended TTF: A EPR spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay O. Chalkov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The chemical oxidation and reduction processes of deprotonated, direduced o-quinone-exTTF-o-quinone in protic solvents were studied by EPR spectroscopy. The formation of relatively stable paramagnetic protonated redox forms of the parent triad was very surprising. The character of spin-density distribution in the semiquinone–quinone and semiquinone–catechol redox forms indicates that the p-phenylene-extended tetrathiafulvalene connector provides a quite effective electronic communication channel between dioxolene coordination sites. It was found that the deprotonated, direduced o-quinone-exTTF-o-quinone is capable to reduction of the metal copper in solution. The radical anion species formed in this reaction exists in solution as a solvent-separated ion pair with a copper cation. A character of spin-density distribution in a radical anion species leads to the conclusion that the ligand corresponds to type III of the Robin–Day classification.

  9. Universal quinone electrodes for long cycle life aqueous rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanliang; Jing, Yan; Gheytani, Saman; Lee, Kuan-Yi; Liu, Ping; Facchetti, Antonio; Yao, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Aqueous rechargeable batteries provide the safety, robustness, affordability, and environmental friendliness necessary for grid storage and electric vehicle operations, but their adoption is plagued by poor cycle life due to the structural and chemical instability of the anode materials. Here we report quinones as stable anode materials by exploiting their structurally stable ion-coordination charge storage mechanism and chemical inertness towards aqueous electrolytes. Upon rational selection/design of quinone structures, we demonstrate three systems that coupled with industrially established cathodes and electrolytes exhibit long cycle life (up to 3,000 cycles/3,500 h), fast kinetics (>=20C), high anode specific capacity (up to 200-395 mAh g-1), and several examples of state-of-the-art specific energy/energy density (up to 76-92 Wh kg-1/ 161-208 Wh l-1) for several operational pH values (-1 to 15), charge carrier species (H+, Li+, Na+, K+, Mg2+), temperature (-35 to 25 °C), and atmosphere (with/without O2), making them a universal anode approach for any aqueous battery technology.

  10. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

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    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems.

  11. The sodium pumping NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na⁺-NQR), a unique redox-driven ion pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquera, Blanca

    2014-08-01

    The Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) is a unique Na(+) pumping respiratory complex found only in prokaryotes, that plays a key role in the metabolism of marine and pathogenic bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae and other human pathogens. Na(+)-NQR is the main entrance for reducing equivalents into the respiratory chain of these bacteria, catalyzing the oxidation of NADH and the reduction of quinone, the free energy of this redox reaction drives the selective translocation of Na(+) across the cell membrane, which energizes key cellular processes. In this review we summarize the unique properties of Na(+)-NQR in terms of its redox cofactor composition, electron transfer reactions and a possible mechanism of coupling and pumping.

  12. Redox Couples with Unequal Diffusion Coefficients: Effect on Redox Cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mampallil Augustine, Dileep; Mathwig, Klaus; Kang, Shuo; Lemay, Serge G.

    2013-01-01

    Redox cycling between two electrodes separated by a narrow gap allows dramatic amplification of the faradaic current. Unlike conventional electrochemistry at a single electrode, however, the mass-transport-limited current is controlled by the diffusion coefficient of both the reduced and oxidized fo

  13. Information processing through a bio-based redox capacitor: signatures for redox-cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Kim, Eunkyoung; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-08-01

    Redox-cycling compounds can significantly impact biological systems and can be responsible for activities that range from pathogen virulence and contaminant toxicities, to therapeutic drug mechanisms. Current methods to identify redox-cycling activities rely on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and employ enzymatic or chemical methods to detect ROS. Here, we couple the speed and sensitivity of electrochemistry with the molecular-electronic properties of a bio-based redox-capacitor to generate signatures of redox-cycling. The redox capacitor film is electrochemically-fabricated at the electrode surface and is composed of a polysaccharide hydrogel with grafted catechol moieties. This capacitor film is redox-active but non-conducting and can engage diffusible compounds in either oxidative or reductive redox-cycling. Using standard electrochemical mediators ferrocene dimethanol (Fc) and Ru(NH3)6Cl3 (Ru(3+)) as model redox-cyclers, we observed signal amplifications and rectifications that serve as signatures of redox-cycling. Three bio-relevant compounds were then probed for these signatures: (i) ascorbate, a redox-active compound that does not redox-cycle; (ii) pyocyanin, a virulence factor well-known for its reductive redox-cycling; and (iii) acetaminophen, an analgesic that oxidatively redox-cycles but also undergoes conjugation reactions. These studies demonstrate that the redox-capacitor can enlist the capabilities of electrochemistry to generate rapid and sensitive signatures of biologically-relevant chemical activities (i.e., redox-cycling).

  14. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation.

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    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-19

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB (-)/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB (-)/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA (-)/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA (-).

  15. Redox potential of the terminal quinone electron acceptor QB in photosystem II reveals the mechanism of electron transfer regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuki; Nagao, Ryo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) extracts electrons from water at a Mn4CaO5 cluster using light energy and then transfers them to two plastoquinones, the primary quinone electron acceptor QA and the secondary quinone electron acceptor QB. This forward electron transfer is an essential process in light energy conversion. Meanwhile, backward electron transfer is also significant in photoprotection of PSII proteins. Modulation of the redox potential (Em) gap of QA and QB mainly regulates the forward and backward electron transfers in PSII. However, the full scheme of electron transfer regulation remains unresolved due to the unknown Em value of QB. Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), the Em value of QB reduction was measured directly using spectroelectrochemistry in combination with light-induced Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy. The Em(QB−/QB) was determined to be approximately +90 mV and was virtually unaffected by depletion of the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This insensitivity of Em(QB−/QB), in combination with the known large upshift of Em(QA−/QA), explains the mechanism of PSII photoprotection with an impaired Mn4CaO5 cluster, in which a large decrease in the Em gap between QA and QB promotes rapid charge recombination via QA−. PMID:26715751

  16. Riboflavin is an active redox cofactor in the Na+-pumping NADH: quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae.

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    Juárez, Oscar; Nilges, Mark J; Gillespie, Portia; Cotton, Jennifer; Barquera, Blanca

    2008-11-28

    Here we present new evidence that riboflavin is present as one of four flavins in Na+-NQR. In particular, we present conclusive evidence that the source of the neutral radical is not one of the FMNs and that riboflavin is the center that gives rise to the neutral flavosemiquinone. The riboflavin is a bona fide redox cofactor and is likely to be the last redox carrier of the enzyme, from which electrons are donated to quinone. We have constructed a double mutant that lacks both covalently bound FMN cofactors (NqrB-T236Y/NqrC-T225Y) and have studied this mutant together with the two single mutants (NqrB-T236Y and NqrC-T225Y) and a mutant that lacks the noncovalently bound FAD in NqrF (NqrF-S246A). The double mutant contains riboflavin and FAD in a 0.6:1 ratio, as the only flavins in the enzyme; noncovalently bound flavins were detected. In the oxidized form, the double mutant exhibits an EPR signal consistent with a neutral flavosemiquinone radical, which is abolished on reduction of the enzyme. The same radical can be observed in the FAD deletion mutant. Furthermore, when the oxidized enzyme reacts with ubiquinol (the reduced form of the usual electron acceptor) in a process that reverses the physiological direction of the electron flow, a single kinetic phase is observed. The kinetic difference spectrum of this process is consistent with one-electron reduction of a neutral flavosemiquinone. The presence of riboflavin in the role of a redox cofactor is thus far unique to Na+-NQR.

  17. Another unusual type of citric acid cycle enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the malate:quinone oxidoreductase.

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    Kather, B; Stingl, K; van der Rest, M E; Altendorf, K; Molenaar, D

    2000-06-01

    The only enzyme of the citric acid cycle for which no open reading frame (ORF) was found in the Helicobacter pylori genome is the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Here, it is shown that in this organism the oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate is catalyzed by a malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). This flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent membrane-associated enzyme donates electrons to quinones of the electron transfer chain. Similar to succinate dehydrogenase, it is part of both the electron transfer chain and the citric acid cycle. MQO activity was demonstrated in isolated membranes of H. pylori. The enzyme is encoded by the ORF HP0086, which is shown by the fact that expression of the HP0086 sequence from a plasmid induces high MQO activity in mqo deletion mutants of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. Furthermore, this plasmid was able to complement the phenotype of the C. glutamicum mqo deletion mutant. Interestingly, the protein predicted to be encoded by this ORF is only distantly related to known or postulated MQO sequences from other bacteria. The presence of an MQO shown here and the previously demonstrated presence of a 2-ketoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetoacetyl-CoA transferase indicate that H. pylori possesses a complete citric acid cycle, but one which deviates from the standard textbook example in three steps.

  18. Quinone-modified NH2-MIL-101(Fe) composite as a redox mediator for improved degradation of bisphenol A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianghui; Guo, Weilin; Liu, Zhonghua; Wang, Ruiqin; Liu, Hua

    2017-02-15

    A novel quinone-modified metal-organic frameworks NH2-MIL-101(Fe) was synthesized using a simple chemical method under mild condition. The introduced 2-anthraquinone sulfonate (AQS) can be covalently modified with NH2-MIL-101(Fe) and acts as a redox mediator to enhance the degradation of bisphenol A (BPA) via persulfate activation. The obtained AQS-NH-MIL-101(Fe) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. AQS-NH-MIL-101(Fe) exhibited better catalytic performance compared with NH2-MIL-101(Fe) and NH2-MIL-101(Fe) with free AQS (NH2-MIL-101(Fe)/AQS). That is, AQS-NH-MIL-101(Fe) was proved to be the most effective in that more than 97.7% of BPA was removed. The degradation rate constants (k) of AQS-NH-MIL-101(Fe) was 9-fold higher than that of NH2-MIL-101(Fe) and 7-fold higher than NH2-MIL-101(Fe)/AQS, indicating that AQS is a great electron-transfer mediator when modified with NH2-MIL-101(Fe). Based on the above results, the possible mechanism of catalytic reaction has been investigated in view of the trapping experiments. In addition, the AQS-NH-MIL-101(Fe) catalyst exhibited excellent stability and can be used several times without significant deterioration in performance.

  19. Dimensional behavior of Ni-YSZ composites during redox cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihlatie, Mikko; Kaiser, Andreas; Larsen, Peter Halvor;

    2009-01-01

    The dimensional behavior of Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermets during redox cycling was tested in dilatometry within the temperature range 600-1000 degrees C. The effect Of humidity oil redox stability was investigated at intermediate and low temperatures. We show that both the sintering...... of nickel depending on temperature of the initial reduction and the operating conditions, and the temperature of reoxidation are very important for the size of the dimensional change. Cumulative redox strain (CRS) is shown to be correlated with temperature. Measured maximum CRS after three redox cycles...

  20. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones

    OpenAIRE

    Li eZhang; Yi eJin; Meng eHuang; Penning, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-...

  1. Redox cycling amplified electrochemical detection of DNA hybridization: application to pathogen E. coli bacterial RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Anne; Wu, Jie; Flechsig, Gerd-Uwe; Haake, David A; Wang, Joseph

    2011-03-09

    An electrochemical genosensor in which signal amplification is achieved using p-aminophenol (p-AP) redox cycling by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is presented. An immobilized thiolated capture probe is combined with a sandwich-type hybridization assay, using biotin as a tracer in the detection probe, and streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase as reporter enzyme. The phosphatase liberates the electrochemical mediator p-AP from its electrically inactive phosphate derivative. This generated p-AP is electrooxidized at an Au electrode modified self-assembled monolayer to p-quinone imine (p-QI). In the presence of NADH, p-QI is reduced back to p-AP, which can be re-oxidized on the electrode and produce amplified signal. A detection limit of 1 pM DNA target is offered by this simple one-electrode, one-enzyme format redox cycling strategy. The redox cycling design is applied successfully to the monitoring of the 16S rRNA of E. coli pathogenic bacteria, and provides a detection limit of 250 CFU μL(-1). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Redox regime shifts in microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles

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    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-06-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet they are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the present-day sulfur cycle in the natural environment and the present-day nitrogen cycle in eutrophic terrestrial environments. These shifts may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  3. Redox regime shifts in microbially-mediated biogeochemical cycles

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    Bush, T.; Butler, I. B.; Free, A.; Allen, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    Understanding how the Earth's biogeochemical cycles respond to environmental change is a prerequisite for the prediction and mitigation of the effects of anthropogenic perturbations. Microbial populations mediate key steps in these cycles, yet are often crudely represented in biogeochemical models. Here, we show that microbial population dynamics can qualitatively affect the response of biogeochemical cycles to environmental change. Using simple and generic mathematical models, we find that nutrient limitations on microbial population growth can lead to regime shifts, in which the redox state of a biogeochemical cycle changes dramatically as the availability of a redox-controlling species, such as oxygen or acetate, crosses a threshold (a "tipping point"). These redox regime shifts occur in parameter ranges that are relevant to the sulfur and nitrogen cycles in the present-day natural environment, and may also have relevance to iron cycling in the iron-containing Proterozoic and Archean oceans. We show that redox regime shifts also occur in models with physically realistic modifications, such as additional terms, chemical states, or microbial populations. Our work reveals a possible new mechanism by which regime shifts can occur in nutrient-cycling ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, and highlights the importance of considering microbial population dynamics in models of biogeochemical cycles.

  4. Glutathione maintenance mitigates age-related susceptibility to redox cycling agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas O. Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated hepatocytes from young (4–6 mo and old (24–26 mo F344 rats were exposed to increasing concentrations of menadione, a vitamin K derivative and redox cycling agent, to determine whether the age-related decline in Nrf2-mediated detoxification defenses resulted in heightened susceptibility to xenobiotic insult. An LC50 for each age group was established, which showed that aging resulted in a nearly 2-fold increase in susceptibility to menadione (LC50 for young: 405 μM; LC50 for old: 275 μM. Examination of the known Nrf2-regulated pathways associated with menadione detoxification revealed, surprisingly, that NAD(PH: quinone oxido-reductase 1 (NQO1 protein levels and activity were induced 9-fold and 4-fold with age, respectively (p=0.0019 and p=0.018; N=3, but glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4 declined by 70% (p=0.0043; N=3. These results indicate toxicity may stem from vulnerability to lipid peroxidation instead of inadequate reduction of menadione semi-quinone. Lipid peroxidation was 2-fold higher, and GSH declined by a 3-fold greater margin in old versus young rat cells given 300 µM menadione (p2-fold reduction in cell death, suggesting that the age-related increase in menadione susceptibility likely stems from attenuated GSH-dependent defenses. This data identifies cellular targets for intervention in order to limit age-related toxicological insults to menadione and potentially other redox cycling compounds.

  5. Contribution of quinone-reducing microorganisms to the anaerobic biodegradation of organic compounds under different redox conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, F. J.; Gutierrez, C. H.; Lopez, K. Y.; Estrada-Alvarodo, M. I.; Meza-Escalante, E. R.; Texier, A. C.; Cuervo, F.; Gomez, J.

    2009-07-01

    Reduction of humic substances (HS) has recently been recognized as a microbial respiratory process supporting growth of several distinct microorganisms. Quinone moieties, which are very abundant in the humic acid fraction of humus, are the main functional groups conferring electron-accepting capacity to HS. The capacity to reduce HS has been reported in anaerobic consortia from a wide diversity of environments. (Author)

  6. TCA Cycle Defects and Cancer: When Metabolism Tunes Redox State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cardaci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inborn defects of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle enzymes have been known for more than twenty years. Until recently, only recessive mutations were described which, although resulted in severe multisystem syndromes, did not predispose to cancer onset. In the last ten years, a causal role in carcinogenesis has been documented for inherited and acquired alterations in three TCA cycle enzymes, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, fumarate hydratase (FH, and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH, pointing towards metabolic alterations as the underlying hallmark of cancer. This paper summarizes the neoplastic alterations of the TCA cycle enzymes focusing on the generation of pseudohypoxic phenotype and the alteration of epigenetic homeostasis as the main tumor-promoting effects of the TCA cycle affecting defects. Moreover, we debate on the ability of these mutations to affect cellular redox state and to promote carcinogenesis by impacting on redox biology.

  7. The 2-Methoxy Group Orientation Regulates the Redox Potential Difference between the Primary (QA) and Secondary (QB) Quinones of Type II Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from purple bacteria such as Rb. sphaeroides. 13C HYSCORE measurements of the 2-methoxy group in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with DFT calculations of the 13C hyperfine couplings as a function of the 2-methoxy dihedral angle. X-ray structure comparisons support 2-methoxy dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of 175–193 mV. A model having a methyl group substituted for the 2-methoxy group exhibits no electron affinity difference. This is consistent with the failure of a 2-methyl ubiquinone analogue to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ∼160–195 mV. The conclusion reached is that the 2-methoxy group is the principal determinant of electron transfer from QA to QB in type II photosynthetic reaction centers with ubiquinone serving as both acceptor quinones. PMID:25126386

  8. The 2-Methoxy Group Orientation Regulates the Redox Potential Difference between the Primary (QA) and Secondary (QB) Quinones of Type II Bacterial Photosynthetic Reaction Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Wagner B; Taguchi, Alexander T; Dikanov, Sergei A; Wraight, Colin A; O'Malley, Patrick J

    2014-08-07

    Recent studies have shown that only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from purple bacteria such as Rb. sphaeroides. (13)C HYSCORE measurements of the 2-methoxy group in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with DFT calculations of the (13)C hyperfine couplings as a function of the 2-methoxy dihedral angle. X-ray structure comparisons support 2-methoxy dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of 175-193 mV. A model having a methyl group substituted for the 2-methoxy group exhibits no electron affinity difference. This is consistent with the failure of a 2-methyl ubiquinone analogue to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm of ∼160-195 mV. The conclusion reached is that the 2-methoxy group is the principal determinant of electron transfer from QA to QB in type II photosynthetic reaction centers with ubiquinone serving as both acceptor quinones.

  9. Redox cycling for electrolysis of pure water in a thin layer cell

    OpenAIRE

    李, 春艳

    2013-01-01

    The redox cycling can achieve in thin layer cell because products of electrode reactions diffuse in opposite directions across the thin layer to the electrodes where they can react again. This redox cycling can enhance the current, and hence improve the sensitivity and selectivity. The redox cycling can make the current be under steady state in thin layer electrolysis. The aim of this thesis is to get controlling factors of redox cycling in electrolysis of water. the factors include not only ...

  10. Tuning cofactor redox potentials: the 2-methoxy dihedral angle generates a redox potential difference greater than 160 mV between the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) quinones of the photosynthetic reaction center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T.; Mattis, Aidas J.; O'Malley, Patrick J.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Wraight, Colin A.

    2013-01-01

    Only quinones with a 2-methoxy group can act simultaneously as the primary (QA) and secondary (QB) electron acceptors in photosynthetic reaction centers from Rb. sphaeroides. 13C HYSCORE measurements of the 2-methoxy in the semiquinone states, SQA and SQB, were compared with QM calculations of the 13C couplings as a function of dihedral angle. X-ray structures support dihedral angle assignments corresponding to a redox potential gap (ΔEm) between QA and QB of ~180 mV. This is consistent with the failure of a ubiquinone analog lacking the 2-methoxy to function as QB in mutant reaction centers with a ΔEm ≈ 160–195 mV. PMID:24079813

  11. Effects of citrinin on iron-redox cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Lozzo, Eneida Janiscki; Mangrich, Antonio Salvio; Rocha, Maria Eliane Merlin; de Oliveira, Maria Benigna Martinelli; Carnieri, Eva Gunilla Skare

    2002-03-01

    The ability of the mycotoxin citrinin to act as an inhibitor of iron-induced lipoperoxidation of biological membranes prompted us to determine whether it could act as an iron chelating agent, interfering with iron redox reactions or acting as a free radical scavenger. The addition of Fe3+ to citrinin rapidly produced a chromogen, indicating the formation of citrinin-Fe3+ complexes. An EPR study confirms that citrinin acts as a ligand of Fe3+, the complexation depending on the [Fe3+]:[citrinin] ratios. Effects of citrinin on the iron redox cycle were evaluated by oxygen consumption or the o-phenanthroline test. No effect on EDTA-Fe2+-->EDTA-Fe3+ oxidation was observed in the presence of citrinin, but the mycotoxin inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ by hydrogen peroxide. Reducing agents such as ascorbic acid and DTT reduced the Fe3+-citrinin complex, but DTT did not cause reduction of Fe3+-EDTA, indicating that the redox potentials of Fe3+-citrinin and Fe3+-EDTA are not the same. The Fe2+ formed from the reduction of Fe3+-citrinin by reducing agents was not rapidly reoxidized to Fe3+ by atmospheric oxygen. Citrinin has no radical scavenger ability as demonstrated by the absence of DPPH reduction. However, a reaction between citrinin and hydrogen peroxide was observed by UV spectrum changes of citrinin after incubation with hydrogen peroxide. It was also observed that citrinin did not induce direct or reductive mobilization of iron from ferritin. These results indicate that the protective effect on iron-induced lipid peroxidation by citrinin occurs due to the formation of a redox inactive Fe3+-citrinin complex, as well as from the reaction of citrinin and hydrogen peroxide. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Selective activation of mitomycin A by thiols to form DNA cross-links and monoadducts: biochemical basis for the modulation of mitomycin cytotoxicity by the quinone redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, M M; Das, A; Palom, Y; He, Q Y; Tomasz, M

    2001-08-16

    Mitomycin A (MA) but not mitomycin C (MC) cross-linked linearized (32)P-pBR322 DNA in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) or glutathione (GSH), as shown by a sensitive DNA cross-link assay. Incubation of calf-thymus DNA with MA and DTT or mercaptoethanol (MER) resulted in the formation of MA-DNA adducts, which were isolated from nuclease digests of the drug-DNA complexes by HPLC. The adducts were characterized by their UV absorption spectra, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS), and facile conversion from 7-methoxy- to 7-amino-substituted mitosene type adducts upon 10% NH(4)OH treatment, which were identical with known adducts of MC. Both DNA interstrand and intrastrand cross-link adducts, linking two deoxyguanosine residues at N(2), as well as several deoxyguanosine-N(2) monoadducts of MA, were identified. No DNA adducts were formed with MC under the same conditions. A specificity of DNA cross-link formation for the CpG sequence was observed using 12-mer synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides as substrates and as DNA sequence models, in analogy to the known CpG sequence specificity of MC-induced DNA cross-links. MA is known to be more cytotoxic by 2-3 orders of magnitude than MC, and this property correlates with redox potentials of MA (-0.19 V) and MA analogues that are higher than those of MC (-0.40 V) and its analogues. It is suggested that the biochemical basis for the higher cytotoxic potency of MA is MA's propensity to be reductively activated by cellular thiols while MC is resistant to thiol activation. This distinction is probably derived from the large difference between the quinone redox potentials of the two drugs.

  13. EXAMINATION OF QUINONE TOXICITY USING YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE MODEL SYSTEM. (R827352C007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity of quinones is generally thought to occur by two mechanisms: the formation of covalent bonds with biological molecules by Michael addition chemistry and the catalytic reduction of oxygen to superoxide and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) (redox cycling). In an ...

  14. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eBenzine

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ i-chip enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria and six Fe(II phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8, Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5, and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31 were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  15. Fe-phyllosilicate redox cycling organisms from a redox transition zone in Hanford 300 Area sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzine, Jason; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Xiong, Mai Yia; Kennedy, David W.; McKinley, James P.; Lin, Xueju; Roden, Eric E.

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms capable of reducing or oxidizing structural iron (Fe) in Fe-bearing phyllosilicate minerals were enriched and isolated from a subsurface redox transition zone at the Hanford 300 Area site in eastern Washington, USA. Both conventional and in situ "i-chip" enrichment strategies were employed. One Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter (G. bremensis strain R1, Deltaproteobacteria) and six Fe(II) phyllosilicate-oxidizing isolates from the Alphaproteobacteria (Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains 22, is5, and in8p8), Betaproteobacteria (Cupriavidus necator strain A5-1, Dechloromonas agitata strain is5), and Actinobacteria (Nocardioides sp. strain in31) were recovered. The G. bremensis isolate grew by oxidizing acetate with the oxidized form of NAu-2 smectite as the electron acceptor. The Fe(II)-oxidizers grew by oxidation of chemically reduced smectite as the energy source with nitrate as the electron acceptor. The Bradyrhizobium isolates could also carry out aerobic oxidation of biotite. This is the first report of the recovery of a Fe(II)-oxidizing Nocardioides, and to date only one other Fe(II)-oxidizing Bradyrhizobium is known. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of the isolates were similar to ones found in clone libraries from Hanford 300 sediments and groundwater, suggesting that such organisms may be present and active in situ. Whole genome sequencing of the isolates is underway, the results of which will enable comparative genomic analysis of mechanisms of extracellular phyllosilicate Fe redox metabolism, and facilitate development of techniques to detect the presence and expression of genes associated with microbial phyllosilicate Fe redox cycling in sediments.

  16. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  17. Quinone-induced protein handling changes: Implications for major protein handling systems in quinone-mediated toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David, E-mail: david.ross@ucdenver.edu

    2014-10-15

    Para-quinones such as 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ) and menadione (MD) and ortho-quinones including the oxidation products of catecholamines, are derived from xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules. The effects of quinones on major protein handling systems in cells; the 20/26S proteasome, the ER stress response, autophagy, chaperone proteins and aggresome formation, have not been investigated in a systematic manner. Both BQ and aminochrome (AC) inhibited proteasomal activity and activated the ER stress response and autophagy in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. AC also induced aggresome formation while MD had little effect on any protein handling systems in N27 cells. The effect of NQO1 on quinone induced protein handling changes and toxicity was examined using N27 cells stably transfected with NQO1 to generate an isogenic NQO1-overexpressing line. NQO1 protected against BQ–induced apoptosis but led to a potentiation of AC- and MD-induced apoptosis. Modulation of quinone-induced apoptosis in N27 and NQO1-overexpressing cells correlated only with changes in the ER stress response and not with changes in other protein handling systems. These data suggested that NQO1 modulated the ER stress response to potentiate toxicity of AC and MD, but protected against BQ toxicity. We further demonstrated that NQO1 mediated reduction to unstable hydroquinones and subsequent redox cycling was important for the activation of the ER stress response and toxicity for both AC and MD. In summary, our data demonstrate that quinone-specific changes in protein handling are evident in N27 cells and the induction of the ER stress response is associated with quinone-mediated toxicity. - Highlights: • Unstable hydroquinones contributed to quinone-induced ER stress and toxicity.

  18. Solar fuel processing efficiency for ceria redox cycling using alternative oxygen partial pressure reduction methods

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Meng; Haussener, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Solar-driven non-stoichiometric thermochemical redox cycling of ceria for the conversion of solar energy into fuels shows promise in achieving high solar-to-fuel efficiency. This efficiency is significantly affected by the operating conditions, e.g. redox temperatures, reduction and oxidation pressures, solar irradiation concentration, or heat recovery effectiveness. We present a thermodynamic analysis of five redox cycle designs to investigate the effects of working conditions on the fuel pr...

  19. Electrochemical redox cycling in a new nanogap sensor: Design and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafarani, Hamid Reza; Mathwig, Klaus; Sudhölter, E. J. R.; Rassaei, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new geometry for nanogap electrochemical sensing devices. These devices consist of two closely spaced side-by-side electrodes which work under redox cycling conditions. Using finite element simulations, we investigate the effects of different geometric parameters on the redox cycling si

  20. Redox Changes During the Cell Cycle in the Embryonic Root Meristem of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Simone, Ambra; Hubbard, Rachel; Viñegra de la Torre, Natanael; Velappan, Yazhini; Wilson, Michael; Considine, Michael J; Soppe, Wim J J; Foyer, Christine H

    2017-05-30

    The aim of this study was to characterize redox changes in the nuclei and cytosol occurring during the mitotic cell cycle in the embryonic roots of germinating Arabidopsis seedlings, and to determine how redox cycling was modified in mutants with a decreased capacity for ascorbate synthesis. Using an in vivo reduction-oxidation (redox) reporter (roGFP2), we show that transient oxidation of the cytosol and the nuclei occurred at G1 in the synchronized dividing cells of the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, with reduction at G2 and mitosis. This redox cycle was absent from low ascorbate mutants in which nuclei were significantly more oxidized than controls. The cell cycle-dependent increase in nuclear size was impaired in the ascorbate-deficient mutants, which had fewer cells per unit area in the root proliferation zone. The transcript profile of the dry seeds and size of the imbibed seeds was strongly influenced by low ascorbate but germination, dormancy release and seed aging characteristics were unaffected. These data demonstrate the presence of a redox cycle within the plant cell cycle and that the redox state of the nuclei is an important factor in cell cycle progression. Controlled oxidation is a key feature of the early stages of the plant cell cycle. However, sustained mild oxidation restricts nuclear functions and impairs progression through the cell cycle leading to fewer cells in the root apical meristem. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  1. Paraquat-Melanin Redox-Cycling: Evidence from Electrochemical Reverse Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; Panzella, Lucia; Alfieri, Maria Laura; Napolitano, Alessandra; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2016-08-17

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with oxidative stress and the death of melanin-containing neurons of the substantia nigra. Epidemiological evidence links exposure to the pesticide paraquat (PQ) to Parkinson's disease, and this link has been explained by a redox cycling mechanism that induces oxidative stress. Here, we used a novel electrochemistry-based reverse engineering methodology to test the hypothesis that PQ can undergo reductive redox cycling with melanin. In this method, (i) an insoluble natural melanin (from Sepia melanin) and a synthetic model melanin (having a cysteinyldopamine-melanin core and dopamine-melanin shell) were entrapped in a nonconducting hydrogel film adjacent to an electrode, (ii) the film-coated electrode was immersed in solutions containing PQ (putative redox cycling reductant) and a redox cycling oxidant (ferrocene dimethanol), (iii) sequences of input potentials (i.e., voltages) were imposed to the underlying electrode to systematically engage reductive and oxidative redox cycling, and (iv) output response currents were analyzed for signatures of redox cycling. The response characteristics of the PQ-melanin systems to various input potential sequences support the hypothesis that PQ can directly donate electrons to melanin. This observation of PQ-melanin redox interactions demonstrates an association between two components that have been individually linked to oxidative stress and Parkinson's disease. Potentially, melanin's redox activity could be an important component in understanding the etiology of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease.

  2. Fracture strength of micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell anode in redox cycling experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusz, Jakub; Smirnova, Alevtina; Mohammadi, Alidad; Sammes, Nigel M. [Department of Chemical, Materials, and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Connecticut, 44 Weaver Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The maximum fracture strength of Ni/8YSZ anodes exposed to several redox cycles is compared. The anodes were fabricated using fine and coarse particle size powders. Fine-structured powders show a 77% increase in mechanical strength after exposure to three redox cycles. The coarse-structured material did not produce similar results and redox cycling resulted in gradual decrease in the mechanical stability of the supports. The impact of redox cycling on the microstructure was evaluated using SEM. Fine-structured anodes tend to agglomerate leading to decreased porosity. Coarse anodes did not show any significant changes in microstructure while exposed to redox cycling. The electrochemical performance evaluated under load conditions, and after the first redox cycle, indicates a 40% improvement for the cell fabricated using a fine-structured anode powder. The increase in performance is believed to be due to better adhesion between the anode material and the Ni current collector. The cell fabricated using a coarse-structured anode powder did not recover after the redox cycle. (author)

  3. Differential Cyclic Voltammetry - a Novel Technique for Selective and Simultaneous Detection using Redox Cycling Based Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, M.; Wiedemair, J.; Megen, M.J.J; Olthuis, W.; Berg, van den A.

    2010-01-01

    Redox cycling (RC) is an effect that is used to amplify electrochemical signals. However, traditional techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) do not provide clear insight for a mixture of multiple redox couples while RC is applied. Thus, we have developed a new measurement technique which deliver

  4. Differential Cyclic Voltammetry - a Novel Technique for Selective and Simultaneous Detection using Redox Cycling Based Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, Mathieu; Wiedemair, Justyna; van Megen, M.J.J.; Olthuis, Wouter; van den Berg, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Redox cycling (RC) is an effect that is used to amplify electrochemical signals. However, traditional techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) do not provide clear insight for a mixture of multiple redox couples while RC is applied. Thus, we have developed a new measurement technique which

  5. Simulation of Redox-Cycling Phenomena at Interdigitated Array (IDA) Electrodes: Amplification and Selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, M.; Olthuis, W.; Dam, T.V.A.; Berg, van den A.

    2008-01-01

    We present Finite Element Method (FEM) simulations of interdigitated array (IDA) electrode geometries to study and verify redox selectivity and redox cycling amplification factor. The simulations provide an adequate explanation of an earlier found, but poorly understood, high amplification factor (6

  6. Redox regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle: something old, something new.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelet, Laure; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Morisse, Samuel; Sparla, Francesca; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Francia, Francesco; Danon, Antoine; Marchand, Christophe H; Fermani, Simona; Trost, Paolo; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2013-11-25

    Reversible redox post-translational modifications such as oxido-reduction of disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, play a prominent role in the regulation of cell metabolism and signaling in all organisms. These modifications are mainly controlled by members of the thioredoxin and glutaredoxin families. Early studies in photosynthetic organisms have identified the Calvin-Benson cycle, the photosynthetic pathway responsible for carbon assimilation, as a redox regulated process. Indeed, 4 out of 11 enzymes of the cycle were shown to have a low activity in the dark and to be activated in the light through thioredoxin-dependent reduction of regulatory disulfide bonds. The underlying molecular mechanisms were extensively studied at the biochemical and structural level. Unexpectedly, recent biochemical and proteomic studies have suggested that all enzymes of the cycle and several associated regulatory proteins may undergo redox regulation through multiple redox post-translational modifications including glutathionylation and nitrosylation. The aim of this review is to detail the well-established mechanisms of redox regulation of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes as well as the most recent reports indicating that this pathway is tightly controlled by multiple interconnected redox post-translational modifications. This redox control is likely allowing fine tuning of the Calvin-Benson cycle required for adaptation to varying environmental conditions, especially during responses to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  7. A Review of RedOx Cycling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Anode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Van herle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells are able to convert fuels, including hydrocarbons, to electricity with an unbeatable efficiency even for small systems. One of the main limitations for long-term utilization is the reduction-oxidation cycling (RedOx cycles of the nickel-based anodes. This paper will review the effects and parameters influencing RedOx cycles of the Ni-ceramic anode. Second, solutions for RedOx instability are reviewed in the patent and open scientific literature. The solutions are described from the point of view of the system, stack design, cell design, new materials and microstructure optimization. Finally, a brief synthesis on RedOx cycling of Ni-based anode supports for standard and optimized microstructures is depicted.

  8. Biological redox cycling of iron in nontronite and its potential application in nitrate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Zeng, Qiang; Edelmann, Richard E; Pentrák, Martin; Agrawal, Abinash

    2015-05-05

    Biological redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates is an important but poorly understood process. The objective of this research was to study microbially mediated redox cycles of Fe in nontronite (NAu-2). During the reduction phase, structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 served as electron acceptor, lactate as electron donor, AQDS as electron shuttle, and dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as mediator in bicarbonate- and PIPES-buffered media. During the oxidation phase, biogenic Fe(II) served as electron donor and nitrate as electron acceptor. Nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 was added as mediator in the same media. For all three cycles, structural Fe in NAu-2 was able to reversibly undergo three redox cycles without significant dissolution. Fe(II) in bioreduced samples occurred in two distinct environments, at edges and in the interior of the NAu-2 structure. Nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas was coupled with oxidation of edge-Fe(II) and part of interior-Fe(II) under both buffer conditions, and its extent and rate did not change with Fe redox cycles. These results suggest that biological redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates is a reversible process and has important implications for biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and other nutrients in natural environments.

  9. Biological Redox Cycling Of Iron In Nontronite And Its Potential Application In Nitrate Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zeng, Qiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Pentrak, Martin; Agrawal, Abinash

    2015-05-05

    Redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates provides a potential method to remediate nitrate contamination in natural environment. Past research has only studied chemical redox cycles or a single biologically mediated redox cycle of Fe in phyllosilicates. The objective of this research was to study three microbially driven redox cycles of Fe in one phyllosilicate, nontronite (NAu-2). During the reduction phase structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 served as electron acceptor, lactate as electron donor, AQDS as electron shuttle, and dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as mediator in bicarbonate-buffered and PIPES-buffered media. During the oxidation phase, biogenic Fe(II) served an electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator in the same media. For all three cycles, structural Fe in NAu-2 was able to reversibly undergo 3 redox cycles without significant reductive or oxidative dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that NAu-2 was the dominant residual mineral throughout the 3 redox cycles with some dissolution textures but no significant secondary mineralization. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(II) in bio-reduced samples likely occurred in two distinct environments, at edges and the interior of the NAu-2 structure. Nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both buffer conditions and this extent and rate did not change with Fe redox cycles. Mössbauer spectroscopy further revealed that nitrate reduction was coupled to predominant/preferred oxidation of edge Fe(II). These results suggest that structural Fe in phyllosilicates may represent a renewable source to continuously remove nitrate in natural environments.

  10. The level of menadione redox-cycling in pancreatic β-cells is proportional to the glucose concentration: Role of NADH and consequences for insulin secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heart, Emma [Cellular Dynamics Program, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, 02543 (United States); Palo, Meridith; Womack, Trayce [Department of Science, United States Coast Guard Academy, New London, CT, 06320 (United States); Smith, Peter J.S. [Cellular Dynamics Program, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, 02543 (United States); Institute for Life Sciences, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Gray, Joshua P., E-mail: Joshua.p.gray@uscga.edu [Cellular Dynamics Program, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA, 02543 (United States); Department of Science, United States Coast Guard Academy, New London, CT, 06320 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Pancreatic β-cells release insulin in response to elevation of glucose from basal (4–7 mM) to stimulatory (8–16 mM) levels. Metabolism of glucose by the β-cell results in the production of low levels of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), such as hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), a newly recognized coupling factor linking glucose metabolism to insulin secretion. However, high and toxic levels of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibit insulin secretion. Menadione, which produces H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via redox cycling mechanism in a dose-dependent manner, was investigated for its effect on β-cell metabolism and insulin secretion in INS-1 832/13, a rat β-cell insulinoma cell line, and primary rodent islets. Menadione-dependent redox cycling and resulting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production under stimulatory glucose exceeded several-fold those reached at basal glucose. This was paralleled by a differential effect of menadione (0.1–10 μM) on insulin secretion, which was enhanced at basal, but inhibited at stimulatory glucose. Redox cycling of menadione and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation was dependent on glycolytically-derived NADH, as inhibition of glycolysis and application of non-glycogenic insulin secretagogues did not support redox cycling. In addition, activity of plasma membrane electron transport, a system dependent in part on glycolytically-derived NADH, was also inhibited by menadione. Menadione-dependent redox cycling was sensitive to the NQO1 inhibitor dicoumarol and the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenylene iodonium, suggesting a role for NQO1 and other oxidoreductases in this process. These data may explain the apparent dichotomy between the stimulatory and inhibitory effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and menadione on insulin secretion. -- Highlights: ► Menadione stimulation or inhibition of insulin secretion is dependent upon applied glucose levels. ► Menadione-dependent H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production is proportional to applied glucose levels. ► Quinone-mediated redox cycling

  11. Akt1 intramitochondrial cycling is a crucial step in the redox modulation of cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Gabriela Antico Arciuch

    Full Text Available Akt is a serine/threonine kinase involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and glucose metabolism. Akt is differentially activated by growth factors and oxidative stress by sequential phosphorylation of Ser(473 by mTORC2 and Thr(308 by PDK1. On these bases, we investigated the mechanistic connection of H(2O(2 yield, mitochondrial activation of Akt1 and cell cycle progression in NIH/3T3 cell line with confocal microscopy, in vivo imaging, and directed mutagenesis. We demonstrate that modulation by H(2O(2 entails the entrance of cytosolic P-Akt1 Ser(473 to mitochondria, where it is further phosphorylated at Thr(308 by constitutive PDK1. Phosphorylation of Thr(308 in mitochondria determines Akt1 passage to nuclei and triggers genomic post-translational mechanisms for cell proliferation. At high H(2O(2, Akt1-PDK1 association is disrupted and P-Akt1 Ser(473 accumulates in mitochondria in detriment to nuclear translocation; accordingly, Akt1 T308A is retained in mitochondria. Low Akt1 activity increases cytochrome c release to cytosol leading to apoptosis. As assessed by mass spectra, differential H(2O(2 effects on Akt1-PDK interaction depend on the selective oxidation of Cys(310 to sulfenic or cysteic acids. These results indicate that Akt1 intramitochondrial-cycling is central for redox modulation of cell fate.

  12. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases (AKRs in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH-catechols and PAH o-Quinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZhang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quiniones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  13. Biphilic Organophosphorus Catalysis: Regioselective Reductive Transposition of Allylic Bromides via PIII/PV Redox Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Kyle D.; Dunn, Nicole L.; Fastuca, Nicholas J.; Radosevich, Alexander T.

    2016-01-01

    We report that a regioselective reductive transposition of primary allylic bromides is catalyzed by a biphilic organophosphorus (phosphetane) catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence supports the formation of a pentacoordinate (σ5-P) hydridophosphorane as a key reactive intermediate. Kinetics experiments and computational modeling are consistent with a unimolecular decomposition of the σ5-P hydridophosphorane via a concerted cyclic transition structure that delivers the observed allylic transposition and completes a novel PIII/PV redox catalytic cycle. These results broaden the growing repertoire of reactions catalyzed within the PIII/PV redox couple and suggest additional opportunities for organophosphorus catalysis in a biphilic mode. PMID:25874950

  14. Revisiting the BaO2/BaO redox cycle for solar thermochemical energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, A J; Sastre, D; Serrano, D P; Pizarro, P; Coronado, J M

    2016-03-21

    The barium peroxide-based redox cycle was proposed in the late 1970s as a thermochemical energy storage system. Since then, very little attention has been paid to such redox couples. In this paper, we have revisited the use of reduction-oxidation reactions of the BaO2/BaO system for thermochemical heat storage at high temperatures. Using thermogravimetric analysis, reduction and oxidation reactions were studied in order to find the main limitations associated with each process. Furthermore, the system was evaluated through several charge-discharge stages in order to analyse its possible degradation after repeated cycling. Through differential scanning calorimetry the heat stored and released were also determined. Oxidation reaction, which was found to be slower than reduction, was studied in more detail using isothermal tests. It was observed that the rate-controlling step of BaO oxidation follows zero-order kinetics, although at high temperatures a deviation from Arrhenius behaviour was observed probably due to hindrances to anionic oxygen diffusion caused by the formation of an external layer of BaO2. This redox couple was able to withstand several redox cycles without deactivation, showing reaction conversions close to 100% provided that impurities are previously eliminated through thermal pre-treatment, demonstrating the feasibility of this system for solar thermochemical heat storage.

  15. Rhizospere Redox Cycling and Implications for Rhizosphere Biotransformation of Selected Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) Congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggo, Richard E; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2013-08-01

    Theoretically, sequential cycles of dechlorination followed by aerobic bio-oxidation are desirable to achieve complete degradation of a mixture of higher and lower chlorinated PCBs. In this research, soil was artificially contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in mixture and as single congeners, aged, and planted with two different plant species. Alternating redox cycles were created in the root zone of plants by flooding and draining the soil. Over 32 weeks, switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and poplar (Populus deltoids x nigra DN34) planted systems that were exposed to alternate cycles of flooding performed better in reducing parent PCBs than planted systems that were not cycled (p<0.05). The cycled systems also had a higher mass of PCB transformation products than the uncycled systems. Multiple cycles were necessary to achieve significant differences between the cycled and uncycled treatments.

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen species by the redox cycling of nitroprusside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna Rao, D N; Cederbaum, A I

    1996-03-15

    The formation of oxygen species during the redox cycling of sodium nitroprusside by rat liver microsomes and by chemical reductants was evaluated. The reduction of sodium nitroprusside by ascorbate and glutathione results in formation of the nitroprusside nitroxide radical which, on freezing at 77 K, results exclusively in the tetracyano [Fe(CN4)NO]2- and pentacyano [Fe(CN5)NO]3- forms of nitroxide radicals, respectively. The role of reducing agents on the inter-conversion of these two forms of nitroxide radical is discussed. The NADH and NADPH dependent microsomal reduction of nitroprusside results in the production of nitroprusside nitroxide radical, which in the presence of oxygen undergoes redox cycling to generate superoxide radical, and eventually hydroxyl radical is formed by a Fenton-type of reaction. Studies on the effect of several biologically or toxicologically relevant iron chelators on NADPH-dependent microsomal reduction of nitroprusside and subsequent formation of hydroxyl radical indicate that certain iron chelators such as isocitrate act as hydroxyl radical scavengers (depending on its concentration), but other chelators such as EDTA and DPTA function as good catalysts for the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The NADH and nitroprusside dependent microsomal production of hydroxyl radical is better in the presence of ATP, or equal in the presence of acetate, or diminished in the presence of DTPA when compared to the NADPH- and nitroprusside-dependent microsomal production of hydroxyl radicals. The effect of these chelates on the redox cycling of iron and nitroprusside by microsomes is discussed. Rat liver sub-mitochondrial particles and human hepatoblastoma cells (HepG2 cell line) also generated superoxide and hydroxyl radicals during the redox cycling of nitroprusside. These results provide direct evidence for the production of reactive oxygen species during the redox cycling of nitroprusside, The use of nitroprusside as a nitric oxide donor in

  17. Effects of Redox Cycling of Iron in Nontronite on Reduction of Technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Junjie; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Dong, Hailiang; Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Zhang, Jing; Kim, Jinwook

    2012-01-06

    In situ technetium-99 (99Tc) immobilization by Fe(II) associated with clay minerals has been studied and is a potential cost-effective method for Tc remediation at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Fe redox cycling are common in sedimentary environments, however their effect on Tc reduction and immobilization has not yet been investigated. The objective of this project was therefore to study how multiple cycles of reduction-reoxidation of Fe-rich clay mineral, nontronite, affected its reactivity toward Tc (VII) reduction. Iron-rich nontronite NAu-2 was used as a model clay mineral. NAu-2 suspension was first bioreduced by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, which consequently was re-oxidized by air. Three cycles of reduction-oxidation were conducted and bioreduced NAu-2 samples from all three cycles were collected and used for Tc(VII) reduction experiments. Each redox cycle resulted in a small fraction of dissolution of small size and/or poorly crystalline NAu-2. The released Fe(II) from the dissolution was likely adsorbed onto NAu-2 surface/edge sites with a high reactivity. Upon exposure to O2, this reactive Fe(II) fraction was oxidized more rapidly than structural Fe(II) and may have accounted for a two-step reoxidation kinetics of NAu-2 associated Fe(II): rapid oxidation over first few hours followed by slow oxidation. Progressive increase of this reactive fraction of Fe(II), from increased dissolution, accounted for the successively higher rate of bioreduction and reoxidation with increased redox cycles. The same Fe redistribution accounted for two-step Tc(VII) reduction kinetics as well. Rapid Tc(VII) reduction in the first few hours may be attributed to a small fraction of highly reactive Fe(II) at the NAu-2 surface/edge sites, and more steady Tc(VII) reduction over longer time may be carried out by structural Fe(II). Similar to the increased rates of Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation, the Tc(VII) reduction rate also increased with redox

  18. Microbial mediated iron redox cycling in Fe (hydr)oxides for nitrite removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongsheng; Xu, Lu; Shu, Weikang; Zhou, Jizhi; Chen, Xueping; Xu, Yunfeng; Qian, Guangren

    2017-01-01

    Nitrite, at an environmentally relevant concentration, was significantly reduced with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The average nitrite removal rates of 1.28±0.08 and 0.65±0.02(mgL(-1))h(-1) were achieved with ferrihydrite and magnetite, respectively. The results showed that nitrite removal was able to undergo multiple redox cycles with iron (hydr)oxides mediated by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. During the bioreduction of the following cycles, biogenic Fe(II) was subsequently chemically oxidized to Fe(III), which is associated with nitrite reduction. There was 11.18±1.26mgL(-1) of NH4(+)-N generated in the process of redox cycling of ferrihydrite. Additionally, results obtained by using X-ray diffraction showed that ferrihydrite and magnetite remained mainly stable in the system. This study indicated that redox cycling of Fe in iron (hydr)oxides was a potential process associated with NO2(-)-N removal from solution, and reduced most nitrite abiotically to gaseous nitrogen species.

  19. A high-fidelity multiphysics model for the new solid oxide iron-air redox battery part I: Bridging mass transport and charge transfer with redox cycle kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, XF; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-04-15

    A high-fidelity two-dimensional axial symmetrical multi-physics model is described in this paper as an effort to simulate the cycle performance of a recently discovered solid oxide metal-air redox battery (SOMARB). The model collectively considers mass transport, charge transfer and chemical redox cycle kinetics occurring across the components of the battery, and is validated by experimental data obtained from independent research. In particular, the redox kinetics at the energy storage unit is well represented by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JIVIAK) and Shrinking Core models. The results explicitly show that the reduction of Fe3O4 during the charging cycle limits the overall performance. Distributions of electrode potential, overpotential, Nernst potential, and H-2/H2O-concentration across various components of the battery are also systematically investigated. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glutathione redox cycle dysregulation in Huntington’s disease knock-in striatal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Márcio; Rosenstock, Tatiana; cunha-oliveira, teresa; Ferreira, Ildete; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Rego, Ana Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a CAG repeat disorder affecting the HD gene, which encodes for huntingtin (Htt) and is characterized by prominent cell death in the striatum. Oxidative stress was previously implicated in HD neurodegeneration, but the role of the major endogenous antioxidant system, the glutathione redox cycle, has been less studied following expression of full-length mutant Htt (FL-mHtt). Thus, in this work we analyzed the glutathione system in striatal cells derived from HD knoc...

  1. Changes in the Precambrian ocean U cycle linked to the evolution of surficial redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, C. A.; Bekker, A.; Scott, C.; Gill, B. C.; Lyons, T. W.

    2009-12-01

    The rise of atmospheric oxygen between 2.47 and 2.32 Ga undoubtedly had a significant impact on global biogeochemical cycles and particularly, the intensity of oxidative continental weathering. While the timing of atmospheric oxygenation is well-constrained, the redox -state of the deep ocean throughout the Proterozoic is less known. The distribution of redox-sensitive elements, such as uranium and molybdenum, in ancient sedimentary rocks provides insight into the response of the deep ocean to this dramatic geochemical change. Here we present a compilation of U concentrations in marine black shales, from the Archean to the present to track the coupled redox evolution of the atmosphere and oceans, and to decipher changes in the uranium cycle itself. Since riverine delivery represents the only significant source of uranium to the oceans, and scavenging by organic matter-rich sediments beneath suboxic to anoxic waters represents the only significant sink, uranium concentrations in black shales hold a record of the evolution of the uranium cycle through time. Temporal changes in the concentrations of U in black shales can be attributed to two first-order controls: variable delivery of riverine U to the ocean, a reflection of levels of oxygen in the atmosphere, and the extent of ocean anoxic conditions. The compiled data show a series of changes in the uranium cycle through time. Phanerozoic uranium enrichments are associated with ocean-wide anoxic events coupled with a fully developed oxidative continental weathering cycle. Enrichments are muted in Proterozoic sediments, reflecting either a weaker riverine delivery of uranium to the oceans, and/or a strong sink associated with widespread anoxia. Authigenic uranium enrichments significantly above crustal levels, which reflect strong oxidative continental weathering, do not appear until several hundred million years after the Great Oxidation Event. We propose that the U cycle in the Archean oceans was dominated by the

  2. Nanoscale Electrochemical Sensor Arrays: Redox Cycling Amplification in Dual-Electrode Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Bernhard; Kätelhön, Enno; Yakushenko, Alexey; Krause, Kay J; Adly, Nouran; Hüske, Martin; Rinklin, Philipp

    2016-09-20

    Micro- and nanofabriation technologies have a tremendous potential for the development of powerful sensor array platforms for electrochemical detection. The ability to integrate electrochemical sensor arrays with microfluidic devices nowadays provides possibilities for advanced lab-on-a-chip technology for the detection or quantification of multiple targets in a high-throughput approach. In particular, this is interesting for applications outside of analytical laboratories, such as point-of-care (POC) or on-site water screening where cost, measurement time, and the size of individual sensor devices are important factors to be considered. In addition, electrochemical sensor arrays can monitor biological processes in emerging cell-analysis platforms. Here, recent progress in the design of disease model systems and organ-on-a-chip technologies still needs to be matched by appropriate functionalities for application of external stimuli and read-out of cellular activity in long-term experiments. Preferably, data can be gathered not only at a singular location but at different spatial scales across a whole cell network, calling for new sensor array technologies. In this Account, we describe the evolution of chip-based nanoscale electrochemical sensor arrays, which have been developed and investigated in our group. Focusing on design and fabrication strategies that facilitate applications for the investigation of cellular networks, we emphasize the sensing of redox-active neurotransmitters on a chip. To this end, we address the impact of the device architecture on sensitivity, selectivity as well as on spatial and temporal resolution. Specifically, we highlight recent work on redox-cycling concepts using nanocavity sensor arrays, which provide an efficient amplification strategy for spatiotemporal detection of redox-active molecules. As redox-cycling electrochemistry critically depends on the ability to miniaturize and integrate closely spaced electrode systems, the

  3. Isolation of phyllosilicate-iron redox cycling microorganisms from an illite-smectite rich hydromorphic soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenya S Shelobolina

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The biogeochemistry of phyllosilicate-Fe redox cycling was studied in a Phalaris arundinacea (Reed Canary Grass dominated redoximorphic soil from Shovelers Sink, a small glacial depression near Madison, WI. The clay size fraction of Shovelers Sink soil accounts for 16% of the dry weight of the soil, yet contributes 74% of total Fe. The dominant mineral in the clay size fraction is mixed-layer illite-smectite, and in contrast to many other soils and sediments, Fe(III oxides are present in low abundance. We examined the Fe biogeochemistry of Shovelers Sink soils, estimated the abundance of Fe redox cycling microorganisms, and isolated in pure culture representative phyllosilicate-Fe oxidizing and reducing organisms. The abundance of phyllosilicate-Fe reducing and oxidizing organisms was low compared to culturable aerobic heterotrophs. Both direct isolation and dilution-to-extinction approaches using structural Fe(II in Bancroft biotite as a Fe(II source, and O2 as the electron acceptor, resulted in recovery of common rhizosphere organisms including Bradyrhizobium spp and strains of Cupriavidus necator and Ralstonia solanacearum. In addition to oxidizing biotite and soluble Fe(II with O2, each of these isolates was able to oxidize Fe(II in reduced NAu-2 smectite with NO3- as the electron acceptor. Oxidized NAu-2 smectite or amorphous Fe(III oxide served as electron acceptors for enrichment and isolation of Fe(III- reducing microorganisms, resulting in recovery of a strain related to G. toluenoxydans. The ability of the recovered microorganisms to cycle phyllosilicate Fe was verified in an experiment with native Shovelers Sink clay. This study confirms that Fe in the native Shovelers Sink clay is readily available for microbial redox transformation and can be cycled by the Fe(III-reducing and Fe(II-oxidizing microorganisms recovered from the soil.

  4. Isolation of phyllosilicate-iron redox cycling microorganisms from an illite-smectite rich hydromorphic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelobolina, Evgenya; Konishi, Hiromi; Xu, Huifang; Benzine, Jason; Xiong, Mai Yia; Wu, Tao; Blöthe, Marco; Roden, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of phyllosilicate-Fe redox cycling was studied in a Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass) dominated redoximorphic soil from Shovelers Sink, a small glacial depression near Madison, WI. The clay size fraction of Shovelers Sink soil accounts for 16% of the dry weight of the soil, yet contributes 74% of total Fe. The dominant mineral in the clay size fraction is mixed layer illite-smectite, and in contrast to many other soils and sediments, Fe(III) oxides are present in low abundance. We examined the Fe biogeochemistry of Shovelers Sink soils, estimated the abundance of Fe redox cycling microorganisms, and isolated in pure culture representative phyllosilicate-Fe oxidizing and reducing organisms. The abundance of phyllosilicate-Fe reducing and oxidizing organisms was low compared to culturable aerobic heterotrophs. Both direct isolation and dilution-to-extinction approaches using structural Fe(II) in Bancroft biotite as a Fe(II) source, and O(2) as the electron acceptor, resulted in recovery of common rhizosphere organisms including Bradyrhizobium spp. and strains of Cupriavidus necator and Ralstonia solanacearum. In addition to oxidizing biotite and soluble Fe(II) with O(2), each of these isolates was able to oxidize Fe(II) in reduced NAu-2 smectite with [Formula: see text] as the electron acceptor. Oxidized NAu-2 smectite or amorphous Fe(III) oxide served as electron acceptors for enrichment and isolation of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms, resulting in recovery of a strain related to Geobacter toluenoxydans. The ability of the recovered microorganisms to cycle phyllosilicate-Fe was verified in an experiment with native Shovelers Sink clay. This study confirms that Fe in the native Shovelers Sink clay is readily available for microbial redox transformation and can be cycled by the Fe(III)-reducing and Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms recovered from the soil.

  5. Subduction Zone Redox and the Deep Earth Cycles of Sulfur and Chalcophile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canil, D.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction at convergent plate margins is a return flux to the mantle of rocks influenced by weathering, hydrothermal activity, atmospheric exchange, or bio-mineralization in the exosphere. The latter exogenic processes modify the long-term abundance and behaviour of certain elements in the deeper earth that can be traced over time in the chemistry of mantle-derived magmas. The redox budget of subduction is controlled by the flux of oxidized versus reduced forms of Fe, S, H, or C, and impacts the long-term evolution of oxygen on the planet, critical for life in the exosphere. In particular, the sulfur cycle is specifically tied to the evolution of oxygen on Earth's surface over time and critical to biogeochemical cycles on the surface. The behaviour of sulfur in the exogenic system is well-studied and fairly well understood using sedimentary records. An originally sulfidic ocean on Earth gave way with time and oxygenation to one that is sulfate dominated over the last two billion years. In contrast, far less is known of the deep earth cycle of S, and more so its history. The record of the endogenic cycle can only be monitored via what comes out of the mantle (magmas and their gases), or what goes down via subduction (hydrothermally-altered or weathered subducted lithosphere). Interest in the endogenic cycle of S is not new but several outstanding conundrums remain for sulfur in arc magmas that point to the importance of the subduction process. A hitherto ignored component of the paradox of the sulfur cycle is the sedimentary veneer that sits atop the subducted oceanic basalt crust. Compilations show only 0.12 wt% S in altered ocean basalt crust, but up to 10 times that amount in oceanic sediments, tied to their Fe content (in pyrite). These abundances may seem trivial, but the behaviour of this small amount of S in subduction is not fully appreciated and its oxidation potential in the arc mantle is enormous. The conversion of subducted sulfide to sulfate is a 8

  6. Evaluation of nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia anode degradation during discharge operation and redox cycles operation by electrochemical calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Takaaki; Jiao, Zhenjun; Shikazono, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Degradation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode during discharge operation and redox cycles operation were evaluated by three-dimensional electrochemical calculations using a Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). Three dimensional microstructures were obtained by Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB-SEM) reconstruction. In the electrochemical calculations, changes in exchange current density and ionic conductivity of Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) during the operations were assumed and their values were calculated by fitting the calculated overpotential values to the experimental ones. Changes in triple phase boundary density calculated from the reconstructed microstructures were inconsistent with the gradual degradation observed during repeated redox-discharge cycles. Changes of the fitted exchange current density and YSZ ionic conductivity values in both discharge operation and redox cycle operation showed same tendency as the experimental results. Change in exchange current density or YSZ ionic conductivity should be considered as an essential factor which governs the cell performance change regardless of the redox treatment.

  7. Efficient cycles for carbon capture CLC power plants based on thermally balanced redox reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The rotary reactor differs from most alternative chemical looping combustion (CLC) reactor designs because it maintains near-thermal equilibrium between the two stages of the redox process by thermally coupling channels undergoing oxidation and reduction. An earlier study showed that this thermal coupling between the oxidation and reduction reactors increases the efficiency by up to 2% points when implemented in a regenerative Brayton cycle. The present study extends this analysis to alternative CLC cycles with the objective of identifying optimal configurations and design tradeoffs. Results show that the increased efficiency from reactor thermal coupling applies only to cycles that are capable of exploiting the increased availability in the reduction reactor exhaust. Thus, in addition to the regenerative cycle, the combined CLC cycle and the combined-regenerative CLC cycle are suitable for integration with the rotary reactor. Parametric studies are used to compare the sensitivity of the different cycle efficiencies to parameters like pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, carrier-gas fraction and purge steam generation. One of the key conclusions from this analysis is that while the optimal efficiency for regenerative CLC cycle was the highest of the three (56% at 3. bars, 1200. °C), the combined-regenerative cycle offers a trade-off that combines a reasonably high efficiency (about 54% at 12. bars, 1200. °C) with much lower gas volumetric flow rate and consequently, smaller reactor size. Unlike the other two cycles, the optimal compressor pressure ratio for the regenerative cycle is weakly dependent on the design turbine inlet temperature. For the regenerative and combined regenerative cycles, steam production in the regenerator below 2× fuel flow rate improves exhaust recovery and consequently, the overall system efficiency. Also, given that the fuel side regenerator flow is unbalanced, it is more efficient to generate steam from the

  8. Electrocoagulation of Quinone Pigments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duang Buddhasukh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Some representative quinones, viz. one naphthoquinone (plumbagin and five anthraquinones (alizarin, purpurin, chrysazin, emodin, and anthrarufin, were subjected to electrocoagulation. It was found that the rate and extent of coagulation of these compounds appears to correlate with the number and relative position of their phenolic substituent groups, and that all of the coagulated quinones could be recovered. Attempts were then made to electrochemically isolate three quinones, namely plumbagin, morindone and erythrolaccin, from natural sources.

  9. Global redox cycle of biospheric carbon: Interaction of photosynthesis and earth crust processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, Alexander A

    2015-11-01

    A model of the natural global redox cycle of biospheric carbon is introduced. According to this model, carbon transfer between biosphere and geospheres is accompanied by a conversion of the oxidative forms, presented by CO2, bicarbonate and carbonate ions, into the reduced forms, produced in photosynthesis. The mechanism of carbon transfer is associated with two phases of movement of lithospheric plates. In the short-term orogenic phase, CO2 from the subduction (plates' collisions) zones fills the "atmosphere-hydrosphere" system, resulting in climate warming. In the long-term quiet (geosynclynal) phase, weathering and photosynthesis become dominant depleting the oxidative forms of carbon. The above asymmetric periodicity exerts an impact on climate, biodiversity, distribution of organic matter in sedimentary deposits, etc. Along with photosynthesis expansion, the redox carbon cycle undergoes its development until it reaches the ecological compensation point, at which CO2 is depleted to the level critical to support the growth and reproduction of plants. This occurred in the Permo-Carboniferous time and in the Neogene. Shorter-term perturbations of the global carbon cycle in the form of glacial-interglacial oscillations appear near the ecological compensation point.

  10. Manganese redox cycling in Lake Imandra: impact on nitrogen and the trace metal sediment record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ingri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sediment and water samples from the mine-polluted Yokostrovskaya basin in Lake Imandra have been analysed. Three major processes have influenced the accumulation and distribution of metals in the sediment: (1 Development of the apatite-nepheline and the sulfide ore mining industries. (2 Secondary formation of sulphides in the upper sediment column. (3 Redox cycling of Mn in the surface sediment and in the bottom water.

    This study demonstrate the dominant role of the Mn redox cycling in controlling distribution of several major and trace elements, especially during the winter stratification period. Mn oxides act as a major scavenger and carrier for the non-detrital fraction of Al, Ca, K, Mg, P, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Mo and Zn in the bottom water. Aluminium, Ca, K, Mg, P, Cu, Ni and Zn are mainly sorbed at the surface of the particulate Mn phase, while Ba and Mo form a phase (or inner sphere complex with Mn. Co is associated with the Mn-rich phase, probably by oxidation of Co(II to a trivalent state by the particulate Mn surface. Formation and dissolution of Mn particles most likely also control anoxic ammonium oxidation to nitrate and reduction of nitrate to N2. It is shown that secondary sulphides in Lake Imandra sediments are fed with trace metals primarily scavenged from the dissolved phase in the water column. This enrichment process, driven by the Mn-redox cycle, therefore changes the sediment record by the transfer of a dissolved pollution signal to the particulate sediment record, thus making it more complicated to trace direct influence of particles from different pollution sources.

  11. Isolation of Phyllosilicate–Iron Redox Cycling Microorganisms from an Illite–Smectite Rich Hydromorphic Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Shelobolina, Evgenya S.; Hiromi eKonishi; Huifang eXu; Jason eBenzine; Mai Yia eXiong; Tao eWu; Marco eBlöthe; Eric eRoden

    2012-01-01

    The biogeochemistry of phyllosilicate–Fe redox cycling was studied in a Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass) dominated redoximorphic soil from Shovelers Sink, a small glacial depression near Madison, WI. The clay size fraction of Shovelers Sink soil accounts for 16% of the dry weight of the soil, yet contributes 74% of total Fe. The dominant mineral in the clay size fraction is mixed layer illite–smectite, and in contrast to many other soils and sediments, Fe(III) oxides are present in lo...

  12. In situ redox cycle of a nickel-YSZ fuel cell anode in an environmental transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeangros, Q. [Interdisciplinary Center for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Faes, A. [Interdisciplinary Center for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Laboratory of Industrial Energy Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Wagner, J.B.; Hansen, T.W. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Aschauer, U. [Chemistry Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Van herle, J. [Laboratory of Industrial Energy Systems, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hessler-Wyser, A., E-mail: aicha.hessler@epfl.ch [Interdisciplinary Center for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-08-15

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy is used in combination with density functional theory calculations to study the redox stability of a nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide fuel cell anode. The results reveal that the transfer of oxygen from NiO to yttria-stabilized zirconia triggers the reduction reaction. During Ni reoxidation, the creation of a porous structure, due to mass transport, accounts for the redox instability of the Ni-based anode. Both the expansion of NiO during a redox cycle and the presence of stress in the yttria-stabilized zirconia grains are observed directly. Besides providing an understanding of the Ni-YSZ anode redox degradation, the observations are used to propose an alternative anode design for improved redox tolerance.

  13. Incorporating redox processes improves prediction of carbon and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoping; Zheng, Jianqiu; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David; Gu, Baohua; Mayes, Melanie; Painter, Scott; Thornton, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Among the coupled thermal, hydrological, geochemical, and biological processes, redox processes play major roles in carbon and nutrient cycling and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. Increasingly, mechanistic representation of redox processes is acknowledged as necessary for accurate prediction of GHG emission in the assessment of land-atmosphere interactions. Simple organic substrates, Fe reduction, microbial reactions, and the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM) were added to a reaction network used in the land component of an Earth system model. In conjunction with this amended reaction network, various temperature response functions used in ecosystem models were assessed for their ability to describe experimental observations from incubation tests with arctic soils. Incorporation of Fe reduction reactions improves the prediction of the lag time between CO2 and CH4 accumulation. The inclusion of the WHAM model enables us to approximately simulate the initial pH drop due to organic acid accumulation and then a pH increase due to Fe reduction without parameter adjustment. The CLM4.0, CENTURY, and Ratkowsky temperature response functions better described the observations than the Q10 method, Arrhenius equation, and ROTH-C. As electron acceptors between O2 and CO2 (e.g., Fe(III), SO42-) are often involved, our results support inclusion of these redox reactions for accurate prediction of CH4 production and consumption. Ongoing work includes improving the parameterization of organic matter decomposition to produce simple organic substrates, examining the influence of redox potential on methanogenesis under thermodynamically favorable conditions, and refining temperature response representation near the freezing point by additional model-experiment iterations. We will use the model to describe observed GHG emission at arctic and tropical sites.

  14. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao (NYMEDCO)

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  15. In situ redox cycle of a nickel–YSZ fuel cell anode in an environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Quentin; Faes, Antonin; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2010-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy is used in combination with density functional theory calculations to study the redox stability of a nickel/yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide fuel cell anode. The results reveal that the transfer of oxygen from NiO to yttria-stabilized zirconia...... triggers the reduction reaction. During Ni reoxidation, the creation of a porous structure, due to mass transport, accounts for the redox instability of the Ni-based anode. Both the expansion of NiO during a redox cycle and the presence of stress in the yttria-stabilized zirconia grains are observed...

  16. Redox cycling of copper-amyloid β 1-16 peptide complexes is highly dependent on the coordination mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujano-Ortiz, Lidia G; González, Felipe J; Quintanar, Liliana

    2015-01-05

    Copper (Cu)-amyloid β (Aβ) interactions play a role in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease. This work presents a spectroscopic and electrochemical study of two physiologically relevant Aβ-Cu(II) complexes, as a function of pH and relative Cu-Aβ(1-16) concentrations. Our results reveal that these coordination modes display distinct redox behaviors and provide experimental evidence for the existence of an intermediate Cu(I) species. A mechanism for the redox cycling of these complexes is proposed, providing further insight into the redox relevance of Aβ-Cu interactions.

  17. Cysteine-cystine redox cycling in a gold-gold dual-plate generator-collector microtrench sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Jules L; Gross, Andrew J; Estrela, Pedro; Iniesta, Jesus; Green, Stephen J; Winlove, C Peter; Winyard, Paul G; Benjamin, Nigel; Marken, Frank

    2014-07-15

    Thiols and disulfides are ubiquitous and important analytical targets. However, their redox properties, in particular on gold sensor electrodes, are complex and obscured by strong adsorption. Here, a gold-gold dual-plate microtrench dual-electrode sensor with feedback signal amplification is demonstrated to give well-defined (but kinetically limited) steady-state voltammetric current responses for the cysteine-cystine redox cycle in nondegassed aqueous buffer media at pH 7 down to micromolar concentration levels.

  18. A chemically powered unidirectional rotary molecular motor based on a palladium redox cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Beatrice S. L.; Kistemaker, Jos C. M.; Otten, Edwin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2016-09-01

    The conversion of chemical energy to drive directional motion at the molecular level allows biological systems, ranging from subcellular components to whole organisms, to perform a myriad of dynamic functions and respond to changes in the environment. Directional movement has been demonstrated in artificial molecular systems, but the fundamental motif of unidirectional rotary motion along a single-bond rotary axle induced by metal-catalysed transformation of chemical fuels has not been realized, and the challenge is to couple the metal-centred redox processes to stepwise changes in conformation to arrive at a full unidirectional rotary cycle. Here, we present the design of an organopalladium-based motor and the experimental demonstration of a 360° unidirectional rotary cycle using simple chemical fuels. Exploiting fundamental reactivity principles in organometallic chemistry enables control of directional rotation and offers the potential of harnessing the wealth of opportunities offered by transition-metal-based catalytic conversions to drive motion and dynamic functions.

  19. Changes in glutathione redox cycle during diapause determination and termination in the bivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lin-Chuan; Hou, Yi-Sheng; Sima, Yang-Hu

    2014-02-01

    To explore whether glutathione regulates diapause determination and termination in the bivoltine silkworm Bombyx mori, we monitored the changes in glutathione redox cycle in the ovary of both diapause- and nondiapause-egg producers, as well as those in diapause eggs incubated at different temperatures. The activity of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) was detected in ovaries but not in eggs, while neither ovaries nor eggs showed activity of glutathione peroxidase. A lower reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio was observed in the ovary of diapause-egg producers, due to weaker reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to the reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by glutathione reductase (GR) and TrxR. This indicates an oxidative shift in the glutathione redox cycle during diapause determination. Compared with the 25°C-treated diapause eggs, the 5°C-treated diapause eggs showed lower GSH/GSSG ratio, a result of stronger oxidation of GSH catalyzed by thioredoxin peroxidase and weaker reduction of GSSG catalyzed by GR. Our study demonstrated the important regulatory role of glutathione in diapause determination and termination of the bivoltine silkworm.

  20. Long-Cycling Aqueous Organic Redox Flow Battery (AORFB) toward Sustainable and Safe Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; DeBruler, Camden; Rhodes, Zayn; Liu, T Leo

    2017-01-25

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are a viable technology to store renewable energy in the form of electricity that can be supplied to electricity grids. However, widespread implementation of traditional RFBs, such as vanadium and Zn-Br2 RFBs, is limited due to a number of challenges related to materials, including low abundance and high costs of redox-active metals, expensive separators, active material crossover, and corrosive and hazardous electrolytes. To address these challenges, we demonstrate a neutral aqueous organic redox flow battery (AORFB) technology utilizing a newly designed cathode electrolyte containing a highly water-soluble ferrocene molecule. Specifically, water-soluble (ferrocenylmethyl)trimethylammonium chloride (FcNCl, 4.0 M in H2O, 107.2 Ah/L, and 3.0 M in 2.0 NaCl, 80.4 Ah/L) and N(1)-ferrocenylmethyl-N(1),N(1),N(2),N(2),N(2)-pentamethylpropane-1,2-diaminium dibromide, (FcN2Br2, 3.1 M in H2O, 83.1 Ah/L, and 2.0 M in 2.0 M NaCl, 53.5 Ah/L) were synthesized through structural decoration of hydrophobic ferrocene with synergetic hydrophilic functionalities including an ammonium cation group and a halide anion. When paired with methyl viologen (MV) as an anolyte, resulting FcNCl/MV and FcN2Br2/MV AORFBs were operated in noncorrosive neutral NaCl supporting electrolytes using a low-cost anion-exchange membrane. These ferrocene/MV AORFBs are characterized as having high theoretical energy density (45.5 Wh/L) and excellent cycling performance from 40 to 100 mA/cm(2). Notably, the FcNCl/MV AORFBs (demonstrated at 7.0 and 9.9 Wh/L) exhibited unprecedented long cycling performance, 700 cycles at 60 mA/cm(2) with 99.99% capacity retention per cycle, and delivered power density up to 125 mW/cm(2). These AORFBs are built from earth-abundant elements and are environmentally benign, thus representing a promising choice for sustainable and safe energy storage.

  1. A strategy for selective detection based on interferent depleting and redox cycling using the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Feng [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Yan Jiawei, E-mail: jwyan@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Lu Miao [Pen-Tung Sah Micro-Nano Technology Research Center, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhou Yongliang; Yang Yang; Mao Bingwei [State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > A novel strategy based on a combination of interferent depleting and redox cycling is proposed for the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes. > The strategy break up the restriction of selectively detecting a species that exhibits reversible reaction in a mixture with one that exhibits an irreversible reaction. > The electrodes enhance the current signal by redox cycling. > The electrodes can work regardless of the reversibility of interfering species. - Abstract: The fabrication, characterization and application of the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes for selective detection are demonstrated. The electrodes, fabricated by lithographic microfabrication technology, are composed of a planar film electrode and a 32 x 32 recessed microdisk array electrode. Different from commonly used redox cycling operating mode for array configurations such as interdigitated array electrodes, a novel strategy based on a combination of interferent depleting and redox cycling is proposed for the electrodes with an appropriate configuration. The planar film electrode (the plane electrode) is used to deplete the interferent in the diffusion layer. The recessed microdisk array electrode (the microdisk array), locating within the diffusion layer of the plane electrode, works for detecting the target analyte in the interferent-depleted diffusion layer. In addition, the microdisk array overcomes the disadvantage of low current signal for a single microelectrode. Moreover, the current signal of the target analyte that undergoes reversible electron transfer can be enhanced due to the redox cycling between the plane electrode and the microdisk array. Based on the above working principle, the plane-recessed microdisk array electrodes break up the restriction of selectively detecting a species that exhibits reversible reaction in a mixture with one that exhibits an irreversible reaction, which is a limitation of single redox cycling operating mode. The advantages of the

  2. The Ero1alpha-PDI redox cycle regulates retro-translocation of cholera toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul; Bernardi, Kaleena M; Tsai, Billy

    2010-04-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) is transported from the plasma membrane of host cells to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the catalytic CTA1 subunit retro-translocates to the cytosol to induce toxicity. Our previous analyses demonstrated that the ER oxidoreductase protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) acts as a redox-dependent chaperone to unfold CTA1, a reaction postulated to initiate toxin retro-translocation. In its reduced state, PDI binds and unfolds CTA1; subsequent oxidation of PDI by Ero1alpha enables toxin release. Whether this in vitro model describes events in cells that control CTA1 retro-translocation is unknown. Here we show that down-regulation of Ero1alpha decreases retro-translocation of CTA1 by increasing reduced PDI and blocking efficient toxin release. Overexpression of Ero1alpha also attenuates CTA1 retro-translocation, an effect due to increased PDI oxidation, which prevents PDI from engaging the toxin effectively. Interestingly, Ero1alpha down-regulation increases interaction between PDI and Derlin-1, an ER membrane protein that is a component of the retro-translocation complex. These findings demonstrate that an appropriate Ero1alpha-PDI ratio is critical for regulating the binding-release cycle of CTA1 by PDI during retro-translocation, and implicate PDI's redox state in targeting it to the retro-translocon.

  3. Potential application of microbial iron redox cycles in nitrate removal and their effects on clay mineral properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Dong, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Briggs, B. R.; Zeng, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Phyllosilicates that are ubiquitous in subsurface can serve as an iron source for microbial respiration. The objective of this research is to determine the ability of the phyllosilicate Fe to remove nitrate in subsurface undergoing microbial-driven redox cycles. In this study, thus, a well-characterized reference clay (NAu-2; nontronite), was subjected to redox cycles in a system containing dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002. Three redox cycles were conducted in bicarbonate- and PIPES-buffered medium. The extents of Fe(III) reduction, Fe(II) oxidation, nitrate reduction, and its various intermediate products were measured by wet chemical methods. For each cycle, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Mossbauer spectroscopy confirmed Fe oxidation state. Mineralogical changes were identified by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. For all three cycles, nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both bicarbonate- and PIPES- buffered conditions. As redox cycle increased, bio-reduction extents of Fe(III) in NAu-2 decreased by 33% and 48% in PIPES- and bicarbonate-buffered medium, respectively; however, bio-oxidation extents increased by 66% and 55% in the same medium, respectively. Despite the change of OH-stretching vibration band and OH-bending vibration bands in NAu-2 structure along Fe redox cycles, XRD data showed interlayer spacing of NAu-2 to be constant along the same Fe redox cycle. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated complex reduction and re-oxidation pathways. For example, a distinct Fe(II) doublet and a Fe2.5+ feature due to interfacial Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron transfer on clay mineral are prominent in their RT spectra. Both these Fe(II) are partially oxidized by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The result of this study shows that Fe in biogenically reduced or oxidized NAu-2

  4. Can Mn–S redox cycling drive sedimentary dolomite formation? A hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrash, Daniel A.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; González-Arismendi, Gabriela; Gordon, Robert A.; Méndez, José A.; Gingras, Murray K.; Konhauser, Kurt O. (CLS); (UCV-Venezuela); (CNRS-UMR); (Alberta)

    2016-06-10

    The formation of dolomite in modern peritidal environments is linked to the degradation of buried microbial mats, with complexation of Ca and Mg by extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) and alkalinity generation through organic carbon respiration facilitating the nucleation of dolomite precursors. In the past two decades, microbial sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, and methanotrophy have all been considered as potential drivers of the nucleation process, but it remains unclear why dolomite formation could not also occur in suboxic sediments where abundant alkalinity is produced by processes linked to Mn(IV) and/or Fe(III) reduction coupled with the diffusion and reoxidation of reduced sulfur species. Here we report the interstitial occurrence of spheroidal aggregates of nanometer-scale Ca-rich dolomite rhombohedra within suboxic sediments associated with remnant microbial mats that developed in the peritidal zone of the Archipelago Los Roques, Venezuela. Multiple analytical tools, including EPMA, ICP-MS, synchrotron-based XRF and XRD, and spatially resolved XANES microanalyses, show that the dolomite-cemented interval exhibits depleted bulk iron concentrations, but is interstitially enriched in Mn and elemental sulfur (S⁰). Manganese occurs in several oxidation states, indicating that the dolomite-cemented interval was the locus of complex biological redox transformations characterized by coupled Mn and S cycling. The tight correspondence between sedimentary Mn and MgCO₃ concentrations further hints at a direct role for Mn during dolomitization. While additional studies are required to confirm its relevance in natural settings, we propose a model by which coupled Mn–S redox cycling may promote alkalinity generation and thus dolomite formation in manner similar to, or even more efficiently, than bacterial sulfate reduction alone.

  5. Perylene-Based All-Organic Redox Battery with Excellent Cycling Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, Adriana; Delhorbe, Virginie; Bardet, Michel; Dubois, Lionel; Gutel, Thibaut; Picard, Lionel

    2016-09-07

    Organic materials derived from biomass can constitute a viable option as replacements for inorganic materials in lithium-ion battery electrodes owing to their low production costs, recyclability, and structural diversity. Among them, conjugated carbonyls have become the most promising type of organic electrode material as they present high theoretical capacity, fast reaction kinetics, and quasi-infinite structural diversity. In this letter, we report a new perylene-based all-organic redox battery comprising two aromatic conjugated carbonyl electrode materials, the prelithiated tetra-lithium perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylate (PTCLi6) as negative electrode material and the poly(N-n-hexyl-3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic)imide (PTCI) as positive electrode material. The resulting battery shows promising long-term cycling stability up to 200 cycles. In view of the enhanced cycling performances, the two organic materials studied herein are proposed as suitable candidates for the development of new all-organic lithium-ion batteries.

  6. Rethinking the clockwork: redox cycles and non-transcriptional control of circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lisa; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2014-02-01

    Circadian rhythms are a hallmark of living organisms, observable in all walks of life from primitive bacteria to highly complex humans. They are believed to have evolved to co-ordinate the timing of biological and behavioural processes to the changing environmental needs brought on by the progression of day and night through the 24-h cycle. Most of the modern study of circadian rhythms has centred on so-called TTFLs (transcription-translation feedback loops), wherein a core group of 'clock' genes, capable of negatively regulating themselves, produce oscillations with a period of approximately 24 h. Recently, however, the prevalence of the TTFL paradigm has been challenged by a series of findings wherein circadian rhythms, in the form of redox reactions, persist in the absence of transcriptional cycles. We have found that circadian cycles of oxidation and reduction are conserved across all domains of life, strongly suggesting that non-TTFL mechanisms work in parallel with the canonical genetic processes of timekeeping to generate the cyclical cellular and behavioural phenotypes that we commonly recognize as circadian rhythms.

  7. Update of the NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliou Vasilis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The NAD(PH:quinone acceptor oxidoreductase (NQO gene family belongs to the flavoprotein clan and, in the human genome, consists of two genes (NQO1 and NQO2. These two genes encode cytosolic flavoenzymes that catalyse the beneficial two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the unwanted one-electron reduction of quinones by other quinone reductases; one-electron reduction results in the formation of reactive oxygen species, generated by redox cycling of semiquinones in the presence of molecular oxygen. Both the mammalian NQO1 and NQO2 genes are upregulated as a part of the oxidative stress response and are inexplicably overexpressed in particular types of tumours. A non-synonymous mutation in the NQO1 gene, leading to absence of enzyme activity, has been associated with an increased risk of myeloid leukaemia and other types of blood dyscrasia in workers exposed to benzene. NQO2 has a melatonin-binding site, which may explain the anti-oxidant role of melatonin. An ancient NQO3 subfamily exists in eubacteria and the authors suggest that there should be additional divisions of the NQO family to include the NQO4 subfamily in fungi and NQO5 subfamily in archaebacteria. Interestingly, no NQO genes could be identified in the worm, fly, sea squirt or plants; because these taxa carry quinone reductases capable of one- and two-electron reductions, there has been either convergent evolution or redundancy to account for the appearance of these enzyme functions whenever they have been needed during evolution.

  8. Schisandrin B enhances the glutathione redox cycling and protects against oxidant injury in different types of cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip Y; Leong, Pou Kuan; Chen, Na; Ko, Kam Ming

    2011-01-01

    Tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) challenge caused an initial depletion of cellular reduced glutathione (GSH), which was followed by a gradual restoration of cellular GSH in AML12, H9c2, and differentiated PC12 cells. The time-dependent changes in cellular GSH induced by tBHP were monitored as a measure of GSH recovery capacity (GRC), of which glutathione reductase (GR)-mediated glutathione redox cycling and γ-glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL)-mediated GSH synthesis were found to play an essential role. While glutathione redox cycling sustained the GSH level during the initial tBHP-induced depletion, GSH synthesis restores the GSH level thereafter. The effects of (-)schisandrin B [(-)Sch B] and its analogs (Sch A and Sch C) on GRC were also examined in the cells. (-)Sch B and Sch C, but not Sch A, ameliorated the extent of tBHP-induced GSH depletion, indicative of enhanced glutathione redox cycling. However, the degree of restoration of GSH post-tBHP challenge was not affected or even decreased. Pretreatment with (-)Sch B and Sch C, but not Sch A, protected against oxidant injury in the cells. The (-)Sch B afforded cytoprotection was abolished by N,N'-bis(chloroethyl)-N-nitrosourea pretreatment suggesting the enhancement of glutathione redox cycling is crucially involved in the cytoprotection afforded by (-)Sch B against oxidative stress-induced cell injury.

  9. Identification of lactate dehydrogenase as a mammalian pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagawa, Mitsugu; Minematsu, Kenji; Shibata, Takahiro; Kondo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Takeshi; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a redox-active o-quinone, is an important nutrient involved in numerous physiological and biochemical processes in mammals. Despite such beneficial functions, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established. In the present study, using PQQ-immobilized Sepharose beads as a probe, we examined the presence of protein(s) that are capable of binding PQQ in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts and identified five cellular proteins, including l-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) A chain, as potential mammalian PQQ-binding proteins. In vitro studies using a purified rabbit muscle LDH show that PQQ inhibits the formation of lactate from pyruvate in the presence of NADH (forward reaction), whereas it enhances the conversion of lactate to pyruvate in the presence of NAD+ (reverse reaction). The molecular mechanism underlying PQQ-mediated regulation of LDH activity is attributed to the oxidation of NADH to NAD+ by PQQ. Indeed, the PQQ-bound LDH oxidizes NADH, generating NAD+, and significantly catalyzes the conversion of lactate to pyruvate. Furthermore, PQQ attenuates cellular lactate release and increases intracellular ATP levels in the NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. Our results suggest that PQQ, modulating LDH activity to facilitate pyruvate formation through its redox-cycling activity, may be involved in the enhanced energy production via mitochondrial TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:27230956

  10. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Farhan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C, epicatechin (EC, epigallocatechin (EGC and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  11. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-04

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  12. Biphilic Organophosphorus Catalysis: Regioselective Reductive Transposition of Allylic Bromides via P(III)/P(V) Redox Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichl, Kyle D; Dunn, Nicole L; Fastuca, Nicholas J; Radosevich, Alexander T

    2015-04-29

    We report that a regioselective reductive transposition of primary allylic bromides is catalyzed by a biphilic organophosphorus (phosphetane) catalyst. Spectroscopic evidence supports the formation of a pentacoordinate (σ(5)-P) hydridophosphorane as a key reactive intermediate. Kinetics experiments and computational modeling are consistent with a unimolecular decomposition of the σ(5)-P hydridophosphorane via a concerted cyclic transition structure that delivers the observed allylic transposition and completes a novel P(III)/P(V) redox catalytic cycle. These results broaden the growing repertoire of reactions catalyzed within the P(III)/P(V) redox couple and suggest additional opportunities for organophosphorus catalysis in a biphilic mode.

  13. Electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecular switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ya-Peng; Bian, Bao-An; Yuan, Pei-Pei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we carried out first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function to investigate the electronic transport properties of a quinone-based molecule sandwiched between two Au electrodes. The molecular switch can be reversibly switched between the reduced hydroquinone (HQ) and oxidized quinone (Q) states via redox reactions. The switching behavior of two forms is analyzed through their I- V curves, transmission spectra and molecular projected self-consistent Hamiltonian at zero bias. Then we discuss the transmission spectra of the HQ and Q forms at different bias, and explain the oscillation of current according to the transmission eigenstates of LUMO energy level for Q form. The results suggest that this kind of a quinone-based molecule is usable as one of the good candidates for redox-controlled molecular switches.

  14. Influence of iron redox cycling on organo-mineral associations in Arctic tundra soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Elizabeth; AlBashaireh, Amineh; Singer, David; Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Gu, Baohua; Graham, David

    2017-06-01

    Arctic tundra stores large quantities of soil organic matter under varying redox conditions. As the climate warms, these carbon reservoirs are susceptible to increased rates of decomposition and release to the atmosphere as the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Geochemical interactions between soil organic matter and minerals influence decomposition in many environments but remain poorly understood in Arctic tundra systems and are not considered in decomposition models. The accumulation of iron (Fe) oxyhydroxides and organo-iron precipitates at redox interfaces may be particularly important for carbon cycling given that ferric iron [Fe(III)] species can enhance decomposition by serving as terminal electron acceptors in anoxic soils or inhibit microbial decomposition by binding organic molecules. Here, we examine chemical properties of solid-phase Fe and organic matter in organic and mineral horizons within the seasonally thawed active layer of Arctic tundra on the North Slope of Alaska. Spectroscopic techniques, including micro-X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) mapping, micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μXANES) spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), were coupled with chemical sequential extractions and physical density fractionations to evaluate the spatial distribution and speciation of Fe-bearing phases and associated organic matter in soils. Organic horizons were enriched in poorly crystalline and crystalline iron oxides, and approximately 60% of total Fe stored in organic horizons was calculated to derive from upward translocation from anoxic mineral horizons. Ferrihydrite and goethite were present as coatings on mineral grains and plant debris, and in aggregates with clays and particulate organic matter. Minor amounts of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] were present in iron sulfides (i.e., pyrite and greigite) in mineral horizon soils and iron phosphates (vivianite) in organic horizons. Concentrations of organic

  15. Redox cycling and generation of reactive oxygen species in commercial infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, William L; Crum, Andrea D

    2016-04-01

    Three nationally prominent commercial powdered infant formulas generated hydrogen peroxide, ranging from 10.46 to 11.62 μM, when prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. Treating infant formulas with the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) significantly reduced H2O2 generation. In contrast, the addition of disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) elevated the level of H2O2 generated in the same infant formulas by approximately 3- to 4-fold above the untreated infant formulas. The infant formulas contained ascorbate radicals ranging from about 138 nM to 40 nM. Treatment with catalase reduced the ascorbate radical contents by as much as 67%. Treatment with DTPA further reduced ascorbate radical signals to below quantifiable levels in most samples, further implicating the involvement of transition metal redox cycling in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Supportive evidence of the generation of ROS is provided using luminol-enhanced luminescence (LEL) in both model mixtures of ascorbic acid and in commercial infant formulas.

  16. A Topical Mitochondria-Targeted Redox-Cycling Nitroxide Mitigates Oxidative Stress-Induced Skin Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Rhonda M; Epperly, Michael W; Stottlemyer, J Mark; Skoda, Erin M; Gao, Xiang; Li, Song; Huq, Saiful; Wipf, Peter; Kagan, Valerian E; Greenberger, Joel S; Falo, Louis D

    2017-03-01

    Skin is the largest human organ, and it provides a first line of defense that includes physical, chemical, and immune mechanisms to combat environmental stress. Radiation is a prevalent environmental stressor. Radiation-induced skin damage ranges from photoaging and cutaneous carcinogenesis caused by UV exposure, to treatment-limiting radiation dermatitis associated with radiotherapy, to cutaneous radiation syndrome, a frequently fatal consequence of exposures from nuclear accidents. The major mechanism of skin injury common to these exposures is radiation-induced oxidative stress. Efforts to prevent or mitigate radiation damage have included development of antioxidants capable of reducing reactive oxygen species. Mitochondria are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress, and mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis plays a major role in radiation-induced tissue damage. We reasoned that targeting a redox cycling nitroxide to mitochondria could prevent reactive oxygen species accumulation, limiting downstream oxidative damage and preserving mitochondrial function. Here we show that in both mouse and human skin, topical application of a mitochondrially targeted antioxidant prevents and mitigates radiation-induced skin damage characterized by clinical dermatitis, loss of barrier function, inflammation, and fibrosis. Further, damage mitigation is associated with reduced apoptosis, preservation of the skin's antioxidant capacity, and reduction of irreversible DNA and protein oxidation associated with oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions between microbial iron reduction and metal geochemistry: effect of redox cycling on transition metal speciation in iron bearing sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, D Craig; Picardal, Flynn F; Coby, Aaron J

    2006-03-15

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respectto Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a -3x increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by approximately 12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These

  18. Nitrosative stress and redox-cycling agents synergize to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne R. Diers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide production by the endothelium is required for normal vascular homeostasis; however, in conditions of oxidative stress, interactions of nitric oxide with reactive oxygen species (ROS are thought to underlie endothelial dysfunction. Beyond canonical nitric oxide signaling pathways, nitric oxide production results in the post-translational modification of protein thiols, termed S-nitrosation. The potential interplay between S-nitrosation and ROS remains poorly understood and is the focus of the current study. The effects of the S-nitrosating agent S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO in combination with redox-cycling agents was examined in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC. CysNO significantly impairs mitochondrial function and depletes the NADH/NAD+ pool; however, these changes do not result in cell death. When faced with the additional stressor of a redox-cycling agent used to generate ROS, further loss of NAD+ occurs, and cellular ATP pools are depleted. Cellular S-nitrosothiols also accumulate, and cell death is triggered. These data demonstrate that CysNO sensitizes endothelial cells to redox-cycling agent-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death and identify attenuated degradation of S-nitrosothiols as one potential mechanism for the enhanced cytotoxicity.

  19. Nitrosative stress and redox-cycling agents synergize to cause mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Anne R; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Hogg, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide production by the endothelium is required for normal vascular homeostasis; however, in conditions of oxidative stress, interactions of nitric oxide with reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to underlie endothelial dysfunction. Beyond canonical nitric oxide signaling pathways, nitric oxide production results in the post-translational modification of protein thiols, termed S-nitrosation. The potential interplay between S-nitrosation and ROS remains poorly understood and is the focus of the current study. The effects of the S-nitrosating agent S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO) in combination with redox-cycling agents was examined in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). CysNO significantly impairs mitochondrial function and depletes the NADH/NAD(+) pool; however, these changes do not result in cell death. When faced with the additional stressor of a redox-cycling agent used to generate ROS, further loss of NAD(+) occurs, and cellular ATP pools are depleted. Cellular S-nitrosothiols also accumulate, and cell death is triggered. These data demonstrate that CysNO sensitizes endothelial cells to redox-cycling agent-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death and identify attenuated degradation of S-nitrosothiols as one potential mechanism for the enhanced cytotoxicity.

  20. Structural Changes of Water Molecules Upon the Reduction of Quinones in The Reaction Center from Rhodobactery Sphaeroides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Iwata; M.L.Paddock; M.Y.Okamura; H.Kandori

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The photosynthetic bacterial reaction center (RC) is a membrane protein complex.The RC is composed of three protein subunits and redox components such as bacteriochlorophylls, bacteriopheophytins,and quinones.The RC performs the photochemical electron transfer from the bacteriochlorophyll dimer through a series of electron donor and acceptor molecules to a secondary quinone,QB.QB accepts electrons from a primary quinone,QA,in two sequential electron transfer reactions.The second electron trans...

  1. Glucose sensor based on redox-cycling between selectively modified and unmodified combs of carbon interdigitated array nanoelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepti; Lim, Yeongjin; Lee, Yunjeong; Shin, Heungjoo

    2015-08-19

    We present a novel electrochemical glucose sensor employing an interdigitated array (IDA) of 1:1 aspect ratio carbon nanoelectrodes for the electrochemical-enzymatic redox cycling of redox species (ferricyanide/ferrocyanide) between glucose oxidase (GOx) and the two comb-shaped nanoelectrodes of the IDA. The carbon nanoelectrodes were fabricated using a simple, cost-effective, reproducible microfabrication technology known as the carbon-microelectromechanical-systems (C-MEMS) process. One comb (comb 1) of the IDA was selectively modified with GOx via the electrochemical reduction of an aryl diazonium salt, while the other comb (comb 2) remained unmodified; this facilitates electrochemically more active surface of comb 2, resulting in sensitive glucose detection. Ferricyanide is reduced to ferrocyanide by the GOx in the presence of glucose, and ferrocyanide diffuses to both combs of the IDA where it is oxidized. The limited electrochemical current collection at the surface-modified comb 1 is counterbalanced by the efficient redox cycling between the enzyme sites at comb 1 and the bare carbon surface of comb 2. Reducing the electrode-to-electrode gap between the two combs (gap = 1.9 μm) increases the diffusion flux of redox species at comb 2 hence, enhanced the sensitivity and limit of detection of the glucose sensor by ∼2.3 and ∼295 times, respectively at comb 2 compared to comb 1. The developed IDA-based glucose sensor demonstrated good amperometric response to glucose, affording two linear ranges from 0.001 to 1 mM and from 1 to 10 mM, with limits of detection of 0.4 and 61 μM and sensitivities of 823.2 and 70.0 μA mM(-1) cm(-2), respectively.

  2. Influence of Iron Speciation on Redox Cycling and Reactivity with Persistent Organic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongwook

    2009-01-01

    Although a number of past studies have been aimed at characterizing iron's redox properties in aqueous systems and its contribution to natural attenuation processes of groundwater contaminants, many questions remain. It is especially important to understand the molecular properties that control the reactivity of both Fe[superscript II] and…

  3. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  4. Quinone diazides for olefin functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Hai T; Baran, Phil S

    2014-12-22

    The utility of quinone diazides in materials science is vast and well-documented, yet this potentially useful motif has languished in the annals of organic synthesis. Herein we show that modern tools of catalysis can be employed with free or suitably masked quinone diazides to unleash the power of these classic diazo compounds in the context of both inter- and intramolecular olefin cyclopropanation.

  5. Impact of membrane characteristics on the performance and cycling of the Br-2-H-2 redox flow cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, MC; Cho, KT; Spingler, FB; Weber, AZ; Lin, GY

    2015-06-15

    The Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. In this paper, the effect of various aspects of material selection and processing of proton exchange membranes on the operation of the Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell is determined. Membrane properties have a significant impact on the performance and efficiency of the system. In particular, there is a tradeoff between conductivity and crossover, where conductivity limits system efficiency at high current density and crossover limits efficiency at low current density. The impact of thickness, pretreatment procedure, swelling state during cell assembly, equivalent weight, membrane reinforcement, and addition of a microporous separator layer on this tradeoff is assessed. NR212 (50 mu m) pretreated by soaking in 70 degrees C water is found to be optimal for the studied operating conditions. For this case, an energy efficiency of greater than 75% is achieved for current density up to 400 mA cm(-2), with a maximum obtainable energy efficiency of 88%. A cell with this membrane was cycled continuously for 3164 h. Membrane transport properties, including conductivity and bromine and water crossover, were found to decrease moderately upon cycling but remained higher than those for the as-received membrane. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of oxygen and photosynthesis carbon cycle reactions on kinetics of P700 redox transients in cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolychevtseva, Yu V; Terekhova, I V; Roegner, M; Karapetyan, N V

    2007-03-01

    Effects of oxygen and photosynthesis and respiration inhibitors on the electron transport in photosystem I (PSI) of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis cells were studied. Redox transients of P700 were induced by illumination at 730 nm and monitored as kinetics of the absorption changes at 810 nm; to block electron influx from PSII, the measurements were performed in the presence of 30 microM 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU). Inhibitors of terminal oxidases (potassium cyanide and pentachlorophenol) insignificantly influenced the fast oxidation of P700 under aerobic conditions, whereas removal of oxygen significantly decelerated the accumulation of P700(+). In the absence of oxygen the slow oxidation of P700 observed on the first illumination was accelerated on each subsequent illumination, suggesting an activation of the carbon cycle enzymes. Under the same conditions, pentachlorophenol (an uncoupler) markedly accelerated the P700 photooxidation. Under anaerobic conditions, potassium cyanide (an inhibitor of carbon dioxide assimilation) failed to influence the kinetics of redox transients of P700, whereas iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of NADP(H)-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) completely prevented the photooxidation of P700. Thus, the fast photooxidation of P700 in the A. platensis cells under aerobic conditions in the presence of DCMU was caused by electron transport from PSI onto oxygen, and complicated transient changes in the P700 photooxidation kinetics under anaerobic conditions (in the presence of DCMU) were due to involvement of NADP+ generated during the reducing phase of the carbon cycle.

  7. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release.

  8. Ex-situ tracking solid oxide cell electrode microstructural evolution in a redox cycle by high resolution ptychographic nanotomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angelis, Salvatore; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Esposito, Vincenzo; Tsai, Esther Hsiao Rho; Holler, Mirko; Kreka, Kosova; Abdellahi, Ebtisam; Bowen, Jacob R.

    2017-08-01

    For solid oxide fuel and electrolysis cells, precise tracking of 3D microstructural change in the electrodes during operation is considered critical to understand the complex relationship between electrode microstructure and performance. Here, for the first time, we report a significant step towards this aim by visualizing a complete redox cycle in a solid oxide cell (SOC) electrode. The experiment demonstrates synchrotron-based ptychography as a method of imaging SOC electrodes, providing an unprecedented combination of 3D image quality and spatial resolution among non-destructive imaging techniques. Spatially registered 3D reconstructions of the same location in the electrode clearly show the evolution of the microstructure from the pristine state to the oxidized state and to the reduced state. A complete mechanical destruction of the zirconia backbone is observed via grain boundary fracture, the nickel and pore networks undergo major reorganization and the formation of internal voids is observed in the nickel-oxide particles after the oxidation. These observations are discussed in terms of reaction kinetics, electrode mechanical stress and the consequences of redox cycling on electrode performance.

  9. Polyimide-coated carbon electrodes combined with redox mediators for superior Li-O2 cells with excellent cycling performance and decreased overpotential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seon Hye; Park, Yong Joon

    2017-02-01

    We report an air electrode employing polyimide-coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combined with a redox mediator for Li-O2 cells with enhanced electrochemical performance. The polyimide coating on the carbon surface suppresses unwanted side reactions, which decreases the amount of accumulated reaction products on the surface of the air electrode during cycling. The redox mediators lower the overpotential of the Li-O2 cells because they can easily transfer electrons from the electrode to the reaction products. The low overpotential can also decrease the side reactions that activate at a high potential range. Specifically, the CsI redox mediator effectively interrupted dendrite growth on the Li anode during cycling due to the shielding effect of its Cs+ ions and acted as a redox mediator due to its I‑ ions. LiNO3 also facilitates the decrease in side reactions and the stabilization of the Li anode. The synergic effect of the polyimide coating and the electrolyte containing the LiNO3/CsI redox mediator leads to a low overpotential and excellent cycling performance (over 250 cycles with a capacity of 1,500 mAh·gelectrode‑1).

  10. Polyimide-coated carbon electrodes combined with redox mediators for superior Li-O2 cells with excellent cycling performance and decreased overpotential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seon Hye; Park, Yong Joon

    2017-01-01

    We report an air electrode employing polyimide-coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combined with a redox mediator for Li-O2 cells with enhanced electrochemical performance. The polyimide coating on the carbon surface suppresses unwanted side reactions, which decreases the amount of accumulated reaction products on the surface of the air electrode during cycling. The redox mediators lower the overpotential of the Li-O2 cells because they can easily transfer electrons from the electrode to the reaction products. The low overpotential can also decrease the side reactions that activate at a high potential range. Specifically, the CsI redox mediator effectively interrupted dendrite growth on the Li anode during cycling due to the shielding effect of its Cs+ ions and acted as a redox mediator due to its I− ions. LiNO3 also facilitates the decrease in side reactions and the stabilization of the Li anode. The synergic effect of the polyimide coating and the electrolyte containing the LiNO3/CsI redox mediator leads to a low overpotential and excellent cycling performance (over 250 cycles with a capacity of 1,500 mAh·gelectrode−1). PMID:28198419

  11. Influence of Oxygen and Nitrate on Fe (Hydr)oxide Mineral Transformation and Soil Microbial Communities during Redox Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Jacqueline; Roden, Eric E; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew

    2016-04-05

    Oscillations between reducing and oxidizing conditions are observed at the interface of anaerobic/oxic and anaerobic/anoxic environments, and are often stimulated by an alternating flux of electron donors (e.g., organic carbon) and electron acceptors (e.g., O2 and NO3(-)). In iron (Fe) rich soils and sediments, these oscillations may stimulate the growth of both Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and their metabolism may induce cycling between Fe(II) and Fe(III), promoting the transformation of Fe (hydr)oxide minerals. Here, we examine the mineralogical evolution of lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite, and the adaptation of a natural microbial community to alternating Fe-reducing (anaerobic with addition of glucose) and Fe-oxidizing (with addition of nitrate or air) conditions. The growth of FeRB (e.g., Geobacter) is stimulated under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose. However, the abundance of these organisms depends on the availability of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides. Redox cycling with nitrate results in decreased Fe(II) oxidation thereby decreasing the availability of Fe(III) for FeRB. Additionally, magnetite is detected as the main product of both lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite reduction. In contrast, introduction of air results in increased Fe(II) oxidation, increasing the availability of Fe(III) and the abundance of Geobacter. In the lepidocrocite reactors, Fe(II) oxidation by dissolved O2 promotes the formation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite, whereas in the ferrihydrite reactors we observe a decrease in magnetite stoichiometry (e.g., oxidation). Understanding Fe (hydr)oxide transformation under environmentally relevant redox cycling conditions provides insight into nutrient availability and transport, contaminant mobility, and microbial metabolism in soils and sediments.

  12. The effect of channel height and electrode aspect ratio on redox cycling at carbon interdigitated array nanoelectrodes confined in a microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jeong-Il; Lim, Yeongjin; Shin, Heungjoo

    2013-11-07

    Redox cycling is a commonly used electrochemical sensing scheme for enhancing faradaic current signals. This effect can be improved by either optimizing electrode geometries or restricting electrochemical reactions within a limited volume. Here, we demonstrate a simple batch fabrication of 1 : 1 aspect ratio carbon interdigitated array nanoelectrodes integrated in a polydimethylsiloxane microchannel that enables current amplification by up to 1116 times. We also examine the factors that influence the effect of redox cycling, including the electrode aspect ratio and channel height, by using experiments and simulations.

  13. Antitermitic quinones from Diospyros sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapaty, Seru; Thomas, Pannakal Steve; Fotso, Serge; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2004-05-01

    Six quinones were isolated from the chloroform extract of the roots of Diospyros sylvatica and identified as 2-methyl-anthraquinone, plumbagin, diosindigo, diospyrin, isodiospyrin and microphyllone. The effect of the root extract on the orientation and survival of the subterranean termite, Odontotermes obesus was tested. In addition, four of these quinones were tested on the survival of the subterranean termite. In a direct-choice experiment, exposure to an extract-treated filter disc had a significantly repellent effect over the solvent-treated filter disc. The no-choice experiment revealed the toxic property of the extract as well as the tested quinones and showed high mortality of the O. obesus workers after 48 h on forced exposure. The major termiticidal components identified were plumbagin, isodiospyrin and microphyllone while diospyrin was not toxic to termites at the concentration tested. All the quinones are reported for the first time from D. sylvatica.

  14. Hybrid QM/MM Calculations on the First Redox Step of the Catalytic Cycle of Bovine Glutathione Peroxidase GPX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kóňa, Juraj; Fabian, Walter M F

    2011-08-09

    The first reaction step of the redox cycle of bovine erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase from class 1 (GPX1) was investigated using hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations using the ONIOM methodology. The reduction of hydrogen peroxide by the active-site selenocysteine in selenolate form assisted by the Arg177 residue was modeled based on a proposal from previous molecular dynamics simulations and pKa calculations (J. Chem. TheoryComput. 2010, 6, 1670-1681). The redox reaction is predicted as a concerted SN2 nucleophilic substitution with a concomitant proton transfer from Arg177 onto leaving hydroxide ion upon reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The height of the reaction barrier was predicted in range of 6-11 kcal mol(-1), consistent with an experimental rate constant of ca. 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The proposed GPX1-Se(-)-Arg177H(+) mechanism for GPX1 is compared with the GPX3-SeH-Gln83 one proposed for human glutathione peroxidase from class 3 (GPX3) and with the solvent-assisted proton exchange mechanism proposed for GPX-like organic selenols. The structural and energetic parameters predicted by various density functional theory methods (B3LYP, MPW1PW91, MPW1K, BB1K, M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06) are also discussed.

  15. Quinone-induced inhibition of urease: elucidation of its mechanisms by probing thiol groups of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaborska, Wiesława; Krajewska, Barbara; Kot, Mirosława; Karcz, Waldemar

    2007-06-01

    In this work we studied the reaction of four quinones, 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ), 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-benzoquinone (2,5-DM-1,4-BQ), tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TC-1,4-BQ) and 1,4-naphthoquinone (1,4-NQ) with jack bean urease in phosphate buffer, pH 7.8. The enzyme was allowed to react with different concentrations of the quinones during different incubation times in aerobic conditions. Upon incubation the samples had their residual activities assayed and their thiol content titrated. The titration carried out with use of 5,5'-di-thiobis(2-nitrobenzoic) acid was done to examine the involvement of urease thiol groups in the quinone-induced inhibition. The quinones under investigation showed two distinct patterns of behaviour, one by 1,4-BQ, 2,5-DM-1,4-BQ and TC-1,4-BQ, and the other by 1,4-NQ. The former consisted of a concentration-dependent inactivation of urease where the enzyme-inhibitor equilibrium was achieved in no longer than 10min, and of the residual activity of the enzyme being linearly correlated with the number of modified thiols in urease. We concluded that arylation of the thiols in urease by these quinones resulting in conformational changes in the enzyme molecule is responsible for the inhibition. The other pattern of behaviour observed for 1,4-NQ consisted of time- and concentration-dependent inactivation of urease with a nonlinear residual activity-modified thiols dependence. This suggests that in 1,4-NQ inhibition, in addition to the arylation of thiols, operative are other reactions, most likely oxidations of thiols provoked by 1,4-NQ-catalyzed redox cycling. In terms of the inhibitory strength, the quinones studied formed a series: 1,4-NQ approximately 2,5-DM-1,4-BQ<1,4-BQ

  16. Redox cycling of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in magnetite by Fe-metabolizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James M.; Klueglein, Nicole; Pearce, Carolyn; Rosso, Kevin M.; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Microorganisms are a primary control on the redox-induced cycling of iron in the environment. Despite the ability of bacteria to grow using both Fe(II) and Fe(III) bound in solid-phase iron minerals, it is currently unknown whether changing environmental conditions enable the sharing of electrons in mixed-valent iron oxides between bacteria with different metabolisms. We show through magnetic and spectroscopic measurements that the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 oxidizes magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles using light energy. This process is reversible in co-cultures by the anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. These results demonstrate that Fe ions bound in the highly crystalline mineral magnetite are bioavailable as electron sinks and electron sources under varying environmental conditions, effectively rendering magnetite a naturally occurring battery.

  17. A local redox cycling-based electrochemical chip device with nanocavities for multi-electrochemical evaluation of embryoid bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yusuke; Ino, Kosuke; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2015-12-01

    An electrochemical device, which consists of electrode arrays, nanocavities, and microwells, was developed for multi-electrochemical detection with high sensitivity. A local redox cycling-based electrochemical (LRC-EC) system was used for multi-electrochemical detection and signal amplification. The LRC-EC system consists of n(2) sensors with only 2n bonding pads for external connection. The nanocavities fabricated in the sensor microwells enable significant improvement of the signal amplification compared with the previous devices we have developed. The present device was successfully applied for evaluation of embryoid bodies (EBs) from embryonic stem (ES) cells via electrochemical measurements of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the EBs. In addition, the EBs were successfully trapped in the sensor microwells of the device using dielectrophoresis (DEP) manipulation, which led to high-throughput cell analysis. This device is considered to be useful for multi-electrochemical detection and imaging for bioassays including cell analysis.

  18. Redox cycling of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in magnetite by Fe-metabolizing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, James; Klueglein, Nicole; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-03-26

    Despite the regular occurrence of both magnetite and iron-metabolizing bacteria in the same environments, it is currently unknown whether the iron(II) and iron(III) in magnetite can be cycled between different bacteria and whether or how magnetic properties are affected by this metabolic activity. We show through magnetic and spectroscopic measurements that the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizer Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1 can oxidize solid-phase magnetite nanoparticles using light energy, leading to a decrease in the measured magnetic susceptibility (MS). This process likely occurs at the surface and is reversible in the dark by the Fe(III)-reducer Geobacter sulfurreducens resulting in an increase in MS. These results show that iron ions bound in highly crystalline mineral magnetite are bioavailable as electron stores and electron sinks under varying environmental conditions, making magnetite a potential “biogeobattery” during day/night cycles. These findings are relevant for environmental studies and reinforce the impact of microbial redox processes on the global iron cycle.

  19. Redox conditions and trace metal cycling in coastal sediments from the maritime Antarctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monien, Patrick; Lettmann, Karsten Alexander; Monien, Donata; Asendorf, Sanja; Wölfl, Anne-Cathrin; Lim, Chai Heng; Thal, Janis; Schnetger, Bernhard; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Redox-sensitive trace metals (Mn, Fe, U, Mo, Re), nutrients and terminal metabolic products (NO3-, NH4+, PO43-, total alkalinity) were investigated for the first time in pore waters of Antarctic coastal sediments. The results of this study reveal a high spatial variability in redox conditions in surface sediments from Potter Cove, King George Island, western Antarctic Peninsula. Particularly in the shallower areas of the bay the significant correlation between sulphate depletion and total alkalinity, the inorganic product of terminal metabolism, indicates sulphate reduction to be the major pathway of organic matter mineralisation. In contrast, dissimilatory metal oxide reduction seems to be prevailing in the newly ice-free areas and the deeper troughs, where concentrations of dissolved iron of up to 700 μM were found. We suggest a combination of several factors to be responsible for the domination of metal oxide reduction over sulphate reduction in these areas. These include the increased accumulation of fine-grained material with high amounts of reducible metal oxides, a reduced availability of metabolisable organic matter and an enhanced physical and biological disturbance by bottom water currents, ice scouring and burrowing organisms. Based on modelled iron fluxes we calculate the contribution of the Antarctic shelf to the pool of potentially bioavailable iron (Feb) to be 6.9 × 103 to 790 × 103 t yr-1. Consequently, these shelf sediments would provide an Feb flux of 0.35-39.5 mg m-2 yr-1 (median: 3.8 mg m-2 yr-1) to the Southern Ocean. This contribution is in the same order of magnitude as the flux provided by icebergs and significantly higher than the input by aeolian dust. For this reason suboxic shelf sediments form a key source of iron for the high nutrient-low chlorophyll (HNLC) areas of the Southern Ocean. This source may become even more important in the future due to rising temperatures at the WAP accompanied by enhanced glacier retreat and the

  20. Adaptation of Organisms by Resonance of RNA Transcription with the Cellular Redox Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor

    2012-01-01

    Sequence variation in organisms differs across the genome and the majority of mutations are caused by oxidation, yet its origin is not fully understood. It has also been shown that the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle is the fundamental biochemical cycle that coordinates the timing of all biochemical processes in that cell, including energy production, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. It is shown that the temporal resonance of transcriptome biosynthesis with the oscillating binary state of the reduction-oxidation reaction cycle serves as a basis for non-random sequence variation at specific genome-wide coordinates that change faster than by accumulation of chance mutations. This work demonstrates evidence for a universal, persistent and iterative feedback mechanism between the environment and heredity, whereby acquired variation between cell divisions can outweigh inherited variation.

  1. Cycling performance of the iron-chromium redox energy storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahn, R. F.; Hagedorn, N. H.; Johnson, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extended charge-discharge cycling of this electrochemical storage system at 65 C was performed on 14.5 sq cm single cells and a four cell, 867 sq cm bipolar stack. Both the anolyte and catholyte reactant fluids contained 1 molar concentrations of iron and chromium chlorides in hydrochloric acid and were separated by a low-selectivity, cation-exchange membrane. The effect of cycling on the chromium electrode and the cation-exchange membrane was determined. Bismuth and bismuth-lead catalyzed chromium electrodes and a radiation-grafted polyethylene membrane were evaluated by cycling between 5 and 85 percent state-of-charge at 80 mA/sq cm and by periodic charge-discharge polarization measurements to 140 mA/sq cm. Gradual performance losses were observed during cycling but were recoverable by completely discharging the system. Good scale-up to the 867 sq cm stack was achieved. The only difference appeared to be an unexplained resistive-type loss which resulted in a 75 percent W-hr efficiency (at 80 mA/sq cm versus 81 percent for the 14.5 sq cm cell). A new rebalance cell was developed to maintain reactant ionic balance. The cell successfully reduced ferric ions in the iron reactant stream to ferrous ions while chloride ions were oxidized to chlorine gas.

  2. Ocean acidification affects redox-balance and ion-homeostasis in the life-cycle stages of Emiliania huxleyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian D Rokitta

    Full Text Available Ocean Acidification (OA has been shown to affect photosynthesis and calcification in the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, a cosmopolitan calcifier that significantly contributes to the regulation of the biological carbon pumps. Its non-calcifying, haploid life-cycle stage was found to be relatively unaffected by OA with respect to biomass production. Deeper insights into physiological key processes and their dependence on environmental factors are lacking, but are required to understand and possibly estimate the dynamics of carbon cycling in present and future oceans. Therefore, calcifying diploid and non-calcifying haploid cells were acclimated to present and future CO(2 partial pressures (pCO(2; 38.5 Pa vs. 101.3 Pa CO(2 under low and high light (50 vs. 300 µmol photons m(-2 s(-1. Comparative microarray-based transcriptome profiling was used to screen for the underlying cellular processes and allowed to follow up interpretations derived from physiological data. In the diplont, the observed increases in biomass production under OA are likely caused by stimulated production of glycoconjugates and lipids. The observed lowered calcification under OA can be attributed to impaired signal-transduction and ion-transport. The haplont utilizes distinct genes and metabolic pathways, reflecting the stage-specific usage of certain portions of the genome. With respect to functionality and energy-dependence, however, the transcriptomic OA-responses resemble those of the diplont. In both life-cycle stages, OA affects the cellular redox-state as a master regulator and thereby causes a metabolic shift from oxidative towards reductive pathways, which involves a reconstellation of carbon flux networks within and across compartments. Whereas signal transduction and ion-homeostasis appear equally OA-sensitive under both light intensities, the effects on carbon metabolism and light physiology are clearly modulated by light availability. These interactive effects

  3. Conductivity recovery by redox cycling of yttrium doped barium zirconate proton conductors and exsolution of Ni-based sintering additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasani, Narendar; Pukazhselvan, D.; Kovalevsky, Andrei V.; Shaula, Aliaksandr L.; Fagg, Duncan P.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to their high stability and good bulk proton conductivity yttrium doped barium zirconate-based materials are considered as potential electrolytes for protonic ceramic fuel cell applications. Nonetheless, their refractory nature leads to problematic densification that can necessitate the addition of sintering additives. While these additives assist processing, undesirable, strong, negative impacts on proton conductivity have been regularly reported. The current work assesses the potential sintering additives NiO, BaNiOx and BaY2NiO5 and their influence on subsequent electrochemical properties of BaZr0.85Y0.15O3-δ. All sintering additives allow dense electrolyte materials (>95%) to be formed at temperatures below 1450 °C, with enhanced grain growth; with the largest grain growth being offered by the BaNiOx additive. Degradation in overall electrical performances is shown to be bulk related, corresponding to large reductions in bulk conductivity up to two orders of magnitude, whilst grain boundary conductivities are less affected. Most importantly, the current article demonstrates that these high depletions in bulk proton conductivity can be effectively inverted by redox cycling in relatively mild conditions (750 °C, cycling from N2 to H2 and back to N2), opening the way to improve processing of these materials whilst maintaining high levels of proton conductivity.

  4. Plumbagin induces cell death through a copper-redox cycle mechanism in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazeem, S; Azmi, Asfar S; Hanif, Sarmad; Ahmad, Aamir; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Hadi, S M; Kumar, K Sateesh

    2009-09-01

    Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone derived from the medicinal plant Plumbago zeylanica has been shown to exert anticancer and anti-proliferative activities in cells in culture as well as animal tumor models. In our previous paper, we have reported the cytotoxic action of plumbagin in plasmid pBR322 DNA as well as human peripheral blood lymphocytes through a redox mechanism involving copper. Copper has been shown to be capable of mediating the action of several plant-derived compounds through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether plumbagin induces apoptosis in human cancer cells through the same mechanism which we proposed earlier. Using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt assay, 3-(4,5-B-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay for cell growth inhibition, histone/DNA ELISA, homogeneous caspase-3/7 assay for apoptosis as well as alkaline comet assay for DNA single-strand breaks detection in this report, we confirm that plumbagin causes effective cell growth inhibition, induces apoptosis and generates single-strand breaks in cancer cells. Incubation of cancer cells with scavengers of ROS and neocuproine inhibited the cytotoxic action of plumbagin proving that generation of ROS and Cu(I) are the critical mediators in plumbagin-induced cell growth inhibition. This study is the first to investigate the copper-mediated anticancer mechanism of plumbagin in human cancer cells and these properties of plumbagin could be further explored for the development of anticancer agents with higher therapeutic indices, especially for skin cancer.

  5. Chlorinated biphenyl quinones and phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone differentially modify the catalytic activity of human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase hSULT2A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaoyan; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Teesch, Lynn M; Robertson, Larry W; Duffel, Michael W

    2013-10-21

    Human hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) catalyzes the sulfation of a broad range of environmental chemicals, drugs, and other xenobiotics in addition to endogenous compounds that include hydroxysteroids and bile acids. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental contaminants, and oxidized metabolites of PCBs may play significant roles in the etiology of their adverse health effects. Quinones derived from the oxidative metabolism of PCBs (PCB-quinones) react with nucleophilic sites in proteins and also undergo redox cycling to generate reactive oxygen species. This, along with the sensitivity of hSULT2A1 to oxidative modification at cysteine residues, led us to hypothesize that electrophilic PCB-quinones react with hSULT2A1 to alter its catalytic function. Thus, we examined the effects of four phenylbenzoquinones on the ability of hSULT2A1 to catalyze the sulfation of the endogenous substrate, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The quinones studied were 2'-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (2'-Cl-BQ), 4'-chlorophenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (4'-Cl-BQ), 4'-chlorophenyl-3,6-dichloro-2,5-benzoquinone (3,6,4'-triCl-BQ), and phenyl-2,5-benzoquinone (PBQ). At all concentrations examined, pretreatment of hSULT2A1 with the PCB-quinones decreased the catalytic activity of hSULT2A1. Pretreatment with low concentrations of PBQ, however, increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while higher concentrations inhibited catalysis. A decrease in substrate inhibition with DHEA was seen following preincubation of hSULT2A1 with all of the quinones. Proteolytic digestion of the enzyme followed by LC/MS analysis indicated PCB-quinone- and PBQ-adducts at Cys55 and Cys199, as well as oxidation products at methionines in the protein. Equilibrium binding experiments and molecular modeling suggested that changes due to these modifications may affect the nucleotide binding site and the entrance to the sulfuryl acceptor binding site of hSULT2A1.

  6. Structure activity study on the quinone/quinone methide chemistry of flavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Boeren, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Vervoort, J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    A structure-activity study on the quinone/quinone methide chemistry of a series of 3',4'-dihydroxyflavonoids was performed. Using the glutathione trapping method followed by HPLC, 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF, and LC/MS analysis to identify the glutathionyl adducts, the chemical behavior of the quinones/quinon

  7. Abietane Quinones from Rabdosia serra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new abietane quinone diterpenoid was isolated, together with horminone, 16-acetoxy-7-0-acetylhorminone, β-sitosterol, stigmasterol, ursolic acid and palmitic acid from the leaves of Rabdosia Serra (MAXIM) Hara. The new compound was elucidated as 16-acetoxy-7α-ethoxyroyleanone.

  8. Monitoring the redox cycle of low-molecular peptides using a modified target plate in MALDI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissova, Maria; Mahlapuu, Riina; Vaher, Merike

    2010-11-15

    A new method is being proposed for preparing MALDI target plates with a hydrophobic polymer coating and hydrophilic anchors. The particles of the MALDI matrix were pre-mixed with a poly[4,5-difluoro-2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)-1,3-dioxole-co-tetrafluoroethylene] solution prior to their placement on a mass-spectrometric sample support. This technique led to the formation of matrix microspots with a diameter of less than 1mm inside the polymer. The polymer and matrix concentration as well as the amount of suspension placed on the target plate influenced the size and quality of microspots to a great extent. The sensitivity of the mass-spectrometric analysis was confirmed by obtaining the mass spectra of fmole concentrations of an apomyoglobin tryptic digest. The potential proteomic application of this type of MALDI surface preparation was demonstrated by performing the redox cycle using glutathione and its analogue. All reactions were carried out directly on a MALDI plate, which accommodates low volumes of reagents and prevents sample loss.

  9. Splitting CO2 with a ceria-based redox cycle in a solar-driven thermogravimetric analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, M; Ackermann, S; Bonk, A; Neises-von Puttkamer, M; Haueter, Ph; Scheffe, J R; Vogt, U F; Steinfeld, A

    2017-04-01

    Thermochemical splitting of CO2 via a ceria-based redox cycle was performed in a solar-driven thermogravimetric analyzer. Overall reaction rates, including heat and mass transport, were determined under concentrated irradiation mimicking realistic operation of solar reactors. Reticulated porous ceramic (RPC) structures and fibers made of undoped and Zr(4+)-doped CeO2, were endothermally reduced under radiative fluxes of 1280 suns in the temperature range 1200-1950 K and subsequently re-oxidized with CO2 at 950-1400 K. Rapid and uniform heating was observed for 8 ppi ceria RPC with mm-sized porosity due to its low optical thickness and volumetric radiative absorption, while ceria fibers with μm-sized porosity performed poorly due to its opacity to incident irradiation. The 10 ppi RPC exhibited higher fuel yield because of its higher sample density. Zr(4+)-doped ceria showed increasing reduction extents with dopant concentration but decreasing specific CO yield due to unfavorable oxidation thermodynamics and slower kinetics. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers , 63: 1263-1271, 2017.

  10. Splitting CO2 with a ceria‐based redox cycle in a solar‐driven thermogravimetric analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, M.; Ackermann, S.; Bonk, A.; Neises‐von Puttkamer, M.; Haueter, Ph.; Scheffe, J. R.; Vogt, U. F.

    2016-01-01

    Thermochemical splitting of CO2 via a ceria‐based redox cycle was performed in a solar‐driven thermogravimetric analyzer. Overall reaction rates, including heat and mass transport, were determined under concentrated irradiation mimicking realistic operation of solar reactors. Reticulated porous ceramic (RPC) structures and fibers made of undoped and Zr4+‐doped CeO2, were endothermally reduced under radiative fluxes of 1280 suns in the temperature range 1200–1950 K and subsequently re‐oxidized with CO2 at 950–1400 K. Rapid and uniform heating was observed for 8 ppi ceria RPC with mm‐sized porosity due to its low optical thickness and volumetric radiative absorption, while ceria fibers with μm‐sized porosity performed poorly due to its opacity to incident irradiation. The 10 ppi RPC exhibited higher fuel yield because of its higher sample density. Zr4+‐doped ceria showed increasing reduction extents with dopant concentration but decreasing specific CO yield due to unfavorable oxidation thermodynamics and slower kinetics. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 63: 1263–1271, 2017 PMID:28405030

  11. Sensor Measurements and Sediment Incubations Indicate Diurnal Redox Cycling Associate With Arsenic Mobilization at a Bangladeshi Rice Paddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T.; Lin, C.; Ramanathan, N.; Neumann, R.; Harvey, C.; Jay, J.

    2007-12-01

    The presence of arsenic in the groundwater has led to the largest environmental poisoning in history; tens of millions of people in the Ganges Delta continue to drink groundwater that is dangerously contaminated with arsenic (As). Rice fields receive large loads of arsenic with irrigation water and provide recharge to the underlying aquifer. It is currently not known whether rice fields are a sink or source of arsenic in the hydrologic system. In the dry season, as As(III)-containing minerals are oxidized, As(V) is released and will adhere to Fe hydr(oxide) minerals. When sediments are inundated with water, reducing conditions will then drive reduction of Fe hydr(oxides) and release of As. We have been intensively studying a field site in Munshiganj, Bangladesh with extremely high levels of arsenic in groundwater (up to 1.2 mg/L). To better understand geochemical and microbial processes leading to As mobilization in surface sediment, we deployed sensors to take temporally dense measurements across our experimental rice paddy. Data collected in both 2006 and 2007 showed trends in geochemical parameters indicating that diurnal, possibly plant-induced, processes may be important. Over a two month period, nitrate concentrations decrease consistently each day as ammonium levels increase, presumably through temperature driven reductive processes. Nitrate concentrations in the subsurface then increase while ammonium levels decrease, possibly due to root oxygen leakage or rapid infiltration of oxygen rich surface water. Using sediment from the rice paddy and artificial irrigation water, laboratory microcosms were constructed to simulate the diurnal cycles observed at the field site. In carbon-ammended treatments, Fe and As cycling can occur on the order of days. Oscillations in redox conditions on diurnal as well as seasonal time scales may be important in the mobilization of arsenic into aquifers. By elucidating As mobilization mechanisms at an experimental rice paddy

  12. New roles of flavoproteins in molecular cell biology: an unexpected role for quinone reductases as regulators of proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollner, Sonja; Macheroux, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Quinone reductases are ubiquitous soluble enzymes found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. These enzymes utilize a reduced nicotinamide such as NADH or NADPH to reduce the flavin cofactor (either FMN or FAD), which then affords two-electron reduction of cellular quinones. Although the chemical nature of the quinone substrate is still a matter of debate, the reaction appears to play a pivotal role in quinone detoxification by preventing the generation of potentially harmful semiquinones. In recent years, an additional role of quinone reductases as regulators of proteasomal degradation of transcription factors and possibly intrinsically unstructured protein has emerged. To fulfil this role, quinone reductase binds to the core particle of the proteasome and recruits certain transcription factors such as p53 and p73alpha to the complex. The latter process appears to be governed by the redox state of the flavin cofactor of the quinone reductase, thus linking the stability of transcription factors to cellular events such as oxidative stress. Here, we review the current evidence for protein complex formation between quinone reductase and the 20S proteasome in eukaryotic cells and describe the regulatory role of this complex in stabilizing transcription factors by acting as inhibitors of their proteasomal degradation.

  13. Reduced expression of DNA repair and redox signaling protein APE1/Ref-1 impairs human pancreatic cancer cell survival, proliferation, and cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanlin; Zhou, Shaoyu; Sandusky, George E; Kelley, Mark R; Fishel, Melissa L

    2010-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a deadly disease that is virtually never cured. Understanding the chemoresistance intrinsic to this cancer will aid in developing new regimens. High expression of APE1/Ref-1, a DNA repair and redox signaling protein, is associated with resistance, poor outcome, and angiogenesis; little is known in pancreatic cancer. Immunostaining of adenocarcinoma shows greater APE1/Ref-1 expression than in normal pancreas tissue. A decrease in APE1/Ref-1 protein levels results in pancreatic cancer cell growth inhibition, increased apoptosis, and altered cell cycle progression. Endogenous cell cycle inhibitors increase when APE1/ Ref-1 is reduced, demonstrating its importance to proliferation and growth of pancreatic cancer.

  14. Quinone-mediated decolorization of sulfonated azo dyes by cells and cell extracts from Sphingomonas xenophaga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Ling; LU Hong; ZHOU Jiti; WANG Jing

    2009-01-01

    The effects of various quinone compounds on the decolorization rates of sulfonated azo dyes by Sphingomonas xenophaga QYY were investigated. The results showed that anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) was the most effective redox mediator and AQS reduction was the rate-limited step of AQS-mediated decolorization of sulfonated azo dyes. Based on AQS biological toxicity tests, it was assumed that AQS might enter the cells to kill them. In the cytoplasmic extracts from strain QYY, AQS effectively increased decolorization rates of sulfonated azo dyes than other quinone compounds. In addition, we found a NADH/FMN-dependent AQS reductase using nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Native-PAGE).

  15. Quinones and aromatic chemical compounds in particulate matter induce mitochondrial dysfunction: implications for ultrafine particle toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Korge, Paavo; Weiss, James N; Li, Ning; Venkatesen, M Indira; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre

    2004-10-01

    Particulate pollutants cause adverse health effects through the generation of oxidative stress. A key question is whether these effects are mediated by the particles or their chemical compounds. In this article we show that aliphatic, aromatic, and polar organic compounds, fractionated from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), exert differential toxic effects in RAW 264.7 cells. Cellular analyses showed that the quinone-enriched polar fraction was more potent than the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-enriched aromatic fraction in O2 .- generation, decrease of membrane potential (Delta-Psi m), loss of mitochondrial membrane mass, and induction of apoptosis. A major effect of the polar fraction was to promote cyclosporin A (CsA)-sensitive permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated liver mitochondria. This opening effect is dependent on a direct effect on the PTP at low doses as well as on an effect on Delta-Psi m at high doses in calcium (Ca2+)-loaded mitochondria. The direct PTP effect was mimicked by redox-cycling DEP quinones. Although the aliphatic fraction failed to perturb mitochondrial function, the aromatic fraction increased the Ca2+ retention capacity at low doses and induced mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in Delta-Psi m at high doses. This swelling effect was mostly CsA insensitive and could be reproduced by a mixture of PAHs present in DEPs. These chemical effects on isolated mitochondria could be reproduced by intact DEPs as well as ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs). In contrast, commercial polystyrene nanoparticles failed to exert mitochondrial effects. These results suggest that DEP and UFP effects on the PTP and Delta-Psi m are mediated by adsorbed chemicals rather than the particles themselves.

  16. Catalytic therapy of cancer by ascorbic acid involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, S M; Ullah, M F; Shamim, U; Bhatt, S H; Azmi, A S

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic therapy is a cancer treatment modality based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through administration of ascorbate/medicinal herbal extracts and copper. It is known that antioxidants such as ascorbate also exhibit prooxidant activity in the presence of transition metals such as copper. Based on our work and that in the literature, in this review we propose a mechanism for the cytotoxic action of ascorbate against cancer cells. It involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and the consequent generation of ROS leading to oxidative DNA breakage. Using human peripheral lymphocytes and the Comet assay, we have shown that ascorbic acid is able to cause oxidative breakage in cellular DNA. Such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine (a Cu(I) sequestering agent) and scavengers of ROS indicating that the cellular DNA breakage involves the generation of Cu(I) and formation of ROS. Similar results are also obtained with plant polyphenol antioxidants that are important constituents of medicinal herbal extracts. Copper is an essential component of chromatin and can take part in redox reactions. It is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies. Therefore, cancer cells may be more subject to electron transfer between copper ions and ascorbate/plant polyphenols to generate ROS. In this review we cite evidence to indicate that in catalytic therapy cytotoxic action against cancer cells involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions.

  17. Pd2+/Pd0 redox cycling in hexagonal YMn(0.5)Fe(0.5)O3: implications for catalysis by PGM-substituted complex oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Joshua A; Li, Jun; Schladt, Thomas D; Parra, César R; Ouyang, Xiaoying; Davis, Ryan; Miller, Jeffrey T; Scott, Susannah L; Seshadri, Ram

    2011-09-05

    Complex oxides--containing at least two different cations on crystallographically distinct sites--have recently been shown to display redox cycling of platinum group metals (PGMs), such as Pd; for example, Pd-substituted complex oxides can reversibly extrude metallic Pd under reducing conditions and then reincorporate Pd(2+) ions into the lattice under oxidizing conditions. The title compounds, YMn(0.5)Fe(0.5-x)Pd(x)O(3-δ) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.07) crystallizing in the noncentrosymmetric YMnO(3) structure, were prepared using a sol-gel process at 800 °C, and the structures were refined from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. Their redox cycling behavior was monitored using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and EXAFS studies. In contrast to the previously studied complex oxide host compounds, YMn(0.5)Fe(0.5-x)Pd(x)O(3-δ) is only modestly tolerant to cycling: repeated redox cycling leads to the formation of PdO, which, on the time-scale of the oxidation cycles, does not reincorporate in the complex oxide lattice. Both oxidized and reduced samples were tested for the oxidation of CO to CO(2) under CO-lean conditions. YMn(0.5)Fe(0.5-x)Pd(x)O(3-δ) performs essentially as well as previously studied YFe(1-x)Pd(x)O(3-δ). The CO oxidation light-off characteristics of the hexagonal hosts are very similar to finely dispersed PdO. Despite evidence that Pd is almost fully dispersed as divalent ions in the host lattice, which is presumably accompanied by the concurrent creation of oxygen vacancies (2 Pd(2+):1 V(O(2-))), the as-prepared hexagonal materials do not display any significant improvement in catalytic activity as a function of Pd substitution level. This suggests that the corner-connected trigonal bipyramids that characterize this structural family do not enable the transport of oxygen through the bulk of the lattice. The study casts light on factors in the solid-state chemistry of precious metal-substituted complex oxides that influence the efficacy

  18. Partial-Redox-Promoted Mn Cycling of Mn(II)-Doped Heterogeneous Catalyst for Efficient H2O2-Mediated Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Tao; Gao, Qiang; Han, Bo; Ren, Zheng-Hui; Xia, Kai-Sheng; Zhou, Cheng-Gang

    2017-01-11

    The development of a heterogeneous catalyst with high catalytic activity and durability for H2O2-mediated oxidation is one of the most important industrial and environmental issues. In this study, a Mn(II)-doped TiO2 heterogeneous catalyst was developed for H2O2-mediated oxidation. The TiO2 substrate-dependent partial-redox behavior of Mn was identified on the basis of our density functional theory simulations. This unique redox cycle was induced by a moderate electron transfer from Ti to Mn, which compensated for the electron loss of Mn and finally resulted in a high-efficiency cycling of Mn between its oxidized and reduced forms. In light of the theoretical results, a Mn(II)-doped TiO2 composite with well-defined morphology and large surface area (153.3 m(2) g(-1)) was elaborately fabricated through incorporating Mn(II) ions into a TiO2 nanoflower, and further tested as the catalyst for oxidative degradation of organic pollutants in the presence of H2O2. Benefiting from the remarkable textural features and excellent Mn cycling property, this composite exhibited superior catalytic performance for organic pollutant degradation. Moreover, it could retain 98.40% of its initial activity even in the fifth cycle. Our study provides an effective strategy for designing heterogeneous catalytic systems for H2O2-mediated oxidations.

  19. Belowground in situ redox dynamics and methanogenesis recovery in a degraded fen during dry-wet cycles and flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Estop-Aragonés

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change induced drying and flooding may alter the redox conditions of organic matter decomposition in peat soils. The seasonal and intermittent changes in pore water solutes (NO3, Fe2+, SO42−, H2S, acetate and dissolved soil gases (CO2, O2, CH4, H2 under natural water table fluctuations were compared to the response under a reinforced drying and flooding in fen peats. Oxygen penetration during dryings led to CO2 and CH4 degassing and to a regeneration of dissolved electron acceptors (NO3, Fe3+ and SO42−. Drying intensity controlled the extent of the electron acceptor regeneration. Iron was rapidly reduced and sulfate pools ~ 1 mM depleted upon rewetting and CH4 did not substantially accumulate until sulfate levels declined to ~ 100 μmol L−1. The post-rewetting recovery of soil methane concentrations to levels ~ 80 μmol L−1 needed 40–50 days after natural drought. This recovery was prolonged after experimentally reinforced drought. A greater regeneration of electron acceptors during drying was not related to prolonged methanogenesis suppression after rewetting. Peat compaction, solid phase content of reactive iron and total reduced inorganic sulfur and organic matter content controlled oxygen penetration, the regeneration of electron acceptors and the recovery of CH4 production, respectively. Methane production was maintained despite moderate water table decline of 20 cm in denser peats. Flooding led to accumulation of acetate and H2, promoted CH4 production and strengthened the co-occurrence of iron and sulfate reduction and methanogenesis. Mass balances during drying and flooding indicated that an important fraction of the electron flow must have been used for the

  20. The reactivity of Fe(II) associated with goethite formed during short redox cycles toward Cr(VI) reduction under oxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaszewski, Elizabeth J.; Lee, Seungyeol; Rudolph, Jared; Xu, Huifang; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew (UW)

    2017-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a toxic metal that causes a myriad of health problems and enters the environment as a result of anthropogenic activities and/or natural processes. The toxicity and solubility of chromium is linked to its oxidation state; Cr(III) is poorly soluble and relatively nontoxic, while Cr(VI) is soluble and a known carcinogen. Solid Fe(II) in iron-bearing minerals, such as pyrite, magnetite, and green rusts, reduce the oxidation state of chromium, reducing its toxicity and mobility. However, these minerals are not the only potential sources of solid-associated Fe(II) available for Cr(VI) reduction. For example, ferric (Fe(III)) (hydr)oxides, such as goethite or hematite, can have Fe(II) in the solid without phase transformation; however, the reactivity of Fe(II) within Fe(III) (hydr)oxides with contaminants, has not been previously investigated. Here, we cyclically react goethite with dissolved Fe(II) followed by dissolved O2, leading to the formation of reactive Fe(II) associated with goethite. In separate reactors, the reactivity of this Fe(II) is probed under oxic conditions, by exposure to chromate (CrO42 -) after either one, two, three or four redox cycles. Cr is not present during redox cycling; rather, it is introduced to a subset of the solid after each oxidation half-cycle. Analysis of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra reveals that the extent of Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) depends not only on solid Fe(II) content but also surface area and mean size of ordered crystalline domains, determined by BET surface area analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. Shell-by-shell fitting of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra demonstrates chromium forms both single and double corner sharing complexes on the surface of goethite, in addition to sorbed Cr(III) species. Finally, transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) illustrate that Cr preferentially

  1. Diffusion-limited iron transformations in artificial soil aggregates: The impact of small-scale heterogeneity on cycling of redox-sensitive elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, C.; Meile, C.; Fendorf, S.

    2007-12-01

    Structured soils are typically heterogeneous composites of chemical and biological constituents within an intricate physical framework, which has variable geometry, composition and stability expressed over spatial scales of several orders of magnitude. In such settings, solutes move preferentially (by advection) through macropores and slowly (by diffusion) into intra-aggregate micropores, which promotes the establishment of redox gradients at the aggregate scale. Consequently, in such structured environments characterized by mass transfer limitation and redox gradients within soil aggregates, metals distribution can be strongly localized and the interrelated transport and biogeochemical processes control the fate of redox-sensitive contaminants and metals. Iron (hydr)oxides are particularly ubiquitous in soils and sediments and hence exert a pronounced effect on the fate and transport of nutrients and contaminants. As they are subject to both biotic and abiotic redox transformations, iron cycling depends on a tight interplay between hydrodynamic transport, and (bio)geochemical reactions depending on substrate distribution and microbial activity patterns. In this study, we present an experimental/modelling approach aimed at a qualitative and quantitative understanding of bioreductive processes at the microscale, and between advective and diffusive domains. Artificial soil aggregates, representing systems of intermediate complexity, were used to study the coupling of physical, chemical, and biological processes affecting iron oxides transformations, under environmentally relevant geometries. We used novel aggregate-based reaction flow cell experiments and reactive transport modeling to determine mass transfer and biogeochemical redox controls on the cycling of iron ranging from micropore- to aggregate-scales. Aggregates were made of ferrihydrite coated-sand and inoculated with Shewanella putrefaciens. Lactate was added in the input solution. Chemical gradients

  2. Review of the Two-Step H2O/CO2-Splitting Solar Thermochemical Cycle Based on Zn/ZnO Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Steinfeld

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a comprehensive overview of the work to date on the two‑step solar H2O and/or CO2 splitting thermochemical cycles with Zn/ZnO redox reactions to produce H2 and/or CO, i.e., synthesis gas—the precursor to renewable liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The two-step cycle encompasses: (1 The endothermic dissociation of ZnO to Zn and O2 using concentrated solar energy as the source for high-temperature process heat; and (2 the non-solar exothermic oxidation of Zn with H2O/CO2 to generate H2/CO, respectively; the resulting ZnO is then recycled to the first step. An outline of the underlying science and the technological advances in solar reactor engineering is provided along with life cycle and economic analyses.

  3. Spatial distributions of sulphur species and sulphate-reducing bacteria provide insights into sulphur redox cycling and biodegradation hot-spots in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsiedl, Florian; Pilloni, Giovanni; Ruth-Anneser, Bettina; Lueders, Tillman; Griebler, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) has been proven to be one of the most relevant redox reactions in the biodegradation of contaminants in groundwater. However, the possible role of sulphur species of intermediate oxidation state, as well as the role of potential re-oxidative sulphur cycling in biodegradation particularly at the groundwater table are still poorly understood. Here we used a combination of stable isotope measurements of SO42-, H2S, and S0 as well as geochemical profiling of sulphur intermediates with special emphasis on SO32-, S2O32-, and S0 to unravel possible sulphur cycling in the biodegradation of aromatics in a hydrocarbon-contaminated porous aquifer. By linking these results to the quantification of total bacterial rRNA genes and respiratory genes of sulphate reducers, as well as pyrotag sequencing of bacterial communities over depth, light is shed on possible key-organisms involved. Our results substantiate the role of DSR in biodegradation of hydrocarbons (mainly toluene) in the highly active plume fringes above and beneath the plume core. In both zones the concentration of sulphur intermediates (S0, SO32- and S2O32-) was almost twice that of other sampling-depths, indicating intense sulphur redox cycling. The dual isotopic fingerprint of oxygen and sulphur in dissolved sulphate suggested a re-oxidation of reduced sulphur compounds to sulphate especially at the upper fringe zone. An isotopic shift in δ34S of S0 of nearly +4‰ compared to the δ34S values of H2S from the same depth linked to a high abundance (∼10%) of sequence reads related to Sulphuricurvum spp. (Epsilonproteobacteria) in the same depth were indicative of intensive oxidation of S0 to sulphate in this zone. At the lower plume fringe S0 constituted the main inorganic sulphur species, possibly formed by abiotic re-oxidation of H2S with Fe(III)oxides subsequent to sulphate reduction. These results provide first insights into intense sulphur redox cycling in a hydrocarbon

  4. Theoretical investigation of pillar[4]quinone as a cathode active material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Long; Xie, Ju; Chen, Ming; Diao, Guowang; Zhao, Rongfang; Zuo, Tongfei

    2017-04-01

    The applicability of a novel macrocyclic multi-carbonyl compound, pillar[4]quinone (P4Q), as the cathode active material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) was assessed theoretically. The molecular geometry, electronic structure, Li-binding thermodynamic properties, and the redox potential of P4Q were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) at the M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The results of the calculations indicated that P4Q interacts with Li atoms via three binding modes: Li-O ionic bonding, O-Li···O bridge bonding, and Li···phenyl noncovalent interactions. Calculations also indicated that, during the LIB discharging process, P4Q could yield a specific capacity of 446 mAh g(-1) through the utilization of its many carbonyl groups. Compared with pillar[5]quinone and pillar[6]quinone, the redox potential of P4Q is enhanced by its high structural stability as well as the effect of the solvent. These results should provide the theoretical foundations for the design, synthesis, and application of novel macrocyclic carbonyl compounds as electrode materials in LIBs in the future. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of the proposed charge-discharge mechanism of Pillar[4]quinone as cathode for lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Quinones in aerobic and anaerobic mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klei, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), also known as coenzyme Q, is a ubiquitous quinone and is known to have several functions. One of these functions is electron carrier in the mitochondrial electron transport chain of aerobically functioning bacteria and eukaryotes. In contrast to this aerobically functioning quinone,

  6. Quinones in aerobic and anaerobic mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klei, S.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquinone (UQ), also known as coenzyme Q, is a ubiquitous quinone and is known to have several functions. One of these functions is electron carrier in the mitochondrial electron transport chain of aerobically functioning bacteria and eukaryotes. In contrast to this aerobically functioning quinone,

  7. All-solid-state lithium organic battery with composite polymer electrolyte and pillar[5]quinone cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Meiling; Guo, Dongsheng; Shi, Jifu; Tao, Zhanliang; Chen, Jun

    2014-11-26

    The cathode capacity of common lithium ion batteries (LIBs) using inorganic electrodes and liquid electrolytes must be further improved. Alternatively, all-solid-state lithium batteries comprising the electrode of organic compounds can offer much higher capacity. Herein, we successfully fabricated an all-solid-state lithium battery based on organic pillar[5]quinone (C35H20O10) cathode and composite polymer electrolyte (CPE). The poly(methacrylate) (PMA)/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-LiClO4-3 wt % SiO2 CPE has an optimum ionic conductivity of 0.26 mS cm(-1) at room temperature. Furthermore, pillar[5]quinine cathode in all-solid-state battery rendered an average operation voltage of ∼2.6 V and a high initial capacity of 418 mAh g(-1) with a stable cyclability (94.7% capacity retention after 50 cycles at 0.2C rate) through the reversible redox reactions of enolate/quinonid carbonyl groups, showing favorable prospect for the device application with high capacity.

  8. Atmospheric dissolved iron deposition to the global oceans: effects of oxalate-promoted Fe dissolution, photochemical redox cycling, and dust mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Johnson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust deposition is suggested to be a significant atmospheric supply pathway of bioavailable iron (Fe to Fe-depleted surface oceans. In this study, mineral dust and dissolved Fe (Fed deposition rates are predicted for March 2009 to February 2010 using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem implemented with a comprehensive dust-Fe dissolution scheme. The model simulates Fed production during the atmospheric transport of mineral dust, taking into account inorganic and organic (oxalate-promoted Fe dissolution processes, photochemical redox cycling between ferric (Fe(III and ferrous (Fe(II forms of Fe, dissolution of three different Fe-containing minerals (hematite, goethite, and aluminosilicates, and detailed mineralogy of wind-blown dust from the major desert regions. Our calculations suggest that during the year-long simulation ~0.26 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g of Fed was deposited to global oceanic regions. Compared to simulations only taking into account proton-promoted Fe dissolution, the addition of oxalate and Fe(II/Fe(III redox cycling to the dust-Fe mobilization scheme increased total annual model-predicted Fed deposition to global oceanic regions by ~75%. The implementation of Fe(II/Fe(III photochemical redox cycling in the model also allows for the distinction between different oxidation states of deposited Fed. Our calculations suggest that during the daytime, large fractions of Fed deposited to the global oceans is likely to be in Fe(II form, while nocturnal fluxes of Fed are largely in Fe(III form. Model sensitivity simulations suggest Fed fluxes to the oceans can range from ~50% reduction to ~150% increase associated with the uncertainty in Fe-containing minerals commonly found in dust particles. This study indicates that Fed deposition to the oceans is controlled by total dust-Fe mass concentrations, mineralogy, the surface area of dust particles, atmospheric chemical composition, cloud processing, and meteorological parameters and

  9. The redox processes in Hg-contaminated soils from Descoberto (Minas Gerais, Brazil): implications for the mercury cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windmöller, Cláudia C; Durão Júnior, Walter A; de Oliveira, Aline; do Valle, Cláudia M

    2015-02-01

    Investigations of the redox process and chemical speciation of Hg(II) lead to a better understanding of biogeochemical processes controlling the transformation of Hg(II) into toxic and bioaccumulative monomethyl mercury, mainly in areas contaminated with Hg(0). This study investigates the speciation and redox processes of Hg in soil samples from a small area contaminated with Hg(0) as a result of gold mining activities in the rural municipality of Descoberto (Minas Gerais, Brazil). Soil samples were prepared by adding Hg(0) and HgCl2 separately to dry soil, and the Hg redox process was monitored using thermodesorption coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry. A portion of the Hg(0) added was volatilized (up to 37.4±2.0%) or oxidized (from 36±7% to 88±16%). A correlation with Mn suggests that this oxidation is favored, but many other factors must be evaluated, such as the presence of microorganisms and the types of organic matter present. The interaction of Hg with the matrix is suggested to involve Hg(II)-complexes formed with inorganic and organic sulfur ligands and/or nonspecific adsorption onto oxides of Fe, Al and/or Mn. The kinetics of the oxidation reaction was approximated for two first-order reactions; the faster reaction was attributed to the oxidation of Hg(0)/Hg(I), and the slower reaction corresponded to Hg(I)/Hg(II). The second stage was 43-139 times slower than the first. The samples spiked with Hg(II) showed low volatilization and a shifting of the signal of Hg(II) to lower temperatures. These results show that the extent, rate and type of redox process can be adverse in soils. Descoberto can serve as an example for areas contaminated with Hg(0).

  10. Phospholipid and Respiratory Quinone Analyses From Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiffner, S. M.

    2008-12-01

    Extreme environments on Earth have been chosen as surrogate sites to test methods and strategies for the deployment of space craft in the search for extraterrestrial life. Surrogate sites for many of the NASA astrobiology institutes include the South African gold mines, Canadian subpermafrost, Atacama Desert, and acid rock drainage. Soils, sediments, rock cores, fracture waters, biofilms, and service and drill waters represent the types of samples collected from these sites. These samples were analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry for phospholipid fatty acid methyl esters and by high performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry for respiratory quinones. Phospholipid analyses provided estimates of biomass, community composition, and compositional changes related to nutritional limitations or exposure to toxic conditions. Similar to phospholipid analyses, respiratory quinone analyses afforded identification of certain types of microorganisms in the community based on respiration and offered clues to in situ redox conditions. Depending on the number of samples analyzed, selected multivariate statistical methods were applied to relate membrane lipid results with site biogeochemical parameters. Successful detection of life signatures and refinement of methodologies at surrogate sites on Earth will be critical for the recognition of extraterrestrial life. At this time, membrane lipid analyses provide useful information not easily obtained by other molecular techniques.

  11. Impact of estrogenic compounds on DNA integrity in human spermatozoa: Evidence for cross-linking and redox cycling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennetts, L.E.; De Iuliis, G.N.; Nixon, B.; Kime, M.; Zelski, K. [ARC Centre of Excellence in Biotechnology and Development and Discipline of Biological Sciences, University of Newcastle, NSW (Australia); McVicar, C.M.; Lewis, S.E. [Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Aitken, R.J. [ARC Centre of Excellence in Biotechnology and Development and Discipline of Biological Sciences, University of Newcastle, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: jaitken@mail.newcastle.edu.au

    2008-05-10

    A great deal of circumstantial evidence has linked DNA damage in human spermatozoa with adverse reproductive outcomes including reduced fertility and high rates of miscarriage. Although oxidative stress is thought to make a significant contribution to DNA damage in the male germ line, the factors responsible for creating this stress have not been elucidated. One group of compounds that are thought to be active in this context are the estrogens, either generated as a result of the endogenous metabolism of androgens within the male reproductive tract or gaining access to the latter as a consequence of environmental exposure. In this study, a wide variety of estrogenic compounds were assessed for their direct effects on human spermatozoa in vitro. DNA integrity was assessed using the Comet and TUNEL assays, lesion frequencies were quantified by QPCR using targets within the mitochondrial and nuclear ({beta}-globin) genomes, DNA adducts were characterized by mass spectrometry and redox activity was monitored using dihydroethidium (DHE) as the probe. Of the estrogenic and estrogen analogue compounds evaluated, catechol estrogens, quercetin, diethylstilbestrol and pyrocatechol stimulated intense redox activity while genistein was only active at the highest doses tested. Other estrogens and estrogen analogues, such as 17{beta}-estradiol, nonylphenol, bisphenol A and 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene were inactive. Estrogen-induced redox activity was associated with a dramatic loss of motility and, in the case of 2-hydroxyestradiol, the induction of significant DNA fragmentation. Mass spectrometry also indicated that catechol estrogens were capable of forming dimers that can cross-link the densely packed DNA strands in sperm chromatin, impairing nuclear decondensation. These results highlight the potential importance of estrogenic compounds in creating oxidative stress and DNA damage in the male germ line and suggest that further exploration of these compounds in the aetiology of

  12. Novel, Unifying Mechanism for Mescaline in The Central Nervous System: Electrochemistry, Catechol Redox Metabolite, Receptor, Cell Signaling and Structure Activity Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kovacic

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A unifying mechanism for abused drugs has been proposed previously from the standpoint of electron transfer. Mescaline can be accommodated within the theoretical framework based on redox cycling by the catechol metabolite with its quinone counterpart. Electron transfer may play a role in electrical effects involving the nervous system in the brain. This approach is in accord with structure activity relationships involving mescaline, abused drugs, catecholamines and etoposide. Inefficient demethylation is in keeping with the various drug properties, such as requirement for high dosage and slow acting.

  13. Aconitase post-translational modification as a key in linkage between Krebs cycle, iron homeostasis, redox signaling, and metabolism of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Piroddi, Marta; Galli, Francesco; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    Aconitase, an enzyme possessing an iron-sulfur cluster that is sensitive to oxidation, is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism. There are two isoenzymes of aconitase (Aco)--mitochondrial (mAco) and cytosolic (cAco) ones. The primary role of mAdco is believed to be to control cellular ATP production via regulation of intermediate flux in the Krebs cycle. The cytosolic Aco in its reduced form operates as an enzyme, whereas in the oxidized form it is involved in the control of iron homeostasis as iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a central role in regulation of Aco functions. Catalytic Aco activity is regulated by reversible oxidation of [4Fe-4S]²⁺ cluster and cysteine residues, so redox-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) have gained increasing consideration as regards possible regulatory effects. These include modifications of cysteine residues by oxidation, nitrosylation and thiolation, as well as Tyr nitration and oxidation of Lys residues to carbonyls. Redox-independent PTMs such as phosphorylation and transamination also have been described. In the presence of a sustained ROS flux, redox-dependent PTMs may lead to enzyme damage and cell stress by impaired energy and iron metabolism. Aconitase has been identified as a protein that undergoes oxidative modification and inactivation in aging and certain oxidative stress-related disorders. Here we describe possible mechanisms of involvement of the two aconitase isoforms, cAco and mAco, in the control of cell metabolism and iron homeostasis, balancing the regulatory, and damaging effects of ROS.

  14. PARTICIPATION OF REDOX SIGNALIZATION IN NITRIC OXIDE-, CARBON MONOXIDE- AND HUDROGEN SULFIDE-MEDIATED REGULATION OF APOPTOSIS AND CELL CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. G. Starikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study has demonstrated that proapoptic concentrations of donors of NO (100 mmol SNP and 100 µmol NOC-5, H2S  (10 mmol NaHS, and CO (50 µmol CORM-2 gases caused an increase in the intracellular level of active forms of oxygen in Jurkat cells. As this took place, the activation of redox-dependent transcription factor р53 was observed as Jurkat cells were exposed to 100 mmol SNP and 10 mmol NaHS. In the case of 100 µmol NOC-5 and 50 µmol CORM-2, an increase of р53 was not observed, but the expression of target gens of this transcription factor р21 (under the effect of NO and СО and bax (under the effect of NO increased. The antiproliferative concentration of hydrogen sulfide donor (50 µmol did not cause an increase in the intracellular production of active forms of oxygen and the activation of redox-dependent signal mechanisms.

  15. Posttranslational modification and sequence variation of redox-active proteins correlate with biofilm life cycle in natural microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing proteins recovered from natural microbial communities affords the opportunity to correlate protein expression and modification with environmental factors, including species composition and successional stage. Proteogenomic and biochemical studies of pellicle biofilms from subsurface acid mine drainage streams have shown abundant cytochromes from the dominant organism, Leptospirillum Group II. These cytochromes are proposed to be key proteins in aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, the dominant mode of cellular energy generation by the biofilms. In this study, we determined that posttranslational modification and expression of amino-acid sequence variants change as a function of biofilm maturation. For Cytochrome579 (Cyt579), the most abundant cytochrome in the biofilms, late developmental-stage biofilms differed from early-stage biofilms in N-terminal truncations and decreased redox potentials. Expression of sequence variants of two monoheme c-type cytochromes also depended on biofilm development. For Cyt572, an abundant membrane-bound cytochrome, the expression of multiple sequence variants was observed in both early and late developmental-stage biofilms; however, redox potentials of Cyt572 from these different sources did not vary significantly. These cytochrome analyses show a complex response of the Leptospirillum Group II electron transport chain to growth within a microbial community and illustrate the power of multiple proteomics techniques to define biochemistry in natural systems.

  16. Structure activity study on the quinone/quinone methide chemistry of flavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Boeren, S.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Vervoort, J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    A structure-activity study on the quinone/quinone methide chemistry of a series of 3',4'-dihydroxyflavonoids was performed. Using the glutathione trapping method followed by HPLC, 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF, and LC/MS analysis to identify the glutathionyl adducts, the chemical behavior of the

  17. Atmospheric dissolved iron deposition to the global oceans: effects of oxalate-promoted Fe dissolution, photochemical redox cycling, and dust mineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Johnson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mineral dust deposition is suggested to be a significant atmospheric supply pathway of bioavailable iron (Fe to Fe-depleted surface oceans. In this study, mineral dust and dissolved Fe (Fed deposition rates are predicted for March 2009 to February 2010 using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem implemented with a comprehensive dust-Fe dissolution scheme. The model simulates Fed production during the atmospheric transport of mineral dust taking into account inorganic and organic (oxalate-promoted Fe dissolution processes, photochemical redox cycling between ferric (Fe(III and ferrous (Fe(II forms of Fe, dissolution of three different Fe-containing minerals (hematite, goethite, and aluminosilicates, and detailed mineralogy of wind-blown dust from the major desert regions. Our calculations suggest that during the yearlong simulation ~ 0.26 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g of Fed was deposited to global oceanic regions. Compared to simulations only taking into account proton-promoted Fe dissolution, the addition of oxalate to the dust-Fe mobilization scheme increased total annual model-predicted Fed deposition to global oceanic regions by ~ 75%. The implementation of Fe(II/Fe(III photochemical redox cycling in the model allows for the distinction between different oxidation states of deposited Fed. Our calculations suggest that during the daytime, large fractions of Fed deposited to the global oceans is likely to be in Fe(II form, while nocturnal fluxes of Fed are largely in Fe(III form. Model simulations also show that atmospheric fluxes of Fed can be strongly influenced by the mineralogy of Fe-containing compounds. This study indicates that Fed deposition to the oceans is controlled by total dust-Fe mass concentrations, mineralogy, the surface area of dust particles, atmospheric chemical composition, cloud processing, and meteorological parameters and exhibits complex and spatiotemporally variable patterns. Our study suggests that the explicit model

  18. Atmospheric Dissolved Iron Depostiion to the Global Oceans: Effects of Oxalate-Promoted Fe Dissolution, Photochemical Redox Cycling, and Dust Mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.

    2013-01-01

    Mineral dust deposition is suggested to be a significant atmospheric supply pathway of bioavailable iron (Fe) to Fe-depleted surface oceans. In this study, mineral dust and dissolved Fe (Fed) deposition rates are predicted for March 2009 to February 2010 using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem implemented with a comprehensive dust-Fe dissolution scheme. The model simulates Fed production during the atmospheric transport of mineral dust taking into account inorganic and organic (oxalate)-promoted Fe dissolution processes, photochemical redox cycling between ferric (Fe(III)) and ferrous (Fe(II)) forms of Fe, dissolution of three different Fe-containing minerals (hematite, goethite, and aluminosilicates), and detailed mineralogy of windblown dust from the major desert regions. Our calculations suggest that during the yearlong simulation is approximately 0.26 Tg (1 Tg = 1012 g) of Fed was deposited to global oceanic regions. Compared to simulations only taking into account proton-promoted Fe dissolution, the addition of oxalate to the dust-Fe mobilization scheme increased total annual model-predicted Fed deposition to global oceanic regions by approximately 75%. The implementation of Fe(II)/Fe(III) photochemical redox cycling in the model allows for the distinction between different oxidation states of deposited Fed. Our calculations suggest that during the daytime, large fractions of Fed deposited to the global oceans is likely to be in Fe(II) form, while nocturnal fluxes of Fed are largely in Fe(III) form. Model simulations also show that atmospheric fluxes of Fed can be strongly influenced by the mineralogy of Fe-containing compounds. This study shows that Fed deposition to the oceans is controlled by total dust-Fe mass concentrations, mineralogy, the surface area of dust particles, atmospheric chemical composition, cloud processing, and meteorological parameters and exhibits complex and spatiotemporally variable patterns. Our study suggests that the

  19. Organic Redox Species in Aqueous Flow Batteries: Redox Potentials, Chemical Stability and Solubility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedege, Kristina; Dražević, Emil; Konya, Denes; Bentien, Anders

    2016-12-01

    Organic molecules are currently investigated as redox species for aqueous low-cost redox flow batteries (RFBs). The envisioned features of using organic redox species are low cost and increased flexibility with respect to tailoring redox potential and solubility from molecular engineering of side groups on the organic redox-active species. In this paper 33, mainly quinone-based, compounds are studied experimentially in terms of pH dependent redox potential, solubility and stability, combined with single cell battery RFB tests on selected redox pairs. Data shows that both the solubility and redox potential are determined by the position of the side groups and only to a small extent by the number of side groups. Additionally, the chemical stability and possible degradation mechanisms leading to capacity loss over time are discussed. The main challenge for the development of all-organic RFBs is to identify a redox pair for the positive side with sufficiently high stability and redox potential that enables battery cell potentials above 1 V.

  20. Redox cycling metals: Pedaling their roles in metabolism and their use in the development of novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Danuta S; Stefani, Christian; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ganz, Tomas; Anderson, Gregory J; Subramaniam, Nathan V; Trinder, Debbie; Olynyk, John K; Chua, Anita; Jansson, Patric J; Sahni, Sumit; Lane, Darius J R; Merlot, Angelica M; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Huang, Michael L H; Lee, C Soon; Richardson, Des R

    2016-04-01

    Essential metals, such as iron and copper, play a critical role in a plethora of cellular processes including cell growth and proliferation. However, concomitantly, excess of these metal ions in the body can have deleterious effects due to their ability to generate cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, the human body has evolved a very well-orchestrated metabolic system that keeps tight control on the levels of these metal ions. Considering their very high proliferation rate, cancer cells require a high abundance of these metals compared to their normal counterparts. Interestingly, new anti-cancer agents that take advantage of the sensitivity of cancer cells to metal sequestration and their susceptibility to ROS have been developed. These ligands can avidly bind metal ions to form redox active metal complexes, which lead to generation of cytotoxic ROS. Furthermore, these agents also act as potent metastasis suppressors due to their ability to up-regulate the metastasis suppressor gene, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1. This review discusses the importance of iron and copper in the metabolism and progression of cancer, how they can be exploited to target tumors and the clinical translation of novel anti-cancer chemotherapeutics.

  1. Impact of anaerobic oxidation of methane on the geochemical cycle of redox-sensitive elements at cold-seep sites of the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu; Feng, Dong; Liang, Qianyong; Xia, Zhen; Chen, Linying; Chen, Duofu

    2015-12-01

    Cold hydrocarbon seepage is a frequently observed phenomenon along continental margins worldwide. However, little is known about the impact of seeping fluids on the geochemical cycle of redox-sensitive elements. Pore waters from four gravity cores (D-8, D-5, D-7, and D-F) collected from cold-seep sites of the northern South China Sea were analyzed for SO42-, Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), δ13CDIC, dissolved Fe, Mn, and trace elements (e.g. Mo, U). The sulfate concentration-depth profiles, δ13CDIC values and (ΔDIC+ΔCa2++ΔMg2+)/ΔSO42- ratios suggest that organoclastic sulfate reduction (OSR) is the dominant process in D-8 core. Besides OSR, anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is partially responsible for depletion of sulfate at D-5 and D-7 cores. The sulfate consumption at D-F core is predominantly caused by AOM. The depth of sulfate-methane interface (SMI) and methane diffusive flux of D-F core are calculated to be ~7 m and 0.035 mol m-2 yr-1, respectively. The relatively shallow SMI and high methane flux at D-F core suggest the activity of gas seepage in this region. The concentrations of dissolved uranium (U) were inferred to decrease significantly within the iron reduction zone. It seems that AOM has limited influence on the U geochemical cycling. In contrast, a good correlation between the consumption of sulfate and the removal of molybdenum (Mo) suggests that AOM has a significantly influence on the geochemical cycle of Mo at cold seeps. Accordingly, cold seep environments may serve as an important potential sink in the marine geochemical cycle of Mo.

  2. Measuring protection of aromatic wine thiols from oxidation by competitive reactions vs wine preservatives with ortho-quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Magiatis, Prokopios; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2014-11-15

    Quinones are central intermediates in wine oxidation that can degrade the quality of wine by reactions with varietal thiols, such as 3-sulfanylhexanol, decreasing desirable aroma. Protection by wine preservatives (sulphur dioxide, glutathione, ascorbic acid and model tannin, phloroglucinol) was assessed by competitive sacrificial reactions with 4-methyl-1,2-benzoquinone, quantifying products and ratios by HPLC-UV-MS. Regioselectivity was assessed by product isolation and identification by NMR spectroscopy. Nucleophilic addition reactions compete with two electron reduction of quinones by sulphur dioxide or ascorbic acid, and both routes serve as effective quenching pathways, but minor secondary products from coupled redox reactions between the products and reactants are also observed. The wine preservatives were all highly reactive and thus all very protective against 3-sulfanylhexanol loss to the quinone, but showed only additive antioxidant effects. Confirmation of these reaction rates and pathways in wine is needed to assess the actual protective action of each tested preservative.

  3. Quinone exchange at the A{sub 1} site in photosystem I [PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkoff, A.; Brunkan, N.; Snyder, S.W.; Ostafin, A.; Werst, M.; Thurnauer, M.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Biggins, J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Quinones play an essential role in light-induced electron transport in photosynthetic reaction centers (RC). Study of quinone binding within the protein matrix of the RC is a focal point of understanding the biological optimization of photosynthesis. In plant and cyanobacterial PSI, phylloquinone (K{sub 1}) is believed to be the secondary electron acceptor, A{sub 1}, similar to Q{sub a} in the purple bacterial RC. Photoinduced electron transfer is initiated by reduction of the electron acceptor (A{sub 0}), a chlorophyll species, by the photoexcited primary donor *P{sub 700}. A{sub 1} acts as a transient redox intermediate between A{sub 0} and the iron-sulfur centers (FeS). We have examined the characteristic PSI electron spin polarized (ESP) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signal as a marker of the interacting radical pairs developed during electron transfer.

  4. Electron transfer capacity dependence of quinone-mediated Fe(III) reduction and current generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomin; Liu, Liang; Liu, Tongxu; Yuan, Tian; Zhang, Wei; Li, Fangbai; Zhou, Shungui; Li, Yongtao

    2013-06-01

    Quinone groups in exogenous electron shuttles can accelerate extracellular electron transfer (EET) from bacteria to insoluble terminal electron acceptors, such as Fe(III) oxides and electrodes, which are important in biogeochemical redox processes and microbial electricity generation. However, the relationship between quinone-mediated EET performance and electron-shuttling properties of the quinones remains incompletely characterized. This study investigates the effects of a series of synthetic quinones (SQs) on goethite reduction and current generation by a fermenting bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae L17. In addition, the voltammetric behavior and electron transfer capacities (ETCs) of SQ, including electron accepting (EAC) and donating (EDC) capacities, is also examined using electrochemical methods. The results showed that SQ can significantly increase both the Fe(III) reduction rates and current outputs of L17. Each tested SQ reversibly accepted and donated electrons as indicated by the cyclic voltammograms. The EAC and EDC results showed that Carmine and Alizarin had low relative capacities of electron transfer, whereas 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid (AQDS), 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-HNQ), and 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (5-HNQ) showed stronger relative ETC, and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQC) and 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonic acid (AQS) had high relative ETC. Enhancement of microbial goethite reduction kinetics and current outputs by SQ had a good linear relationship with their ETC, indicating that the effectiveness of quinone-mediated EET may be strongly dependent on the ETC of the quinones. Therefore, the presence of quinone compounds and fermenting microorganisms may increase the diversity of microbial populations that contribute to element transformation in natural environments. Moreover, ETC determination of different SQ would help to evaluate their performance for microbial EET under anoxic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  5. Pyridine Nucleotide Cycling and Control of Intracellular Redox State in Relation to Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Activity and Nuclear Localization of Glutathione during Exponential Growth of Arabidopsis Cells in Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Till K.Pellny; Vittoria Locato; Pedro Diaz Vivancos; Jelena Markovic; Laura De Gara; Federico V.Pallardó; Christine H.Foyer

    2009-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides,ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells,with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle.However,the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized.The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate,glutathione,and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools.Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle,but glutathione was low at this point.The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased.The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information.Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed.Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide,ox-idized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide,reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate,oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate,reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes,and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected.The ascorbate,glutathi-one,and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended.We concludethat there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is main-rained by interplay

  6. Pyridine nucleotide cycling and control of intracellular redox state in relation to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and nuclear localization of glutathione during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellny, Till K; Locato, Vittoria; Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Markovic, Jelena; De Gara, Laura; Pallardó, Federico V; Foyer, Christine H

    2009-05-01

    Pyridine nucleotides, ascorbate and glutathione are major redox metabolites in plant cells, with specific roles in cellular redox homeostasis and the regulation of the cell cycle. However, the regulation of these metabolite pools during exponential growth and their precise functions in the cell cycle remain to be characterized. The present analysis of the abundance of ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotides during exponential growth of Arabidopsis cells in culture provides evidence for the differential regulation of each of these redox pools. Ascorbate was most abundant early in the growth cycle, but glutathione was low at this point. The cellular ascorbate to dehydroascorbate and reduced glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulphide ratios were high and constant but the pyridine nucleotide pools were largely oxidized over the period of exponential growth and only became more reduced once growth had ceased. The glutathione pool increased in parallel with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities and with increases in the abundance of PARP1 and PARP2 mRNAs at a time of high cell cycle activity as indicated by transcriptome information. Marked changes in the intracellular partitioning of GSH between the cytoplasm and nucleus were observed. Extension of the exponential growth phase by dilution or changing the media led to increases in the glutathione and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, oxidized form (NAD)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, reduced form (NADH) pools and to higher NAD/NADH ratios but the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxidized form (NADP)-plus-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form (NADPH) pool sizes, and NAPD/NADPH ratios were much less affected. The ascorbate, glutathione, and pyridine nucleotide pools and PARP activity decreased before the exponential growth phase ended. We conclude that there are marked changes in intracellular redox state during the growth cycle but that redox homeostasis is

  7. Bimetallic Pd-Pt supported graphene promoted enzymatic redox cycling for ultrasensitive electrochemical quantification of microRNA from cell lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang-Fang; Zhang, Jing-Jing; He, Ting-Ting; Shi, Jian-Jun; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2014-08-21

    The expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is related to some cancer diseases. Recently, miRNAs have emerged as new candidate diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for detecting a wide variety of cancers. Due to low levels, short sequences and high sequence homology among family members, the quantitative miRNA analysis is still a challenge. A novel electrochemical biosensor with triple signal amplification for the ultrasensitive detection of miRNA was developed based on phosphatase, redox-cycling amplification, a bimetallic Pd-Pt supported graphene functionalized screen-printed gold electrode, and two stem-loop structured DNAs as target capturers. The proposed biosensor is highly sensitive due to the enhanced electrochemical signal of Pd-Pt supported graphene and sufficiently selective to discriminate the target miRNA from homologous miRNAs in the presence of loop-stem structure probes with T4 DNA ligase. Therefore, this strategy provided a new and ultrasensitive platform for amplified detection and subsequent analysis of miRNA in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis.

  8. The Effect of Walterinnesia aegyptia Venom Proteins on TCA Cycle Activity and Mitochondrial NAD+-Redox State in Cultured Human Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem K. Ghneim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast cultures were used to study the effects of crude Walterinnesia aegyptia venom and its F1–F7 protein fractions on TCA cycle enzyme activities and mitochondrial NAD-redox state. Confluent cells were incubated with 10 μg of venom proteins for 4 hours at 37°C. The activities of all studied TCA enzymes and the non-TCA mitochondrial NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase underwent significant reductions of similar magnitude (50–60% of control activity upon incubation of cells with the crude venom and fractions F4, F5, and F7 and 60–70% for fractions F3 and F6. In addition, the crude and fractions F3–F7 venom proteins caused a drop in mitochondrial NAD+ and NADP+ levels equivalent to around 25% of control values. Whereas the crude and fractions F4, F5, and F7 venom proteins caused similar magnitude drops in NADH and NADPH (around 55% of control levels, fractions F3 and F6 caused a more drastic drop (60–70% of control levels of both reduced coenzymes. Results indicate that the effects of venom proteins could be directed at the mitochondrial level and/or the rates of NAD+ and NADP+ biosynthesis.

  9. Carbons, ionic liquids and quinones for electrochemical capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul eDiaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbons are the main electrode materials used in electrochemical capacitors, which are electrochemical energy storage devices with high power densities and long cycling lifetimes. However, increasing their energy density will improve their potential for commercial implementation. In this regard, the use of high surface area carbons and high voltage electrolytes are well known strategies to increase the attainable energy density, and lately ionic liquids have been explored as promising alternatives to current state of the art acetonitrile-based electrolytes. Also, in terms of safety and sustainability ionic liquids are attractive electrolyte materials for electrochemical capacitors. In addition, it has been shown that the matching of the carbon pore size with the electrolyte ion size further increases the attainable electric double layer (EDL capacitance and energy density.The use of pseudocapacitive reactions can significantly increase the attainable energy density, and quinonic-based materials offer a potentially sustainable and cost effective research avenue for both the electrode and the electrolyte. This perspective will provide an overview of the current state of the art research on electrochemical capacitors based on combinations of carbons, ionic liquids and quinonic compounds, highlighting performances and challenges and discussing possible future research avenues. In this regard, current interest is mainly focused on strategies which may ultimately lead to commercially competitive sustainable high performance electrochemical capacitors for different applications including those requiring mechanical flexibility and biocompatibility.

  10. Carbons, ionic liquids and quinones for electrochemical capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Raul; Doherty, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Carbons are the main electrode materials used in electrochemical capacitors, which are electrochemical energy storage devices with high power densities and long cycling lifetimes. However, increasing their energy density will improve their potential for commercial implementation. In this regard, the use of high surface area carbons and high voltage electrolytes are well known strategies to increase the attainable energy density, and lately ionic liquids have been explored as promising alternatives to current state of the art acetonitrile-based electrolytes. Also, in terms of safety and sustainability ionic liquids are attractive electrolyte materials for electrochemical capacitors. In addition, it has been shown that the matching of the carbon pore size with the electrolyte ion size further increases the attainable electric double layer (EDL) capacitance and energy density. The use of pseudocapacitive reactions can significantly increase the attainable energy density, and quinonic-based materials offer a potentially sustainable and cost effective research avenue for both the electrode and the electrolyte. This perspective will provide an overview of the current state of the art research on electrochemical capacitors based on combinations of carbons, ionic liquids and quinonic compounds, highlighting performances and challenges and discussing possible future research avenues. In this regard, current interest is mainly focused on strategies which may ultimately lead to commercially competitive sustainable high performance electrochemical capacitors for different applications including those requiring mechanical flexibility and biocompatibility.

  11. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle ( pre- & post- transcriptional maturation and protein turnover : Implications in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALAV SUCHIN TRIVEDI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, as well as due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions. Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic. This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition and behavior. Thus a regulatory switch, controlling the lifespan, maturation and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at 1.The pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA (pre-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and 2. the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins (RNP and RNA binding proteins (RNABP in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione antioxidant levels, the redox status of neurons might be the central regulatory switch for methylation

  12. Alternative Oxidase Activity in Tobacco Leaf Mitochondria (Dependence on Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle-Mediated Redox Regulation and Pyruvate Activation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlerberghe, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Wiskich, J. T.; Vanlerberghe, A. E.; McIntosh, L.

    1995-10-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (cv Petit Havana SR1) containing high levels of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein due to the introduction of a sense transgene(s) of Aox1, the nuclear gene encoding AOX, were used to investigate mechanisms regulating AOX activity. After purification of leaf mitochondria, a large proportion of the AOX protein was present as the oxidized (covalently associated and less active) dimer. High AOX activity in these mitochondria was dependent on both reduction of the protein by DTT (to the noncovalently associated and more active dimer) and its subsequent activation by certain [alpha]-keto acids, particularly pyruvate. Reduction of AOX to its more active form could also be mediated by intramitochondrial reducing power generated by the oxidation of certain tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, most notably isocitrate and malate. Our evidence suggests that NADPH may be specifically required for AOX reduction. All of the above regulatory mechanisms applied to AOX in wild-type mitochondria as well. Transgenic leaves lacking AOX due to the introduction of an Aox1 antisense transgene or multiple sense transgenes were used to investigate the potential physiological significance of the AOX-regulatory mechanisms. Under conditions in which respiratory carbon metabolism is restricted by the capacity of mitochondrial electron transport, feed-forward activation of AOX by mitochondrial reducing power and pyruvate may act to prevent redirection of carbon metabolism, such as to fermentative pathways.

  13. An N-myristoylated globin with a redox-sensing function that regulates the defecation cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Tilleman

    Full Text Available Globins occur in all kingdoms of life where they fulfill a wide variety of functions. In the past they used to be primarily characterized as oxygen transport/storage proteins, but since the discovery of new members of the globin family like neuroglobin and cytoglobin, more diverse and complex functions have been assigned to this heterogeneous family. Here we propose a function for a membrane-bound globin of C. elegans, GLB-26. This globin was predicted to be myristoylated at its N-terminus, a post-translational modification only recently described in the globin family. In vivo, this globin is found in the membrane of the head mesodermal cell and in the tail stomato-intestinal and anal depressor muscle cells. Since GLB-26 is almost directly oxidized when exposed to oxygen, we postulate a possible function as electron transfer protein. Phenotypical studies show that GLB-26 takes part in regulating the length of the defecation cycle in C. elegans under oxidative stress conditions.

  14. An N-myristoylated globin with a redox-sensing function that regulates the defecation cycle in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilleman, Lesley; De Henau, Sasha; Pauwels, Martje; Nagy, Nora; Pintelon, Isabel; Braeckman, Bart P; De Wael, Karolien; Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Adriaensen, Dirk; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Globins occur in all kingdoms of life where they fulfill a wide variety of functions. In the past they used to be primarily characterized as oxygen transport/storage proteins, but since the discovery of new members of the globin family like neuroglobin and cytoglobin, more diverse and complex functions have been assigned to this heterogeneous family. Here we propose a function for a membrane-bound globin of C. elegans, GLB-26. This globin was predicted to be myristoylated at its N-terminus, a post-translational modification only recently described in the globin family. In vivo, this globin is found in the membrane of the head mesodermal cell and in the tail stomato-intestinal and anal depressor muscle cells. Since GLB-26 is almost directly oxidized when exposed to oxygen, we postulate a possible function as electron transfer protein. Phenotypical studies show that GLB-26 takes part in regulating the length of the defecation cycle in C. elegans under oxidative stress conditions.

  15. Novel, unifying mechanism for mescaline in the central nervous system: electrochemistry, catechol redox metabolite, receptor, cell signaling and structure activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2009-01-01

    A unifying mechanism for abused drugs has been proposed previously from the standpoint of electron transfer. Mescaline can be accommodated within the theoretical framework based on redox cycling by the catechol metabolite with its quinone counterpart. Electron transfer may play a role in electrical effects involving the nervous system in the brain. This approach is in accord with structure activity relationships involving mescaline, abused drugs, catecholamines, and etoposide. Inefficient demethylation is in keeping with the various drug properties, such as requirement for high dosage and slow acting. There is a discussion of receptor binding, electrical effects, cell signaling and other modes of action. Mescaline is a nonselective, seretonin receptor agonist. 5-HTP receptors are involved in the stimulus properties. Research addresses the aspect of stereochemical requirements. Receptor binding may involve the proposed quinone metabolite and/or the amino sidechain via protonation. Electroencephalographic studies were performed on the effects of mescaline on men. Spikes are elicited by stimulation of a cortical area. The potentials likely originate in nonsynaptic dendritic membranes. Receptor-mediated signaling pathways were examined which affect mescaline behavior. The hallucinogen belongs to the class of 2AR agonists which regulate pathways in cortical neurons. The research identifies neural and signaling mechanisms responsible for the biological effects. Recently, another hallucinogen, psilocybin, has been included within the unifying mechanistic framework. This mushroom constituent is hydrolyzed to the phenol psilocin, also active, which is subsequently oxidized to an ET o-quinone or iminoquinone.

  16. Sulphide-sulphate stability and melting in subducted sediment and its role in arc mantle redox and chalcophile cycling in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canil, Dante; Fellows, Steven A.

    2017-07-01

    The redox budget during subduction is tied to the evolution of oxygen and biogeochemical cycles on Earth's surface over time. The sulphide-sulphate couple in subducted crust has significant potential for redox and control on extraction of chalcophile metals from the arc mantle. We derive oxygen buffers for sulphide-sulphate stability ('SSO buffers') using mineral assemblages in subducted crust within the eclogite facies, and examine their disposition relative to the fO2 in the arc mantle along various P-T trajectories for subduction. The fO2 required for sulphide stability in subducted crust passing beneath an arc is shifted by variations in the bulk Ca/(Ca + Mg + Fe) of the subducting crust alone. Hotter slabs and more Fe-rich sediments stabilize sulphide and favour chalcophile sequestration deep into the mantle, whereas colder slabs and calcic sediment will stabilize anhydrite, in some cases at depths of melt generation in the arc mantle (<130 km). The released sulphate on melting potentially increases the fO2 of the arc mantle. We performed melting experiments on three subducted sediment compositions varying in bulk Ca/(Ca + Mg + Fe) from 0.3 to 0.6 at 2.5 GPa and 900-1100 °C to confirm how anhydrite stability can change by orders of magnitude the S, Cu, As, Zn, Mo, Pb, and Sb contents of sediment melts, and their subsequent liberation to the arc mantle. Using Cu/Sc as a proxy for the behaviour of S, the effect of variable subducted sediment composition on sulphide-sulphate stability and release of chalcophiles to the arc mantle is recognizable in volcanic suites from several subduction zones in space and time. The fO2 of the SSO buffers in subducted sediment relative to the arc mantle may have changed with time by shifts in the nature of pelagic sedimentation in the oceans over earth history. Oxidation of arc mantle and the proliferation of porphyry Cu deposits may be latter-day advents in earth history partly due to the rise of planktic calcifiers in the

  17. Quinones and Sulfhydryl-Dependent Immunotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 7 INTRODUCTION_ The work to be described is based on the use of immunologic models to understand mec-4tnisms of...and o-quinone metabolites of immunotoxic xenobiotics or analogous resonance struc- tures that possess SH-alkylating activity. Potency differences are...1765-1769. Lane, M. A. (1978)t Muscarinic cholinergic activation of mouse spleen cells cytotoxic to tumor cells in vitro, J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 61:923

  18. Role of a redox-based methylation switch in mRNA life cycle (pre- and post-transcriptional maturation) and protein turnover: implications in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard C

    2012-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic scaling in response to neuronal stimulus or activation, and due to changes in cellular niche, is an important phenomenon for memory consolidation, retrieval, and other similar cognitive functions (Turrigiano and Nelson, 2004). Neurological disorders and cognitive disabilities in autism, Rett syndrome, schizophrenia, dementia, etc., are strongly correlated to alterations in protein expression (both synaptic and cytoplasmic; Cajigas et al., 2010). This correlation suggests that efficient temporal regulation of synaptic protein expression is important for synaptic plasticity. In addition, equilibrium between mRNA processing, protein translation, and protein turnover is a critical sensor/trigger for recording synaptic information, normal cognition, and behavior (Cajigas et al., 2010). Thus a regulatory switch, which controls the lifespan, maturation, and processing of mRNA, might influence cognition and adaptive behavior. Here, we propose a two part novel hypothesis that methylation might act as this suggested coordinating switch to critically regulate mRNA maturation at (1) the pre-transcription level, by regulating precursor-RNA processing into mRNA, via other non-coding RNAs and their influence on splicing phenomenon, and (2) the post-transcription level by modulating the regulatory functions of ribonucleoproteins and RNA binding proteins in mRNA translation, dendritic translocation as well as protein synthesis and synaptic turnover. DNA methylation changes are well recognized and highly correlated to gene expression levels as well as, learning and memory; however, RNA methylation changes are recently characterized and yet their functional implications are not established. This review article provides some insight on the intriguing consequences of changes in methylation levels on mRNA life-cycle. We also suggest that, since methylation is under the control of glutathione anti-oxidant levels (Lertratanangkoon et al., 1997), the redox status of

  19. Inhibition of cell proliferation and migration by oxidative stress from ascorbate-driven juglone redox cycling in human bladder-derived T24 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kviecinski, M.R., E-mail: mrkviecinski@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Pedrosa, R.C., E-mail: rozangelapedrosa@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Felipe, K.B., E-mail: kakabettega@yahoo.com.br [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Farias, M.S., E-mail: mirellesfarias@hotmail.com [Laboratorio de Bioquimica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil); Glorieux, C., E-mail: christophe.glorieux@uclouvain.be [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Valenzuela, M., E-mail: mavalenzuela@med.uchile.cl [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); Sid, B., E-mail: brice.sid@uclouvain.be [Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Universite Catholique de Louvain, 73 Avenue E. Mounier, GTOX 7309, 1200 Brussels (Belgium); and others

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cytotoxicity of juglone is markedly increased by ascorbate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T24 cell death by oxidative stress is necrosis-like. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Redox cycling by juglone/ascorbate inhibits cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular migration is impaired by juglone/ascorbate. -- Abstract: The effects of juglone on T24 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of ascorbate. The EC{sub 50} value for juglone at 24 h decreased from 28.5 {mu}M to 6.3 {mu}M in the presence of ascorbate. In juglone-treated cells, ascorbate increased ROS formation (4-fold) and depleted GSH (65%). N-acetylcysteine or catalase restricted the juglone/ascorbate-mediated effects, highlighting the role of oxidative stress in juglone cytotoxicity. Juglone alone or associated with ascorbate did not cause caspase-3 activation or PARP cleavage, suggesting necrosis-like cell death. DNA damage and the mild ER stress caused by juglone were both enhanced by ascorbate. In cells treated with juglone (1-5 {mu}M), a concentration-dependent decrease in cell proliferation was observed. Ascorbate did not impair cell proliferation but its association with juglone led to a clonogenic death state. The motility of ascorbate-treated cells was not affected. Juglone slightly restricted motility, but cells lost their ability to migrate most noticeably when treated with juglone plus ascorbate. We postulate that juglone kills cells by a necrosis-like mechanism inhibiting cell proliferation and the motility of T24 cells. These effects are enhanced in the presence of ascorbate.

  20. Biogeochemical redox cycling of arsenic in mine-impacted lake sediments and co-existing pore waters near Giant Mine, Yellowknife Bay, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, C.F. [Queen' s University, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Jamieson, H.E., E-mail: jamieson@geol.queensu.ca [Queen' s University, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kyser, T.K. [Queen' s University, Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering, Kingston, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Praharaj, T.; Fortin, D. [University of Ottawa, Department of Earth Sciences, Ottawa, K1A 3N5 (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    Lacustrine sediments, submerged tailings, and their pore waters have been collected at several sites in Yellowknife Bay, Great Slave Lake, Canada, in order to investigate the biogeochemical controls on the remobilization of As from mining-impacted materials under different depositional conditions. Radiometric dating confirms that a mid-core enrichment of Pb, Zn, Cu and Sb corresponds to the opening of a large Au mine 60 a ago. This was evident even in a relatively remote site. Arsenic was enriched at mid-core, coincident with mining activity, but clearly exhibited post-depositional mobility, migrating upwards towards the sediment water interface (SWI) as well as down-core. Deep-water (15 m) Yellowknife Bay sediments that contain buried mine waste are suboxic, relatively organic-rich and abundant in microbes with As in pore waters and sediments reaching 585 {mu}g/L and 1310 mg/kg, respectively. Late summer pore waters show equal proportions of As(III) and As(V) (16-415 {mu}g/L) whereas late winter pore waters are dominated by As(III) (284-947 {mu}g/L). This can be explained by As(III) desorption mechanisms associated with the conversion of FeS to FeS{sub 2} and the reduction of As(V) to As(III) through the oxidation of dissolved sulfide, both microbially-mediated processes. Processes affecting As cycling involve the attenuating efficiency of the oxic zone at the SWI, sediment redox heterogeneity and the reductive dissolution of Fe(hydr)oxides by labile organic matter, temporarily and spatially variable.

  1. Redox regulation of cardiomyocyte cell cycling via an ERK1/2 and c-Myc-dependent activation of cyclin D2 transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Thomas V.A.; Smyrnias, Ioannis; Schnelle, Moritz; Mistry, Rajesh K.; Zhang, Min; Beretta, Matteo; Martin, Daniel; Anilkumar, Narayana; de Silva, Shana M.; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian cardiomyocytes have a very limited capacity to proliferate, and consequently the loss of cells after cardiac stress promotes heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that administration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), can regulate redox-dependent signalling pathway(s) to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation in vitro, but the potential relevance of such a pathway in vivo has not been tested. We have generated a transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the H2O2-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), is overexpressed within the postnatal cardiomyocytes, and observed that the hearts of 1–3 week old Tg mice pups are larger in comparison to wild type (Wt) littermate controls. We demonstrate that the cardiomyocytes of Tg mouse pups have increased cell cycling capacity in vivo as determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine. Further, microarray analyses of the transcriptome of these Tg mouse hearts suggested that the expression of cyclin D2 is significantly increased. We investigated the molecular mechanisms which underlie this more proliferative phenotype in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) in vitro, and demonstrate that Nox4 overexpression mediates an H2O2-dependent activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which in turn phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor c-myc. This results in a significant increase in cyclin D2 expression, which we show to be mediated, at least in part, by cis-acting c-myc binding sites within the proximal cyclin D2 promoter. Overexpression of Nox4 in NRCs results in an increase in their proliferative capacity that is ablated by the silencing of cyclin D2. We further demonstrate activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, increased phosphorylation of c-myc and significantly increased expression of cyclin D2 protein in the Nox4 Tg hearts. We suggest that this pathway acts to maintain the proliferative capacity of cardiomyocytes in Nox4 Tg pups in vivo and so delays their exit from the cell

  2. Modification of quinone electrochemistry by the proteins in the biological electron transfer chains: examples from photosynthetic reaction centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunner, M. R.; Madeo, Jennifer; Zhu, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Quinones such as ubiquinone are the lipid soluble electron and proton carriers in the membranes of mitochondria, chloroplasts and oxygenic bacteria. Quinones undergo controlled redox reactions bound to specific sites in integral membrane proteins such as the cytochrome bc1 oxidoreductase. The quinone reactions in bacterial photosynthesis are amongst the best characterized, presenting a model to understand how proteins modulate cofactor chemistry. The free energy of ubiquinone redox reactions in aqueous solution and in the QA and QB sites of the bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs) are compared. In the primary QA site ubiquinone is reduced only to the anionic semiquinone (Q•−) while in the secondary QB site the product is the doubly reduced, doubly protonated quinol (QH2). The ways in which the protein modifies the relative energy of each reduced and protonated intermediate are described. For example, the protein stabilizes Q•− while destabilizing Q= relative to aqueous solution through electrostatic interactions. In addition, kinetic and thermodynamic mechanisms for stabilizing the intermediate semiquinones are compared. Evidence for the protein sequestering anionic compounds by slowing both on and off rates as well as by binding the anion more tightly is reviewed. PMID:18979192

  3. Quinone emissions from gasoline and diesel motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakober, Chris A; Riddle, Sarah G; Robert, Michael A; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M Judith; Green, Peter G; Kleeman, Michael J

    2007-07-01

    Gas- and particle-phase emissions from gasoline and diesel vehicles operated on chassis dynamometers were collected using annular denuders, quartz filters, and PUF substrates. Quinone species were measured using O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization in conjunction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Nine quinones were observed, ranging from C6 to C16. New species identified in motor vehicle exhaust include methyl-1,4-benzoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone (MNQN), and aceanthrenequinone. Gas-phase motor vehicle emissions of quinones are also reported for the first time. Six gas-phase quinones were quantified with emission rates of 2-28 000 microg L(-1) fuel consumed. The most abundant gas-phase quinones were 1,4-benzoquinone (BON) and MNQN. The gas-phase fraction was > or = 69% of quinone mass for light-duty gasoline emissions, and > or = 84% for heavy-duty diesel emissions. Eight particle-phase quinones were observed between 2 and 1600 microg L(-1), with BQN the most abundant species followed by 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and 1,2-naphthoquinone. Current particle-phase quinone measurements agree well with the few available previous results. Further research is needed concerning the gas-particle partitioning behavior of quinones in ambient and combustion source conditions.

  4. Impact of the redox-cycling herbicide diquat on transcript expression and antioxidant enzymatic activities of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouetard, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.bouetard@rennes.inra.fr [INRA, UMR INRA-Agrocampus Ouest ESE 0985, Equipe Ecotoxicologie et Qualite des Milieux Aquatiques, 65 rue de Saint-Brieuc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Besnard, Anne-Laure; Vassaux, Daniele; Lagadic, Laurent; Coutellec, Marie-Agnes [INRA, UMR INRA-Agrocampus Ouest ESE 0985, Equipe Ecotoxicologie et Qualite des Milieux Aquatiques, 65 rue de Saint-Brieuc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2013-01-15

    The presence of pesticides in the environment results in potential unwanted effects on non-target species. Freshwater organisms inhabiting water bodies adjacent to agricultural areas, such as ditches, ponds and marshes, are good models to test such effects as various pesticides may reach these habitats through several ways, including aerial drift, run-off, and drainage. Diquat is a non-selective herbicide used for crop protection or for weed control in such water bodies. In this study, we investigated the effects of diquat on a widely spread aquatic invertebrate, the holarctic freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Due to the known redox-cycling properties of diquat, we studied transcript expression and enzymatic activities relative to oxidative and general stress in the haemolymph and gonado-digestive complex (GDC). As diquat is not persistent, snails were exposed for short times (5, 24, and 48 h) to ecologically relevant concentrations (22.2, 44.4, and 222.2 {mu}g l{sup -1}) of diquat dibromide. RT-qPCR was used to quantify the transcription of genes encoding catalase (cat), a cytosolic superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-sod), a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (gpx), a glutathione reductase (gred), the retinoid X receptor (rxr), two heat shock proteins (hsp40 and hsp70), cortactin (cor) and the two ribosomal genes r18S and r28s. Enzymatic activities of SOD, Gpx, Gred and glutathione S-transferase (GST) were investigated in the GDC using spectrophoto/fluorometric methods. Opposite trends were obtained in the haemolymph depending on the herbicide concentration. At the lowest concentration, effects were mainly observed after 24 h of exposure, with over-transcription of cor, hsp40, rxr, and sod, whereas higher concentrations down-regulated the expression of most of the studied transcripts, especially after 48 h of exposure. In the GDC, earlier responses were observed and the fold-change magnitude was generally much higher: transcription of all target genes increased

  5. Efficiency calculations and optimization analysis of a solar reactor for the high temperature step of the zinc/zinc-oxide thermochemical redox cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haussener, S.

    2007-03-15

    A solar reactor for the first step of the zinc/zinc-oxide thermochemical redox cycle is analysed and dimensioned in terms of maximization of efficiency and reaction conversion. Zinc-oxide particles carried in an inert carrier gas, in our case argon, enter the reactor in absorber tubes and are heated by concentrated solar radiation mainly due to radiative heat transfer. The particles dissociate and, in case of complete conversion, a gas mixture of argon, zinc and oxygen leaves the reactor. The aim of this study is to find an optimal design of the reactor regarding efficiency, materials and economics. The number of absorber tubes and their dimensions, the cavity dimension and its material as well as the operating conditions should be determined. Therefore 2D and 3D simulations of an 8 kW reactor are implemented. The gases are modeled as ideal gases with temperature-dependent properties. Absorption and scattering of the particle gas mixture are calculated by Mie-theory. Radiative heat transfer is included in the simulation and implemented with the aid of the discrete ordinates (DO) method. The mixture is modeled as ideal mixture and the reaction with an Arrhenius-type ansatz. Temperature distribution, reaction efficiency (heat used for zinc-oxide reaction divided by input) and tube efficiency (heat going into absorber tubes divided by input) as well as reaction conversion are analyzed to find the most promising reactor design. The results show that the most significant factors for efficiencies, conversion and absorber fluid temperature are concentration of the solar incoming radiation, zinc-oxide mass flow, the number of tubes and their dimension. Higher concentration leads to solely positive effects. Zinc-oxide mass flow variations indicate the existence of an optimal flow rate for each reactor design which maximizes efficiencies and conversion. Higher zinc-oxide mass flow leads, on one hand, to higher tube efficiency but on the other hand to lower temperatures in

  6. Reactivities of Quinone Methides versus o-Quinones in Catecholamine Metabolism and Eumelanin Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manickam Sugumaran

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Melanin is an important biopolymeric pigment produced in a vast majority of organisms. Tyrosine and its hydroxylated product, dopa, form the starting material for melanin biosynthesis. Earlier studies by Raper and Mason resulted in the identification of dopachrome and dihydroxyindoles as important intermediates and paved way for the establishment of well-known Raper–Mason pathway for the biogenesis of brown to black eumelanins. Tyrosinase catalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine as well as dopa to dopaquinone. Dopaquinone thus formed, undergoes intramolecular cyclization to form leucochrome, which is further oxidized to dopachrome. Dopachrome is either converted into 5,6-dihydroxyindole by decarboxylative aromatization or isomerized into 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. Oxidative polymerization of these two dihydroxyindoles eventually produces eumelanin pigments via melanochrome. While the role of quinones in the biosynthetic pathway is very well acknowledged, that of isomeric quinone methides, however, remained marginalized. This review article summarizes the key role of quinone methides during the oxidative transformation of a vast array of catecholamine derivatives and brings out the importance of these transient reactive species during the melanogenic process. In addition, possible reactions of quinone methides at various stages of melanogenesis are discussed.

  7. The Diterpenoid Quinones from Coleus forskohlii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two new diterpenoid quinones, coleon S and T were isolated from the chloroform extract of the leaves of Coleus forskohlii, and based on spectroscopic data, their structures were identified as 1,4-phenathrenedione-4b,5,6,8a,9,10-hexahydro-3,9b,10a-trihydroxy-4b,7,8-rimethyl -2-(2-ethoxypropyl)(1) and 1,4-phenathrenedione-2,3,4b,5,6, 8a,9,10-octahydro-3,9b,10a- tri-hydroxy-4b,7,8-trimethyl-2-propylene(2), respectively.

  8. Microfluidic redox battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Goulet, Marc-Antoni; Kjeang, Erik

    2013-07-01

    A miniaturized microfluidic battery is proposed, which is the first membraneless redox battery demonstrated to date. This unique concept capitalizes on dual-pass flow-through porous electrodes combined with stratified, co-laminar flow to generate electrical power on-chip. The fluidic design is symmetric to allow for both charging and discharging operations in forward, reverse, and recirculation modes. The proof-of-concept device fabricated using low-cost materials integrated in a microfluidic chip is shown to produce competitive power levels when operated on a vanadium redox electrolyte. A complete charge/discharge cycle is performed to demonstrate its operation as a rechargeable battery, which is an important step towards providing sustainable power to lab-on-a-chip and microelectronic applications.

  9. Antiprotozoal Isoflavan Quinones from Abrus precatorius ssp. africanus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hata, Y

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ) and abruquinone G (2), and three isoflavan quinones, abruquinone I (3), abruquinone B (4), and 7, 8, 3′‚5′- tetramethoxyisoflavan-1′,4′- quinone (5). Compounds 1 and 3 were new natural products. The absolute configuration of compounds was determined by comparison...

  10. Thiol-based redox switches in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillion, Melanie; Antelmann, Haike

    2015-05-01

    Bacteria encounter reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a consequence of the aerobic life or as an oxidative burst of activated neutrophils during infections. In addition, bacteria are exposed to other redox-active compounds, including hypochloric acid (HOCl) and reactive electrophilic species (RES) such as quinones and aldehydes. These reactive species often target the thiol groups of cysteines in proteins and lead to thiol-disulfide switches in redox-sensing regulators to activate specific detoxification pathways and to restore the redox balance. Here, we review bacterial thiol-based redox sensors that specifically sense ROS, RES and HOCl via thiol-based mechanisms and regulate gene transcription in Gram-positive model bacteria and in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We also pay particular attention to emerging widely conserved HOCl-specific redox regulators that have been recently characterized in Escherichia coli. Different mechanisms are used to sense and respond to ROS, RES and HOCl by 1-Cys-type and 2-Cys-type thiol-based redox sensors that include versatile thiol-disulfide switches (OxyR, OhrR, HypR, YodB, NemR, RclR, Spx, RsrA/RshA) or alternative Cys phosphorylations (SarZ, MgrA, SarA), thiol-S-alkylation (QsrR), His-oxidation (PerR) and methionine oxidation (HypT). In pathogenic bacteria, these redox-sensing regulators are often important virulence regulators and required for adapation to the host immune defense.

  11. Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of AQS Transformation and Microbial Goethite Reduction:Insight into "Redox mediator-Microbe-Iron oxide" Interaction Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihuang; Shi, Mengran; Yu, Dan; Liu, Chongxuan; Huang, Tinglin; Wu, Fengchang

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics and kinetics of redox transformation of a redox mediator, anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS), during microbial goethite reduction by Shewanella decolorationis S12, a dissimilatory iron reduction bacterium (DIRB), were investigated to provide insights into "redox mediator-iron oxide" interaction in the presence of DIRB. Two pre-incubation reaction systems of the "strain S12- goethite" and the "strain S12-AQS" were used to investigate the dynamics of goethite reduction and AQS redox transformation. Results show that the concentrations of goethite and redox mediator, and the inoculation cell density all affect the characteristics of microbial goethite reduction, kinetic transformation between oxidized and reduced species of the redox mediator. Both abiotic and biotic reactions and their coupling regulate the kinetic process for "Quinone-Iron" interaction in the presence of DIRB. Our results provide some new insights into the characteristics and mechanisms of interaction among "quinone-DIRB- goethite" under biotic/abiotic driven.

  12. Arabidopsis dehydroascorbate reductase 1 and 2 modulate redox states of ascorbate-glutathione cycle in the cytosol in response to photooxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshi, Masahiro; Yamada, Hiroki; Hatanaka, Risa; Tanabe, Noriaki; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2017-03-01

    Ascorbate and glutathione are indispensable cellular redox buffers and allow plants to acclimate stressful conditions. Arabidopsis contains three functional dehydroascorbate reductases (DHAR1-3), which catalyzes the conversion of dehydroascorbate into its reduced form using glutathione as a reductant. We herein attempted to elucidate the physiological role in DHAR1 and DHAR2 in stress responses. The total DHAR activities in DHAR knockout Arabidopsis plants, dhar1 and dhar2, were 22 and 92%, respectively, that in wild-type leaves. Under high light (HL), the levels of total ascorbate and dehydroascorbate were only reduced and increased, respectively, in dhar1. The oxidation of glutathione under HL was significantly inhibited in both dhar1 and dhar2, while glutathione contents were only enhanced in dhar1. The dhar1 showed stronger visible symptoms than the dhar2 under photooxidative stress conditions. Our results demonstrated a pivotal role of DHAR1 in the modulation of cellular redox states under photooxidative stress.

  13. β-Sitosterol enhances cellular glutathione redox cycling by reactive oxygen species generated from mitochondrial respiration: protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells and rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hoi Shan; Chen, Na; Leong, Pou Kuan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2014-07-01

    Herba Cistanches (Cistanche deserticola Y. C. Ma) is a 'Yang-invigorating' tonic herb in Chinese medicine. Preliminary chemical analysis indicated that β-sitosterol (BS) is one of the chemical constituents in an active fraction of Herba Cistanches. To investigate whether BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches, the effects of BS on H9c2 cells and rat hearts were examined. The results indicated that BS stimulated the mitochondrial ATP generation capacity in H9c2 cells, which was associated with the increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. BS also stimulated mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration, with the resultant decrease in coupling efficiency. BS produced an up-regulation of cellular glutathione redox cycling and protected against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, the protective effect of BS against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury was seen in female but not male rats ex vivo. The cardioprotection afforded by BS was likely mediated by an up-regulation of mitochondrial glutathione redox cycling in female rat hearts. In conclusion, the ensemble of results suggests that BS is an active ingredient of Herba Cistanches. The gender-dependent effect of BS on myocardial protection will further be investigated. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Exogenous quinones inhibit photosynthetic electron transfer in Chloroflexus aurantiacus by specific quenching of the excited bacteriochlorophyll c antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, N-U; Tokita, S; Matsuura, K

    1999-01-01

    In the photosynthetic green filamentous bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, excitation energy is transferred from a large bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c antenna via smaller BChl a antennas to the reaction center. The effects of substituted 1,4-naphthoquinones on BChl c and BChl a fluorescence and o...... antenna. Our results provide a model system for studying the redox-dependent antenna quenching in green sulfur bacteria because the antennas in these bacteria inherently exhibit a sensitivity to O(2) similar to the quinone-supplemented cells of Cfx. aurantiacus....

  15. Copper Toxicity Affects Photosystem II Electron Transport at the Secondary Quinone Acceptor, QB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Narendranath; Vass, Imre; Demeter, Sándor

    1989-01-01

    The nature of Cu2+ inhibition of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry in pea (Pisum sativum L.) thylakoids was investigated monitoring Hill activity and light emission properties of photosystem II. In Cu2+-inhibited thylakoids, diphenyl carbazide addition does not relieve the loss of Hill activity. The maximum yield of fluorescence induction restored by hydroxylamine in Tris-inactivated thylakoids is markedly reduced by Cu2+. This suggests that Cu2+ does not act on the donor side of PSII but on the reaction center of PSII or on components beyond. Thermoluminescence and delayed luminescence studies show that charge recombination between the positively charged intermediate in water oxidation cycle (S2) and negatively charged primary quinone acceptor of pSII (QA−) is largely unaffected by Cu2+. The S2QB− charge recombination, however, is drastically inhibited which parallels the loss of Hill activity. This indicates that Cu2+ inhibits photosystem II photochemistry primarily affecting the function of the secondary quinone electron acceptor, QB. We suggest that Cu2+ does not block electron flow between the primary and secondary quinone acceptor but modifies the QB site in such a way that it becomes unsuitable for further photosystem II photochemistry. PMID:16666731

  16. Integrating a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell into a redox flow battery for unassisted photocharging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Shichao; Zong, Xu; Seger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    photoelectrochemical reactions. Here we report an efficient SRFC based on a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell and a quinone/bromine redox flow battery for in situ solar energy conversion and storage. Using narrow bandgap silicon for efficient photon collection and fast redox couples for rapid interface charge......Solar rechargeable flow cells (SRFCs) provide an attractive approach for in situ capture and storage of intermittent solar energy via photoelectrochemical regeneration of discharged redox species for electricity generation. However, overall SFRC performance is restricted by inefficient...

  17. Insight into the kinetics and thermodynamics of the hydride transfer reactions between quinones and lumiflavin: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Clorice R; Jaglinski, Tanner C; Kastenschmidt, Ashly M; Song, Eun H; Gross, Adam K; Krause, Alyssa J; Gollmar, Jonathan M; Meise, Kristin J; Stenerson, Zachary S; Weibel, Tyler J; Dison, Andrew; Finnegan, Mackenzie R; Griesi, Daniel S; Heltne, Michael D; Hughes, Tom G; Hunt, Connor D; Jansen, Kayla A; Xiong, Adam H; Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The kinetics and equilibrium of the hydride transfer reaction between lumiflavin and a number of substituted quinones was studied using density functional theory. The impact of electron withdrawing/donating substituents on the redox potentials of quinones was studied. In addition, the role of these substituents on the kinetics of the hydride transfer reaction with lumiflavin was investigated in detail under the transition state (TS) theory assumption. The hydride transfer reactions were found to be more favorable for an electron-withdrawing substituent. The activation barrier exhibited a quadratic relationship with the driving force of these reactions as derived under the formalism of modified Marcus theory. The present study found a significant extent of electron delocalization in the TS that is stabilized by enhanced electrostatic, polarization, and exchange interactions. Analysis of geometry, bond-orders, and energetics revealed a predominant parallel (Leffler-Hammond) effect on the TS. Closer scrutiny reveals that electron-withdrawing substituents, although located on the acceptor ring, reduce the N-H bond order of the donor fragment in the precursor complex. Carried out in the gas-phase, this is the first ever report of a theoretical study of flavin's hydride transfer reactions with quinones, providing an unfiltered view of the electronic effect on the nuclear reorganization of donor-acceptor complexes.

  18. Quinone 1 e and 2 e /2 H + Reduction Potentials: Identification and Analysis of Deviations from Systematic Scaling Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh, Mioy T.; Anson, Colin W.; Cavell, Andrew C.; Stahl, Shannon S.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2016-11-10

    Quinones participate in diverse electron transfer and proton-coupled electron transfer processes in chemistry and biology. An experimental study of common quinones reveals a non-linear correlation between the 1 e and 2 e/2 H+ reduction potentials. This unexpected observation prompted a computational study of 128 different quinones, probing their 1 e reduction potentials, pKa values, and 2 e/2 H+ reduction potentials. The density functional theory calculations reveal an approximately linear correlation between these three properties and an effective Hammett constant associated with the quinone substituent(s). However, deviations from this linear scaling relationship are evident for quinones that feature halogen substituents, charged substituents, intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the hydroquinone, and/or sterically bulky substituents. These results, particularly the different substituent effects on the 1 e versus 2 e /2 H+ reduction potentials, have important implications for designing quinones with tailored redox properties.

  19. Production and Radioprotective Effects of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Xuan Yang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ was produced by fermentation of the Methylovorus sp. MP688 strain and purified by ion-exchange chromatography, crystallization and recrystallization. The yield of PQQ reached approximately 125 mg/L and highly pure PQQ was obtained. To determine the optimum dose of PQQ for radioprotection, three doses (2 mg/kg, 4 mg/kg, 8 mg/kg of PQQ were orally administrated to the experimental animals subjected to a lethal dose of 8.0 Gy in survival test. Survival of mice in the irradiation + PQQ (4 mg/kg group was found to be significantly higher in comparison with the irradiation and irradiation + nilestriol (10 mg/kg groups. The numbers of hematocytes and bone marrow cells were measured for 21 days after sublethal 4 Gy gamma-ray irradiation with per os of 4 mg/kg of PQQ. The recovery of white blood cells, reticulocytes and bone marrow cells in the irradiation + PQQ group was faster than that in the irradiation group. Furthermore, the recovery of bone marrow cell in the irradiation + PQQ group was superior to that in irradiation + nilestriol group. Our results clearly indicate favourable effects on survival under higher lethal radiation doses and the ability of pyrroloquinoline quinine to enhance haemopoietic recovery after sublethal radiation exposure.

  20. Development of Redox Metabolic Imaging Using Endogenous Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, Fuminori; Ito, Shinji; Eto, Hinako; Nakaji, Tomoko; Yasukawa, Keiji; Kobayashi, Ryoma; Utsumi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Redox metabolism plays a central role in maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. The electron transfer system in mitochondria produces ATP via endogenous redox molecules such as flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), which have flavin or quinone moieties. One-electron transfer reactions convert FMN, FAD, and CoQ10 to the free radical intermediates FMNH and FADH, and CoQ10H, respectively. Dynamic nuclear polarization-magnetic resonance imaging (DNP-MRI) allows us to visualize free radicals in vitro and in vivo. We present a spectroscopic imaging technology with DNP-MRI, which enables the imaging of multiple free radical intermediates such as FADH and CoQH. DNP-MRI can also identify various endogenous free radical intermediates derived from redox transformations.

  1. Refining the Neoproterozoic and Early Paleozoic record of carbon cycling and seawater chemistry using quantitative geochemical models of redox dynamics and carbonate diagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahm, Anne-Sofie Crüger

    This thesis explores the ancient sedimentary archive of Earth history and examines enigmatic climatic transitions that may have shaped the evolution of animal life. Much of our understanding of the climatic history of Earth is based on chemical and isotopic measurements of ancient sediments. One...... demonstrates that modern weathering processes remobilize reactive Fe in outcrop samples which leads to a loss of specific minerals phases (pyrite) and a gain of others (Fe-oxides). These results highlight the need for caution when using Fe-speciation to catalog past environment redox change from purely outcrop...... through diagenesis and provide more robust estimates for past seawater chemistry. Ancient carbonate rocks with extreme negative carbon isotopes are found worldwide bracketing the Marinoan glaciation (∼635 Ma). There is no scientific consensus as to whether these excursions originate from a primary...

  2. Synthesis of polypyrrole within the cell wall of yeast by redox-cycling of [Fe(CN)6](3-)/[Fe(CN)6](4-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanavicius, Arunas; Andriukonis, Eivydas; Stirke, Arunas; Mikoliunaite, Lina; Balevicius, Zigmas; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Yeast cells are often used as a model system in various experiments. Moreover, due to their high metabolic activity, yeast cells have a potential to be applied as elements in the design of biofuel cells and biosensors. However a wider application of yeast cells in electrochemical systems is limited due to high electric resistance of their cell wall. In order to reduce this problem we have polymerized conducting polymer polypyrrole (Ppy) directly in the cell wall and/or within periplasmic membrane. In this research the formation of Ppy was induced by [Fe(CN)6](3-)ions, which were generated from K4[Fe(CN)6], which was initially added to polymerization solution. The redox process was catalyzed by oxido-reductases, which are present in the plasma membrane of yeast cells. The formation of Ppy was confirmed by spectrophotometry and atomic force microscopy. It was confirmed that the conducting polymer polypyrrole was formed within periplasmic space and/or within the cell wall of yeast cells, which were incubated in solution containing pyrrole, glucose and [Fe(CN)6](4-). After 24h drying at room temperature we have observed that Ppy-modified yeast cell walls retained their initial spherical form. In contrast to Ppy-modified cells, the walls of unmodified yeast have wrinkled after 24h drying. The viability of yeast cells in the presence of different pyrrole concentrations has been evaluated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fe3 O4 nanoparticle redox system modulation via cell-cycle progression and gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Vaiyapuri S; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alhazmi, Mohammad; Alatiah, Khalid A; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2016-08-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) across multiple fields and applications has rapidly increased over the last decade owing to their unusual properties. However, there is an increased need in understanding their toxicological effect on human health. Particularly, iron oxide (Fe3 O4 ) have been used in various sectors, including biomedical, food, and agriculture, but the current understanding of their impact on human health is inadequate. In this investigation, we assessed the toxic effect of Fe3 O4 NPs on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) adopting cell viability, cellular morphological changes, mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and cell-cycle progression assessment methodologies. Furthermore, the expression of oxidative stress, cell death, and cell-cycle regulatory genes was assessed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The Fe3 O4 NPs induced cytotoxicity and nuclear morphological changes in hMSCs by dose and time exposure. Cell-cycle analysis indicated that Fe3 O4 NPs altered the cell-cycle progression through a decrease in the proportion of cells in the G0 -G1 phase. The hMSC mitochondrial membrane potential loss increased with an increase in the concentration of Fe3 O4 NPs exposure. The observed expression levels of the CYP1A, TNF3, TNFSF10, E2F1, and CCNC genes were significantly upregulated in hMSCs in response to Fe3 O4 NPs exposure. Our findings suggest that Fe3 O4 NPs caused metabolic stress through altered cell cycle, oxidative stress, and cell death regulatory gene expression in hMSCs. The results of this investigation revealed that Fe3 O4 NPs exhibited moderate toxicity on hMSCs and that Fe3 O4 NPs may have biomedical applications at low concentrations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 901-912, 2016.

  4. Quinones as Strecker degradation reagents in wine oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla Maria; Santos, Sónia A O; Silvestre, Armando J D; Barros, António S; Ferreira, António César Silva; Silva, Artur M S

    2017-08-01

    The Strecker aldehydes formed during the reaction between α-amino acids (phenylalanine or methionine) and either gallic acid, caffeic acid or (+)-catechin ortho-quinones were evaluated in wine-model systems. It was demonstrated that phenylacetaldehyde was formed by quinone intermediates at wine pH. The highest amounts of phenylacetaldehyde during the 10days of experiment (69±5µg/L/day; 7x>Control) were obtained from (+) catechin, followed by gallic acid (61±4µg/L/day; 6x>Control) and caffeic acid (41±4µg/L/day; 4x>Control). The intermediate structures delivered from the reaction of ortho-quinones with α-amino acids were demonstrated by MS(n). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quinones as Electron Acceptors and Redox Mediators for the Anaerobic Biotransformation of Priority Pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes-Carillo, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Humus is the most abundant organic fraction in the biosphere. It is composed of a complex structure in which recalcitrant polymers prevail with a residence time lasting decades or even centuries. Despite the recalcitrance of humic substances, they have recently been recognized to play an important r

  6. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopic investigation on quinones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Well resolved far-infrared spectra of 1,4-benzoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9, 10-anthraquinonme in polycrystalline form have been measured with terahertz time domain spectroscopy at room tem- perature. The characterizations of power absorption and index of refraction in the frequency range 0.3 -2.0 THz are presented. Theoretical calculation is applied to assist the analysis and assignment of individual THz absorption spectra of the p-quinones with semiempirical AM1, Hartree-Fock (HF), and density functional theory (DFT) method. Observed THz responses are assigned to the translational and torsional vibrations of p-quinone dimer held together by weak hydrogen bonds.

  7. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopic investigation on quinones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Min; ZHAO HongWei; WANG WenFeng; YU XiaoHan; LI WenXin

    2008-01-01

    Well resolved far-infrared spectra of 1,4-benzoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9, 10-anthraquinonme in polycrystalline form have been measured with terahertz time domain spectroscopy at room tem-perature. The characterizations of power absorption and index of refraction in the frequency range 0.3 -2.0 THz are presented. Theoretical calculation is applied to assist the analysis and assignment of individual THz absorption spectra of the p-quinones with semiempirical AM1, Hartree-Fock (HF), and density functional theory (DFT) method. Observed THz responses are assigned to the translational and torsional vibrations of p-quinone dimer held together by weak hydrogen bonds.

  8. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang, E-mail: songyangwenrong@hotmail.com

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  9. Redox cycling of a copper complex with benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone contributes to its enhanced antitumor activity, but no change in the mechanism of action occurs after chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinli; Li, Cuiping; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Zhou, Pingxin; Yuan, Yanbin; Zhou, Sufeng; Li, Shaoshan; Li, Changzheng

    2016-03-01

    Many anticancer drugs used in the clinical have potent metal chelating ability. The formed metal complex(es) may exhibit improved (or antagonistic) antitumor activity. However, the underlying mechanism has received limited attention. Therefore, investigation of the mechanism involved in the change upon chelation is required to extend our understanding of the effects of various drugs. In the present study, the proliferation inhibition effect of benzaldehyde nitrogen mustard-2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (BNMPH) and its copper complex on tumor cell lines was investigated. The copper chelate exhibited almost a 10-fold increase in antitumor activity (with IC50 copper complex induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and caused upregulation of caspase 8 and Bax as well as the downregulation of Bcl-2, indicating that apoptosis was involved in the cytotoxic effects. DNA fragmentation noted in the comet assay further supported ROS involvement. The present study indicated that BNMPH and its copper complex effectively induced S phase arrest and the cell cycle arrest was associated with the downregulation of cyclin D1. The formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) and an increase in cleaved LC3-II demonstrated that autophagy occurred in the HepG2 cells treated with the agents. Taken together, BNMPH and its copper complex exhibited proliferation inhibition via apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and autophagy, which was dependent on ROS. The enhanced antitumor activity of the copper complex was due to its redox-cycling ability, but the mechanism was not altered compared to BNMPH. Our findings may significantly contribute to the understanding of the anti-proliferative effect of BNMPH and its copper complex.

  10. Redox potential tuning by redox-inactive cations in nature's water oxidizing catalyst and synthetic analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewald, Vera; Neese, Frank; Pantazis, Dimitrios A

    2016-04-28

    The redox potential of synthetic oligonuclear transition metal complexes has been shown to correlate with the Lewis acidity of a redox-inactive cation connected to the redox-active transition metals of the cluster via oxo or hydroxo bridges. Such heterometallic clusters are important cofactors in many metalloenzymes, where it is speculated that the redox-inactive constituent ion of the cluster serves to optimize its redox potential for electron transfer or catalysis. A principal example is the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of natural photosynthesis, a Mn4CaO5 cofactor that oxidizes water into dioxygen, protons and electrons. Calcium is critical for catalytic function, but its precise role is not yet established. In analogy to synthetic complexes it has been suggested that Ca(2+) fine-tunes the redox potential of the manganese cluster. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by computing the relative redox potentials of substituted derivatives of the oxygen-evolving complex with the cations Sr(2+), Gd(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), Mg(2+), Sc(3+), Na(+) and Y(3+) for two sequential transitions of its catalytic cycle. The theoretical approach is validated with a series of experimentally well-characterized Mn3AO4 cubane complexes that are structural mimics of the enzymatic cluster. Our results reproduce perfectly the experimentally observed correlation between the redox potential and the Lewis acidities of redox-inactive cations for the synthetic complexes. However, it is conclusively demonstrated that this correlation does not hold for the oxygen evolving complex. In the enzyme the redox potential of the cluster only responds to the charge of the redox-inactive cations and remains otherwise insensitive to their precise identity, precluding redox-tuning of the metal cluster as a primary role for Ca(2+) in biological water oxidation.

  11. Hydrogen production from a combination of the water-gas shift and redox cycle process of methane partial oxidation via lattice oxygen over LaFeO3 perovskite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao Ping; Wu, Qiong; Li, Ran Jia; Yu, Chang Chun; Hao, Zheng Ping

    2006-12-28

    A redox cycle process, in which CH4 and air are periodically brought into contact with a solid oxide packed in a fixed-bed reactor, combined with the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, is proposed for hydrogen production. The sole oxidant for partial oxidation of methane (POM) is found to be lattice oxygen instead of gaseous oxygen. A perovskite-type LaFeO3 oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method and employed as an oxygen storage material in this process. The results indicate that, under appropriate reaction conditions, methane can be oxidized to CO and H2 by the lattice oxygen of LaFeO3 perovskite oxide with a selectivity higher than 95% and the consumed lattice oxygen can be replenished in a reoxidation procedure by a redox operation. It is suggested that the POM to H2/CO by using the lattice oxygen of the oxygen storage materials instead of gaseous oxygen should be possibly applicable. The LaFeO3 perovskite oxide maintained relatively high catalytic activity and structural stability, while the carbonaceous deposits, which come from the dissociation of CH4 in the pulse reaction, occurred due to the low migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. A new dissociation-oxidation mechanism for this POM without gaseous oxygen is proposed based on the transient responses of the products checked at different surface states via both pulse reaction and switch reaction over the LaFeO3 catalyst. In the absence of gaseous-phase oxygen, the rate-determining step of methane conversion is the migration rate of lattice oxygen, but the process can be carried out in optimized cycles. The product distribution for POM over LaFeO3 catalyst in the absence of gaseous oxygen was determined by the concentration of surface oxygen, which is relevant with the migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. This process of hydrogen production via selective oxidation of methane by lattice oxygen is better in avoiding the deep oxidation (to CO2) and

  12. The regioselectivity of glutathione adduct formation with flavonoid quinone methides is pH-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Boeren, S.; Vervoort, J.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, the formation of glutathionyl adducts from a series of 3',4'-dihydroxy flavonoid o-quinone/p-quinone methides was investigated with special emphasis on the regioselectivity of the glutathione addition as a function of pH. The flavonoid o-quinones were generated using

  13. The regioselectivity of glutathione adduct formation with flavonoid quinone methides is pH-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Awad, H.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Boeren, S.; Vervoort, J.; Bladeren, van P.J.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, the formation of glutathionyl adducts from a series of 3',4'-dihydroxy flavonoid o-quinone/p-quinone methides was investigated with special emphasis on the regioselectivity of the glutathione addition as a function of pH. The flavonoid o-quinones were generated using horseradis

  14. Two New Abietane Quinones from Isodon lophanthoides var. Micranthus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The structures of two new abietane quinones, named micranthins A and B, weredetermined to be 7α-methoxy-14, 16-epoxy-8, 13-abietadiene-11, 12-dione (1) and 16-acetoxy-6,7-dehydroroyleanone (2) respectively, which were isolated from Isodon lophanthoides var.micranthus.

  15. Structural requirements of pyrroloquinoline quinone dependent enzymatic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oubrie, Arthur; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of crystal structures of the pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) dependent enzymes methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) and soluble glucose dehydrogenase (s-GDH), different catalytic mechanisms have been proposed. However, several lines of biochemical and kinetic evidence are strikingly similar for

  16. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  17. The influence of the biological pump on ocean chemistry: implications for long-term trends in marine redox chemistry, the global carbon cycle, and marine animal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K M; Ridgwell, A; Payne, J L

    2016-05-01

    The net export of organic matter from the surface ocean and its respiration at depth create vertical gradients in nutrient and oxygen availability that play a primary role in structuring marine ecosystems. Changes in the properties of this 'biological pump' have been hypothesized to account for important shifts in marine ecosystem structure, including the Cambrian explosion. However, the influence of variation in the behavior of the biological pump on ocean biogeochemistry remains poorly quantified, preventing any detailed exploration of how changes in the biological pump over geological time may have shaped long-term shifts in ocean chemistry, biogeochemical cycling, and ecosystem structure. Here, we use a 3-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity to quantitatively explore the effects of the biological pump on marine chemistry. We find that when respiration of sinking organic matter is efficient, due to slower sinking or higher respiration rates, anoxia tends to be more prevalent and to occur in shallower waters. Consequently, the Phanerozoic trend toward less bottom-water anoxia in continental shelf settings can potentially be explained by a change in the spatial dynamics of nutrient cycling rather than by any change in the ocean phosphate inventory. The model results further suggest that the Phanerozoic decline in the prevalence ocean anoxia is, in part, a consequence of the evolution of larger phytoplankton, many of which produce mineralized tests. We hypothesize that the Phanerozoic trend toward greater animal abundance and metabolic demand was driven more by increased oxygen concentrations in shelf environments than by greater food (nutrient) availability. In fact, a lower-than-modern ocean phosphate inventory in our closed system model is unable to account for the Paleozoic prevalence of bottom-water anoxia. Overall, these model simulations suggest that the changing spatial distribution of photosynthesis and respiration in the oceans has

  18. Removal of bisphenol derivatives through quinone oxidation by polyphenol oxidase and subsequent quinone adsorption on chitosan in the heterogeneous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuji; Takahashi, Ayumi; Kashiwada, Ayumi; Yamada, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the combined use of a biopolymer chitosan and an oxidoreductase polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was systematically investigated for the removal of bisphenol derivatives from aqueous medium. The process parameters, such as the pH value, temperature, and PPO concentration, were estimated to conduct the enzymatic quinone oxidation of bisphenol derivatives by as little enzyme as possible. Bisphenol derivatives effectively underwent PPO-catalysed quinone oxidation without H2O2 unlike other oxidoreductases, such as peroxidase and tyrosinase, and the optimum conditions were determined to be pH 7.0 and 40°C for bisphenol B, bisphenol E, bisphenol O, and bisphenol Z; pH 7.0 and 30°C for bisphenol C and bisphenol F; and pH 8.0 and 40°C for bisphenol T. They were completely removed through adsorption of enzymatically generated quinone derivatives on chitosan beads or chitosan powders. Quinone adsorption on chitosan beads or chitosan powders in the heterogeneous system was found to be a more effective procedure than generation of aggregates in the homogeneous system with chitosan solution. The removal time was shortened by increasing the amount of chitosan beads or decreasing the size of the chitosan powders.

  19. Transition metal complexes as mediator-titrants in protein redox potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul V; Chen, Kuan-I; Sharpe, Philip C

    2006-10-01

    A selection of nine macrocyclic Fe(III/II) and Co(III/II) transition metal complexes has been chosen to serve as a universal set of mediator-titrants in redox potentiometry of protein samples. The potential range spanned by these mediators is approximately from +300 to -700 mV vs the normal hydrogen electrode, which covers the range of most protein redox potentials accessible in aqueous solution. The complexes employed exhibit stability in both their oxidized and their reduced forms as well as pH-independent redox potentials within the range 6 < pH < 9. The mediators were also chosen on the basis of their very weak visible absorption maxima in both oxidation states, which will enable (for the first time) optical redox potentiometric titrations of proteins with relatively low extinction coefficients. This has previously been impractical with organic mediators, such as indoles, viologens and quinones, whose optical spectra interfere strongly with those of the protein.

  20. DOC-dynamics in a small headwater catchment as driven by redox fluctuations and hydrological flow paths - are DOC exports mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, K.-H.

    2013-02-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) exports from many catchments in Europe and North-America are steadily increasing. Several studies have sought to explain this observation. As possible causes, a decrease in acid rain or sulfate deposition, concomitant reductions in ionic strength and increasing temperatures were identified. DOC often originates from riparian wetlands; but here, despite higher DOC concentrations, ionic strength in pore waters usually exceeds that in surface waters. In the catchment under study, DOC concentrations were synchronous with dissolved iron concentrations in pore and stream water. This study aims at testing the hypothesis that DOC exports are mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles. Following the observed hydrographs, δ18O of water and DOC fluorescence, the wetlands were identified as the main source of DOC. Antecedent biogeochemical conditions, i.e., water table levels in the wetlands, influenced the discharge patterns of nitrate, iron and DOC during an event. The correlation of DOC with pH was positive in pore waters, but negative in surface waters; it was negative for DOC with sulfate in pore waters, but only weak in surface waters. Though, the positive correlation of DOC with iron was universal for pore and surface water. The decline of DOC and iron concentrations in transition from anoxic wetland pore water to oxic stream water suggests a flocculation of DOC with oxidising iron, leading to a drop in pH in the stream during high DOC fluxes. The pore water did not per se differ in pH. There is, thus, a need to consider processes more thoroughly of DOC mobilisation in wetlands when interpreting DOC exports from catchments. The coupling of DOC with iron fluxes suggested that increased DOC exports could at least, in part, be caused by increasing activities in iron reduction, possibly due to increases in temperature, increasing wetness of riparian wetlands, or by a shift from sulfate dominated to iron reduction dominated biogeochemical

  1. DOC-dynamics in a small headwater catchment as driven by redox fluctuations and hydrological flow paths – are DOC exports mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Knorr

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic carbon (DOC exports from many catchments in Europe and North-America are steadily increasing. Several studies have sought to explain this observation. As possible causes, a decrease in acid rain or sulfate deposition, concomitant reductions in ionic strength and increasing temperatures were identified. DOC often originates from riparian wetlands; but here, despite higher DOC concentrations, ionic strength in pore waters usually exceeds that in surface waters. In the catchment under study, DOC concentrations were synchronous with dissolved iron concentrations in pore and stream water. This study aims at testing the hypothesis that DOC exports are mediated by iron reduction/oxidation cycles. Following the observed hydrographs, δ18O of water and DOC fluorescence, the wetlands were identified as the main source of DOC. Antecedent biogeochemical conditions, i.e., water table levels in the wetlands, influenced the discharge patterns of nitrate, iron and DOC during an event. The correlation of DOC with pH was positive in pore waters, but negative in surface waters; it was negative for DOC with sulfate in pore waters, but only weak in surface waters. Though, the positive correlation of DOC with iron was universal for pore and surface water. The decline of DOC and iron concentrations in transition from anoxic wetland pore water to oxic stream water suggests a flocculation of DOC with oxidising iron, leading to a drop in pH in the stream during high DOC fluxes. The pore water did not per se differ in pH. There is, thus, a need to consider processes more thoroughly of DOC mobilisation in wetlands when interpreting DOC exports from catchments. The coupling of DOC with iron fluxes suggested that increased DOC exports could at least, in part, be caused by increasing activities in iron reduction, possibly due to increases in temperature, increasing wetness of riparian wetlands, or by a shift from sulfate dominated to iron

  2. Synthesis and Charge Transport Properties of Polymers Derived from Oxidation of 1-H-1’(6-pyrrol-1-yl)-hexyl-4,4’-bipyridinium Bis-hexafluorophosphate and Demonstration of a pH Sensitive Microelectrochemical Transistor Derived from the Redox Properties of a Conventional Redox Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-15

    platinized poly(3- methylthiophene), 7b a viologen /quinone polymer, 9 ferrocyanide-loaded protonated poly(4-vinylpyridine),10 and electroactive metal...number) FiELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Microelectrode array, redox polymer, polypyrrole, viologen 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by...electrochemical properties of redox polymers, having a poly- pyrrole backbone and viologen subunits, derived from oxidative electropolymerization of l

  3. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T; O'Malley, Patrick J; Wraight, Colin A; Dikanov, Sergei A

    2013-07-09

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones (13)C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the (13)C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-25°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes.

  4. Conformational differences between the methoxy groups of QA and QB site ubisemiquinones in bacterial reaction centers: a key role for methoxy group orientation in modulating ubiquinone redox potential†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Alexander T.; O'Malley, Patrick J.; Wraight, Colin A.; Dikanov, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquinone is an almost universal, membrane-associated redox mediator. Its ability to accept either one or two electrons allows it to function in critical roles in biological electron transport. The redox properties of ubiquinone in vivo are determined by its environment in the binding sites of proteins and by the dihedral angle of each methoxy group relative to the ring plane. This is an attribute unique to ubiquinone among natural quinones and could account for its widespread function with many different redox complexes. In this work, we use the photosynthetic reaction center as a model system for understanding the role of methoxy conformations in determining the redox potential of the ubiquinone/semiquinone couple. Despite the abundance of X-ray crystal structures for the reaction center, quinone site resolution has thus far been too low to provide a reliable measure of the methoxy dihedral angles of the primary and secondary quinones, QA and QB. We performed 2D ESEEM (HYSCORE) on isolated reaction centers with ubiquinones 13C-labeled at the headgroup methyl and methoxy substituents, and have measured the 13C isotropic and anisotropic components of the hyperfine tensors. Hyperfine couplings were compared to those derived by DFT calculations as a function of methoxy torsional angle allowing estimation of the methoxy dihedral angles for the semiquinones in the QA and QB sites. Based on this analysis, the orientation of the 2-methoxy groups are distinct in the two sites, with QB more out of plane by 20-30°. This corresponds to an ≈50 meV larger electron affinity for the QB quinone, indicating a substantial contribution to the experimental difference in redox potentials (60-75 mV) of the two quinones. The methods developed here can be readily extended to ubiquinone-binding sites in other protein complexes. PMID:23745576

  5. Study of quinones reactions with wine nucleophiles by cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla M; Barros, António S; Ferreira, António C S; Silva, Artur M S

    2016-11-15

    Quinones are electrophilic species which can react with various nucleophiles, like wine antioxidants, such as sulfur dioxide or ascorbic acid, thiols, amino acids, and numerous polyphenols. These reactions are very important in wine aging because they mediate oxygen reactions during both production and bottle aging phases. In this work, the major challenge was to determine the interaction between ortho-quinones and wine nucleophiles (amino acids, thiols, and the antioxidants SO2 and ascorbic acid), by cyclic voltammetry. Wine-model solutions with gallic acid, caffeic acid, or (+)-catechin and nucleophilic compounds were used. To understand the effect of nucleophilic addition in wine, a white wine with the same added nucleophiles was also analysed. Cyclic voltammograms were taken with glassy carbon electrode or screen-printed carbon electrodes, respectively, for wine-model and white wines solutions, in the absence and in the presence of nucleophiles. A nucleophilic order profile related to the cathodic current intensity decrease was observed.

  6. Quinone-Enriched Gold Nanoparticles in Bioelectrochemistry and Charge Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michal; Qvortrup, Katrine; Tanner, David Ackland

    We are aiming at the development of a general electrochemical platform suitable for multifarious investigations of biogenic materials. The new platform can be attained by grafting organic/metal hybrids with quinone functionality. In-house made and customized anthraquinone derivatives (with linking...... groups ranging from thiophenes to thiols) were chosen as model compounds for linking together bulk quantities of gold nanoparticles and providing desired functionality. Anthraquinone thiophene and thiol derivatives were synthetized via Sonogashira coupling-type reactions. The synthetic pathways...... for merging gold nanoparticles with resultant anthraquinones include one-pot microwave assisted synthesis or after-mixing of separately prepared gold nanoparticles with selected compounds. The quinone-enriched gold nanoparticles can be transferred onto different electrode surfaces, thus enabling facile...

  7. Two new quinones from the roots of Juglans mandshurica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Mei; Sun, Jinfeng; Li, Ren; Diao, Shengbao; Zhang, Changhao; Cui, Jiongmo; Son, Jong-Keun; Zhou, Wei; Li, Gao

    2016-09-01

    Two new quinones, 1-hydroxy-5-pentyl-anthraquinone (1) and 4-(5-hydroxy-1,4-dioxo-1,4-dihydro-naphthalen-2-ylamino)-butyric acid methyl ester (2), together with two known quinones, 5-hydroxy-2-(2-hydroxy-ethylamino)-(1,4) naphthoquinone (3) and juglone (4) were isolated from the roots of Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectral data. Compound 3 was isolated from the Juglans genus for the first time. Compounds 1-4 exhibited significant cytotoxicity towards cultured MDA-MB231, HepG2 and SNU638 cells with IC50 values ranging from 4.46 to 88.47 μM.

  8. Selective synthesis of the para-quinone region of geldanamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrus, Merritt B; Hicken, Erik J; Meredith, Erik L; Simmons, Bryon L; Cannon, John F

    2003-10-16

    [structure: see text] The quinone portion of the ansamycin geldanamycin was made with complete selectivity from the 1,4-dihydroquinone generated from a 1,4-bis-methoxymethyl (MOM) ether intermediate. Palladium catalysis with air gave the desired product in 98% isolated yield. The structure was established using NMR, UV, and X-ray analysis with comparisons to geldanamycin, ortho-quino-geldanamycin and a model compound.

  9. Soluble and stable zethrenebis(dicarboximide) and its quinone

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Zhe

    2010-10-15

    Soluble and stable zethrenebis(dicarboximide) (1) was synthesized by an in situ Stille cross coupling/transannular cyclization reaction. 1 showed largely improved photostability and solubility compared with the very unstable zethrene and it also exhibited far-red absorption and emission with high photoluminescence quantum yield. Bromination of 1 with NBS/DMF gave its quinone form 2 via an unusual pathway. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Biogeochemical redox processes and their impact on contaminant dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borch, Thomas; Kretzschmar, Ruben; Kappler, Andreas; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew; Campbell, Kate M.

    2010-01-01

    Life and element cycling on Earth is directly related to electron transfer (or redox) reactions. An understanding of biogeochemical redox processes is crucial for predicting and protecting environmental health and can provide new opportunities for engineered remediation strategies. Energy can be released and stored by means of redox reactions via the oxidation of labile organic carbon or inorganic compounds (electron donors) by microorganisms coupled to the reduction of electron acceptors including humic substances, iron-bearing minerals, transition metals, metalloids, and actinides. Environmental redox processes play key roles in the formation and dissolution of mineral phases. Redox cycling of naturally occurring trace elements and their host minerals often controls the release or sequestration of inorganic contaminants. Redox processes control the chemical speciation, bioavailability, toxicity, and mobility of many major and trace elements including Fe, Mn, C, P, N, S, Cr, Cu, Co, As, Sb, Se, Hg, Tc, and U. Redox-active humic substances and mineral surfaces can catalyze the redox transformation and degradation of organic contaminants. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of biogeochemical redox processes and their impact on contaminant fate and transport, including future research needs.

  11. Simulating hypoxia-induced acidic environment in cancer cells facilitates mobilization and redox-cycling of genomic copper by daidzein leading to pro-oxidant cell death: implications for the sensitization of resistant hypoxic cancer cells to therapeutic challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mohammad F; Ahmad, Aamir; Bhat, Showket H; Khan, Husain Y; Zubair, Haseeb; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Hadi, Sheikh M

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of action involved in the anti-cancer activity of daidzein and identification of cancer specific micro-environment as therapeutic target of this secondary metabolite derived from soy. Our data indicated that daidzein induces cellular DNA breakage, anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. We demonstrated that such a daidzein-induced anti-cancer action involves a copper-dependant pathway in which endogenous copper is mobilized by daidzein and redox-cycled to generate reactive oxygen species which act as an upstream signal leading to pro-oxidant cell death. Further in the context of hypoxia being a resistant factor against standard therapies and that an effect secondary to hypoxia is the intracellular acidification, we show that the anticancer activity of daidzein is modulated positively in acidic pH but copper-specific chelator is still able to inhibit daidzein activity. Moreover, an experimental setup of hypoxia mimic (cobalt chloride) revealed an enhanced sensitivity of cancer cells to the cytotoxic effects of daidzein which was neutralized in the presence of neocuproine. The findings support a paradigm shift from the conventional antioxidant property of dietary isoflavones to molecules capable of initiating a pro-oxidant signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species. Further, the clinical relevance of such an action mechanism in cancer chemoprevention is also proposed. This study identified endogenous copper as a molecular target and acidic pH as a modulating factor for the therapeutic activity of daidzein against cancer. The evidence presented highlights the potential of dietary agents as adjuvants to standard therapeutic regimens.

  12. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator......The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... metabolic pathways and for optimizing chloroplast functions. The redox poise of photosynthetic electron transport components like plastoquinone is crucial to initiate signaling cascades and might also be involved in key biosynthetic pathways such as chlorophyll biosynthesis. We, therefore, explored...

  13. Role of the NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase NQR and the cytochrome b AIR12 in controlling superoxide generation at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniek, Catherine; Heyno, Eiri; Kruk, Jerzy; Sparla, Francesca; Trost, Paolo; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-04-01

    The quinone reductase NQR and the b-type cytochrome AIR12 of the plasma membrane are important for the control of reactive oxygen species in the apoplast. AIR12 and NQR are two proteins attached to the plant plasma membrane which may be important for generating and controlling levels of reactive oxygen species in the apoplast. AIR12 (Auxin Induced in Root culture) is a single gene of Arabidopsis that codes for a mono-heme cytochrome b. The NADPH quinone oxidoreductase NQR is a two-electron-transferring flavoenzyme that contributes to the generation of O 2(•-) in isolated plasma membranes. A. thaliana double knockout plants of both NQR and AIR12 generated more O 2(•-) and germinated faster than the single mutant affected in AIR12. To test whether NQR and AIR12 are able to interact functionally, recombinant purified proteins were added to plasma membranes isolated from soybean hypocotyls. In vitro NADH-dependent O 2(•-) production at the plasma membrane in the presence of NQR was reduced upon addition of AIR12. Electron donation from semi-reduced menadione to AIR12 was shown to take place. Biochemical analysis showed that purified plasma membrane from soybean hypocotyls or roots contained phylloquinone and menaquinone-4 as redox carriers. This is the first report on the occurrence of menaquinone-4 in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. We propose that NQR and AIR12 interact via the quinone, allowing an electron transfer from cytosolic NAD(P)H to apoplastic monodehydroascorbate and control thereby the level of reactive oxygen production and the redox state of the apoplast.

  14. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy consuming redox circuit

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+:NADH) and anabolic (NADP+:NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homeostasis however is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling, mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to...

  15. Design and Synthesis of Novel Isoxazole Tethered Quinone-Amino Acid Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravi Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new series of isoxazole tethered quinone-amino acid hybrids has been designed and synthesized involving 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction followed by an oxidation reaction using cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN. Using this method, for the first time various isoxazole tethered quinone-phenyl alanine and quinone-alanine hybrids were synthesized from simple commercially available 4-bromobenzyl bromide, propargyl bromide, and 2,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde in good yield.

  16. Compositions comprising a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinlan, Jason; Xu, Feng; Sweeney, Matthew

    2017-09-05

    The present invention relates to compositions comprising: a polypeptide having cellulolytic enhancing activity and a quinone compound. The present invention also relates to methods of using the compositions.

  17. Integrating a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell into a redox flow battery for unassisted photocharging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shichao; Zong, Xu; Seger, Brian; Pedersen, Thomas; Yao, Tingting; Ding, Chunmei; Shi, Jingying; Chen, Jian; Li, Can

    2016-05-04

    Solar rechargeable flow cells (SRFCs) provide an attractive approach for in situ capture and storage of intermittent solar energy via photoelectrochemical regeneration of discharged redox species for electricity generation. However, overall SFRC performance is restricted by inefficient photoelectrochemical reactions. Here we report an efficient SRFC based on a dual-silicon photoelectrochemical cell and a quinone/bromine redox flow battery for in situ solar energy conversion and storage. Using narrow bandgap silicon for efficient photon collection and fast redox couples for rapid interface charge injection, our device shows an optimal solar-to-chemical conversion efficiency of ∼5.9% and an overall photon-chemical-electricity energy conversion efficiency of ∼3.2%, which, to our knowledge, outperforms previously reported SRFCs. The proposed SRFC can be self-photocharged to 0.8 V and delivers a discharge capacity of 730 mAh l(-1). Our work may guide future designs for highly efficient solar rechargeable devices.

  18. Redox kinetics of adriamycin adsorbed on the surface of graphite and mercury electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorsky-Lovrić, Sebojka

    2006-09-01

    Kinetics of the surface redox reactions of adriamycin (doxorubicin hydrochloride) adsorbed on paraffin-impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and on mercury electrode is measured by square-wave voltammetry. In 0.9 mol/L KNO3 buffered to pH 4.65, the standard electrode reaction rate constants of the first quinone/hydroquinone redox couple (see Scheme 2) on PIGE and mercury are k(s1)=49+/-12 s(-1) and k(s1)=147+/-36 s(-1), respectively. Under the same conditions, the standard rate constant of the second redox couple on the PIGE is smaller than 4 s(-1) and the electron transfer coefficient of the reduction is alpha2=0.35.

  19. Chloroplast Redox Poise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steccanella, Verdiana

    The redox state of the chloroplast is maintained by a delicate balance between energy production and consumption and is affected by the need to avoid increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Redox power and ROS generated in the chloroplast are essential for maintaining physiological...... the redox status of the plastoquinone pool and chlorophyll biosynthesis. Furthermore, in the plant cell, the equilibrium between redox reactions and ROS signals is also maintained by various balancing mechanisms among which the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin system (TR-Trx) stands out as a mediator...... it lacks some of the key enzymes for ROS scavenging and it is the only, so far, known species to have two NTRC genes. Our aim was to elucidate the role of the two NTRC isoforms found in moss as an alternative system for protection against oxidative damage, providing the first partial attempt of a molecular...

  20. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated.

  1. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. A novel coumarin-quinone derivative SV37 inhibits CDC25 phosphatases, impairs proliferation, and induces cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bana, Emilie; Sibille, Estelle; Valente, Sergio; Cerella, Claudia; Chaimbault, Patrick; Kirsch, Gilbert; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc; Bagrel, Denyse

    2015-03-01

    Cell division cycle (CDC) 25 proteins are key phosphatases regulating cell cycle transition and proliferation by regulating CDK/cyclin complexes. Overexpression of these enzymes is frequently observed in cancer and is related to aggressiveness, high-grade tumors and poor prognosis. Thus, targeting CDC25 by compounds, able to inhibit their activity, appears a good therapeutic approach. Here, we describe the synthesis of a new inhibitor (SV37) whose structure is based on both coumarin and quinone moieties. An analytical in vitro approach shows that this compound efficiently inhibits all three purified human CDC25 isoforms (IC50 1-9 µM) in a mixed-type mode. Moreover, SV37 inhibits growth of breast cancer cell lines. In MDA-MB-231 cells, reactive oxygen species generation is followed by pCDK accumulation, a mark of CDC25 dysfunction. Eventually, SV37 treatment leads to activation of apoptosis and DNA cleavage, underlining the potential of this new type of coumarin-quinone structure.

  3. Electron transfer between iron minerals and quinones: estimating the reduction potential of the Fe(II)-goethite surface from AQDS speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsetti, Silvia; Laskov, Christine; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2013-12-17

    Redox reactions at iron mineral surfaces play an important role in controlling biogeochemical processes of natural porous media such as sediments, soils and aquifers, especially in the presence of recurrent variations in redox conditions. Ferrous iron associated with iron mineral phases forms highly reactive species and is regarded as a key factor in determining pathways, rates, and extent of chemically and microbially driven electron transfer processes across the iron mineral-water interface. Due to their transient nature and heterogeneity a detailed characterization of such surface bound Fe(II) species in terms of redox potential is still missing. To this end, we used the nonsorbing anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) as a redox probe and studied the thermodynamics of its redox reactions in heterogeneous iron systems, namely goethite-Fe(II). Our results provide a thermodynamic basis for and are consistent with earlier observations on the ability of AQDS to "shuttle" electrons between microbes and iron oxide minerals. On the basis of equilibrium AQDS speciation we reported for the first time robust reduction potential measurements of reactive iron species present at goethite in aqueous systems (EH,Fe-GT ≈ -170 mV). Due to the high redox buffer intensity of heterogeneous mixed valent iron systems, this value might be characteristic for many iron-reducing environments in the subsurface at circumneutral pH. Our results corroborate the picture of a dynamic remodelling of Fe(II)/Fe(III) surface sites at goethite in response to oxidation/reduction events. As quinones play an essential role in the electron transport systems of microbes, the proposed method can be considered as a biomimetic approach to determine "effective" biogeochemical reduction potentials in heterogeneous iron systems.

  4. Redox Transformations of Mercury in Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyot, M.

    2007-12-01

    Wetlands are valued for their high biodiversity and for their ecosystem services. However, we still have a poor understanding of their role in the redox transformation of contaminants such as mercury. We first propose a brief overview of past studies conducted on wetlands from different latitudes. In most instances, photochemical processes are determinant in the upper portion of the water column. At the sediment/water interface, evidence is currently supporting a significant contribution of bacterial communities, as promoters of Hg(II) reduction, particularly in the presence of anoxia. A multi-year study was recently conducted on Hg redox cycling in a fluvial wetland of the St. Lawrence River, where wetland restoration could have unintended consequences. In addition to photochemistry and bacterial reduction, Hg redox cycling was affected by epiphytes living on macrophytes, through adsorption/absorption processes. Redox studies such as this one have been historically seen as having implication for water/air flux studies, since Hg(0) is volatile. We here also discuss the potential bioavailability of Hg(0) towards bacteria. An emerging axis of our wetland research effort deals with beaver dams, which are in expansion and shown to produce high levels of methylHg

  5. Crystal structure and characterization of pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikemoto Kazuto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, a tricarboxylic acid, has attracted attention as a growth factor, and its application to supplements and cosmetics is underway. The product used for these purposes is a water-soluble salt of PQQ disodium. Although in the past, PQQ disodiumpentahydrates with a high water concentration were used, currently, low hydration crystals of PQQ disodiumpentahydrates are preferred. Results We prepared a crystal of PQQ disodium trihydrate in a solution of ethanol and water, studied its structure, and analyzed its properties. In the prepared crystal, the sodium atom interacted with the oxygen atom of two carboxylic acids as well as two quinones of the PQQ disodium trihydrate. In addition, the hydration water of the prepared crystal was less than that of the conventional PQQ disodium crystal. From the results of this study, it was found that the color and the near-infrared (NIR spectrum of the prepared crystal changed depending on the water content in the dried samples. Conclusions The water content in the dried samples was restored to that in the trihydrate crystal by placing the samples in a humid environment. In addition, the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray diffraction-differential calorimetry (XRD-DSC analyses show that the phase of the trihydrate crystal changed when the crystallization water was eliminated. The dried crystal has two crystalline forms that are restored to the original trihydrate crystals in 20% relative humidity (RH. This crystalline (PQQ disodium trihydrate is stable under normal environment.

  6. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  7. Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Quinones from Compost for Microbial Community Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Gede Ratna Juliasih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE was used to extract quinones from compost to monitor the microbial community dynamics during composting. The 0.3 g of dried compost was extracted using 3 mL min−1 of carbon dioxide (90% and methanol (10% at 45°C and 25 MPa for a 30 min extraction time. The extracted quinones were analysed using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC with 0.3 mL min−1 of methanol mobile phase for a 50 min chromatographic run time. A comparable detected amount of quinones was obtained using the developed method and an organic solvent extraction method, being 36.06 μmol kg−1 and 34.54 μmol kg−1, respectively. Significantly low value of dissimilarity index (D between the two methods (0.05 indicated that the quinone profile obtained by both methods was considered identical. The developed method was then applied to determine the maturity of the compost by monitoring the change of quinone during composting. The UQ-9 and MK-7 were predominant quinones in the initial stage of composting. The diversity of quinone became more complex during the cooling and maturation stages. This study showed that SFE had successfully extracted quinones from a complex matrix with simplification and rapidity of the analysis that is beneficial for routine analysis.

  8. Electron affinity of p-quinones. Improved method of electrochemical estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Jan S.

    1986-06-01

    Electron affinities of four p-quinones are estimated from enthalpy changes obtained on the basis of measured formal potentials and reaction entropies in the electroreduction process. A linear correlation between electron affinities of p-quinones and parent hydrocarbons is found.

  9. Redox pioneer: professor Barry Halliwell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervaiz, Shazib

    2011-05-01

    Professor Barry Halliwell is recognized as a Redox Pioneer because he has published eight articles on redox biology that have been each cited more than 1000 times, and 158 articles that have been each cited more than 100 times. His contributions go back as far as 1976, when he was involved in elucidation of the Foyer-Halliwell-Asada cycle, an efficient mechanism for preventing oxidative damage to chloroplasts. His subsequent work established the important role of iron and zinc in free radical reactions and their relevance to human pathologies. Professor Halliwell is also a leader in developing novel methodology for detecting free radical intermediates in vivo, and his contributions to our knowledge of reactive nitrogen species are highly significant. His sustained excellence won him the top-cited scientist award in the United Kingdom in biomedical sciences in 1999, and in 2003 he was recognized as a highly cited scientist by Institute of Scientific Information (ISI) for work on plant antioxidants, and the same year ranked 28 out of 5494 biochemists/biologists for scientific impact. Two pieces of his scholarly work have been listed as Citation Classics by ISI, and in 2007 his laboratory was ranked number 1 worldwide based on highest citation score in research on free radicals.

  10. Identification of a lactate-quinone oxidoreductase (Lqo in staphylococcus aureus that is essential for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Fuller

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen commonly infecting nearly every host tissue. The ability of S. aureus to resist innate immunity is critical to its success as a pathogen, including its propensity to grow in the presence of host nitric oxide (NO·. Upon exogenous NO· exposure, S. aureus immediately excretes copious amounts of L-lactate to maintain redox balance. However, after prolonged NO·-exposure, S. aureus reassimilates L-lactate specifically and in this work, we identify the enzyme responsible for this L-lactate consumption as a L-lactate-quinone oxidoreductase (Lqo, SACOL2623. Originally annotated as Mqo2 and thought to oxidize malate, we show that this enzyme exhibits no affinity for malate but reacts specifically with L-lactate (KM = ~330 µM. In addition to its requirement for reassimilation of L-lactate during NO·-stress, Lqo is also critical to respiratory growth on L-lactate as a sole carbon source. Moreover, ∆lqo mutants exhibit attenuation in a murine model of sepsis, particularly in their ability to cause myocarditis. Interestingly, this cardiac-specific attenuation is completely abrogated in mice unable to synthesize inflammatory NO· (iNOS-/-. We demonstrate that S. aureus NO·-resistance is highly dependent on the availability of a glycolytic carbon sources. However, S. aureus can utilize the combination of peptides and L-lactate as carbon sources during NO·-stress in an Lqo-dependent fashion. Murine cardiac tissue has markedly high levels of L-lactate in comparison to renal or hepatic tissue consistent with the NO·-dependent requirement for Lqo in S. aureus myocarditis. Thus, Lqo provides S. aureus with yet another means of replicating in the presence of host NO·.

  11. Quinone-based stable isotope probing for assessment of 13C substrate-utilizing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunihiro, Tadao; Katayama, Arata; Demachi, Toyoko; Veuger, Bart; Boschker, Henricus T. S.; van Oevelen, Dick

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we attempted to establish quinone-stable-isotope probing (SIP) technique to link substrate-utilizing bacterial group to chemotaxonomic group in bacterial community. To identify metabolically active bacterial group in various environments, SIP techniques combined with biomarkers have been widely utilized as an attractive method for environmental study. Quantitative approaches of the SIP technique have unique advantage to assess substrate-incorporation into bacteria. As a most major quantitative approach, SIP technique based on phospholipid-derived fatty acids (PLFA) have been applied to simultaneously assess substrate-incorporation rate into bacteria and microbial community structure. This approach is powerful to estimate the incorporation rate because of the high sensitivity due to the detection by a gas chromatograph-combustion interface-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (GC-c-IRMS). However, its phylogenetic resolution is limited by specificity of a compound-specific marker. We focused on respiratory quinone as a biomarker. Our previous study found a good correlation between concentrations of bacteria-specific PLFAs and quinones over several orders of magnitude in various marine sediments, and the quinone method has a higher resolution (bacterial phylum level) for resolving differences in bacterial community composition more than that of bacterial PLFA. Therefore, respiratory quinones are potentially good biomarkers for quantitative approaches of the SIP technique. The LC-APCI-MS method as molecular-mass based detection method for quinone was developed and provides useful structural information for identifying quinone molecular species in environmental samples. LC-MS/MS on hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap, which enables to simultaneously identify and quantify compounds in a single analysis, can detect high molecular compounds with their isotope ions. Use of LC-MS/MS allows us to develop quinone-SIP based on molecular mass differences due to

  12. Activation of Electron-Deficient Quinones through Hydrogen-Bond-Donor-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turek, Amanda K; Hardee, David J; Ullman, Andrew M; Nocera, Daniel G; Jacobsen, Eric N

    2016-01-11

    Quinones are important organic oxidants in a variety of synthetic and biological contexts, and they are susceptible to activation towards electron transfer through hydrogen bonding. Whereas this effect of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs) has been observed for Lewis basic, weakly oxidizing quinones, comparable activation is not readily achieved when more reactive and synthetically useful electron-deficient quinones are used. We have successfully employed HBD-coupled electron transfer as a strategy to activate electron-deficient quinones. A systematic investigation of HBDs has led to the discovery that certain dicationic HBDs have an exceptionally large effect on the rate and thermodynamics of electron transfer. We further demonstrate that these HBDs can be used as catalysts in a quinone-mediated model synthetic transformation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Redox Stable Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang eXiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs can convert chemical energy from the fuel directly to electrical energy with high efficiency and fuel flexibility. Ni-based cermets have been the most widely adopted anode for SOFCs. However, the conventional Ni-based anode has low tolerance to sulfur-contamination, is vulnerable to deactivation by carbon build-up (coking from direct oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels, and suffers volume instability upon redox cycling. Among these limitations, the redox instability of the anode is particularly important and has been intensively studied since the SOFC anode may experience redox cycling during fuel cell operations even with the ideal pure hydrogen as the fuel. This review aims to highlight recent progresses on improving redox stability of the conventional Ni-based anode through microstructure optimization and exploration of alternative ceramic-based anode materials.

  14. Redox therapy in neonatal sepsis: reasons, targets, strategy, and agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajčetić, Milica; Spasić, Snežana; Spasojević, Ivan

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal sepsis is one of the most fulminating conditions in neonatal intensive care units. Antipathogen and supportive care are administered routinely, but do not deliver satisfactory results. In addition, the efforts to treat neonatal sepsis with anti-inflammatory agents have generally shown to be futile. The accumulating data imply that intracellular redox changes intertwined into neonatal sepsis redox cycle represent the main cause of dysfunction of mitochondria and cells in neonatal sepsis. Our aim here is to support the new philosophy in neonatal sepsis treatment, which involves the integration of mechanisms that are responsible for cellular dysfunction and organ failure, the recognition of the most important targets, and the selection of safe agents that can stop the neonatal sepsis redox cycle by hitting the hot spots. Redox-active agents that could be beneficial for neonatal sepsis treatment according to these criteria include lactoferrin, interleukin 10, zinc and selenium supplements, ibuprofen, edaravone, and pentoxifylline.

  15. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Celis, Lourdes B. [División de Geociencias Aplicadas, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Cervantes, Francisco J. [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico); Rangel-Mendez, J. Rene, E-mail: rene@ipicyt.edu.mx [División de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (IPICyT), Camino a la Presa San José 2055, Col. Lomas 4a Sección, San Luis Potosí, SLP 78216 (Mexico)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) act as redox mediator. • Electron accepting capacity increased with oxidation time of ACF. •ACFs increased 8-fold the reduction of methyl red in biological assays. •Biofilm formed on the ACFs partly blocked their redox mediator capacity. -- Abstract: The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8 M HNO{sub 3} to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents.

  16. Redox control of teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jason M; Harris, Craig

    2013-01-01

    A number of human teratogens elicit their deleterious effects through mechanisms involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. However, classic definitions of oxidative stress do not fully coincide with basic fundamental principles of teratology. Newer definitions of oxidative stress focus on the targeted redox modification of cysteine/thiol functional groups found in the regulatory domains of critical signaling pathway proteins, suggesting that the targeted disruption of signaling through specific redox couples may account for the specificity of teratogen-induced malformations which previously could not be rationalized. Here, we review examples of teratogens that induce ROS and oxidative injury, describe oxidative stress-related teratogenic mechanisms, and provide rationale for developmental periods of sensitivity and species susceptibility. Understanding how chemicals disrupt redox status, induce oxidative stress leading to dysmorphogenesis becomes important to identify potential teratogens and develop therapeutic interventions for attenuation of harmful chemical effects in utero following exposure.

  17. Cytotoxic Quinones from the Roots of Aloe dawei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negera Abdissa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Seven naphthoquinones and nine anthraquinones were isolated from the roots of Aloe dawei by chromatographic separation. The purified metabolites were identified by NMR and MS analyses. Out of the sixteen quinones, 6-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone is a new compound. Two of the isolates, 5,8-dihydroxy-3-methoxy-2-methylnaphthalene-1,4-dione and 1-hydroxy-8-methoxy-3-methylanthraquinone showed high cytotoxic activity (IC50 1.15 and 4.85 µM on MCF-7 breast cancer cells, whereas the others showed moderate to low cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-231 (ER Negative and MCF-7 (ER Positive cancer cells.

  18. Accessible reactive surface area and abiotic redox reactivity of iron oxyhydroxides in acidic brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlau, Jennifer H.; Toner, Brandy M.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2017-01-01

    The reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in low pH and high ionic strength solutions was quantified to assess abiotic contributions to oxidation-reduction chemistry in acidic brine environments, such as mine groundwater seepage, lakes in Western Australia, and acid mine drainage settings, which are of global interest for their environmental impacts and unique geomicrobiology. Factors expected to influence accessible and reactive surface area, including Fe(II) adsorption and aggregate size, were measured as a function of pH and CaCl2 concentration and related to the kinetics of redox reactions in aqueous suspensions of synthetic goethite (α-FeOOH), akaganeite (β-FeOOH), and ferrihydrite (Fe10O14(OH)2) nanoparticles. Aqueous conditions and iron oxyhydroxides were chosen based on characterization of natural iron-rich mine microbial mats located in Soudan Underground Mine State Park, Minnesota, USA. Quinone species were used as redox sensors because they are well-defined probes and are present in natural organic matter. Fe(II) adsorption to the iron oxyhydroxide mineral surfaces from aqueous solution was measurable only at pH values above 4 and either decreased or was not affected by CaCl2 concentration. Concentrations at or above 0.020 M CaCl2 in acetate buffer (pH 4.5) induced particle aggregation. Assessment of Fe(II) adsorption and particle aggregation in acidic brine suggested that accessible reactive surface area may be limited in acidic brines. This was supported by observations of decreasing benzoquinone reduction rate by adsorbed Fe(II) at high CaCl2 concentration. In contrast, the hydroquinone oxidation rate increased at high CaCl2 concentrations, which may be due to suppressed adsorption of Fe(II) generated by the reaction. Results suggest that iron geochemical cycling in acidic brine environments will be substantially different than for iron oxyhydroxides in low-saline waters with circumneutral pH. These findings have implications for acidic

  19. An isotope-edited FTIR investigation of the role of Ser-L223 in binding quinone (QB) and semiquinone (QB-) in the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabedryk, Eliane; Paddock, Mark L; Okamura, Melvin Y; Breton, Jacques

    2005-11-08

    In the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions occur at the secondary quinone (Q(B)) site. Several nearby residues are important for both binding and redox chemistry involved in the light-induced conversion from Q(B) to quinol Q(B)H(2). Ser-L223 is one of the functionally important residues located near Q(B). To obtain information on the interaction between Ser-L223 and Q(B) and Q(B)(-), isotope-edited Q(B)(-)/Q(B) FTIR difference spectra were measured in a mutant RC in which Ser-L223 is replaced with Ala and compared to the native RC. The isotope-edited IR fingerprint spectra for the C=O [see text] and C=C [see text] modes of Q(B) (Q(B)(-)) in the mutant are essentially the same as those of the native RC. These findings indicate that highly equivalent interactions of Q(B) and Q(B)(-) with the protein occur in both native and mutant RCs. The simplest explanation of these results is that Ser-L223 is not hydrogen bonded to Q(B) or Q(B)(-) but presumably forms a hydrogen bond to a nearby acid group, preferentially Asp-L213. The rotation of the Ser OH proton from Asp-L213 to Q(B)(-) is expected to be an important step in the proton transfer to the reduced quinone. In addition, the reduced quinone remains firmly bound, indicating that other distinct hydrogen bonds are more important for stabilizing Q(B)(-). Implications on the design features of the Q(B) binding site are discussed.

  20. Identification of quinone imine containing glutathione conjugates of diclofenac in rat bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldon, Daniel J; Teffera, Yohannes; Colletti, Adria E; Liu, Jingzhou; Zurcher, Danielle; Copeland, Katrina W; Zhao, Zhiyang

    2010-12-20

    High-resolution accurate MS with an LTQ-Orbitrap was used to identify quinone imine metabolites derived from the 5-hydroxy (5-OH) and 4 prime-hydroxy (4'-OH) glutathione conjugates of diclofenac in rat bile. The initial quinone imine metabolites formed by oxidation of diclofenac have been postulated to be reactive intermediates potentially involved in diclofenac-mediated hepatotoxicity; while these metabolites could be formed using in vitro systems, they have never been detected in vivo. This report describes the identification of secondary quinone imine metabolites derived from 5-OH and 4'-OH diclofenac glutathione conjugates in rat bile. To verify the proposed structures, the diclofenac quinone imine GSH conjugate standards were prepared synthetically and enzymatically. The novel metabolite peaks displayed the identical retention times, accurate mass MS/MS spectra, and the fragmentation patterns as the corresponding authentic standards. The formation of these secondary quinone metabolites occurs only under conditions where bile salt homeostasis was experimentally altered. Standard practice in biliary excretion experiments using bile duct-cannulated rats includes infusion of taurocholic acid and/or other bile acids to replace those lost due to continuous collection of bile; for this experiment, the rats received no replacement bile acid infusion. High-resolution accurate mass spectrometry data and comparison with chemically and enzymatically prepared quinone imines of diclofenac glutathione conjugates support the identification of these metabolites. A mechanism for the formation of these reactive quinone imine containing glutathione conjugates of diclofenac is proposed.

  1. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoxville, U. Tennessee; U. Texas Austin; U, McGill; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  2. Monitoring Dopamine Quinone-Induced Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity Using Dopamine Functionalized Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Liu, Hui-Ting; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-07-08

    Dopamine (DA) quinone-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is known to occur due to the interaction between DA quinone and cysteine (Cys) residue, and it may play an important a role in pathological processes associated with neurodegeneration. In this study, we monitored the interaction process of DA to form DA quinone and the subsequent Cys residue using dopamine functionalized quantum dots (QDs). The fluorescence (FL) of the QD bioconjugates changes as a function of the structure transformation during the interaction process, providing a potential FL tool for monitoring dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

  3. Redox-capacitor to connect electrochemistry to redox-biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Leverage, W Taylor; Liu, Yi; White, Ian M; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2014-01-07

    It is well-established that redox-reactions are integral to biology for energy harvesting (oxidative phosphorylation), immune defense (oxidative burst) and drug metabolism (phase I reactions), yet there is emerging evidence that redox may play broader roles in biology (e.g., redox signaling). A critical challenge is the need for tools that can probe biologically-relevant redox interactions simply, rapidly and without the need for a comprehensive suite of analytical methods. We propose that electrochemistry may provide such a tool. In this tutorial review, we describe recent studies with a redox-capacitor film that can serve as a bio-electrode interface that can accept, store and donate electrons from mediators commonly used in electrochemistry and also in biology. Specifically, we (i) describe the fabrication of this redox-capacitor from catechols and the polysaccharide chitosan, (ii) discuss the mechanistic basis for electron exchange, (iii) illustrate the properties of this redox-capacitor and its capabilities for promoting redox-communication between biology and electrodes, and (iv) suggest the potential for enlisting signal processing strategies to "extract" redox information. We believe these initial studies indicate broad possibilities for enlisting electrochemistry and signal processing to acquire "systems level" redox information from biology.

  4. Redox theory of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean P. Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome. The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome–exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity.

  5. Influence of Low Molecular Weight Fractions of Humic Substances on Their Reducing Capacities and Distribution of Redox Functional Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Jiang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Humic substances (HS) are redox-active organic compounds and their reducing capacities depend on molecule structure and distribution of redox functional groups (RFG). During dialysis experiments, initial HS were separated into low molecular weight fractions (LMWF, molecular weight dialysis device were calculated for initial HA, retentate and LMWF in native and reduced state, and result suggests that releasing of LMWF leads to production and explosion of RFG. LWMF have great fluorescence intensities for protein-like fluorophores and humic acids-like fluorophores (quinone-like functional groups), where quinonoid π-π* transition is responsible for the great reducing capacities of LMWF. The 3,500 Da molecules (0.25 nm diameter) of HS are capable of stimulating transformation of redox-active metals or potential pollutants trapped in soil micropores (< 2 nm diameter). A development of relationship between reducing capacity and Ex / Em position provides a possibility to predicate relative reducing capacities of HS in treated raw water sample.

  6. Pyrroloquinoline-quinone and its versatile roles in biological processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Misra; Y S Rajpurohit; N P Khairnar

    2012-06-01

    Pyrroloquinoline-quinine (PQQ) was initially characterized as a redox cofactor for membrane-bound dehydrogenases in the bacterial system. Subsequently, PQQ was shown to be an antioxidant protecting the living cells from oxidative damage in vivo and the biomolecules from artificially produced reaction oxygen species in vitro. The presence of PQQ has been documented from different biological samples. It functions as a nutrient and vitamin for supporting the growth and protection of living cells under stress. Recently, the role of PQQ has also been shown as a bio-control agent for plant fungal pathogens, an inducer for proteins kinases involved in cellular differentiation of mammalian cells and as a redox sensor leading to development of biosensor. Recent reviews published on PQQ and enzymes requiring this cofactor have brought forth the case specific roles of PQQ. This review covers the comprehensive information on various aspects of PQQ known till date. These include the roles of PQQ in the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation in mammalian system, as a nutrient and vitamin in stress tolerance, in crop productivity through increasing the availability of insoluble phosphate and as a bio-control agent, and as a redox agent leading to the biosensor development. Most recent findings correlating the exceptionally high redox recycling ability of PQQ to its potential as anti-neurodegenerative, anticancer and pharmacological agents, and as a signalling molecule have been distinctly brought out. This review discusses different findings suggesting the versatility in PQQ functions and provides the most plausible intellectual basis to the ubiquitous roles of this compound in a large number of biological processes, as a nutrient and a perspective vitamin.

  7. Solid state oxidation of phenols to quinones with sodium perborate on wet montmorillonite K10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemi, Mohammed M.; Eftekhari-Sis, Bagher; Khalili, Behzad; Karimi-Jaberi, Zahed [Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry]. E-mail: mhashemi@sharif.edu

    2005-09-15

    Phenols were oxidized to quinones using sodium perborate (SPB) on wet montmorillonite as oxidant. The reaction was carried out at ambient temperature on the solid phase under solvent free conditions. (author)

  8. Porphyrin-quinone compounds as synthetic models of the reaction centre in photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovkov, V. V.; Evstigneeva, Rima P.; Strekova, L. N.; Filippovich, E. I.

    1989-06-01

    Data on the synthesis, steric structure, and photochemical properties of porphyrin-quinone compounds as synthetic models of the reaction centre in photosynthesis are examined and described systematically. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  9. Ediacaran Redox Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S. K.; Jiang, G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Kendall, B.; Owens, J. D.; Anbar, A. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence for pervasive oxic conditions, and likely even deep ocean oxygenation has been documented at three intervals in the lower (ca. 632 Ma), middle (ca. 580 Ma) and upper (ca. 551 Ma) Ediacaran. The Doushantuo Formation in South China hosts large enrichments of redox-sensitive trace element (e.g., molybdenum, vanadium and uranium) in anoxic shales, which are indicative of a globally oxic ocean-atmosphere system. However, ocean redox conditions between these periods continue to be a topic of debate and remain elusive. We have found evidence for widespread anoxic conditions through much of the Ediacaran in the deep-water Wuhe section in South China. During most of the Ediacaran-early Cambrian in basinal sections is characterized by Fe speciation data and pyrite morphologies that indicate deposition under euxinic conditions with near-crustal enrichments of redox-sensitive element and positive pyrite-sulfur isotope values, which suggest low levels of marine sulfate and widespread euxinia. Our work reinforces an emerging view that the early Earth, including the Ediacaran, underwent numerous rises and falls in surface oxidation state, rather than a unidirectional rise as originally imagined. The Ediacaran ocean thus experienced repetitive expansion and contraction of marine chalcophilic trace-metal levels that may have had fundamental impact on the slow evolution of early animals and ecosystems. Further, this framework forces us to re-examine the relationship between Neoproterozoic oxygenation and metazoan diversification. Varying redox conditions through the Cryogenian and Ediacaran may help explain molecular clock and biomarker evidence for an early appearance and initial diversification of metazoans but with a delay in the appearance of most major metazoan crown groups until close to Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary.

  10. Mild and rapid method for the generation of ortho-(naphtho)quinone methide intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Abdul kadar; Cobb, Alexander J A; Varvounis, George

    2012-01-20

    A new mild method has been devised for generating o-(naphtho)quinone methides via fluoride-induced desilylation of silyl derivatives of o-hydroxybenzyl(or 1-naphthylmethyl) nitrate. The reactive o-(naphtho)quinone methide intermediates were trapped by C, O, N, and S nucleophiles and underwent "inverse electron-demand" hetero-Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles to give stable adducts. The method has useful potential application in natural product synthesis and drug research.

  11. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Partin, Camille A.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-01-01

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (∼2.5–0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth’s oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (∼1.8–0.8 Ga). Given the coupling between redox-sensitive trace element cycles and planktonic productivity, various models for mid-Proterozoic ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients, with potential ecological constraints on emerging eukaryotic life. Here, we exploit the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and chromium to provide constraints on seafloor redox evolution by coupling a large database of sedimentary metal enrichments to a mass balance model that includes spatially variant metal burial rates. We find that the metal enrichment record implies a Proterozoic deep ocean characterized by pervasive anoxia relative to the Phanerozoic (at least ∼30–40% of modern seafloor area) but a relatively small extent of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) seafloor (less than ∼1–10% of modern seafloor area). Our model suggests that the oceanic Mo reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of sulfidic seafloor and that the record of Mo and chromium enrichments through time is consistent with the possibility of a Mo–N colimited marine biosphere during many periods of Earth’s history. PMID:23515332

  12. Proterozoic ocean redox and biogeochemical stasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Christopher T; Planavsky, Noah J; Robbins, Leslie J; Partin, Camille A; Gill, Benjamin C; Lalonde, Stefan V; Bekker, Andrey; Konhauser, Kurt O; Lyons, Timothy W

    2013-04-02

    The partial pressure of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere has increased dramatically through time, and this increase is thought to have occurred in two rapid steps at both ends of the Proterozoic Eon (∼2.5-0.543 Ga). However, the trajectory and mechanisms of Earth's oxygenation are still poorly constrained, and little is known regarding attendant changes in ocean ventilation and seafloor redox. We have a particularly poor understanding of ocean chemistry during the mid-Proterozoic (∼1.8-0.8 Ga). Given the coupling between redox-sensitive trace element cycles and planktonic productivity, various models for mid-Proterozoic ocean chemistry imply different effects on the biogeochemical cycling of major and trace nutrients, with potential ecological constraints on emerging eukaryotic life. Here, we exploit the differing redox behavior of molybdenum and chromium to provide constraints on seafloor redox evolution by coupling a large database of sedimentary metal enrichments to a mass balance model that includes spatially variant metal burial rates. We find that the metal enrichment record implies a Proterozoic deep ocean characterized by pervasive anoxia relative to the Phanerozoic (at least ∼30-40% of modern seafloor area) but a relatively small extent of euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic) seafloor (less than ∼1-10% of modern seafloor area). Our model suggests that the oceanic Mo reservoir is extremely sensitive to perturbations in the extent of sulfidic seafloor and that the record of Mo and chromium enrichments through time is consistent with the possibility of a Mo-N colimited marine biosphere during many periods of Earth's history.

  13. Semiquinone formation and DNA base damage by toxic quinones and inhibition by N-acetylcysteine (NAC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, D.C.; Shibamoto, T.

    1986-03-05

    Toxic, mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects have been reported for some quinones as well as compounds metabolized to quinones. Semiquinone radical formation, thymidine degradation, and protection by NAC were studied in a hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase (HX/XO) system. Quinone, benzo(a)pyrene-3,6-quinone, danthron, doxorubicin, emodin, juglone, menadione, and moniliformin were tested. Diethylstilbestrolquinone, N-acetylquinoneimine, and benzoquinonediimine, hypothesized toxic metabolites of diethylstilbestrol, acetaminophen and p-phenylenediamine, respectively, were synthesized and studied. Semiquinone radical formation was assessed in a HX/XO system monitoring cytochrome C reduction. Large differences in rates of semiquinone radical formation were noted for different quinones, with V/Vo values ranging from 1.2 to 10.6. DNA base degradation, thymine or thymidine glycol formation, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) production were measured in a similar system containing thymine, thymidine, calf thymus DNA, or deoxyribose. TBARS formation was observed with deoxyribose, but thymidine degradation without TBARS formation was noted with thymidine. NAC (0.5 to 10 mM) caused dose-dependent inhibition of quinone-induced cytochrome C reduction.

  14. Terreic Acid, a Quinone Epoxide Inhibitor of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yuko; Hartman, Stephen E.; Kinoshita, Eiji; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Kitaura, Jiro; Yao, Libo; Inagaki, Naoki; Franco, Alessandra; Hata, Daisuke; Maeda-Yamamoto, Mari; Fukamachi, Hiromi; Nagai, Hiroichi; Kawakami, Toshiaki

    1999-03-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) plays pivotal roles in mast cell activation as well as in B cell development. Btk mutations lead to severe impairments in proinflammatory cytokine production induced by cross-linking of high-affinity IgE receptor on mast cells. By using an in vitro assay to measure the activity that blocks the interaction between protein kinase C and the pleckstrin homology domain of Btk, terreic acid (TA) was identified and characterized in this study. This quinone epoxide specifically inhibited the enzymatic activity of Btk in mast cells and cell-free assays. TA faithfully recapitulated the phenotypic defects of btk mutant mast cells in high-affinity IgE receptor-stimulated wild-type mast cells without affecting the enzymatic activities and expressions of many other signaling molecules, including those of protein kinase C. Therefore, this study confirmed the important roles of Btk in mast cell functions and showed the usefulness of TA in probing into the functions of Btk in mast cells and other immune cell systems. Another insight obtained from this study is that the screening method used to identify TA is a useful approach to finding more efficacious Btk inhibitors.

  15. Effects of commonly consumed fruit juices and carbohydrates on redox status and anticancer biomarkers in female rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke M.; Nielsen, Salka E.; Knuthsen, Pia

    2003-01-01

    the average carbohydrate levels in the employed fruit juices. None of the fruit juices were found to affect the activities of antioxidant enzymes in red blood cells or hepatic glutathione S-transferase. Hepatic quinone reductase activity, on the other hand, was significantly increased by grape-fruit juice....../kg of diet. However, no effects were observed on hepatic glutathione S-transferase or quinone reductase activities, plasma redox status, or the activity of red blood cell antioxidant enzymes. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that commonly consumed fruit juices can alter lipid and protein......Administration of apple juice, black currant juice, ora 1:1 combination of the two juices significantly decreased the level of the lipid peroxidation biomarker malondialdehyde in plasma of female rats, whereas the protein oxidation biomarker 2-amino-adipic semialdehyde, was significantly increased...

  16. Reciprocal Control of the Circadian Clock and Cellular Redox State - a Critical Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putker, Marrit; O'Neill, John Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Redox signalling comprises the biology of molecular signal transduction mediated by reactive oxygen (or nitrogen) species. By specific and reversible oxidation of redox-sensitive cysteines, many biological processes sense and respond to signals from the intracellular redox environment. Redox signals are therefore important regulators of cellular homeostasis. Recently, it has become apparent that the cellular redox state oscillates in vivo and in vitro, with a period of about one day (circadian). Circadian time-keeping allows cells and organisms to adapt their biology to resonate with the 24-hour cycle of day/night. The importance of this innate biological time-keeping is illustrated by the association of clock disruption with the early onset of several diseases (e.g. type II diabetes, stroke and several forms of cancer). Circadian regulation of cellular redox balance suggests potentially two distinct roles for redox signalling in relation to the cellular clock: one where it is regulated by the clock, and one where it regulates the clock. Here, we introduce the concepts of redox signalling and cellular timekeeping, and then critically appraise the evidence for the reciprocal regulation between cellular redox state and the circadian clock. We conclude there is a substantial body of evidence supporting circadian regulation of cellular redox state, but that it would be premature to conclude that the converse is also true. We therefore propose some approaches that might yield more insight into redox control of cellular timekeeping.

  17. Aluminum complexes of the redox-active [ONO] pincer ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Géza; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-07-14

    A series of aluminum complexes containing the tridentate, redox-active ligand bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenol)amine ([ONO]H(3)) in three different oxidation states were synthesized. The aluminum halide salts AlCl(3) and AlBr(3) were reacted with the doubly deprotonated form of the ligand to afford five-coordinate [ONHO(cat)]AlX(solv) complexes (1a, X = Cl, solv = OEt(2); 1b, X = Br, solv = THF), each having a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry at the aluminum and containing the [ONHO(cat)](2-) ligand with a protonated, sp(3)-hybridized nitrogen donor. The [ONO] ligand platform may also be added to aluminum through the use of the oxidized ligand salt [ONO(q)]K, which was reacted with AlCl(3) in the presence of either diphenylacetylacetonate (acacPh(2)(-)) or 8-oxyquinoline (quinO(-)) to afford [ONO(q)]Al(acacPh(2))Cl (2) or [ONO(q)]Al(quinO)Cl (3), respectively, with well-defined [ONO(q)](-) ligands. Quinonate complexes 2 and 3 were reduced by one electron to afford the corresponding complexes K{[ONO(sq)]Al(acacPh(2))(py)} (4) and K{[ONO(sq)]Al(quinO)(py)} (5), respectively, containing well-defined [ONO(sq)](2-) ligands. The addition of tetrachloro-1,2-quinone to 1a in the presence of pyridine resulted in the expulsion of HCl and the formation of an aluminum complex with two different redox active ligands, [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(6)Cl(4))(py) (6). Similar results were obtained when 1a was reacted with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(14)H(8))(py) (7) or with pyrene-4,5-dione to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(16)H(8))(py) (8). Structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic measurements on 6-8 suggest ligand non-innocent redox behavior in these complexes.

  18. 31. Antioxidant and hypoxia induce the human antioxidant response element-mediated expression of NAD(P) H: quinone oxidoreductase1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Background: NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is an obligate two-electron reductase that is involved in protection of cells against redox cycling, oxidative stress, and neoplasia. and can also bioactivate certain antitumor quinones. Many antioxidants are cancer chemopreventive agents, and tumour hypoxia are now being exploited in cancer treatment which shows considerable promise to overcome the resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Antioxidant response element (ARE) is sensitive to perturbations of cellular redox states. Our previous studies have shown that β-tyrosol (β-TY), as a phenolic antioxidant, can protects cells against DNA damage resulting from toxic H2O2. Aim: We take the present study with the goal of whether antioxidants such as β-tyrosol, butylated hydroxyanisole(BHA) and β-Naphthooflavone(β-NF) and hypoxia (pO2 0.1% -0.5%) can induce gene expression of NQO1, inhibit proliferation of human hepatoma cells SMMC-7721 and the relationship between them; whether ARE can mediate gene expression in response to antioxidans and hypoxia. Methods: SMMC-7721 human hepatoma cells are planted in plates, grown for 24h. and exposed to antioxidants and hypoxia, each alone or in combination for another 24h. The enzyme activity was determinied by spectrophotometric assay using direct measurement of NQO1 from cells cultured in Microtiter wells. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique was used to measure NQO1 mRNA levets. Proliferation was estimated using the crystal violet staining technique. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was employed to assess protein binding to the ARE under all of These conditions. Hypoxia cells were harvested in an anaerobic chamber at the end of the incubation period. Results: Antioxidant (90ug/ml β-TY、60μmol/L BHA、80μmol/L β-NF) potently induce an increase in the activity of NQO1. From 60μg/ml to 90μg/ml, β-TY caused NQO1 activity enhancement in a dose-dependent manner The NQO1 activity induced

  19. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Syntrophic Growth via Quinone-Mediated Interspecies Electron Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS. A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and Geobacter sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Cocultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require

  1. Biotransformation of lepidocrocite in the presence of quinones and flavins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Woojin

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (γ-FeIIIOOH) and its mineral transformation in the presence of exogenous (quinones) and endogenous (flavins) electron transfer mediators (ETMs) at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32). It is very important to investigate the bioreduction of lepidocrocite in the presence of different ETMs because biotransformation of Fe(III)-containing minerals can be stimulated by ETMs and affect fate and transport of contaminants in contaminated environments. In the absence of phosphate, green rust formation was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.44-0.56 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while goethite formed at slow Fe(II) production rate (0.24-0.29 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. In the presence of phosphate, formation of green rust and vivianite was observed with fast Fe(II) production rate (0.54-0.74 mM d-1) during the bioreduction of lepidocrocite with exogenous ETMs, while vivianite formed at moderate Fe(II) production rate (0.36-0.40 mM d-1) with endogenous ETMs. Vivianite formed in all experimental cases with phosphate in a broad range of Fe(II) production rates (0.23-0.74 mM d-1). Our results (1) suggest that exogenous and endogenous ETMs can significantly but differently affect the biotransformation of lepidocrocite, especially at low concentrations of the ETMs and bacterial cells, (2) highlight the importance of Fe(II) production rate to determine the formation of specific biogenic minerals, (3) provide additional evidence that phosphate can significantly affect the bioreduction rate and the mineral transformation, and (4) help to understand the basic knowledge about complex interactions among microbial cell, soil mineral, and ETM in natural environments and engineered systems.

  2. The Na+-Translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase Enhances Oxidative Stress in the Cytoplasm of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muras, Valentin; Dogaru-Kinn, Paul; Minato, Yusuke; Häse, Claudia C; Steuber, Julia

    2016-09-01

    We searched for a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytoplasm of the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae and addressed the mechanism of ROS formation using the dye 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in respiring cells. By comparing V. cholerae strains with or without active Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR), this respiratory sodium ion redox pump was identified as a producer of ROS in vivo The amount of cytoplasmic ROS detected in V. cholerae cells producing variants of Na(+)-NQR correlated well with rates of superoxide formation by the corresponding membrane fractions. Membranes from wild-type V. cholerae showed increased superoxide production activity (9.8 ± 0.6 μmol superoxide min(-1) mg(-1) membrane protein) compared to membranes from the mutant lacking Na(+)-NQR (0.18 ± 0.01 μmol min(-1) mg(-1)). Overexpression of plasmid-encoded Na(+)-NQR in the nqr deletion strain resulted in a drastic increase in the formation of superoxide (42.6 ± 2.8 μmol min(-1) mg(-1)). By analyzing a variant of Na(+)-NQR devoid of quinone reduction activity, we identified the reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of cytoplasmic NqrF subunit as the site for intracellular superoxide formation in V. cholerae The impact of superoxide formation by the Na(+)-NQR on the virulence of V. cholerae is discussed. In several studies, it was demonstrated that the Na(+)-NQR in V. cholerae affects virulence in a yet unknown manner. We identified the reduced FAD cofactor in the NADH-oxidizing NqrF subunit of the Na(+)-NQR as the site of superoxide formation in the cytoplasm of V. cholerae Our study provides the framework to understand how reactive oxygen species formed during respiration could participate in the regulated expression of virulence factors during the transition from aerobic to microaerophilic (intestinal) habitats. This hypothesis may turn out to be right for many other pathogens which, like V. cholerae, depend on the Na

  3. Redox theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P

    2015-08-01

    Metazoan genomes encode exposure memory systems to enhance survival and reproductive potential by providing mechanisms for an individual to adjust during lifespan to environmental resources and challenges. These systems are inherently redox networks, arising during evolution of complex systems with O2 as a major determinant of bioenergetics, metabolic and structural organization, defense, and reproduction. The network structure decreases flexibility from conception onward due to differentiation and cumulative responses to environment (exposome). The redox theory of aging is that aging is a decline in plasticity of genome-exposome interaction that occurs as a consequence of execution of differentiation and exposure memory systems. This includes compromised mitochondrial and bioenergetic flexibility, impaired food utilization and metabolic homeostasis, decreased barrier and defense capabilities and loss of reproductive fidelity and fecundity. This theory accounts for hallmarks of aging, including failure to maintain oxidative or xenobiotic defenses, mitochondrial integrity, proteostasis, barrier structures, DNA repair, telomeres, immune function, metabolic regulation and regenerative capacity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. A Sulfur Heterocyclic Quinone Cathode and a Multifunctional Binder for a High-Performance Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting; Zhao, Qing; Wang, Jianbin; Pan, Zeng; Chen, Jun

    2016-05-23

    We report a rational design of a sulfur heterocyclic quinone (dibenzo[b,i]thianthrene-5,7,12,14-tetraone=DTT) used as a cathode (uptake of four lithium ions to form Li4 DTT) and a conductive polymer [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)= PSS) used as a binder for a high-performance rechargeable lithium-ion battery. Because of the reduced energy level of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) caused by the introduced S atoms, the initial Li-ion intercalation potential of DTT is 2.89 V, which is 0.3 V higher than that of its carbon analog. Meanwhile, there is a noncovalent interaction between DTT and PSS, which remarkably suppressed the dissolution and enhanced the conductivity of DTT, thus leading to the great improvement of the electrochemical performance. The DTT cathode with the PSS binder displays a long-term cycling stability (292 mAh g(-1) for the first cycle, 266 mAh g(-1) after 200 cycles at 0.1 C) and a high rate capability (220 mAh g(-1) at 1 C). This design strategy based on a noncovalent interaction is very effective for the application of small organic molecules as the cathode of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. TEMPOL increases NAD+ and improves redox imbalance in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Yamato

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Continuous energy conversion is controlled by reduction–oxidation (redox processes. NAD+ and NADH represent an important redox couple in energy metabolism. 4-Hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPOL is a redox-cycling nitroxide that promotes the scavenging of several reactive oxygen species (ROS and is reduced to hydroxylamine by NADH. TEMPOL is also involved in NAD+ production in the ascorbic acid–glutathione redox cycle. We utilized the chemical properties of TEMPOL to investigate the effects of antioxidants and NAD+/NADH modulators on the metabolic imbalance in obese mice. Increases in the NAD+/NADH ratio by TEMPOL ameliorated the metabolic imbalance when combined with a dietary intervention, changing from a high-fat diet to a normal diet. Plasma levels of the superoxide marker dihydroethidium were higher in mice receiving the dietary intervention compared with a control diet, but were normalized with TEMPOL consumption. These findings provide novel insights into redox regulation in obesity.

  6. Investigation of the redox chemistry of anthraquinone derivatives using density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jonathan E; Curtiss, Larry A; Assary, Rajeev S

    2014-09-25

    Application of density functional calculations to compute electrochemical properties such as redox windows, effect of substitution by electron donating and electron withdrawing groups on redox windows, and solvation free energies for ∼50 anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives are presented because of their potential as anolytes in all-organic redox flow batteries. Computations suggest that lithium ions can increase (by ∼0.4 V) the reduction potential of anthraquinone due to the lithium ion pairing by forming a Lewis base-Lewis acid complex. To design new redox active species, the substitution by electron donating groups is essential to improve the reduction window of AQ with adequate oxidative stability. For instance, a complete methylation of AQ can improve its reduction window by ∼0.4 V. The quantum chemical studies of the ∼50 AQ derivatives are used to derive a relationship that connects the computed LUMO energy and the reduction potential that can be applied as a descriptor for screening thousands of AQ derivatives. Our computations also suggest that incorporating oxy-methyl dioxolane substituents in the AQ framework can increase its interaction with nonaqueous solvent and improve its solubility. Thermochemical calculations for likely bond breaking decomposition reactions of unsubstituted AQ anions suggest that the dianions are relatively stable in the solution. These studies provide an ideal platform to perform further combined experimental and theoretical studies to understand the electrochemical reversibility and solubility of new quinone molecules as energy storage materials.

  7. Redox flow batteries: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Adam Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Mench, Matthew M [ORNL; Meyers, Jeremy [University of Texas, Austin; Ross, Philip N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gostick, Jeffrey T. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Liu, Qinghua [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2011-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of RFBs with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  8. Direct electrochemistry of redox proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heering, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the project was to obtain more detailed insight in interactions between redox proteins and solid electrodes and the mechanisms of electron transfer. In addition to this, the influence of the protein environment on the redox properties of the active site and the possible influence of the

  9. Automated and continuous redox potential measurements in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G; van Marum, Daan; Wattel, Kees; Eijsackers, Herman J P

    2004-01-01

    Redox potential (Eh) describes the electrical state of a matrix. In soils, Eh is an important parameter controlling the persistence of many organic and inorganic compounds. A popular, but also criticized, manual measuring method makes use of a small tip of Pt placed on a copper wire that is placed in the soil; a reference electrode is placed in the same soil at a fixed distance. Fluctuations in redox potential values measured in the soil can be very large and depth-dependent. This will be overlooked when making single-point measurements. We developed the datalogger Hypnos 2.0 for continuous redox potential and temperature measurements at various depths in the soil and without disturbance of the site. Hypnos is field-deployable, relatively cheap, and runs on batteries. The datalogger can use a "sleep mode" between sampling events. In sleep mode, there is no constant voltage on the Pt wire or the reference electrode, but there is only a short pulse during sampling. We did not measure an effect of this short pulse on the measured redox potential. In sandy soils in mesocosms and in a salt marsh soil we measured changes in the Eh as large as from -400 to +100 mV within 4 d, and daily cycles of 200 mV. Both absolute redox potential values and their diurnal variations were depth-dependent. Because single redox measurements are insufficient in describing redox conditions in some soil systems, Hypnos can be a powerful tool when studying the effects of fluctuating redox conditions on metal availability and pollutant degradation.

  10. Chlorophyll-quinone photochemistry in liposomes: mechanisms of radical formation and decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.K.; Tollin, G.

    1980-01-01

    Laser flash photolysis has been used to investigate the mechanism of formation and decay of the radical species generated by light induced electron transfer from chlorophyll a triplet to quinone in egg phosphatidyl choline bilayer vesicles. Chlorophyll triplet quenching by quinone is controlled by diffusion occurring within the bilayer membrane and reflects bilayer viscosity. Radical formation via separation of the intermediate ion pair is also inhibited by increased bilayer viscosity. Cooperativity is observed in this process due to an enhancement of radical separation by electron transfer from semiquinone anion radical to a neighboring quinone molecule. Two modes of radical decay are observed, a rapid recombination occurring within the bilayer and a much slower recombination occurring across the bilayer. The slow decay is only observed with quinones which are not tightly anchored into the bilayer, and is probably the result of electron transfer from semiquinone anion radical formed within the bilayer to a quinone molecule residing at the bilayer-water interface. With benzoquinone, approximately 60% of the radical decay occurs via the slow mode. Triplet to radical conversion efficiencies in the bilayer systems are comparable to those obtained in fluid solution (approx. 60%). However, radical recombination, at least for the slow decay mechanism, is considerably retarded.

  11. Zinc-redox battery: A technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollandsworth, R. P.

    Since 1977, scientists at Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc., have been developing the Zinc-Redox Battery for large-scale electrical energy storage. The current state of technology for this battery has demonstrated a number of positive features: (1) high energy efficiency (82.6 +/- 4.4%) demonstrated for more than 754 cycles with a low-cost alpha-methyl styrene membrane; (2) minimal environmental concerns because the only toxic reactant is 2N sodium hydroxide, and thus low projected balance-of-plant costs; and (3) good cell performance over a wide range of discharge rates with cell IR being the main determinant of energy efficiency. Current studies have focused on zinc electrode performance parameters, high current density discharge evaluation, and low-cost membrane cycle-life performance.

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer reactions of ruthenium(II)-complexes containing amino acid with quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswaran, Rajkumar; Kalayar, Swarnalatha; Paulpandian, Muthu Mareeswaran; Seenivasan, Rajagopal

    2014-05-01

    With the aim of mimicking, at basic level the photoinduced electron transfer process in the reaction center of photosystem II, ruthenium(II)-polypyridyl complexes, carrying amino acids were synthesized and studied their photoinduced electron transfer reactions with quinones by steady state and time resolved measurements. The reaction of quinones with excited state of ruthenium(II)-complexes, I-V in acetonitrile has been studied by luminescence quenching technique and the rate constant, k(q), values are close to the diffusion controlled rate. The detection of the semiquinone anion radical in this system using time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy confirms the electron transfer nature of the reaction. The semiclassical theory of electron transfer has been successfully applied to the photoluminescence quenching of Ru(II)-complexes with quinones.

  13. NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 localizes to the mitotic spindle in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Siegel

    Full Text Available NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 is an FAD containing quinone reductase that catalyzes the 2-electron reduction of a broad range of quinones. The 2-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones by NQO1 is believed to be a detoxification process since this reaction bypasses the formation of the highly reactive semiquinone. NQO1 is expressed at high levels in normal epithelium, endothelium and adipocytes as well as in many human solid tumors. In addition to its function as a quinone reductase NQO1 has been shown to reduce superoxide and regulate the 20 S proteasomal degradation of proteins including p53. Biochemical studies have indicated that NQO1 is primarily located in the cytosol, however, lower levels of NQO1 have also been found in the nucleus. In these studies we demonstrate using immunocytochemistry and confocal imaging that NQO1 was found associated with mitotic spindles in cells undergoing division. The association of NQO1 with the mitotic spindles was observed in many different human cell lines including nontransformed cells (astrocytes, HUVEC immortalized cell lines (HBMEC, 16HBE and cancer (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, BXPC3. Confocal analysis of double-labeling experiments demonstrated co-localization of NQO1with alpha-tubulin in mitotic spindles. In studies with BxPc-3 human pancreatic cancer cells the association of NQO1 with mitotic spindles appeared to be unchanged in the presence of NQO1 inhibitors ES936 or dicoumarol suggesting that NQO1 can associate with the mitotic spindle and still retain catalytic activity. Analysis of archival human squamous lung carcinoma tissue immunostained for NQO1 demonstrated positive staining for NQO1 in the spindles of mitotic cells. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate for the first time the association of the quinone reductase NQO1 with the mitotic spindle in human cells.

  14. Globin-based redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Henau, Sasha; Braeckman, Bart P

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have become recognized as signaling cues that participate at all levels of cellular organization. Globins, with their redox-active heme iron and ubiquitous presence, seem ideally suited to participate in ROS metabolism. Here we comment on our recent findings that show the participation of a globin, GLB-12, in a redox signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GLB-12 produces superoxide, a type of ROS, after which this is converted to what appears to be a hydrogen peroxide gradient over the plasma membrane by the activity of intracellular and extracellular superoxide dismutases. In the first part, we discuss in more detail the different regulatory mechanisms that increase the effectiveness of this redox signal. In the second part, we comment on how specific structural and biochemical properties allow this globin to perform redox reactions. Interestingly, these properties are also observed in 2 other C. elegans globins that appear to be involved in redox biology. We therefore hypothesize that globins involved in redox signaling display similar structural and biochemical characteristics and propose that a subgroup of globins can be added to the group of proteins that play a vital role in redox signaling.

  15. Substituent effects on carbocation stability: the pK(R) for p-quinone methide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toteva, Maria M; Moran, Michael; Amyes, Tina L; Richard, John P

    2003-07-23

    A value of k(H) = 1.5 x 10(-)(3) M(-)(1) s(-)(1) has been determined for the generation of simple p-quinone methide by the acid-catalyzed cleavage of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol in water at 25 degrees C and I = 1.0 (NaClO(4)). This was combined with k(s) = 5.8 x 10(6) s(-)(1) for the reverse addition of solvent water to the 4-hydroxybenzyl carbocation [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 6349-6356] to give pK(R) = -9.6 as the Lewis acidity constant of O-protonated p-quinone methide. Values of pK(R) = 2.3 for the Lewis acidity constant of neutral p-quinone methide and pK(add) = -7.6 for the overall addition of solvent water to p-quinone methide to form 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol are also reported. The thermodynamic driving force for transfer of the elements of water from formaldehyde hydrate to p-quinone methide to form formaldehyde and p-(hydroxymethyl)phenol (4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol) is determined as 6 kcal/mol. This relatively small driving force represents the balance between the much stronger chemical bonds to oxygen at the reactant formaldehyde hydrate than at the product p-(hydroxymethyl)phenol and the large stabilization of product arising from the aromatization that accompanies solvent addition to p-quinone methide. The Marcus intrinsic barrier for nucleophilic addition of solvent water to the "extended" carbonyl group at p-quinone methide is estimated to be 4.5 kcal/mol larger than that for the addition of water to the simple carbonyl group of formaldehyde. O-Alkylation of p-quinone methide to give the 4-methoxybenzyl carbocation and of formaldehyde to give a simple oxocarbenium ion results in very little change in the relative Marcus intrinsic barriers for the addition of solvent water to these electrophiles.

  16. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan V.; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier J.; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-03-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and bulk euxinic shales) with the goal of tracking changes in the marine Co reservoir throughout Earth's history. We further provide an overview of the modern marine Co cycle, which we use as a platform to evaluate how changes in the redox state of Earth's surface were likely to have affected marine Co concentrations. Based on sedimentary Co contents and our understanding of marine Co sources and sinks, we propose that from ca. 2.8 to 1.8 Ga the large volume of hydrothermal fluids circulating through abundant submarine ultramafic rocks along with a predominantly anoxic ocean with a low capacity for Co burial resulted in a large dissolved marine Co reservoir. We tentatively propose that there was a decrease in marine Co concentrations after ca. 1.8 Ga resulting from waning hydrothermal Co sources and the expansion of sulfide Co burial flux. Changes in the Co reservoir due to deep-water ventilation in the Neoproterozoic, if they occurred, are not resolvable with the current dataset. Rather, Co enrichments in Phanerozoic euxinic shales deposited during ocean anoxic events (OAE) indicate Co mobilization from expanded anoxic sediments and enhanced hydrothermal sources. A new record of marine Co concentrations provides a platform from which we can reevaluate the role that environmental Co concentrations played in shaping biological Co utilization throughout Earth's history.

  17. Design of an Os Complex-Modified Hydrogel with Optimized Redox Potential for Biosensors and Biofuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyou, Piyanut; Ruff, Adrian; Pöller, Sascha; Ma, Su; Ludwig, Roland; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Multistep synthesis and electrochemical characterization of an Os complex-modified redox hydrogel exhibiting a redox potential ≈+30 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl 3 M KCl) is demonstrated. The careful selection of bipyridine-based ligands bearing N,N-dimethylamino moieties and an amino-linker for the covalent attachment to the polymer backbone ensures the formation of a stable redox polymer with an envisaged redox potential close to 0 V. Most importantly, the formation of an octahedral N6-coordination sphere around the Os central atoms provides improved stability concomitantly with the low formal potential, a low reorganization energy during the Os(3+/2+) redox conversion and a negligible impact on oxygen reduction. By wiring a variety of enzymes such as pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and the FAD-dependent dehydrogenase domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase, low-potential glucose biosensors could be obtained with negligible co-oxidation of common interfering compounds such as uric acid or ascorbic acid. In combination with a bilirubin oxidase-based biocathode, enzymatic biofuel cells with open-circuit voltages of up to 0.54 V were obtained.

  18. Effects of dietary pyrroloquinoline quinone disodium on growth performance, carcass yield and antioxidant status of broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, K G; Zhang, H J; Wang, J; Wu, S G; Yue, H Y; Sun, L L; Qi, G H

    2015-03-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a putative essential nutrient and redox modulator in microorganisms, cell and animal models, has been recognized as a growth promoter in rodents. Growth performance, carcass yield and antioxidant status were evaluated on broiler chickens fed different levels of PQQ disodium (PQQ.Na2). A total of 784 day-old male Arbor Acres (AA) broilers were randomly allotted into seven dietary groups: negative control group (NC) fed a basal diet without virginiamycin (VIR) or PQQ.Na2; a positive control group (PC) fed a diet with 15 mg of VIR/kg diet; and PQQ.Na2 groups fed with 0.05, 0.10, 0.20, 0.40 or 0.80 mg PQQ.Na2/kg diet. Each treatment contained eight replicates with 14 birds each. The feeding trial lasted for 6 weeks. The results showed that chicks fed 0.2 mg PQQ.Na2/kg diet significantly improved growth performance comparable to those in PC group, and the feed efficiency enhancement effects of dietary PQQ.Na2 was more apparent in grower phase. Dietary addition of PQQ.Na2 had the potential to stimulate immune organs development, and low level dietary addition (<0.1 mg/kg) increased plasma lysozyme level. Broilers fed 0.2 mg PQQ.Na2/kg diet gained more carcasses at day 42, and had lower lipid peroxide malondialdehyde content and higher total antioxidant power in plasma. The results indicated that dietary PQQ.Na2 (0.2 mg/kg diet) had the potential to act as a growth promoter comparable to antibiotic in broiler chicks.

  19. Chloride supporting electrolytes for all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soowhan; Vijayakumar, M; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jianlu; Chen, Baowei; Nie, Zimin; Chen, Feng; Hu, Jianzhi; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-10-28

    This paper examines vanadium chloride solutions as electrolytes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery. The chloride solutions were capable of dissolving more than 2.3 M vanadium at varied valence states and remained stable at 0-50 °C. The improved stability appeared due to the formation of a vanadium dinuclear [V(2)O(3)·4H(2)O](4+) or a dinuclear-chloro complex [V(2)O(3)Cl·3H(2)O](3+) in the solutions over a wide temperature range. The all-vanadium redox flow batteries with the chloride electrolytes demonstrated excellent reversibility and fairly high efficiencies. Only negligible, if any, gas evolution was observed. The improved energy capacity and good performance, along with the ease in heat management, would lead to substantial reduction in capital cost and life-cycle cost, making the vanadium chloride redox flow battery a promising candidate for stationary applications.

  20. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy-consuming redox circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E; Reese, Lauren R; Gilliam, Laura A A; Cathey, Brook L; Lark, Daniel S; Smith, Cody D; Muoio, Deborah M; Neufer, P Darrell

    2015-04-15

    Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+/NADH) and anabolic (NADP+/NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homoeostasis, however, is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm)-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced, however, is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyses the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of ΔΨm. The net effect is an automatic fine-tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy-expenditure rates, consistent with their well-known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homoeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance.

  1. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase constitute an energy consuming redox circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey H.; Lin, Chien-Te; Ryan, Terence E.; Reese, Lauren R.; Gilliam, Laura A. A.; Cathey, Brook L.; Lark, Daniel S.; Smith, Cody D.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Neufer, P. Darrell

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cellular proteins rely on reversible redox reactions to establish and maintain biological structure and function. How redox catabolic (NAD+:NADH) and anabolic (NADP+:NADPH) processes integrate during metabolism to maintain cellular redox homeostasis however is unknown. The present work identifies a continuously cycling, mitochondrial membrane potential-dependent redox circuit between the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT). PDHC is shown to produce H2O2 in relation to reducing pressure within the complex. The H2O2 produced however is effectively masked by a continuously cycling redox circuit that links, via glutathione/thioredoxin, to NNT, which catalyzes the regeneration of NADPH from NADH at the expense of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The net effect is an automatic fine tuning of NNT-mediated energy expenditure to metabolic balance at the level of PDHC. In mitochondria, genetic or pharmacological disruptions in the PDHC-NNT redox circuit negate counterbalance changes in energy expenditure. At the whole animal level, mice lacking functional NNT (C57BL/6J) are characterized by lower energy expenditure rates, consistent with their well known susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. These findings suggest the integration of redox sensing of metabolic balance with compensatory changes in energy expenditure provides a potential mechanism by which cellular redox homeostasis is maintained and body weight is defended during periods of positive and negative energy balance. PMID:25643703

  2. Oxygen control of nif gene expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae depends on NifL reduction at the cytoplasmic membrane by electrons derived from the reduced quinone pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Roman; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2003-04-01

    In Klebsiella pneumoniae, the flavoprotein, NifL regulates NifA mediated transcriptional activation of the N2-fixation (nif) genes in response to molecular O2 and ammonium. We investigated the influence of membrane-bound oxidoreductases on nif-regulation by biochemical analysis of purified NifL and by monitoring NifA-mediated expression of nifH'-'lacZ reporter fusions in different mutant backgrounds. NifL-bound FAD-cofactor was reduced by NADH only in the presence of a redox-mediator or inside-out vesicles derived from anaerobically grown K. pneumoniae cells, indicating that in vivo NifL is reduced by electrons derived from membrane-bound oxidoreductases of the anaerobic respiratory chain. This mechanism is further supported by three lines of evidence: First, K. pneumoniae strains carrying null mutations of fdnG or nuoCD showed significantly reduced nif-induction under derepressing conditions, indicating that NifL inhibition of NifA was not relieved in the absence of formate dehydrogenase-N or NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase. The same effect was observed in a heterologous Escherichia coli system carrying a ndh null allele (coding for NADH dehydrogenaseII). Second, studying nif-induction in K. pneumoniae revealed that during anaerobic growth in glycerol, under nitrogen-limitation, the presence of the terminal electron acceptor nitrate resulted in a significant decrease of nif-induction. The final line of evidence is that reduced quinone derivatives, dimethylnaphthoquinol and menadiol, are able to transfer electrons to the FAD-moiety of purified NifL. On the basis of these data, we postulate that under anaerobic and nitrogen-limited conditions, NifL inhibition of NifA activity is relieved by reduction of the FAD-cofactor by electrons derived from the reduced quinone pool, generated by anaerobic respiration, that favours membrane association of NifL. We further hypothesize that the quinol/quinone ratio is important for providing the signal to NifL.

  3. Redox Properties of Free Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neta, P.

    1981-01-01

    Describes pulse radiolysis as a useful means in studing one-electron redox potentials. This method allows the production of radicals and the determination of their concentration and rates of reaction. (CS)

  4. Bifunctional redox flow battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Y.H. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China)], E-mail: wen_yuehua@126.com; Cheng, J. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China); Xun, Y. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, P.H. [Full Cell R and D Center, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Yang, Y.S. [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing Science and Technology University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-08-20

    A new bifunctional redox flow battery (BRFB) system, V(III)/V(II)-L-cystine(O{sub 2}), was systematically investigated by using different separators. It is shown that during charge, water transfer is significantly restricted with increasing the concentration of HBr when the Nafion 115 cation exchange membrane is employed. The same result can be obtained when the gas diffusion layer (GDL) hot-pressed separator is used. The organic electro-synthesis is directly correlated with the crossover of vanadium. When employing the anion exchange membrane, the electro-synthesis efficiency is over 96% due to a minimal crossover of vanadium. When the GDL hot-pressed separator is applied, the crossover of vanadium and water transfer are noticeably prevented and the electro-synthesis efficiency of over 99% is obtained. Those impurities such as vanadium ions and bromine can be eliminated through the purification of organic electro-synthesized products. The purified product is identified to be L-cysteic acid by IR spectrum. The BRFB shows a favorable discharge performance at a current density of 20 mA cm{sup -2}. Best discharge performance is achieved by using the GDL hot-pressed separator. The coulombic efficiency of 87% and energy efficiency of about 58% can be obtained. The cause of major energy losses is mainly associated with the cross-contamination of anodic and cathodic active electrolytes.

  5. Globin-based redox signaling

    OpenAIRE

    De Henau, Sasha; Braeckman, Bart

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have become recognized as signaling cues that participate at all levels of cellular organization. Globins, with their redox-active heme iron and ubiquitous presence, seem ideally suited to participate in ROS metabolism. Here we comment on our recent findings that show the participation of a globin, GLB-12, in a redox signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GLB-12 produces superoxide, a type of ROS, a...

  6. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R. Griffiths

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites.

  7. Spare quinones in the QB cavity of crystallized photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Roland; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2007-06-01

    The recent crystallographic structure at 3.0 A resolution of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus has revealed a cavity in the protein which connects the membrane phase to the binding pocket of the secondary plastoquinone Q(B). The cavity may serve as a quinone diffusion pathway. By fluorescence methods, electron transfer at the donor and acceptor sides was investigated in the same membrane-free PSII core particle preparation from T. elongatus prior to and after crystallization; PSII membrane fragments from spinach were studied as a reference. The data suggest selective enrichment of those PSII centers in the crystal that are intact with respect to O(2) evolution at the manganese-calcium complex of water oxidation and with respect to the integrity of the quinone binding site. One and more functional quinone molecules (per PSII monomer) besides of Q(A) and Q(B) were found in the crystallized PSII. We propose that the extra quinones are located in the Q(B) cavity and serve as a PSII intrinsic pool of electron acceptors.

  8. Anaerobic mineralization of toluene by enriched sediments with quinones and humus as terminal electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Dijksma, W.; Duong-Dac, T.; Ivanova, A.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic microbial oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled to humus respiration was demonstrated by use of enriched anaerobic sediments from the Amsterdam petroleum harbor (APH) and the Rhine River. Both highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA) and the humic quinone moiety model compound anthraquin

  9. Anaerobic mineralization of toluene by enriched sediments with quinones and humus as terminal electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes, F.J.; Dijksma, W.; Duong-Dac, T.; Ivanova, A.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic microbial oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled to humus respiration was demonstrated by use of enriched anaerobic sediments from the Amsterdam petroleum harbor (APH) and the Rhine River. Both highly purified soil humic acids (HPSHA) and the humic quinone moiety model compound

  10. Selective enrichment of Geobacter sulfurreducens from anaerobic granular sludge with quinones as terminal electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervantes-Carillo, F.J.; Duong Dac, T.; Ivanova, A.E.; Roest, de K.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Lettinga, G.; Field, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    A quinone-respiring, enrichment culture derived from methanogenic granular sludge was phylogenetically characterized by using a combined cloning-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method, which revealed that the consortium developed was dominated by a single microorganism: 97% related, i

  11. Induction of micronuclei and aneuploidy by the quinone-forming agents benzene and o-phenylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastmond, D A

    1993-04-01

    A number of carcinogens appear to exert their tumorigenic effects through the formation of quinone metabolites. These quinone-forming carcinogens are generally inactive or weakly active in standard gene mutation assays. Accumulating evidence indicates that this class of compounds may exert their genotoxic and carcinogenic effects through the induction of large-scale gene alterations. This article presents an overview of work that has been performed using recently developed molecular cytogenic techniques to investigate the aneuploidy-inducing and clastogenic properties of the major quinone-forming metabolites of benzene, a widely used industrial chemical, and o-phenylphenol, a fungicide and disinfectant. These metabolites of benzene (hydroquinone, catechol, and benzenetriol) and o-phenylphenol (phenylhydroquinone) have each been shown to be capable of interfering with chromosome segregation and inducing chromosomal breakage. These results indicate that both numerical and structural chromosomal aberrations induced by the quinone metabolites of benzene and o-phenylphenol may play a role in the carcinogenic effects of these two agents.

  12. Role of Catechin Quinones in the Induction of EpRE-Mediated Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muzolf-Panek, M.; Gliszczynska-Swiglo, A.; Haan, de L.H.J.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Szymusiak, H.; Vervoort, J.J.M.; Tyrakowska, B.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, the ability of green tea catechins to induce electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated gene expression and the role of their quinones in the mechanism of this induction were investigated. To this end, Hepa1c1c7 mouse hepatoma cells were used, stably transfected with a luc

  13. Catalytic aerobic oxidation of phenols to ortho-quinones with air-stable copper precatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, M S; Rodríguez-Solano, L A; Proppe, A; McAllister, B; Lumb, J-P; Ottenwaelder, X

    2015-07-21

    A range of air-stable copper species was examined for catalytic activity in the catalytic aerobic transformation of phenols into ortho-quinones. Efficient catalysis was obtained with commercially available copper(II) acetate. The stability of all constituents before mixing makes for a practical process that advances previously reported copper(I)-based oxygenations.

  14. Preserving the adhesion of catechol-conjugated hydrogels by thiourea-quinone coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang J; Wei, Kongchang; Zhao, Pengchao; Feng, Qian; Choi, Chun Kit K; Bian, Liming

    2016-11-15

    Mussel adhesion has inspired the development of catechol-based adhesive polymers. However, conventional strategies require basic pH conditions and lead to the loss of adhesion. To solve the problem, we report the first attempt to use thiourea-functionalized polymers for preserving hydrogel adhesion. We believe that this simple thiourea-quinone coupling chemistry is instrumental to synthetic adhesive materials.

  15. Studies on Antibacterial QSAR of Diterpene Quinones from Sclvic Przewalskii Maxim

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Ming; SHI Yan-bin; CUI Yin; ZHOU Zong-tian; ZHANG Bin; LUO Yong-jiang; XIA Wen-jiang; ZHAO Rong-cai; WANG Han-qing

    2001-01-01

    The antibacierial (staphylococcus aureus) activities of 23 diterpene quinones from the Salvia przewalskii Maxim, the artificial synthesis ones and that of the metabolism in pigs were examined in an effort to study the quantitative structure activity relationship with the Free-Wilson method. With the application of the multipiy regression, the Free-Wilson pattern was established by the dummy (indicator) variable of the structural fragments or substituents. The results showed: (1) The diketone moiety played the fundamental role in antibacterial activities, ortho-quinones was higher active than para-quinones. (2) The single bond existed between the C15 and the C16 at D-ring led to higher activity. (3) The saturation at the A-ring led to higher activity. (4) The components adjacent to nitrogen substituents at C15 led to higher activity. (5)The hydroxylation or dehydrogenation at A-ring led to less activity. The research results can provide the theoretical basis for developing a new antibacterial drug from the Salvia diterpene quinones.

  16. Genomic Analysis of the Human Gut Microbiome Suggests Novel Enzymes Involved in Quinone Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Thiele, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinone and menaquinone are membrane lipid-soluble carriers of electrons that are essential for cellular respiration. Eukaryotic cells can synthesize ubiquinone but not menaquinone, whereas prokaryotes can synthesize both quinones. So far, most of the human gut microbiome (HGM) studies have been based on metagenomic analysis. Here, we applied an analysis of individual HGM genomes to the identification of ubiquinone and menaquinone biosynthetic pathways. In our opinion, the shift from metagenomics to analysis of individual genomes is a pivotal milestone in investigation of bacterial communities, including the HGM. The key results of this study are as follows. (i) The distribution of the canonical pathways in the HGM genomes was consistent with previous reports and with the distribution of the quinone-dependent reductases for electron acceptors. (ii) The comparative genomics analysis identified four alternative forms of the previously known enzymes for quinone biosynthesis. (iii) Genes for the previously unknown part of the futalosine pathway were identified, and the corresponding biochemical reactions were proposed. We discuss the remaining gaps in the menaquinone and ubiquinone pathways in some of the microbes, which indicate the existence of further alternate genes or routes. Together, these findings provide further insight into the biosynthesis of quinones in bacteria and the physiology of the HGM. PMID:26904004

  17. Identification of NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase activity in azoreductases from P. aeruginosa: azoreductases and NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductases belong to the same FMN-dependent superfamily of enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ryan

    Full Text Available Water soluble quinones are a group of cytotoxic anti-bacterial compounds that are secreted by many species of plants, invertebrates, fungi and bacteria. Studies in a number of species have shown the importance of quinones in response to pathogenic bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas. Two electron reduction is an important mechanism of quinone detoxification as it generates the less toxic quinol. In most organisms this reaction is carried out by a group of flavoenzymes known as NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductases. Azoreductases have previously been separate from this group, however using azoreductases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa we show that they can rapidly reduce quinones. Azoreductases from the same organism are also shown to have distinct substrate specificity profiles allowing them to reduce a wide range of quinones. The azoreductase family is also shown to be more extensive than originally thought, due to the large sequence divergence amongst its members. As both NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductases and azoreductases have related reaction mechanisms it is proposed that they form an enzyme superfamily. The ubiquitous and diverse nature of azoreductases alongside their broad substrate specificity, indicates they play a wide role in cellular survival under adverse conditions.

  18. Force Spectroscopy of Individual Stimulus-Responsive Poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) Chains: Towards a Redox-Driven Macromolecular Motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zou, Shan; Hempenius, Mark A.; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, G. Julius

    2006-01-01

    Progress in the development of a redox-driven macromolecular motor and the characterization of its redox-mechanical cycle using electrochemical AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) is described. The elasticities of individual neutral and oxidized poly(ferrocenyldimethylsilane) (PFS) m

  19. X-ray structural studies of quinone reductase 2 nanomolar range inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegan, Scott D.; Sturdy, Megan; Ferry, Gilles; Delagrange, Philippe; Boutin, Jean A.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (IdRS); (Purdue); (Colorado); (UIC)

    2011-09-06

    Quinone reductase 2 (QR2) is one of two members comprising the mammalian quinone reductase family of enzymes responsible for performing FAD mediated reductions of quinone substrates. In contrast to quinone reductase 1 (QR1) which uses NAD(P)H as its co-substrate, QR2 utilizes a rare group of hydride donors, N-methyl or N-ribosyl nicotinamide. Several studies have linked QR2 to the generation of quinone free radicals, several neuronal degenerative diseases, and cancer. QR2 has been also identified as the third melatonin receptor (MT3) through in cellulo and in vitro inhibition of QR2 by traditional MT3 ligands, and through recent X-ray structures of human QR2 (hQR2) in complex with melatonin and 2-iodomelatonin. Several MT3 specific ligands have been developed that exhibit both potent in cellulo inhibition of hQR2 nanomolar, affinity for MT3. The potency of these ligands suggest their use as molecular probes for hQR2. However, no definitive correlation between traditionally obtained MT3 ligand affinity and hQR2 inhibition exists limiting our understanding of how these ligands are accommodated in the hQR2 active site. To obtain a clearer relationship between the structures of developed MT3 ligands and their inhibitory properties, in cellulo and in vitro IC{sub 50} values were determined for a representative set of MT3 ligands (MCA-NAT, 2-I-MCANAT, prazosin, S26695, S32797, and S29434). Furthermore, X-ray structures for each of these ligands in complex with hQR2 were determined allowing for a structural evaluation of the binding modes of these ligands in relation to the potency of MT3 ligands.

  20. Electrochemical and microstructural characterization of cyclic redox behaviour of SOFC anodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Jiangrong; SUN Kening; ZHOU Derui; ZHANG Naiqing; QIAO Jinshuo

    2006-01-01

    The oxidation of Ni to NiO in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode will result in large bulk volume change, which may change the interfaces of the two phases in the anode cermet and thus may cause significant performance degradation. The reduction and oxidation (redox) of the Ni/YSZ cermet were studied at 800 ℃. Anodic polarization measurements were performed before and after redox cycles. The anode current density at an overpotential of 100 mV kept decreasing during the whole redox treatment. It decreased from 19.11 to 7.95 mA·cm-2 after two redox cycles. Anode supported unit cell was assembled for cell's discharge measurements. Cell performance declined after each redox cycle. The maximum power density decreased from 126.28 to 40.32 mW·cm-2 . The microstructural changes after redox cycling were recorded using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results reveal that after re-oxidation, the Ni gets coarse and has a higher porosity; the nickel network structure turns to be desultory.

  1. Improved localization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in cells with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride as fluorescent redox dye reveals its cell cycle-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiks, Wilma M; van Marle, Jan; van Oven, Carel; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Cascante, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Since the introduction of cyano-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride (CTC), a tetrazolium salt that gives rise to a fluorescent formazan after reduction, it has been applied to quantify activity of dehydrogenases in individual cells using flow cytometry. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that the fluorescent formazan was exclusively localized at the surface of individual cells and not at intracellular sites of enzyme activity. In the present study, the technique has been optimized to localize activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) intracellularly in individual cells. Activity was demonstrated in cultured fibrosarcoma cells in different stages of the cell cycle. Cells were incubated for the detection of G6PD activity using a medium containing 6% (w/v) polyvinyl alcohol, 5 mM CTC, magnesium chloride, sodium azide, the electron carrier methoxyphenazine methosulphate, NADP, and glucose-6-phosphate. Before incubation, cells were permeabilized with 0.025% glutaraldehyde. Fluorescent formazan was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of fibrosarcoma cells. The amount of fluorescent formazan in cells increased linearly with incubation time when measured with flow cytometry and CLSM. When combining the Hoechst staining for DNA with the CTC method for the demonstration of G6PD activity, flow cytometry showed that G6PD activity of cells in S phase and G2/M phase is 27 +/- 4% and 43 +/- 4% higher, respectively, than that of cells in G1 phase. CLSM revealed that cells in all phases of mitosis as well as during apoptosis contained considerably lower G6PD activity than cells in interphase. It is concluded that posttranslational regulation of G6PD is responsible for this cell cycle-dependent activity.

  2. New Supercapacitors Based on the Synergetic Redox Effect between Electrode and Electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Redox electrolytes can provide significant enhancement of capacitance for supercapacitors. However, more important promotion comes from the synergetic effect and matching between the electrode and electrolyte. Herein, we report a novel electrochemical system consisted of a polyanilline/carbon nanotube composite redox electrode and a hydroquinone (HQ redox electrolyte, which exhibits a specific capacitance of 7926 F/g in a three-electrode system when the concentration of HQ in H2SO4 aqueous electrolyte is 2 mol/L, and the maximum energy density of 114 Wh/kg in two-electrode symmetric configuration. Moreover, the specific capacitance retention of 96% after 1000 galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles proves an excellent cyclic stability. These ultrahigh performances of the supercapacitor are attributed to the synergistic effect both in redox polyanilline-based electrolyte and the redox hydroquinone electrode.

  3. High performance hybrid supercapacitors by using para-Benzoquinone ionic liquid redox electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalpotro, Paula; Palma, Jesús; Anderson, Marc; Marcilla, Rebeca

    2016-02-01

    A solution of 0.4M para-Benzoquinone (p-BQ) in the ionic liquid N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide (PYR14TFSI) was used as a redox electrolyte in hybrid supercapacitors. Two carbons with very different textural properties, Pica carbon and Vulcan carbon, were used as electrode material. Electrochemical performance of these energy storage systems was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (CD). Unlike SCs with pure IL electrolyte, new battery-like features appeared in the CV curves and CD profiles. This electrochemical performance, associated with the faradaic contribution of the redox electrolyte, results in a significant improvement of the electrochemical performance of the hybrid system. For Vulcan carbon with low specific surface area (SBET = 240 m2 g-1), specific capacitance (Cs) and specific real energy (Ereal) values as high as 70 Fg-1 and 10.3 WhKg-1 were obtained at 5 mAcm-2 with hybrid SC operating at 3 V. This represents an increment of 300% in Cs and Ereal with respect to the SC based on pure PYR14TFSI. For high surface area carbon such as Pica (SBET = 2410 m2g-1), the addition of the redox quinone molecule resulted in a moderate enhancement reaching values of 156 Fg-1 and 30 WhKg-1 under the same experimental conditions (36% and 10% increment, respectively).

  4. Redox-mediated bypass of restriction point via skipping of G1pm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene James J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known that cancer cells bypass the restriction point, R, and undergo uncontrolled cell proliferation. Hypothesis and evidence We suggest here that fibrosarcoma cells enter G1ps directly from M, skipping G1pm, hence bypassing R, in response to redox modulation. Evidence is presented from the published literature that demonstrate a shortening of the cycle period of transformed fibroblasts (SV-3T3 compared to the nontransformed 3T3 fibroblasts, corresponding to the duration of G1pm in the 3T3 fibroblasts. Evidence is also presented that demonstrate that redox modulation can induce the CUA-4 fibroblasts to bypass R, resulting in a cycle period closely corresponding to the cycle period of fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080. Conclusion The evidence supports our hypothesis that a low internal redox potential can cause fibrosarcoma cells to skip the G1pm phase of the cell cycle.

  5. Redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantadosi, Claude A; Suliman, Hagir B

    2012-12-01

    The cell renews, adapts, or expands its mitochondrial population during episodes of cell damage or periods of intensified energy demand by the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis. This bigenomic program is modulated by redox-sensitive signals that respond to physiological nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. This review summarizes our current ideas about the pathways involved in the activation of mitochondrial biogenesis by the physiological gases leading to changes in the redox milieu of the cell, with an emphasis on the responses to oxidative stress and inflammation. The cell's energy supply is protected from conditions that damage mitochondria by an inducible transcriptional program of mitochondrial biogenesis that operates in large part through redox signals involving the nitric oxide synthase and the heme oxygenase-1/CO systems. These redox events stimulate the coordinated activities of several multifunctional transcription factors and coactivators also involved in the elimination of defective mitochondria and the expression of counterinflammatory and antioxidant genes, such as IL10 and SOD2, as part of a unified damage-control network. The redox-regulated mechanisms of mitochondrial biogenesis schematically outlined in the graphical abstract link mitochondrial quality control to an enhanced capacity to support the cell's metabolic needs while improving its resistance to metabolic failure and avoidance of cell death during periods of oxidative stress.

  6. Redox Homeostasis in Pancreatic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Ježek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed mechanisms that determine reactive oxygen species (redox homeostasis, redox information signaling and metabolic/regulatory function of autocrine insulin signaling in pancreatic β cells, and consequences of oxidative stress and dysregulation of redox/information signaling for their dysfunction. We emphasize the role of mitochondrion in β cell molecular physiology and pathology, including the antioxidant role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP2. Since in pancreatic β cells pyruvate cannot be easily diverted towards lactate dehydrogenase for lactate formation, the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation intensity are governed by the availability of glucose, leading to a certain ATP/ADP ratio, whereas in other cell types, cell demand dictates respiration/metabolism rates. Moreover, we examine the possibility that type 2 diabetes mellitus might be considered as an inevitable result of progressive self-accelerating oxidative stress and concomitantly dysregulated information signaling in peripheral tissues as well as in pancreatic β cells. It is because the redox signaling is inherent to the insulin receptor signaling mechanism and its impairment leads to the oxidative and nitrosative stress. Also emerging concepts, admiting participation of redox signaling even in glucose sensing and insulin release in pancreatic β cells, fit in this view. For example, NADPH has been firmly established to be a modulator of glucose-stimulated insulin release.

  7. Redox electrode materials for supercapatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linpo; Chen, George Z.

    2016-09-01

    Redox electrode materials, including transition metal oxides and electronically conducting polymers, are capable of faradaic charge transfer reactions, and play important roles in most electrochemical energy storage devices, such as supercapacitor, battery and supercapattery. Batteries are often based on redox materials with low power capability and safety concerns in some cases. Supercapacitors, particularly those based on redox inactive materials, e.g. activated carbon, can offer high power output, but have relatively low energy capacity. Combining the merits of supercapacitor and battery into a hybrid, the supercapattery can possess energy as much as the battery and output a power almost as high as the supercapacitor. Redox electrode materials are essential in the supercapattery design. However, it is hard to utilise these materials easily because of their intrinsic characteristics, such as the low conductivity of metal oxides and the poor mechanical strength of conducting polymers. This article offers a brief introduction of redox electrode materials, the basics of supercapattery and its relationship with pseudocapacitors, and reviews selectively some recent progresses in the relevant research and development.

  8. Sedimentary cobalt concentrations track marine redox evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanner, Elizabeth; Planavsky, Noah; Lalonde, Stefan; Robbins, Jamie; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2013-04-01

    Oxygen production by photosynthesis drove the redox evolution of the atmosphere and ocean. Primary productivity by oxygenic photosynthesizers in the modern surface ocean is limited by trace nutrients such as iron, but previous studies have also observed high Co uptake associated with natural cyanobacterial populations. Constraining the size and variation of the oceanic reservoir of Co through time will help to understand the regulation of primary productivity and hence oxygenation through time. In this study, Co concentrations from iron formations (IF), shales and marine pyrites deposited over nearly 4 billion years of Earth's history are utilized to reconstruct secular changes in the mechanisms of Co removal from the oceanic reservoir. The Co reservoir prior to ~2 Ga was dominated by hydrothermal inputs and Fe(III)oxyhydroxides were likely involved in the removal of Co from the water column. Fe(II) oxidation in the water column resulted in the deposition of IF in the Archean and Paleoproterozoic, and the Co inventory of IF records a large oceanic reservoir of Co during this time. Lower Co concentrations in sediments during the Middle Proterozoic signify a decrease in the oceanic reservoir due to the expansion euxinic environments, corresponding to the results of previous studies. A transition to an oxidized deep ocean in the Phanerozoic is evidenced by correlation between Co and manganese (Mn) concentrations in hydrothermal and exhalative deposits, and in marine pyrites. This relationship between Co and Mn, signifying deposition of Co in association with Mn(IV)oxides, does not occur in the Precambrian. Mn(II) oxidation occurs at higher redox potentials than that required for Fe(II) oxidation, and the extent of Mn redox cycling prior to full ventilation of the oceans at the end of the Neoproterozoic was likely limited to spatially restricted oxic surface waters. In this regard, Co is another valuable redox proxy for tracking the growth and decline in oxygenated

  9. Sustainable Redox Mediation for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries by a Composite Protective Layer on the Lithium-Metal Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Jin; Lee, Hongkyung; Kim, Yun-Jung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2016-02-03

    A synergic combination of a soluble -redox mediator and a protected Li metal -electrode to prevent the self-discharge of the redox mediator is realized by -exploiting a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl 1-oxyl (TEMPO) redox mediator and an Al2 O3 /PVdF-HFP composite -protective layer (CPL). Stabilization of Li metal by simple CPL coating is effective at -suppressing the chemical reduction of the oxidized TEMPO and opens up the possibility of sustainable redox mediation for robust cycling of Li-O2 batteries.

  10. Radical Compatibility with Nonaqueous Electrolytes and Its Impact on an All-Organic Redox Flow Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Huang, Jinhua; Zhang, Lu; Walter, Eric D.; Lawrence, Chad W.; Vijayakumar, M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Li, Bin; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-07-20

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries hold the promise to achieve higher energy density ascribed to the broader voltage window than their aqueous counterparts, but their current performance is limited by low redox material concentration, poor cell efficiency, and inferior cycling stability. We report a new nonaqueous total-organic flow battery based on high concentrations of 9-fluorenone as negative and 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1-methoxy-4-[2’-methoxyethoxy]benzene as positive redox materials. The supporting electrolytes are found to greatly affect the cycling stability of flow cells through varying chemical stabilities of the charged radical species, especially the 9-fluorenone radical anions, as confirmed by electron spin resonance. Such an electrolyte optimization sheds light on mechanistic understandings of capacity fading in flow batteries employing organic radical-based redox materials and demonstrates that rational design of supporting electrolyte is vital for stable cyclability.

  11. Taming reactive phenol tautomers and o-quinone methides with transition metals: a structure-reactivity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amouri, Hani; Le Bras, Jean

    2002-07-01

    Quinone methides act as important intermediates in organic syntheses, as well as in chemical and biological processes; however, examples of such isolated species are scarce as a result of their high reactivity. Phenol tautomers (keto form of phenol) are also important intermediates in several organic and organometallic reactions; nevertheless, isolated complexes are rare. This Account reviews the recent progress on the synthesis and reactivity of iridium and rhodium o-quinone methide complexes as well as on iridium-mediated ortho functionalization of phenols. This reaction was at the origin of the discovery of a general synthetic procedure to prepare the first metal-stabilized o-quinone methide.

  12. Mitochondrial redox and pH signaling occurs in axonal and synaptic organelle clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Michael O; Armoundas, Antonis A; Aon, Miguel A; Bendszus, Martin; O'Rourke, Brian; Schwarzländer, Markus; Dick, Tobias P; Kurz, Felix T

    2016-03-22

    Redox switches are important mediators in neoplastic, cardiovascular and neurological disorders. We recently identified spontaneous redox signals in neurons at the single mitochondrion level where transients of glutathione oxidation go along with shortening and re-elongation of the organelle. We now have developed advanced image and signal-processing methods to re-assess and extend previously obtained data. Here we analyze redox and pH signals of entire mitochondrial populations. In total, we quantified the effects of 628 redox and pH events in 1797 mitochondria from intercostal axons and neuromuscular synapses using optical sensors (mito-Grx1-roGFP2; mito-SypHer). We show that neuronal mitochondria can undergo multiple redox cycles exhibiting markedly different signal characteristics compared to single redox events. Redox and pH events occur more often in mitochondrial clusters (medium cluster size: 34.1 ± 4.8 μm(2)). Local clusters possess higher mitochondrial densities than the rest of the axon, suggesting morphological and functional inter-mitochondrial coupling. We find that cluster formation is redox sensitive and can be blocked by the antioxidant MitoQ. In a nerve crush paradigm, mitochondrial clusters form sequentially adjacent to the lesion site and oxidation spreads between mitochondria. Our methodology combines optical bioenergetics and advanced signal processing and allows quantitative assessment of entire mitochondrial populations.

  13. Analysis of the redox oscillations in the circadian clockwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Nikolay B.; Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K.; Edgar, Rachel S.; O’Neill, John S.; Reddy, Akhilesh B.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of tight coupling between the circadian system and redox homeostasis of the cell has been proposed to coincide roughly with the appearance of the first aerobic organisms, around 3 billion years ago. The rhythmic production of oxygen and its effect on core metabolism are thought to have exerted selective pressure for the temporal segregation of numerous metabolic pathways. Until recently, the only evidence for such coupling came from studies showing circadian cycles in the abundance of various redox metabolites, with many arguing that these oscillations are simply an output from the transcription/translation-feedback loop (TTFL). The recent discovery that the peroxiredoxin (PRX) proteins exhibit circadian cycles in their oxidation status, even in the absence of transcription, demonstrated the existence of autonomous oscillations in the redox status of the cell. The PRXs are a family of cellular thiol peroxidases whose abundance and high reaction rate make them the major cellular sink for cellular peroxides. Interestingly, as part of the normal catalytic cycle, PRXs become inactivated by their own substrate via over-oxidation of the catalytic residue, with the inactivated form of the enzyme displaying circadian accumulation. Here, we describe the biochemical properties of the PRX system, with particular emphasis on the features important for the experimental analysis of these enzymes. We will also present a detailed protocol for measuring PRX over-oxidation across circadian time in adherent cell cultures, red blood cells and fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), providing practical suggestions for ensuring consistency and reproducibility of the results. PMID:25707278

  14. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Borshchevskiy

    Full Text Available Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium.

  15. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borshchevskiy, Valentin; Round, Ekaterina; Bertsova, Yulia; Polovinkin, Vitaly; Gushchin, Ivan; Ishchenko, Andrii; Kovalev, Kirill; Mishin, Alexey; Kachalova, Galina; Popov, Alexander; Bogachev, Alexander; Gordeliy, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR) is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium.

  16. Tuning of Hemes b Equilibrium Redox Potential Is Not Required for Cross-Membrane Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintscher, Sebastian; Kuleta, Patryk; Cieluch, Ewelina; Borek, Arkadiusz; Sarewicz, Marcin; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-03-25

    In biological energy conversion, cross-membrane electron transfer often involves an assembly of two hemesb The hemes display a large difference in redox midpoint potentials (ΔEm_b), which in several proteins is assumed to facilitate cross-membrane electron transfer and overcome a barrier of membrane potential. Here we challenge this assumption reporting on hemebligand mutants of cytochromebc1in which, for the first time in transmembrane cytochrome, one natural histidine has been replaced by lysine without loss of the native low spin type of heme iron. With these mutants we show that ΔEm_b can be markedly increased, and the redox potential of one of the hemes can stay above the level of quinone pool, or ΔEm_b can be markedly decreased to the point that two hemes are almost isopotential, yet the enzyme retains catalytically competent electron transfer between quinone binding sites and remains functionalin vivo This reveals that cytochromebc1can accommodate large changes in ΔEm_b without hampering catalysis, as long as these changes do not impose overly endergonic steps on downhill electron transfer from substrate to product. We propose that hemesbin this cytochrome and in other membranous cytochromesbact as electronic connectors for the catalytic sites with no fine tuning in ΔEm_b required for efficient cross-membrane electron transfer. We link this concept with a natural flexibility in occurrence of several thermodynamic configurations of the direction of electron flow and the direction of the gradient of potential in relation to the vector of the electric membrane potential. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Copper dynamics under alternating redox conditions is influenced by soil properties and contamination source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Ramona; Said-Pullicino, Daniel; Ajmone-Marsan, Franco

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of soil redox conditions on contaminant dynamics is of significant importance for evaluating their lability, mobility and potential transfer to other environmental compartments. Under changing redox conditions, soil properties and constituents such as Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and organic matter (OM) may influence the behavior of associated metallic elements (MEs). In this work, the redox-driven release and redistribution of Cu between different soil pools was studied in three soils having different contamination sources. This was achieved by subjecting soil columns to a series of alternating reducing and oxidizing cycles under non-limiting C conditions, and assessing their influence on soil pore water, leachate and solid phase composition. Results showed that, in all soils, alternating redox conditions led to an increase in the distribution of Cu in the more labile fractions, consequently enhancing its susceptibility to loss. This was generally linked to the redox-driven cycling of Fe, Mn and dissolved organic matter (DOM). In fact, results suggested that the reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides and subsequent reprecipitation as poorly-ordered phases under oxic conditions contributed to the release and mobilization of Cu and/or Cu-containing organometallic complexes. However, the behavior of Cu, as well as the mechanisms controlling Cu release and loss with redox cycling, was influenced by both soil properties (e.g. pH, contents of easily reducible Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides) and source of Cu contamination.

  18. Progress on Synthesis and Applications of Redox Poly (hydroquinone)%氧化还原活性的聚对苯二酚的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张爱娟; 张文静; 张拥军; 关英

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroquione (PHQ) is a polymer that only contains quinone and hydroquinone groups in its main chain. PHQ retain the characters of quinones, such as redox activity and reversibility consisting of two electron transfer. Compared with monomer, the polymer PHQ has shown improved heat-resistance. As a redox polymer,PHQ has a low redox potential and a fast electron transfer rate, and has been used as an electron mediator for bio-sensors and as an antioxidant or a redox polymer agent since it can capture radicals quickly. The progress on the preparation of PHQ,and on the study of their structure and redox properties and applications is summarized.%聚对苯二酚是一类主链完全由醌和氢醌组成的氧化还原聚合物,保持了醌、酚的性质,具有良好的氧化还原可逆性,并能进行二电子的氧化还原;同时,与醌和酚相比,热稳定性高.该聚合物氧化还原电位低,电子转移速率快,可应用于生物传感器中的电子媒介体.此外,该聚合物还能快速捕获自由基,可做为抗氧化剂和高分子氧化还原试剂等.本文综述了聚对苯二酚的制备方法,结构特征,可逆氧化还原电化学性质及其在生物传感器、抗氧化剂等领域的应用.

  19. Molecular and Catalytic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, a Quinoheme Protein Containing Pyrroloquinoline Quinone, Cytochrome b, and Cytochrome c▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, S.; Chavez-Pacheco, J. L.; Contreras-Zentella, M.; Sosa-Torres, M. E.; Arreguín-Espinosa, R.; Pérez de la Mora, M.; Membrillo-Hernández, J.; Escamilla, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Several aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) complexes have been purified from the membranes of acetic acid bacteria. The enzyme structures and the chemical nature of the prosthetic groups associated with these enzymes remain a matter of debate. We report here on the molecular and catalytic properties of the membrane-bound ALDH complex of the diazotrophic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. The purified ALDH complex is a heterodimer comprising two subunits of 79.7 and 50 kDa, respectively. Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy led us to demonstrate, for the first time, the unequivocal presence of a pyrroloquinoline quinone prosthetic group associated with an ALDH complex from acetic acid bacteria. In addition, heme b was detected by UV-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and confirmed by reversed-phase HPLC. The smaller subunit bears three cytochromes c. Aliphatic aldehydes, but not formaldehyde, were suitable substrates. Using ferricyanide as an electron acceptor, the enzyme showed an optimum pH of 3.5 that shifted to pH 7.0 when phenazine methosulfate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol were the electron acceptors. Acetaldehyde did not reduce measurable levels of the cytochrome b and c centers; however, the dithionite-reduced hemes were conveniently oxidized by ubiquinone-1; this finding suggests that cytochrome b and the cytochromes c constitute an intramolecular redox sequence that delivers electrons to the membrane ubiquinone. PMID:20802042

  20. Molecular and catalytic properties of the aldehyde dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, a quinoheme protein containing pyrroloquinoline quinone, cytochrome b, and cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, S; Chavez-Pacheco, J L; Contreras-Zentella, M; Sosa-Torres, M E; Arreguín-Espinosa, R; Pérez de la Mora, M; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Escamilla, J E

    2010-11-01

    Several aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) complexes have been purified from the membranes of acetic acid bacteria. The enzyme structures and the chemical nature of the prosthetic groups associated with these enzymes remain a matter of debate. We report here on the molecular and catalytic properties of the membrane-bound ALDH complex of the diazotrophic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. The purified ALDH complex is a heterodimer comprising two subunits of 79.7 and 50 kDa, respectively. Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy led us to demonstrate, for the first time, the unequivocal presence of a pyrroloquinoline quinone prosthetic group associated with an ALDH complex from acetic acid bacteria. In addition, heme b was detected by UV-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and confirmed by reversed-phase HPLC. The smaller subunit bears three cytochromes c. Aliphatic aldehydes, but not formaldehyde, were suitable substrates. Using ferricyanide as an electron acceptor, the enzyme showed an optimum pH of 3.5 that shifted to pH 7.0 when phenazine methosulfate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol were the electron acceptors. Acetaldehyde did not reduce measurable levels of the cytochrome b and c centers; however, the dithionite-reduced hemes were conveniently oxidized by ubiquinone-1; this finding suggests that cytochrome b and the cytochromes c constitute an intramolecular redox sequence that delivers electrons to the membrane ubiquinone.

  1. Oxidant-induced formation of a neutral flavosemiquinone in the Na+-translocating NADH:Quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Minli; Casutt, Marco S; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2008-01-01

    The Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is a respiratory flavo-FeS complex composed of the six subunits NqrA-F. The Na(+)-NQR was produced as His(6)-tagged protein by homologous expression in V. cholerae. The isolated complex contained near-stoichiometric amounts of non-covalently bound FAD (0.78 mol/mol Na(+)-NQR) and riboflavin (0.70 mol/mol Na(+)-NQR), catalyzed NADH-driven Na(+) transport (40 nmol Na(+)min(-1) mg(-1)), and was inhibited by 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. EPR spectroscopy showed that Na(+)-NQR as isolated contained very low amounts of a neutral flavosemiquinone (10(-3) mol/mol Na(+)-NQR). Reduction with NADH resulted in the formation of an anionic flavosemiquinone (0.10 mol/mol Na(+)-NQR). Subsequent oxidation of the Na(+)-NQR with ubiquinone-1 or O(2) led to the formation of a neutral flavosemiquinone (0.24 mol/mol Na(+)-NQR). We propose that the Na(+)-NQR is fully oxidized in its resting state, and discuss putative schemes of NADH-triggered redox transitions.

  2. Localization and function of the membrane-bound riboflavin in the Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casutt, Marco S; Huber, Tamara; Brunisholz, René; Tao, Minli; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2010-08-27

    The sodium ion-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is a respiratory membrane protein complex that couples the oxidation of NADH to the transport of Na(+) across the bacterial membrane. The Na(+)-NQR comprises the six subunits NqrABCDEF, but the stoichiometry and arrangement of these subunits are unknown. Redox-active cofactors are FAD and a 2Fe-2S cluster on NqrF, covalently attached FMNs on NqrB and NqrC, and riboflavin and ubiquinone-8 with unknown localization in the complex. By analyzing the cofactor content and NADH oxidation activity of subcomplexes of the Na(+)-NQR lacking individual subunits, the riboflavin cofactor was unequivocally assigned to the membrane-bound NqrB subunit. Quantitative analysis of the N-terminal amino acids of the holo-complex revealed that NqrB is present in a single copy in the holo-complex. It is concluded that the hydrophobic NqrB harbors one riboflavin in addition to its covalently attached FMN. The catalytic role of two flavins in subunit NqrB during the reduction of ubiquinone to ubiquinol by the Na(+)-NQR is discussed.

  3. Heats of formation and protonation thermochemistry of gaseous benzaldehyde, tropone and quinone methides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoux, Guy

    2010-08-01

    Quantum chemistry calculations using composite G3B3, G3MP2B3 and CBS-QB3 methods were performed for benzaldehyde, 1, tropone, 2, ortho-quinone methide, 3, para-quinone methide, 4, their protonated forms 1H+- 4H+ and the isomeric meta-hydroxybenzyl cation 5H+. The G3B3 298 K heats of formation values obtained in this work are: -39, 61, 52, 39, 661, 679, 699, 680 and 733 kJ mol -1 for 1- 4, 1H+- 5H+, respectively. At the same level of theory, computed proton affinities are equal to 834, 916, 887 and 892 kJ mol -1 for molecules 1- 4. These results allow to correct discrepancies on the previously reported thermochemistry of molecules 2- 4 and cations 2H+- 5H+.

  4. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) by withanolides isolated from Physalis pubescens L. (Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Long; Yuan, Yonglei; Ma, Zhongjun; Chen, Zhe; Gan, Lishe; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Huang, Dongsheng

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, it was demonstrated that the dichloromethane extract of Physalis pubescens L. (DEPP) had weak potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity, but an UPLC-ESI-MS method with glutathione (GSH) as the substrate revealed that the DEPP had electrophiles (with an α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety). These electrophiles could induce quinone reductase (QR) activity, which might be attributed to the modification of the highly reactive cysteine residues in Keap1. Herein, four withanolides, including three new compounds physapubescin B (2), physapubescin C (3), physapubescin D (4), together with one known steroidal compound physapubescin (1) were isolated. Structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analysis and that of physapubescin C (3) was confirmed by a combination of molecular modeling and quantum chemical DFT-GIAO calculations. Evaluation of the QR inducing activities of all withanolides indicated potent activities of compounds 1 and 2, which had a common α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety.

  5. An antibacterial ortho-quinone diterpenoid and its derivatives from Caryopteris mongolica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruul, Erdenebileg; Murata, Toshihiro; Selenge, Erdenechimeg; Sasaki, Kenroh; Yoshizaki, Fumihiko; Batkhuu, Javzan

    2015-06-15

    To identify antibacterial components in traditional Mongolian medicinal plant Caryopteris mongolica, an ortho-quinone abietane caryopteron A (1) and three its derivatives caryopteron B-D (2-4) were isolated from the roots of the plant together with three known abietanes demethylcryptojaponol (5), 6α-hydroxydemethyl cryptojaponol (6), and 14-deoxycoleon U (7). The chemical structures of these abietane derivatives were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compounds 1-4 had C-13 methylcyclopropane substructures, and 2-4 had a hexanedioic anhydride ring C instead of ortho-quinone in 1. The stereochemistry of these compound was assumed from NOE spectra and ECD Cotton effects. Compounds 1 and 5-7 showed antibacterial activities against the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Enterococcus faecalis, and Micrococcus luteus, being 1 the more potent.

  6. Synthesis and properties of polycyclic quinones condensed with 1,6-methano[10]annulene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyasu Kuroda et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of polycyclic quinones condensed with 1,6-methano[10]annulenes as type A: 1,6-methanonaphtho[2,3-c][10]annulene-7,12-dione 5a, and type B: 1,6-methanonaphtho[2,3-c][10]annulene-5,14-dione 18, bis(1,6-methano[10]annuleno[3,4-b; 3,4-g]anthracene-10,21-dione 20, 1,6-methanoanthraceno[2,3-c][10]annulene-5,16-dione 22, 1,6-methanotetraceno[2,3-c][10]annulene-6,17-dione 23, and 1,6-methano phenanthreno[2,3-c][10]annulene-5,6-dione 24 have been synthesized. The acene derivative 6 corresponding to that of 5a was synthesized by the reduction of quinone 5a. The physical, spectral, and chemical properties of these new compounds have been investigated.

  7. Comparative evaluation of the acceptor properties of quinone derivatized polypyridinic ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norambuena, Ester [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Metropolitana de Ciencias de la Educacion, Santiago (Chile); Olea-Azar, Claudio [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Delgadillo, Alvaro [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de La Serena, Casilla 599, La Serena (Chile); Barrera, Mauricio [Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile); Loeb, Barbara, E-mail: bloeb@puc.cl [Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile)

    2009-05-18

    The reduction properties of four acceptor polipyridyl ligands modified with quinones were studied by different experimental methods, as cyclic voltammetry and ESR spectroscopy, and by theoretical calculations. ESR spectra for the reduced ligands show different patterns among them, suggesting that the quinone moiety plays an important role in the delocalization of the received electron. The hyperfine coupling constants calculated for the magnetic nucleus were in good agreement with experimental data. The results were additionally interpreted with the help of two theoretical predictors: the electrophilicity index and the Fukui function obtained through the spin density. The results suggest that 12,17-dihydronaphtho-[2,3-h]dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]-phenazine-12,17-dione, Aqphen, shows the most promising behavior to be employed as an acceptor ligand in complexes with potential application in NLO devices.

  8. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing quinone based ligands: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic applications and DNA interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, P.; Manikandan, R.; Endo, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Viswanathamurthi, P.

    2012-12-01

    1,2-Naphthaquinone reacts with amines such as semicarbazide, isonicotinylhydrazide and thiosemicarbazide in high yield procedure with the formation of tridentate ligands HLn (n = 1-3). By reaction of ruthenium(II) starting complexes and quinone based ligands HLn (n = 1-3), a series of ruthenium complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR and ESI-MS). The ligands were coordinated to ruthenium through quinone oxygen, imine nitrogen and enolate oxygen/thiolato sulfur. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry may be assigned for all the complexes. Further, the catalytic oxidation of primary, secondary alcohol and transfer hydrogenation of ketone was carried out. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  9. New method for spectrophotometric determination of quinones and barbituric acid through their reaction. A kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1996-11-01

    A new and sensitive spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of p-benzoquinone, p-chloranil and 1.4-naphthoquinone. The method is based on the reaction between quinones and barbituric acid, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption between 485 and 555 nm in 50% methyl alcohol-water mixture. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range 0.025-05 mM of orginal quinone. The kinetics of the reaction between p-benzoquinone and barbituric acid was studied in a range of methyl alcohol-water mixtures. The reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rate increases with increasing dielectric constant. The method was applied for determination of barbituric acid with p-benzoquinone in the concentration range of 0.025-0.345 mM. Other barbiturates do not interfere.

  10. Mitochondrially targeted fluorescent redox sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kylie; Kolanowski, Jacek L; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-04-06

    The balance of oxidants and antioxidants within the cell is crucial for maintaining health, and regulating physiological processes such as signalling. Consequently, imbalances between oxidants and antioxidants are now understood to lead to oxidative stress, a physiological feature that underlies many diseases. These processes have spurred the field of chemical biology to develop a plethora of sensors, both small-molecule and fluorescent protein-based, for the detection of specific oxidizing species and general redox balances within cells. The mitochondrion, in particular, is the site of many vital redox reactions. There is therefore a need to target redox sensors to this particular organelle. It has been well established that targeting mitochondria can be achieved by the use of a lipophilic cation-targeting group, or by utilizing natural peptidic mitochondrial localization sequences. Here, we review how these two approaches have been used by a number of researchers to develop mitochondrially localized fluorescent redox sensors that are already proving useful in providing insights into the roles of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria.

  11. Nitrate bioreduction in redox-variable low permeability sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Sen; Liu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Liang; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kennedy, David W.; Resch, Charles T.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Fansler, Sarah J.

    2015-09-09

    Denitrification is a microbial process that reduces nitrate and nitrite to nitrous oxide (N2O) or dinitrogen (N2) with a strong implication to global nitrogen cycling and climate change. This paper reports the effect of sediment redox conditions on the rate and end product of denitrification. The sediments were collected from a redox transition zone consisting of oxic and reduced layers at US Department of Energy’s Hanford Site where N2O was locally accumulated in groundwater. The results revealed that denitrification rate and end product varied significantly with initial sediment redox state. The denitrification rate was relatively faster, limited by organic carbon content and bioavailability in the oxic sediment. In contrast, the rate was much slower in the reduced sediment, limited by biomass and microbial function. A significant amount of N2O was accumulated in the reduced sediment; while in the oxic sediment, N2O was further reduced to N2. RT-PCR analysis revealed that nosZ, the gene that codes for N2O reductase, was below detection in the reduced sediment. The results implied that redox transition zones can be important sinks or sources of N2O depending on local biogeochemical and microbial conditions, and are important systems for understanding and modeling denitrification in subsurface environments.

  12. Comparative Studies on Plastoquinones: V. Changes in Lipophilic Chloroplast Quinones during Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, R; Crane, F L; Peak, S M

    1970-01-01

    Changes of lipophilic chloroplast quinones in corn, oats, peas, and Vicia faba are reported after 0, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 48, 72, or 96 hours of exposure to light. There is a pronounced increase in plastoquinone A and chlorophyll levels and slight increase, in plastoquinone C(1-6), vitamin K(1), and alpha-tocopherylquinone content. Coenzyme Q levels, on the other hand, show little change upon exposure to light.THE SEQUENCE IN WHICH INDIVIDUAL QUINONES APPEAR DURING DEVELOPMENT IS AS FOLLOWS: plastoquinone A instantaneously after exposure to light, plastoquinone C(1-6) from 4 to 24 hours, vitamin K(1) from 12 to 24 hours, alpha-tocopherylquinone from 0 to 24 hours of illumination. Small amounts (<0.01 mumole/g, dry wt) of plastoquinone A and plastoquinone B are found in seeds and etiolated tissues. After exposure to light, the quinone tentatively identified as a member of the plastoquinone B series by reverse phase thin layer chromatography disappears and can be detected again in small amounts during maturity and toward senescence of the leaf.

  13. Crystal structures of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 quinone oxidoreductase and its complex with NADPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Xiaowei [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Hongmei; Gao, Yu; Li, Mei [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China); Chang, Wenrui, E-mail: wrchang@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2009-12-18

    Zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase is NAD(P)H-dependent and catalyzes one-electron reduction of certain quinones to generate semiquinone. Here we present the crystal structures of zeta-crystallin-like quinone oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (PtoQOR) and its complexes with NADPH determined at 2.4 and 2.01 A resolutions, respectively. PtoQOR forms as a homologous dimer, each monomer containing two domains. In the structure of the PtoQOR-NADPH complex, NADPH locates in the groove between the two domains. NADPH binding causes obvious conformational changes in the structure of PtoQOR. The putative substrate-binding site of PtoQOR is wider than that of Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus HB8. Activity assays show that PtoQOR has weak 1,4-benzoquinone catalytic activity, and very strong reduction activity towards large substrates such as 9,10-phenanthrenequinone. We propose a model to explain the conformational changes which take place during reduction reactions catalyzed by PtoQOR.

  14. Changes in redox properties of humic acids upon sorption to alumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subdiaga, Edisson; Orsetti, Silvia; Jindal, Sharmishta; Haderlein, Stefan B.

    2016-04-01

    1. Introduction A prominent role of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) in biogeochemical processes is its ability to act as an electron shuttle, accelerating rates between a bulk electron donor and an acceptor. The underlying processes are reversible redox reactions of quinone moieties.1 This shuttling effect has been studied in two major areas: transformation of redox active pollutants and microbial respiration.2-3 Previous studies primarily compared effects in the presence or absence of NOM without addressing the redox properties of NOM nor its speciation. The interaction between humic acids (HA) and minerals might change properties and reactivity of organic matter. Specifically, we investigate whether changes in the redox properties of a HA occur upon sorption to redox inactive minerals. Since fractionation and conformational rearrangements of NOM moieties upon sorption are likely to happen, the redox properties of the NOM fractions upon sorption might differ as well. 2. Materials and methods Elliot Soil Humic Acid (ESHA), Pahokee Peat Humic Acid (PPHA) and Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) were used as received from IHSS. Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) was suspended in 0.1M KCl. Sorption was studied at pH 7.0 in duplicate batch experiments for several HA/Al2O3 ratios. For the suspension (mineral + sorbed HA, plus dissolved HA), the filtrate (0.45μm) and the HA stock solution, the electron donating and accepting capacities (EDC and EAC) were determined following established procedures.4 3. Results All studied HA-Al2O3 systems showed similar behavior with regard to changes in redox properties. There was a significant increase in the EDC of the whole suspension compared to the stock solutions and the non-sorbed HA in the filtrate (up to 300% for PPHA). This effect was more pronounced with increasing amounts of sorbed HA in the suspension. Although ESHA had the highest sorption capacity on Al2O3 (~ 6 times higher than PPHA & SRHA), it showed the smallest changes in redox

  15. Redox potentials of dopamine and its supramolecular complex with aspartic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Han, Ling-Li; Du, Chun-Mei; Yu, Zhang-Yu

    2014-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) can be oxidized to dopamine quinone (DAquinone) through a one-step, two-electron redox reaction. The electron transfer property of DA and its supramolecular complex with aspartic acid (Asp) has been investigated by the theoretical calculations. We calculated the standard redox potentials ( E o) of DA/DAquinone at the MP2/6-31G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G( d,p), MP2/6-31+G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G( d,p), MP2/6-31G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p), and MP2/6-311+G( d,p)//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels. Comparing the experimental value, the redox potentials of DA/DAquinone obtained at MP2//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p) and MP2//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels can be considered as the upper and lower estimates. DA can form supramolecular complex (DA-Asp) with Asp through hydrogen bond (H-bond). Therefore, the values of 0.631 and 0.628 V obtained at MP2//B3LYP/6-311G( d,p) and MP2//B3LYP/6-311+G( d,p) levels for DA-Asp/DAquinone-Asp can be proposed as the upper and lower estimates of a probable (about 0.630 V) value of the corresponding redox potential. The calculated E o values of DA-Asp/DAquinone-Asp at the four theoretical levels are upper than those of DA/DAquinone, which indicates that the formation of H-bonds weaken the electron-donating ability of DA.

  16. Occurrence and Potential Sources of Quinones Associated with PM2.5 in Guadalajara, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Barradas-Gimate

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to establish the influence of primary emission sources and atmospheric transformation process contributing to the concentrations of quinones associated to particulate matter of less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5 in three sites within the Metropolitan Area of Guadalajara (MAG, namely Centro (CEN, Tlaquepaque (TLA and Las Águilas (AGU. Environmental levels of quinones extracted from PM2.5 filters were analyzed using Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. Overall, primary emissions in combination with photochemical and oxidation reactions contribute to the presence of quinones in the urban atmosphere of MAG. It was found that quinones in PM2.5 result from the contributions from direct emission sources by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels such as diesel and gasoline that relate mainly to vehicular activity intensity in the three sampling sites selected. However, this also suggests that the occurrence of quinones in MAG can be related to photochemical transformation of the parent Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs, to chemical reactions with oxygenated species, or a combination of both routes. The higher concentration of 1,4-Chrysenequinone during the rainy season compared to the warm-dry season indicates chemical oxidation of chrysene, since the humidity could favor singlet oxygen collision with parent PAH present in the particle phase. On the contrary, 9,10-Anthraquinone/Anthracene and 1,4-Naftoquinone/Naphthalene ratios were higher during the warm-dry season compared to the rainy season, which might indicate a prevalence of the photochemical formation during the warm-dry season favored by the large solar radiation typical of the season. In addition, the estimated percentage of photochemical formation of 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone showed that the occurrence of this compound in Tlaquepaque (TLA and Las Águilas (AGU sites is mainly propagated by conditions of high solar radiation such as in the warm-dry season and

  17. Bioinformatic evidence for a widely distributed, ribosomally produced electron carrier precursor, its maturation proteins, and its nicotinoprotein redox partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haft Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    as N,N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (NDMA for the enzyme to cycle. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that the mycofactocin precursor is modified by the Rv0693 family rSAM protein and other enzymes in its cluster. It becomes an electron carrier molecule that serves in vivo as NDMA and other artificial electron acceptors do in vitro. Subclasses from three different nicotinoprotein families show "only-if" relationships to mycofactocin because they require its presence. This framework suggests a segregated redox pool in which mycofactocin mediates communication among enzymes with non-exchangeable cofactors.

  18. Preparation and evaluation of composite membrane for vanadium redox battery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieng, S. C.; Kazacos, M.; Skyllas-Kazacos, M.

    A composite membrane has been fabricated from Daramic (a microporous separator), treated with Amberlite 400CG (an ion-exchange resin), and cross-linked using divinyl benzene. Coulombic, voltage and energy efficiencies of 95, 85 and 83%, respectively, have been achieved when this membrane is employed in the vanadium redox cell. Long-term charge/discharge cycling has been conducted on the membrane for more than 700 cycles (4000 h), without any appreciable drop in performance. The composite membrane satisfies the stability, low area resistance, selectivity, and low-cost requirements for use as a separator in the vanadium redox battery.

  19. Electrochemical analyses of redox-active iron minerals: a review of nonmediated and mediated approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B; Gorski, Christopher A

    2015-05-19

    Redox-active minerals are ubiquitous in the environment and are involved in numerous electron transfer reactions that significantly affect biogeochemical processes and cycles as well as pollutant dynamics. As a consequence, research in different scientific disciplines is devoted to elucidating the redox properties and reactivities of minerals. This review focuses on the characterization of mineral redox properties using electrochemical approaches from an applied (bio)geochemical and environmental analytical chemistry perspective. Establishing redox equilibria between the minerals and working electrodes is a major challenge in electrochemical measurements, which we discuss in an overview of traditional electrochemical techniques. These issues can be overcome with mediated electrochemical analyses in which dissolved redox mediators are used to increase the rate of electron transfer and to facilitate redox equilibration between working electrodes and minerals in both amperometric and potentiometric measurements. Using experimental data on an iron-bearing clay mineral, we illustrate how mediated electrochemical analyses can be employed to derive important thermodynamic and kinetic data on electron transfer to and from structural iron. We summarize anticipated methodological advancements that will further contribute to advance an improved understanding of electron transfer to and from minerals in environmentally relevant redox processes.

  20. Redox cycling with facing interdigitated array electrodes as a method for selective detection of redox species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, V.A.T.; Olthuis, W.; Berg, van den A.

    2007-01-01

    A pair of interdigitated ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs) is used to electrochemically detect a weak reductor ( dopamine) in the presence of a stronger one (K-4[ Fe(CN)(6)]). In the mixture of both reductors, one of the two interdigitated electrodes ( the generator electrode) is used to oxidize both spec

  1. Lipogenesis and Redox Balance in Nitrogen-Fixing Pea Bacteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terpolilli, Jason J; Masakapalli, Shyam K; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Webb, Isabel U C; Green, Rob; Watmough, Nicholas J; Kruger, Nicholas J; Ratcliffe, R George; Poole, Philip S

    2016-10-15

    Within legume root nodules, rhizobia differentiate into bacteroids that oxidize host-derived dicarboxylic acids, which is assumed to occur via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to generate NAD(P)H for reduction of N2 Metabolic flux analysis of laboratory-grown Rhizobium leguminosarum showed that the flux from [(13)C]succinate was consistent with respiration of an obligate aerobe growing on a TCA cycle intermediate as the sole carbon source. However, the instability of fragile pea bacteroids prevented their steady-state labeling under N2-fixing conditions. Therefore, comparative metabolomic profiling was used to compare free-living R. leguminosarum with pea bacteroids. While the TCA cycle was shown to be essential for maximal rates of N2 fixation, levels of pyruvate (5.5-fold reduced), acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA; 50-fold reduced), free coenzyme A (33-fold reduced), and citrate (4.5-fold reduced) were much lower in bacteroids. Instead of completely oxidizing acetyl-CoA, pea bacteroids channel it into both lipid and the lipid-like polymer poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), the latter via a type III PHB synthase that is active only in bacteroids. Lipogenesis may be a fundamental requirement of the redox poise of electron donation to N2 in all legume nodules. Direct reduction by NAD(P)H of the likely electron donors for nitrogenase, such as ferredoxin, is inconsistent with their redox potentials. Instead, bacteroids must balance the production of NAD(P)H from oxidation of acetyl-CoA in the TCA cycle with its storage in PHB and lipids. Biological nitrogen fixation by symbiotic bacteria (rhizobia) in legume root nodules is an energy-expensive process. Within legume root nodules, rhizobia differentiate into bacteroids that oxidize host-derived dicarboxylic acids, which is assumed to occur via the TCA cycle to generate NAD(P)H for reduction of N2 However, direct reduction of the likely electron donors for nitrogenase, such as ferredoxin, is inconsistent with their redox

  2. Acupuncture mechanism and redox equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiang-Hong; Li, Qian-Qian; Xu, Qian; Li, Fang; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease, and hypertension, ranging from redox system, antioxidant system, anti-inflammatory system, and nervous system to signaling pathway. Although the molecular and cellular pathways studies of acupuncture effect on oxidative stress are preliminary, they represent an important step forward in the research of acupuncture antioxidative effect.

  3. Acupuncture Mechanism and Redox Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Hong Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementia, Parkinson’s disease, and hypertension, ranging from redox system, antioxidant system, anti-inflammatory system, and nervous system to signaling pathway. Although the molecular and cellular pathways studies of acupuncture effect on oxidative stress are preliminary, they represent an important step forward in the research of acupuncture antioxidative effect.

  4. Acupuncture Mechanism and Redox Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang-Hong Zeng; Qian-Qian Li; Qian Xu; Fang Li; Cun-Zhi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress participates in the pathological process of various diseases. Acupuncture is a component of the health care system in China that can be traced back for at least 3000 years. Recently, increased evidences indicate that acupuncture stimulation could reduce oxidative damage in organisms under pathological state, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. This review focuses on the emerging links between acupuncture and redox modulation in various disorders, such as vascular dementi...

  5. Ocean redox change at the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2013-01-01

    and marine (mass) ex¬tinction. The geographic and temporal extend and the intensity (ferruginous vs. euxinic) of anoxic con¬ditions is, however, strongly debated and not well constraint. This complicates understanding of close coupling between Earth’s physical, chemical and bi¬ological processes. We studied...... ocean redox change over the largest mass extinction event in Earth history, at the Permian-Tri¬assic boundary (at ~252 Ma). This event is marked by a major perturbation in the global exogenic carbon cycle (and associated major negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE)), likely initiated by carbon...... (anoxic but not euxinic) coinciding with the main extinction event. Molybdenum enrichments, often indicative for freely available sulfide in the water-column, only occur dur¬ing the second phase of euxinia. This pattern of ocean redox-change in Svalbard direct¬ly reflects similar trends in Greenland...

  6. Redox cycling in nanofluidic channels using interdigitated electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goluch, E.D.; Wolfrum, B.; Singh, P.S.; Zevenbergen, M.A.G.; Lemay, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    Amperometric detection is ideally suited for integration into micro- and nanofluidic systems as it directly yields an electrical signal and does not necessitate optical components. However, the range of systems to which it can be applied is constrained by the limited sensitivity and specificity of t

  7. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  8. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF-VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  9. High-energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-11-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage.

  10. High–energy density nonaqueous all redox flow lithium battery enabled with a polymeric membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuankun; Pan, Feng; Zhu, Yun Guang; Huang, Qizhao; Lu, Li; Wang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are considered one of the most promising large-scale energy storage technologies. However, conventional RFBs suffer from low energy density due to the low solubility of the active materials in electrolyte. On the basis of the redox targeting reactions of battery materials, the redox flow lithium battery (RFLB) demonstrated in this report presents a disruptive approach to drastically enhancing the energy density of flow batteries. With LiFePO4 and TiO2 as the cathodic and anodic Li storage materials, respectively, the tank energy density of RFLB could reach ~500 watt-hours per liter (50% porosity), which is 10 times higher than that of a vanadium redox flow battery. The cell exhibits good electrochemical performance under a prolonged cycling test. Our prototype RFLB full cell paves the way toward the development of a new generation of flow batteries for large-scale energy storage. PMID:26702440

  11. The Microbial Engines That Drive Earth's Biogeochemical Cycles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul G. Falkowski; Tom Fenchel; Edward F. Delong

    2008-01-01

    .... Hence, although there is enormous genetic diversity in nature, there remains a relatively stable set of core genes coding for the major redox reactions essential for life and biogeochemical cycles...

  12. FAD semiquinone stability regulates single- and two-electron reduction of quinones by Anabaena PCC7119 ferredoxin:NADP+ reductase and its Glu301Ala mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusevicius, Zilvinas; Miseviciene, Lina; Medina, Milagros; Martinez-Julvez, Marta; Gomez-Moreno, Carlos; Cenas, Narimantas

    2005-05-15

    Flavoenzymes may reduce quinones in a single-electron, mixed single- and two-electron, and two-electron way. The mechanisms of two-electron reduction of quinones are insufficiently understood. To get an insight into the role of flavin semiquinone stability in the regulation of single- vs. two-electron reduction of quinones, we studied the reactions of wild type Anabaena ferredoxin:NADP(+)reductase (FNR) with 48% FAD semiquinone (FADH*) stabilized at the equilibrium (pH 7.0), and its Glu301Ala mutant (8% FADH* at the equilibrium). We found that Glu301Ala substitution does not change the quinone substrate specificity of FNR. However, it confers the mixed single- and two-electron mechanism of quinone reduction (50% single-electron flux), whereas the wild type FNR reduces quinones in a single-electron way. During the oxidation of fully reduced wild type FNR by tetramethyl-1,4-benzoquinone, the first electron transfer (formation of FADH*) is about 40 times faster than the second one (oxidation of FADH*). In contrast, the first and second electron transfer proceeded at similar rates in Glu301Ala FNR. Thus, the change in the quinone reduction mechanism may be explained by the relative increase in the rate of second electron transfer. This enabled us to propose the unified scheme of single-, two- and mixed single- and two-electron reduction of quinones by flavoenzymes with the central role of the stability of flavin/quinone ion-radical pair.

  13. Graphene incorporated, N doped activated carbon as catalytic electrode in redox active electrolyte mediated supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiyong; Liu, Xiao; Chang, Jiuli; Wu, Dapeng; Xu, Fang; Zhang, Lingcui; Du, Weimin; Jiang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Graphene incorporated, N doped activated carbons (GNACs) are synthesized by alkali activation of graphene-polypyrrole composite (G-PPy) at different temperatures for application as electrode materials of supercapacitors. Under optimal activation temperature of 700 °C, the resultant samples, labeled as GNAC700, owns hierarchically porous texture with high specific surface area and efficient ions diffusion channels, N, O functionalized surface with apparent pseudocapacitance contribution and high wettability, thus can deliver a moderate capacitance, a high rate capability and a good cycleability when used as supercapacitor electrode. Additionally, the GNAC700 electrode demonstrates high catalytic activity for the redox reaction of pyrocatechol/o-quinone pair in H2SO4 electrolyte, thus enables a high pseudocapacitance from electrolyte. Under optimal pyrocatechol concentration in H2SO4 electrolyte, the electrode capacitance of GNAC700 increases by over 4 folds to 512 F g-1 at 1 A g-1, an excellent cycleability is also achieved simultaneously. Pyridinic- N is deemed to be responsible for the high catalytic activity. This work provides a promising strategy to ameliorate the capacitive performances of supercapacitors via the synergistic interaction between redox-active electrolyte and catalytic electrodes.

  14. Redox enzymes in the plant plasma membrane and their possible roles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berczi, A.; Møller, I.M.

    2000-01-01

    Purified plasma membrane (PM) vesicles from higher plants contain redox proteins with low-molecular-mass prosthetic groups such as flavins (both FMN and FAD), hemes, metals (Cu, Fe and Mn), thiol groups and possibly naphthoquinone (vitamin K-1), all of which are likely to participate in redox.......1.1.37) is localized on the inner side of the PM. Several NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductases have been purified from the cytocolic surface of the PM, but their function is still unknown. Different forms of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1-3) are found attached to, as well as anchored in, the PM where they may act...... as a nitrate sensor and/or contribute to blue-light perception, although both functions are speculative. Ferric-chelate-reducing enzymes (EC 1.6.99.13) are localized and partially characterized on the inner surface of the PM but they may participate only in the reduction of ferric-chelates in the cytosol. Very...

  15. Acetaminophen perturbed redox homeostasis in Wistar rat liver: protective role of aqueous Pterocarpus osun leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajiboye, Taofeek O; Salau, Amadu K; Yakubu, Musa T; Oladiji, Adenike T; Akanji, Musbau A; Okogun, Joseph I

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro antioxidant potentials and attenuation of acetaminophen-induced redox imbalance by Pterocarpus osun Craib (Fabaceae) leaf in Wistar rat liver. The in vitro antioxidant activity of the extract (0.2-1.0 mg/mL) was evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazl (DPPH), hydrogen peroxide, superoxide ion, 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS), and ferric ion. The extract (150 and 300 mg/kg body weight) significantly (P<0.05) attenuated the altered liver and serum enzymes of acetaminophen treated animals. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities as well as vitamins C and E, and glutathione levels were significantly (P<0.05) elevated by the extract. The activities of uridyl diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase (59%), quinone oxidoreductase (53%), and glutathione S-transferase (73%) significantly increased. The extract of P. osun leaf extract at 1.0mg/mL scavenged the DPPH, hydrogen peroxide, superoxide ion, and ABTS at 94, 98, 92, and 86%, respectively, while ferric ion was significantly reduced. There was attenuation of malondialdehyde and lipid hydroperoxide. The results indicates that P. osun leaves attenuated acetaminophen-induced redox imbalance, possibly acting as free radical scavenger, inducer of antioxidant and drug-detoxifying enzymes, which prevented/reduced lipid peroxidation.

  16. Roles of the sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) on vibrio cholerae metabolism, motility and osmotic stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Kirkwood, Jay S; Halang, Petra; Quinn, Matthew J; Faulkner, Wyatt J; Aagesen, Alisha M; Steuber, Julia; Stevens, Jan F; Häse, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I). Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog), transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s) can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology.

  17. Roles of the sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR on vibrio cholerae metabolism, motility and osmotic stress resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Minato

    Full Text Available The Na+ translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR is a unique respiratory enzyme catalyzing the electron transfer from NADH to quinone coupled with the translocation of sodium ions across the membrane. Typically, Vibrio spp., including Vibrio cholerae, have this enzyme but lack the proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I. Thus, Na+-NQR should significantly contribute to multiple aspects of V. cholerae physiology; however, no detailed characterization of this aspect has been reported so far. In this study, we broadly investigated the effects of loss of Na+-NQR on V. cholerae physiology by using Phenotype Microarray (Biolog, transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. We found that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant showed multiple defects in metabolism detected by Phenotype Microarray. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant up-regulates 31 genes and down-regulates 55 genes in both early and mid-growth phases. The most up-regulated genes included the cadA and cadB genes, encoding a lysine decarboxylase and a lysine/cadaverine antiporter, respectively. Increased CadAB activity was further suggested by the metabolomics analysis. The down-regulated genes include sialic acid catabolism genes. Metabolomic analysis also suggested increased reductive pathway of TCA cycle and decreased purine metabolism in the V. cholerae ΔnqrA-F mutant. Lack of Na+-NQR did not affect any of the Na+ pumping-related phenotypes of V. cholerae suggesting that other secondary Na+ pump(s can compensate for Na+ pumping activity of Na+-NQR. Overall, our study provides important insights into the contribution of Na+-NQR to V. cholerae physiology.

  18. Complete phenotypic recovery of an Alzheimer's disease model by a quinone-tryptophan hybrid aggregation inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Scherzer-Attali

    Full Text Available The rational design of amyloid oligomer inhibitors is yet an unmet drug development need. Previous studies have identified the role of tryptophan in amyloid recognition, association and inhibition. Furthermore, tryptophan was ranked as the residue with highest amyloidogenic propensity. Other studies have demonstrated that quinones, specifically anthraquinones, can serve as aggregation inhibitors probably due to the dipole interaction of the quinonic ring with aromatic recognition sites within the amyloidogenic proteins. Here, using in vitro, in vivo and in silico tools we describe the synthesis and functional characterization of a rationally designed inhibitor of the Alzheimer's disease-associated beta-amyloid. This compound, 1,4-naphthoquinon-2-yl-L-tryptophan (NQTrp, combines the recognition capacities of both quinone and tryptophan moieties and completely inhibited Abeta oligomerization and fibrillization, as well as the cytotoxic effect of Abeta oligomers towards cultured neuronal cell line. Furthermore, when fed to transgenic Alzheimer's disease Drosophila model it prolonged their life span and completely abolished their defective locomotion. Analysis of the brains of these flies showed a significant reduction in oligomeric species of Abeta while immuno-staining of the 3(rd instar larval brains showed a significant reduction in Abeta accumulation. Computational studies, as well as NMR and CD spectroscopy provide mechanistic insight into the activity of the compound which is most likely mediated by clamping of the aromatic recognition interface in the central segment of Abeta. Our results demonstrate that interfering with the aromatic core of amyloidogenic peptides is a promising approach for inhibiting various pathogenic species associated with amyloidogenic diseases. The compound NQTrp can serve as a lead for developing a new class of disease modifying drugs for Alzheimer's disease.

  19. High On/Off Conductance Switching Ratio via H-Tautomerization in Quinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Sherif Abdulkader; Cui, X Y; Ringer, S P; Stampfl, C

    2015-09-01

    Through first-principles electron transport simulations using the nonequilibrium Green's function formalism together with density functional theory, we show that, upon H-tautomerization, a simple derivative of quinone can act as a molecular switch with high ON/OFF ratio, up to 70 at low bias voltage. This switching behavior is explained by the quantum interference effect, where the positional change of hydrogen atoms causes the energies of the transmission channels to overlap. Our results suggest that this molecule could have potential applications as an effective switching device.

  20. THz-Raman Identification of labile products in the system "phenol-semiquinone-quinone"

    CERN Document Server

    Polubotko, E A Iasenko V P Chelibanov A M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the results of SERS studies of the dynamic behavior of "phenol-semiquinone-quinone" system. This system is a key part of chemiluminescent sensors for reactive oxygen species. The dynamics of the system seems to be very important in the processes that determine the secondary metabolism at the cellular level in molecular biology. THz Raman spectra were recorded for the labile products formed in the processes initiated by proton transfer. A mechanism of the proton-transfer-initiated reaction is proposed.

  1. Homologation of α-aryl amino acids through quinone-catalyzed decarboxylation/Mukaiyama-Mannich addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugeberg, Benjamin J; Phan, Johnny H; Liu, Xinyun; O'Connor, Thomas J; Clift, Michael D

    2017-03-09

    A new method for amino acid homologation by way of formal C-C bond functionalization is reported. This method utilizes a 2-step/1-pot protocol to convert α-amino acids to their corresponding N-protected β-amino esters through quinone-catalyzed oxidative decarboxylation/in situ Mukaiyama-Mannich addition. The scope and limitations of this chemistry are presented. This methodology provides an alternative to the classical Arndt-Eistert homologation for accessing β-amino acid derivatives. The resulting N-protected amine products can be easily deprotected to afford the corresponding free amines.

  2. Mouse redox histology using genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Roma, Leticia P; Sobotta, Mirko C; Rose, Adam J; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Breckwoldt, Michael O; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Herzig, Stephan; Müller-Decker, Karin; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-03-15

    Mapping the in vivo distribution of endogenous oxidants in animal tissues is of substantial biomedical interest. Numerous health-related factors, including diet, physical activity, infection, aging, toxins, or pharmacological intervention, may cause redox changes. Tools are needed to pinpoint redox state changes to particular organs, tissues, cell types, and subcellular organelles. We describe a procedure that preserves the in vivo redox state of genetically encoded redox biosensors within histological tissue sections, thus providing "redox maps" for any tissue and comparison of interest. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by visualizing endogenous redox differences and changes in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, embryonic development, and nutrient starvation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Influence of low molecular weight fractions of humic substances on reducing capacities and distribution of redox functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Jiang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Humic substances (HS) are redox-active organic compounds and their reducing capacities depend on their molecule structure and distribution of redox functional groups (RFG). During dialysis experiments, bulk humic acids (HA) were separated into low molecular weight fractions (LMWF) and retentate. LMWF account for only 2% of the total organic carbon content of HA molecules, however, their reducing capacities are up to 33 times greater than either those of the bulk HA or retentate. Furthermore, the total reducing capacity of the bulk HA accounts for less than 15% of the total reducing capacity of bulk HA, retentate and LMWF combined, suggesting that releasing of LMWF cannot reduce the number of RFG. RFG are neither in fixed amounts nor in uniformly distributed in bulk HA. LWMF have great fluorescence intensities for humic-like fluorophores (quinone-like functional groups), where quinonoid π-π* transition is responsible for the great reducing capacities of LMWF, and protein-like fluorophores. The 3,500 Da molecules (1.25 nm diameter) of HS could stimulate transformation of redox-active metals or potential pollutants trapped in soil micropores (< 2 nm diameter). A development of relationship between reducing capacity and Ex/Em position provides a possibility to predicate relative reducing capacities of HS in environmental samples.

  4. Sustainable electrical energy storage through the ferrocene/ferrocenium redox reaction in aprotic electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Ding, Yu; Song, Jie; Li, Gang; Dong, Guangbin; Goodenough, John B; Yu, Guihua

    2014-10-06

    The large-scale, cost-effective storage of electrical energy obtained from the growing deployment of wind and solar power is critically needed for the integration into the grid of these renewable energy sources. Rechargeable batteries having a redox-flow cathode represent a viable solution for either a Li-ion or a Na-ion battery provided a suitable low-cost redox molecule soluble in an aprotic electrolyte can be identified that is stable for repeated cycling and does not cross the separator membrane to the anode. Here we demonstrate an environmentally friendly, low-cost ferrocene/ferrocenium molecular redox couple that shows about 95% energy efficiency and about 90% capacity retention after 250 full charge/discharge cycles.

  5. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos; Aishwarya Parasuraman; Tuti Mariana Lim; Suminto Winardi; Helen Prifti

    2012-01-01

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. Th...

  6. Redox conditions for mantle plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heister, L. E.; Lesher, C. E.

    2005-12-01

    The vanadium to scandium ratio (V/Sc) for basalts from mid-ocean ridge (MOR) and arc environments has been proposed as a proxy for fO2 conditions during partial melting (e.g. [1] and [2]). Contrary to barometric measurements of the fO2 of primitive lavas, the V/Sc ratio of the upper mantle at mid-ocean ridges and arcs is similar, leading previous authors to propose that the upper mantle has uniform redox potential and is well-buffered. We have attempted to broaden the applicability of the V/Sc parameter to plume-influenced localities (both oceanic and continental), where mantle heterogeneities associated with recycled sediments, mafic crust, and metasomatized mantle, whether of shallow or deep origin, exist. We find that primitive basalts from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), Hawaii (both the Loa and Kea trends), Deccan, Columbia River, and Siberian Traps show a range of V/Sc ratios that are generally higher (average ~9) than those for MOR (average ~ 6.7) or arc (average ~7) lavas. Based on forward polybaric decompression modeling, we attribute these differences to polybaric melting and melt segregation within the garnet stability field rather than the presence of a more oxidized mantle in plume-influenced settings. Like MORB, the V/Sc ratios for plume-influenced basalts can be accounted for by an oxidation state approximately one log unit below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO-1). Our analysis suggests that source heterogeneities have little, if any, resolvable influence on mantle redox conditions, although they have significant influence on the trace element and isotopic composition of mantle-derived melts. We suggest that variations in the redox of erupted lavas is largely a function of shallow lithospheric processes rather than intrinsic to the mantle source, regardless of tectonic setting. [1] Li and Lee (2004) EPSL, [2] Lee et al. (2005) J. of Petrology

  7. Understanding the redox behaviour of PbCrO4 and its application in selective hydrogen combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez-Quero, S.; Hernández-Mejía, C.; Hendrikx, R.; Rothenberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of PbCrO4 during reduction/oxidation cycles has been studied over the temperature range 673-873 K. During thermal treatment in an inert atmosphere, PbCrO4 is stable up to 773 K. At higher temperatures, it decomposes rapidly and irreversibly to Pb2(CrO4)O. Moreover, the redox cycling

  8. A redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein sensor for monitoring nuclear glutathione redox dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banach-Latapy, Agata; Dardalhon, Michèle; Huang, Meng-Er

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular redox homeostasis is crucial for many cellular functions, but accurate measurements of cellular compartment-specific redox states remain technically challenging. Genetically encoded biosensors, including the glutathione-specific redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP), provide an alternative approach to overcome the limitations of conventional glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) redox measurements. In this chapter we describe methods to measure the nuclear rxYFP redox state in human cells by a redox Western blot technique. A nucleus-targeted rxYFP sensor can be used to sense nuclear steady-state and dynamic redox changes in response to oxidative stress. Complementary to existing redox sensors and conventional redox measurements, nucleus-targeted rxYFP sensors provide a novel tool for examining nuclear redox homeostasis in mammalian cells, permitting high-resolution readout of steady glutathione state and dynamics of redox changes. The technique described may be used with minimal variations to study the effects of stress conditions which lead to glutathione redox changes.

  9. Scaling behavior in mitochondrial redox fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanujan, V Krishnan; Biener, Gabriel; Herman, Brian A

    2006-05-15

    Scale-invariant long-range correlations have been reported in fluctuations of time-series signals originating from diverse processes such as heart beat dynamics, earthquakes, and stock market data. The common denominator of these apparently different processes is a highly nonlinear dynamics with competing forces and distinct feedback species. We report for the first time an experimental evidence for scaling behavior in NAD(P)H signal fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact cells isolated from the liver of a young (5-month-old) mouse. Time-series data were collected by two-photon imaging of mitochondrial NAD(P)H fluorescence and signal fluctuations were quantitatively analyzed for statistical correlations by detrended fluctuation analysis and spectral power analysis. Redox [NAD(P)H / NAD(P)(+)] fluctuations in isolated mitochondria and intact liver cells were found to display nonrandom, long-range correlations. These correlations are interpreted as arising due to the regulatory dynamics operative in Krebs' cycle enzyme network and electron transport chain in the mitochondria. This finding may provide a novel basis for understanding similar regulatory networks that govern the nonequilibrium properties of living cells.

  10. Xanthones with quinone reductase-inducing activity from the fruits of Garcinia mangostana (Mangosteen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Young-Won; Jung, Hyun-Ah; Chai, Heebyung; Keller, William J; Kinghorn, A Douglas

    2008-02-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of a dichloromethane-soluble extract of Garcinia mangostana fruits has led to the isolation and identification of five compounds, including two xanthones, 1,2-dihydro-1,8,10-trihydroxy-2-(2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)-9-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)furo[3,2-a]xanthen-11-one (1) and 6-deoxy-7-demethylmangostanin (2), along with three known compounds, 1,3,7-trihydroxy-2,8-di-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)xanthone (3), mangostanin (4), and alpha-mangostin (5). The structures of compounds 1 and 2 were determined from analysis of their spectroscopic data. All isolated compounds in the present study together with eleven other compounds previously isolated from the pericarp of mangosteen, were tested in an in vitro quinone reductase-induction assay using murine hepatoma cells (Hepa 1c1c7) and an in vitro hydroxyl radical antioxidant assay. Of these, compounds 1-4 induced quinone reductase (concentration to double enzyme induction, 0.68-2.2microg/mL) in Hepa 1c1c7 cells and gamma-mangostin (6) exhibited hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (IC50, 0.20microg/mL).

  11. Absence of large-scale displacement of quinone QB in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Jacques

    2004-03-30

    Photosynthesis transforms light into chemical energy by coupling electron transfer to proton uptake at the quinone Q(B). The possibility of initiating this process with a brief pulse of light and the known X-ray structure makes the photosynthetic bacterial reaction center a paradigm for studying coupled electron-proton transfer in biology. It has been established that electron transfer from the primary quinone Q(A) to Q(B) is gated by a protein conformational change. On the basis of a dramatic difference in the location of Q(B) in structures derived from crystals cooled to 90 K either under illumination or in the dark, a functional model for the gating mechanism was proposed whereby neutral Q(B) moves 4.5 A before receiving the electron from Q(A)(-) [Stowell, M. H. B., McPhillips, T. M., Rees, D. C., Soltis, S. M., Abresch, E., and Feher, G. (1997) Science 276, 812-816]. Isotope-edited FTIR difference spectroscopy of Q(B) photoreduction at 290 and 85 K is used to investigate whether Q(B) moves upon reduction. We show that the specific interactions of the carbonyl groups of Q(B) and Q(B)(-) with the protein at a single binding site remain identical at both temperatures. Therefore, the different locations of Q(B) reported in many X-ray crystal structures probably are unrelated to functional electron transfer from Q(A)(-) to Q(B).

  12. Direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens: mechanisms and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pat-Espadas, Aurora M; Razo-Flores, Elías; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene; Cervantes, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Palladium(II) reduction to Pd(0) nanoparticles by Geobacter sulfurreducens was explored under conditions of neutral pH, 30 °C and concentrations of 25, 50, and 100 mg of Pd(II)/L aiming to investigate the effect of solid species of palladium on their microbial reduction. The influence of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate was reported to enhance the palladium reaction rate in an average of 1.7-fold and its addition is determining to achieve the reduction of solid species of palladium. Based on the obtained results two mechanisms are proposed: (1) direct, which is fully described considering interactions of amide, sulfur, and phosphoryl groups associated to proteins from bacteria on palladium reduction reaction, and (2) quinone-mediated, which implies multiheme c-type cytochromes participation. Speciation analysis and kinetic results were considered and integrated into a model to fit the experimental data that explain both mechanisms. This work provides elements for a better understanding of direct and quinone-mediated palladium reduction by G. sulfurreducens, which could facilitate metal recovery with concomitant formation of valuable palladium nanoparticles in industrial processes.

  13. High Performance Hybrid Energy Storage with Potassium Ferricyanide Redox Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhan; Choudhury, Soumyadip; Weingarth, Daniel; Kim, Daekyu; Presser, Volker

    2016-09-14

    We demonstrate stable hybrid electrochemical energy storage performance of a redox-active electrolyte, namely potassium ferricyanide in aqueous media in a supercapacitor-like setup. Challenging issues associated with such a system are a large leakage current and high self-discharge, both stemming from ion redox shuttling through the separator. The latter is effectively eliminated when using an ion exchange membrane instead of a porous separator. Other critical factors toward the optimization of a redox-active electrolyte system, especially electrolyte concentration and volume of electrolyte, have been studied by electrochemical methods. Finally, excellent long-term stability is demonstrated up to 10 000 charge/discharge cycles at 1.2 and 1.8 V, with a broad maximum stability window of up to 1.8 V cell voltage as determined via cyclic voltammetry. An energy capacity of 28.3 Wh/kg or 11.4 Wh/L has been obtained from such cells, taking the nonlinearity of the charge-discharge profile into account. The power performance of our cell has been determined to be 7.1 kW/kg (ca. 2.9 kW/L or 1.2 kW/m(2)). These ratings are higher compared to the same cell operated in aqueous sodium sulfate. This hybrid electrochemical energy storage system is believed to find a strong foothold in future advanced energy storage applications.

  14. Redox-active conjugated microporous polymers: a new organic platform for highly efficient energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Chen, Xiong; Tang, Zhiwei; Wu, Dingcai; Fu, Ruowen; Jiang, Donglin

    2014-05-14

    Conjugated microporous polymers are developed as a new platform for lithium-battery energy storage, which features a near-unity coulombic efficiency, high capacity and cycle stability. The polymers exhibit synergistic structural effects on facilitating charge dynamics by virtue of their built-in redox skeletons, open nanopores and large surface areas.

  15. Monitoring of BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO in the gas of capsules of Asclepias physocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bing-Ji; Peng, Hua; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2006-01-01

    Three volatile components, namely benzoic acid ethyl ester (1), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone) (2), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) (3), were detected from the gas in the capsules of Asclepias physocarpa by means of GC/MS analysis. BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO as organic pollutants are the degradation products of the antioxidant 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). Ground water, lake water and/or rain water are a source of BHT metabolites in the plant Asclepias physocarpa.

  16. A physiological threshold for protection against menadione toxicity by human NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de L.H.J.; Boerboom, A.M.J.F.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Capelle, van D.; Ruijter, de A.J.M.; Jaiswal, A.K.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) has often been suggested to be involved in cancer prevention by means of detoxification of electrophilic quinones. In the present study, a series of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing various elevated levels of human NQO1 were generated by stabl

  17. 滞育发动前家蚕滞育性与非滞育性卵的谷胱甘肽氧化还原循环状态分析%An Analysis on Status of Glutathione Redox Cycle Between Diapause and Non-diapause Eggs of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori, Before Diapause Initiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万华星; 司马杨虎; 赵林川

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand whether the glutathione redox cycle is different in diapause eggs and non-diapause eggs of the silkworm (Bombyx mori) before diapause initiation, glutathione content and activity of related metabolic enzymes in diapause and non-diapause eggs before diapause initiation (from 0 h to 24 h post-oviposition at 25 ℃) were determined using spectrophotometric methods. It was discovered that, before diapause initiation, diapausing eggs had no significant variation in contents of reduced glutathione (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and total glutathione (GSH +2GSSG), in ratio of GSH/GSSG, and in activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST). However, the activity of thi-oredoxin peroxidase (TPX) was reduced by 23% and the activity of glutathione reductase (GR) was increased by 57%. Non-diapausing eggs had no significant variation in GSH content and activity of TPX and GST, either. But GSSG content was increased by 61%, GSH + 2GSSG content was increased by 41 %, the ratio of GSH/GSSG was reduced by 33%, and activity of GR was reduced by 16%. Compared to non-diapausing eggs, diapausing eggs had lower contents of GSH, GSSG and GSH +2GSSG, higher ratio of GSH/GSSG, lower activity of TPX, no significant difference in activity of GST, and higher activity of GR.However, activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) was undetectable in both diapause and non-diapause eggs. These results indicate that higher ratio of GSH/GSSG in diapause eggs before diapause initiation is resulted from lower activity of TPX and higher activity of GR, making the glutathione redox cycle remain at a relatively reduced state.%为了调查滞育和非滞育性家蚕卵的谷胱甘肽氧化还原循环在滞育发动前是否存在差异,利用分光光度法检测滞育发动前(25℃中蚕卵产下后0~24h)滞育与非滞育蚕卵的谷胱甘肽含量和相关代谢酶活性.滞育发动前,滞育性家蚕卵中的还原型谷胱甘肽( GSH)含量、

  18. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Chausse

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting (IF is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  19. Glutathione Redox Control of Asthma: From Molecular Mechanisms to Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Dean P.; Brown, Lou Ann S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways associated with airway hyper-responsiveness and airflow limitation in response to specific triggers. Whereas inflammation is important for tissue regeneration and wound healing, the profound and sustained inflammatory response associated with asthma may result in airway remodeling that involves smooth muscle hypertrophy, epithelial goblet-cell hyperplasia, and permanent deposition of airway extracellular matrix proteins. Although the specific mechanisms responsible for asthma are still being unraveled, free radicals such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are important mediators of airway tissue damage that are increased in subjects with asthma. There is also a growing body of literature implicating disturbances in oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions and impaired antioxidant defenses as a risk factor for asthma development and asthma severity. Ultimately, these redox-related perturbations result in a vicious cycle of airway inflammation and injury that is not always amenable to current asthma therapy, particularly in cases of severe asthma. This review will discuss disruptions of redox signaling and control in asthma with a focus on the thiol, glutathione, and reduced (thiol) form (GSH). First, GSH synthesis, GSH distribution, and GSH function and homeostasis are discussed. We then review the literature related to GSH redox balance in health and asthma, with an emphasis on human studies. Finally, therapeutic opportunities to restore the GSH redox balance in subjects with asthma are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 375–408. PMID:22304503

  20. The effect of different chemical treatments, pyrolysis conditions and feedstocks on the redox properties of biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Francisco Javier; Cayuela, María Luz; Roig, Asunción; Ángel Sánchez-Monedero, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    Pyrogenic carbonaceous materials can have a role in several biogeochemical redox reactions as electron transfer catalysts. Low N2O emissions in biochar amended soils can be related to its ability to act as an "electron shuttle", facilitating the transport of electrons to soil denitrifying microorganisms. Modifying biochar redox properties could be an interesting approach to regulate this effect. In this work we propose several methods for the development of biochars from slow pyrolysis with altered electrochemical properties. To improve its electron exchange capacity we aimed to: 1) Increase the number of redox active functional groups in biochar. Several pyrolysis conditions and chemical treatments (KOH, H3PO4 and H2O2) were tested. 2) Raise the fraction of redox active mineral in biochar. The presence of Fe and Mn-based minerals in biochar could also catalyze redox reactions in soil associated with the nitrogen cycle. Different additives (FeCl3, KMnO4 and clay) were combined with the feedstock before the pyrolysis process. Results of their ability to modify biochar redox properties, measured by mediated electrochemical analysis, are presented. Additionally, we characterized biochars produced from different feedstocks to assess how their lignin, holocellulose and ash composition affects these properties. Analytical issues arising from the difficulty of measuring the electron exchange capacity of biochar will also be discussed.

  1. Speciation of selenium in groundwater: Seasonal variations and redox transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, A. Ramesh [Chemical Laboratory, Central Groundwater Board, South Eastern Coastal Region, E1, Rajaji Bhavan, Besant Nagar, Chennai 600 090 (India); Riyazuddin, P., E-mail: riyazdr@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Selenium(VI) was the predominant species of Se present in groundwater. {yields} Groundwater recharge increased Se mobilization. {yields} Dissolved oxygen and redox potential control the mobilization of soil selenium. {yields} Shallow groundwater is susceptible for more selenium enrichment than deeper ones. - Abstract: Speciation of selenium in groundwater is essential from the viewpoint of toxicity to organisms and biogeochemical cycling. Selenium speciation in groundwater is controlled by aquifer redox conditions, microbial transformations, dissolved oxygen (DO) and other redox couples. A suburban area of Chennai city in India, where improper waste disposal measures have been practiced is selected for this study. Se(IV), Se(VI) and other hydrochemical parameters were monitored in shallow ground water during pre- and post-monsoon seasons for a period of three years. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of groundwater recharge on selenium speciation. The concentration of Se(IV), and Se(VI) ranged between 0.15-0.43 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.16-4.73 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. During post-monsoon period the concentration of Se(IV), and Se(VI) ranged between 0.15-1.25 {mu}g L{sup -1} and 0.58-10.37 {mu}g L{sup -1}, respectively. Se(VI) was the dominant species of selenium during the pre- and post-monsoon periods. During the post-monsoon periods, leaching of selenium from soil was more effective due to the increased oxidizing nature of the groundwater as indicated by the DO and redox potential (Eh) measurements. This finding has important implications on the behavior of selenium in groundwater, and also on the health of people consuming groundwater from seleniferous areas.

  2. A redox-flow battery with an alloxazine-based organic electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaixiang; Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Beh, Eugene S.; Tong, Liuchuan; Chen, Qing; Valle, Alvaro; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Aziz, Michael J.; Gordon, Roy G.

    2016-09-01

    Redox-flow batteries (RFBs) can store large amounts of electrical energy from variable sources, such as solar and wind. Recently, redox-active organic molecules in aqueous RFBs have drawn substantial attention due to their rapid kinetics and low membrane crossover rates. Drawing inspiration from nature, here we report a high-performance aqueous RFB utilizing an organic redox compound, alloxazine, which is a tautomer of the isoalloxazine backbone of vitamin B2. It can be synthesized in high yield at room temperature by single-step coupling of inexpensive o-phenylenediamine derivatives and alloxan. The highly alkaline-soluble alloxazine 7/8-carboxylic acid produces a RFB exhibiting open-circuit voltage approaching 1.2 V and current efficiency and capacity retention exceeding 99.7% and 99.98% per cycle, respectively. Theoretical studies indicate that structural modification of alloxazine with electron-donating groups should allow further increases in battery voltage. As an aza-aromatic molecule that undergoes reversible redox cycling in aqueous electrolyte, alloxazine represents a class of radical-free redox-active organics for use in large-scale energy storage.

  3. Kinetically Enhanced Electrochemical Redox of Polysulfides on Polymeric Carbon Nitrides for Improved Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ji; Yin, Lichang; Tang, Xiaonan; Yang, Huicong; Yan, Wensheng; Song, Li; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Li, Feng

    2016-09-28

    The kinetics and stability of the redox of lithium polysulfides (LiPSs) fundamentally determine the overall performance of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Inspired by theoretical predictions, we herein validated the existence of a strong electrostatic affinity between polymeric carbon nitride (p-C3N4) and LiPSs, that can not only stabilize the redox cycling of LiPSs, but also enhance their redox kinetics. As a result, utilization of p-C3N4 in a Li-S battery has brought much improved performance in the aspects of high capacity and low capacity fading over prolonged cycling. Especially upon the application of p-C3N4, the kinetic barrier of the LiPS redox reactions has been significantly reduced, which has thus resulted in a better rate performance. Further density functional theory simulations have revealed that the origin of such kinetic enhancement was from the distortion of molecular configurations of the LiPSs anchored on p-C3N4. Therefore, this proof-of-concept study opens up a promising avenue to improve the performance of Li-S batteries by accelerating their fundamental electrochemical redox processes, which also has the potential to be applied in other electrochemical energy storage/conversion systems.

  4. Time-Resolved Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Pd Porphyrin-Quinone and Zn Porphyrin-Quinone Dyads with a Cyclohexylene Spacer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchanova, Maya; Kurreck, Harry; Berg, Alexander

    2015-07-23

    Peculiarities of the light induced intramolecular electron transfer processes in two ensembles where Pd porphyrin and Zn porphyrin donors with similar peripheral substituents are covalently linked via cyclohexylene spacer with a quinone acceptor, were studied by time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in different phases of the magnetically oriented nematic liquid crystal E-7. In the photoexcited PdP-Q the net absorptive signal was observed and ascribed to the thermally equilibrated spectrum of (3)*(PdP(•+)-Q(•-)). In ZnP-Q photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer was also found. It was demonstrated that the multiplet spectrum of the charge-separated state (3)*(ZnP(•+)-Q(•-)) consists of two signals with different widths and decay times. The signals were assigned to two spin-polarized triplets of the radical pairs formed in "stretched" and "folded" ensemble conformers, corresponding to different configurations of the cyclohexylene spacer. These findings were discussed in terms of differences in the properties of the porphyrin metal cores, macrocycle peripheral substituents and geometry of the donor-acceptor cyclohexylene spacer.

  5. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  6. Redox characteristics of the eukaryotic cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R

    2007-01-01

    (ROS) and glutathionylated proteins are maintained at very low levels. In the present review, recent progress in the understanding of the cytosolic thiol-disulfide redox metabolism and novel analytical approaches to studying cytosolic redox properties are discussed. We will focus on the yeast model...

  7. Characterization of redox proteins using electrochemical methods.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, M.F.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The use of electrochemical techniques in combination with proteins started approximately a decade ago and has since then developed into a powerfull technique for the study of small redox proteins. In addition to the determination of redox potentials, electrochemistry can be used to obtain informatio

  8. Characterization of redox conditions in pollution plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Banwart, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Evalution of redox conditions in groundwater pollution plumes is often a prerequisite for understanding the behviour of the pollutants in the plume and for selecting remediation approaches. Measuring of redox conditions in pollution plumes is, however, a fairly recent issue and yet relative few...

  9. Redox- and non-redox-metal-induced formation of free radicals and their role in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Marian; Jomova, Klaudia; Rhodes, Christopher J; Kuča, Kamil; Musílek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Transition metal ions are key elements of various biological processes ranging from oxygen formation to hypoxia sensing, and therefore, their homeostasis is maintained within strict limits through tightly regulated mechanisms of uptake, storage and secretion. The breakdown of metal ion homeostasis can lead to an uncontrolled formation of reactive oxygen species, ROS (via the Fenton reaction, which produces hydroxyl radicals), and reactive nitrogen species, RNS, which may cause oxidative damage to biological macromolecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. An imbalance between the formation of free radicals and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems is termed oxidative stress. Most vulnerable to free radical attack is the cell membrane which may undergo enhanced lipid peroxidation, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal and other exocyclic DNA adducts. While redox-active iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) undergo redox-cycling reactions, for a second group of redox-inactive metals such as arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd), the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. While arsenic is known to bind directly to critical thiols, other mechanisms, involving formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions, have been proposed. Redox-inert zinc (Zn) is the most abundant metal in the brain and an essential component of numerous proteins involved in biological defense mechanisms against oxidative stress. The depletion of zinc may enhance DNA damage by impairing DNA repair mechanisms. Intoxication of an organism by arsenic and cadmium may lead to metabolic disturbances of redox-active copper and iron, with the occurrence of oxidative stress induced by the enhanced formation of ROS/RNS. Oxidative stress occurs when excessive formation of ROS overwhelms the antioxidant defense system, as is maintained by antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, alpha

  10. Engineered Proteins: Redox Properties and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhulkar, Shradha; Tian, Hui; Wang, Xiaotang; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Oxidoreductases and metalloproteins, representing more than one third of all known proteins, serve as significant catalysts for numerous biological processes that involve electron transfers such as photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, and molecular signaling. The functional properties of the oxidoreductases/metalloproteins are determined by the nature of their redox centers. Protein engineering is a powerful approach that is used to incorporate biological and abiological redox cofactors as well as novel enzymes and redox proteins with predictable structures and desirable functions for important biological and chemical applications. The methods of protein engineering, mainly rational design, directed evolution, protein surface modifications, and domain shuffling, have allowed the creation and study of a number of redox proteins. This review presents a selection of engineered redox proteins achieved through these methods, resulting in a manipulation in redox potentials, an increase in electron-transfer efficiency, and an expansion of native proteins by de novo design. Such engineered/modified redox proteins with desired properties have led to a broad spectrum of practical applications, ranging from biosensors, biofuel cells, to pharmaceuticals and hybrid catalysis. Glucose biosensors are one of the most successful products in enzyme electrochemistry, with reconstituted glucose oxidase achieving effective electrical communication with the sensor electrode; direct electron-transfer-type biofuel cells are developed to avoid thermodynamic loss and mediator leakage; and fusion proteins of P450s and redox partners make the biocatalytic generation of drug metabolites possible. In summary, this review includes the properties and applications of the engineered redox proteins as well as their significance and great potential in the exploration of bioelectrochemical sensing devices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1796–1822. PMID:22435347

  11. HMGB1 redox during sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmahdi, Wasan; Patel, Devika; Rabadi, May M; Azar, Tala; Jules, Edson; Lipphardt, Mark; Hashemiyoon, Rameen; Ratliff, Brian B

    2017-10-01

    During sepsis, the alarmin HMGB1 is released from tissues and promotes systemic inflammation that results in multi-organ damage, with the kidney particularly susceptible to injury. The severity of inflammation and pro-damage signaling mediated by HMGB1 appears to be dependent on the alarmin's redox state. Therefore, we examined HMGB1 redox in kidney cells during sepsis. Using intravital microscopy, CellROX labeling of kidneys in live mice indicated increased ROS generation in the kidney perivascular endothelium and tubules during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. Subsequent CellROX and MitoSOX labeling of LPS-stressed endothelial and kidney proximal tubule cells demonstrated increased ROS generation in these cells as sepsis worsens. Consequently, HMGB1 oxidation increased in the cytoplasm of kidney cells during its translocation from the nucleus to the circulation, with the degree of oxidation dependent on the severity of sepsis, as measured in in vivo mouse samples using a thiol assay and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The greater the oxidation of HMGB1, the greater the ability of the alarmin to stimulate pro-inflammatory cyto-/chemokine release (measured by Luminex Multiplex) and alter mitochondrial ATP generation (Luminescent ATP Detection Assay). Administration of glutathione and thioredoxin inhibitors to cell cultures enhanced HMGB1 oxidation during sepsis in endothelial and proximal tubule cells, respectively. In conclusion, as sepsis worsens, ROS generation and HMGB1 oxidation increases in kidney cells, which enhances HMGB1's pro-inflammatory signaling. Conversely, the glutathione and thioredoxin systems work to maintain the protein in its reduced state. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Crystal structure of quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase from Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes. A versatile dehydrogenase oxidizing alcohols and carbohydrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozeboom, Henriette J.; Yu, Shukun; Mikkelsen, Rene; Nikolaev, Igor; Mulder, Harm J.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2015-01-01

    The quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (PQQ-ADH, E.C. 1.1.5.2) from the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudogluconobacter saccharoketogenes IFO 14464 oxidizes primary alcohols (e.g. ethanol, butanol), secondary alcohols (monosaccharides), as well as aldehydes, polysaccharides, and cyclodextrins. The

  13. The interaction of quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment and the acceptor side of photosystem II in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, W.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described which are directed towards a further characterization of the interaction of the native bound plastoquinone Q B , artificial quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of Photosystem II in the thylakoid

  14. Hydroquinone and quinone-grafted porous carbons for highly selective CO2 capture from flue gases and natural gas upgrading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Krishna, R.; Yang, J.; Deng, S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydroquinone and quinone functional groups were grafted onto a hierarchical porous carbon framework via the Friedel-Crafts reaction to develop more efficient adsorbents for the selective capture and removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases and natural gas. The oxygen-doped porous carbons were

  15. Cathodic Voltammetric Behavior of Pillar[5]quinone in Nonaqueous Media. Symmetry Effects on the Electron Uptake Sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Beijun; Kaifer, Angel E

    2015-08-12

    The cathodic voltammetric behavior of pillar[5]quinone was investigated in dichloromethane solution. Our data show that the symmetry of the macrocycle has a pronounced effect on the electron uptake sequence. The uptake of the first five electrons follows a 2-1-2 pattern, and only a total of eight electrons could be injected into the macrocycle under our experimental conditions.

  16. The effect of glassy carbon surface oxides in non-aqueous voltammetry: the case of quinones in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Patrick A; Newell, Christina M; Pullman, David P; Smith, Diane K

    2014-11-04

    Glassy carbon (GC) electrodes are well-known to contain oxygenated functional groups such as phenols, carbonyls, and carboxylic acids on their surface. The effects of these groups on voltammetry in aqueous solution are well-studied, but there has been little discussion of their possible effects in nonaqueous solution. In this study, we show that the acidic functional groups, particularly phenols, are likely causes of anomalous features often seen in the voltammetry of quinones in nonaqueous solution. These features, a too small second cyclic voltammetric wave and extra current between the two waves that sometimes appears to be a small, broad third voltammetric wave, have previously been attributed to different types of dimerization. In this work, concentration-dependent voltammetry in acetonitrile rules out dimerization with a series of alkyl-benzoquinones because the anomalous features get larger as the concentration decreases. At low concentrations, solution bimolecular reactions will be relatively less important than reactions with surface groups. Addition of substoichiometric amounts of naphthol at higher quinone concentrations produces almost identical behavior as seen at low quinone concentrations with no added naphthol. This implicates hydrogen bonding and proton transfer from the surface phenolic groups as the cause of the anomalous features in quinone voltammetry at GC electrodes. This conclusion is supported by the perturbation of surface oxide coverage on GC electrodes through different electrode pretreatments.

  17. The interaction of quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of photosystem II in photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaas, W.F.J.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis experiments are described which are directed towards a further characterization of the interaction of the native bound plastoquinone Q B , artificial quinones, herbicides and bicarbonate with their binding environment at the acceptor side of Photosystem II in

  18. Ocean redox change at the Permian-Triassic mass extinction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhl, Micha; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Earth’s history is marked by multiple events of ocean anoxia developing along continental margins and po¬tentially into the open ocean realm. These events of¬ten coincide with the emplacement of large igneous provinces (LIPs) on continents, major perturbations of global geochemical cycles...... ocean redox change over the largest mass extinction event in Earth history, at the Permian-Tri¬assic boundary (at ~252 Ma). This event is marked by a major perturbation in the global exogenic carbon cycle (and associated major negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE)), likely initiated by carbon...... and marine (mass) ex¬tinction. The geographic and temporal extend and the intensity (ferruginous vs. euxinic) of anoxic con¬ditions is, however, strongly debated and not well constraint. This complicates understanding of close coupling between Earth’s physical, chemical and bi¬ological processes. We studied...

  19. Microporous separators for Fe/V redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Luo, Qingtao; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Wei; Li, Bin; Xia, Guan-Guang; Miller, Eric; Chambers, Jeff; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-11-01

    The Fe/V redox flow battery has demonstrated promising performance with distinct advantages over other redox flow battery systems. Due to the less oxidative nature of the Fe(III) species, hydrocarbon-based ion exchange membranes or separators can be used. Daramic® microporous polyethylene separators were tested on Fe/V flow cells using sulphuric/chloric mixed acid-supporting electrolytes. Among them, separator C exhibited good flow cell cycling performance with satisfactory repeatability over a broad temperature range of 5-50 °C. Energy efficiency (EE) of C remains around 70% at current densities of 50-80 mA cm-2 in temperatures ranging from room temperature to 50 °C. The capacity decay problem could be circumvented through hydraulic pressure balancing by means of applying different pump rates to the positive and negative electrolytes. Stable capacity and energy were obtained over 20 cycles at room temperature and 40 °C. These results show that extremely low-cost separators ($1-20 m-2) are applicable in the Fe/V flow battery system with acceptable energy efficiency. This represents a remarkable breakthrough: a significant reduction of the capital cost of the Fe/V flow battery system, which could further its market penetration in grid stabilization and renewable integration.

  20. Peltomexicanin, a Peltogynoid Quinone Methide from Peltogyne Mexicana Martínez Purple Heartwood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Gutiérrez-Macías

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Peltomexicanin (7,10-dihydroxy-6,12-dioxa-5H-tetraphen-3-one is a new peltogynoid quinone methide isolated from Palo Morado (Peltogyne mexicana Martínez heartwood by column chromatography. Its chemical structure was elucidated by IR, NMR (1H, 13C, 2D NMR experiments (COSY, NOESY, HMQC, and HSQC, ESI-MS, and UV-Vis spectroscopic analysis. According to HPLC quantification, this compound is the main pigment and accounts for 1.21% of Palo Morado heartwood material. The antioxidant activity of peltomexicanin and dried methanolic extract (DEx of purple heartwood was evaluated using the radical of 2,2’-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS assay, and the corresponding values expressed as Trolox equivalents (µmol TE/mg sample were 4.25 and 4.57, respectively.

  1. Anti-inflammatory and Quinone Reductase Inducing Compounds from Fermented Noni (Morinda citrifolia) Juice Exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Ui Joung; Park, Eun-Jung; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Sang-Ngern, Mayuramas; Wall, Marisa M; Wei, Yanzhang; Pezzuto, John M; Chang, Leng Chee

    2016-06-24

    A new fatty acid ester disaccharide, 2-O-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-1-O-(2E,4Z,7Z)-deca-2,4,7-trienoyl-β-d-glucopyranose (1), a new ascorbic acid derivative, 2-caffeoyl-3-ketohexulofuranosonic acid γ-lactone (2), and a new iridoid glycoside, 10-dimethoxyfermiloside (3), were isolated along with 13 known compounds (4-16) from fermented noni fruit juice (Morinda citrifolia). The structures of the new compounds, together with 4 and 5, were determined by 1D and 2D NMR experiments, as well as comparison with published values. Compounds 2 and 7 showed moderate inhibitory activities in a TNF-α-induced NF-κB assay, and compounds 4 and 6 exhibited considerable quinone reductase-1 (QR1) inducing effects.

  2. New light on a dark subject: On the use of fluorescence data to deduce redox states of natural organic matter (NOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the use of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (EEMS), parallel factor statistical analysis (PARAFAC), and oxidation-reduction experiments to examine the effect of redox conditions on PARAFAC model results for aqueous samples rich in natural organic matter. Fifty-four aqueous samples from 11 different geographic locations and two plant extracts were analyzed untreated and after chemical treatments or irradiation were used in attempts to change the redox status of the natural organic matter. The EEMS spectra were generated and modeled using a PARAFAC package developed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The PARAFAC model output was examined for consistency with previously reported relations and with changes expected to occur upon experimental oxidation and reduction of aqueous samples. Results indicate the implied fraction of total sample fluorescence attributed to quinone-like moieties was consistent (0.64 to 0.78) and greater than that observed by Cory and McKnight (2005). The fraction of the quinone-like moieties that was reduced (the reducing index, RI) showed relatively little variation (0.46 to 0.71) despite attempts to alter the redox status of the natural organic matter. The RI changed little after reducing samples using zinc metal, oxidizing at high pH with air, or irradiating with a Xenon lamp. Our results, however, are consistent with the correlations between the fluorescence indices (FI) of samples and the ratio of PARAFAC fitting parameters suggested by Cory and McKnight (2005), though we used samples with a much narrower range of FI values.

  3. Redox subpopulations and the risk of cancer progression: a new method for characterizing redox heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, He N.; Li, Lin Z.

    2016-02-01

    It has been shown that a malignant tumor is akin to a complex organ comprising of various cell populations including tumor cells that are genetically, metabolically and functionally different. Our redox imaging data have demonstrated intra-tumor redox heterogeneity in all mouse xenografts derived from human melanomas, breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Based on the signals of NADH and oxidized flavoproteins (Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)) and their ratio, i.e., the redox ratio, which is an indicator of mitochondrial metabolic status, we have discovered several distinct redox subpopulations in xenografts of breast tumors potentially recapitulating functional/metabolic heterogeneity within the tumor. Furthermore, xenografts of breast tumors with higher metastatic potential tend to have a redox subpopulation whose redox ratio is significantly different from that of tumors with lower metastatic potential and usually have a bi-modal distribution of the redox ratio. The redox subpopulations from human breast cancer samples can also be very complex with multiple subpopulations as determined by fitting the redox ratio histograms with multi- Gaussian functions. In this report, we present a new method for identifying the redox subpopulations within individual breast tumor xenografts and human breast tissues, which may be used to differentiate between breast cancer and normal tissue and among breast cancer with different risks of progression.

  4. Photochemical formation and chemistry of long-lived adamantylidene-quinone methides and 2-adamantyl cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarić, Nikola; Zabcić, Ivana; Mlinarić-Majerski, Kata; Wan, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hydroxymethylphenols strategically substituted with the 2-hydroxy-2-adamantyl moiety, AdPh 8-10, were synthesized, and their photochemical reactivity was investigated. On excitation to the singlet excited state, AdPh 8 undergoes intramolecular proton transfer coupled with a loss of H(2)O giving quinone methide 8QM. The presence of 8QM has been detected by laser flash photolysis (CH(3)CN-H(2)O 1:1, tau = 0.55 s) and UV-vis spectroscopy. Singlet excited states of AdPh 9 and 10 in the presence of H(2)O dehydrate giving 9QM and 10QM. Photochemically formed QMs are trapped by nucleophiles giving the addition products (e.g., Phi for methanolysis of 8 is 0.55). In addition, the zwitterionic 9QM undergoes an unexpected rearrangement involving transformation of the 2-phenyl-2-adamantyl cation into the 4-phenyl-2-adamantyl cation (Phi approximately 0.03). An analogous rearrangement was observed with methoxy derivatives 9a and 10a. Zwitterionic 9QM was characterized by LFP in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (tau = 1 mus). In TFE, in the ground state, AdPh 10 is in equilibrium with 10QM, which allowed for recording the (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra of the QM. Introduction of the adamantyl substituent into the o-hydroxymethylphenol moiety increased the quantum yield of the associated QM formation by up to 3-fold and significantly prolonged their lifetimes. Furthermore, adamantyl substituent made the study of the alkyl-substituted quinone methides easier by LFP by prolonging their lifetimes and increasing the quantum yields of formation.

  5. Controls on the redox potential of rainwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Joan D; Mullaugh, Katherine M; Kieber, Robert J; Avery, G Brooks; Mead, Ralph N

    2012-12-18

    Hydrogen peroxide acting as a reductant affects the redox potential of rainwater collected at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series Station, the South Island of New Zealand, the contiguous USA, and the primary study site in Wilmington, NC. Analytical measurements of both halves of redox couples for dissolved iron, mercury, and the nitrate-nitrite-ammonium system can predict the rainwater redox potential measured directly by a platinum electrode. Measurements of these redox couples along with the pH in rain yields pe⁻ between 8 and 11; the half reaction for hydrogen peroxide acting as a reductant using typical rainwater conditions of 15 μM H₂O₂ at pH 4.7 gives pe⁻ = 9.12, where pe⁻ = negative log of the activity of hydrated electrons. Of the six rainwater redox systems investigated, only manganese speciation appeared to be controlled by molecular oxygen (pe⁻ = 15.90). Copper redox speciation was consistent with superoxide acting as a reductant (pe⁻ = 2.7). The concentration of H₂O₂ in precipitation has more than doubled over the preceding decade due to a decrease in SO₂ emissions, which suggests the redox chemistry of rainwater is dynamic and changing, potentially altering the speciation of many organic compounds and trace metals in atmospheric waters.

  6. Metabolomic profiling unravels DNA adducts in human breast that are formed from peroxidase mediated activation of estrogens to quinone methides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilesh W Gaikwad

    Full Text Available Currently there are three major hypotheses that have been proposed for estrogen induced carcinogenicity, however exact etiology remains unknown. Based on the chemical logic, studies were undertaken to investigate if estrogens could generate quinone methides in an oxidative environment which then could cause DNA damage in humans. In presence of MnO2 estrogens were oxidized to quinone methides. Surprisingly quinone methides were found to be stable with t1/2 of 20.8 and 4.5 min respectively. Incubation of estrogens with lactoperoxidase (LPO and H2O2 resulted in formation of respective quinone methides (E1(E2-QM. Subsequent addition of adenine to the assay mixture lead to trapping of E1(E2-QM, resulting in formation of adenine adducts of estrogens, E1(E2-9-N-Ade. Targeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS based metabolomic analysis of the breast tissue extracts showed the presence of adenine adducts of estrogens, E1(E2-9-N-Ade, along with other estrogen related metabolites. Identity of E1(E2-N-Ade in LPO assay extracts and breast tissue extracts were confirmed by comparing them to pure synthesized E1(E2-9-N-Ade standards. From these results, it is evident that peroxidase enzymes or peroxidase-like activity in human breast tissue could oxidize estrogens to electrophilic and stable quinone methides in a single step that covalently bind to DNA to form adducts. The error prone repair of the damaged DNA can result in mutation of critical genes and subsequently cancer. This article reports evidence for hitherto unknown estrogen metabolic pathway in human breast, catalyzed by peroxidase, which could initiate cancer.

  7. Catalytic reaction of cytokinin dehydrogenase : preference for quinones as electron acceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frébortová, Jitka; Fraaije, Marco W.; Galuszka, Petr; Šebela, Marek; Peč, Pavel; Hrbáč, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Bilyeu, Kristin D.; English, James T.; Frébort, Ivo; Sebela, M.; Pec, P.; Hrbac, J.; Frebort, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic reaction of cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (EC 1.5.99.12) was studied in detail using the recombinant flavoenzyme from maize. Determination of the redox potential of the covalently linked flavin cofactor revealed a relatively high potential dictating the type of electron acceptor that

  8. Studies using structural analogs and inbred strain differences to support a role for quinone methide metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in mouse lung tumor promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J A; Carlson, T J; Sun, Y; Dwyer-Nield, L D; Malkinson, A M

    2001-03-07

    Chronic treatment of BALB and GRS mice with BHT (2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol) following a single urethane injection increases lung tumor multiplicity, but this does not occur in CXB4 mice. Previous data suggest that promotion requires the conversion of BHT to a tert-butyl-hydroxylated metabolite (BHTOH) in lung and the subsequent oxidation of this species to an electrophilic quinone methide. To obtain additional evidence for the importance of quinone methide formation, structural analogs that form less reactive quinone methides were tested and found to lack promoting activity in BHT-responsive mice. The possibility that promotion-unresponsive strains are unable to form BHTOH was tested by substituting this compound for BHT in the promotion protocol using CXB4 mice. No promotion occurred, and in-vitro work demonstrated that CXB4 mice are, in fact, capable of producing BHTOH and its quinone methide, albeit in smaller quantities. Incubations with BALB lung microsomes and radiolabeled substrates confirmed that more covalent binding to protein occurs with BHTOH than with BHT and, in addition, BHTOH quinone methide is considerably more toxic to mouse lung epithelial cells than BHT quinone methide. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that a two-step oxidation process, i.e. hydroxylation and quinone methide formation, is required for the promotion of mouse lung tumors by BHT.

  9. Sediment phosphorus speciation and mobility under dynamic redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Chris T.; Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; O'Connell, David W.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment has caused phosphorus (P) accumulation in many freshwater sediments, raising concerns that internal loading from legacy P may delay the recovery of aquatic ecosystems suffering from eutrophication. Benthic recycling of P strongly depends on the redox regime within surficial sediment. In many shallow environments, redox conditions tend to be highly dynamic as a result of, among others, bioturbation by macrofauna, root activity, sediment resuspension and seasonal variations in bottom-water oxygen (O2) concentrations. To gain insight into the mobility and biogeochemistry of P under fluctuating redox conditions, a suspension of sediment from a hypereutrophic freshwater marsh was exposed to alternating 7-day periods of purging with air and nitrogen gas (N2), for a total duration of 74 days, in a bioreactor system. We present comprehensive data time series of bulk aqueous- and solid-phase chemistry, solid-phase phosphorus speciation and hydrolytic enzyme activities demonstrating the mass balanced redistribution of P in sediment during redox cycling. Aqueous phosphate concentrations remained low ( ˜ 2.5 µM) under oxic conditions due to sorption to iron(III) oxyhydroxides. During anoxic periods, once nitrate was depleted, the reductive dissolution of iron(III) oxyhydroxides released P. However, only 4.5 % of the released P accumulated in solution while the rest was redistributed between the MgCl2 and NaHCO3 extractable fractions of the solid phase. Thus, under the short redox fluctuations imposed in the experiments, P remobilization to the aqueous phase remained relatively limited. Orthophosphate predominated at all times during the experiment in both the solid and aqueous phase. Combined P monoesters and diesters accounted for between 9 and 16 % of sediment particulate P. Phosphatase activities up to 2.4 mmol h-1 kg-1 indicated the potential for rapid mineralization of organic P (Po), in particular during periods of aeration when the

  10. Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Luteal (after egg release) Changes During the Menstrual Cycle The menstrual cycle is regulated by the complex interaction of ... egg release) Luteal (after egg release) The menstrual cycle begins with menstrual bleeding (menstruation), which marks the first day of ...

  11. Graphite felt modified with bismuth nanoparticles as negative electrode in a vanadium redox flow battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, David J; González, Zoraida; Blanco, Clara; Granda, Marcos; Menéndez, Rosa; Santamaría, Ricardo

    2014-03-01

    A graphite felt decorated with bismuth nanoparticles was studied as negative electrode in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB). The results confirm the excellent electrochemical performance of the bismuth modified electrode in terms of the reversibility of the V(3+) /V(2+) redox reactions and its long-term cycling performance. Moreover a mechanism that explains the role that Bi nanoparticles play in the redox reactions in this negative half-cell is proposed. Bi nanoparticles favor the formation of BiHx , an intermediate that reduces V(3+) to V(2+) and, therefore, inhibits the competitive irreversible reaction of hydrogen formation (responsible for the commonly observed loss of Coulombic efficiency of VRFBs). Thus, the total charge consumed during the cathodic sweep in this electrode is used to reduce V(3+) to V(2+) , resulting in a highly reversible and efficient process.

  12. Synthesis and atomic level in situ redox characterization in ceria and ceria zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruigang

    2007-12-01

    solution sample shows better low-temperature redox properties than the 70% ceria-30% zirconia solid solution sample. The reducibility of the solid solution samples was strongly influenced by high temperature redox cycling and reoxidation conditions. In the 50% ceria-50% zirconia solid solution sample, the low temperature reducibility after high temperature redox cycles was identified and correlated with nanostructure and composition. The presence of fluorite-like and pyrochlore-like phases was found to play a critical role in controlling the improved low temperature reducibility and decreased reduction percentage. This study also demonstrated that in situ environmental transmission electron microscope is a powerful tool to investigate the oxide catalyst gassolid reactions with subnanometer resolution under near reactor conditions.

  13. Microglia antioxidant systems and redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhardt, F; Haslund-Vinding, J; Jaquet, V

    2017-01-01

    of protein thiolation of target redox proteins the necessity for tightly localized, timed, and confined oxidant production to work in concert with antioxidant proteins to promote redox signaling. NOX2-mediated redox signaling modulate the acquisition of the classical or alternative microglia activation...... of the antioxidant response in microglia will reveal antioxidant proteins as dynamic players in redox signaling, which in concert with NOX-derived oxidants fulfill important roles in the autocrine or paracrine regulation of essential enzymes or transcriptional programs. This article is protected by copyright. All......'t stand alone however, and are not always pernicious. We discuss in general terms, and where available in microglia, GSH synthesis and relation to cystine import and glutamate export, and the thioredoxin system as the most important antioxidative defense mechanism, and further, we discuss in the context...

  14. Novel Redox Processes for Carbonaceous Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Feng

    The current study investigates oxygen carrier development, process intensification, and oxygen carrier attrition behaviors for a number of novel, redox-based energy conversion schemes. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  15. Assessment of redox markers in cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Nathaniel Caleb

    2007-01-01

    Metabolic redox status may have important implications to cattle health and production. Antioxidants and biomarkers of oxidative stress were evaluated in cattle under three phases of management. Each phase stood alone as a treatment model, and managerial aspects during the phase were evaluated as potential moderators of redox balance. Yearling heifers were used to assess the impact of fescue toxicosis and heat stress on selected markers in study 1. Intravaginal temperatures, ADG, serum prolac...

  16. Cyanide degradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 involves a malate:quinone oxidoreductase and an associated cyanide-insensitive electron transfer chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, Victor M; Merchán, Faustino; Blasco, Rafael; Igeño, M Isabel; Martínez-Luque, Manuel; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado; Castillo, Francisco; Roldán, M Dolores

    2011-03-01

    The alkaliphilic bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is able to grow with cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. Membrane fractions from cells grown under cyanotrophic conditions catalysed the production of oxaloacetate from L-malate. Several enzymic activities of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles in association with the cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway seem to be responsible for the oxaloacetate formation in vivo. Thus, in cyanide-grown cells, citrate synthase and isocitrate lyase activities were significantly higher than those observed with other nitrogen sources. Malate dehydrogenase activity was undetectable, but a malate:quinone oxidoreductase activity coupled to the cyanide-insensitive alternative oxidase was found in membrane fractions from cyanide-grown cells. Therefore, oxaloacetate production was linked to the cyanide-insensitive respiration in P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344. Cyanide and oxaloacetate reacted chemically inside the cells to produce a cyanohydrin (2-hydroxynitrile), which was further converted to ammonium. In addition to cyanide, strain CECT5344 was able to grow with several cyano derivatives, such as 2- and 3-hydroxynitriles. The specific system required for uptake and metabolization of cyanohydrins was induced by cyanide and by 2-hydroxynitriles, such as the cyanohydrins of oxaloacetate and 2-oxoglutarate.

  17. Selective superoxide generation within mitochondria by the targeted redox cycler MitoParaquat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Ellen L; Gawel, Justyna M; Aksentijević, Dunja; Cochemé, Helena M; Stewart, Tessa S; Shchepinova, Maria M; Qiang, He; Prime, Tracy A; Bright, Thomas P; James, Andrew M; Shattock, Michael J; Senn, Hans M; Hartley, Richard C; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Superoxide is the proximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain and plays a major role in pathological oxidative stress and redox signaling. While there are tools to detect or decrease mitochondrial superoxide, none can rapidly and specifically increase superoxide production within the mitochondrial matrix. This lack impedes progress, making it challenging to assess accurately the roles of mitochondrial superoxide in cells and in vivo. To address this unmet need, we synthesized and characterized a mitochondria-targeted redox cycler, MitoParaquat (MitoPQ) that comprises a triphenylphosphonium lipophilic cation conjugated to the redox cycler paraquat. MitoPQ accumulates selectively in the mitochondrial matrix driven by the membrane potential. Within the matrix, MitoPQ produces superoxide by redox cycling at the flavin site of complex I, selectively increasing superoxide production within mitochondria. MitoPQ increased mitochondrial superoxide in isolated mitochondria and cells in culture ~a thousand-fold more effectively than untargeted paraquat. MitoPQ was also more toxic than paraquat in the isolated perfused heart and in Drosophila in vivo. MitoPQ enables the selective generation of superoxide within mitochondria and is a useful tool to investigate the many roles of mitochondrial superoxide in pathology and redox signaling in cells and in vivo.

  18. Membranes for Redox Flow Battery Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Skyllas-Kazacos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  19. Membranes for redox flow battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prifti, Helen; Parasuraman, Aishwarya; Winardi, Suminto; Lim, Tuti Mariana; Skyllas-Kazacos, Maria

    2012-06-19

    The need for large scale energy storage has become a priority to integrate renewable energy sources into the electricity grid. Redox flow batteries are considered the best option to store electricity from medium to large scale applications. However, the current high cost of redox flow batteries impedes the wide spread adoption of this technology. The membrane is a critical component of redox flow batteries as it determines the performance as well as the economic viability of the batteries. The membrane acts as a separator to prevent cross-mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes, while still allowing the transport of ions to complete the circuit during the passage of current. An ideal membrane should have high ionic conductivity, low water intake and excellent chemical and thermal stability as well as good ionic exchange capacity. Developing a low cost, chemically stable membrane for redox flow cell batteries has been a major focus for many groups around the world in recent years. This paper reviews the research work on membranes for redox flow batteries, in particular for the all-vanadium redox flow battery which has received the most attention.

  20. Immobilized redox mediator on metal-oxides nanoparticles and its catalytic effect in a reductive decolorization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, L H; Perez-Cruz, M A; Rangel-Mendez, J R; Cervantes, F J

    2010-12-15

    Different metal-oxides nanoparticles (MONP) including α-Al(2)O(3), ZnO and Al(OH)(3), were utilized as adsorbents to immobilize anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Immobilized AQDS was subsequently tested as a solid-phase redox mediator (RMs) for the reductive decolorization of the azo dye, reactive red 2 (RR2), by anaerobic sludge. The highest adsorption capacity of AQDS was achieved on Al(OH)(3) nanoparticles, which was ∼0.16 mmol g(-1) at pH 4. Immobilized AQDS increased up to 7.5-fold the rate of decolorization of RR2 by anaerobic sludge as compared with sludge incubations lacking AQDS. Sterile controls including immobilized AQDS did not show significant (reduction) were not responsible for the enhanced decolorization achieved. Immobilization of AQDS on MONP was very stable under the applied experimental conditions and spectrophotometric screening did not detect any detachment of AQDS during the reductive decolorization of RR2, confirming that immobilized AQDS served as an effective RMs. The present study constitutes the first demonstration that immobilized quinones on MONP can serve as effective RMs in the reductive decolorization of an azo dye. The immobilizing technique developed could be applied in anaerobic wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the redox biotransformation of recalcitrant pollutants.

  1. Redox potential as a master variable controlling pathways of metal reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levar, Caleb E; Hoffman, Colleen L; Dunshee, Aubrey J; Toner, Brandy M; Bond, Daniel R

    2017-01-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens uses at least two different pathways to transport electrons out of the inner membrane quinone pool before reducing acceptors beyond the outer membrane. When growing on electrodes poised at oxidizing potentials, the CbcL-dependent pathway operates at or below redox potentials of –0.10 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode, whereas the ImcH-dependent pathway operates only above this value. Here, we provide evidence that G. sulfurreducens also requires different electron transfer proteins for reduction of a wide range of Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-(oxyhydr)oxides, and must transition from a high- to low-potential pathway during reduction of commonly studied soluble and insoluble metal electron acceptors. Freshly precipitated Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides could not be reduced by mutants lacking the high-potential pathway. Aging these minerals by autoclaving did not change their powder X-ray diffraction pattern, but restored reduction by mutants lacking the high-potential pathway. Mutants lacking the low-potential, CbcL-dependent pathway had higher growth yields with both soluble and insoluble Fe(III). Together, these data suggest that the ImcH-dependent pathway exists to harvest additional energy when conditions permit, and CbcL switches on to allow respiration closer to thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. With evidence of multiple pathways within a single organism, the study of extracellular respiration should consider not only the crystal structure or solubility of a mineral electron acceptor, but rather the redox potential, as this variable determines the energetic reward affecting reduction rates, extents, and final microbial growth yields in the environment. PMID:28045456

  2. A Protocol for Electrochemical Evaluations and State of Charge Diagnostics of a Symmetric Organic Redox Flow Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Wentao; Vemuri, Rama S.; Hu, Dehong; Yang, Zheng; Wei, Xiaoliang

    2017-01-01

    Redox flow batteries have been considered as one of the most promising stationary energy storage solutions for improving the reliability of the power grid and deployment of renewable energy technologies. Among the many flow battery chemistries, nonaqueous flow batteries have the potential to achieve high energy density because of the broad voltage windows of nonaqueous electrolytes. However, significant technical hurdles exist currently limiting nonaqueous flow batteries to demonstrate their full potential, such as low redox concentrations, low operating currents, under-explored battery status monitoring, etc. In an attempt to address these limitations, we report a nonaqueous flow battery based on a highly soluble, redox-active organic nitronyl nitroxide radical compound, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO). This redox materials exhibits an ambipolar electrochemical property with two reversible redox pairs that are moderately separated by a voltage gap of ~1.7 V. Therefore, PTIO can serve as both anolyte and catholyte redox materials to form a symmetric flow battery chemistry, which affords the advantages such as high effective redox concentrations and low irreversible redox material crossover. The PTIO flow battery shows decent electrochemical cyclability under cyclic voltammetry and flow cell conditions; an improved redox concentration of 0.5 M PTIO and operational current density of 20 mA cm-2 were achieved in flow cell tests. Moreover, we show that Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy could measure the PTIO concentrations during the PTIO flow battery cycling and offer reasonably accurate detection of the battery state of charge (SOC) as cross-validated by electron spin resonance measurements. This study suggests FTIR can be used as a reliable online SOC sensor to monitor flow battery status and ensure battery operations stringently in a safe SOC range.

  3. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  4. Seasonal variation of redox species and redox potentials in shallow groundwater: A comparison of measured and calculated redox potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Kumar, A.; Riyazuddin, P.

    2012-06-01

    SummaryThe seasonal variation of redox potential (Eh) and redox species such as As(V)/As(III), Cr(VI)/Cr(III), Fe(III)/Fe(II), NO3-/NO2-, and Se(VI)/Se(IV) were studied in a shallow groundwater for a period of three years (May, 2004-January, 2007). The study area was Chrompet area of Chennai city, India. Groundwater samples from 65 wells were monitored for pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen (DO), and major ions during pre-(May) and post-monsoon (January) seasons. The objective of the study was to gain insight into the temporal variation of the redox species due to groundwater recharge and to identify the redox reactions controlling the measured Eh of the groundwater. The study revealed that the shallow groundwater was "oxic" with DO ranging between 0.25 and 5.00 mg L-1, and between 0.38 and 5.05 mg L-1 during pre-(May, 2004) and post-monsoon (January, 2005) seasons, respectively. The measured Eh (with respect to standard hydrogen electrode, SHE) ranged between 65 and 322 mV, and between 110 and 330 mV during pre- and post-monsoon seasons, respectively. During post-monsoon seasons, DO and Eh increased in most of the wells due to groundwater recharge. The calculated Eh using the redox couples As(V)/As(III), NO3-/NO2-, O2/H2O and Se(VI)/Se(IV) neither agreed among themselves nor with the measured Eh during all the seasons. It shows that in the shallow groundwater, the various redox couples are in disequilibrium among themselves and with the Pt electrode. However, 41% (n = 122) of the Eh values calculated from Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple agreed with the measured Eh within ±30 mV, the uncertainty of Pt-electrode measurement. The post-monsoon seasons showed higher values of As(V)/As(III) and Se(VI)/Se(IV) compared to the pre-monsoon seasons, whereas Fe(III)/Fe(II) behaved in the opposite manner. This pattern of variation is consistent with the increased oxidizing nature, as shown by the higher DO and Eh values observed during post-monsoon seasons. The results

  5. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in part via downregulated NF-κB and p38/JNK activation in microglial and attenuates microglia activation in lipopolysaccharide treatment mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongfei Yang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic strategies designed to inhibit the activation of microglia may lead to significant advancement in the treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ is a naturally occurring redox cofactor that acts as an essential nutrient, antioxidant, and has been reported to exert potent immunosuppressive effects. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of PQQ was investigated in LPS treated primary microglia cells. Our observations showed that pretreatment with PQQ significantly inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1 and MIP-1a in LPS treated primary microglia cells. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation level of p65, p38 and JNK MAP kinase pathways were also inhibited by PQQ in LPS stimulated primary microglia cells. Further a systemic LPS treatment acute inflammation murine brain model was used to study the suppressive effects of PQQ against neuroinflammation in vivo. Mice treated with PQQ demonstrated marked attenuation of neuroinflammation based on Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of Iba1-against antibody in the brain tissue. Indicated that PQQ protected primary cortical neurons against microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. These results collectively suggested that PQQ might be a promising therapeutic agent for alleviating the progress of neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglia activation.

  6. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in part via downregulated NF-κB and p38/JNK activation in microglial and attenuates microglia activation in lipopolysaccharide treatment mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chongfei; Yu, Lifeng; Kong, Lingbo; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Juliang; Zhu, Qingsheng; Zhu, Jinyu; Hao, Dingjun

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies designed to inhibit the activation of microglia may lead to significant advancement in the treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a naturally occurring redox cofactor that acts as an essential nutrient, antioxidant, and has been reported to exert potent immunosuppressive effects. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of PQQ was investigated in LPS treated primary microglia cells. Our observations showed that pretreatment with PQQ significantly inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1 and MIP-1a in LPS treated primary microglia cells. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation level of p65, p38 and JNK MAP kinase pathways were also inhibited by PQQ in LPS stimulated primary microglia cells. Further a systemic LPS treatment acute inflammation murine brain model was used to study the suppressive effects of PQQ against neuroinflammation in vivo. Mice treated with PQQ demonstrated marked attenuation of neuroinflammation based on Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of Iba1-against antibody in the brain tissue. Indicated that PQQ protected primary cortical neurons against microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. These results collectively suggested that PQQ might be a promising therapeutic agent for alleviating the progress of neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglia activation.

  7. Successful removal of p-quinone with chitosan in an aqueous phase in relation to degree of deacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tomoki; Imai, Masanao; Suzuki, Isao

    2004-01-01

    Phenol oxidant is successfully removed by using chitosan particles in the aqueous phase. Removal of p-quinone by chitosan from crab shells was investigated kinetically from molecular weight (MW) of chitosan, deacetylation degree (DD) and reaction temperature. The rate constant assuming first-ordered reaction on removal of p-quinone in aqueous phase primarily depended on the MW of chitosan, not on the DD. Quantities of chitosan exceeding 5 x 10(5) MW are able to obtain a sufficiently high rate constant (10(-3) s(-1)). At higher temperatures, higher rate constants were obtained in the entire experimental MW and DD. The activation energy obtained was 43.8 kJ x mol(-1).

  8. Selective, nontoxic CB(2) cannabinoid o-quinone with in vivo activity against triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Paula; Blasco-Benito, Sandra; Andradas, Clara; Gómez-Cañas, María; Flores, Juana María; Goya, Pilar; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Sánchez, Cristina; Jagerovic, Nadine

    2015-03-12

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) represents a subtype of breast cancer characterized by high aggressiveness. There is no current targeted therapy for these patients whose prognosis, as a group, is very poor. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a potent antitumor agent in vivo for this type of breast cancer designed as a combination of quinone/cannabinoid pharmacophores. This new compound (10) has been selected from a series of chromenopyrazolediones with full selectivity for the nonpsychotropic CB2 cannabinoid receptor and with efficacy in inducing death of human TNBC cell lines. The dual concept quinone/cannabinoid was supported by the fact that compound 10 exerts antitumor effect by inducing cell apoptosis through activation of CB2 receptors and through oxidative stress. Notably, it did not show either cytotoxicity on noncancerous human mammary epithelial cells nor toxic effects in vivo, suggesting that it may be a new therapeutic tool for the management of TNBC.

  9. Chloroplast Redox Imbalance Governs Phenotypic Plasticity: the Grand Design of Photosynthesis Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman eHuner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sunlight, the ultimate energy source for life on our planet, enters the biosphere as a direct consequence of the evolution of photoautotrophy. Photoautotrophs must balance the light energy absorbed and trapped through extremely fast, temperature-insensitive photochemistry with energy consumed through much slower, temperature-dependent biochemistry and metabolism. The attainment of such a balance in cellular energy flow between chloroplasts, mitochondria and the cytosol is called photostasis. Photoautotrophs sense cellular energy imbalances through modulation of excitation pressure which is a measure of the relative redox state of QA, the first stable quinone electron acceptor of PSII reaction centers. High excitation pressure constitutes a potential stress condition that can be caused either by exposure to an irradiance that exceeds the capacity of C, N and S assimilation to utilize the electrons generated from the absorbed energy or by low temperature or any stress that decreases the capacity of the metabolic pathways downstream of photochemistry to utilize photosynthetically-generated reductants. The similarities and differences in the phenotypic responses between cyanobacteria, green algae, crop plants and variegation mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana as a function of cold acclimation and photoacclimation are reconciled in terms of differential responses to excitation pressure and the predisposition of photoautotrophs to maintain photostasis. The various acclimation strategies associated with green algae and cyanobacteria versus winter cereals and Arabidopsis thaliana are discussed in terms of retrograde regulation and the grand design of photosynthesis originally proposed by Daniel Arnon in 1982.

  10. Clinical Physiology and Mechanism of Dizocilpine (MK-801: Electron Transfer, Radicals, Redox Metabolites and Bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kovacic

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dizocilpine (MK-801, an extensively investigated drug possessing secondary amine and benzenoid functions, displays a wide array of biological properties, including anticonvulsant and anesthetic. There is scant discussion of biomechanism. A relevant, important finding is formation of oxidative metabolites in the hydroxylamine and phenolic categories. Analogy to cocaine metabolites suggests participation of redox entities, such as, hydroxylamine, nitroxide and nitrosonium, which can lead to electron transfer and radical formation. There is also similarity to metabolism by 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile and phencyclidine. Alternatively, the phenolic metabolites are well-known precursors of ET quinones. The review documents various physiological effects, mainly involving the central nervous system. Also of interest are the pro- and anti-oxidant properties. Considerable attention has been paid to MK-801 as an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the glutamate category. This aspect is often associated with effects on the central nervous system. The review also provides recent literature dealing with MK-801/NMDA receptor in various areas of bioactivity. Studies were made of MK-801 involvement in working memory processing. Deficits in behavior were noted after administration of the drug. Treatment of mice with dizocilpine induced learning impairment. The influence of MK-801 on fear has been investigated. The substance is known to exert an analgesic effect in pain control. A number of reports deal with anesthetic properties.

  11. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  12. 3-Methoxy-2-methyl-carbazole-1,4-quinone, carbazomycins D and F from Streptomyces sp. CMU-JT005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruanpanun, Pornthip; Dame, Zerihun Teklemariam; Laatsch, Hartmut; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2011-09-01

    3-Methoxy-2-methyl-carbazole-1,4-quinone (1) together with carbazomycins D (2) and F (3) were isolated from the crude extract of Streptomyces CMU-JT005, an actinomycete with nematicidal activity. 3-Methoxy-2-methyl-carbazole-1,4-quinone is reported here for the first time from nature. In this paper, we describe the isolation and structure elucidation of the compounds together with the characterization of the Streptomyces strain CMU-JT005.

  13. Novel synthesis of 3-substituted 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans via ortho-quinone methide intermediates generated in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Abdul kadar; Varvounis, George

    2014-03-01

    A new method is presented for the regioselective one-pot synthesis of 3-substituted 2,3-dihydrobenzofurans from 2-bromo-1-{2-[(triisopropylsilyl)oxy]phenyl}ethyl nitrate by fluoride-induced desilylation leading to o-quinone methide generation, Michael addition of different C, N, O, and S nucleophiles, and intramolecular 5-exo-tet elimination of a bromide anion. The method has potential synthetic applications in drug discovery.

  14. The key role of glutamate 172 in the mechanism of type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductase of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipe M; Sena, Filipa V; Batista, Ana P; Athayde, Diogo; Brito, José A; Archer, Margarida; Oliveira, A Sofia F; Soares, Cláudio M; Catarino, Teresa; Pereira, Manuela M

    2017-10-01

    Type II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane bound enzymes that deliver electrons to the respiratory chain by oxidation of NADH and reduction of quinones. In this way, these enzymes also contribute to the regeneration of NAD(+), allowing several metabolic pathways to proceed. As for the other members of the two-Dinucleotide Binding Domains Flavoprotein (tDBDF) superfamily, the enzymatic mechanism of NDH-2s is still little explored and elusive. In this work we addressed the role of the conserved glutamate 172 (E172) residue in the enzymatic mechanism of NDH-2 from Staphylococcus aureus. We aimed to test our earlier hypothesis that E172 plays a key role in proton transfer to allow the protonation of the quinone. For this we performed a complete biochemical characterization of the enzyme's variants E172A, E172Q and E172S. Our steady state kinetic measurements show a clear decrease in the overall reaction rate, and our substrate interaction studies indicate the binding of the two substrates is also affected by these mutations. Interestingly our fast kinetic results show quinone reduction is more affected than NADH oxidation. We have also determined the X-ray crystal structure of the E172S mutant (2.55Ǻ) and compared it with the structure of the wild type (2.32Ǻ). Together these results support our hypothesis for E172 being of central importance in the catalytic mechanism of NDH-2, which may be extended to other members of the tDBDF superfamily. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of metagenomic interplay on the mosquito redox homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Cody J; Xu, Jiannong

    2017-04-01

    Mosquitoes are exposed to oxidative challenges throughout their life cycle. The primary challenge comes from a blood meal. The blood digestion turns the midgut into an oxidative environment, which imposes pressure not only on mosquito fecundity and other physiological traits but also on the microbiota in the midgut. During evolution, mosquitoes have developed numerous oxidative defense mechanisms to maintain redox homeostasis in the midgut. In addition to antioxidants, SOD, catalase, and glutathione system, sufficient supply of the reducing agent, NADPH, is vital for a successful defense against oxidative stress. Increasing evidence indicates that in response to oxidative stress, cells reconfigure metabolic pathways to increase the generation of NADPH through NADP-reducing networks including the pentose phosphate pathway and others. The microbial homeostasis is critical for the functional contributions to various host phenotypes. The symbiotic microbiota is regulated largely by the Duox-ROS pathway in Drosophila. In mosquitoes, Duox-ROS pathway, heme-mediated signaling, antimicrobial peptide production and C-type lectins work in concert to maintain the dynamic microbial community in the midgut. Microbial mechanisms against oxidative stress in this context are not well understood. Emerging evidence that microbial metabolites trigger host oxidative response warrants further study on the metagenomic interplay in an oxidative environment like mosquito gut ecosystem. Besides the classical Drosophila model, hematophagous insects like mosquitoes provide an alternative model system to study redox homeostasis in a symbiotic metagenomic context. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Redox properties of an engineered purple Cu(A) azurin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dapeng; Wang, Xiaotang; Davidson, Victor L

    2002-08-01

    Purple Cu(A) centers are a class of binuclear, mixed-valence copper complexes found in cytochrome c oxidase and nitrous oxide reductase. An engineered Cu(A) protein was formed by replacing a portion of the amino acid sequence that contains three of the ligands to the native type I copper center of Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin with the corresponding portion of sequence from the Cu(A) center of cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 461]. Oxidation-reduction midpoint potential (E(m)) values of the Cu(A) azurin of +399+/-10 and +380+/-2mV, respectively, were determined by cyclic voltammetry and spectrochemical titration. An n value of one was obtained, indicating that the redox reaction is cycling between the mixed valence and the fully reduced states. Whereas the E(m) value of native azurin is pH dependent, the E(m) value of Cu(A) azurin is not, as expected for the Cu(A) center. Similarities and differences in the redox properties are discussed in terms of the known crystal structures of Cu(A) centers in cytochrome c oxidase and Cu(A) azurin.

  17. Thiol switches in redox regulation of chloroplasts: balancing redox state, metabolism and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-05-01

    In photosynthesizing chloroplasts, rapidly changing energy input, intermediate generation of strong reductants as well as oxidants and multiple participating physicochemical processes and pathways, call for efficient regulation. Coupling redox information to protein function via thiol modifications offers a powerful mechanism to activate, down-regulate and coordinate interdependent processes. Efficient thiol switching of target proteins involves the thiol-disulfide redox regulatory network, which is highly elaborated in chloroplasts. This review addresses the features of this network. Its conditional function depends on specificity of reduction and oxidation reactions and pathways, thiol redox buffering, but also formation of heterogeneous milieus by microdomains, metabolite gradients and macromolecular assemblies. One major player is glutathione. Its synthesis and function is under feedback redox control. The number of thiol-controlled processes and involved thiol switched proteins is steadily increasing, e.g., in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, plastid transcription and plastid translation. Thus chloroplasts utilize an intricate and versatile redox regulatory network for intraorganellar and retrograde communication.

  18. Enhanced dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of naturally occurring quinones and ferrihydrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doong, Ruey-an; Lee, Chun-chi; Lien, Chia-min

    2014-02-01

    The effect of naturally occurring quinones including lawsone (LQ), ubiquinone (UQ), juglone (JQ), and 1,4-naphthoquinone (NQ) on the biotransformation of carbon tetrachloride (CT) in the presence of Geobacter sulfurreducens and ferrihydrite was investigated. AQDS was used as the model compound for comparison. The reductive dissolution of ferrihydrite by G. sulfurreducens was enhanced by AQDS, NQ, and LQ. However, addition of UQ and JQ had little enhancement effect on Fe(II) production. The bioreduction efficiency and rate of ferrihydrite was highly dependent on the natural property and concentration of quinone compounds and the addition of low concentrations of LQ and NQ significantly accelerated the biotransformation rate of CT. The pseudo-first-order rate constants for CT dechlorination (kobsCT) in AQDS-, LQ- and NQ-amended batches were 5.4-5.8, 4.6-7.4 and 2.4-5.8 times, respectively, higher than those in the absence of quinone. A good relationship between kobsCT for CT dechlorination and bioreduction ratio of ferrihydrite was observed, indicating the important role of biogenic Fe(II) in dechlorination of CT under iron-reducing conditions. Spectroscopic analysis showed that AQDS and NQ could be reduced to semiquinones and hydroquinones, while only hydroquinones were generated in LQ-amended batches.

  19. A new approach to evaluating the extent of Michael adduct formation to PAH quinones: tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis with GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Mary K; Desavis, Emmanuel; Mazzer, Paula A; Sunoj, R B; Hatcher, Susan A; Hadad, Christopher M; Hatcher, Patrick G

    2003-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmental pollutants that are converted to cytotoxic and carcinogenic metabolites, quinones, by detoxifying enzyme systems in animals. PAH metabolites such as the quinones can form Michael adducts with biological macromolecules containing reactive nucleophiles, making detection of exposure to PAHs difficult using conventional techniques. A technique has been developed for detecting exposure to PAHs. Tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) thermochemolysis coupled with GC/MS is proposed as an assay method for PAH quinones that have formed Michael adducts with biological molecules. Three PAH quinones (1,4-naphthoquinone, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 1,4-anthraquinone) and 1,4-benzoquinone were reacted with cysteine, and the TMAH thermochemolysis method was used to assay for both thiol and amine adduction between the quinones and the cysteine. Additional studies with 1,4-naphthoquinone adducts to glutathione and bovine serum albumin showed the same thiol and amine TMAH thermochemolysis products with larger peptides as was observed with cysteine adducts. The TMAH GC/MS method clearly shows great promise for detecting PAH quinones, produced by enzymatic conversion of PAHs in biological systems, that have been converted to respective Michael adducts.

  20. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jason Z. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ke, Yuebin [Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Trush, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Y. Robert [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University SBES, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States); Zhu, Hong, E-mail: zhu@campbell.edu [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Jia, Zhenquan, E-mail: z_jia@uncg.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  1. Lipoprotein-like particles in a prokaryote: quinone droplets of Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, István; Knispel, Roland Wilhelm; Kofler, Christine; Orsini, Massimiliano; Boicu, Marius; Varga, Sándor; Weyher-Stingl, Elisabeth; Sun, Na; Fernandez-Busnadiego, Ruben; Kukolya, József; Nickell, Stephan; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Cytosolic, globular droplets with an average diameter of 50 nm were observed in vitrified Thermoplasma acidophilum cells by means of cryo-electron tomography. These droplets were isolated by column chromatography and immunoprecipitation protein purification methods. Subsequent chemical and biochemical analyses identified lipid and protein components, respectively. Two major lipid components, comigrating menaquinones at the solvent front and the slower migrating Thermoplasma polar lipid U4, were detected by TLC experiments. The major protein component was identified as the 153 amino acid long Ta0547 vitellogenin-N domain protein. This domain has been found so far exclusively in large lipid transport proteins of vertebrates and non-vertebrates. Blast protein database homology searches with Ta0547 did not return any eukaryal hits; homologous sequences were found only in thermo-acidophilic archaeons. However, a profile-sequence domain search performed with the vitellogenin-N domain (PF01347) hmm-profile against the T. acidophilum proteome returned Ta0547 as hit. Electron microscopy appearance of isolated droplets resembled to lipoprotein particles. However, no (tetraether) lipid layer could be detected on the droplets surface, rather hydrophobic compounds of the electron dense lumen were surrounded by a denser discontinuous protein boundary. Based on described features, these particles qualify for a novel lipoprotein particle category, what we nominated Thermoplasma Quinone Droplet.

  2. Quinone-formaldehyde polymer as an active material in Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnat, Klemen; Mali, Gregor; Gaberscek, Miran; Dominko, Robert

    2016-05-01

    A benzoquinone polymer is synthesized by the polymerisation of hydrobenzoquinone and formaldehyde, followed by oxidation process using a hydrogen peroxide to convert hydroquinone to quinone. As prepared materials are characterized with FTIR, 1H-13C CPMAS NMR, pyrolysis coupled with gas chromatography (GC) and mass spectrometer (MS), TGA-MS analysis, EDX, elemental analysis, XRD, SEM and TEM microscopies and BET nitrogen adsorption. The benzoquinone polymer shows an excellent electrochemical performance when used as a positive electrode material in Li-ion secondary batteries. Using an electrolyte consisting 1 M bis(trifluoromethane)-sulfonimide lithium salt dissolved in 1,3-dioxolane and dimethoxyethane in a vol. ratio 1:1 (1 M LiTFSI/DOL + DME = 1:1) a stable capacity close to 150 mAh/g can be obtained. Compared to other electroactive materials based on benzoquinones it has a supreme capacity stability and is prepared by a simple synthesis using easily accessible starting materials. Further improvements in the capacity value (up to the theoretical value of 406 mAh/g) can be foreseen by achieving a higher degree of oxidation and by modification of polymerization process to enhance the electronic and ionic conductivity.

  3. Flavin adenine dinucleotide content of quinone reductase 2: analysis and optimization for structure-function studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kevin Ka Ki; Litchfield, David W; Shilton, Brian H

    2012-01-01

    Quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) is a broadly expressed enzyme implicated in responses to a number of compounds, including protein kinase inhibitors, resveratrol, and antimalarial drugs. NQO2 includes a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, but X-ray crystallographic analysis of human NQO2 expressed in Escherichia coli showed that electron density for the isoalloxazine ring of FAD was weak and there was no electron density for the adenine mononucleotide moiety. Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the NQO2 preparation indicated that FAD was not present and only 38% of the protomers contained flavin mononucleotide (FMN), explaining the weak electron density for FAD in the crystallographic analysis. A method for purifying NQO2 and reconstituting with FAD such that the final content approaches 100% occupancy with FAD is presented here. The enzyme prepared in this manner has a high specific activity, and there is strong electron density for the FAD cofactor in the crystal structure. Analysis of NQO2 crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank indicates that many may have sub-stoichiometric cofactor content and/or contain FMN rather than FAD. This method of purification and reconstitution will help to optimize structural and functional studies of NQO2 and possibly other flavoproteins.

  4. Pyrroloquinoline quinone ameliorates l-thyroxine-induced hyperthyroidism and associated problems in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narendra; Kar, Anand; Panda, Sunanda

    2014-08-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is believed to be a strong antioxidant. In this study, we have evaluated its hitherto unknown role in l-thyroxin (L-T4 )-induced hyperthyroidism considering laboratory rat as a model. Alterations in the serum concentration of thyroxin (T4 ) and triiodothyronine (T3 ); lipid peroxidation (LPO) of liver, kidney, heart, muscles and brain; in the endogenous antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione and in serum total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotien, triglycerides, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and urea were evaluated. Administration of l-T4 (500-µg kg(-1) body weight) enhanced not only the serum T3 and T4 levels but also the tissue LPO, serum SGOT, SGPT and urea with a parallel decrease in the levels of antioxidants and serum lipids. However, on simultaneous administration of PQQ (5 mg kg(-1) for 6 days), all these adverse effects were ameliorated, indicating the potential of PQQ in the amelioration of hyperthyroidism and associated problems. Possibly, the curative effects were mediated through inhibition of oxidative stress. We suggest that PQQ may be considered for therapeutic use for hyperthyroidism after dose standardization.

  5. Glycosylation of quinone-fused polythiophene for reagentless and label-free detection of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fen; Rehman, Abdul; Liu, Haiying; Zhang, Jingtuo; Zhu, Shilei; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2015-02-03

    In this report, a new polythiophene interface is fabricated containing fused quinone moieties which are then glycosylated to form a carbohydrate platform for bacterial detection. Very importantly, this interface can be used for label-free and reagentless detection, both by electrochemical and Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) transducers and by using the direct pili-mannose binding as well as Concanavalin A (Con A) mediated lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-mannose binding. The conductive polymer's unique collective properties are very sensitive to very minor perturbations, which result in significant changes of electrical conductivity and providing amplified sensitivity and improved limits of detection (i.e., 25 cell/mL for electrochemical sensor and 50 cells/mL for QCM sensor), a widened logarithmic range of detection (i.e., 3-7 for pili-mannose binding and 2-8 for Con A mediated binding), high specificity and selectivity, and an extraordinary reliability by a mechanism of internal validation. With these analytical performances, the described biosensor is envisaged for being capable of differentiating Gram-negative bacterial strain and species, for many important applications.

  6. Origin of the Giant Honeycomb Network of Quinones on Cu(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, T. L.; Kim, Kwangmoo; Wyrick, Jon; Cheng, Zhihai; Bartels, Ludwig; Berland, Kristian; Hyldgaard, Per

    2011-03-01

    We discuss the factors that lead to the amazing regular giant honeycomb network formed by quinones on Cu(111). Using a related lattice gas model with many characteristic energies, we can reproduce many experimental features. These models require a long-range attraction, which can be attributed to indirect interactions mediated by the Shockley surface state of Cu(111). However, Wyrick's preceding talk gave evidence that the network self-selects for the size of the pore rather than for the periodicity of the superstructure, suggesting that confined states are the key ingredient. We discuss this phenomenon in terms of the magic numbers of 2D quantum dots. We also report calculations of the effects of anthraquinones (AQ) in modifying the surface states by considering a superlattice of AQ chains with various separations. We discuss implications of these results for tuning the electronic states and, thence, superstructures. Supported by (TLE) NSF CHE 07-50334 & UMD MRSEC DMR 05-20471, (JW & LB) NSF CHE NSF CHE 07-49949, (KB & PH) Swedish Vetenskapsrådet VR 621-2008-4346.

  7. Hydrolysis of the quinone methide of butylated hydroxytoluene in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcockson, Maren Gulsrud; Toteva, Maria M; Stella, Valentino J

    2013-10-01

    Butylated hydroxytoluene or BHT is an antioxidant commonly used in pharmaceutical formulations. BHT upon oxidation forms a quinone methide (QM). QM is a highly reactive electrophilic species that can undergo nucleophilic addition. Here, the kinetic reactivity of QM with water at various apparent pH values in a 50% (v/v) water-acetonitrile solution at constant ionic strength of I = 0.5 (NaCl)4 , was studied. The hydrolysis of QM in the presence of added acid, base, sodium chloride, and phosphate buffer resulted in the formation of only one product--the corresponding 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (BA). The rate of BA formation was catalyzed by the addition of acid and base, but not chloride and phosphate species. Nucleophilic excipients, used in the pharmaceutical formulation, or nucleophilic groups on active pharmaceutical ingredient molecule may form adducts with QM, the immediate oxidative product of BHT degradation, thus having implications for drug product impurity profiles. Because of these considerations, BHT should be used with caution in formulations containing drugs or excipients capable of acting as nucleophiles.

  8. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inducer activity of some novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorab, Mostafa M; Alsaid, Mansour S; Higgins, Maureen; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T; Shahat, Abdelaaty A; Elghazawy, Nehal H; Arafa, Reem K

    2016-01-01

    The Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1)/nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response elements pathway enables cells to survive oxidative stress conditions through regulating the expression of cytoprotective enzymes such as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). This work presents the design and synthesis of novel anilinoquinazoline derivatives (2–16a) and evaluation of their NQO1 inducer activity in murine cells. Molecular docking of the new compounds was performed to assess their ability to inhibit Keap1–Nrf2 protein–protein interaction through occupying the Keap1–Nrf2-binding domain, which leads to Nrf2 accumulation and enhanced gene expression of NQO1. Docking results showed that all compounds can potentially interact with Keap1; however, 1,5-dimethyl-2-phenyl-4-(2-phenylquinazolin-4-ylamino)-1,2-dihydropyrazol-3-one (9), the most potent inducer, showed the largest number of interactions with key amino acids in the binding pocket (Arg483, Tyr525, and Phe478) compared to the native ligand or any other compound in this series. PMID:27540279

  9. Quinone molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs for low-temperature Na ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Canghao; Ishii, Yosuke; Inayama, Shunya; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2017-09-01

    We have performed Li and Na ion charge-discharge experiments of 9,10-phenanthrene quinone (PhQ) molecules encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with mean tube diameters of 1.5 and 2.5 nm at room temperature and also at low temperatures. The Na ion reversible capacity of PhQ encapsulated in the larger diameter SWCNTs, measured at a low temperature of 0 °C, remained as high as that measured at room temperature (RT), while the capacity of PhQ in the smaller diameter SWCNTs at 0 °C was about a half of that at RT. The diameter dependence of the capacity should be attributed to the difference in the interactions between the encapsulated PhQ molecules and the host SWCNTs, which was revealed by Raman peak profile analysis. Charge-transfer reaction from metallic tubes to PhQ molecules encapsulated in the smaller diameter SWCNTs was detected by Raman measurements. The electrostatic interaction between charged SWCNTs and PhQ molecules, induced by the charge-transfer reaction, would partly contribute to the stabilization of PhQ molecules in the smaller diameter SWCNTs, while only van der Waals interaction stabilizes PhQ molecules in the larger diameter SWCNTs. The difference in stability was confirmed by thermogravimetric, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman measurements. Charge-discharge curves of PhQ encapsulated in SWCNTs were also discussed based on the stability difference.

  10. Up-regulation of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 during human liver injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lauren M Aleksunes; Michael Goedken; José E Manautou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression and activity of NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in human liver specimens obtained from patients with liver damage due to acetaminophen (APAP) overdose or primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC).METHODS: NQO1 activity was determined in cytosol from normal, APAP and PBC liver specimens. Western blot and immunohistochemical staining were used to determine patterns of NQO1 expression using a specific antibody against NQO1.RESULTS: NQO1 protein was very low in normal human livers. In both APAP and PBC livers, there was strong induction of NQO1 protein levels on Western blot.Correspondingly, significant up-regulation of enzyme activity (16- and 22-fold, P< 0.05) was also observed in APAP and PBC livers, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis highlighted injury-specific patterns of NQO1 staining in both APAP and PBC livers.CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that NQO1 protein and activity are markedly induced in human livers during both APAP overdose and PBC. Up-regulation of this cytoprotective enzyme may represent an adaptive stress response to limit further disease progression by detoxifying reactive species.

  11. Bisphenol A 3,4-quinone induces the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into oxidase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Satoru; Nakanishi, Masahiko; Morinaga, Kazuhiro; Fujitake, Mihoyo; Wada, Shun-ichi; Fujimoto, Yohko

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the influence of bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol A 3,4-quinone (BPAQ) on the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) into xanthine oxidase (XO) in the rat liver in vitro. BPA up to 100 micromol/L did not affect the XO and XD activities in the partially purified cytosolic fraction from rat liver, whereas BPAQ (2-10 micromol/L) dose-dependently enhanced the XO activity concomitant with a decrease in the XD activity, implying that BPAQ, but not BPA, can convert XD into the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing the form XO. Furthermore, it was found that BPAQ could increase the generation of ROS and oxidize the guanine moiety of deoxyguanosine in the DNA of primary rat hepatocyte cultures. These results suggest that BPAQ has the potential to convert XD into XO in the liver, which in turn may lead to ROS generation and oxidative DNA damage in this region. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of redox fluctuation on iron-organic matter interactions in wet tropical soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, A.; Campbell, A.; Lin, Y.; Nico, P. S.; Silver, W. L.; Pett-Ridge, J.

    2016-12-01

    Two-thirds of the C in the terrestrial biosphere is stored as soil organic C, and much of this is stabilized via iron (Fe) mineral-organic matter (OM) associations that are susceptible to redox effects. The rapid C cycling typical of wet tropical ecosystems- driven by ample moisture and temperature- may also be fueled by a characteristically dynamic redox environment. Yet the net result of altered tropical soil climate and fluctuating soil redox regimes on Fe-organic matter associations is poorly understood. In this study, we hypothesized that the timing of redox transitions (frequency of O2 introduction and ferrous iron (Fe2+) generation) will lead to differences in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide mineral crystallinity and C degradation rates and alter the proportion of organic C associated with iron minerals. Surface soils from a humid tropical forest in Puerto Rico were incubated for 44 days under four redox regimes: (1) static anoxic, (2) static oxic, (3) 4 days anoxic, 4 days oxic, and (4) 4 days anoxic, 8 days oxic. Replicate microcosms were harvested at multiple time points, including before and after a redox switch (oxic to anoxic or vice versa). Selective chemical extractions, bulk Fe K-edge EXAFS and STXM/NEXAFS spectromicroscopy were used to comprehensively probe treatment effects on Fe and C speciation. Static redox conditions had a significant effect on Fe2+ and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, and prolonged anoxia promoted reductive dissolution of Fe-oxides and an increase in amorphous or short-range ordered (SRO) Fe oxides. Preferential dissolution of this less-crystalline Fe pool was more prominent during rapid redox switches from oxic to anoxic conditions, and coincided with increased DOC. Bulk Fe K-edge EXAFS spectroscopy identified Fe3+ as the dominant Fe species in all treatments and indicated O/N atoms in the first Fe co-ordination sphere and features similar to SRO Fe-oxide phases (e.g. ferrihydrite or nano-goethite) in the second co

  13. Altered Glutathione Redox State in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K. Yao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered antioxidant status has been reported in schizophrenia. The glutathione (GSH redox system is important for reducing oxidative stress. GSH, a radical scavenger, is converted to oxidized glutathione (GSSG through glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and converted back to GSH by glutathione reductase (GR. Measurements of GSH, GSSG and its related enzymatic reactions are thus important for evaluating the redox and antioxidant status. In the present study, levels of GSH, GSSG, GPx and GR were assessed in the caudate region of postmortem brains from schizophrenic patients and control subjects (with and without other psychiatric disorders. Significantly lower levels of GSH, GPx, and GR were found in schizophrenic group than in control groups without any psychiatric disorders. Concomitantly, a decreased GSH:GSSG ratio was also found in schizophrenic group. Moreover, both GSSG and GR levels were significantly and inversely correlated to age of schizophrenic patients, but not control subjects. No significant differences were found in any GSH redox measures between control subjects and individuals with other types of psychiatric disorders. There were, however, positive correlations between GSH and GPx, GSH and GR, as well as GPx and GR levels in control subjects without psychiatric disorders. These positive correlations suggest a dynamic state is kept in check during the redox coupling under normal conditions. By contrast, lack of such correlations in schizophrenia point to a disturbance of redox coupling mechanisms in the antioxidant defense system, possibly resulting from a decreased level of GSH as well as age-related decreases of GSSG and GR activities.

  14. Redox regulation of protein damage in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Helen R; Dias, Irundika H K; Willetts, Rachel S; Devitt, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The presence and concentrations of modified proteins circulating in plasma depend on rates of protein synthesis, modification and clearance. In early studies, the proteins most frequently analysed for damage were those which were more abundant in plasma (e.g. albumin and immunoglobulins) which exist at up to 10 orders of magnitude higher concentrations than other plasma proteins e.g. cytokines. However, advances in analytical techniques using mass spectrometry and immuno-affinity purification methods, have facilitated analysis of less abundant, modified proteins and the nature of modifications at specific sites is now being characterised. The damaging reactive species that cause protein modifications in plasma principally arise from reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by NADPH oxidases (NOX), nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and oxygenase activities; reactive nitrogen species (RNS) from myeloperoxidase (MPO) and NOS activities; and hypochlorous acid from MPO. Secondary damage to proteins may be caused by oxidized lipids and glucose autooxidation. In this review, we focus on redox regulatory control of those enzymes and processes which control protein maturation during synthesis, produce reactive species, repair and remove damaged plasma proteins. We have highlighted the potential for alterations in the extracellular redox compartment to regulate intracellular redox state and, conversely, for intracellular oxidative stress to alter the cellular secretome and composition of extracellular vesicles. Through secreted, redox-active regulatory molecules, changes in redox state may be transmitted to distant sites.

  15. Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Kasimova, Marina R.; Krab, Klaas

    2005-01-01

    Redox conditions and protein oxidation in plant mitochondria NAD(P)H has a central position in respiratory metabolism. It is produced by a large number of enzymes, e.g. the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, in the mitochondrial matrix and is oxidised by, amongst others, the respiratory chain. Most...... of this NAD(P)H appears to be bound to proteins, in fact free NAD(P)H – an important parameter in metabolic regulation - has never been observed in mitochondria. We have estimated free and bound NAD(P)H in isolated plant mitochondria under different metabolic conditions. The fluorescence spectra of free...... and bound NADH was determined and used to deconvolute fluorescence spectra of actively respiring mitochondria. Most of the mitochondrial NADH is bound in states 2 and 4. The amount of free NADH is lower but relatively constant even increasing a little in state 3 where it is about equal to bound NADH...

  16. Recent Development of Nanocomposite Membranes for Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Cha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vanadium redox flow battery (VRB has received considerable attention due to its long cycle life, flexible design, fast response time, deep-discharge capability, and low pollution emissions in large-scale energy storage. The key component of VRB is an ion exchange membrane that prevents cross mixing of the positive and negative electrolytes by separating two electrolyte solutions, while allowing the conduction of ions. This review summarizes efforts in developing nanocomposite membranes with reduced vanadium ion permeability and improved proton conductivity in order to achieve high performance and long life of VRB systems. Moreover, functionalized nanocomposite membranes will be reviewed for the development of next-generation materials to further improve the performance of VRB, focusing on their properties and performance of VRB.

  17. REDOX IMAGING OF THE p53-DEPENDENT MITOCHONDRIAL REDOX STATE IN COLON CANCER EX VIVO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE N. XU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial redox state and its heterogeneity of colon cancer at tissue level have not been previously reported. Nor has how p53 regulates mitochondrial respiration been measured at (deep tissue level, presumably due to the unavailability of the technology that has sufficient spatial resolution and tissue penetration depth. Our prior work demonstrated that the mitochondrial redox state and its intratumor heterogeneity is associated with cancer aggressiveness in human melanoma and breast cancer in mouse models, with the more metastatic tumors exhibiting localized regions of more oxidized redox state. Using the Chance redox scanner with an in-plane spatial resolution of 200 μm, we imaged the mitochondrial redox state of the wild-type p53 colon tumors (HCT116 p53 wt and the p53-deleted colon tumors (HCT116 p53-/- by collecting the fluorescence signals of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH and oxidized flavoproteins [Fp, including flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD] from the mouse xenografts snap-frozen at low temperature. Our results show that: (1 both tumor lines have significant degree of intratumor heterogeneity of the redox state, typically exhibiting a distinct bi-modal distribution that either correlates with the spatial core–rim pattern or the "hot/cold" oxidation-reduction patches; (2 the p53-/- group is significantly more heterogeneous in the mitochondrial redox state and has a more oxidized tumor core compared to the p53 wt group when the tumor sizes of the two groups are matched; (3 the tumor size dependence of the redox indices (such as Fp and Fp redox ratio is significant in the p53-/- group with the larger ones being more oxidized and more heterogeneous in their redox state, particularly more oxidized in the tumor central regions; (4 the H&E staining images of tumor sections grossly correlate with the redox images. The present work is the first to reveal at the submillimeter scale the intratumor heterogeneity pattern of

  18. Biogeochemical Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, Brad; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This lecture will introduce the concept of biogeochemical cycling. The roles of microbes in the cycling of nutrients, production and consumption of trace gases, and mineralization will be briefly introduced.

  19. Cyclic conductance switching in networks of redox-active molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jianhui; Agustsson, Jon S; Wu, Songmei; Schönenberger, Christian; Calame, Michel; Leroux, Yann; Mayor, Marcel; Jeannin, Olivier; Ran, Ying-Fen; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio

    2010-03-10

    Redox-active dithiolated tetrathiafulvalene derivatives (TTFdT) were inserted in two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays to build interlinked networks of molecular junctions. Upon oxidation of the TTFdT to the dication state, we observed a conductance increase of the networks by up to 1 order of magnitude. Successive oxidation and reduction cycles demonstrated a clear switching behavior of the molecular junction conductance. These results show the potential of interlinked nanoparticle arrays as chemical sensors.

  20. Influence of pH on the redox chemistry of metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter in paddy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Y.; Koopmans, G.F.; Bonten, L.T.C.; Song, J.; Luo, Y.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine how flooding and draining cycles affect the redox chemistry of metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter in paddy soils and how the pH influences these processes. Our secondary purpose was to determine to what extent a geochemical thermodynamic

  1. Influence of pH on the redox chemistry of metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter in paddy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Y.; Koopmans, G.F.; Bonten, L.T.C.; Song, J.; Luo, Y.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Comans, R.N.J.

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine how flooding and draining cycles affect the redox chemistry of metal (hydr)oxides and organic matter in paddy soils and how the pH influences these processes. Our secondary purpose was to determine to what extent a geochemical thermodynamic equilibr

  2. Potentiometric Measurements of Semiconductor Nanocrystal Redox Potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Gerard M; Brozek, Carl K; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Tsui, Emily Y; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-04-06

    A potentiometric method for measuring redox potentials of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is described. Fermi levels of colloidal ZnO NCs are measured in situ during photodoping, allowing correlation of NC redox potentials and reduction levels. Excellent agreement is found between electrochemical and optical redox-indicator methods. Potentiometry is also reported for colloidal CdSe NCs, which show more negative conduction-band-edge potentials than in ZnO. This difference is highlighted by spontaneous electron transfer from reduced CdSe NCs to ZnO NCs in solution, with potentiometry providing a measure of the inter-NC electron-transfer driving force. Future applications of NC potentiometry are briefly discussed.

  3. Redox-active Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4-}-doped conducting polymers with greatly enhanced capacity as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Min; Qian, Jianfeng; Ai, Xinping; Yang, Hanxi [Hubei Key Laboratory of Electrochemical Power Sources, College of Chemistry and Molecular Science, Wuhan University (China)

    2011-11-09

    Polypyrrole and polythiophenes doped with redox-active Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4-} anions deliver a 56% to 300% enhanced redox capacity and also exhibit greatly improved cycling stability, enabling them to be used as a new class of low-cost, environmentally benign, and high-capacity cathode material for electric storage applications. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl as a model organic redox active compound for nonaqueous flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Barton, John L.; Darling, Robert M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-09-01

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) that utilize redox active organic molecules are an emerging energy storage concept with the possibility of meeting grid storage requirements. Sporadic and uneven advances in molecular discovery and development, however, have stymied efforts to quantify the performance characteristics of nonaqueous redox electrolytes and flow cells. A need exists for archetypal redox couples, with well-defined electrochemical properties, high solubility in relevant electrolytes, and broad availability, to serve as probe molecules. This work investigates the 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (AcNH-TEMPO) redox pair for such an application. We report the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the reduced and oxidized compounds at dilute concentrations for electroanalysis, as well as moderate-to-high concentrations for RFB applications. Changes in conductivity, viscosity, and UV-vis absorbance as a function of state-of-charge are quantified. Cyclic voltammetry investigates the redox potential, reversibility, and diffusion coefficients of dilute solutions, while symmetric flow cell cycling determines the stability of the AcNH-TEMPO redox pair over long experiment times. Finally, single electrolyte flow cell studies demonstrate the utility of this redox couple as a platform chemistry for benchmarking NAqRFB performance.

  5. Redox properties of structural Fe in clay minerals. 2. Electrochemical and spectroscopic characterization of electron transfer irreversibility in ferruginous smectite, SWa-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Christopher A; Klüpfel, Laura; Voegelin, Andreas; Sander, Michael; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2012-09-04

    Structural Fe in clay minerals is an important, albeit poorly characterized, redox-active phase found in many natural and engineered environments. This work develops an experimental approach to directly assess the redox properties of a natural Fe-bearing smectite (ferruginous smectite, SWa-1, 12.6 wt % Fe) with mediated electrochemical reduction (MER) and oxidation (MEO). By utilizing a suite of one-electron-transfer mediating compounds to facilitate electron transfer between structural Fe in SWa-1 and a working electrode, we show that the Fe2+/Fe3+ couple in SWa-1 is redox-active over a large range of potentials (from E(H) = -0.63 V to +0.61 V vs SHE). Electrochemical and spectroscopic analyses of SWa-1 samples that were subject to reduction and re-oxidation cycling revealed both reversible and irreversible structural Fe rearrangements that altered the observed apparent standard reduction potential (E(H)(ø)) of structural Fe. E(H)(ø)-values vary by as much as 0.56 V between SWa-1 samples with different redox histories. The wide range of E(H)-values over which SWa-1 is redox-active and redox history-dependent E(H)(ø)-values underscore the importance of Fe-bearing clay minerals as redox-active phases in a wide range of redox regimes.

  6. Thioredoxin-mediated redox regulation of resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Rosalind Brigham; Roy, Deodutta

    2013-08-01

    Resistance to endocrine therapy in breast carcinogenesis due to the redox regulation of the signal transduction system by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the subject of this review article. Both antiestrogens and aromatase inhibitors are thought to prevent cancer through modulating the estrogen receptor function, but other mechanisms cannot be ruled out as these compounds also block metabolism and redox cycling of estrogen and are free radical scavengers. Endocrine therapeutic agents, such as, tamoxifen and other antiestrogens, and the aromatase inhibitor, exemestane, are capable of producing ROS. Aggressive breast cancer cells have high oxidative stress and chronic treatment with exemestane, fulvestrant or tamoxifen may add additional ROS stress. Breast cancer cells receiving long-term antiestrogen treatment appear to adapt to this increased persistent level of ROS. This, in turn, may lead to the disruption of reversible redox signaling that involves redox-sensitive phosphatases, protein kinases, such as, ERK and AKT, and transcription factors, such as, AP-1, NRF-1 and NF-κB. Thioredoxin modulates the expression of estrogen responsive genes through modulating the production of H2O2 in breast cancer cells. Overexpressing thioredoxine reductase 2 and reducing oxidized thioredoxin restores tamoxifen sensitivity to previously resistant breast cancer cells. In summary, it appears that resistance to endocrine therapy may be mediated, in part, by ROS-mediated dysregulation of both estrogen-dependent and estrogen-independent redox-sensitive signaling pathways. Further studies are needed to define the mechanism of action of thioredoxin modifiers, and their effect on the redox regulation that contributes to restoring the antiestrogen-mediated signal transduction system and growth inhibitory action.

  7. Redox regulation and overreduction control in the photosynthesizing cell: complexity in redox regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelze, Marie-Luise; Kandlbinder, Andrea; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2008-11-01

    Regulation of the photosynthetic apparatus between efficient energy conversion at low light and avoidance of overreduction and damage development at excess light resembles dangerous navigating between Scylla and Charybdis. Photosynthesis is a high rate redox metabolic pathway that generates redox intermediates with extreme redox potentials and eventually reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Therefore it is not surprising that the states of defined redox reactions in the chloroplast provide the predominant information and thus directly or indirectly the decisive signals for the multilevel control of cell activities in the chloroplast, cytoplasm, mitochondrion and nucleus. This review elaborates on the diversity of photosynthesis-derived redox signals such as the plastoquinone and thiol redox state that regulate and coordinate light use efficiency, electron transport activity, metabolic reactions, gene transcription and translation not only in the chloroplast but through retrograde signaling also essentially in all other cell compartments. The synergistic and antagonistic interrelations between the redox-dependent signaling pathways and their interactions with other signals such as abscisic acid and tetrapyrol intermediates constitute a redundant and probably buffered regulatory network to optimize performance of photosynthesis on the cellular and whole leaf level.

  8. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

    2009-02-11

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

  9. Supported iron based redox systems for hydrogen production and storage from ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosmaninho, M. G., E-mail: mgrosmaninho@ufmg.br; Souza, L. R. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Quimica, ICEx (Brazil); Gomes, G. M.; Zica, R. F. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Escola de Engenharia (Brazil); Nascimento, J. S.; Pereira, M. C.; Fabris, J. D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Quimica, ICEx (Brazil); Ardison, J. D. [Centro Nacional de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN) (Brazil); Moura, F. C. C. [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (UFOP), Departamento de Quimica, ICEB (Brazil); Lago, R. M.; Araujo, M. H. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Departamento de Quimica, ICEx (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    Hydrogen production using ethanol and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/support in a redox cycle was investigated. The composites were prepared by impregnation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} with Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, with different proportions of iron, i.e. 10, 30 and 50 wt.%, calcinated at 450 deg. C and characterized by Moessbauer spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, BET and TG. The redox cycle to produce and/or store hydrogen is a two step process (1) initially the ethanol is used to reduce the iron oxide to Fe{sup o}; (2) and when H{sub 2} is needed, Fe{sup o} reacts with H{sub 2}O to produce CO-free hydrogen, and the iron oxide is reduced again to Fe{sup o} making this system cyclic. After the reactions it was interesting to observe that ethanol can directly reduce the iron oxide to produce metallic iron, with carbon deposition and iron-carbon as side product. Preliminary results indicate that it is possible to perform multiple redox cycles with the supported iron oxide without deactivation.

  10. Radiation-induced non-equilibrium redox chemistry of plutonium: implications for environmental migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, J M; Siekhaus, W J

    2009-02-11

    Static concentrations of plutonium oxidation states in solution and at surfaces in oxide-water systems are identified as non-equilibrium steady states. These kinetically controlled systems are described by redox cycles based on irreversible disproportionation of Pu(IV), Pu(V), and Pu(VI) in OH-bridged intermediate complexes and at OH-covered oxide surfaces. Steady state is fixed by continuous redox cycles driven by radioactivity-promoted electron-transfer and energetically favorable reactions of Pu(III) and Pu(VII) disproportionation products with H2O. A model based on the redox cycles accounts for the high steady-state [Pu] coexisting with Pu(IV) hydrous oxide at pH 0-15 and for predominance of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) in solution. The steady-state [Pu] depends on pH and the surface area of oxide in solution, but not on the initial Pu oxidation state. PuO{sub 2+x} formation is attributed to high Pu(V) concentrations existing at water-exposed oxide surfaces. Results infer that migration of Pu in an aqueous environment is controlled by kinetic factors unique to that site and that the predominant oxidation states in solution are Pu(V) and Pu(VI).

  11. Organic Acids: The Pools of Fixed Carbon Involved in Redox Regulation and Energy Balance in Higher Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Abir U Igamberdiev; Eprintsev, Alexander T.

    2016-01-01

    Organic acids are synthesized in plants as a result of the incomplete oxidation of photosynthetic products and represent the stored pools of fixed carbon accumulated due to different transient times of conversion of carbon compounds in metabolic pathways. When redox level in the cell increases, e.g., in conditions of active photosynthesis, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in mitochondria is transformed to a partial cycle supplying citrate for the synthesis of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate (c...

  12. Co-Electrodeposition of Bilirubin Oxidase with Redox Polymer through Ligand Substitution for Use as an Oxygen Reduction Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyo Sul; Kang, Chan [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    The water soluble redox polymer, poly(N-vinylimidazole) complexed with Os(4,4'-dichloro-2,2'-bipyridine){sub 2}Cl]{sup +} (PVI-[Os(dCl-bpy){sub 2}Cl]{sup +}), was electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode by applying cycles of alternating square wave potentials between 0.2 V (2 s) and 0.7 V (2 s) to the electrode in a solution containing the redox polymer. The coordinating anionic ligand, Cl- of the osmium complex, became labile in the reduced state of the complex and was substituted by the imidazole of the PVI chain. The ligand substitution reactions resulted in crosslinking between the PVI chains, which made the redox polymer water insoluble and caused it to be deposited on the electrode surface. The deposited film was still electrically conducting and the continuous electrodeposition of the redox polymer was possible. When cycles of square wave potentials were applied to the electrode in a solution of bilirubin oxidase and the redox polymer, the enzyme was co-electrodeposited with the redox polymer, because the enzymes could be bound to the metal complexes through the ligand exchange reactions. The electrode with the film of the PVI-[Os(dCl-bpy){sub 2}Cl]{sup +} redox polymer and the co-electrodeposited bilirubin oxidase was employed for the reduction of O{sub 2} and a large increase of the currents was observed due to the electrocataly