WorldWideScience

Sample records for quinazolines blocks mitosis

  1. Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Paula

    Cytology is the subject that is dealt with in this autoinstructional program. The process to be understood by secondary school students who are taking biology is mitosis. The material is presented to be adequate for achievers at the middle level. Knowledge of the structure of the DNA molecule and of the parts of the cell are considered as…

  2. Quantitative characterization of mitosis-blocked tetraploid cells using high content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Linnette E; Ghosh, Richik N

    2006-08-01

    A range of cellular evidence supporting a G1 tetraploidy checkpoint was obtained from different assay methods including flow cytometry, immunoblotting, and microscopy. Cancer research would benefit if these cellular properties could instead be measured by a single, quantitative, automated assay method, such as high content analysis (HCA). Thus, nocodazole-treated cells were fluorescently labeled for different cell cycle-associated properties, including DNA content, retinoblastoma (Rb) and histone H3 phosphorylation, p53 and p21(WAF1) expression, nuclear and cell sizes, and cell morphology, and automatically imaged, analyzed, and correlated using HCA. HCA verified that nocodazole-induced mitosis block resulted in tetraploid cells. Rb and histone H3 were maximally hyperphosphorylated by 24 h of nocodazole treatment, accompanied by cell and nuclear size decreases and cellular rounding. Cells remained tetraploid and mononucleated with longer treatments, but other targets reverted to G1 levels, including Rb and histone H3 dephosphorylation accompanied by cellular respreading. This was accompanied by increased p53 and p21(WAF1) expression levels. The range of effects accompanying nocodazole-induced block of mitosis and the resulting tetraploid cells' reversal to a pseudo-G1 state can be quantitatively measured by HCA in an automated manner, recommending this assay method for the large-scale biology challenges of modern cancer drug discovery.

  3. Quinazolin-4-one derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosley, Cara A; Acker, Timothy M; Hansen, Kasper Bø;

    2010-01-01

    We describe a new class of subunit-selective antagonists of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA)-selective ionotropic glutamate receptors that contain the (E)-3-phenyl-2-styrylquinazolin-4(3H)-one backbone. The inhibition of recombinant NMDA receptor function induced by these quinazolin-4-one derivatives ...

  4. Presenting Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Stephanie; Sterling, Donna R.

    2005-01-01

    When the topic of cell division is introduced in the classroom, students can showcase their interpretations of the stages of mitosis by creating a slide show illustrating prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase (see samples in Figure 1). With the help of a computer, they can create a model of mitosis that will help them distinguish the…

  5. Movie Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiages, Christopher; Hitt, Austin M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitosis and meiosis are essential for the growth, development, and reproduction of organisms. Because these processes are essential to life, both are emphasized in biology texts, state standards, and the National Science Education Standards. In this article, the authors present their methodology for teaching mitosis by having students produce…

  6. Movie Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiages, Christopher; Hitt, Austin M.

    2008-01-01

    Mitosis and meiosis are essential for the growth, development, and reproduction of organisms. Because these processes are essential to life, both are emphasized in biology texts, state standards, and the National Science Education Standards. In this article, the authors present their methodology for teaching mitosis by having students produce…

  7. Presenting Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Stephanie; Sterling, Donna R.

    2005-01-01

    When the topic of cell division is introduced in the classroom, students can showcase their interpretations of the stages of mitosis by creating a slide show illustrating prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase (see samples in Figure 1). With the help of a computer, they can create a model of mitosis that will help them distinguish the…

  8. Synthesis and Reactivity of [1,2,4]Triazolo-annelated Quinazolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashad A. Al-Salahi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the synthesis of phenyl-substituted 2-alkoxy(methylsulfanyl-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-a]quinazolines starting from N-cyanoimidocarbonates and substituted hydrazinobenzoic acids as building blocks. Thionation or chlorination of the inherent lactam moiety in the target compounds followed by treatment with multifunctional nucleophiles provided access to a variety of derivatives.

  9. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  10. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  11. Biotransformation of quinazoline and phthalazine by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John B; Heinze, Thomas M; Schnackenberg, Laura K; Freeman, James P; Williams, Anna J

    2011-03-01

    Cultures of Aspergillus niger NRRL-599 in fluid Sabouraud medium were grown with quinazoline and phthalazine for 7 days. Metabolites were purified by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Quinazoline was oxidized to 4-quinazolinone and 2,4-quinazolinedione, and phthalazine was oxidized to 1-phthalazinone.

  12. Mitosis and its regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frías Vázquez Sara

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell division by mitosis is essential for the development of organisms and their reproduction; it is also neces- sary that each new cell is genetically identical to that from which it comes. In eukaryotes this is achieved by the presence of complex mechanisms that ensure the integrity of genomic material and their proper segregation during mitosis. The traditional view of mitosis has been divided into different stages that were characterized by morphological studies in dividing cells; advances in molecular biology have led beyond this characterization, so that we now know a range of participant molecules. This article will discuss the process of mitosis, both at the cellular and molecular level and a brief summary of the molecular players that regulate this process.

  13. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  14. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  15. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  16. The DNA damage response during mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; Vugt, Marcel A.T.M. van, E-mail: m.vugt@umcg.nl

    2013-10-15

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  17. Regulatory Genes Controlling Mitosis in the Fission Yeast SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE

    OpenAIRE

    Nurse, Paul; Thuriaux, Pierre

    1980-01-01

    Fifty-two wee mutants that undergo mitosis and cell division at a reduced size compared with wild type have been genetically analyzed. The mutants define two genes, wee1 and cdc2, which control the timing of mitosis. Fifty-one of the mutants map at the wee1 locus, which is unlinked to any known cdc gene. One of the wee1 alleles has been shown to be nonsense suppressible. The 52nd wee mutant maps within cdc2. Previously, only temperature-sensitive mutants that become blocked at mitosis have be...

  18. Cancer: Mitosis Run Amok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Virtually every student knows someone who has battled cancer. It is a topic that is of great interest to many students because of their personal connection to the subject. Mitosis is an important topic in a middle school unit on cells and cell processes (National Science Standards, Grades 5?8: Life Sciences: Content Standard C). Studying cancer…

  19. Cancer: Mitosis Run Amok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Scope, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Virtually every student knows someone who has battled cancer. It is a topic that is of great interest to many students because of their personal connection to the subject. Mitosis is an important topic in a middle school unit on cells and cell processes (National Science Standards, Grades 5?8: Life Sciences: Content Standard C). Studying cancer…

  20. Mitosis Methods & Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitosis Methods & Protocols Andrew D. McAinsh (Edt Humana press, Totowa, New Jersey (USA Series: Springer Protocols Methods in Molecular Biology, Volume 545, 2009 ISBN: 978-1-60327-992-5   It is quite clear from the contents of this book that the remarkably fascinating phenomenon of mitosis (that captured, and still is capturing, the attention of entire generations of scientists is still open to research. This is mainly due to our lack of knowledge of so many multifaced events of this extraordinarly complex process. The reader giving a glace through the Contents and Contributors sections is speechless: All of the first-class models (i.e., budding yeast, Caenorabditis, Drosophila, Xenopus and Human are presented..... 

  1. Mitosis is swell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatulovskiy, Evgeny; Skotheim, Jan M

    2015-11-23

    Cell volume and dry mass are typically correlated. However, in this issue, Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201505056) and Son et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201505058) use new live-cell techniques to show that entry to mitosis coincides with rapid cell swelling, which is reversed before division.

  2. Synthesis and Antihypertensive Screening of New Derivatives of Quinazolines Linked with Isoxazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujeeb Ur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 7-substituted-3-(4-(3-(4-substitutedphenyl-4,5-dihydroisoxazol-5-ylphenyl-2-substituted quinazolin-4(3H-one (1–30 have been synthesized by the cyclization of (E-3-(4-(3-substitutedphenylacrylolylphenyl-2-(substitutedphenyl-7-substituted quinazolin-4-(3H-one with hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The synthesized compounds were examined for their in vivo antihypertensive activity using albino rats. All the titled compounds exhibited good to moderate antihypertensive activity. Compounds 7-Chloro-3-(4-(3-(4-chlorophenyl-4,5- dihydroisoxazol-5-ylphenyl-2-p-tolylquinazolin-4(3H-one (23 and 7-Chloro-3-(4-(3-(4-chlorophenyl-4,5-dihydroisoxazol-5-ylphenyl-2-(4-methoxyphenylquinazolin-4(3H-one (24 exhibited potent antihypertensive activity through their anticipated α1-adrenergic receptor blocking property similar to its clinically used analogue, prazosin, without affecting heart rate with prolonged duration of action when tested in adrenaline induced hypertension in anaesthetized rats.

  3. The Biochemistry of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Samuel; Pines, Jonathon

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we will discuss the biochemistry of mitosis in eukaryotic cells. We will focus on conserved principles that, importantly, are adapted to the biology of the organism. It is vital to bear in mind that the structural requirements for division in a rapidly dividing syncytial Drosophila embryo, for example, are markedly different from those in a unicellular yeast cell. Nevertheless, division in both systems is driven by conserved modules of antagonistic protein kinases and phosphatases, underpinned by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, which create molecular switches to drive each stage of division forward. These conserved control modules combine with the self-organizing properties of the subcellular architecture to meet the specific needs of the cell. Our discussion will draw on discoveries in several model systems that have been important in the long history of research on mitosis, and we will try to point out those principles that appear to apply to all cells, compared with those in which the biochemistry has been specifically adapted in a particular organism. PMID:25663668

  4. Regulatory genes controlling mitosis in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, P; Thuriaux, P

    1980-11-01

    Fifty-two wee mutants that undergo mitosis and cell division at a reduced size compared with wild type have been genetically analyzed. The mutants define two genes, wee1 and cdc2, which control the timing of mitosis. Fifty-one of the mutants map at the wee1 locus, which is unlinked to any known cdc gene. One of the wee1 alleles has been shown to be nonsense suppressible. The 52nd were mutant maps within cdc2. Previously, only temperature-sensitive mutants that become blocked at mitosis have been found at the cdc2 locus. The simplest interpretation of these observations is that wee1+ codes for a negative element or inhibitor, and cdc2+ codes for a positive element or activator in the mitotic control. The gene dosage of wee1+ plays some role in determining the timing of mitosis, but the gene dosage of cdc2+ has little effect. However, some aspect of the cdc2 gene product activity is important for determining when mitosis takes place. The possible roles of wee1 and cdc2 in the mitotic control are discussed, with particular reference to the part they may play in the monitoring of cell growth rate, both of which influence the timing of mitosis.

  5. Turning meiosis into mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle d'Erfurth

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Apomixis, or asexual clonal reproduction through seeds, is of immense interest due to its potential application in agriculture. One key element of apomixis is apomeiosis, a deregulation of meiosis that results in a mitotic-like division. We isolated and characterised a novel gene that is directly involved in controlling entry into the second meiotic division. By combining a mutation in this gene with two others that affect key meiotic processes, we created a genotype called MiMe in which meiosis is totally replaced by mitosis. The obtained plants produce functional diploid gametes that are genetically identical to their mother. The creation of the MiMe genotype and apomeiosis phenotype is an important step towards understanding and engineering apomixis.

  6. Advances in Metal-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling Reactions of Halogenated Quinazolinones and Their Quinazoline Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malose Jack Mphahlele

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Halogenated quinazolinones and quinazolines are versatile synthetic intermediates for the metal-catalyzed carbon–carbon bond formation reactions such as the Kumada, Stille, Negishi, Sonogashira, Suzuki-Miyaura and Heck cross-coupling reactions or carbon-heteroatom bond formation via the Buchwald-Hartwig cross-coupling to yield novel polysubstituted derivatives. This review presents an overview of the application of these methods on halogenated quinazolin-4-ones and their quinazolines to generate novel polysubstituted derivatives.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of novel F-18 labeled quinazoline derivatives with low lipophilicity for tumor PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yan; Chang, Jin; Zhao, Wenwen; He, Yong; Li, Yuqiao; Zhang, Huabei; Qi, Chuanmin

    2017-08-18

    Four novel F-18 labeled quinazoline derivatives with low lipophilicity, [(18) F]4-(2-fluoroethoxy)-6,7-dimethoxyquinazoline ([(18) F]I), [(18) F]4-(3-((4-(2-fluoroethoxy)-7-methoxyquinazolin-6-yl)oxy)propyl)morpholine ([(18) F]II), [(18) F]4-(2-fluoroethoxy)-7-methoxy-6-(2-methoxyethoxy)quinazoline ([(18) F]III) and [(18) F]4-(2-fluoroethoxy)-6,7-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)quinazoline ([(18) F]IV), were synthesized via a two-step radiosynthesis procedure with an overall radiochemical yield of 10-38% (without decay correction) and radiochemical purities of > 98%. The lipophilicity and stability of labeled compounds were tested in vitro. The log P values of the four radiotracers ranged from 0.52 to 1.07. We then performed ELISA to measure their affinities to EGFR-TK. ELISA assay results indicated that each inhibitor was specifically bound to EGFR-TK in a dose-dependent manner. The EGFR-TK autophosphorylation IC50 values of [(18) F]I, [(18) F]II, [(18) F]III, and [(18) F]IV were 7.732 μM, 0.4698 μM, 0.1174 μM, and 0.1176 μM, respectively. All labeled compounds were evaluated via cellular uptake and blocking studies in HepG2 cell lines in vitro. Cellular uptake and blocking experiment results indicated that [(18) F]I and [(18) F]III had excellent cellular uptake at 120 min post-injection in HepG2 carcinoma cells (51.80±3.42 %ID/mg protein and 27.31±1.94 %ID/mg protein, respectively). Additionally, biodistribution experiments in S180 tumor-bearing mice in vivo indicated that [(18) F]I had a very fast clearance in blood and a relatively high uptake ratio of tumor to blood (4.76) and tumor to muscle (1.82) at 60 min post-injection. [(18) F]III had a quick clearance in plasma, and its highest uptake ratio of tumor to muscle was 2.55 at 15 min post-injection. These experimental results and experiences were valuable for the further exploration of novel radiotracers of quinazoline derivatives. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Behavioural Response of Triatoma infestans (Klug (Hemiptera: Reduviidae to Quinazolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zerba

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The behavioural responses of the haematophagous bug Triatoma infestans towards some previously identified components of its faeces: 4-methylquinazoline, 2,4- dimethylquinazoline and their mixtures were evaluated using a video tracking system. Fifth instar nymphs and females but not males were significantly attracted to polyethylene glycol formulations of 4-methyl + 2,4-dimethylquinazoline (50 μg each. Fifth instar nymphs were also attracted to 4-methylquinazoline alone (50 μg but females were only attracted by the mixture of both methyl quinazolines (50 μg each. Syntheses of both methyl quinazolines were carried out starting from 2-aminoacetophenone by modifying the conditions of reported procedures.

  9. Synthesis of Novel Quinazoline Derivatives via Pyrimidine ortho-Quinodimethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Herrera Fernández

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The [4+2] cycloaddition between 2,4-diphenylpyrimidine ortho-quinodimethane and dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate leads to 2,4-diphenylquinazoline-6,7-dicarboxylate (6. 2,4-Diphenylfuro[3,4-g]quinazoline-6,8-dione (7 is also obtained by basic hydrolysis of compound 6, followed by the closure of the resulting diacid in acetic anhydride.

  10. Molecular Docking and Anticonvulsant Activity of Newly Synthesized Quinazoline Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem A. Abuelizz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A new series of quinazoline-4(3H-ones are evaluated for anticonvulsant activity. After intraperitoneal (ip injection to albino mice at a dose of 100 mg/kg body weight, synthesized quinazolin-4(3H-ones (1–24 were examined in the maximal electroshock (MES induced seizures and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ induced seizure models in mice. The Rotarod method was applied to determine the neurotoxicity. Most of the compounds displayed anticonvulsant activity in the scPTZ screen at a dose range of 0.204–0.376 mmol/mL. Out of twenty-four, compounds 8, 13 and 19 proved to be the most active with a remarkable protection (100% against PTZ induced convulsions and four times more potent activity than ethosuximide. The structure-activity relationship concluded valuable pharmacophoric information, which was confirmed by the molecular docking studies using the target enzyme human carbon anhydrase II (HCA II. The studied quinazoline analogues suggested that the butyl substitution at position 3 has a significant effect on preventing the spread of seizure discharge and on raising the seizure threshold. However, benzyl substitution at position 3 has shown a strong anticonvulsant activity but with less seizure prevention compared to the butyl substitution.

  11. The SUMO Pathway in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Debaditya; Dasso, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Mitosis is the stage of the cell cycle during which replicated chromosomes must be precisely divided to allow the formation of two daughter cells possessing equal genetic material. Much of the careful spatial and temporal organization of mitosis is maintained through post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, of key cellular proteins. Here, we will review evidence that sumoylation, conjugation to the SUMO family of small ubiquitin-like modifiers, also serves essential regulatory roles during mitosis. We will discuss the basic biology of sumoylation, how the SUMO pathway has been implicated in particular mitotic functions, including chromosome condensation, centromere/kinetochore organization and cytokinesis, and what cellular proteins may be the targets underlying these phenomena.

  12. Mcl-1 dynamics influence mitotic slippage and death in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Olivia; Topham, Caroline; Diez, Maria; Taylor, Stephen

    2016-02-02

    Microtubule-binding drugs such as taxol are frontline treatments for a variety of cancers but exactly how they yield patient benefit is unclear. In cell culture, inhibiting microtubule dynamics prevents spindle assembly, leading to mitotic arrest followed by either apoptosis in mitosis or slippage, whereby a cell returns to interphase without dividing. Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1), a pro-survival member of the Bcl-2 family central to the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, is degraded during a prolonged mitotic arrest and may therefore act as a mitotic death timer. Consistently, we show that blocking proteasome-mediated degradation inhibits taxol-induced mitotic apoptosis in a Mcl-1-dependent manner. However, this degradation does not require the activity of either APC/C-Cdc20, FBW7 or MULE, three separate E3 ubiquitin ligases implicated in targeting Mcl-1 for degradation. This therefore challenges the notion that Mcl-1 undergoes regulated degradation during mitosis. We also show that Mcl-1 is continuously synthesized during mitosis and that blocking protein synthesis accelerates taxol induced death-in-mitosis. Modulating Mcl-1 levels also influences slippage; overexpressing Mcl-1 extends the time from mitotic entry to mitotic exit in the presence of taxol, while inhibiting Mcl-1 accelerates it. We suggest that Mcl-1 competes with Cyclin B1 for binding to components of the proteolysis machinery, thereby slowing down the slow degradation of Cyclin B1 responsible for slippage. Thus, modulating Mcl-1 dynamics influences both death-in-mitosis and slippage. However, because mitotic degradation of Mcl-1 appears not to be under the control of an E3 ligase, we suggest that the notion of network crosstalk is used with caution.

  13. Quinazoline antifolates inhibiting thymidylate synthase: 4-thio-substituted analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, T J; Jones, T R; Jackman, A L; Flinn, A; O'Connor, B M; Warner, P; Calvert, A H

    1991-03-01

    We report the synthesis of four new 4-thio-5,8-dideazafolic acid analogues and a 4-(methylthio) analogue structurally related to the thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibitor N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid. Three N10-propargyl-4-thio-5,8-dideazafolic acid analogues had C2 amino, hydrogen, and methyl substituents. A 4-thio and a 4-(methylthio) compound each with hydrogen at C2 and ethyl at N10 were also synthesized. In general, the synthetic route involved thionation of the appropriate 4-oxoquinazoline; the sulfur thus introduced was then protected by methylation. Further protection with a pivaloyl group was required for the quinazoline bearing a 2-amino substituent. The protected quinazolines were treated with N-bromosuccinimide and the resulting 6-(bromomethyl) compounds were then coupled to the appropriate N-monoalkylated diethyl N-(4-aminobenzoyl)-L-glutamate in N,N-dimethylacetamide with calcium carbonate as base. The 4-thio-5,8-dideazafolic acids were obtained by removal of the methylthio group with sodium hydrosulfide, followed by deprotection of the carboxyl groups with cold dilute alkali. For the compound containing a pivaloyl protecting group, hot dilute alkali was used. To obtain the 5,8-dideazafolic acid containing a 4-(methylthio) substituent, the corresponding diester was treated with lithium hydroxide which selectively deprotected the carboxyl groups. The five compounds were tested as inhibitors of L1210 TS. It was found that replacement of the 4-oxygen of the quinazoline moiety by sulfur did not alter the TS inhibition. However, the introduction of a methylthio substituent at position 4 severely impaired TS inhibition. All 4-thio compounds were less cytotoxic to L1210 cells in culture than their 4-oxo counterparts.

  14. Crystal structure of 4-meth-oxy-quinazoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hiti, Gamal A; Smith, Keith; Hegazy, Amany S; Alshammari, Mohammed B; Kariuki, Benson M

    2014-12-01

    The title compound, C9H8N2O, is almost planar, with the C atom of the meth-oxy group deviating from the mean plane of the quinazoline ring system (r.m.s. deviation = 0.011 Å) by 0.068 (4) Å. In the crystal, mol-ecules form π-π stacks parallel to the b-axis direction [centroid-centroid separation = 3.5140 (18) Å], leading to a herringbone packing arrangement.

  15. Synthesis of Novel Quinazoline Derivatives as Antimicrobial Agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ALY,A.A

    2003-01-01

    Quinazoline isothiocyanate 1 reacts with various nucleophiles(nitrogen nucleophiles,oxygen nucleophiles and sulphur nucleophiles)to afford heterocyclic systemes 2-13,Also,the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction of 1 with phenyl isocyanate,benzylidene aryl amine and cinnamic acid derivatives gave novel heterocyclic compounds 14-16,Moreover,the reaction of 1 with active methylene compounds under Michael reaction conditions also was investigated to yield 17 and 18 and it was found that all these reactions proceede via isothiocyanate heterocyclization to furnish non-condensed heterocyclic compoundes,Some of the newly synthesized compounds were tested for their antimicrobial activities.

  16. Synthesis and in vitro antitumor evaluation of primary amine substituted quinazoline linked benzimidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Kamaldeep; Sharma, Alka; Luxami, Vijay

    2014-01-15

    By combining the structural features of quinazoline and benzimidazole, new hybrid regioisomeric molecules with substituted primary amines have been synthesized. Evaluation of these molecules over 60 cancer cell line panel has identified three molecules as most potent anticancer agents. Compound 10 showed ten and eleven folds more activity than respective quinazoline and benzimidazole class of compounds with GI50 value of 1.64 μM. Compound 11 (GI50 value of 0.81 μM) showed almost twenty and twenty-two fold more activity than quinazoline and benzimidazole analogue, respectively while compound 12 (GI50 value of 4.52 μM) has four fold more activity than quinazoline and benzimidazole analogue. In vitro evaluation of compound 11 exhibited remarkable anticancer activity towards colon cancer cell lines and prostate cancer cell lines at five dose concentrations with GI50 values of 0.34 and 0.31 μM, respectively.

  17. The dynamic nature of the nuclear envelope: lessons from closed mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnone, James T; Walters, Alison D; Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, chromosomes are encased by a dynamic nuclear envelope. In contrast to metazoans, where the nuclear envelope disassembles during mitosis, many fungi including budding yeast undergo "closed mitosis," where the nuclear envelope remains intact throughout the cell cycle. Consequently, during closed mitosis the nuclear envelope must expand to accommodate chromosome segregation to the two daughter cells. A recent study by Witkin et al. in budding yeast showed that if progression through mitosis is delayed, for example due to checkpoint activation, the nuclear envelope continues to expand despite the block to chromosome segregation. Moreover, this expansion occurs at a specific region of the nuclear envelope- adjacent to the nucleolus- forming an extension referred to as a "flare." These observations raise questions regarding the regulation of nuclear envelope expansion both in budding yeast and in higher eukaryotes, the mechanisms confining mitotic nuclear envelope expansion to a particular region and the possible consequences of failing to regulate nuclear envelope expansion during the cell cycle.

  18. Synthesis of New 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl-quinazoline Nucleoside and Acyclonucleoside Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaaziz Ouahrouch

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we describe the synthesis of 1,4-disustituted-1,2,3-triazolo-quinazoline ribonucleosides or acyclonucleosides by means of 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between various O or N-alkylated propargyl-quinazoline and 1'-azido-2',3',5'-tri-O-benzoylribose or activated alkylating agents under microwave conditions. None of the compounds selected showed significant anti-HCV activity in vitro.

  19. Synthesis and Evaluation of 2,4-Disubstituted Quinazoline Derivatives with Potent Anti-Angiogenesis Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjin Yu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of 2,4-disubstituted quinazoline derivatives were designed and synthesized. The biological results showed that most of quinazoline derivatives exhibited potent antiproliferative activities against a panel of three tumor cell lines and a good inhibitory effect against the adhesion and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Among these compounds, 11d was the most potent agent, that also exhibited the highest anti-angiogenesis activities in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM assay.

  20. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Some Novel Substituted Piperazinyl-quinazolin-3(4H-ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Raghavendra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Several substituted-quinazolin-3(4H-ones were synthesized by condensation of 2-chloro-N-(4-oxo-substituted-quinazolin-3(4H-yl-acetamides with various substituted piperazines through single step reaction. Elemental analysis, IR, 1HNMR and mass spectral data confirmed the structure of the newly synthesized compounds. Synthesized quinazolin-4-one derivatives were investigated for their antibacterial and antifungal activities.

  1. Killing cells by targeting mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchado, E; Guillamot, M; Malumbres, M

    2012-03-01

    Cell cycle deregulation is a common feature of human cancer. Tumor cells accumulate mutations that result in unscheduled proliferation, genomic instability and chromosomal instability. Several therapeutic strategies have been proposed for targeting the cell division cycle in cancer. Whereas inhibiting the initial phases of the cell cycle is likely to generate viable quiescent cells, targeting mitosis offers several possibilities for killing cancer cells. Microtubule poisons have proved efficacy in the clinic against a broad range of malignancies, and novel targeted strategies are now evaluating the inhibition of critical activities, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 1, Aurora or Polo kinases or spindle kinesins. Abrogation of the mitotic checkpoint or targeting the energetic or proteotoxic stress of aneuploid or chromosomally instable cells may also provide further benefits by inducing lethal levels of instability. Although cancer cells may display different responses to these treatments, recent data suggest that targeting mitotic exit by inhibiting the anaphase-promoting complex generates metaphase cells that invariably die in mitosis. As the efficacy of cell-cycle targeting approaches has been limited so far, further understanding of the molecular pathways modulating mitotic cell death will be required to move forward these new proposals to the clinic.

  2. Insights into centromeric transcription in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The major role of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) is to generate mRNAs. I recently uncovered a novel function of RNAP II in chromosome segregation in mitosis, installing the cohesin protector, Shugoshin, at centromeres. Here I will discuss the current understanding of RNAP II-dependent centromeric transcription in mitosis.

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor and mitosis, pay attention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Federico Coccolini; Fausto Catena; Luca Ansaloni; Antonio Daniele Pinna

    2012-01-01

    The difference between stages I and III of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor depends principally on the number of mitosis. According with TNM classification, the presence in the tumor of high mitotic rate determines the upgrading. Many studies exposed different count techniques in evaluating the number of mitosis. An international standardized method to assess mitotic rate is needed.

  4. One-pot synthesis of quinazoline derivatives via [2+2+2] cascade annulation of diaryliodonium salts and two nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiang; Chen, Chao; Wang, Yong; Chen, Junjie; Lou, Zhenbang; Li, Ming

    2013-08-04

    An efficient one-pot approach to multiple substituted quinazolines with diaryliodonium salt , and two nitriles has been presented. The reaction enables great flexibility of the substitution patterns on quinazolines and is applicable to two different nitriles to give a regio-selective product.

  5. SnapShot: Phosphoregulation of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Andrew; Vuong, Jenny; Rogers, Samuel; Malumbres, Marcos; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2017-06-15

    During mitosis, a cell divides its duplicated genome into two identical daughter cells. This process must occur without errors to prevent proliferative diseases (e.g., cancer). A key mechanism controlling mitosis is the precise timing of more than 32,000 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events by a network of kinases and counterbalancing phosphatases. The identity, magnitude, and temporal regulation of these events have emerged recently, largely from advances in mass spectrometry. Here, we show phosphoevents currently believed to be key regulators of mitosis. For an animated version of this SnapShot, please see http://www.cell.com/cell/enhanced/odonoghue2. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Synthesis, single crystal and antitumor activities of benzimidazole-quinazoline hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alka; Luxami, Vijay; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2013-06-01

    A series of novel regioisomeric hybrids of quinazoline/benzimidazole viz. (3-allyl-2-methyl-3H-benzimidazol-5-yl)-(2-substituted-quinazolin-4-yl)-amine and (1-allyl-2-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-5-yl)-(2-substituted-quinazolin-4-yl)-amine of biological interest were synthesized. All the synthesized compounds were well characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR as well as mass spectroscopy. The newly synthesized compounds were screened for in vitro antitumor activities against 60 tumor cell lines panel assay. A significant inhibition for cancer cells were observed with compound 9 and also more active against known drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in some tumor cell lines. Compound 9 displayed appreciable anticancer activity against leukemia, colon, melanoma, renal and breast cancer cell lines.

  7. Insights into cardio-oncology:Polypharmacology of quinazoline-based α1-adrenoceptor antagonists

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salvatore; Patanè

    2015-01-01

    New uses of cardiovascular drugs with proven experience are emerging,including for treating cancer.Quinazoline is a compound made up of two fused six member simple aromatic rings,benzene and pyrimidine rings,with several biological effects.Cardiologists first used quinazoline-based α1-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin,doxazosin,and terazosin; currently available data support their use as safe,well tolerated,and effective add-on therapy in uncontrolled hypertension with additional favourable metabolic effects.Recent findings highlight the anticancer effects of quinazoline-based α1-adrenoceptor antagonists,indicating that they may have a significant role in uncontrolled hypertensive cancer patients without signs of ischemia.

  8. Synthesis and in vitro antitumor activity of substituted quinazoline and quinoxaline derivatives: search for anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolvi, Malleshappa N; Patel, Harun M; Bhardwaj, Varun; Chauhan, Ankit

    2011-06-01

    The synthesis of some 2-furano-4(3H)-quinazolinones, diamides (open ring quinazolines), quinoxalines and their biological evaluation as antitumor agents using National Cancer Institute (NCI) disease oriented antitumor screen protocol are investigated. Among the synthesize compounds, seventeen compounds were granted NSC code and screened at National Cancer Institute (NCI), USA for anticancer activity at a single high dose (10(-5) M) in full NCI 60 cell panel. Among the selected compounds, 3-(2-chloro benzylideneamine)-2-(furan-2-yl) quinazoline-4(3h)-one 21 was found to be the most active candidate of the series at five dose level screening against Ovarian OVCAR-4 and Non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H522 with GI50 1.82 & 2.14 μM respectively. Rational approach and QSAR techniques enabled the understanding of the pharmacophoric requirement for quinazoline, diamides and quinoxaline derivatives.

  9. Romancing mitosis and the mitotic apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, William B R

    2014-11-01

    One of the earliest lessons students learn in biology is the process of mitosis and how cells divide to produce daughter cells. Although first described more than a century ago by early investigators such as E. B. Wilson, many aspects of mitosis and cell division remain the subject of considerable research today. My personal investigations and research contributions to the study of mitosis were made possible by recent developments in the field when I began my career, including access to novel mammalian cell culture models and electron and fluorescence microscopy. Building upon those innovations, my laboratory and other contemporary investigators first charted the ultrastructure and molecular organization of mitosis and chromosome movement and the assembly and function of the cytoskeleton. This field of research remains a significant challenge for future investigators in cell biology and medicine.

  10. Understanding mitosis in secondary school in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Teaching experience show that students have trouble understands thematic of the cell and genetics. The purpose of our research was to evaluate students' knowledge of the cell and genetics. Next to evaluation of students’ knowledge we also tested a successfulness of a method of teaching the mitosis by letting students to sort the pictures with 15 different phases of mitosis. 99 first¬-year high school students were included in the research. First the students answered a questionnaire containin...

  11. [Flow cytometric analysis of ICRF-193 influence on cell passage through mitosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatrova, A N; Aksenov, N D; Zenin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Studying the effect of topoisomerase II (topo II) inhibitors on cell passage through mitosis seems to be important for understanding the role of this enzyme during chromosome condensation and segregation. A flow cytometric assay (Zenin et al., 2001) allowed to determine the mitotic index, and to discriminate between not only cells in G2 and M phases (including metaphase and anaphase cells), but also cells in pseudo-G1 with 4c DNA content. It is shown that topo II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-193 blocks G2-M transition in a lymphoblastoid cell line GM-130. Addition of caffeine to cells abrogated a block of their entering mitosis but not the inhibitor action. Cells entered mitosis, which was proven by the presence of chromosomes in the examined specimen, and, bypassing anaphase, appeared in pseudo-G1 with 4c DNA content. We have found that in the presence of ICRF-193 cells, GM-130 and Hep-2 lines, previously blocked by nocodazole when in mitosis and then washed, pass through metaphase, enter anaphase and leave it to pass to pseudo-G1 with the 4c DNA content. Thus, by inhibiting topo II activity ICRF-193 causes abnormal mitotic transition.

  12. Fresh WNT into the regulation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ailine; Bastians, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggering β-catenin-dependent gene expression contributes to cell cycle progression, in particular at the G1/S transition. Recently, however, it became clear that the cell cycle can also feed back on Wnt signaling at the G2/M transition. This is illustrated by the fact that mitosis-specific cyclin-dependent kinases can phosphorylate the Wnt co-receptor LRP6 to prime the pathway for incoming Wnt signals when cells enter mitosis. In addition, there is accumulating evidence that various Wnt pathway components might exert additional, Wnt-independent functions that are important for proper regulation of mitosis. The importance of Wnt pathways during mitosis was most recently enforced by the discovery of Wnt signaling contributing to the stabilization of proteins other than β-catenin, specifically at G2/M and during mitosis. This Wnt-mediated stabilization of proteins, now referred to as Wnt/STOP, might on one hand contribute to maintaining a critical cell size required for cell division and, on the other hand, for the faithful execution of mitosis itself. In fact, most recently we have shown that Wnt/STOP is required for ensuring proper microtubule dynamics within mitotic spindles, which is pivotal for accurate chromosome segregation and for the maintenance of euploidy.

  13. Phosphorylation of p37 is important for Golgi disassembly at mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Yayoi [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan); Tamura, Kaori [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Totsukawa, Go [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan); Kondo, Hisao, E-mail: hk228@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} p37 is phosphorylated on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 by Cdc2 at mitosis. {yields} Phosphorylated p37 does not bind to Golgi membranes. {yields} p37 phosphorylation inhibits p97/p37-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. -- Abstract: In mammals, the Golgi apparatus is disassembled at early mitosis and reassembled at the end of mitosis. For Golgi disassembly, membrane fusion needs to be blocked. Golgi biogenesis requires two distinct p97ATPase-mediated membrane fusion, the p97/p47 and p97/p37 pathways. We previously reported that p47 phosphorylation on Serine-140 by Cdc2 results in mitotic inhibition of the p97/p47 pathway . In this study, we demonstrate that p37 is phosphorylated on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 by Cdc2 at mitosis, and this phosphorylated p37 does not bind to Golgi membranes. Using an in vitro Golgi reassembly assay, we show that mutated p37(S56D, T59D), which mimics mitotic phosphorylation, does not cause any cisternal regrowth, indicating that p37 phosphorylation inhibits the p97/p37 pathway. Our results demonstrate that p37 phosphorylation on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 is important for Golgi disassembly at mitosis.

  14. The tumor suppressor CDKN3 controls mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalepa, Grzegorz; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Enzor, Rikki; Dey, Dilip; He, Ying; Gehlhausen, Jeff R; Lehmann, Amalia S; Park, Su-Jung; Yang, Yanzhu; Yang, Xianlin; Chen, Shi; Guan, Xiaowei; Chen, Yanwen; Renbarger, Jamie; Yang, Feng-Chun; Parada, Luis F; Clapp, Wade

    2013-06-24

    Mitosis is controlled by a network of kinases and phosphatases. We screened a library of small interfering RNAs against a genome-wide set of phosphatases to comprehensively evaluate the role of human phosphatases in mitosis. We found four candidate spindle checkpoint phosphatases, including the tumor suppressor CDKN3. We show that CDKN3 is essential for normal mitosis and G1/S transition. We demonstrate that subcellular localization of CDKN3 changes throughout the cell cycle. We show that CDKN3 dephosphorylates threonine-161 of CDC2 during mitotic exit and we visualize CDC2(pThr-161) at kinetochores and centrosomes in early mitosis. We performed a phosphokinome-wide mass spectrometry screen to find effectors of the CDKN3-CDC2 signaling axis. We found that one of the identified downstream phosphotargets, CKβ phosphorylated at serine 209, localizes to mitotic centrosomes and controls the spindle checkpoint. Finally, we show that CDKN3 protein is down-regulated in brain tumors. Our findings indicate that CDKN3 controls mitosis through the CDC2 signaling axis. These results have implications for targeted anticancer therapeutics.

  15. The Ran pathway in Drosophila melanogaster mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James G Wakefield

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance and regulation of the microtubule (MT-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs - a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that, far from being superfluous, it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation.

  16. Synthesis and antihyperlipidemic activity of some novel 4-substituted-2-substitutedmethyltriazino[6,1-b]quinazolin-10-ones and 2,4-disubstituted-6,7-dimethoxy quinazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K. Kathiravan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and antihyperlipidemic activity of some novel 4-substituted-2-substitutedmethyltriazino[6,1-b]quinazolin-10-ones and 2,4-disubstituted-6,7-dimethoxy quinazoline derivatives are described. Among the series 4-chloro-2-acetoxymethyl-3H,11H-[1,2,4]triazino[6,1-b] quinazoline-4,10-dione 5d has shown better activity in case of % reduction in serum cholesterol level while 4-chloro-10-oxo-10H-[1,2,4]triazino[6,1-b]quinazolin-2-yl benzoate 5f in reducing % serum triglyceride level than that of the standard. 4-Hydroxyquinazolin-2-yl nicotinate 6g has significantly increased serum HDL level. Among the series compound 6g has shown promising results over all in lipid profile. These molecules indeed have the potential to be developed as an antihyperlipaemic molecule.

  17. Cytotoxicity and anti-HIV evaluations of some new synthesized quinazoline and thioxopyrimidine derivatives using 4-(thiophen-2-yl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydrobenzo[h]quinazoline-2(1H)-thione as synthon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yahia A Mohamed; Abd El-Galil E Amr; Salwa F Mohamed; Mohamed M Abdalla; Mohamed A Al-Omare; Samira H Shfik

    2012-05-01

    A series of dihydrobenzo[h]quinazoline derivatives 5-19 were synthesized using arylmethylene 2, thiopyrimidine 3 and 2-(4-(thiophen-2-yl)-5,6-dihydrobenzo[h]quinazolin-2-ylthio) acetic acid (4) as a starting materials. The biological screening showed that many of these compounds have good anticancer and antiviral activities. The structure assignments of the new compounds based on chemical and spectroscopic evidence. The detailed synthesis, spectroscopic data, and pharmacological properties are reported.

  18. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Naim, Valeria

    2017-04-03

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease.

  19. Tetraploid induction by inhibiting mitosis I in scallop Chlamys farreri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ping; Guo, Xi-Ming; Chen, Zai-Zhong; Wang, Yong-Ping

    1999-12-01

    Tetraploid induction was carried out by inhibiting mitosis I in fertilized eggs of Chlamys farreri. Mitosis I was blocked with cold shock (5 7°C), Cytochalasin B (0.75 mg/L) and 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP) (60 75 mg/L) when 60% fertilized eggs released polar body II at 20°C. At 4-cells embryo stage, the ploidy was determined by counting chromosome number. In control groups, most embryos were diploids (72.22%) and aneuploids (24.78%). In Cytochalasin B, cold shock and 6-DMAP treated groups, tetraploids were respectively 10.51%, 4.08%, and 13.34%; aneuploids were 43.10%, 35.93% and 29.16%, and triploids were 7.84%, 8.52% and 18.33%. At D-larva stage, ploidy was determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The ploidy analysis of day 2 larvae showed diploids in control group and also in three treated groups. Juvenile scallops (0.2 0.3cm) which were harvested in two control groups and two CB treated groups were all diploids through checking ploidy individually by FCM.

  20. Dynamics of the mitochondrial network during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanfer, Gil; Kornmann, Benoît

    2016-04-15

    During mitosis, cells undergo massive deformation and reorganization, impacting on all cellular structures. Mitochondria, in particular, are highly dynamic organelles, which constantly undergo events of fission, fusion and cytoskeleton-based transport. This plasticity ensures the proper distribution of the metabolism, and the proper inheritance of functional organelles. During cell cycle, mitochondria undergo dramatic changes in distribution. In this review, we focus on the dynamic events that target mitochondria during mitosis. We describe how the cell-cycle-dependent microtubule-associated protein centromeric protein F (Cenp-F) is recruited to mitochondria by the mitochondrial Rho GTPase (Miro) to promote mitochondrial transport and re-distribution following cell division.

  1. Action of mercury in plant mitosis II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente, R.

    1972-01-01

    The cytological abnormalities induced by mercurochrome on mitosis and meiosis of Allium cepa are studied and the capacity of the chemical agent to induce c-mitosis is shown. Inhibition of the cytokinetic process as well as alterations of the nucleoli and pollen-mother cells (from pachytene to division II) have also been observed. These cytological effects may be ascribed to the affinity of the mercurial compounds for the thyolic groups existing in the nucleoproteins and protoplasmic proteins, with the subsequent inhibitory effect on the enzymatic mechanisms.

  2. Chlorpromazine inhibits mitosis of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, G B; Paul, D C; Williams, D C

    1983-09-01

    Chlorpromazine (CPZ) at minimally effective concentrations accumulates mammalian cells in mitosis without lethal effects on the cells. Star-metaphase morphology similar to effects seen with classical antimitotic compounds probably results from the preferential action of CPZ on a specific class of microtubules--the pole-to-pole microtubules of the mitotic spindle. At CPZ concentrations of 8 X 10(-6) M, flow cytometry indicates no effect of CPZ on the progress of cells through phases of the cell cycle other than mitosis (M). These results suggest a possible mechanism for toxic side effects of CPZ in man such as granulocytopenia and light sensitization.

  3. On the regulation of protein phosphatase 2A and its role in controlling entry into and exit from mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Tim

    2013-05-01

    The process of mitosis involves a comprehensive reorganization of the cell: chromosomes condense, the nuclear envelope breaks down, the mitotic spindle is assembled, cells round up and release their ties to the substrate and so on and so forth. This reorganization is triggered by the activation of the protein kinase, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1). The end of mitosis is marked by the proteolysis of the cyclin subunit of CDK1, which terminates kinase activity. At this point, the phosphate moieties that altered the properties of hundreds of proteins to bring about the cellular reorganization are removed by protein phosphatases. At least one protein phosphatase, PP2A-B55, is completely shut off in mitosis. Depletion of this particular form of PP2A accelerates entry into mitosis, and blocks exit from mitosis. Control of this phosphatase is achieved by an inhibitor protein (α-endosulfine or ARPP-19) that becomes inhibitory when phosphorylated by a protein kinase called Greatwall, which is itself a substrate of CDK1. Failure to inhibit PP2A-B55 causes arrest of the cell cycle in G2 phase. I will discuss the role of this control mechanism in the control of mitosis.

  4. Inhibitory action of oestrogen on calcium-induced mitosis in rat bone marrow and thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G R; Gurson, M L; Riddell, A J; Perris, A D

    1975-04-01

    In the male rat injections of CaCl-2 and MgCl-2 stimulated mitosis in bone marrow and thymus tissue. The magnesium salt was also mitogenic in the normal female, but calcium only exerted its mitogenic effect after ovariectomy. Oestradiol, but not progesterone replacement therpy abolished calcium-induced mitosis in the ovariectomized rat. The inability of calcium to stimulate cell division was also apparent in the thyroparathyroidectomized female rat, suggesting the oestradiol blockage did not operate via some indirect action on the calcium homeostatic hormones calcitonin or parathyroid hormone. When thymic lymphocytes derived from male or female rats were isolated and maintained in suspension, increased calcium or magnesium concentrations in the culture medium stimulated the entry of cells into mitosis. Addition of oestradiol to the culture medium abolished the mitogenic effect of increased calcium levels, but had no effect on magnesium-induced proliferation. These experiments suggested that oestradiol might act at the cell surface to prevent the influx of calcium but not magnesium ions into the interior of the cell and thus to block the sequence of biochemical events which led to the initiation of DNA synthesis and culminate in mitosis.

  5. Preparation of six quinazoline schiff bases and their inhibitory effect on HHCC and Bcap-37 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈惠; 孙晓莉; 刘志红; 张生勇; 药立波

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To prepare six quinazoline schiff bases by six steps of chemistry organic synthesis and test their inhibitory effect on hepatomacellular carcinoma cells HHCC and mammary cancer cell Bcap-37, furthmore,to compare their antitumor activities on these two kinds of cells. Methods: 2-Amino-5-nitro-benzylcarbonitrile was the initial material, and it was under the reaction of hydrolysis, ring-closing, halogenation, addition, reduction and substitution in turn to get the six quinazoline schiff bases, MTT method was adopted to compare their anticancer activities against the two cancer cells. Result and Conclusion: Six 6-imine-4-halo substituted anilinoquinozolines were prepared. The anticancer activities against both HHCC and Bcap-37were found, furthermore, they have more potency that on HHCC than on Bcap-37. In the six compounds, the schiff base Ⅵ is the most potent compound.

  6. The Reactivity of 2-Ethoxy-4-Chloroquinazoline and Its Use in Synthesis of Novel Quinazoline Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    El-Hashash, M. A.; Darwish, K. M.; Rizk, S. A.; EL-BASSIOUNY, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of 2-ethoxy-4-chloroquinazoline 2 towards various nitrogen nucleophiles, namely: thiosemicarbazide, sodium azide, glucosamine, ethanol, and hydrazine hydrate has been discussed. Also, the behavior of 4-(2-ethoxyquinazolin-4-yl)thiosemicarbazide towards one-carbon, for example, ethyl chloroformate, and two-carbon donors, for example, ethyl chloroacetate and diethyl oxalate has been investigated. On the other hand, new 5-ethoxy-2-substituted[1,2,4]-triazolo-[1,5-c]quinazoline deriv...

  7. Supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline: Reaction kinetics and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan; Xu, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a first quantitative kinetic model for supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of quinazoline that describes the formation and interconversion of intermediates and final products at 673-873 K. The set of 11 reaction pathways for phenol, pyrimidine, naphthalene, NH3, etc, involved in the simplified reaction network proved sufficient for fitting the experimental results satisfactorily. We validated the model prediction ability on CO2 yields at initial quinazoline loading not used in the parameter estimation. Reaction rate analysis and sensitivity analysis indicate that nearly all reactions reach their thermodynamic equilibrium within 300 s. The pyrimidine yielding from quinazoline is the dominant ring-opening pathway and provides a significant contribution to CO2 formation. Low sensitivity of NH3 decomposition rate to concentration confirms its refractory nature in SCWO. Nitrogen content in liquid products decreases whereas that in gaseous phase increases as reaction time prolonged. The nitrogen predicted by the model in gaseous phase combined with the experimental nitrogen in liquid products gives an accurate nitrogen balance of conversion process.

  8. Mitosis-associated repression in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Emilia; Lim, Bomyi; Guessous, Ghita; Falahati, Hanieh; Levine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Transcriptional repression is a pervasive feature of animal development. Here, we employ live-imaging methods to visualize the Snail repressor, which establishes the boundary between the presumptive mesoderm and neurogenic ectoderm of early Drosophila embryos. Snail target enhancers were attached to an MS2 reporter gene, permitting detection of nascent transcripts in living embryos. The transgenes exhibit initially broad patterns of transcription but are refined by repression in the mesoderm following mitosis. These observations reveal a correlation between mitotic silencing and Snail repression. We propose that mitosis and other inherent discontinuities in transcription boost the activities of sequence-specific repressors, such as Snail. © 2016 Esposito et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Action of mercury in plant mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorente, R.

    1969-01-01

    The p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonate (PMPS) acts on mitosis of Allium cepa as a substance typically c-mitotic. Metaphases with the classic c-pair as well as polyploid cells, multipolar anaphases, polynucleate and aneuploid cells were observed. These effects were observed from the first 24 hr post-treatment and after 12 and 15 days of recuperation in some cases. These effects by PMPS are immediate and persist in root meristematic cells of Allium cepa.

  10. Mitosis and growth in biological tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Mombach, Jose Carlos Merino; Almeida, Rita Maria Cunha de; Iglesias, Jose Roberto

    1993-01-01

    We present a simulation of the growth of a two-dimensional biological cellular system in which the cells experience mitosis whenever the (area)/(perimeter) ratio reaches a critical value. The model also includes the effect of interfacial energy and temperature. A stationary state with a constant average area is attained. We calculate the distribution of cells as a function of area, perimeter, and number of sides and also the two-cell correlation function. The results depend on temperature and...

  11. Facile access to potent antiviral quinazoline heterocycles with fluorescence properties via merging metal-free domino reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Felix E.; Guryev, Anton A.; Fröhlich, Tony; Hampel, Frank; Kahnt, Axel; Hutterer, Corina; Steingruber, Mirjam; Bahsi, Hanife; von Bojničić-Kninski, Clemens; Mattes, Daniela S.; Foertsch, Tobias C.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Marschall, Manfred; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B.

    2017-05-01

    Most of the known approved drugs comprise functionalized heterocyclic compounds as subunits. Among them, non-fluorescent quinazolines with four different substitution patterns are found in a variety of clinically used pharmaceuticals, while 4,5,7,8-substituted quinazolines and those displaying their own specific fluorescence, favourable for cellular uptake visualization, have not been described so far. Here we report the development of a one-pot synthetic strategy to access these 4,5,7,8-substituted quinazolines, which are fluorescent and feature strong antiviral properties (EC50 down to 0.6+/-0.1 μM) against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Merging multistep domino processes in one-pot under fully metal-free conditions leads to sustainable, maximum efficient and high-yielding organic synthesis. Furthermore, generation of artesunic acid-quinazoline hybrids and their application against HCMV (EC50 down to 0.1+/-0.0 μM) is demonstrated. Fluorescence of new antiviral hybrids and quinazolines has potential applications in molecular imaging in drug development and mechanistic studies, avoiding requirement of linkage to external fluorescent markers.

  12. Phosphorylation of the centrosomal protein, Cep169, by Cdk1 promotes its dissociation from centrosomes in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yusuke; Inoue, Yoko; Taniyama, Yuki; Tanaka, Sayori; Terada, Yasuhiko

    2015-12-25

    Cep169 is a centrosomal protein conserved among vertebrates. In our previous reports, we showed that mammalian Cep169 interacts and collaborates with CDK5RAP2 to regulate microtubule (MT) dynamics and stabilization. Although Cep169 is required for MT regulation, its precise cellular function remains largely elusive. Here we show that Cep169 associates with centrosomes during interphase, but dissociates from these structures from the onset of mitosis, although CDK5RAP2 (Cep215) is continuously located at the centrosomes throughout cell cycle. Interestingly, treatment with purvalanol A, a Cdk1 inhibitor, nearly completely blocked the dissociation of Cep169 from centrosomes during mitosis. In addition, mass spectrometry analyses identified 7 phosphorylated residues of Cep169 corresponding to consensus phosphorylation sequence for Cdk1. These data suggest that the dissociation of Cep169 from centrosomes is controlled by Cdk1/Cyclin B during mitosis, and that Cep169 might regulate MT dynamics of mitotic spindle.

  13. Meiosis: an overview of key differences from mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-20

    Meiosis is the specialized cell division that generates gametes. In contrast to mitosis, molecular mechanisms and regulation of meiosis are much less understood. Meiosis shares mechanisms and regulation with mitosis in many aspects, but also has critical differences from mitosis. This review highlights these differences between meiosis and mitosis. Recent studies using various model systems revealed differences in a surprisingly wide range of aspects, including cell-cycle regulation, recombination, postrecombination events, spindle assembly, chromosome-spindle interaction, and chromosome segregation. Although a great degree of diversity can be found among organisms, meiosis-specific processes, and regulation are generally conserved. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. TopBP1-mediated DNA processing during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Irene; Christiansen, Signe Korbo; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Lisby, Michael; Oestergaard, Vibe H

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is crucial to avoid cancer and other genetic diseases. Thus faced with DNA damage, cells mount a DNA damage response to avoid genome instability. The DNA damage response is partially inhibited during mitosis presumably to avoid erroneous processing of the segregating chromosomes. Yet our recent study shows that TopBP1-mediated DNA processing during mitosis is highly important to reduce transmission of DNA damage to daughter cells. (1) Here we provide an overview of the DNA damage response and DNA repair during mitosis. One role of TopBP1 during mitosis is to stimulate unscheduled DNA synthesis at underreplicated regions. We speculated that such genomic regions are likely to hold stalled replication forks or post-replicative gaps, which become the substrate for DNA synthesis upon entry into mitosis. Thus, we addressed whether the translesion pathways for fork restart or post-replicative gap filling are required for unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis. Using genetics in the avian DT40 cell line, we provide evidence that unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis does not require the translesion synthesis scaffold factor Rev1 or PCNA ubiquitylation at K164, which serve to recruit translesion polymerases to stalled forks. In line with this finding, translesion polymerase η foci do not colocalize with TopBP1 or FANCD2 in mitosis. Taken together, we conclude that TopBP1 promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis in mitosis independently of the examined translesion polymerases.

  15. Live imaging of mitosis in the developing mouse embryonic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Silver, Debra L

    2014-06-04

    Although of short duration, mitosis is a complex and dynamic multi-step process fundamental for development of organs including the brain. In the developing cerebral cortex, abnormal mitosis of neural progenitors can cause defects in brain size and function. Hence, there is a critical need for tools to understand the mechanisms of neural progenitor mitosis. Cortical development in rodents is an outstanding model for studying this process. Neural progenitor mitosis is commonly examined in fixed brain sections. This protocol will describe in detail an approach for live imaging of mitosis in ex vivo embryonic brain slices. We will describe the critical steps for this procedure, which include: brain extraction, brain embedding, vibratome sectioning of brain slices, staining and culturing of slices, and time-lapse imaging. We will then demonstrate and describe in detail how to perform post-acquisition analysis of mitosis. We include representative results from this assay using the vital dye Syto11, transgenic mice (histone H2B-EGFP and centrin-EGFP), and in utero electroporation (mCherry-α-tubulin). We will discuss how this procedure can be best optimized and how it can be modified for study of genetic regulation of mitosis. Live imaging of mitosis in brain slices is a flexible approach to assess the impact of age, anatomy, and genetic perturbation in a controlled environment, and to generate a large amount of data with high temporal and spatial resolution. Hence this protocol will complement existing tools for analysis of neural progenitor mitosis.

  16. Novel functions of plant cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1, can act non-cell-autonomously and inhibit entry into mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinl, Christina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Kuijt, Suzanne J H

    2005-01-01

    numbers of cells consistent with a function of CKIs in blocking the G1-S cell cycle transition. Here, we demonstrate that at least one inhibitor from Arabidopsis, ICK1/KRP1, can also block entry into mitosis but allows S-phase progression causing endoreplication. Our data suggest that plant CKIs act...... independently from ICK1/KRP1-induced endoreplication. Strikingly, we found that endoreplicated cells were able to reenter mitosis, emphasizing the high degree of flexibility of plant cells during development. Moreover, we show that in contrast with animal CDK inhibitors, ICK1/KRP1 can move between cells...

  17. Synthesis with Nitriles: Synthesis of Some New Mercaptopyridazine, Mercaptopyridazino[1,6-a]quinazoline and Thiophene Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam A. Al-Sheikh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available 2-(1-(4-Bromophenyl-2-thiocyanatoethylidenemalononitrile (3 undergoes azo coupling with diazotized aromatic amines to afford arylhydrazone derivatives, which are readily cyclized to afford the corresponding 3(2H-pyridazinimine derivatives upon reflux in aqueous NaOH. Under similar condition an o-cyanoarylhydrazone derivative was cyclized into 6H-pyridazino[1,6-a]quinazolin-6-imine, which in turn was easily transformed into 6H-pyridazino[1,6-a]quinazolin-6-one on reflux in ethanolic/HCl. Compound 3 afforded substituted 5-acetylthiophene derivatives upon reflux in AcOH/HCl mixtures.

  18. Nuclear Reprogramming and Mitosis--how does mitosis enhance changes in gene expression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley-Stott, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming changes the identity of cells by changing gene expression programmes. Two recent pieces of work have highlighted the role that mitosis plays in enhancing the success of nuclear reprogramming. This Point of View article examines this work in the context of nuclear reprogramming.

  19. Mitosis and growth in biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombach, J. C. M.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.; Iglesias, J. R.

    1993-07-01

    We present a simulation of the growth of a two-dimensional biological cellular system in which the cells experience mitosis whenever the area-to-perimeter ratio reaches a critical value. The model also includes the effect of interfacial energy and temperature. A stationary state with a constant average area is attained. We calculate the distribution of cells as a function of area, perimeter, and number of sides and also the two-cell correlation function. The results depend on temperature and are in agreement with experimental data, simulations, and theoretical models.

  20. Hg(2+) mediated quinazoline ensemble for highly selective recognition of Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2014-04-05

    A fluorimetric sensor for Hg(2+) ion and Cysteine based on quinazoline platform was designed and synthesized by one step reaction and characterized by using common spectroscopic methods. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory calculations shows that probe behaves as "ON-OFF" fluorescent quenching sensor via electron transfer/heavy atom effect. Receptor was found to exhibit selective fluorescence quenching behavior over the other competitive metal ions, and also the receptor-Hg(2+) ensemble act as an efficient "OFF-ON" sensor for Cysteine. Moreover this sensor has also been successfully applied to detection of Hg(2+) in natural water samples with good recovery.

  1. Synthesis, anti-inflammatory evaluation and docking studies of some new fluorinated fused quinazolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, C; Lamba, P; Kishore, D Pran; Narayana, B Lakshmi; Rao, K Venkat; Rajwinder, K; Rao, A Raghuram; Shireesha, B; Narsaiah, B

    2010-11-01

    A series of novel 8/10-trifluoromethyl-substituted-imidazo[1,2-c] quinazolines have been synthesized and evaluated in vivo (rat paw edema) for their anti-inflammatory activity and in silico (docking studies) to recognize the hypothetical binding motif of the title compounds with the cyclooxygenase isoenzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) employing GOLD (CCDC, 4.0.1 version) software. The compounds, 9b and 10b, were found to have good anti-inflammatory activity [around 80% of the standard: indomethacin]. The binding mode of the title compounds has been proposed based on the docking studies.

  2. Using a Case-Study Article to Effectively Introduce Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2007-01-01

    Community college students in a nonmajors biology class are introduced to mitosis by reading a case-study article that allows them to gauge how many times various parts of their bodies have been regenerated. The case-study article allows students to develop a conceptual framework of the cell cycle prior to a lecture on mitosis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  3. Promoters active in interphase are bookmarked during mitosis by ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mansi; Zhang, Jie; Heine, George F; Ozer, Gulcin; Liu, Hui-wen; Huang, Kun; Parvin, Jeffrey D

    2012-11-01

    We analyzed modification of chromatin by ubiquitination in human cells and whether this mark changes through the cell cycle. HeLa cells were synchronized at different stages and regions of the genome with ubiquitinated chromatin were identified by affinity purification coupled with next-generation sequencing. During interphase, ubiquitin marked the chromatin on the transcribed regions of ∼70% of highly active genes and deposition of this mark was sensitive to transcriptional inhibition. Promoters of nearly half of the active genes were highly ubiquitinated specifically during mitosis. The ubiquitination at the coding regions in interphase but not at promoters during mitosis was enriched for ubH2B and dependent on the presence of RNF20. Ubiquitin labeling of both promoters during mitosis and transcribed regions during interphase, correlated with active histone marks H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 but not a repressive histone modification, H3K27me3. The high level of ubiquitination at the promoter chromatin during mitosis was transient and was removed within 2 h after the cells exited mitosis and entered the next cell cycle. These results reveal that the ubiquitination of promoter chromatin during mitosis is a bookmark identifying active genes during chromosomal condensation in mitosis, and we suggest that this process facilitates transcriptional reactivation post-mitosis.

  4. Using a Case-Study Article to Effectively Introduce Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoewyk, Doug

    2007-01-01

    Community college students in a nonmajors biology class are introduced to mitosis by reading a case-study article that allows them to gauge how many times various parts of their bodies have been regenerated. The case-study article allows students to develop a conceptual framework of the cell cycle prior to a lecture on mitosis. (Contains 1 figure.)

  5. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of 3-(Substituted)-2-(4-oxo-2-phenylquinazolin-3(4H)-ylamino)quinazolin-4(3H)-one

    OpenAIRE

    Ramgopal Appani; Baburao Bhukya; Kiran Gangarapu

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel 3-(substituted)-2-(substituted quinazolinylamino)quinazolin-4(3H)-ones were synthesized by the reaction of 3-(substituted)-2-hydrazino-quinazoline-4(3H)-ones with 2-phenyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one. The starting materials 3-(substituted)-2-hydrazino-quinazolin-4(3H)-ones were synthesized from various primary amines by a multistep synthesis. All the title compounds were tested for their antibacterial activity using ciprofloxacin as reference standard. Compounds 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-...

  6. Dynamic Alterations to α-Actinin Accompanying Sarcomere Disassembly and Reassembly during Cardiomyocyte Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaohu; Hughes, Bryan G; Ali, Mohammad A M; Cho, Woo Jung; Lopez, Waleska; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Although mammals are thought to lose their capacity to regenerate heart muscle shortly after birth, embryonic and neonatal cardiomyocytes in mammals are hyperplastic. During proliferation these cells need to selectively disassemble their myofibrils for successful cytokinesis. The mechanism of sarcomere disassembly is, however, not understood. To study this, we performed a series of immunofluorescence studies of multiple sarcomeric proteins in proliferating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and correlated these observations with biochemical changes at different cell cycle stages. During myocyte mitosis, α-actinin and titin were disassembled as early as prometaphase. α-actinin (representing the sarcomeric Z-disk) disassembly precedes that of titin (M-line), suggesting that titin disassembly occurs secondary to the collapse of the Z-disk. Sarcomere disassembly was concurrent with the dissolution of the nuclear envelope. Inhibitors of several intracellular proteases could not block the disassembly of α-actinin or titin. There was a dramatic increase in both cytosolic (soluble) and sarcomeric α-actinin during mitosis, and cytosolic α-actinin exhibited decreased phosphorylation compared to sarcomeric α-actinin. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) induced the quick reassembly of the sarcomere. Sarcomere dis- and re-assembly in cardiomyocyte mitosis is CDK1-dependent and features dynamic differential post-translational modifications of sarcomeric and cytosolic α-actinin.

  7. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-05-11

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position.

  8. An unexpected copper(II)-catalyzed three-component reaction of quinazoline 3-oxide, alkylidenecyclopropane, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Danqing; Wu, Jie

    2014-08-21

    An unexpected copper(II)-catalyzed three-component reaction of quinazoline-3-oxide, alkylidenecyclopropane and water under mild conditions is reported. This transformation including [3+2] cycloaddition and intramolecular rearrangement leads to N-(2-(5-oxa-6-azaspiro[2.4]hept-6-en-7-yl)phenyl)formamides in good yields.

  9. Apoptosis induction by doxazosin and other quinazoline alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists: a new mechanism for cancer treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kyprianou; T.B. Vaughan; M.C. Michel

    2009-01-01

    Doxazosin and related, quinazoline-based alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists can induce apoptosis in prostate and various other normal, benign, smooth muscle, endothelial and malignant cells. Such apoptosis-inducing effects occur independently of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonism and typically require

  10. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of 1-(3-benzyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazolin-2-yl-4-(substitutedthiosemicarbazide derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagarsamy Veerachamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of 1-(3-benzyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazolin-2-yl-4-(substituted thiosemicarbazides (AS1-AS10 were obtained by the reaction of 2-hydrazino- 3-benzyl quinazolin-4(3H-one (6 with different dithiocarbamic acid methyl ester derivatives. The key intermediate 3-benzyl-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1Hquinazolin-4-one (4 was obtained by reacting benzyl amine (1 with carbon disulphide and sodium hydroxide in dimethyl sulphoxide to give sodium dithiocarbamate, which was methylated with dimethyl sulfate to yield the dithiocarbamic acid methyl ester (2 and condensed with methyl anthranilate (3 in ethanol yielded the desired compound (4 via the thiourea intermediate. The SH group of compound (4 was methylated for the favorable nucleophilic displacement reaction with hydrazine hydrate, which afford 2-hydrazino-3- benzyl-3H-quinazolin-4-one (6. The IR, 1H, and 13C NMR spectrum of these compounds showed the presence of peaks due to thiosemicarbazides, carbonyl (C=O, NH and aryl groups. The quinazolin-4-one moiety molecular ion peaks (m/z 144 were observed all the mass spectrum of compounds (AS1-AS10. Elemental (C, H, N analysis satisfactorily confirmed purity of the synthesized compounds and elemental composition. All synthesized compounds were also screened for their antimicrobial activity against selective gram positive and gram negative by agar dilution method. In the present study compounds AS8 and AS9 were emerged as the most active compounds of the series.

  11. Copper-Catalyzed Multicomponent Domino Reaction of 2-Bromoaldehydes, Benzylamines, and Sodium Azide for the Assembly of Quinazoline Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Jia, Feng-Cheng; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Zheng, Si-Jie; Li, Han; Wu, An-Xin

    2016-04-01

    An efficient three-component domino reaction of 2-bromoaldehydes, benzylamines, and sodium azide has been developed for the synthesis of quinazoline derivatives. This domino process involves copper-catalyzed SNAr, oxidation/cyclization, and denitrogenation sequences. The mild catalytic system enabled the effective construction of three C-N bonds in one operation.

  12. p21 is Responsible for Ionizing Radiation-induced Bypass of Mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu Rui; LIU Yong Ai; SUN Fang; LI He; LEI Su Wen; WANG Ju Fang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the role of p21 in ionizing radiation-induced changes in protein levels during the G2/M transition and long-term G2 arrest. Methods Protein expression levels were assessed by western blot in the human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells after treatment with ionizing radiation. Depletion of p21 was carried out by employing the siRNA technique. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry combined with histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser28, an M-phase marker. Senescence was assessed by senescence-associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining combined with Ki67 staining, a cell proliferation marker. Results Accompanying increased p21, the protein levels of G2/M transition genes declined significantly in 92-1 cells irradiated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Furthermore, these irradiated cells were blocked at the G2 phase followed by cellular senescence. Depletion of p21 rescued radiation-induced G2 arrest as demonstrated by the upregulation of G2/M transition kinases, as well as the high expression of histone H3 phosphorylated at Ser28. Knockdown of p21 resulted in entry into mitosis of irradiated 92-1 cells. However, cells with serious DNA damage failed to undergo cytokinesis, leading to the accumulation of multinucleated cells. Conclusion Our results indicated that p21 was responsible for the downregulation of G2/M transition regulatory proteins and the bypass of mitosis induced by irradiation. Downregulation of p21 by siRNA resulted in G2-arrested cells entering into mitosis with serious DNA damage. This is the first report on elucidating the role of p21 in the bypass of mitosis.

  13. p21 is Responsible for Ionizing Radiation-induced Bypass of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu Rui; Liu, Yong Ai; Sun, Fang; Li, He; Lei, Su Wen; Wang, Ju Fang

    2016-07-01

    To explore the role of p21 in ionizing radiation-induced changes in protein levels during the G2/M transition and long-term G2 arrest. Protein expression levels were assessed by western blot in the human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells after treatment with ionizing radiation. Depletion of p21 was carried out by employing the siRNA technique. Cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry combined with histone H3 phosphorylation at Ser28, an M-phase marker. Senescence was assessed by senescence- associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining combined with Ki67 staining, a cell proliferation marker. Accompanying increased p21, the protein levels of G2/M transition genes declined significantly in 92-1 cells irradiated with 5 Gy of X-rays. Furthermore, these irradiated cells were blocked at the G2 phase followed by cellular senescence. Depletion of p21 rescued radiation-induced G2 arrest as demonstrated by the upregulation of G2/M transition kinases, as well as the high expression of histone H3 phosphorylated at Ser28. Knockdown of p21 resulted in entry into mitosis of irradiated 92-1 cells. However, cells with serious DNA damage failed to undergo cytokinesis, leading to the accumulation of multinucleated cells. Our results indicated that p21 was responsible for the downregulation of G2/M transition regulatory proteins and the bypass of mitosis induced by irradiation. Downregulation of p21 by siRNA resulted in G2-arrested cells entering into mitosis with serious DNA damage. This is the first report on elucidating the role of p21 in the bypass of mitosis. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  14. Binding characteristics and interactive region of 2-phenylpyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yonghai; Zhong, Dandan; Luo, Jinhui; Tan, Hongliang; Chen, Shouhui; Li, Ping; Wang, Li; Wang, Tao

    2014-12-01

    The interaction between 2-phenylpyrazolo[1,5-c]quinazoline (PQ) and DNA under physiological conditions was investigated using multi-spectroscopic techniques, atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis. The thermodynamic parameters were estimated and were discussed in detail. The results of fluorescence-quenching experiments indicated that the main interactive force between PQ and DNA was a hydrophobic interaction and that it was a static quenching process. Potassium iodide and single-strand (ss)DNA quenching studies, together with circular dichroism spectra implied groove binding of PQ with DNA. Atomic force microscopy and gel electrophoresis experiments suggested that there were no major conformational changes in DNA upon interaction with PQ. In addition, UV/vis absorption titration of DNA bases confirmed that PQ bound with DNA mainly through a minor groove interaction and preferentially interacted with adenine and thymine. We anticipate that this work will provide useful information for the application of quinazoline derivatives in the fields of medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry.

  15. Synthetic approaches, functionalization and therapeutic potential of quinazoline and quinazolinone skeletons: the advances continue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Imtiaz; Ibrar, Aliya; Ahmed, Waqas; Saeed, Aamer

    2015-01-27

    The presence of N-heterocycles as an essential structural motif in a variety of biologically active substances has stimulated the development of new strategies and technologies for their synthesis. Among the various N-heterocyclic scaffolds, quinazolines and quinazolinones form a privileged class of compounds with their diverse spectrum of therapeutic potential. The easy generation of complex molecular diversity through broadly applicable, cost-effective, practical and sustainable synthetic methods in a straightforward fashion along with the importance of these motifs in medicinal chemistry, received significant attention from researchers engaged in drug design and heterocyclic methodology development. In this perspective, the current review article is an effort to recapitulate recent developments in the eco-friendly and green procedures for the construction of highly challenging and potentially bioactive quinazoline and quinazolinone compounds in order to help medicinal chemists in designing and synthesizing novel and potent compounds for the treatment of different disorders. The key mechanistic insights for the synthesis of these heterocycles along with potential applications and manipulations of the products have also been conferred. This article also aims to highlight the promising future directions for the easy access to these frameworks in addition to the identification of more potent and specific products for numerous biological targets.

  16. 2-Guanidino-quinazolines as a novel class of translation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova Andreyanova, E S; Osterman, I A; Pletnev, P I; Ivanenkov, Y A; Majouga, A G; Bogdanov, A A; Sergiev, P V

    2017-02-01

    A variety of structurally unrelated organic compounds has been reported to have antibacterial activity. Among these, certain small-molecule translation inhibitors have attracted a great deal of attention, due to their relatively high selectivity against prokaryotes, and an appropriate therapeutic index with minor "off target" effects. However, ribosomes are being considered as poorly druggable biological targets, thereby making some routine computational-based approaches to rational drug design and its development rather ineffective. Taking this into account, diversity-oriented biological screening can reasonably be considered as the most advantageous strategy. Thus, using a high-throughput screening (HTS) platform, we applied a unique biological assay for in vitro evaluation of thousands of organic molecules, especially targeted against bacterial ribosomes and translation. As a result, we have identified a series of structurally diverse small-molecule compounds that induce a reporter strain sensitive to translation and DNA biosynthesis inhibitors. In a cell free system, several molecules were found to strongly inhibit protein biosynthesis. Among them, compounds bearing a 2-guanidino-quinazoline core demonstrated the most promising antibacterial activity. With regard to the preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) study, we revealed that relatively small substituents at positions 4, 6 and 8 of the quinazoline ring significantly enhance the target activity whereas modification of the guanidine group leads to decrease or loss of antibacterial potency. This novel class of translation inhibitors can properly be regarded as a promising starting point for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutic or screening tools.

  17. Spectroscopic Investigations and DFT Calculations on 3-(Diacetylamino-2-ethyl-3H-quinazolin-4-one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Sert

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical and experimental vibrational frequencies of 3-(diacetylamino-2-ethyl-3H-quinazolin-4-one (2 were investigated. The experimental Laser-Raman spectrum (4000–100 cm−1 and FT-IR spectrum (4000–400 cm−1 of the newly synthesized compound were recorded in the solid phase. Both the theoretical vibrational frequencies and the optimized geometric parameters such as bond lengths and bond angles have for the first time been calculated using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP and DFT/M06-2X quantum chemical methods with the 6-311++G(d,p basis set using Gaussian 03 software. The vibrational frequencies were assigned with the help of potential energy distribution (PED analysis using VEDA 4 software. The calculated vibrational frequencies and the optimized geometric parameters were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding reported experimental data. Also, the energies of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO, highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, and other related molecular energies for 3-(diacetylamino-2-ethyl-3H-quinazolin-4-one (2 have been investigated using the same computational methods.

  18. Quinazoline derivatives as cathepsins B, H and L inhibitors and cell proliferating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Neera; Jangra, Suman; Kumar, Ajay; Bhattacharyya, Shalmoli

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine Cathepsins well known to be involved in cancer, inflammation and regulation of degenerative processes like apoptosis have become specific targets in drug designing. The potential of quinazolines and their derivatives in medicinal chemistry led us to synthesise a novel series of seven compounds of quinazolines to evaluate their effect on cathepsins and cellular aspects of HepG2 cells. In the present work we report the solvent free microwave assisted synthesis of (E)-8-benzylidene-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2,4-diarylquinazolines as inhibitors of mammalian hepatic cysteine proteases viz. Cathepsins B, H and L. In vitro inhibition of Cathepsins B, H and L is correlated well with in vitro studies when tested using MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay on HepG2 cells, hepatocellular carcinoma cell line. The studies have been extended to evaluate the type of inhibition exhibited by the individual enzyme. Out of the seven compounds 1g i.e. (E)-8-(4-fluorobenzylidene)-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-phenyl-5, 6, 7, 8-tetrahydroquinazoline has been found to be most inhibitory for Cathepsins B, H and L to a maximum extent with the Ki values of 10(-10)M, 10(-10)M and 10(-9)M order respectively. In silico studies of all compounds have also been done at the active sites of Cathepsin B, H and L. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Supercritical water oxidation of Quinazoline: Effects of conversion parameters and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan

    2016-09-01

    The supercritical water oxidation reaction of quinazoline and a set of related reaction products were investigated in batch reactors by varying the temperature (T, 400-600 °C), time (t, 0-400 s), water density (ρ, 70.79-166.28  kg m(-3)) and oxidation coefficient (OC, 0-4.0). The TOC removal efficiency (CRE) increased significantly as the OC increased, whereas this effect was very limited at high OC (>2.0). Lack of oxygen resulted in low CRE and TN removal efficiency (NRE), also cause coke-formation, and giving high yield of NH3 and nitrogenous organic intermediates. Prolonging reaction time did not provide an appreciable improvement on CRE but remarkably increased NRE at temperature higher than 500 °C. Pyrimidines and pyridines as the nitrogenous intermediates were largely found in GC-MS spectrum. Polymerization among benzene, phenyl radical and benzyl radical played important roles in the formation of PAHs, such as naphthalene, biphenyl, phenanthrene. These collective results showed how the yield of intermediate products responded to changes in the process variables, which permitted the development of a potential reaction network for supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline.

  20. Synthesis, antibacterial and antifungal activity of pyrazolyl-quinazolin-4(3H-one derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin B. Patel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of pyrazolyl-quinazolin-4(3H-ones 6a-m have been synthesized from 2-[2-(phenylaminophenyl]acetic acid by using efficient methods. An acid chloride of 2-[2-(phenylaminophenyl]acetic acid on cyclization reaction with 5-iodo anthranilic acid yielded benzoxazinone 2, which on condensation reaction with hydrazine hydrate afforded quinazolin-4(3H-one 3. Acetylation of compound 3 and then condensation with aromatic aldehydes led to the formation of chalcones 5a-m which on subjected to reaction with phenyl hydrazine yielded the disired compounds 6a-m. All the synthesized componds have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR and NMR spectra data. The title compounds have been screened against bacterial as well as fungal microorganisms. The potency of these compounds was calculated and compared with standard drugs i.e. Penicillin-G and Fluconazole. Some of the compounds showed very good antimicrobial activity.

  1. Design, synthesis and in vitro antiproliferative activity of novel isatin-quinazoline hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Mohamed; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abou-Seri, Sahar M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Aly, Mohamed H; Tolba, Mai F

    2015-02-01

    Using a molecular hybridization approach, a new series of isatin-quinazoline hybrids 15a-o was designed and synthesized via two different synthetic routes. The target compounds 15a-o were prepared by the reaction of quinazoline hydrazines 12a-e with indoline-2,3-diones 13a-c or by treating 4-chloroquinazoline derivatives 11a-e with isatin hydrazones 14a-c. The in vitro anticancer activity of the newly synthesized hybrids was evaluated against the liver HepG2, breast MCF-7 and colon HT-29 cancer cell lines. A distinctive selective growth inhibitory effect was observed towards the HepG2 cancer cell line. Compounds 15b, 15g and 15l displayed the highest potency, with IC50 values ranging from 1.0 ± 0.2 to 2.4 ± 0.4 μM, and they were able to induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells, as evidenced by enhanced expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, in addition to increased caspase-3 levels.

  2. On the move: organelle dynamics during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongsma, Marlieke L M; Berlin, Ilana; Neefjes, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    A cell constitutes the minimal self-replicating unit of all organisms, programmed to propagate its genome as it proceeds through mitotic cell division. The molecular processes entrusted with ensuring high fidelity of DNA replication and subsequent segregation of chromosomes between daughter cells have therefore been studied extensively. However, to process the information encoded in its genome a cell must also pass on its non-genomic identity to future generations. To achieve productive sharing of intracellular organelles, cells have evolved complex mechanisms of organelle inheritance. Many membranous compartments undergo vast spatiotemporal rearrangements throughout mitosis. These controlled organizational changes are crucial to enabling completion of the division cycle and ensuring successful progeny. Herein we review current understanding of intracellular organelle segregation during mitotic division in mammalian cells, with a focus on compartment organization and integrity throughout the inheritance process.

  3. Mitosis can drive cell cannibalism through entosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgan, Joanne; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Hamann, Jens C; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Collinson, Lucy; Hall, Alan; Overholtzer, Michael; Florey, Oliver

    2017-07-11

    Entosis is a form of epithelial cell cannibalism that is prevalent in human cancer, typically triggered by loss of matrix adhesion. Here, we report an alternative mechanism for entosis in human epithelial cells, driven by mitosis. Mitotic entosis is regulated by Cdc42, which controls mitotic morphology. Cdc42 depletion enhances mitotic deadhesion and rounding, and these biophysical changes, which depend on RhoA activation and are phenocopied by Rap1 inhibition, permit subsequent entosis. Mitotic entosis occurs constitutively in some human cancer cell lines and mitotic index correlates with cell cannibalism in primary human breast tumours. Adherent, wild-type cells can act efficiently as entotic hosts, suggesting that normal epithelia may engulf and kill aberrantly dividing neighbours. Finally, we report that Paclitaxel/taxol promotes mitotic rounding and subsequent entosis, revealing an unconventional activity of this drug. Together, our data uncover an intriguing link between cell division and cannibalism, of significance to both cancer and chemotherapy.

  4. On the robustness of SAC silencing in closed mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Donovan; Liu, Jian

    Mitosis equally partitions sister chromatids to two daughter cells. This is achieved by properly attaching these chromatids via their kinetochores to microtubules that emanate from the spindle poles. Once the last kinetochore is properly attached, the spindle microtubules pull the sister chromatids apart. Due to the dynamic nature of microtubules, however, kinetochore-microtubule attachment often goes wrong. When this erroneous attachment occurs, it locally activates an ensemble of proteins, called the spindle assembly checkpoint proteins (SAC), which halts the mitotic progression until all the kinetochores are properly attached by spindle microtubules. The timing of SAC silencing thus determines the fidelity of chromosome segregation. We previously established a spatiotemporal model that addresses the robustness of SAC silencing in open mitosis for the first time. Here, we focus on closed mitosis by examining yeast mitosis as a model system. Though much experimental work has been done to study the SAC in cells undergoing closed mitosis, the processes responsible are not well understood. We leverage and extend our previous model to study SAC silencing mechanism in closed mitosis. We show that a robust signal of the SAC protein accumulation at the spindle pole body can be achieved. This signal is a nonlinear increasing function of number of kinetochore-microtubule attachments, and can thus serve as a robust trigger to time the SAC silencing. Together, our mechanism provides a unified framework across species that ensures robust SAC silencing and fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Intramural research program in NHLBI at NIH.

  5. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is inhibited during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Andrew B; Willox, Anna K; Okeke, Emmanuel; Royle, Stephen J

    2012-04-24

    A long-standing paradigm in cell biology is the shutdown of endocytosis during mitosis. There is consensus that transferrin uptake is inhibited after entry into prophase and that it resumes in telophase. A recent study proposed that endocytosis is continuous throughout the cell cycle and that the observed inhibition of transferrin uptake is due to a decrease in available transferrin receptor at the cell surface, and not to a shutdown of endocytosis. This challenge to the established view is gradually becoming accepted. Because of this controversy, we revisited the question of endocytic activity during mitosis. Using an antibody uptake assay and controlling for potential changes in surface receptor density, we demonstrate the strong inhibition of endocytosis in mitosis of CD8 chimeras containing any of the three major internalization motifs for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (YXXΦ, [DE]XXXL[LI], or FXNPXY) or a CD8 protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The shutdown is not gradual: We describe a binary switch from endocytosis being "on" in interphase to "off" in mitosis as cells traverse the G(2)/M checkpoint. In addition, we show that the inhibition of transferrin uptake in mitosis occurs despite abundant transferrin receptor at the surface of HeLa cells. Our study finds no support for the recent idea that endocytosis continues during mitosis, and we conclude that endocytosis is temporarily shutdown during early mitosis.

  6. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is inhibited during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Andrew B.; Willox, Anna K.; Okeke, Emmanuel; Royle, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing paradigm in cell biology is the shutdown of endocytosis during mitosis. There is consensus that transferrin uptake is inhibited after entry into prophase and that it resumes in telophase. A recent study proposed that endocytosis is continuous throughout the cell cycle and that the observed inhibition of transferrin uptake is due to a decrease in available transferrin receptor at the cell surface, and not to a shutdown of endocytosis. This challenge to the established view is gradually becoming accepted. Because of this controversy, we revisited the question of endocytic activity during mitosis. Using an antibody uptake assay and controlling for potential changes in surface receptor density, we demonstrate the strong inhibition of endocytosis in mitosis of CD8 chimeras containing any of the three major internalization motifs for clathrin-mediated endocytosis (YXXΦ, [DE]XXXL[LI], or FXNPXY) or a CD8 protein with the cytoplasmic tail of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor. The shutdown is not gradual: We describe a binary switch from endocytosis being “on” in interphase to “off” in mitosis as cells traverse the G2/M checkpoint. In addition, we show that the inhibition of transferrin uptake in mitosis occurs despite abundant transferrin receptor at the surface of HeLa cells. Our study finds no support for the recent idea that endocytosis continues during mitosis, and we conclude that endocytosis is temporarily shutdown during early mitosis. PMID:22493256

  7. Genome accessibility is widely preserved and locally modulated during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Morrissey, Christapher S; Udugama, Maheshi; Frank, Christopher L; Keller, Cheryl A; Baek, Songjoon; Giardine, Belinda; Crawford, Gregory E; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2015-02-01

    Mitosis entails global alterations to chromosome structure and nuclear architecture, concomitant with transient silencing of transcription. How cells transmit transcriptional states through mitosis remains incompletely understood. While many nuclear factors dissociate from mitotic chromosomes, the observation that certain nuclear factors and chromatin features remain associated with individual loci during mitosis originated the hypothesis that such mitotically retained molecular signatures could provide transcriptional memory through mitosis. To understand the role of chromatin structure in mitotic memory, we performed the first genome-wide comparison of DNase I sensitivity of chromatin in mitosis and interphase, using a murine erythroblast model. Despite chromosome condensation during mitosis visible by microscopy, the landscape of chromatin accessibility at the macromolecular level is largely unaltered. However, mitotic chromatin accessibility is locally dynamic, with individual loci maintaining none, some, or all of their interphase accessibility. Mitotic reduction in accessibility occurs primarily within narrow, highly DNase hypersensitive sites that frequently coincide with transcription factor binding sites, whereas broader domains of moderate accessibility tend to be more stable. In mitosis, proximal promoters generally maintain their accessibility more strongly, whereas distal regulatory elements tend to lose accessibility. Large domains of DNA hypomethylation mark a subset of promoters that retain accessibility during mitosis and across many cell types in interphase. Erythroid transcription factor GATA1 exerts site-specific changes in interphase accessibility that are most pronounced at distal regulatory elements, but has little influence on mitotic accessibility. We conclude that features of open chromatin are remarkably stable through mitosis, but are modulated at the level of individual genes and regulatory elements.

  8. Synthesis of quinazolines and tetrahydroquinazolines: copper-catalyzed tandem reactions of 2-bromobenzyl bromides with aldehydes and aqueous ammonia or amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuesen; Li, Bin; Guo, Shenghai; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xinying

    2014-03-01

    An efficient synthesis of diversely substituted quinazolines and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinazolines through copper-catalyzed tandem reactions of the readily available 2-bromobenzyl bromides, aldehydes, and aqueous ammonia or amines has been developed. By using ammonia and simple aliphatic amines as the nitrogen source, the present method provides a versatile and practical protocol for the synthesis of quinazolines and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinazolines.

  9. Linking abnormal mitosis to the acquisition of DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellman, David

    2012-01-01

    Cellular defects that impair the fidelity of mitosis promote chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. Increasing evidence reveals that errors in mitosis can also promote the direct and indirect acquisition of DNA damage and chromosome breaks. Consequently, deregulated cell division can devastate the integrity of the normal genome and unleash a variety of oncogenic stimuli that may promote transformation. Recent work has shed light on the mechanisms that link abnormal mitosis with the development of DNA damage, how cells respond to such affronts, and the potential impact on tumorigenesis. PMID:23229895

  10. Promyelocytic leukemia bodies tether to early endosomes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palibrk, Vuk; Lång, Emma; Lång, Anna; Schink, Kay Oliver; Rowe, Alexander D; Bøe, Stig Ove

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis the nuclear envelope breaks down, leading to potential interactions between cytoplasmic and nuclear components. PML bodies are nuclear structures with tumor suppressor and antiviral functions. Early endosomes, on the other hand, are cytoplasmic vesicles involved in transport and growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that PML bodies form stable interactions with early endosomes immediately following entry into mitosis. The 2 compartments remain stably associated throughout mitosis and dissociate in the cytoplasm of newly divided daughter cells. We also show that a minor subset of PML bodies becomes anchored to the mitotic spindle poles during cell division. The study demonstrates a stable mitosis-specific interaction between a cytoplasmic and a nuclear compartment.

  11. Pathologic mitoses and pathology of mitosis in tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    RG Steinbeck

    2009-01-01

    The gist of my hypothesis (.. is) a certain abnormal chromatin constitution. Each process, which brings about this chromatin constitution, would result in the origin of a malignant tumour. Certainly, I consider irregularities with mitosis as the normal mode of the origin of an incorrectly assembled nucleus. This statement by Boveri (1914) has considered earlier observations of asymmetric divisions in human cancers (Hansemann, 1890). The hypothesis is based on the understanding of mitosis as a...

  12. Trichomonas vaginalis: chromatin and mitotic spindle during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Conde, E; Mena-López, R; Hernández-Jaúregui, P; González-Camacho, M; Arroyo, R

    2000-11-01

    The mitotic phases and the changes that the chromatin and mitotic microtubules undergo during mitosis in the sexually transmitted parasite Trichomonas vaginalis are described. Parasites arrested in the gap 2 phase of the cell cycle by nutrient starvation were induced to mitosis by addition of fresh whole medium. [(3)H] Thymidine labeling of trichomonad parasites for 24 h showed that parasites have at least four synchronic duplications after mitosis induction. Fixed or live and acridine orange (AO)-stained trichomonads analyzed at different times during mitosis by epifluorescence microscopy showed that mitosis took about 45 min and is divided into five stages: prophase, metaphase, early and late anaphase, early and late telophase, and cytokinesis. The AO-stained nucleus of live trichomonads showed green (DNA) and orange (RNA) fluorescence, and the nucleic acid nature was confirmed by DNase and RNase treatment, respectively. The chromatin appeared partially condensed during interphase. At metaphase, it appeared as six condensed chromosomes, as recently reported, which decondensed at anaphase and migrated to the nuclear poles at telophase. In addition, small bundles of microtubules (as hemispindles) were detected only in metaphase with the polyclonal antibody anti-Entamoeba histolytica alpha-tubulin. This antibody showed that the hemispindle and an atractophore-like structure seem to duplicate and polarize during metaphase. In conclusion, T. vaginalis mitosis involves five mitotic phases in which the chromatin undergoes different degrees of condensation, from chromosomes to decondensed chromatin, and two hemispindles that are observed only in the metaphase stage.

  13. Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazer, Shelley; Lynch, Michael; Needleman, Daniel

    2014-11-17

    The origin of the nucleus at the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition represents one of the most important events in the evolution of cellular organization. The nuclear envelope encircles the chromosomes in interphase and is a selectively permeable barrier between the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm and an organizational scaffold for the nucleus. It remains intact in the 'closed' mitosis of some yeasts, but loses its integrity in the 'open' mitosis of mammals. Instances of both types of mitosis within two evolutionary clades indicate multiple evolutionary transitions between open and closed mitosis, although the underlying genetic changes that influenced these transitions remain unknown. A survey of the diversity of mitotic nuclei that fall between these extremes is the starting point from which to determine the physiologically relevant characteristics distinguishing open from closed mitosis and to understand how they evolved and why they are retained in present-day organisms. The field is now poised to begin addressing these issues by defining and documenting patterns of mitotic nuclear variation within and among species and mapping them onto a phylogenic tree. Deciphering the evolutionary history of open and closed mitosis will complement cell biological and genetic approaches aimed at deciphering the fundamental organizational principles of the nucleus.

  14. Entry into mitosis without Cdc2 kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowdy, P M; Anderson, H J; Roberge, M

    1998-11-01

    Mouse FT210 cells at 39 degreesC cannot enter mitosis but arrest in G2 phase, because they lack Cdc2 kinase activity as a result of a temperature-sensitive lesion in the cdc2 gene. Incubation of arrested cells with the protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitor okadaic acid induces morphologically normal chromosome condensation. We now show that okadaic acid also induces two other landmark events of early mitosis, nuclear lamina depolymerization and centrosome separation, in the absence of Cdc2 kinase activity. Okadaic acid-induced entry into mitosis is accompanied by partial activation of Cdc25C and may be prevented by tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors and by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, suggesting that Cdc25C and kinases distinct from Cdc2 are required for these mitotic events. Using in-gel assays, we show that a 45-kDa protein kinase normally activated at mitosis is also activated by okadaic acid independently of Cdc2 kinase. The 45-kDa kinase can utilize GTP, is stimulated by spermine and is inhibited by heparin. These properties are characteristic of the kinase CK2, but immunoprecipitation studies indicate that it is not CK2. The data underline the importance of a tyrosine phosphatase, possibly Cdc25C, and of kinases other than Cdc2 in the structural changes the cell undergoes at mitosis, and indicate that entry into mitosis involves the activation of multiple kinases working in concert with Cdc2 kinase.

  15. Synthesis of a new class of pyrrolo[3,4-h]quinazolines with antimitotic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Virginia; Montalbano, Alessandra; Carbone, Anna; Parrino, Barbara; Diana, Patrizia; Cirrincione, Girolamo; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Brun, Paola; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Tisi, Silvia; Primac, Irina; Vedaldi, Daniela; Salvador, Alessia; Barraja, Paola

    2014-03-03

    A new series of pyrrolo[3,4-h]quinazolines was conveniently prepared with a broad substitution pattern. A large number of derivatives was obtained and the cellular cytotoxicity was evaluated in vitro against 5 different human tumor cell lines with GI₅₀ values reaching the low micromolar level (1.3-19.8 μM). These compounds were able to induce cell death mainly by apoptosis through a mitochondrial dependent pathway. Selected compounds showed antimitotic activity and a reduction of tubulin polymerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, they showed anti-angiogenic properties since reduced in vitro endothelial cell migration and disrupted HUVEC capillary-like tube network in Matrigel.

  16. Fourier transform microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopy of quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Don; Godfrey, Peter D.; Jahn, Michaela K.; Dewald, David A.; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-01

    The pure rotational spectra of the bicyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycle molecules, quinazoline, quinoxaline, and phthalazine, have been recorded and assigned in the region 13-87 GHz. An analysis, guided by ab initio molecular orbital predictions, of frequency-scanned Stark modulated, jet-cooled millimeter wave absorption spectra (48-87 GHz) yielded a preliminary set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. Subsequent spectral analysis at higher resolution was carried out with Fourier transform microwave (FT-MW) spectroscopy (13-18 GHz) of a supersonic rotationally cold molecular beam. The high spectral resolution of the FT-MW instrument provided an improved set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants together with nitrogen quadrupole coupling constants for all three species. Density functional theory calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G** level of theory closely predict rotational constants and are useful in predicting quadrupole coupling constants and dipole moments for such species.

  17. The Reactivity of 2-Ethoxy-4-Chloroquinazoline and Its Use in Synthesis of Novel Quinazoline Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. El-Hashash

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of 2-ethoxy-4-chloroquinazoline 2 towards various nitrogen nucleophiles, namely: thiosemicarbazide, sodium azide, glucosamine, ethanol, and hydrazine hydrate has been discussed. Also, the behavior of 4-(2-ethoxyquinazolin-4-ylthiosemicarbazide towards one-carbon, for example, ethyl chloroformate, and two-carbon donors, for example, ethyl chloroacetate and diethyl oxalate has been investigated. On the other hand, new 5-ethoxy-2-substituted[1,2,4]-triazolo-[1,5-c]quinazoline derivatives have been obtained by ring closure accompanied with Dimroth rearrangement through the interaction of compound 2 with hydrazides of acetic, benzoic, crotonic, cinnamic, 2-furoic, and phthalimidoacetic acids. Structures of the novel products were confirmed by elemental, IR, MS, and 1H-NMR spectral analyses.

  18. Mitosis can drive cell cannibalism through entosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgan, Joanne; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Hamann, Jens C; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Collinson, Lucy; Overholtzer, Michael; Florey, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Entosis is a form of epithelial cell cannibalism that is prevalent in human cancer, typically triggered by loss of matrix adhesion. Here, we report an alternative mechanism for entosis in human epithelial cells, driven by mitosis. Mitotic entosis is regulated by Cdc42, which controls mitotic morphology. Cdc42 depletion enhances mitotic deadhesion and rounding, and these biophysical changes, which depend on RhoA activation and are phenocopied by Rap1 inhibition, permit subsequent entosis. Mitotic entosis occurs constitutively in some human cancer cell lines and mitotic index correlates with cell cannibalism in primary human breast tumours. Adherent, wild-type cells can act efficiently as entotic hosts, suggesting that normal epithelia may engulf and kill aberrantly dividing neighbours. Finally, we report that Paclitaxel/taxol promotes mitotic rounding and subsequent entosis, revealing an unconventional activity of this drug. Together, our data uncover an intriguing link between cell division and cannibalism, of significance to both cancer and chemotherapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.27134.001 PMID:28693721

  19. Rapid Synthesis and Antiviral Activity of (Quinazolin-4-YlaminoMethyl-Phosphonates Through Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoan Song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the simple synthesis of new (quinazolin-4-ylamino methylphosphonates via microwave irradiation. Substituted-2-aminobenzonitrile reacted with 1,1-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylmethanamine at a reflux condition to obtain N'-(substituted-2-cyanophenyl-N,N-dimethylformamidine (1. The subsequent reaction of this intermediate product with α-aminophosphonate (2 in a solution containing glacial acetic acid in 2-propanol through microwave irradiation resulted in the formation of (quinazolin-4-ylaminomethyl-phosphonate derivatives 3a to 3x, which were unequivocally characterized by the spectral data and elemental analysis. The influence of the reaction conditions on the yield of 3a was investigated to optimize the synthetic conditions. The relative optimal conditions for the synthesis of 3a include a 1:1 molar ratio of N’-(2-cyanophenyl-N,N-dimethylformamidine to diethyl amino(phenylmethylphosphonate and a 4:1 volume ratio of isopropanol to HOAc in the solvent mixture, at a reaction temperature of 150 °C, with a microwave power of 100 W and a corresponding pressure of 150 psi for 20 min in the microwave synthesizer. The yield of 3a was approximately 79%, whereas those of 3b to 3x were approximately 77% to 86%. Some of the synthesized compounds displayed weak to good anti-Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV activity.

  20. Spatial reorganization of the endoplasmic reticulum during mitosis relies on mitotic kinase cyclin A in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J; Mclaurin, Justin D; Eritano, Anthony S; Johnson, Brittany M; Sims, Amanda Q; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  1. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  2. Benzimidazole-Based Quinazolines: In Vitro Evaluation, Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship, and Molecular Modeling as Aurora Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alka; Luxami, Vijay; Saxena, Sanjai; Paul, Kamaldeep

    2016-03-01

    A series of benzimidazole-based quinazoline derivatives with different substitutions of primary and secondary amines at the C2 position (1-12) were evaluated for their Aurora kinase inhibitory activities. All compounds except for 3 and 6 showed good activity against Aurora kinase inhibitors, with IC50 values in the range of 0.035-0.532 μM. The ligand efficiency (LE) of the compounds with Aurora A kinase was also determined. The structure-activity relationship and the quantitative structure-activity relationship revealed that the Aurora inhibitory activities of these derivatives primarily depend on the different substitutions of the amine present at the C2 position of the quinazoline core. Molecular docking studies in the active binding site also provided theoretical support for the experimental biological data acquired. The current study identifies a novel class of Aurora kinase inhibitors, which can further be used for the treatment of cancer.

  3. Quinazoline derivatives are efficient chemosensitizers of antibiotic activity in Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Jacqueline; Mahamoud, Abdallah; Baitiche, Milad; Adam, Elissavet; Viveiros, Miguel; Smarandache, Adriana; Militaru, Andra; Pascu, Mihail L; Amaral, Leonard; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2010-08-01

    Amongst the three series of quinazoline derivatives synthesised and studied in this work, some molecules increase the antibiotic susceptibility of Gram-negative bacteria presenting multidrug-resistant phenotypes. N-alkyl compounds induced an increase in the activity of chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid and sparfloxacin, which are substrates of the AcrAB-TolC and MexAB-OprM efflux pumps in clinical isolates. These molecules are able to increase the intracellular concentration of chloramphenicol in efflux pump-overproducing strains. Their activity depends on the antibiotic structure, suggesting that different sites may be involved for the recognition of substrates by a given efflux pump. Quinazoline molecules exhibiting a nitro functional group are more active, and structure-activity relationship studies may be undertaken to identify the pharmacophoric group involved in the AcrB and MexB affinity sites.

  4. SYNTHESIS AND IN VITRO ANTIMICROBIAL EVALUATION OF PIPERAZINE SUBSTITUTED QUINAZOLINE-BASED THIOUREA/THIAZOLIDINONE/CHALCONE HYBRIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, D R; Lakum, H P; Chikhalia, K H

    2015-01-01

    In frames of the search for new biological entities to fight against recent drug-resistant microbial strains, we report a library of quinazoline-based thiourea/4-thiazolidinone/chalcone hybrids. The newly synthesized compounds were studied for efficacy against several bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus clavatus) using the broth dilution technique. From the biological evaluation, (E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(4-((4-(4-ethylpiperazin-1-yl)quinazolin-2-yl)amino)phenyl)prop-2-en-1-one was found to be the most active analogue (microbial inhibition concentration 3.12 μg/mL) to inhibit the bacterial growth. The rest of the compounds showed equipotent efficacy (3.12-12.5 μg/mL) as compared to the standard. Final compounds were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis.

  5. Synthesis and preliminary in vitro kinase inhibition evaluation of new diversely substituted pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinyeh, Wael; Esvan, Yannick J; Nauton, Lionel; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Théry, Vincent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of new diversely substituted pyrido[3,4-g]quinazolines is described. The inhibitory potencies of prepared compounds toward a panel of five CMGC protein kinases (CDK5, CLK1, DYRK1A, CK1, GSK3), that are known to play a potential role in Alzheimer's disease, were evaluated. The best overall kinase inhibition profile was found for nitro compound 4 bearing an ethyl group at the 5-position.

  6. Role of liver functions on liver cell mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takata,Tameyuki

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The control mechanism of mitosis in the regenerating rat liver was studied in relation to the cell functions. Partial hepatec· tomy induces a series of changes prior to the initiation of mitosis, i. e. decrease in serum glucose and albumin levels, loss of glycogen from liver cells, and increased lipid mobilization to liver cells. Massive supplies of glucose and fructose suppressed significantly hepatocellu. lar mitosis with suppression of lipid accumulation and preservation of glycogen in the liver cells and of blood sugar level. Homologous serum administration also suppressed the rate of liver cell mitosis after hepatectomy preventing the decrease in serum albumin level, but did not suppress the lipid accumulation in the liver. Starvation, which would relieve the liver cell from the work of detoxication of intesti. nal toxic products, did not show any suppressive effect on the mitotic rate of liver cells after partial hepatectomy in single animals. But starvation induced severe hypoglycemia, moderate hypoalbuminemia and loss of glycogen content in the liver. These changes in metabo. lism by starvation and partial hepatectomy were suppressed by con· jugating the animals with nonhepatectomized fed.partners by aortic anastomosis, and mitosis was suppressed in the residual liver of the fasting animals in this parabiosis. The results indicate that all the major functions of parenchymal live cells tested, sugar metabolism, serum albumin production, and detoxication, are closely related to the control of liver cell mitosis. Accumulation of lipids in the liver remnant after partial hepatectomy is thought to be for the compensa. tion of reduced glycogen storage and not concerned directly with the liver cell mitosis. Discussion was made briefly on the humoral factor and portal blood factor in relation to excess load of functions on resi. dual liver cells.

  7. Design and synthesis of 4-substituted quinazolines as potent EGFR inhibitors with anti-breast cancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marwa; Magdy, Naja

    2016-09-23

    Cancer is a major health problem to human beings around the world. Many quinazoline derivatives were reported to have potent cytotoxic activity. Our aim in this work is the discovery of potent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors with anti-breast cancer activity containing 4-substituted quinazoline pharmacophore. Novel series of 4-substituted 6,8-dibromo-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-quinazoline derivatives have been designed and synthesized. New derivatives were tested against MCF-7 (human breast carcinoma cell line) and screened for their inhibition activity against epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK). Most of the tested compounds show potent antiproliferative activity and EGFR-TK inhibitory activity. Compounds VIIIc and VIIIb exerted powerful cytotoxic activity (IC50 3.1 and 6.3 µM) with potent inhibitory percent (91.1 and 88.4%) against EGFR-TK. Compounds IX, VIIa, X, VIIb, VIc, V, IV, VIa and VIb showed promising cytotoxic effects with IC50 range (12-79 µM) with good activity against EGFR-TK with the inhibitory percent (85.4-60.8%). On the other hand, compounds VIIc, VIIIa exerted low cytotoxic effects as revealed from their IC50 value (124 and 144 µM) with low activity against EGFR-TK with inhibitory percent 30.6 and 29.1% respectively.

  8. Nuclear transport factors: global regulation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Douglass J; Travesa, Anna; Nord, Matthew S; Bernis, Cyril

    2015-08-01

    The unexpected repurposing of nuclear transport proteins from their function in interphase to an equally vital and very different set of functions in mitosis was very surprising. The multi-talented cast when first revealed included the import receptors, importin alpha and beta, the small regulatory GTPase RanGTP, and a subset of nuclear pore proteins. In this review, we report that recent years have revealed new discoveries in each area of this expanding story in vertebrates: (a) The cast of nuclear import receptors playing a role in mitotic spindle regulation has expanded: both transportin, a nuclear import receptor, and Crm1/Xpo1, an export receptor, are involved in different aspects of spindle assembly. Importin beta and transportin also regulate nuclear envelope and pore assembly. (b) The role of nucleoporins has grown to include recruiting the key microtubule nucleator - the γ-TuRC complex - and the exportin Crm1 to the mitotic kinetochores of humans. Together they nucleate microtubule formation from the kinetochores toward the centrosomes. (c) New research finds that the original importin beta/RanGTP team have been further co-opted by evolution to help regulate other cellular and organismal activities, ranging from the actual positioning of the spindle within the cell perimeter, to regulation of a newly discovered spindle microtubule branching activity, to regulation of the interaction of microtubule structures with specific actin structures. (d) Lastly, because of the multitudinous roles of karyopherins throughout the cell cycle, a recent large push toward testing their potential as chemotherapeutic targets has begun to yield burgeoning progress in the clinic.

  9. An imaging flow cytometric method for measuring cell division history and molecular symmetry during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filby, Andrew; Perucha, Esperanza; Summers, Huw; Rees, Paul; Chana, Prabhjoat; Heck, Susanne; Lord, Graham M; Davies, Derek

    2011-07-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important mechanism for generating cellular diversity, however, techniques for measuring the distribution of fate-regulating molecules during mitosis have been hampered by a lack of objectivity, quantitation, and statistical robustness. Here we describe a novel imaging flow cytometric approach that is able to report a cells proliferative history and cell cycle position using dye dilution, pH3, and PI staining to then measure the spatial distribution of fluorescent signals during mitosis using CCD-derived imagery. Using Jurkat cells, resolution of the fluorescently labeled populations was comparable to traditional PMT based cytometers thus eliminating the need to sort cells with specific division histories for microscopy. Subdividing mitotic stages by morphology allowed us to determine the time spent in each cell cycle phase using mathematical modeling approaches. Furthermore high sample throughput allowed us to collect statistically relevant numbers of cells without the need to use blocking agents that artificially enrich for mitotic events. The fluorescent imagery was used to measure PKCζ protein and EEA-1+ endosome distribution during different mitotic phases in Jurkat cells. While telophase cells represented the favorable population for measuring asymmetry, asynchronously dividing cells spent approximately 43 seconds in this stage, explaining why they were present at such low frequencies. This necessitated the acquisition of large cell numbers. Interestingly we found that PKCζ was inherited asymmetrically in 2.5% of all telophasic events whereas endosome inheritance was significantly more symmetrical. Furthermore, molecular polarity at early mitotic phases was a poor indicator of asymmetry during telophase highlighting that, though rare, telophasic events represented the best candidates for asymmetry studies. In summary, this technique combines the spatial information afforded by fluorescence microscopy with the statistical

  10. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is recognized by ECT2 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is an unique posttranslational modification and required for spindle assembly and function during mitosis. However, the molecular mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in mitosis remains elusive. Here, we show the evidence that PAR is recognized by ECT2, a key guanine nucleotide exchange factor in mitosis. The BRCT domain of ECT2 directly binds to PAR both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that α-tubulin is PARylated during mitosis. PARylation of α-tubulin is recognized by ECT2 and recruits ECT2 to mitotic spindle for completing mitosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PAR regulates mitosis.

  11. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-08-25

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ~200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function.

  12. Synthesis and Antibacterial Activity of 3-(Substituted)-2-(4-oxo-2-phenylquinazolin-3(4H)-ylamino)quinazolin-4(3H)-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appani, Ramgopal; Bhukya, Baburao; Gangarapu, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel 3-(substituted)-2-(substituted quinazolinylamino)quinazolin-4(3H)-ones were synthesized by the reaction of 3-(substituted)-2-hydrazino-quinazoline-4(3H)-ones with 2-phenyl-3,1-benzoxazin-4-one. The starting materials 3-(substituted)-2-hydrazino-quinazolin-4(3H)-ones were synthesized from various primary amines by a multistep synthesis. All the title compounds were tested for their antibacterial activity using ciprofloxacin as reference standard. Compounds 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(4-oxo-2-phenylquinazolin-3(4H)-ylamino)quinazolin-4(3H)-one (9a) and 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-(4-oxo-2-phenylquinazolin-3(4H)-ylamino)quinazolin-4(3H)-one (9h) emerged as the most active compounds of the series. These compounds have shown most potent antibacterial activity against the tested organisms of Proteus vulgaris and Bacillus subtilis having zone of inhibition values of 1.1 cm and 1.4 cm for compound 9a 1.2 cm and 1.0 cm for compound 9h, respectively.

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and DFT calculations of monohydroxyalkylated derivatives of 1-phenyl-2H,6H-imidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszkowska, Agnieszka; Hęclik, Karol; Trzybiński, Damian; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Klasek, Antonin; Zarzyka, Iwona

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis of new derivatives with an imidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione ring has been presented. Two new alcohols with the imidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione ring were obtained and characterized by spectral (1H, 13C NMR, IR and UV) and crystallography methods. A reaction chemoselectivity has been observed with a formation of monohydroxyalkyl derivatives of 1-phenyl-2H,6H-imidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione substituted at the 2. nitrogen atom. The absence of derivatives substituted at the 6. nitrogen atom was proven experimentally. The synthesis with chemoselectivity over 99% without control of the substituent effect happens very rarely. The HOMO-LUMO mappings are reported which reveals the different charge transfer possibilities within the molecule of 1-phenyl-2H,6H-imidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione in the region of the 2. and the 6. nitrogen atoms. Quantum-mechanical DFT calculations proved to be very useful to explain the reason of selectivity reaction of 1-phenyl-2H,6H-imidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione with oxiranes.

  14. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiato, Helder; Gomes, Ana Margarida; Sousa, Filipe; Barisic, Marin

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E) that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle microtubule

  15. Mechanisms of Chromosome Congression during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Maiato

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome congression during prometaphase culminates with the establishment of a metaphase plate, a hallmark of mitosis in metazoans. Classical views resulting from more than 100 years of research on this topic have attempted to explain chromosome congression based on the balance between opposing pulling and/or pushing forces that reach an equilibrium near the spindle equator. However, in mammalian cells, chromosome bi-orientation and force balance at kinetochores are not required for chromosome congression, whereas the mechanisms of chromosome congression are not necessarily involved in the maintenance of chromosome alignment after congression. Thus, chromosome congression and maintenance of alignment are determined by different principles. Moreover, it is now clear that not all chromosomes use the same mechanism for congressing to the spindle equator. Those chromosomes that are favorably positioned between both poles when the nuclear envelope breaks down use the so-called “direct congression” pathway in which chromosomes align after bi-orientation and the establishment of end-on kinetochore-microtubule attachments. This favors the balanced action of kinetochore pulling forces and polar ejection forces along chromosome arms that drive chromosome oscillatory movements during and after congression. The other pathway, which we call “peripheral congression”, is independent of end-on kinetochore microtubule-attachments and relies on the dominant and coordinated action of the kinetochore motors Dynein and Centromere Protein E (CENP-E that mediate the lateral transport of peripheral chromosomes along microtubules, first towards the poles and subsequently towards the equator. How the opposite polarities of kinetochore motors are regulated in space and time to drive congression of peripheral chromosomes only now starts to be understood. This appears to be regulated by position-dependent phosphorylation of both Dynein and CENP-E and by spindle

  16. Novel functions of endocytic player clathrin in mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxiang Fu; Qing Jiang; Chuanmao Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Clathrin has been widely recognized as a pivotal player in endocytosis,in which several adaptors and accessory proteins are involved.Recent studies suggested that clathrin is also essential for cell division.Here this review mainly focuses on the clathrin-dependent mechanisms involved in spindle assembly and chromosome alignment.In mitosis,clathrin forms a complex with phosphorylated TACC3 to ensure spindle stability and proper chromosome alignment.The clathrin-regulated mechanism in mitosis requires the crosstalk among clathrin,spindle assembly factors (SAFs),Ran-GTP and mitotic kinases.Meanwhile,a coordinated mechanism is required for role transitions of clathrin during endocytosis and mitosis.Taken together,the findings of the multiple functions of clathrin besides endocytosis have expanded our understanding of the basic cellular activities.

  17. Live-cell imaging of mitosis in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, James A

    2010-06-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a wonderful model system for live imaging studies of mitosis. A huge collection of research tools is readily available to facilitate experimentation. For imaging, C. elegans embryos provide large clear cells, an invariant pattern of cell division, only six chromosomes, a very short cell cycle, and remain healthy and happy at room temperature. Mitosis is a complicated process and the types of research questions being asked about the mechanisms involved are continuously expanding. For each experiment, the details of imaging methods need to be tailored to the question. Specific imaging methods will depend on the microscopy hardware and software available to each researcher. This article presents points to consider when choosing a microscope, designing an imaging experiment, or selecting appropriate worm strains for imaging. A method for mounting C. elegans embryos and guidelines for fluorescence and differential interference contrast imaging of mitosis in live embryos are presented.

  18. Aurora-A regulates MCRS1 function during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Timón, Krystal; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-07-02

    The mitotic spindle is made of microtubules (MTs) nucleated through different pathways involving the centrosomes, the chromosomes or the walls of pre-existing MTs. MCRS1 is a RanGTP target that specifically associates with the chromosome-driven MTs protecting them from MT depolymerases. MCRS1 is also needed for the control of kinetochore fiber (K-fiber) MT minus-ends dynamics in metaphase. Here, we investigated the regulation of MCRS1 activity in M-phase. We show that MCRS1 is phosphorylated by the Aurora-A kinase in mitosis on Ser35/36. Although this phosphorylation has no role on MCRS1 localization to chromosomal MTs and K-fiber minus-ends, we show that it regulates MCRS1 activity in mitosis. We conclude that Aurora-A activity is particularly important in the tuning of K-fiber minus-ends dynamics in mitosis.

  19. Mitosis in the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Noel; Mahajan, Babita; Kumar, Sanjai

    2011-01-01

    Malaria is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites belonging to Plasmodium spp. (phylum Apicomplexa) that produce significant morbidity and mortality, mostly in developing countries. Plasmodium parasites have a complex life cycle that includes multiple stages in anopheline mosquito vectors and vertebrate hosts. During the life cycle, the parasites undergo several cycles of extreme population growth within a brief span, and this is critical for their continued transmission and a contributing factor for their pathogenesis in the host. As with other eukaryotes, successful mitosis is an essential requirement for Plasmodium reproduction; however, some aspects of Plasmodium mitosis are quite distinct and not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss the current understanding of the architecture and key events of mitosis in Plasmodium falciparum and related parasites and compare them with the traditional mitotic events described for other eukaryotes. PMID:21317311

  20. Hepatitis C virus infection causes cell cycle arrest at the level of initiation of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Rathi P; Hensley, Lucinda L; Evers, Lauren E; Lemon, Stanley M; McGivern, David R

    2011-08-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with increased risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Chronic immune-mediated inflammation is likely to be an important factor in the development of HCV-associated HCC, but direct effects of HCV infection on the host cell cycle may also play a role. Although overexpression studies have revealed multiple interactions between HCV-encoded proteins and host cell cycle regulators and tumor suppressor proteins, the relevance of these observations to HCV-associated liver disease is not clear. We determined the net effect of these interactions on regulation of the cell cycle in the context of virus infection. Flow cytometry of HCV-infected carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester-labeled hepatoma cells indicated a slowdown in proliferation that correlated with abundance of viral antigen. A decrease in the proportions of infected cells in G(1) and S phases with an accumulation of cells in G(2)/M phase was observed, compared to mock-infected controls. Dramatic decreases in markers of mitosis, such as phospho-histone H3, in infected cells suggested a block to mitotic entry. In common with findings described in the published literature, we observed caspase 3 activation, suggesting that cell cycle arrest is associated with apoptosis. Differences were observed in patterns of cell cycle disturbance and levels of apoptosis with different strains of HCV. However, the data suggest that cell cycle arrest at the interface of G(2) and mitosis is a common feature of HCV infection.

  1. Cholesterol is essential for mitosis progression and its deficiency induces polyploid cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Carlos; Lobo Md, María del Val T; Gómez-Coronado, Diego; Lasunción, Miguel A

    2004-10-15

    As an essential component of mammalian cell membranes, cells require cholesterol for proliferation, which is either obtained from plasma lipoproteins or synthesized intracellularly from acetyl-CoA. In addition to cholesterol, other non-sterol mevalonate derivatives are necessary for DNA synthesis, such as the phosphorylated forms of isopentane, farnesol, geranylgeraniol, and dolichol. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of cholesterol in mitosis. For this, human leukemia cells (HL-60) were incubated in a cholesterol-free medium and treated with SKF 104976, which inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis by blocking sterol 14alpha-demethylase, and the expression of relevant cyclins in the different phases of the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Prolonged cholesterol starvation induced the inhibition of cytokinesis and the formation of polyploid cells, which were multinucleated and had mitotic aberrations. Supplementing the medium with cholesterol completely abolished these effects, demonstrating they were specifically due to cholesterol deficiency. This is the first evidence that cholesterol is essential for mitosis completion and that, in the absence of cholesterol, the cells fail to undergo cytokinesis, entered G1 phase at higher DNA ploidy (tetraploidy), and then progressed through S (rereplication) into G2, generating polyploid cells.

  2. CSL protein regulates transcription of genes required to prevent catastrophic mitosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Převorovský, Martin; Oravcová, Martina; Zach, Róbert; Jordáková, Anna; Bähler, Jürg; Půta, František; Folk, Petr

    2016-11-16

    For every eukaryotic cell to grow and divide, intricately coordinated action of numerous proteins is required to ensure proper cell-cycle progression. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has been instrumental in elucidating the fundamental principles of cell-cycle control. Mutations in S. pombe 'cut' (cell untimely torn) genes cause failed coordination between cell and nuclear division, resulting in catastrophic mitosis. Deletion of cbf11, a fission yeast CSL transcription factor gene, triggers a 'cut' phenotype, but the precise role of Cbf11 in promoting mitotic fidelity is not known. We report that Cbf11 directly activates the transcription of the acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase gene cut6, and the biotin uptake/biosynthesis genes vht1 and bio2, with the former 2 implicated in mitotic fidelity. Cbf11 binds to a canonical, metazoan-like CSL response element (GTGGGAA) in the cut6 promoter. Expression of Cbf11 target genes shows apparent oscillations during the cell cycle using temperature-sensitive cdc25-22 and cdc10-M17 block-release experiments, but not with other synchronization methods. The penetrance of catastrophic mitosis in cbf11 and cut6 mutants is nutrient-dependent. We also show that drastic decrease in biotin availability arrests cell proliferation but does not cause mitotic defects. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that CSL proteins play conserved roles in regulating cell-cycle progression, and they could guide experiments into mitotic CSL functions in mammals.

  3. Acentrosomal Microtubule Assembly in Mitosis: The Where, When, and How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    In mitosis the cell assembles the bipolar spindle, a microtubule (MT)-based apparatus that segregates the duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Most animal cells enter mitosis with duplicated centrosomes that provide an active source of dynamic MTs. However, it is now established that spindle assembly relies on the nucleation of acentrosomal MTs occurring around the chromosomes after nuclear envelope breakdown, and on pre-existing microtubules. Where chromosome-dependent MT nucleation occurs, when MT amplification takes place and how the two pathways function are still key questions that generate some controversies. We reconcile the data and present an integrated model accounting for acentrosomal microtubule assembly in the dividing cell.

  4. Inhibitory effect of Polo-like kinase 1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Hua Chen; Bin Lan; Ying Qu; Xiao-Qing Zhang; Qu Cai; Bing-Ya Liu; Zheng-Gang Zhu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) serine/threonine kinase plays a vital role in multiple phases of mitosis in gastric cancer cells. To investigate the effect of PLK1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells.METHODS: PLK1 expression was blocked by small RNA interference(siRNA). The expression levels of PLK1, cdc2, cyclin B and caspase 3 were detected by Western blotting. Then, PLK1 depletion, cdc2 activity,cell proliferation, cell cycle phase distribution, mitotic spindle structure, and the rate of apoptosis of the PLK1knockdown cells were observed.RESULTS: PLK1 gene knockdown was associated with increased cyclin B expression, increased cdc2 activity (but not with the expression levels), accumulation of gastric cancer cells at G2/M, improper mitotic spindle formation,delayed chromosome separation and delayed or arrested cytokinesis. Moreover, PLK1 depletion in gastric cancer cells was associated with decreased proliferation,attenuated pro-caspase 3 levels and increased apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Blockage of PLK1 expression may lead to decreased mitosis or even apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, indicating that PLK1 may be a valuable therapeutic target for gastric cancer.

  5. Effectiveness of teaching mitosis through the learning cycle in secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Perko, Irena

    2013-01-01

    We carried out research on mitosis with first year secondary school students in altogether eleven different programs. The aim of the research was to find out how much knowledge about mitosis these students already have acquired in primary school. Additionally, we wanted to test how much new information on mitosis the students acquired, after I explained with the use of computer the method of classifying images of mitosis phases according to Schields. Five weeks after this lesson, I tested the...

  6. Autophagic flux is highly active in early mitosis and differentially regulated throughout the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is a fast process that involves dramatic cellular remodeling and has a high energy demand. Whether autophagy is active or inactive during the early stages of mitosis in a naturally dividing cell is still debated. Here we aimed to use multiple assays to resolve this apparent discrepancy. Although the LC3 puncta number was reduced in mitosis, the four different cell lines we tested all have active autophagic flux in both interphase and mitosis. In addition, the autophagic flux was highl...

  7. Rock blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, W.

    2007-01-01

    Consider representation theory associated to symmetric groups, or to Hecke algebras in type A, or to q-Schur algebras, or to finite general linear groups in non-describing characteristic. Rock blocks are certain combinatorially defined blocks appearing in such a representation theory, first observed by R. Rouquier. Rock blocks are much more symmetric than general blocks, and every block is derived equivalent to a Rock block. Motivated by a theorem of J. Chuang and R. Kessar in the case of sym...

  8. Students as "Humans Chromosomes" in Role-Playing Mitosis and Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Joseph P.; Yue, Joyce W.; Torres, Kieron M.

    2004-01-01

    Students often find it challenging to understand mitosis and meiosis and determine their processes. To develop an easier way to understand these terms, students are asked to role-play mitosis and meiosis and students themselves act as human chromosomes, which help students to learn differences between mitosis and meiosis.

  9. Students as "Humans Chromosomes" in Role-Playing Mitosis and Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Joseph P.; Yue, Joyce W.; Torres, Kieron M.

    2004-01-01

    Students often find it challenging to understand mitosis and meiosis and determine their processes. To develop an easier way to understand these terms, students are asked to role-play mitosis and meiosis and students themselves act as human chromosomes, which help students to learn differences between mitosis and meiosis.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and antibacterial activities of Zn(II and Cd(II complexes of a quinazoline-4(3H-one Schiff base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahman Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Zn(II and Cd(II complexes of a Schiff base derived from quinazoline-4(3H one and 2-formylphenoxy acetic acid were prepared and characterized by elemental and different spectroscopic (IR, UV-Visible and NMR analyses. The elemental analysis indicated the formation of the complexes: [ML(AcO].H2O, where M stands for Zn(II and Cd(II and L stands for quinazoline-4(3H-one Schiff base. The molar conductivities of the prepared complexes revealed their non-electrolytic nature. The complexes were also investigated for their antimicrobial activities by using turbidometric assay method.

  11. DABCO-catalyzed one-pot three component synthesis of dihydropyrano[3,2-c]chromene substituted quinazolines and their evaluation towards anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodnala, Sumathi; Bhavani, A K D; Kamutam, Ramakrishna; Naidu, V G M; Promila; Prabhakar, Ch

    2016-08-15

    A facile DABCO promoted one-pot three component synthesis of a new series of C-C linked bis-heterocycle containing dihydropyrano[c]chromene as highly fused oxa-heteryl group at C-2 position of quinazoline was developed. Quinazoline-2-carbaldehyde, substituted 4-hydroxycoumarin and ethyl cyanoacetate were used as key components in the Knoevenagel-Michael addition reaction to get the titled compounds. These compounds were screened for anti-cancer activity against the breast cancer cell lines of MDA-MB 231, and MDA-MB 453. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. One-Pot Cascade Synthesis of Quinazolin-4(3H)-ones via Nickel-Catalyzed Dehydrogenative Coupling of o-Aminobenzamides with Alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parua, Seuli; Das, Siuli; Sikari, Rina; Sinha, Suman; Paul, Nanda D

    2017-07-21

    In this paper, we report a general, efficient, and environmentally benign method for the one-pot cascade synthesis of quinazolin-4(3H)-ones via acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of o-aminobenzamide with alcohols catalyzed by a simple Ni(II) catalyst, [Ni(MeTAA)], featuring a tetraaza macrocyclic ligand (tetramethyltetraaza[14]annulene (MeTAA)). A wide variety of substituted quinazolin-4(3H)-ones were synthesized in high yields starting from readily available benzyl alcohols and o-aminobenzamides. Several controlled reactions along with deuterium labeling studies were carried out to establish the acceptorless dehydrogenative nature of the reactions.

  13. Studies on quinazolines. 5. 2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2-c]quinazoline derivatives: a novel class of potent and selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists and antihypertensive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, J W; Tao, P L; Yen, M H; Lu, G Y; Shiau, C Y; Lai, Y J; Chien, S L; Chan, C H

    1993-07-23

    A series of 2-[(substituted phenylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl]- and 2-[(substituted phenylpiperidin-1-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2- c]quinazolin-5(6H)-ones or -5(6H)-thiones, and 3-[(substituted phenylpiperazin-1-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2-c]quinaz oline derivatives were synthesized, as conformationally restricted analogues of SGB-1534 and ketanserin, for evaluation as alpha-antagonists and antihypertensive agents. Most compounds containing a (substituted phenylipiperazinyl)methyl side chain displayed high binding affinity for alpha 1-adrenoceptor with no significant activity at alpha 2-sites. Compounds having a (substituted phenylpiperazinyl)methyl at the 3-position of 2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2-c]quinazolin-5(6H)-one ring system had a better activity than those with the same substituent at the 2-position. Structure-activity relationships for alpha 1-adrenoceptor affinity are presented and indicate that compounds with substitution at the ortho position on the benzene ring of the phenylpiperazine side chain moiety are more potent than those without substitution and/or substitutions at the 3- and 4-positions. Computer-assisted superimposition of SGB-1534 and 20b showed little structural correspondence between the quinazolinone and 2,3-dihydroimidazo[1,2-c]quinazoline nucleus, and specific interactions of these molecular fragments with the receptor protein appear unlikely. Antihypertensive activity was evaluated via intravenous administration of each compound to spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compounds (16a, 16b, 20b, and 28b) illustrated similar efficacy to SGB-1534 when assessed after 6 h. The pA2 value for 16a against phenylephedrine in rat aorta was much higher than that of prazosin. On the basis of alpha 1-adrenoceptor affinity/selectivity in vitro and duration of antihypertensive action in vivo, compounds 20b and 28b warrant further evaluation.

  14. Using pool noodles to teach mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, John; McDermid, Heather E

    2005-05-01

    Although mitosis and meiosis are fundamental to understanding genetics, students often find them difficult to learn. We suggest using common "pool noodles" as teaching aids to represent chromatids in classroom demonstrations. Students use these noodles to demonstrate the processes of synapsis, segregation, and recombination. Student feedback has been overwhelmingly positive.

  15. Mitosis, diffusible crosslinkers, and the ideal gas law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odde, David J

    2015-03-12

    During mitosis, molecular motors hydrolyze ATP to generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubules and form the bipolar mitotic spindle. Lansky et al. now show that the diffusible microtubule crosslinker Ase1p can generate sliding forces between adjacent microtubules, and it does so without ATP hydrolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals widespread full phosphorylation site occupancy during mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Brunak, Søren; Olsen, JV

    2010-01-01

    ) or CDK2 were almost fully phosphorylated in mitotic cells. In particular, nuclear proteins and proteins involved in regulating metabolic processes have high phosphorylation site occupancy in mitosis. This suggests that these proteins may be inactivated by phosphorylation in mitotic cells....

  17. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest...

  18. EWSR1 regulates mitosis by dynamically influencing microtubule acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yin, Rong-Hua; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-08-17

    EWSR1, participating in transcription and splicing, has been identified as a translocation partner for various transcription factors, resulting in translocation, which in turn plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have investigated the role of EWSR1 in mitosis. However, the effect of EWSR1 on mitosis is poorly understood. Here, we observed that depletion of EWSR1 resulted in cell cycle arrest in the mitotic phase, mainly due to an increase in the time from nuclear envelope breakdown to metaphase, resulting in a high percentage of unaligned chromosomes and multipolar spindles. We also demonstrated that EWSR1 is a spindle-associated protein that interacts with α-tubulin during mitosis. EWSR1 depletion increased the cold-sensitivity of spindle microtubules, and decreased the rate of spindle assembly. EWSR1 regulated the level of microtubule acetylation in the mitotic spindle; microtubule acetylation was rescued in EWSR1-depleted mitotic cells following suppression of HDAC6 activity by its specific inhibitor or siRNA treatment. In summary, these results suggest that EWSR1 regulates the acetylation of microtubules in a cell cycle-dependent manner through its dynamic location on spindle MTs, and may be a novel regulator for mitosis progress independent of its translocation.

  19. Ochratoxin A: apoptosis and aberrant exit from mitosis due to perturbation of microtubule dynamics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rached, Eva; Pfeiffer, Erika; Dekant, Wolfgang; Mally, Angela

    2006-07-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent nephrotoxin and causes high incidences of renal tumors in rodents. The molecular events leading to tumor formation by OTA are not well defined. Early pathological changes observed in kidneys of rats treated with OTA in vivo include frequent mitotic and abnormally enlarged cells, detachment of tubule cells, and apoptosis within the S3 segment of the proximal tubule, suggesting that OTA may interfere with molecules involved in the regulation of cell division and apoptosis. In this study, treatment of immortalized human kidney epithelial (IHKE) cells with OTA (0-50 microM) resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in apoptosis and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase. At the same time, OTA blocked metaphase/anaphase transition and led to the formation of aberrant mitotic figures and giant cells with abnormally enlarged and/or multiple nuclei, sometimes still connected by chromatin bridges. Immunostaining of the mitotic apparatus using an alpha-tubulin antibody revealed defects in spindle formation. In addition, OTA inhibited microtubule assembly in a concentration-dependent manner in a cell-free, in vitro assay. Interestingly, treatment with OTA also resulted in activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB), which has recently been shown to promote cell survival during mitotic cell cycle arrest. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that the mechanism by which OTA promotes tumor formation involves interference with microtubuli dynamics and mitotic spindle formation, resulting in apoptosis or-in the presence of survival signals such as stimulation of the NFkappaB pathway-premature exit from mitosis. Aberrant exit from mitosis resulting in blocked or asymmetric cell division may favor the occurrence of cytogenetic abnormalities and may therefore play a critical role in renal tumor formation by OTA.

  20. Comparative proteomics of mitosis and meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Dhali, Snigdha; Srikanth, Rapole; Ghosh, Santanu Kumar; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2014-09-23

    Precise and timely segregation of genetic material and conservation of ploidy are the two foremost requirements for survival of a eukaryotic organism. Two highly regulated cell division processes, namely mitosis and meiosis are central to achieve this objective. The modes of chromosome segregation are distinct in these two processes that generate progeny cells of equal ploidy and half the ploidy in mitosis and meiosis, respectively. Additionally, the nutritional requirement and intracellular processing of biological cue also differ in these two processes. From this, it can be envisaged that proteome of mitotic and meiotic cells will differ significantly. Therefore, identification of proteins that differ in their level of expression between mitosis and meiosis would further reveal the mechanistic detail of these processes. In the present study, we have investigated the protein expression profile of mitosis and meiosis by comparing proteome of budding yeast cultures arrested at mitotic metaphase and metaphase-I of meiosis using proteomic approach. Approximately 1000 and 2000 protein spots were visualized on 2-DE and 2D-DIGE gels respectively, out of which 14 protein spots were significant in 2-DE and 22 in 2D-DIGE (pmitosis, an up-regulation of actin cytoskeleton and its negative regulator occurs in meiosis. Mitosis and meiosis are two different types of cell division cycles with entirely different outcomes with definite biological implication for almost all eukaryotic species. In this work, we investigated, for the first time, the differential proteomic profile of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture arrested at mitotic metaphase (M) and metaphase-I (MI) of meiosis using 2-DE and 2D-DIGE. Our findings of up-regulation of actin and its negative regulator cofilin during meiosis suggest that the rate of actin cytoskeleton turnover is more in meiosis and actin cytoskeleton may play more crucial role during meiosis compared to mitosis. Present study also suggests that actin

  1. Differential regulation of Smad3 and of the type II transforming growth factor-β receptor in mitosis: implications for signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, Tal; Barizilay, Lior; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) depends on cellular context. This context is changed in mitosis through selective inhibition of vesicle trafficking, reduction in cell volume and the activation of mitotic kinases. We hypothesized that these alterations in cell context may induce a differential regulation of Smads and TGF-β receptors. We tested this hypothesis in mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells, arrested (or not) in mitosis with 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2). In mitosis, without TGF-β stimulation, Smad3 was phosphorylated at the C-terminus and linker regions and localized to the mitotic spindle. Phosphorylated Smad3 interacted with the negative regulators of Smad signaling, Smurf2 and Ski, and failed to induce a transcriptional response. Moreover, in cells arrested in mitosis, Smad3 levels were progressively reduced. These phosphorylations and reduction in the levels of Smad3 depended on ERK activation and Mps1 kinase activity, and were abrogated by increasing the volume of cells arrested in mitosis with hypotonic medium. Furthermore, an Mps1-dependent phosphorylation of GFP-Smad3 was also observed upon its over-expression in interphase cells, suggesting a mechanism of negative regulation which counters increases in Smad3 concentration. Arrest in mitosis also induced a block in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII). Moreover, following the stimulation of mitotic cells with TGF-β, the proteasome-mediated attenuation of TGF-β receptor activity, the degradation and clearance of TβRII from the plasma membrane, and the clearance of the TGF-β ligand from the medium were compromised, and the C-terminus phosphorylation of Smad3 was prolonged. We propose that the reduction in Smad3 levels, its linker phosphorylation, and its association with negative regulators (observed in mitosis prior to ligand stimulation) represent a signal attenuating mechanism. This mechanism is balanced by the retention of active TGF

  2. Differential Regulation of Smad3 and of the Type II Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor in Mitosis: Implications for Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, Tal; Barizilay, Lior; Smorodinsky, Nechama I.; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) depends on cellular context. This context is changed in mitosis through selective inhibition of vesicle trafficking, reduction in cell volume and the activation of mitotic kinases. We hypothesized that these alterations in cell context may induce a differential regulation of Smads and TGF-β receptors. We tested this hypothesis in mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells, arrested (or not) in mitosis with 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2). In mitosis, without TGF-β stimulation, Smad3 was phosphorylated at the C-terminus and linker regions and localized to the mitotic spindle. Phosphorylated Smad3 interacted with the negative regulators of Smad signaling, Smurf2 and Ski, and failed to induce a transcriptional response. Moreover, in cells arrested in mitosis, Smad3 levels were progressively reduced. These phosphorylations and reduction in the levels of Smad3 depended on ERK activation and Mps1 kinase activity, and were abrogated by increasing the volume of cells arrested in mitosis with hypotonic medium. Furthermore, an Mps1-dependent phosphorylation of GFP-Smad3 was also observed upon its over-expression in interphase cells, suggesting a mechanism of negative regulation which counters increases in Smad3 concentration. Arrest in mitosis also induced a block in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβRII). Moreover, following the stimulation of mitotic cells with TGF-β, the proteasome-mediated attenuation of TGF-β receptor activity, the degradation and clearance of TβRII from the plasma membrane, and the clearance of the TGF-β ligand from the medium were compromised, and the C-terminus phosphorylation of Smad3 was prolonged. We propose that the reduction in Smad3 levels, its linker phosphorylation, and its association with negative regulators (observed in mitosis prior to ligand stimulation) represent a signal attenuating mechanism. This mechanism is balanced by the retention of active TGF

  3. (E-3-Propoxymethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazolin-9-one monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhon Zh Elmuradov

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C15H16N2O2·H2O, was synthesized via the alkylation of 3-hydroxymethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-b]quinazolin-9-one with n-propyl iodide in the presence of sodium hydroxide. The organic molecule and the water molecule both lie on a crystallographic mirror plane. In the crystal structure, intermolecular O—H...O and O—H...N hydrogen bonds link the components into extended chains along [100].

  4. Synthesis and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some Novel 3-(6-Substituted-1, 3-benzothiazole-2-yl-2-[{(4-substituted phenyl amino} methyl] quinazolines-4 (3H-ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Srivastav

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel 3-(6-substituted-1, 3-benzothiazole-2-yl-2-[{(4-substituted phenyl amino} methyl] quinazolines-4(3H-ones were synthesized by treating 2-(chloromethyl-3-(6-substituted-1, 3-benzothiazole-2-yl quinazoline-4-(3H-one (IIa-d with various substituted amine. The compounds (IIa-d prepared by treating 2-[(chloroacetyl amino] benzoic acid with different 2-amino-6-substituted benzothiazole. Elemental analysis, IR, 1HNMR and mass spectral data confirmed the structure of the newly synthesized compounds. Synthesized quinazolines-4-one derivative were investigated for their anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activity.

  5. Rh(III)- and Zn(II)-Catalyzed Synthesis of Quinazoline N-Oxides via C-H Amidation-Cyclization of Oximes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Fen; Yang, Xifa; Zhou, Xukai; Li, Xingwei

    2016-12-02

    Quinazoline N-oxides have been prepared from simple ketoximes and 1,4,2-dioxazol-5-ones via Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activation-amidation of the ketoximes and subsequent Zn(II)-catalyzed cyclization. The substrate scope and functional group compatibility were examined. The reaction features relay catalysis by Rh(III) and Zn(II).

  6. Synthesis and SAR of new pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline-3-carboxamide derivatives as potent and selective MPS1 kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldarelli, Marina; Angiolini, Mauro; Disingrini, Teresa; Donati, Daniele; Guanci, Marco; Nuvoloni, Stefano; Posteri, Helena; Quartieri, Francesca; Silvagni, Marco; Colombo, Riccardo

    2011-08-01

    The synthesis and SAR of a series of novel pyrazolo-quinazolines as potent and selective MPS1 inhibitors are reported. We describe the optimization of the initial hit, identified by screening the internal library collection, into an orally available, potent and selective MPS1 inhibitor.

  7. Synthesis of quinazolines from N-(2-nitrophenylsulfonyl)iminodiacetate and alpha-(2-nitrophenylsulfonyl)amino ketones via 2H-indazole 1-oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupková, Sona; Slough, Greg A; Krchnák, Viktor

    2010-07-02

    Base-catalyzed rearrangement of 2H-indazoles 1-oxides, prepared by tandem carbon-carbon followed by nitrogen-nitrogen bond formations from easily accessible N-alkyl-2-nitro-N-(2-oxo-2-aryl-ethyl)-benzenesulfonamides using glycine, 2-nitrobenzenesulfonyl chlorides, and bromo ketones/acetates, yielded high purity quinazolines.

  8. UV-guided isolation of verrucine A and B, novel quinazolines from Penicillium verrucosum structurally related to anacine from P. aurantiogriseum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Franzyk, Henrik; Jensen, Søren Rosendal

    1999-01-01

    Two novel quinazolines, verrucine A and B, have been isolated as a major and a minor metabolite of Penicillium verrucosum, respectively. Both are condensates of one mole each of anthranilic acid, phenylalanine and glutamine. The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and the two...

  9. H-Y-zeolites induced heterocyclization: Highly efficient synthesis of substituted-quinazolin-4(3H)ones under microwave irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Bakavoli; O. Sabzevari; M. Rahimizadeh

    2007-01-01

    A highly efficient synthesis of 2-amino-N-substituted-benzamides was performed by the condensation of isatoic anhydride with several amines in solvent-free conditions under microwave irradiation. H-Y-zeolites induced heterocyclization of these products with ortho-esters under similar conditions afforded the relevant substituted-quinazolin-4(3H)ones in high yields.

  10. Silver(I) complexes with phthalazine and quinazoline as effective agents against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glišić, Biljana Đ; Senerovic, Lidija; Comba, Peter; Wadepohl, Hubert; Veselinovic, Aleksandar; Milivojevic, Dusan R; Djuran, Miloš I; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina

    2016-02-01

    Five silver(I) complexes with aromatic nitrogen-containing heterocycles, phthalazine (phtz) and quinazoline (qz), were synthesized, characterized and analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Although different AgX salts reacted with phtz, only dinuclear silver(I) complexes of the general formula {[Ag(X-O)(phtz-N)]2(μ-phtz-N,N')2} were formed, X=NO3(-) (1), CF3SO3(-) (2) and ClO4(-) (3). However, reactions of qz with an equimolar amount of AgCF3SO3 and AgBF4 resulted in the formation of polynuclear complexes, {[Ag(CF3SO3-O)(qz-N)]2}n (4) and {[Ag(qz-N)][BF4]}n (5). Complexes 1-5 were evaluated by in vitro antimicrobial studies against a panel of microbial strains that lead to many skin and soft tissue, respiratory, wound and nosocomial infections. The obtained results indicate that all tested silver(I) complexes have good antibacterial activity with MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values in the range from 2.9 to 48.0μM against the investigated strains. Among the investigated strains, these complexes were particularly efficient against pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MIC=2.9-29μM) and had a marked ability to disrupt clinically relevant biofilms of strains with high inherent resistance to antibiotics. On the other hand, their activity against the fungus Candida albicans was moderate. In order to determine the therapeutic potential of silver(I) complexes 1-5, their antiproliferative effect on the human lung fibroblastic cell line MRC5, has been also evaluated. The binding of complexes 1-5 to the genomic DNA of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated by gel electrophoresis techniques and well supported by molecular docking into the DNA minor groove. All investigated complexes showed an improved cytotoxicity profile in comparison to the clinically used AgNO3.

  11. Quinazoline antifolate thymidylate synthase inhibitors: nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine substituents in the C2 position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsham, P R; Chambers, P; Hayter, A J; Hughes, L R; Jackman, A L; O'Connor, B M; Bishop, J A; Calvert, A H

    1989-03-01

    The synthesis of 16 new N10-propargylquinazoline antifolates with methylamino, ethylamino, (2-aminoethyl)amino, [2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]amino, (2-hydroxyethyl)amino, (carboxymethyl)amino, dimethylamino, imidazol-1-yl, methoxy, ethoxy, phenoxy, 2-methoxyethoxy, 2-hydroxyethoxy, mercapto, methylthio, and chloro substituents at C2 is described. In general, the synthetic route involved the coupling of diethyl N-[4-(prop-2-ynylamino)benzoyl]-L-glutamate (5a) with 6-(bromomethyl)-2-chloro-3,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinazoline in N,N-dimethylformamide with calcium carbonate as the base, displacement of the C2-chloro substituent with nitrogen and sulfur nucleophiles, and deprotection using mild alkali. The C2-ether analogues were most conveniently prepared by coupling 5a with 6-(bromomethyl)-2,4-diakoxy(or diphenoxy)quinazolines. In this series the final deprotection step with aqueous alkali gave simultaneous selective hydrolysis of the C4-alkoxy or C4-phenoxy substituent. The compounds were tested as inhibitors of partially purified L1210 thymidylate synthase (TS). As a measure of cytotoxicity, they were examined for their inhibition of the growth of L1210 cells in culture. The C2-methoxy analogue 11a was equivalent to the previously described tight binding TS inhibitor N10-propargyl-5,8-dideazafolic acid (CB3717, ICI 155387, 1a) against the TS enzyme and exhibited enhanced potency in culture. The C2-methoxy substituent also gave a 110-fold enhancement in aqueous solubility relative to the C2-amine. These results suggest that 11a will be an interesting compound for further study as a potential antitumor agent in vivo. A further series of 2-methoxyquinazoline antifolates with modified alkyl substituents at N10 is also described. None of these analogues equalled the activity of 11a. Thus the propargyl group appears to be the optimum N10 substituent in both 2-amino- and 2-methoxyquinazoline antifolates.

  12. Discovery of quinazolin-4-amines bearing benzimidazole fragments as dual inhibitors of c-Met and VEGFR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Wu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Zhi; Xue, Jia-Yu; Xu, Yun-Gen

    2014-09-01

    Both c-Met and VEGFR-2 are important targets for the treatment of cancers. In this study, a series of N-(2-phenyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-5-yl)quinazolin-4-amine derivatives were designed and identified as dual c-Met and VEGFR-2 inhibitors. Among these compounds bearing quinazoline and benzimidazole fragments, compound 7j exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against c-Met and VEGFR-2 with IC50 of 0.05μM and 0.02μM, respectively. It also showed the highest anticancer activity against the tested cancer cell lines with IC50 of 1.5μM against MCF-7 and 8.7μM against Hep-G2. Docking simulation supported the initial pharmacophoric hypothesis and suggested a common mode of interaction at the ATP-binding site of c-Met and VEGFR-2, which demonstrates that compound 7j is a potential agent for cancer therapy deserving further researching.

  13. Synthesis and anti-TMV activity of novel β-amino acid ester derivatives containing quinazoline and benzothiazole moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Han; Li, Pei; Hu, Deyu; Song, Bao-An

    2014-08-01

    Here, a series of β-amino acid ester derivatives containing quinazoline and benzothiazoles was synthesized and evaluated for anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activity. The compounds 3n, 3o, 3p and 3q showed good antiviral activity against TMV at a concentration of 500 μg/mL, with curative rates of 55.55%, 52.32%, 52.77% and 50.91%, respectively, and protection rates of 52.33%, 55.96%, 54.21% and 50.98%, respectively. These values were close to those of the commercially available antiviral agent ningnanmycin (which has curative and protection rates of 55.27% and 52.16%, respectively). To our knowledge, this is the first report of the anti-TMV activity of β-amino acid ester derivatives containing quinazoline and benzothiazoles moieties; the results indicate that these novel compounds can potentially be used as protective agents against TMV diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Insecticidal quinazoline derivatives with (trifluoromethyl)diazirinyl and azido substituents as NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase inhibitors and candidate photoaffinity probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latli, B; Wood, E; Casida, J E

    1996-03-01

    Two candidate photoaffinity probes are designed from 4-substituted quinazolines known to be potent insecticides/acaricides and NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase inhibitors acting at or near the rotenone site. 4-(11-Azidoundecyl-2-amino)quinazoline, based on the undecylamino analog SAN 548A as a prototype, was synthesized in 18% overall yield from ethyl 10-undecenoate by oxidation of the terminal double bond, reductive amination, coupling to 4-chloroquinazoline, and functional group manipulation of the terminal ethyl ester to an alcohol, a mesylate and finally nucleophilic displacement with azide ions. 4-(4-(3-(Trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl)phenethoxy)quinaz oline [the (trifluoromethyl)diazirinyl analog of fenazaquin insecticide/acaricide] was prepared from 4-bromophenethyl alcohol in 31% overall yield by first introducing the trifluoromethylketone moiety followed by its conversion to the (trifluoromethyl)-diazirine and finally coupling to 4-chloroquinazoline as above. Both candidate photoaffinity probes have the inhibitory potency of rotenone (IC50 of 3-4 nM in each case). The azidoundecylamino compound has inadequate photoreactivity whereas that of the (trifluoromethyl)diazirinyl analog is ideal at 350 nm. Radiosynthesis of the latter photoaffinity ligand included introduction of the diazirinyl moiety as the carbene precursor, oxidation of (trifluoromethyl)diazirinylphenethyl alcohol to the corresponding acid with Jones' reagent, and reduction of the phenacetyl chloride intermediate with sodium borotritide to incorporate tritium.

  15. Cycling with BRCA2 from DNA repair to mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunsook, E-mail: HL212@snu.ac.kr

    2014-11-15

    Genetic integrity in proliferating cells is guaranteed by the harmony of DNA replication, appropriate DNA repair, and segregation of the duplicated genome. Breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 is a unique tumor suppressor that is involved in all three processes. Hence, it is critical in genome maintenance. The functions of BRCA2 in DNA repair and homology-directed recombination (HDR) have been reviewed numerous times. Here, I will briefly go through the functions of BRCA2 in HDR and focus on the emerging roles of BRCA2 in telomere homeostasis and mitosis, then discuss how BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in a cell-cycle specific manner in the maintenance of genomic integrity. - Highlights: • BRCA2 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor and is crucial in genetic integrity. • BRCA2 exerts distinct functions in cell cycle-specific manner. • Mitotic kinases regulate diverse functions of BRCA2 in mitosis and cytokinesis.

  16. Disruption of microtubule integrity initiates mitosis during CNS repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossing, Torsten; Barros, Claudia S; Fischer, Bettina; Russell, Steven; Shepherd, David

    2012-08-14

    Mechanisms of CNS repair have vital medical implications. We show that traumatic injury to the ventral midline of the embryonic Drosophila CNS activates cell divisions to replace lost cells. A pilot screen analyzing transcriptomes of single cells during repair pointed to downregulation of the microtubule-stabilizing GTPase mitochondrial Rho (Miro) and upregulation of the Jun transcription factor Jun-related antigen (Jra). Ectopic Miro expression can prevent midline divisions after damage, whereas Miro depletion destabilizes cortical β-tubulin and increases divisions. Disruption of cortical microtubules, either by chemical depolymerization or by overexpression of monomeric tubulin, triggers ectopic mitosis in the midline and induces Jra expression. Conversely, loss of Jra renders midline cells unable to replace damaged siblings. Our data indicate that upon injury, the integrity of the microtubule cytoskeleton controls cell division in the CNS midline, triggering extra mitosis to replace lost cells. The conservation of the identified molecules suggests that similar mechanisms may operate in vertebrates.

  17. Dissecting mitosis by RNAi in Drosophila tissue culture cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiato Helder

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a detailed methodology to study the function of genes whose products function during mitosis by dsRNA-mediated interference (RNAi in cultured cells of Drosophila melanogaster. This procedure is particularly useful for the analysis of genes for which genetic mutations are not available or for the dissection of complicated phenotypes derived from the analysis of such mutants. With the advent of whole genome sequencing it is expected that RNAi-based screenings will be one method of choice for the identification and study of novel genes involved in particular cellular processes. In this paper we focused particularly on the procedures for the proper phenotypic analysis of cells after RNAi-mediated depletion of proteins required for mitosis, the process by which the genetic information is segregated equally between daughter cells. We use RNAi of the microtubule-associated protein MAST/Orbit as an example for the usefulness of the technique.

  18. Meeting report--Getting Into and Out of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchedlishvili, Nunu; Jonak, Katarzyna; Saurin, Adrian T

    2015-11-15

    The Company of Biologists Workshop 'Getting Into and Out of Mitosis' was held 10-13 May 2015 at Wiston House in West Sussex, UK. The workshop brought together researchers from wide-ranging disciplines and provided a forum to discuss their latest work on the control of cell division from mitotic entry to exit. This report highlights the main topics and summarises the discussion around the key themes and questions that emerged from the meeting.

  19. Circadian-independent cell mitosis in immortalized fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Yeom, Mijung; Pendergast, Julie S.; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-01-01

    Two prominent timekeeping systems, the cell cycle, which controls cell division, and the circadian system, which controls 24-h rhythms of physiology and behavior, are found in nearly all living organisms. A distinct feature of circadian rhythms is that they are temperature-compensated such that the period of the rhythm remains constant (~24 h) at different ambient temperatures. Even though the speed of cell division, or growth rate, is highly temperature-dependent, the cell-mitosis rhythm is ...

  20. Circadian-independent cell mitosis in immortalized fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Mijung; Pendergast, Julie S; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-05-25

    Two prominent timekeeping systems, the cell cycle, which controls cell division, and the circadian system, which controls 24-h rhythms of physiology and behavior, are found in nearly all living organisms. A distinct feature of circadian rhythms is that they are temperature-compensated such that the period of the rhythm remains constant (approximately 24 h) at different ambient temperatures. Even though the speed of cell division, or growth rate, is highly temperature-dependent, the cell-mitosis rhythm is temperature-compensated. Twenty-four-hour fluctuations in cell division have also been observed in numerous species, suggesting that the circadian system is regulating the timing of cell division. We tested whether the cell-cycle rhythm was coupled to the circadian system in immortalized rat-1 fibroblasts by monitoring cell-cycle gene promoter-driven luciferase activity. We found that there was no consistent phase relationship between the circadian and cell cycles, and that the cell-cycle rhythm was not temperature-compensated in rat-1 fibroblasts. These data suggest that the circadian system does not regulate the cell-mitosis rhythm in rat-1 fibroblasts. These findings are inconsistent with numerous studies that suggest that cell mitosis is regulated by the circadian system in mammalian tissues in vivo. To account for this discrepancy, we propose two possibilities: (i) There is no direct coupling between the circadian rhythm and cell cycle but the timing of cell mitosis is synchronized with the rhythmic host environment, or (ii) coupling between the circadian rhythm and cell cycle exists in normal cells but it is disconnected in immortalized cells.

  1. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  2. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  3. Rheology of the Active Cell Cortex in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Friedrich, Elisabeth; Toyoda, Yusuke; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2016-08-09

    The cell cortex is a key structure for the regulation of cell shape and tissue organization. To reach a better understanding of the mechanics and dynamics of the cortex, we study here HeLa cells in mitosis as a simple model system. In our assay, single rounded cells are dynamically compressed between two parallel plates. Our measurements indicate that the cortical layer is the dominant mechanical element in mitosis as opposed to the cytoplasmic interior. To characterize the time-dependent rheological response, we extract a complex elastic modulus that characterizes the resistance of the cortex against area dilation. In this way, we present a rheological characterization of the cortical actomyosin network in the linear regime. Furthermore, we investigate the influence of actin cross linkers and the impact of active prestress on rheological behavior. Notably, we find that cell mechanics values in mitosis are captured by a simple rheological model characterized by a single timescale on the order of 10 s, which marks the onset of fluidity in the system. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of MEK activity in COS7 cells entering mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Luo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been extensively investigated, numerous events remain unclear. In the present study, we examined mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) expression from interphase to mitosis. Following nocodazole treatment, COS7 cells gradually became round as early as 4 h after treatment. Cyclin B1 expression gradually increased from 4 to 24 h in the presence of nocodazole. When cells were treated with nocodazole for 4 h, the level of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated MEK phosphorylation did not significantly change between nocodazole-untreated and -treated (4 h) cells (P>0.05). However, EGF-mediated MEK phosphorylation was significantly inhibited upon treatment with nocodazole for 8 and 24 h compared to nocodazole-untreated cells (P0.05). The results showed that MEK expression is gradually inhibited from cell interphase to mitosis, and that MEK downstream signaling is affected by this inhibition, which probably reflects the requirements of cell physiology during mitosis.

  5. Pathologic mitoses and pathology of mitosis in tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RG Steinbeck

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The gist of my hypothesis (.. is a certain abnormal chromatin constitution. Each process, which brings about this chromatin constitution, would result in the origin of a malignant tumour. Certainly, I consider irregularities with mitosis as the normal mode of the origin of an incorrectly assembled nucleus. This statement by Boveri (1914 has considered earlier observations of asymmetric divisions in human cancers (Hansemann, 1890. The hypothesis is based on the understanding of mitosis as an equational bipartition of the hereditary substance (Flemming, 1879; Roux, 1883. Latest since it was known that genes are located on chromosomes (Sturtevant, 1913, their balanced transport in anaphase appeared as a condition of correct somatic proliferation. True mitoses guarantee the constancy of terminally differentiated tissues. Politzer (1934 has performed X-ray experiments to investigate abnormal karyokinesis with regard to anomalous chromatin condensation, chromosome breakage, spindle malformation, and failure in cytokinesis. On the basis of light microscopy, further significant progress in understanding the pathology of mitosis was not possible. Tumour cases with reduced chromosome numbers seduced to the idea that mitotic activity is rather under cytoplasmic than under nuclear control (Koller, 1947.

  6. Mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells changed by endocrine effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-yun LIU; Dong-mei Li; Xiao-fang ZHANG; Jian-hui WU; Zu-yue SUN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of androgen and estrogen on mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells of male rats. Methods: Castrated rats were treated with a single injection of testosterone propionate (TP) or benzogynestry (E2). There were 8 rats in the control group and TP-treated or E2-treated group. Prostate, liver, a specimen of skin, and a segment of the jejunum and colon were removed after the corresponding treatment. The results were observed through immunohistochemistry and iron hematoxylin-eosin staining.Results: All mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats with TP were oriented parallel to the basement membrane; however, mitoses found in the prostate epithelial cells of castrated rats in E2 and the control group were oriented perpendicular to the basement membrane. TP treatment resulted in marked changes in mitosis orientation in the prostate epithelial cells. Bromodeoxyuridine-labeled positive cells could be seen throughout the stroma and prostate epithelial cells with an injection of TP; however, the positive cells could only be seen in the stroma of prostate with an injection of E2, and the positive cells could hardly be seen in the control group. Conclusion: We found a novel effect of TP in the prostate as a marked change of mitosis orientation in prostate epithelial cells.

  7. Chromatin proteins and RNA are associated with DNA during all phases of mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    L Black, Kathryn; Petruk, Svetlana; Fenstermaker, Tyler K.; Hodgson, Jacob W.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Brock, Hugh W; Mazo, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis brings about major changes to chromosome and nuclear structure. We used recently developed proximity ligation assay-based techniques to investigate the association with DNA of chromatin-associated proteins and RNAs in Drosophila embryos during mitosis. All groups of tested proteins, histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling proteins and methylated histones remained in close proximity to DNA during all phases of mitosis. We also found that RNA transcripts are associated with DNA durin...

  8. The Role of BRCA1/BARD1 Heterodimers in the Mitosis-Interphase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Littlepage, L., Wu, H., and Ruderman, J. V. (2003). Aurora A, meiosis and mitosis. Biol Cell 96, 215-229. Deng, C. X., and Wang, R. H. (2003...mitosis. J. Cell Biol. 120, 947–957. Crane, R., Gadea, B., Littlepage, L., Wu, H., and Ruderman, J.V. (2003). Aurora A, meiosis and mitosis. Biol. Cell...and the mitotic state. Extract naturally arrested in metaphase of meiosis II (CSF-arrested extract) was prepared by crushing unfertilized eggs in

  9. Zitongdong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Zitongdong Block (Eastern Zitong Block) is located in the northwest of the Sichuan Basin. Tectonically, it is situated in the east part of Zitong Depression, southeast of mid-Longmenshan folded and faulted belt( as shown on Fig. 8 ), covering an area of 1 730 km2. The traffic is very convenient, the No. 108 national highway passes through the north of the block. Topographically, the area belongs to low hilly land at the elevation of 500-700 m.

  10. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis-G1 transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Bartman, Caroline R; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Keller, Cheryl A; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A

    2016-06-15

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer-promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis-G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states.

  11. Nucleocytoplasmic protein translocation during mitosis in the social amoebozoan Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Budniak, Aldona

    2015-02-01

    Mitosis is a fundamental and essential life process. It underlies the duplication and survival of all cells and, as a result, all eukaryotic organisms. Since uncontrolled mitosis is a dreaded component of many cancers, a full understanding of the process is critical. Evolution has led to the existence of three types of mitosis: closed, open, and semi-open. The significance of these different mitotic species, how they can lead to a full understanding of the critical events that underlie the asexual duplication of all cells, and how they may generate new insights into controlling unregulated cell division remains to be determined. The eukaryotic microbe Dictyostelium discoideum has proved to be a valuable biomedical model organism. While it appears to utilize closed mitosis, a review of the literature suggests that it possesses a form of mitosis that lies in the middle between truly open and fully closed mitosis-it utilizes a form of semi-open mitosis. Here, the nucleocytoplasmic translocation patterns of the proteins that have been studied during mitosis in the social amoebozoan D. discoideum are detailed followed by a discussion of how some of them provide support for the hypothesis of semi-open mitosis.

  12. Autophagic flux is highly active in early mitosis and differentially regulated throughout the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is a fast process that involves dramatic cellular remodeling and has a high energy demand. Whether autophagy is active or inactive during the early stages of mitosis in a naturally dividing cell is still debated. Here we aimed to use multiple assays to resolve this apparent discrepancy. Although the LC3 puncta number was reduced in mitosis, the four different cell lines we tested all have active autophagic flux in both interphase and mitosis. In addition, the autophagic flux was highly active in nocodazole-induced, double-thymidine synchronization released as well as naturally occurring mitosis in HeLa cells. Multiple autophagy proteins are upregulated in mitosis and the increased Beclin-1 level likely contributes to the active autophagic flux in early mitosis. It is interesting that although the autophagic flux is active throughout the cell cycle, early mitosis and S phase have relatively higher autophagic flux than G1 and late G2 phases, which might be helpful to degrade the damaged organelles and provide energy during S phase and mitosis. PMID:27213594

  13. Resumption of mitosis in frozen-thawed embryos is not related to the chromosomal constitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Inge E; Kølvrå, Steen; Crüger, Dorthe G

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relation between the resumption of mitosis after thaw and chromosomal constitution in frozen-thawed embryos. In addition, to evaluate the correlation among the three parameters of resumption of mitosis after thaw, postthaw blastomere loss, and multinucleation. DESIGN: Frozen....... RESULT(S): No difference was observed in the chromosomal constitution of embryos with and without resumption of mitosis. Neither was the postthaw blastomere loss connected to the chromosomal constitution. The resumption of mitosis was not associated with postthaw loss of blastomeres...

  14. The polo-like kinase PLKA is required for initiation and progression through mitosis in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachewich, Catherine; Masker, Kathryn; Osmani, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Polo-like kinases (PLK) function during multiple stages of mitotic progression and in cytokinesis. We identified and cloned a PLK homologue in Aspergillus nidulans, plkA, which is the first PLK reported in a filamentous fungus and the largest member of the PLK family to date. As plkA was essential, the effects of overexpression and localization of protein in living cells were explored to determine PLKA function. Overexpression of PLKA permitted hyphal formation, but blocked nuclear division in interphase. In NIMA or NIMT temperature-sensitive backgrounds, overexpression of PLKA impaired normal entry into mitosis upon release from restrictive temperature, supporting a role for PLKA during G2/M. In the few mitotic cells present, spindles were monopolar or disorganized, and chromatin condensation and segregation were impaired, suggesting additional roles for PLKA in spindle formation and in chromosome dynamics. Consistent with this, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged PLKA could localize to the spb during interphase, and to the spb and nucleus throughout mitosis. Intriguingly, PLKA remained on the spb during telophase and into G1, in contrast to other PLK. In addition, spb localization was independent of NIMA function, unlike that demonstrated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe where PLK localization to the spb required the NIMA homologue Fin1. PLKA was not detected at cortical, septation-associated sites, and overexpression did not drive septum formation, also in contrast to that observed with other PLK. Therefore, PLKA is important for multiple events during mitosis, similar to PLK in higher organisms, but exhibits differences in size, localization and influence on septation/cytokinesis, suggesting additional novel regulatory features.

  15. Translocation of the papillomavirus L2/vDNA complex across the limiting membrane requires the onset of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calton, Christine M; Bronnimann, Matthew P; Manson, Ariana R; Li, Shuaizhi; Chapman, Janice A; Suarez-Berumen, Marcela; Williamson, Tatum R; Molugu, Sudheer K; Bernal, Ricardo A; Campos, Samuel K

    2017-05-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L2 protein acts as a chaperone to ensure that the viral genome (vDNA) traffics from endosomes to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and eventually the nucleus, where HPV replication occurs. En route to the nucleus, the L2/vDNA complex must translocate across limiting intracellular membranes. The details of this critical process remain poorly characterized. We have developed a system based on subcellular compartmentalization of the enzyme BirA and its cognate substrate to detect membrane translocation of L2-BirA from incoming virions. We find that L2 translocation requires transport to the TGN and is strictly dependent on entry into mitosis, coinciding with mitotic entry in synchronized cells. Cell cycle arrest causes retention of L2/vDNA at the TGN; only release and progression past G2/M enables translocation across the limiting membrane and subsequent infection. Microscopy of EdU-labeled vDNA reveals a rapid and dramatic shift in vDNA localization during early mitosis. At late G2/early prophase vDNA egresses from the TGN to a pericentriolar location, accumulating there through prometaphase where it begins to associate with condensed chromosomes. By metaphase and throughout anaphase the vDNA is seen bound to the mitotic chromosomes, ensuring distribution into both daughter nuclei. Mutations in a newly defined chromatin binding region of L2 potently blocked translocation, suggesting that translocation is dependent on chromatin binding during prometaphase. This represents the first time a virus has been shown to functionally couple the penetration of limiting membranes to cellular mitosis, explaining in part the tropism of HPV for mitotic basal keratinocytes.

  16. Remodeling of bovine oviductal epithelium by mitosis of secretory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Sayaka; Kobayashi, Yoshihiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Kimura, Koji; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Two types of oviductal epithelial cells, secretory and ciliated, play crucial roles in the first days after fertilization in mammals. Secretory cells produce various molecules promoting embryo development, while ciliated cells facilitate transport of oocytes and zygotes by ciliary beating. The proportions of the two cell types change during the estrous cycle. The proportion of ciliated cells on the oviductal luminal surface is abundant at the follicular phase, whereas the proportion of secretory cells gradually increases with the formation of the corpus luteum. In the present study, we hypothesize that the proportions of ciliated and secretory epithelial cells are regulated by mitosis. The proportion of the cells being positive for FOXJ1 (a ciliated cell marker) or Ki67 (a mitosis marker) in epithelial cells during the estrous cycle were immunohistochemically examined. Ki67 and FOXJ1 or PAX8 (a secretory cell marker), were double-stained to clarify which types of epithelial cells undergo mitosis. In the ampulla, the percentage of FOXJ1-positive cells was highest at the day of ovulation (Day 0) and decreased by about 50 % by Days 8-12, while in the isthmus it did not change during the estrous cycle. The proportion of Ki67-positive cells was highest at around the time of ovulation in both the ampulla and isthmus. All the Ki67-positive cells were PAX8-positive and FOXJ1-negative in both the ampulla and isthmus. These findings suggest that epithelial remodeling, which is regulated by differentiation and/or proliferation of secretory cells of the oviduct, provides the optimal environment for gamete transport, fertilization and embryonic development.

  17. Synthesis, Antimicrobial, and Anti-HIV1 Activity of Quinazoline-4(3H-one Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vijayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation aims to synthesize 11 compounds of quinazoline-1 derivatives and to test their antimicrobial and anti-HIV1 activities. A quick-witted method was developed for the synthesis of novel substituted quinazolinone derivatives by summarizing diverse diamines with benzoxazine reactions, and it demonstrated the benefits of typical reactions, handy operation, and outstanding product yields. These compounds were confirmed by elemental analysis, I R, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass spectra. Then antimicrobial and anti-HIV1 activities of the compounds were tested in-vitro. It was found that compounds 7–11 possessed a wide range of anti microbial and anti-HIV1 activity.

  18. Discovery of antibiotic (E)-3-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4-cyanostyryl)quinazolin-4(3H)-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouley, Renee; Kumarasiri, Malika; Peng, Zhihong; Otero, Lisandro H; Song, Wei; Suckow, Mark A; Schroeder, Valerie A; Wolter, William R; Lastochkin, Elena; Antunes, Nuno T; Pi, Hualiang; Vakulenko, Sergei; Hermoso, Juan A; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2015-02-11

    In the face of the clinical challenge posed by resistant bacteria, the present needs for novel classes of antibiotics are genuine. In silico docking and screening, followed by chemical synthesis of a library of quinazolinones, led to the discovery of (E)-3-(3-carboxyphenyl)-2-(4-cyanostyryl)quinazolin-4(3H)-one (compound 2) as an antibiotic effective in vivo against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This antibiotic impairs cell-wall biosynthesis as documented by functional assays, showing binding of 2 to penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2a. We document that the antibiotic also inhibits PBP1 of S. aureus, indicating a broad targeting of structurally similar PBPs by this antibiotic. This class of antibiotics holds promise in fighting MRSA infections.

  19. From equator to pole: splitting chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Eris

    2015-01-01

    During eukaryotic cell division, chromosomes must be precisely partitioned to daughter cells. This relies on a mechanism to move chromosomes in defined directions within the parental cell. While sister chromatids are segregated from one another in mitosis and meiosis II, specific adaptations enable the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I to reduce ploidy for gamete production. Many of the factors that drive these directed chromosome movements are known, and their molecular mechanism has started to be uncovered. Here we review the mechanisms of eukaryotic chromosome segregation, with a particular emphasis on the modifications that ensure the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I. PMID:25593304

  20. Restarting life: fertilization and the transition from meiosis to mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Dean; Schuh, Melina

    2013-09-01

    Fertilization triggers a complex cellular programme that transforms two highly specialized meiotic germ cells, the oocyte and the sperm, into a totipotent mitotic embryo. Linkages between sister chromatids are remodelled to support the switch from reductional meiotic to equational mitotic divisions; the centrosome, which is absent from the egg, is reintroduced; cell division shifts from being extremely asymmetric to symmetric; genomic imprinting is selectively erased and re-established; and protein expression shifts from translational control to transcriptional control. Recent work has started to reveal how this remarkable transition from meiosis to mitosis is achieved.

  1. From equator to pole: splitting chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Eris; Marston, Adèle L

    2015-01-15

    During eukaryotic cell division, chromosomes must be precisely partitioned to daughter cells. This relies on a mechanism to move chromosomes in defined directions within the parental cell. While sister chromatids are segregated from one another in mitosis and meiosis II, specific adaptations enable the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I to reduce ploidy for gamete production. Many of the factors that drive these directed chromosome movements are known, and their molecular mechanism has started to be uncovered. Here we review the mechanisms of eukaryotic chromosome segregation, with a particular emphasis on the modifications that ensure the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I.

  2. Periodic Solutions of a Model of Mitosis in Frog Eggs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bei-ye Feng; Zuo-huan Zheng

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,we discuss a simplified model of mitosis in frog eggs proposed by M.T. Borisuk and J.J.Tyson in [1]. By using rigorous qualitative analysis, we prove the existence of the periodic solutions on a large scale and present the space region of the periodic solutions and the parameter region coresponding to the periodic solution. We also present the space region and the parameter region where there are no periodic solutions. The results are in accordance with the numerical results in [1] up to the qualitative property.

  3. The terminal basal mitosis of chicken retinal Lim1 horizontal cells is not sensitive to cisplatin-induced cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi Fard, Shahrzad; Thyselius, Malin; All-Ericsson, Charlotta; Hallböök, Finn

    2014-01-01

    For proper development, cells need to coordinate proliferation and cell cycle-exit. This is mediated by a cascade of proteins making sure that each phase of the cell cycle is controlled before the initiation of the next. Retinal progenitor cells divide during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration, where they undergo S-phase on the basal side, followed by mitoses on the apical side of the neuroepithelium. The final cell cycle of chicken retinal horizontal cells (HCs) is an exception to this general cell cycle behavior. Lim1 expressing (+) horizontal progenitor cells (HPCs) have a heterogenic final cell cycle, with some cells undergoing a terminal mitosis on the basal side of the retina. The results in this study show that this terminal basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs is not dependent on Chk1/2 for its regulation compared to retinal cells undergoing interkinetic nuclear migration. Neither activating nor blocking Chk1 had an effect on the basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs. Furthermore, the Lim1+ HPCs were not sensitive to cisplatin-induced DNA damage and were able to continue into mitosis in the presence of γ-H2AX without activation of caspase-3. However, Nutlin3a-induced expression of p21 did reduce the mitoses, suggesting the presence of a functional p53/p21 response in HPCs. In contrast, the apical mitoses were blocked upon activation of either Chk1/2 or p21, indicating the importance of these proteins during the process of interkinetic nuclear migration. Inhibiting Cdk1 blocked M-phase transition both for apical and basal mitoses. This confirmed that the cyclin B1-Cdk1 complex was active and functional during the basal mitosis of Lim1+ HPCs. The regulation of the final cell cycle of Lim1+ HPCs is of particular interest since it has been shown that the HCs are able to sustain persistent DNA damage, remain in the cell cycle for an extended period of time and, consequently, survive for months.

  4. Automated mitosis detection using texture, SIFT features and HMAX biologically inspired approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Humayun; Jalali, Sepehr; Roux, Ludovic; Racoceanu, Daniel; Hwee, Lim Joo; Naour, Gilles Le; Capron, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    According to Nottingham grading system, mitosis count in breast cancer histopathology is one of three components required for cancer grading and prognosis. Manual counting of mitosis is tedious and subject to considerable inter- and intra-reader variations. The aim is to investigate the various texture features and Hierarchical Model and X (HMAX) biologically inspired approach for mitosis detection using machine-learning techniques. We propose an approach that assists pathologists in automated mitosis detection and counting. The proposed method, which is based on the most favorable texture features combination, examines the separability between different channels of color space. Blue-ratio channel provides more discriminative information for mitosis detection in histopathological images. Co-occurrence features, run-length features, and Scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) features were extracted and used in the classification of mitosis. Finally, a classification is performed to put the candidate patch either in the mitosis class or in the non-mitosis class. Three different classifiers have been evaluated: Decision tree, linear kernel Support Vector Machine (SVM), and non-linear kernel SVM. We also evaluate the performance of the proposed framework using the modified biologically inspired model of HMAX and compare the results with other feature extraction methods such as dense SIFT. The proposed method has been tested on Mitosis detection in breast cancer histological images (MITOS) dataset provided for an International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR) 2012 contest. The proposed framework achieved 76% recall, 75% precision and 76% F-measure. Different frameworks for classification have been evaluated for mitosis detection. In future work, instead of regions, we intend to compute features on the results of mitosis contour segmentation and use them to improve detection and classification rate.

  5. The budding yeast Dbf2 protein kinase localises to the centrosome and moves to the bud neck in late mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenz, L M; Lee, S E; Fesquet, D; Johnston, L H

    2000-10-01

    Dbf2 is a multifunctional protein kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that functions in transcription, the stress response and as part of a network of genes in exit from mitosis. By analogy with fission yeast it seemed likely that these mitotic exit genes would be involved in cytokinesis. As a preliminary investigation of this we have used Dbf2 tagged with GFP to examine intracellular localisation of the protein in living cells. Dbf2 is found on the centrosomes/spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and also at the bud neck where it forms a double ring. The localisation of Dbf2 is cell cycle regulated. It is on the SPBs for much of the cell cycle and migrates from there to the bud neck in late mitosis, consistent with a role in cytokinesis. Dbf2 partly co-localises with septins at the bud neck. A temperature-sensitive mutant of dbf2 also blocks progression of cytokinesis at 37 degrees C. Following cytokinesis some Dbf2 moves into the nascent bud. Localisation to the bud neck depends upon the septins and also the mitotic exit network proteins Mob1, Cdc5, Cdc14 and Cdc15. The above data are consistent with Dbf2 acting downstream in a pathway controlling cytokinesis.

  6. Symmetric pollen mitosis I and suppression of pollen mitosis II prevent pollen development in Brachiaria jubata (Gramineae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Risso-Pascotto

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Microsporogenesis and pollen development were analyzed in a tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36 accession of the forage grass Brachiaria jubata (BRA 007820 from the Embrapa Beef Cattle Brachiaria collection that showed partial male sterility. Microsporocytes and pollen grains were prepared by squashing and staining with 0.5% propionic carmine. The meiotic process was typical of polyploids, with precocious chromosome migration to the poles and laggards in both meiosis I and II, resulting in tetrads with micronuclei in some microspores. After callose dissolution, microspores were released into the anther locule and appeared to be normal. Although each microspore initiated its differentiation into a pollen grain, in 11.1% of them nucleus polarization was not observed, i.e., pollen mitosis I was symmetric and the typical hemispherical cell plate was not detected. After a central cytokinesis, two equal-sized cells showing equal chromatin condensation and the same nuclear shape and size were formed. Generative cells and vegetative cells could not be distinguished. These cells did not undergo the second pollen mitosis and after completion of pollen wall synthesis each gave rise to a sterile and uninucleate pollen grain. The frequency of abnormal pollen mitosis varied among flowers and also among inflorescences. All plants were equally affected. The absence of fertile sperm cells in a considerable amount of pollen grains in this accession of B. jubata may compromise its use in breeding and could explain, at least in part, why seed production is low when compared with the amount of flowers per raceme.

  7. Sulfamic acid as energy efficient catalyst for synthesis of flurophores, 1--spiro [isoindoline-1,2′-quinazoline]-3,4′(3′)-diones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mansing M Mane; Dattaprasad M Pore

    2016-04-01

    An energy efficient synthesis of 1--spiro[isoindoline-1,2′-quinazoline]-3,4′(3′)-diones has been expediently accomplished by a reaction of isatin(s) / cyclic ketone and anthranilamide in ethanol at ambient temprature. Excellent yields of the products in short time duration, operational simplicity, and simple work-up procedure are the attractive features of the present protocol. Synthesized 1--spiro[isoindoline-1,2′-quinazoline]-3,4′(3′)-diones were found to be fluorescent with absorption in UV region (302, 362 nm) and emission in visible region (413-436 nm) with Stokes shift of 44-72 nm.

  8. Zitongxi Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Zitongxi Block (Western Zitong Block), is located in Zitong County, northwest of Sichuan Province (as shown on Fig. 8 ). Geologically. it is situated in the Zitong Depression, southwest of the middle Longmenshan faulted and folded belt, covering an area of 1 830 km2. Transportation is very convenient. A crisscross network of highways run through the block and the Baocheng railway is nearby. The climate is moderate. Most area belongs to hilly land with the elevation of 500-600 m.The Tongjiang River runs across the area.

  9. Endosomal recycling controls plasma membrane area during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucrot, Emmanuel; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2007-05-08

    The shape and total surface of a cell and its daughters change during mitosis. Many cells round up during prophase and metaphase and reacquire their extended and flattened shape during cytokinesis. How does the total area of plasma membrane change to accommodate these morphological changes and by what mechanism is control of total membrane area achieved? Using single-cell imaging methods, we have found that the amount of plasma membrane in attached cells in culture decreases at the beginning of mitosis and recovers rapidly by the end. Clathrin-based endocytosis is normal throughout all phases of cell division, whereas recycling of internalized membranes back to the cell surface slows considerably during the rounding up period and resumes at the time at which recovery of cell membrane begins. Interference with either one of these processes by genetic or chemical means impairs cell division. The total cell-membrane area recovers even in the absence of a functional Golgi apparatus, which would be needed for export of newly synthesized membrane lipids and proteins. We propose a mechanism by which modulation of endosomal recycling controls cell area and surface expression of membrane-bound proteins during cell division.

  10. Mitosis Detection for Invasive Breast Cancer Grading in Histopathological Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Angshuman; Mukherjee, Dipti Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Histopathological grading of cancer not only offers an insight to the patients' prognosis but also helps in making individual treatment plans. Mitosis counts in histopathological slides play a crucial role for invasive breast cancer grading using the Nottingham grading system. Pathologists perform this grading by manual examinations of a few thousand images for each patient. Hence, finding the mitotic figures from these images is a tedious job and also prone to observer variability due to variations in the appearances of the mitotic cells. We propose a fast and accurate approach for automatic mitosis detection from histopathological images. We employ area morphological scale space for cell segmentation. The scale space is constructed in a novel manner by restricting the scales with the maximization of relative-entropy between the cells and the background. This results in precise cell segmentation. The segmented cells are classified in mitotic and non-mitotic category using the random forest classifier. Experiments show at least 12% improvement in F1 score on more than 450 histopathological images at 40× magnification.

  11. FANCA safeguards interphase and mitosis during hematopoiesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Sater, Zahi; Cerabona, Donna; Potchanant, Elizabeth Sierra; Sun, Zejin; Enzor, Rikki; He, Ying; Robertson, Kent; Goebel, W Scott; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA/BRCA) signaling network controls multiple genome-housekeeping checkpoints, from interphase DNA repair to mitosis. The in vivo role of abnormal cell division in FA remains unknown. Here, we quantified the origins of genomic instability in FA patients and mice in vivo and ex vivo. We found that both mitotic errors and interphase DNA damage significantly contribute to genomic instability during FA-deficient hematopoiesis and in nonhematopoietic human and murine FA primary cells. Super-resolution microscopy coupled with functional assays revealed that FANCA shuttles to the pericentriolar material to regulate spindle assembly at mitotic entry. Loss of FA signaling rendered cells hypersensitive to spindle chemotherapeutics and allowed escape from the chemotherapy-induced spindle assembly checkpoint. In support of these findings, direct comparison of DNA crosslinking and anti-mitotic chemotherapeutics in primary FANCA-/- cells revealed genomic instability originating through divergent cell cycle checkpoint aberrations. Our data indicate that FA/BRCA signaling functions as an in vivo gatekeeper of genomic integrity throughout interphase and mitosis, which may have implications for future targeted therapies in FA and FA-deficient cancers.

  12. Controlling the switches: Rho GTPase regulation during animal cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yan; Oh, Wonkyung; Frost, Jeffrey A

    2014-12-01

    Animal cell division is a fundamental process that requires complex changes in cytoskeletal organization and function. Aberrant cell division often has disastrous consequences for the cell and can lead to cell senescence, neoplastic transformation or death. As important regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, Rho GTPases play major roles in regulating many aspects of mitosis and cytokinesis. These include centrosome duplication and separation, generation of cortical rigidity, microtubule-kinetochore stabilization, cleavage furrow formation, contractile ring formation and constriction, and abscission. The ability of Rho proteins to function as regulators of cell division depends on their ability to cycle between their active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound states. However, Rho proteins are inherently inefficient at fulfilling this cycle and require the actions of regulatory proteins that enhance GTP binding (RhoGEFs), stimulate GTPase activity (RhoGAPs), and sequester inactive Rho proteins in the cytosol (RhoGDIs). The roles of these regulatory proteins in controlling cell division are an area of active investigation. In this review we will delineate the current state of knowledge of how specific RhoGEFs, RhoGAPs and RhoGDIs control mitosis and cytokinesis, and highlight the mechanisms by which their functions are controlled.

  13. Regulation of APC/C activators in mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, Jillian A; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2008-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a multisubunit E3 ubiquitin ligase that triggers the degradation of multiple substrates during mitosis. Cdc20/Fizzy and Cdh1/Fizzy-related activate the APC/C and confer substrate specificity through complex interactions with both the core APC/C and substrate proteins. The regulation of Cdc20 and Cdh1 is critical for proper APC/C activity and occurs in multiple ways: targeted protein degradation, phosphorylation, and direct binding of inhibitory proteins. During the specialized divisions of meiosis, the activity of the APC/C must be modified to achieve proper chromosome segregation. Recent studies show that one way in which APC/C activity is modified is through the use of meiosis-specific APC/C activators. Furthermore, regulation of the APC/C during meiosis is carried out by both mitotic regulators of the APC/C as well as meiosis-specific regulators. Here, we review the regulation of APC/C activators during mitosis and the role and regulation of the APC/C during female meiosis.

  14. INPP5E Preserves Genomic Stability through Regulation of Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra Potchanant, Elizabeth A; Cerabona, Donna; Sater, Zahi Abdul; He, Ying; Sun, Zejin; Gehlhausen, Jeff; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2017-03-15

    The partially understood phosphoinositide signaling cascade regulates multiple aspects of cellular metabolism. Previous studies revealed that INPP5E, the inositol polyphosphate-5-phosphatase that is mutated in the developmental disorders Joubert and MORM syndromes, is essential for the function of the primary cilium and maintenance of phosphoinositide balance in nondividing cells. Here, we report that INPP5E further contributes to cellular homeostasis by regulating cell division. We found that silencing or genetic knockout of INPP5E in human and murine cells impairs the spindle assembly checkpoint, centrosome and spindle function, and maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Consistent with a cell cycle regulatory role, we found that INPP5E expression is cell cycle dependent, peaking at mitotic entry. INPP5E localizes to centrosomes, chromosomes, and kinetochores in early mitosis and shuttles to the midzone spindle at mitotic exit. Our findings identify the previously unknown, essential role of INPP5E in mitosis and prevention of aneuploidy, providing a new perspective on the function of this phosphoinositide phosphatase in health and development. Copyright © 2017 Sierra Potchanant et al.

  15. Kindlin1 regulates microtubule function to ensure normal mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh; Stavrou, Ifigeneia; Shrestha, Roshan L; Draviam, Viji; Frame, Margaret C; Brunton, Valerie G

    2016-08-01

    Loss of Kindlin 1 (Kin1) results in the skin blistering disorder Kindler Syndrome (KS), whose symptoms also include skin atrophy and reduced keratinocyte proliferation. Kin1 binds to integrins to modulate their activation and more recently it has been shown to regulate mitotic spindles and cell survival in a Plk1-dependent manner. Here we report that short-term Kin1 deletion in mouse skin results in impaired mitosis, which is associated with reduced acetylated tubulin (ac-tub) levels and cell proliferation. In cells, impaired mitosis and reduced ac-tub levels are also accompanied by reduced microtubule stability, all of which are rescued by HDAC6 inhibition. The ability of Kin1 to regulate HDAC6-dependent cellular ac-tub levels is dependent on its phosphorylation by Plk1. Taken together, these data define a novel role for Kin1 in microtubule acetylation and stability and offer a mechanistic insight into how certain KS phenotypes, such as skin atrophy and reduced cell proliferation, arise. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS.

  16. Synthesis and antiulcer activity of 2-[5-substituted-1--benzo(d) imidazol-2-yl sulfinyl]methyl-3-substituted quinazoline-4-(3) ones

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avinash Patil; Swastika Ganguly; Sanjay Surana

    2010-05-01

    2-[5-substituted-1--benzo(d)imidazol-2-yl sulfinyl]methyl-3-substituted quinazoline-4-(3)-one derivatives were synthesized and tested for antiulcer activity against pylorus ligation-induced, aspirin induced and ethanol induced ulcer in rat model. All the synthesized compounds were characterized by using IR, MS and 1H NMR spectral and elemental analysis. The compounds were scramed for their antiulcer activity: compounds 5k and 5n showed higher activity than omeprazole used as standard.

  17. Mitosis detection in breast cancer histology images with deep neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cireşan, Dan C; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    We use deep max-pooling convolutional neural networks to detect mitosis in breast histology images. The networks are trained to classify each pixel in the images, using as context a patch centered on the pixel. Simple postprocessing is then applied to the network output. Our approach won the ICPR 2012 mitosis detection competition, outperforming other contestants by a significant margin.

  18. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  19. Identifying mitosis deep in tissue using dynamic light scattering fluctuation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2012-03-01

    In the cell cycle, mitosis is the most dramatic phase, especially in Telophase and Cytokinesis. For single cells and cell monolayer, there are precise microscopic studies of mitosis, while for 3-D tissue such as tumor spheroids the light signal is obscured by the high background of diffusely scattered light. Therefore, the mitosis phase cannot be detected deep inside 3-D tissue using conventional microscopic techniques. In this work, we detect mitosis in living tissue using Tissue Dynamic Imaging (TDI). We trace depth-gated dynamic speckles from a tumor spheroid (up to 1mm in diameter) using coherence-gated digital holography imaging. Frequency-versus-time spectrograms depend on specific types of perturbation such as cell shape change, membrane undulation and cell organelles movements. By using these spectral responses as functional finger prints, we can identify mitosis events from different voxels at a specified depth inside tumor spheroids. By performing B-scans of the tumor spheroid, we generate 3-D mitosis maps (or movies) for the entire tumor spheroids. We show that for healthy tumor spheroids, the mitosis events only happen within the proliferating shell. We also compare results when anti-cancer drugs are applied to arrest, release and synchronize mitosis. This shows the application of TDI for drug screening. The technique can identify and monitor complex motilities inside 3-D tissue with a strong potential for drug diagnosis and developmental biology studies.

  20. Chengzikou Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Chengzikou Block is located in the north of Hekou district, Dongying City, Shandong Province, adjacent to Bohai Bay. It can be geographically divided into three units: onshore, transitional zone and offshore ultrashallow zone, totally covering an area of 470 km2. The southern onshore area is low and gentle in topography;the northern shallow sea is at water depths of 2-8 m below sea level, and the transitional zone occupies more than 60% of the whole block. The climate belongs to temperate zone with seasonal wind. Highways are welldeveloped here, and the traffic is very convenient. The Chengzikou Block is about 80 km away from Dongying City and 290 km from Jinan City in the south. The northern offshore area of the block is 160 km away from Longkou port in the east and only 38 km away in the west from Zhuangxi port.

  1. Longmenshan Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ Longmenshan Block is located in Jiange County of Jiangyou City in the northwest of Sichuan Basin. covering an area of 2 628 km2. Geologically, it is situated in the Mid-Longmenshan fault and fold belt, neighbouring Zitong Depression in its southeast. There are mountains surrounding its northwest , the rest area being hilly land,with the elevation of 500-700 m. The BaoCheng railway and the No. 108 highway run through the block, the traffic is very convenient.

  2. Monitoring the elasticity changes of HeLa cells during mitosis by atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ningcheng; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Jinshu; Ding, Xuemei; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin

    2016-10-01

    Cell mitosis plays a crucial role in cell life activity, which is one of the important phases in cell division cycle. During the mitosis, the cytoskeleton micro-structure of the cell changed and the biomechanical properties of the cell may vary depending upon different mitosis stages. In this study, the elasticity property of HeLa cells during mitosis was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Also, the actin filaments in different mitosis stages of the cells were observed by confocal imaging. Our results show that the cell in anaphase is stiffer than that in metaphase and telophase. Furthermore, lots of actin filaments gathered in cells' center area in anaphase, which contributes to the rigidity of the cell in this phase. Our findings demonstrate that the nano-biomechanics of living cells could provide a new index for characterizing cell physiological states.

  3. Prolonged Mitosis of Neural Progenitors Alters Cell Fate in the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; McMahon, John J; Miller, Emily E; Lennox, Ashley L; Suzuki, Aussie; Salmon, Edward; Silver, Debra L

    2016-01-06

    Embryonic neocortical development depends on balanced production of progenitors and neurons. Genetic mutations disrupting progenitor mitosis frequently impair neurogenesis; however, the link between altered mitosis and cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that prolonged mitosis of radial glial progenitors directly alters neuronal fate specification and progeny viability. Live imaging of progenitors from a neurogenesis mutant, Magoh(+/-), reveals that mitotic delay significantly correlates with preferential production of neurons instead of progenitors, as well as apoptotic progeny. Independently, two pharmacological approaches reveal a causal relationship between mitotic delay and progeny fate. As mitotic duration increases, progenitors produce substantially more apoptotic progeny or neurons. We show that apoptosis, but not differentiation, is p53 dependent, demonstrating that these are distinct outcomes of mitotic delay. Together our findings reveal that prolonged mitosis is sufficient to alter fates of radial glia progeny and define a new paradigm to understand how mitosis perturbations underlie brain size disorders such as microcephaly.

  4. Mitosis-specific phosphorylation of PML at T409 regulates spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J; Liu, J

    2016-08-31

    During mitosis, Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs) change dramatically in morphology and composition, but little is known about function of PML in mitosis. Here, we show that PML is phosphorylated at T409 (PML p409) in a mitosis-specific manner. More importantly, PML p409 contributes to maintain the duration of pro-metaphase and regulates spindle checkpoint. Deficient PML p409 caused a shortening of pro-metaphase and challenged the nocodazole-triggered mitotic arrest. T409A mutation led to a higher frequency of misaligned chromosomes on metaphase plate, and subsequently death in late mitosis. In addition, inhibition of PML p409 repressed growth of tumor cells, suggesting that PML p409 is a potential target for cancer therapy. Collectively, our study demonstrated an important phosphorylated site of PML, which contributed to explore the role of PML in mitosis.

  5. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting...... can lead to anaphase bridges that impair accurate chromosome segregation. The recent decade featured many advances in our understanding of how cells cope with underreplicated loci in mitosis. A major advance was the description of ultra-fine anaphase bridges (UFBs), a class of anaphase bridges...... established Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study anaphase bridges, and we identified Dpb11/TopBP1 as a novel UFB-associated protein in yeast and avian DT40 cells, respectively. TopBP1 localized to confined areas on replication-stress induced UFBs. Upon onset of mitosis we observed a burst...

  6. Importance of the CEP215-pericentrin interaction for centrosome maturation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongjae; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-01-01

    At the onset of mitosis, the centrosome undergoes maturation, which is characterized by a drastic expansion of the pericentriolar material (PCM) and a robust increase in microtubule-organizing activity. CEP215 is one of the major PCM components which accumulates at the centrosome during mitosis. The depletion phenotypes indicate that CEP215 is essential for centrosome maturation and bipolar spindle formation. Here, we performed a series of knockdown-rescue experiments to link the protein-protein interaction properties of CEP215 to its biological functions. The results showed that CEP215 and pericentrin, another major PCM component, is interdependent for their accumulation at the spindle poles during mitosis. As a result, The CEP215-pericentrin interaction is required for centrosome maturation and subsequent bipolar spindle formation during mitosis. On the other hand, CEP215 interaction with γ-tubulin is dispensable for centrosome maturation. Our results provide an insight how PCM components are assembled to form a spindle pole during mitosis.

  7. The role of model organisms in the history of mitosis research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2014-09-02

    Mitosis is a cell-cycle stage during which condensed chromosomes migrate to the middle of the cell and segregate into two daughter nuclei before cytokinesis (cell division) with the aid of a dynamic mitotic spindle. The history of mitosis research is quite long, commencing well before the discovery of DNA as the repository of genetic information. However, great and rapid progress has been made since the introduction of recombinant DNA technology and discovery of universal cell-cycle control. A large number of conserved eukaryotic genes required for the progression from early to late mitotic stages have been discovered, confirming that DNA replication and mitosis are the two main events in the cell-division cycle. In this article, a historical overview of mitosis is given, emphasizing the importance of diverse model organisms that have been used to solve fundamental questions about mitosis.

  8. The Functional Role of TopBP1 in DNA Maintenance at Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    When cells traverse mitosis, genome integrity of the emerging daughter cells is dependent on replication of the entire genome during the preceding S-phase and accurate chromosome segregation in mitosis. Replication stress may cause cells to enter mitosis with underreplicated loci, consisting...... can lead to anaphase bridges that impair accurate chromosome segregation. The recent decade featured many advances in our understanding of how cells cope with underreplicated loci in mitosis. A major advance was the description of ultra-fine anaphase bridges (UFBs), a class of anaphase bridges...... established Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism to study anaphase bridges, and we identified Dpb11/TopBP1 as a novel UFB-associated protein in yeast and avian DT40 cells, respectively. TopBP1 localized to confined areas on replication-stress induced UFBs. Upon onset of mitosis we observed a burst...

  9. Automated mitosis detection in histopathology using morphological and multi-channel statistics features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Humayun

    2013-01-01

    According to Nottingham grading system, mitosis count plays a critical role in cancer diagnosis and grading. Manual counting of mitosis is tedious and subject to considerable inter- and intra-reader variations. The aim is to improve the accuracy of mitosis detection by selecting the color channels that better capture the statistical and morphological features, which classify mitosis from other objects. We propose a framework that includes comprehensive analysis of statistics and morphological features in selected channels of various color spaces that assist pathologists in mitosis detection. In candidate detection phase, we perform Laplacian of Gaussian, thresholding, morphology and active contour model on blue-ratio image to detect and segment candidates. In candidate classification phase, we extract a total of 143 features including morphological, first order and second order (texture) statistics features for each candidate in selected channels and finally classify using decision tree classifier. The proposed method has been evaluated on Mitosis Detection in Breast Cancer Histological Images (MITOS) dataset provided for an International Conference on Pattern Recognition 2012 contest and achieved 74% and 71% detection rate, 70% and 56% precision and 72% and 63% F-Measure on Aperio and Hamamatsu images, respectively. The proposed multi-channel features computation scheme uses fixed image scale and extracts nuclei features in selected channels of various color spaces. This simple but robust model has proven to be highly efficient in capturing multi-channels statistical features for mitosis detection, during the MITOS international benchmark. Indeed, the mitosis detection of critical importance in cancer diagnosis is a very challenging visual task. In future work, we plan to use color deconvolution as preprocessing and Hough transform or local extrema based candidate detection in order to reduce the number of candidates in mitosis and non-mitosis classes.

  10. Distinct chromatin environment associated with phosphorylated H3S10 histone during pollen mitosis I in orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Santosh Kumar; Yamamoto, Maki; Mukai, Yasuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Pollen developmental pathway in plants involving synchronized transferal of cellular divisions from meiosis (microsporogenesis) to mitosis (pollen mitosis I/II) eventually offers a unique "meiosis-mitosis shift" at pollen mitosis I. Since the cell type (haploid microspore) and fate of pollen mitosis I differ from typical mitosis (in meristem cells), it is immensely important to analyze the chromosomal distribution of phosphorylated H3S10 histone during atypical pollen mitosis I to comprehend the role of histone phosphorylation in pollen development. We investigated the chromosomal phosphorylation of H3S10 histone during pollen mitosis I in orchids using immunostaining technique. The chromosomal distribution of H3S10ph during pollen mitosis I revealed differential pattern than that of typical mitosis in plants, however, eventually following the similar trends of mitosis in animals where H3S10 phosphorylation begins in the pericentromeric regions first, later extending to the whole chromosomes, and finally declining at anaphase/early cytokinesis (differentiation of vegetative and generative cells). The study suggests that the chromosomal distribution of H3S10ph during cell division is not universal and can be altered between different cell types encoded for diverse cellular processes. During pollen development, phosphorylation of histone might play a critical role in chromosome condensation events throughout pollen mitosis I in plants.

  11. Clathrin is spindle-associated but not essential for mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Borlido

    Full Text Available Clathrin is a multimeric protein involved in vesicle coat assembly. Recently clathrin distribution was reported to change during the cell cycle and was found to associate with the mitotic spindle. Here we test whether the recruitment of clathrin to the spindle is indicative of a critical functional contribution to mitosis.Previously a chicken pre-B lymphoma cell line (DKO-R was developed in which the endogenous clathrin heavy chain alleles were replaced with the human clathrin heavy chain under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter. Receptor-mediated and fluid-phase endocytosis were significantly inhibited in this line following clathrin knockout, and we used this to explore the significance of clathrin heavy chain expression for cell cycle progression. We confirmed using confocal microscopy that clathrin colocalised with tubulin at mitotic spindles. Using a propidium iodide flow cytometric assay we found no statistical difference in the cell cycle distribution of the knockout cells versus the wild-type. Additionally, we showed that the ploidy and the recovery kinetics following cell cycle arrest with nocodazole were unchanged by repressing clathrin heavy chain expression.We conclude that the association of clathrin with the mitotic spindle and the contribution of clathrin to endocytosis are evolutionarily conserved. However we find that the contribution of clathrin to mitosis is less robust and dependent on cellular context. In other cell-lines silencing RNA has been used by others to knockdown clathrin expression resulting in an increase in the mitotic index of the cells. We show an effect on the G2/M phase population of clathrin knockdown in HEK293 cells but show that repressing clathrin expression in the DKO-R cell-line has no effect on the size of this population. Consequently this work highlights the need for a more detailed molecular understanding of the recruitment and function of clathrin at the spindle, since the

  12. Protein Phosphatases Involved in Regulating Mitosis: Facts and Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Fernandes, Gary; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Almost all eukaryotic proteins are subject to post-translational modifications during mitosis and cell cycle, and in particular, reversible phosphorylation being a key event. The recent use of high-throughput experimental analyses has revealed that more than 70% of all eukaryotic proteins are regulated by phosphorylation; however, the mechanism of dephosphorylation, counteracting phosphorylation, is relatively unknown. Recent discoveries have shown that many of the protein phosphatases are involved in the temporal and spatial control of mitotic events, such as mitotic entry, mitotic spindle assembly, chromosome architecture changes and cohesion, and mitotic exit. This implies that certain phosphatases are tightly regulated for timely dephosphorylation of key mitotic phosphoproteins and are essential for control of various mitotic processes. This review describes the physiological and pathological roles of mitotic phosphatases, as well as the versatile role of various protein phosphatases in several mitotic events.

  13. Spindle mechanics and dynamics during mitosis in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Mijung; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2004-04-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model for studying mitosis. Syncytial embryos are amenable to time-lapse imaging of hundreds of synchronously dividing spindles, allowing the quantitation of spindle and chromosome dynamics with unprecedented fidelity. Other Drosophila cell types, including neuroblasts, cultured cells, spermatocytes and oocytes, contain spindles that differ in their design, providing cells amenable to different types of experiments and allowing identification of common core mechanisms. The function of mitotic proteins can be studied using mutants, inhibitor microinjection and RNA interference (RNAi) to identify the full inventory of mitotic proteins encoded by the genome. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how ensembles of mitotic proteins coordinate spindle assembly and chromosome motion in this system.

  14. Chadong Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    @@ The Chadong Block, located in the east of Qaidam Basin, Qinghai Province, covers an area of 12 452 km2. It is bounded by Kunlum Mountains in the south and the northwest is closely adjacent to Aimunike Mountain.Rivers are widely distributed, which always run in NWSE direction, including the Sulunguole, Qaidam and Haluwusu Rivers. The traffic condition is good, the Qinghai-Tibet highway stretching through the whole area and the Lan-Qing railway, 20-50 km away from the block, passing from north to west. A lot of Mongolia minority people have settled there, of which herdsmen always live nearby the Qaidam River drainage area.

  15. A nutrient dependant switch explains mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis initiation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannige, C T; Kulasiri, D; Samarasinghe, S

    2014-01-21

    Nutrients from living environment are vital for the survival and growth of any organism. Budding yeast diploid cells decide to grow by mitosis type cell division or decide to create unique, stress resistant spores by meiosis type cell division depending on the available nutrient conditions. To gain a molecular systems level understanding of the nutrient dependant switching between meiosis and mitosis initiation in diploid cells of budding yeast, we develop a theoretical model based on ordinary differential equations (ODEs) including the mitosis initiator and its relations to budding yeast meiosis initiation network. Our model accurately and qualitatively predicts the experimentally revealed temporal variations of related proteins under different nutrient conditions as well as the diverse mutant studies related to meiosis and mitosis initiation. Using this model, we show how the meiosis and mitosis initiators form an all-or-none type bistable switch in response to available nutrient level (mainly nitrogen). The transitions to and from meiosis or mitosis initiation states occur via saddle node bifurcation. This bidirectional switch helps the optimal usage of available nutrients and explains the mutually exclusive existence of meiosis and mitosis pathways.

  16. ERK5 pathway regulates the phosphorylation of tumour suppressor hDlg during mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A. [Departamento de Inmunologia y Oncologia, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco-UAM, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Campbell, David G.; Arthur, J. Simon C. [MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit, Sir James Black Building, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Cuenda, Ana, E-mail: acuenda@cnb.csic.es [Departamento de Inmunologia y Oncologia, Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia-CSIC, Campus de Cantoblanco-UAM, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis in multiple residues. {yields} Prospho-hDlg is excluded from the midbody during mitosis. {yields} hDlg is not phosphorylated by p38{gamma} or JNK1/2 during mitosis. {yields} ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis. -- Abstract: Human disc-large (hDlg) is a scaffold protein critical for the maintenance of cell polarity and adhesion. hDlg is thought to be a tumour suppressor that regulates the cell cycle and proliferation. However, the mechanism and pathways involved in hDlg regulation during these processes is still unclear. Here we report that hDlg is phosphorylated during mitosis, and we establish the identity of at least three residues phosphorylated in hDlg; some are previously unreported. Phosphorylation affects hDlg localisation excluding it from the contact point between the two daughter cells. Our results reveal a previously unreported pathway for hDlg phosphorylation in mitosis and show that ERK5 pathway mediates hDlg cell cycle dependent phosphorylation. This is likely to have important implications in the correct timely mitotic entry and mitosis progression.

  17. Phosphorylation of AIB1 at Mitosis Is Regulated by CDK1/CYCLIN B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Macarena; Ferragud, Juan; Orlando, Leonardo; Valero, Luz; Sánchez del Pino, Manuel; Farràs, Rosa; Font de Mora, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Background Although the AIB1 oncogene has an important role during the early phase of the cell cycle as a coactivator of E2F1, little is known about its function during mitosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mitotic cells isolated by nocodazole treatment as well as by shake-off revealed a post-translational modification occurring in AIB1 specifically during mitosis. This modification was sensitive to the treatment with phosphatase, suggesting its modification by phosphorylation. Using specific inhibitors and in vitro kinase assays we demonstrate that AIB1 is phosphorylated on Ser728 and Ser867 by Cdk1/cyclin B at the onset of mitosis and remains phosphorylated until exit from M phase. Differences in the sensitivity to phosphatase inhibitors suggest that PP1 mediates dephosphorylation of AIB1 at the end of mitosis. The phosphorylation of AIB1 during mitosis was not associated with ubiquitylation or degradation, as confirmed by western blotting and flow cytometry analysis. In addition, luciferase reporter assays showed that this phosphorylation did not alter the transcriptional properties of AIB1. Importantly, fluorescence microscopy and sub-cellular fractionation showed that AIB1 phosphorylation correlated with the exclusion from the condensed chromatin, thus preventing access to the promoters of AIB1-dependent genes. Phospho-specific antibodies developed against Ser728 further demonstrated the presence of phosphorylated AIB1 only in mitotic cells where it was localized preferentially in the periphery of the cell. Conclusions Collectively, our results describe a new mechanism for the regulation of AIB1 during mitosis, whereby phosphorylation of AIB1 by Cdk1 correlates with the subcellular redistribution of AIB1 from a chromatin-associated state in interphase to a more peripheral localization during mitosis. At the exit of mitosis, AIB1 is dephosphorylated, presumably by PP1. This exclusion from chromatin during mitosis may represent a mechanism for governing the

  18. Mitosis Counting in Breast Cancer: Object-Level Interobserver Agreement and Comparison to an Automatic Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J; Jiwa, Mehdi; Al-Janabi, Shaimaa; Pluim, Josien P W

    2016-01-01

    Tumor proliferation speed, most commonly assessed by counting of mitotic figures in histological slide preparations, is an important biomarker for breast cancer. Although mitosis counting is routinely performed by pathologists, it is a tedious and subjective task with poor reproducibility, particularly among non-experts. Inter- and intraobserver reproducibility of mitosis counting can be improved when a strict protocol is defined and followed. Previous studies have examined only the agreement in terms of the mitotic count or the mitotic activity score. Studies of the observer agreement at the level of individual objects, which can provide more insight into the procedure, have not been performed thus far. The development of automatic mitosis detection methods has received large interest in recent years. Automatic image analysis is viewed as a solution for the problem of subjectivity of mitosis counting by pathologists. In this paper we describe the results from an interobserver agreement study between three human observers and an automatic method, and make two unique contributions. For the first time, we present an analysis of the object-level interobserver agreement on mitosis counting. Furthermore, we train an automatic mitosis detection method that is robust with respect to staining appearance variability and compare it with the performance of expert observers on an "external" dataset, i.e. on histopathology images that originate from pathology labs other than the pathology lab that provided the training data for the automatic method. The object-level interobserver study revealed that pathologists often do not agree on individual objects, even if this is not reflected in the mitotic count. The disagreement is larger for objects from smaller size, which suggests that adding a size constraint in the mitosis counting protocol can improve reproducibility. The automatic mitosis detection method can perform mitosis counting in an unbiased way, with substantial

  19. Inhibition of endocytic vesicle fusion by Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of vimentin during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, Keisuke; Satou, Ayaka; Fukuhara, Mitsuko; Matsumura, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Goto, Hidemasa; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Inagaki, Masaki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Toyoshima, Fumiko

    2014-01-01

    Endocytic vesicle fusion is inhibited during mitosis, but the molecular pathways that mediate the inhibition remain unclear. Here we uncovered an essential role of Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) in this mechanism. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed that Plk1 phosphorylates the intermediate filament protein vimentin on Ser459, which is dispensable for its filament formation but is necessary for the inhibition of endocytic vesicle fusion in mitosis. Furthermore, this mechanism is required for integrin trafficking toward the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis. Our results thus identify a novel mechanism for fusion inhibition in mitosis and implicate its role in vesicle trafficking after anaphase onset.

  20. Quinazolin-4-one Coupled with Pyrrolidin-2-iminium Alkaloids from Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanqin Dai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Three new alkaloids, including auranomides A and B (1 and 2, a new scaffold containing quinazolin-4-one substituted with a pyrrolidin-2-iminium moiety, and auranomide C (3, as well as two known metabolites auranthine (4 and aurantiomides C (5 were isolated from the marine-derived fungus Penicillium aurantiogriseum. The chemical structures of compounds 13 were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including IR, HRESIMS and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configurations of compounds 13 were suggested from the perspective of a plausible biosynthesis pathway. Compounds 13 were subjected to antitumor and antimicrobial screening models. Auranomides A–C exhibited moderate cytotoxic activity against human tumor cells. Auranomides B was the most potent among them with an IC50 value of 0.097 μmol/mL against HEPG2 cells.

  1. Synthesis, anti-microbial and molecular docking studies of quinazolin-4(3H)-one derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Al-Har, Munirah S; Barakat, Assem; Aldawsari, Fahad D; Aldalbahi, Ali; Ul-Haq, Zaheer

    2014-06-25

    In this work, synthesis, antimicrobial activities and molecular docking studies of some new series of substituted quinazolinone 2a-h and 3a-d were described. Starting form 2-aminobenzamide derivatives 1, a new series of quinazolinone derivatives has been synthesized, in high yields, assisted by microwave and classical methods. Some of these substituted quinazolinones were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Esherichia coli) and Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis), and anti-fungal activity against (Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cervevisiae, and Candida albicans) using agar well diffusion method. Among the prepared products, 3-benzyl-2-(4-chlorophenyl)quinazolin-4(3H)-one (3a) was found to exhibits the most potent in vitro anti-microbial activity with MICs of 25.6±0.5, 24.3±0.4, 30.1±0.6, and 25.1±0.5 µg/mL against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Esherichia coli, respectively. Compound 3a was found to exhibits the most potent in vitro anti-fungal activity with MICs of 18.3±0.6, 23.1±0.4, and 26.1±0.5 µg/mL against Aspergillus fumigatus, Saccharomyces cervevisiae, and Candidaal bicans, respectively.

  2. Profiling the Interaction Mechanism of Quinoline/Quinazoline Derivatives as MCHR1 Antagonists: An in Silico Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingwei; Li, Yan; Fu, Xinmei; Wang, Jinghui; Zhang, Shuwei; Yang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1), a crucial regulator of energy homeostasis involved in the control of feeding and energy metabolism, is a promising target for treatment of obesity. In the present work, the up-to-date largest set of 181 quinoline/quinazoline derivatives as MCHR1 antagonists was subjected to both ligand- and receptor-based three-dimensional quantitative structure–activity (3D-QSAR) analysis applying comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA). The optimal predictable CoMSIA model exhibited significant validity with the cross-validated correlation coefficient (Q2) = 0.509, non-cross-validated correlation coefficient (R2ncv) = 0.841 and the predicted correlation coefficient (R2pred) = 0.745. In addition, docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for further elucidation of the binding modes of MCHR1 antagonists. MD simulations in both water and lipid bilayer systems were performed. We hope that the obtained models and information may help to provide an insight into the interaction mechanism of MCHR1 antagonists and facilitate the design and optimization of novel antagonists as anti-obesity agents. PMID:25257526

  3. Mitosis, double strand break repair, and telomeres: a view from the end: how telomeres and the DNA damage response cooperate during mitosis to maintain genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesare, Anthony J

    2014-11-01

    Double strand break (DSB) repair is suppressed during mitosis because RNF8 and downstream DNA damage response (DDR) factors, including 53BP1, do not localize to mitotic chromatin. Discovery of the mitotic kinase-dependent mechanism that inhibits DSB repair during cell division was recently reported. It was shown that restoring mitotic DSB repair was detrimental, resulting in repair dependent genome instability and covalent telomere fusions. The telomere DDR that occurs naturally during cellular aging and in cancer is known to be refractory to G2/M checkpoint activation. Such DDR-positive telomeres, and those that occur as part of the telomere-dependent prolonged mitotic arrest checkpoint, normally pass through mitosis without covalent ligation, but result in cell growth arrest in G1 phase. The discovery that suppressing DSB repair during mitosis may function primarily to protect DDR-positive telomeres from fusing during cell division reinforces the unique cooperation between telomeres and the DDR to mediate tumor suppression.

  4. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division.

  5. Parkin Regulates Mitosis and Genomic Stability through Cdc20/Cdh1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Baek; Kim, Jung Jin; Nam, Hyun-Ja; Gao, Bowen; Yin, Ping; Qin, Bo; Yi, Sang-Yeop; Ham, Hyoungjun; Evans, Debra; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Zhang, Jun; Deng, Min; Liu, Tongzheng; Zhang, Haoxing; Billadeau, Daniel D; Wang, Liewei; Giaime, Emilie; Shen, Jie; Pang, Yuan-Ping; Jen, Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Lou, Zhenkun

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease. Parkin has also been implicated in mitosis through mechanisms that are unclear. Here we show that Parkin interacts with anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 to mediate the degradation of several key mitotic regulators independent of APC/C. We demonstrate that ordered progression through mitosis is orchestrated by two distinct E3 ligases through the shared use of Cdc20 and Cdh1. Furthermore, Parkin is phosphorylated and activated by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) during mitosis. Parkin deficiency results in overexpression of its substrates, mitotic defects, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. These results suggest that the Parkin-Cdc20/Cdh1 complex is an important regulator of mitosis.

  6. Release of chromosomes from the nuclear envelope: a universal mechanism for eukaryotic mitosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Multiple domains of chromosomes are associated with the nuclear envelope (NE) in interphase. The association between chromosomes and the NE is involved in a variety of chromosomal reactions, such as gene expression and DNA repair. However, efficient chromosome movements are required for the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis. Most higher eukaryotes perform open mitosis, in which the NE is broken down, enabling chromosomes to be released from the NE as well as spindle microtubules to access to kinetochores. By contrast, lower eukaryotes, such as Schizosaccharomyces pombe, perform closed mitosis, during which NE breakdown does not occur. In S. pombe, telomeres are tethered to the NE in interphase. Phosphorylation of the telomere-binding protein Rap1 at M phase promotes transient dissociation of telomeres from the NE, facilitating the faithful chromosome segregation. These findings imply a common mechanism for genome stability via the dissociation of chromosomes from the NE in eukaryotic mitosis.

  7. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Avila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-08-05

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule minus-end-binding protein, revealing a new class of mitosis-specific microtubule minus-end regulators. By adopting distinct functions in interphase and mitosis, KANSL proteins provide a link to coordinate the tasks of faithful expression and inheritance of the genome during different phases of the cell cycle.

  8. Kinesin-II is not essential for mitosis and cell growth in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kumi; Lefebvre, Paul A; Kamiya, Ritsu; Hirono, Masafumi

    2002-08-01

    The FLA10 gene product (Fla10p) in Chlamydomonas, a heterotrimeric kinesin-II, plays a crucial role in flagellar assembly as a motor protein driving intraflagellar transport. This protein has also been suggested to play a role in mitosis based on its localization to mitotic spindle. A role for Fla10p in mitosis has been difficult to test because to date only conditional (temperature-sensitive) mutant alleles were available, and it is not known whether these retain residual function for mitosis at the non-permissive temperature. In this report, we describe a null allele of fla10 produced by insertional mutagenesis. This mutant does not assemble flagella, but proliferates at a rate identical to that of wild type cells. Observation of microtubule organization in the cell body revealed that normal mitotic spindles are formed in dividing mutant cells. Thus, we conclude that FLA10 kinesin plays no significant roles in mitosis.

  9. Mitosis Counting in Breast Cancer : Object-Level Interobserver Agreement and Comparison to an Automatic Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J; Jiwa, Mehdi; Al-Janabi, Shaimaa; Pluim, JPW

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor proliferation speed, most commonly assessed by counting of mitotic figures in histological slide preparations, is an important biomarker for breast cancer. Although mitosis counting is routinely performed by pathologists, it is a tedious and subjective task with poor

  10. GLD-3 and Control of the Mitosis/Meiosis Decision in the Germline of Caenorhabditis elegans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eckmann, Christian R; Crittenden, Sarah L; Suh, Nayoung; Kimble, Judith

    2004-01-01

    .... Furthermore, FBF acts largely upstream of gld-3 in the mitosis/meiosis decision. By contrast, GLD-3 acts upstream of FBF in the sperm/oocyte decision, and GLD-3 protein can antagonize FBF binding to RNA regulatory elements...

  11. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Ávila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule m...

  12. Population control of resident and immigrant microglia by mitosis and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirenfeldt, Martin; Dissing-Olesen, Lasse; Babcock, Alicia

    2007-01-01

    Microglial population expansion occurs in response to neural damage via processes that involve mitosis and immigration of bone marrow-derived cells. However, little is known of the mechanisms that regulate clearance of reactive microglia, when microgliosis diminishes days to weeks later. We have...... in bone marrow chimeric mice. These results broaden our understanding of the microglial response to neural damage by demonstrating that simultaneously occurring mitosis and apoptosis regulate expansion and reduction of both resident and immigrant microglial cell populations....

  13. PICH promotes sister chromatid disjunction and co-operates with topoisomerase II in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Huttner, Diana; Bizard, Anna H

    2015-01-01

    PICH is a SNF2 family DNA translocase that binds to ultra-fine DNA bridges (UFBs) in mitosis. Numerous roles for PICH have been proposed from protein depletion experiments, but a consensus has failed to emerge. Here, we report that deletion of PICH in avian cells causes chromosome structural......-193-treated cells. We propose that PICH and Topo II cooperate to prevent chromosome missegregation events in mitosis....

  14. Multi-channels statistical and morphological features based mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Humayun; Roux, Ludovic; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Accurate counting of mitosis in breast cancer histopathology plays a critical role in the grading process. Manual counting of mitosis is tedious and subject to considerable inter- and intra-reader variations. This work aims at improving the accuracy of mitosis detection by selecting the color channels that better capture the statistical and morphological features having mitosis discrimination from other objects. The proposed framework includes comprehensive analysis of first and second order statistical features together with morphological features in selected color channels and a study on balancing the skewed dataset using SMOTE method for increasing the predictive accuracy of mitosis classification. The proposed framework has been evaluated on MITOS data set during an ICPR 2012 contest and ranked second from 17 finalists. The proposed framework achieved 74% detection rate, 70% precision and 72% F-Measure. In future work, we plan to apply our mitosis detection tool to images produced by different types of slide scanners, including multi-spectral and multi-focal microscopy.

  15. Bora and Aurora-A continue to activate Plk1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, Wytse; Macurek, Libor; Freire, Raimundo; Lindqvist, Arne; Medema, René H

    2014-02-15

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) is required for proper cell division. Activation of Plk1 requires phosphorylation on a conserved threonine in the T-loop of the kinase domain (T210). Plk1 is first phosphorylated on T210 in G2 phase by the kinase Aurora-A, in concert with its cofactor Bora. However, Bora was shown to be degraded prior to entry into mitosis, and it is currently unclear how Plk1 activity is sustained in mitosis. Here we show that the Bora-Aurora-A complex remains the major activator of Plk1 in mitosis. We show that a small amount of Aurora-A activity is sufficient to phosphorylate and activate Plk1 in mitosis. In addition, a fraction of Bora is retained in mitosis, which is essential for continued Aurora-A-dependent T210 phosphorylation of Plk1. We find that once Plk1 is activated, minimal amounts of the Bora-Aurora-A complex are sufficient to sustain Plk1 activity. Thus, the activation of Plk1 by Aurora-A may function as a bistable switch; highly sensitive to inhibition of Aurora-A in its initial activation, but refractory to fluctuations in Aurora-A activity once Plk1 is fully activated. This provides a cell with robust Plk1 activity once it has committed to mitosis.

  16. Positive Feedback Keeps Duration of Mitosis Temporally Insulated from Upstream Cell-Cycle Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Ana Rita; Gelens, Lendert; Sheriff, Rahuman S M; Santos, Silvia D M

    2016-10-20

    Cell division is characterized by a sequence of events by which a cell gives rise to two daughter cells. Quantitative measurements of cell-cycle dynamics in single cells showed that despite variability in G1-, S-, and G2 phases, duration of mitosis is short and remarkably constant. Surprisingly, there is no correlation between cell-cycle length and mitotic duration, suggesting that mitosis is temporally insulated from variability in earlier cell-cycle phases. By combining live cell imaging and computational modeling, we showed that positive feedback is the molecular mechanism underlying the temporal insulation of mitosis. Perturbing positive feedback gave rise to a sluggish, variable entry and progression through mitosis and uncoupled duration of mitosis from variability in cell cycle length. We show that positive feedback is important to keep mitosis short, constant, and temporally insulated and anticipate it might be a commonly used regulatory strategy to create modularity in other biological systems. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel 2,3-Dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinazolin-1-ones: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malose J. Mphahlele

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Herein we describe the synthesis and evaluation of a series of novel 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinazolin-1-ones for in vitro cytotoxicity against three human cancer cell lines as well as for potential antimalarial activity against the chloroquine-sensitive strain 3D7 of Plasmodium falciparum. The title compounds were prepared via PdCl2-mediated endo-dig cyclization of 2-aryl-8-(arylethynyl-6-bromo-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H-ones. The latter were prepared, in turn, via initial Sonogashira cross-coupling of 2-amino-5-bromo-3-iodobenzamide with aryl acetylenes followed by boric acid-mediated cyclocondensation of the intermediate 2-amino-3-(arylethynyl-5-bromobenzamides with benzaldehyde derivatives. The 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinazolin-1-ones 4a–k were evaluated for potential in vitro cytotoxicity against the breast (MCF-7, melanoma (B16 and endothelioma (sEnd.2 cell lines. All of the compounds except 4h and 4i were found to be inactive against the three cancer cell lines. Compound 4h substituted with a 4-methoxyphenyl and 4-fluorophenyl groups at the 3- and 5-positions was found to exhibit significant cytotoxicity against the three cancer cell lines. The presence of phenyl and 3-chlorophenyl groups at the 3- and 5-posiitons of the pyrroloquinazolinone 4i, on the other hand, resulted in significant cytotoxicity against vascular tumour endothelial cells (sEnd.2, but reduced activity against the melanoma (B16 and breast cancer (MCF-7 cells except at higher concentrations. The 2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2,1-ij]quinazolin-1-ones 4a–l were found to be inactive against the chloroquine sensitive 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum.

  18. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Bursomanno, Sara; Aleliunaite, Aiste; Wu, Wei; Mankouri, Hocine W; Shen, Huahao; Liu, Ying; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-12-10

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress has been implicated as a driver of tumorigenesis. Many chromosomal rearrangements characteristic of human cancers originate from specific regions of the genome called common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are difficult-to-replicate loci that manifest as gaps or breaks on metaphase chromosomes (termed CFS 'expression'), particularly when cells have been exposed to replicative stress. The MUS81-EME1 structure-specific endonuclease promotes the appearance of chromosome gaps or breaks at CFSs following replicative stress. Here we show that entry of cells into mitotic prophase triggers the recruitment of MUS81 to CFSs. The nuclease activity of MUS81 then promotes POLD3-dependent DNA synthesis at CFSs, which serves to minimize chromosome mis-segregation and non-disjunction. We propose that the attempted condensation of incompletely duplicated loci in early mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest that targeting this pathway could represent a new therapeutic approach.

  19. A conserved role for kinesin-5 in plant mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannigan, Alex; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Lukowitz, Wolfgang; Fagerstrom, Carey; Wadsworth, Patricia; Somerville, Chris; Baskin, Tobias I

    2007-08-15

    The mitotic spindle of vascular plants is assembled and maintained by processes that remain poorly explored at a molecular level. Here, we report that AtKRP125c, one of four kinesin-5 motor proteins in arabidopsis, decorates microtubules throughout the cell cycle and appears to function in both interphase and mitosis. In a temperature-sensitive mutant, interphase cortical microtubules are disorganized at the restrictive temperature and mitotic spindles are massively disrupted, consistent with a defect in the stabilization of anti-parallel microtubules in the spindle midzone, as previously described in kinesin-5 mutants from animals and yeast. AtKRP125c introduced into mammalian epithelial cells by transfection decorates microtubules throughout the cell cycle but is unable to complement the loss of the endogenous kinesin-5 motor (Eg5). These results are among the first reports of any motor with a major role in anastral spindle structure in plants and demonstrate that the conservation of kinesin-5 motor function throughout eukaryotes extends to vascular plants.

  20. Regulation of mitosis onset and thymidine kinase activity during the cell cycle of Physarum polycephalum plasmodia: effect of fluorodeoxyuridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M; Tollon, Y

    1989-05-01

    The effects of fluorodeoxyuridine were investigated during three events of the cell cycle: S-phase, mitosis, and the cyclic synthesis of thymidine kinase in the synchronous plasmodium of the myxomycete Physarum. DNA synthesis was inhibited, and there was limited action on other macromolecular syntheses. When DNA synthesis was slowed down, onset of the following increase of thymidine kinase synthesis occurred at approximately the same time as in the control, but mitosis was blocked in a very early prophase stage and metaphase was never observed. These effects were suppressed when the action of fluorodeoxyuridine was prevented by the addition of thymidine to the medium. In agreement with the action of aphidicolin and hydroxyurea, these observations show that: 1) perturbation of the S-phase does not prevent the nuclei from entering a very early prophase stage, but it does prevent them from proceeding through metaphase; 2) blockage of DNA synthesis does not perturb the normal timing of the triggering of thymidine kinase synthesis; and 3) the signal that triggers the arrest of thymidine kinase synthesis is postmitotic and does not require extensive DNA synthesis. In contrast with hydroxyurea and aphidicolin, in the presence of fluorodeoxyuridine metaphase was not observed. Thus, the triggering of thymidine kinase synthesis is unambiguously dissociated from metaphase and postmitotic events. Because synthesis of thymidine kinase remains under the control of temperature shifts from 22 to 32 degrees C, a simple model of the cell cycle involving two regulatory pathways could account for the triggering of thymidine kinase synthesis, early prophase stage, and metaphase.

  1. Potential of N-aryl(benzyl,heteryl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamides as anticancer and antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksii M. Antypenko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The death rate from cancer and infectious diseases is still very high, therefore research in this area is extremely important and promising as in medical, so in economic point of view. Thus, potassium salt of tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-thion was modified per alkylation by N-aryl(benzyl,heterylacetamides with proper confirmation of newly synthesized compounds’ structures by FT-IR, LC–MS, 1H NMR and elemental analysis data. The substances were tested for bioluminescence inhibition against Photobacterium leiognathi Sh1 (5–50 μg/mL to check their cytotoxicity. Then they were screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities (100 μg against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Candida albicans. It was found that compounds 1.1, 1.5, 1.10, 1.31, 1.33 possessed light activity against K. pneumonia. The US National Cancer Institute (NCI has chosen 19 compounds and screened them for ability to inhibit in 10 μM concentration 60 different human tumor cell lines. The LOX IMVI cell line of melanoma appeared to be the most sensitive one, and N-(6-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamide (1.31 and N-(3-fluorobenzyl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamide (1.19 exhibited high growth inhibition rate, and N-(6-methoxybenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl-2-(tetrazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-ylthioacetamide (1.32 showed lethal antitumor activity against it. The latter compound 1.32 showed the best anticancer results, also inhibiting growth of leukemia SR cell line, NCI-H460 of non-small cell lung cancer, KM12 of colon cancer and SF-295 of CNS cancer. The in silico molecular docking studies have predicted the affinity of the synthesized substances to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR.

  2. Metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase IIIα-dependent PI4P Is subverted by HCV and is targeted by a 4-anilino quinazoline with antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Bianco

    Full Text Available 4-anilino quinazolines have been identified as inhibitors of HCV replication. The target of this class of compounds was proposed to be the viral protein NS5A, although unequivocal proof has never been presented. A 4-anilino quinazoline moiety is often found in kinase inhibitors, leading us to formulate the hypothesis that the anti-HCV activity displayed by these compounds might be due to inhibition of a cellular kinase. Type III phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase α (PI4KIIIα has recently been identified as a host factor for HCV replication. We therefore evaluated AL-9, a compound prototypical of the 4-anilino quinazoline class, on selected phosphatidylinositol kinases. AL-9 inhibited purified PI4KIIIα and, to a lesser extent, PI4KIIIβ. In Huh7.5 cells, PI4KIIIα is responsible for the phosphatidylinositol-4 phosphate (PI4P pool present in the plasma membrane. Accordingly, we observed a gradual decrease of PI4P in the plasma membrane upon incubation with AL-9, indicating that this agent inhibits PI4KIIIα also in living cells. Conversely, AL-9 did not affect the level of PI4P in the Golgi membrane, suggesting that the PI4KIIIβ isoform was not significantly inhibited under our experimental conditions. Incubation of cells expressing HCV proteins with AL-9 induced abnormally large clusters of NS5A, a phenomenon previously observed upon silencing PI4KIIIα by RNA interference. In light of our findings, we propose that the antiviral effect of 4-anilino quinazoline compounds is mediated by the inhibition of PI4KIIIα and the consequent depletion of PI4P required for the HCV membranous web. In addition, we noted that HCV has a profound effect on cellular PI4P distribution, causing significant enrichment of PI4P in the HCV-membranous web and a concomitant depletion of PI4P in the plasma membrane. This observation implies that HCV--by recruiting PI4KIIIα in the RNA replication complex--hijacks PI4P metabolism, ultimately resulting in a markedly altered

  3. Discovery of pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives as CMGC family protein kinase inhibitors: Design, synthesis, inhibitory potency and X-ray co-crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esvan, Yannick J; Zeinyeh, Wael; Boibessot, Thibaut; Nauton, Lionel; Théry, Vincent; Knapp, Stefan; Chaikuad, Apirat; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Anizon, Fabrice; Giraud, Francis; Moreau, Pascale

    2016-08-08

    The design and synthesis of new pyrido[3,4-g]quinazoline derivatives is described as well as their protein kinase inhibitory potencies toward five CMGC family members (CDK5, CK1, GSK3, CLK1 and DYRK1A). The interest for this original tricyclic heteroaromatic scaffold as modulators of CLK1/DYRK1A activity was validated by nanomolar potencies (compounds 12 and 13). CLK1 co-crystal structures with two inhibitors revealed the binding mode of these compounds within the ATP-binding pocket.

  4. C. elegans RNA-binding proteins PUF-8 and MEX-3 function redundantly to promote germline stem cell mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariz, Mohd; Mainpal, Rana; Subramaniam, Kuppuswamy

    2009-02-15

    Maintenance of mitotically cycling germline stem cells (GSCs) is vital for continuous production of gametes. In worms and insects, signaling from surrounding somatic cells play an essential role in the maintenance of GSCs by preventing premature differentiation. In addition, germ cell proteins such as the Drosophila Pumilio and Caenorhabditis elegans FBF, both members of the PUF family translational regulators, contribute to GSC maintenance. FBF functions by suppressing GLD-1, which promotes meiotic entry. However, factors that directly promote GSC proliferation, rather than prevent differentiation, are not known. Here we show that PUF-8, another C. elegans member of the PUF family and MEX-3, a KH domain translational regulator, function redundantly to promote GSC mitosis. We find that PUF-8 protein is highly enriched in mitotic germ cells, which is similar to the expression pattern of MEX-3 described earlier. The puf-8(-) mex-3(-) double mutant gonads contain far fewer germ cells than both single mutants and wild-type. While these cells lack mitotic, meiotic and sperm markers, they retain the germ cell-specific P granules, and are capable of gametogenesis if GLP-1, which normally blocks meiotic entry, is removed. Significantly, we find that at least one of these two proteins is essential for germ cell proliferation even in meiotic entry-defective mutants, which otherwise produce germ cell tumors. We conclude PUF-8 and MEX-3 contribute to GSC maintenance by promoting mitotic proliferation rather than by blocking meiotic entry.

  5. Synthesis and anticancer activities of 4-(4-substituted piperazin)-5,6,7-trialkoxy quinazoline derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Huang, Yin-Jiu; Xiang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Pei-Yi; Hu, De-Yu; Xue, Wei; Song, Bao-An; Yang, Song

    2014-05-01

    A series of 4-(4-substituted piperazin)-5,6,7-trialkoxy quinazoline was prepared by conventional heating methods. Among these compounds, the crystal structure of compound 10o (CCDC: 916922) was determined by X-ray crystallography. Bioassay results showed that most target compounds had certain inhibition activities against proliferation of tumor cells, and some compounds even had good broad-spectrum inhibition activities. The ethoxyl series of compounds possessed higher inhibition activities against tumor cells than the methoxyl series of compounds. Bioactivity tests showed that the IC50 values of compound 10s against PC3, MGC803, A375, and A549 cells were 1.8, 2.8, 1.3, and 2.9 μΜ, respectively, which were much higher than those of commercial gefitinib (7.2, 7.6, 7.2, and 9.8 μM, respectively). Conversely, the IC50 values of compound 10s were very low against NH3T3, indicating only weak effect on normal cells as also proven by lactate dehydrogenase and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining. Analyses of cell configuration and cell cycle revealed that compound 10s possibly caused cells to remain at G0/G1 phase by inhibiting cell proliferation for 24 h. Compound 10s also inhibited the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38 with obvious concentration dependence. Thus, these compounds can inhibit the proliferation of A549 cells through the interruption of ERK1/2 and P38signaling pathways.

  6. Hyperphosphorylation regulates the activity of SREBP1 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria T; Punga, Tanel; Ericsson, Johan

    2005-08-16

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors controls the biosynthesis of cholesterol and other lipids, and lipid synthesis is critical for cell growth and proliferation. We were, therefore, interested in the expression and activity of SREBPs during the cell cycle. We found that the expression of a number of SREBP-responsive promoter-reporter genes were induced in a SREBP-dependent manner in cells arrested in G2/M. In addition, the mature forms of SREBP1a and SREBP1c were hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells, giving rise to a phosphoepitope recognized by the mitotic protein monoclonal-2 (MPM-2) antibody. In contrast, SREBP2 was not hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells and was not recognized by the MPM-2 antibody. The MPM-2 epitope was mapped to the C terminus of mature SREBP1, and the mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylation of SREBP1 depended on this domain of the protein. The transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of SREBP1 was enhanced in cells arrested in G2/M, and these effects depended on the C-terminal domain of the protein. In part, these effects could be explained by our observation that mature SREBP1 was stabilized in G2/M. In agreement with these observations, we found that the synthesis of cholesterol was increased in G2/M-arrested cells. Thus, our results demonstrate that the activity of mature SREBP1 is regulated by phosphorylation during the cell cycle, suggesting that SREBP1 may provide a link between lipid synthesis, proliferation, and cell growth.

  7. 3d QSAR studies on a series of quinazoline derrivatives as tyrosine kinase (egfr) inhibitor: the k-nearest neighbor molecular field analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noolvi, Malleshappa N; Patel, Harun M

    2010-06-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are known for its role in cancer. Quinazoline have been reported to be the molecules of interest, with potent anticancer activity and they act by binding to ATP site of protein kinases. ATP binding site of protein kinases provides an extensive opportunity to design newer analogs. With this background, we report an attempt to discern the structural and physicochemical requirements for inhibition of EGFR tyrosine kinase. The k-Nearest Neighbor Molecular Field Analysis (kNN-MFA), a three dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D- QSAR) method has been used in the present case to study the correlation between the molecular properties and the tyrosine kinase (EGFR) inhibitory activities on a series of quinazoline derivatives. kNNMFA calculations for both electrostatic and steric field were carried out. The master grid maps derived from the best model has been used to display the contribution of electrostatic potential and steric field. The statistical results showed significant correlation coefficient r(2) (q(2)) of 0.846, r(2) for external test set (pred_r2) 0.8029, coefficient of correlation of predicted data set (pred_r(2)se) of 0.6658, degree of freedom 89 and k nearest neighbor of 2. Therefore, this study not only casts light on binding mechanism between EGFR and its inhibitors, but also provides hints for the design of new EGFR inhibitors with observable structural diversity.

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of quinazolin-4(3H)-one derivatives bearing dithiocarbamate side chain at C2-position as potential antitumor agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pan-Pan; Gao, Man; Mao, Bei-Bei; Cao, Sheng-Li; Liu, Cui-Huan; Yang, Chao-Rui; Li, Zhong-Feng; Liao, Ji; Zhao, Hongchang; Li, Zheng; Li, Jing; Wang, Hailong; Xu, Xingzhi

    2016-01-27

    A series of quinazolin-4(3H)-one derivatives bearing dithiocarbamate side chain at the C2-position were synthesized and evaluated for their antiproliferative activities against A549, MCF-7, HeLa, HT29 and HCT-116 cell lines. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad spectrum antitproliferative activity against five cell lines, of which 5c was the most potent against HT29 cell line with an IC50 value of 5.53 μM, inducing a G2/M phase arrest in HT29 cells. Treatment of HT29 cells with 5c resulted in BubR1 phosphorylation and an increase of mitotic index in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, 5c promoted tubulin polymerization in vitro. These results demonstrate that quinazolin-4(3H)-one derivatives bearing dithiocarbamate side chain at C2-position may be potentially novel antitumor agents targeting tubulin to activate the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  9. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy.

  10. Comprehensive identification of SUMO2/3 targets and their dynamics during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou, Julie; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hayward, Daniel G; Olsen, Jesper V; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis large alterations in cellular structures occur rapidly, which to a large extent is regulated by post-translational modification of proteins. Modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-related protein SUMO2/3 regulates mitotic progression, but few mitotic targets have been identified so far. To deepen our understanding of SUMO2/3 during this window of the cell cycle, we undertook a comprehensive proteomic characterization of SUMO2/3 modified proteins in mitosis and upon mitotic exit. We developed an efficient tandem affinity purification strategy of SUMO2/3 modified proteins from mitotic cells. Combining this purification strategy with cell synchronization procedures and quantitative mass spectrometry allowed for the mapping of numerous novel targets and their dynamics as cells progressed out of mitosis. This identified RhoGDIα as a major SUMO2/3 modified protein, specifically during mitosis, mediated by the SUMO ligases PIAS2 and PIAS3. Our data provide a rich resource for further exploring the role of SUMO2/3 modifications in mitosis and cell cycle regulation.

  11. Abnormal mitosis triggers p53-dependent cell cycle arrest in human tetraploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffer, Christian; Kuznetsova, Anastasia Yurievna; Storchová, Zuzana

    2013-08-01

    Erroneously arising tetraploid mammalian cells are chromosomally instable and may facilitate cell transformation. An increasing body of evidence shows that the propagation of mammalian tetraploid cells is limited by a p53-dependent arrest. The trigger of this arrest has not been identified so far. Here we show by live cell imaging of tetraploid cells generated by an induced cytokinesis failure that most tetraploids arrest and die in a p53-dependent manner after the first tetraploid mitosis. Furthermore, we found that the main trigger is a mitotic defect, in particular, chromosome missegregation during bipolar mitosis or spindle multipolarity. Both a transient multipolar spindle followed by efficient clustering in anaphase as well as a multipolar spindle followed by multipolar mitosis inhibited subsequent proliferation to a similar degree. We found that the tetraploid cells did not accumulate double-strand breaks that could cause the cell cycle arrest after tetraploid mitosis. In contrast, tetraploid cells showed increased levels of oxidative DNA damage coinciding with the p53 activation. To further elucidate the pathways involved in the proliferation control of tetraploid cells, we knocked down specific kinases that had been previously linked to the cell cycle arrest and p53 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the checkpoint kinase ATM phosphorylates p53 in tetraploid cells after abnormal mitosis and thus contributes to proliferation control of human aberrantly arising tetraploids.

  12. A new theory of the origin of cancer: quantum coherent entanglement, centrioles, mitosis, and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameroff, Stuart R

    2004-11-01

    Malignant cells are characterized by abnormal segregation of chromosomes during mitosis ("aneuploidy"), generally considered a result of malignancy originating in genetic mutations. However, recent evidence supports a century-old concept that maldistribution of chromosomes (and resultant genomic instability) due to abnormalities in mitosis itself is the primary cause of malignancy rather than a mere byproduct. In normal mitosis chromosomes replicate into sister chromatids which are then precisely separated and transported into mirror-like sets by structural protein assemblies called mitotic spindles and centrioles, both composed of microtubules. The elegant yet poorly understood ballet-like movements and geometric organization occurring in mitosis have suggested guidance by some type of organizing field, however neither electromagnetic nor chemical gradient fields have been demonstrated or shown to be sufficient. It is proposed here that normal mirror-like mitosis is organized by quantum coherence and quantum entanglement among microtubule-based centrioles and mitotic spindles which ensure precise, complementary duplication of daughter cell genomes and recognition of daughter cell boundaries. Evidence and theory supporting organized quantum states in cytoplasm/nucleoplasm (and quantum optical properties of centrioles in particular) at physiological temperature are presented. Impairment of quantum coherence and/or entanglement among microtubule-based mitotic spindles and centrioles can result in abnormal distribution of chromosomes, abnormal differentiation and uncontrolled growth, and account for all aspects of malignancy. New approaches to cancer therapy and stem cell production are suggested via non-thermal laser-mediated effects aimed at quantum optical states of centrioles.

  13. p53 Dependent Centrosome Clustering Prevents Multipolar Mitosis in Tetraploid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Qiyi; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Huang, Yun; Ma, Tieliang; Zhang, Yingyin; Hou, Heli; Cooke, Howard J.; Yang, Da-Qing; Wu, Mian; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-01-01

    Background p53 abnormality and aneuploidy often coexist in human tumors, and tetraploidy is considered as an intermediate between normal diploidy and aneuploidy. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether and how p53 influences the transformation from tetraploidy to aneuploidy. Principal Findings Live cell imaging was performed to determine the fates and mitotic behaviors of several human and mouse tetraploid cells with different p53 status, and centrosome and spindle immunostaining was used to investigate centrosome behaviors. We found that p53 dominant-negative mutation, point mutation, or knockout led to a 2∼ 33-fold increase of multipolar mitosis in N/TERT1, 3T3 and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), while mitotic entry and cell death were not significantly affected. In p53-/- tetraploid MEFs, the ability of centrosome clustering was compromised, while centrosome inactivation was not affected. Suppression of RhoA/ROCK activity by specific inhibitors in p53-/- tetraploid MEFs enhanced centrosome clustering, decreased multipolar mitosis from 38% to 20% and 16% for RhoA and ROCK, respectively, while expression of constitutively active RhoA in p53+/+ tetraploid 3T3 cells increased the frequency of multipolar mitosis from 15% to 35%. Conclusions p53 could not prevent tetraploid cells entering mitosis or induce tetraploid cell death. However, p53 abnormality impaired centrosome clustering and lead to multipolar mitosis in tetraploid cells by modulating the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. PMID:22076149

  14. DNA-damage response during mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Kabeche, Lilian; Murnane, John P; Zaki, Bassem I; Compton, Duane A

    2014-11-01

    Many cancers display both structural (s-CIN) and numerical (w-CIN) chromosomal instabilities. Defective chromosome segregation during mitosis has been shown to cause DNA damage that induces structural rearrangements of chromosomes (s-CIN). In contrast, whether DNA damage can disrupt mitotic processes to generate whole chromosomal instability (w-CIN) is unknown. Here, we show that activation of the DNA-damage response (DDR) during mitosis selectively stabilizes kinetochore-microtubule (k-MT) attachments to chromosomes through Aurora-A and PLK1 kinases, thereby increasing the frequency of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Inhibition of DDR proteins, ATM or CHK2, abolishes the effect of DNA damage on k-MTs and chromosome segregation, whereas activation of the DDR in the absence of DNA damage is sufficient to induce chromosome segregation errors. Finally, inhibiting the DDR during mitosis in cancer cells with persistent DNA damage suppresses inherent chromosome segregation defects. Thus, the DDR during mitosis inappropriately stabilizes k-MTs, creating a link between s-CIN and w-CIN. The genome-protective role of the DDR depends on its ability to delay cell division until damaged DNA can be fully repaired. Here, we show that when DNA damage is induced during mitosis, the DDR unexpectedly induces errors in the segregation of entire chromosomes, thus linking structural and numerical chromosomal instabilities. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Microtubules as key coordinators of nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore

    2014-07-01

    During mitosis, cells comprehensively restructure their interior to promote the faithful inheritance of DNA and cytoplasmic contents. In metazoans, this restructuring entails disassembly of the nuclear envelope, redistribution of its components into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and eventually nuclear envelope reassembly around the segregated chromosomes. The microtubule cytoskeleton has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mitotic nuclear envelope and ER dynamics. Microtubules and associated molecular motors tear open the nuclear envelope in prophase and remove nuclear envelope remnants from chromatin. Additionally, two distinct mechanisms of microtubule-based regulation of ER dynamics operate later in mitosis. First, association of the ER with microtubules is reduced, preventing invasion of ER into the spindle area, and second, organelle membrane is actively cleared from metaphase chromosomes. However, we are only beginning to understand the role of microtubules in shaping and distributing ER and other organelles during mitosis. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Strasburger's legacy to mitosis and cytokinesis and its relevance for the Cell Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluška, František; Volkmann, Dieter; Menzel, Diedrik; Barlow, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Eduard Strasburger was one of the most prominent biologists contributing to the development of the Cell Theory during the nineteenth century. His major contribution related to the characterization of mitosis and cytokinesis and especially to the discovery of the discrete stages of mitosis, which he termed prophase, metaphase and anaphase. Besides his observations on uninucleate plant and animal cells, he also investigated division processes in multinucleate cells. Here, he emphasised the independent nature of mitosis and cytokinesis. We discuss these issues from the perspective of new discoveries in the field of cell division and conclude that Strasburger's legacy will in the future lead to a reformulation of the Cell Theory and that this will accommodate the independent and primary nature of the nucleus, together with its complement of perinuclear microtubules, for the organisation of the eukaryotic cell.

  17. Skp2 is required for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Huang, Yu-Fan; Zhou, Xin-Ke; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Yi-Fan; Lv, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Xiu-Rong; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora B kinase plays a critical role in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint. Here, we showed that the ubiquitin E3-ligase protein Skp2, also as a cell-cycle regulatory protein, was required for the activation of Aurora B and its downstream protein. When we restored Skp2 knockdown Hela cells with Skp2 and Skp2-LRR E3 ligase dead mutant we found that Skp2 could rescue the defect in the activation of Aurora B, but the mutant failed to do so. Furthermore, we discovered that Skp2 could interact with Aurora B and trigger Aurora B Lysine (K) 63-linked ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrated the essential role of Skp2 in cell mitosis progression and spindle checkpoint, which was Aurora B dependent. Our results identified a novel ubiquitinated substrate of Skp2, and also indicated that Aurora B ubiquitination might serve as an important event for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

  18. Tank binding kinase 1 is a centrosome-associated kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Smitha; Nguyen, Jonathan; Johnson, Joseph; Haura, Eric; Coppola, Domenico; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2015-12-10

    TANK Binding Kinase 1 (TBK1) is a non-canonical IκB kinase that contributes to KRAS-driven lung cancer. Here we report that TBK1 plays essential roles in mammalian cell division. Specifically, levels of active phospho-TBK1 increase during mitosis and localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and midbody, and selective inhibition or silencing of TBK1 triggers defects in spindle assembly and prevents mitotic progression. TBK1 binds to the centrosomal protein CEP170 and to the mitotic apparatus protein NuMA, and both CEP170 and NuMA are TBK1 substrates. Further, TBK1 is necessary for CEP170 centrosomal localization and binding to the microtubule depolymerase Kif2b, and for NuMA binding to dynein. Finally, selective disruption of the TBK1-CEP170 complex augments microtubule stability and triggers defects in mitosis, suggesting that TBK1 functions as a mitotic kinase necessary for microtubule dynamics and mitosis.

  19. Comprehensive Identification of SUMO2/3 Targets and Their Dynamics during Mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Julie; Kelstrup, Christian D; Hayward, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    During mitosis large alterations in cellular structures occur rapidly, which to a large extent is regulated by post-translational modification of proteins. Modification of proteins with the small ubiquitin-related protein SUMO2/3 regulates mitotic progression, but few mitotic targets have been...... identified so far. To deepen our understanding of SUMO2/3 during this window of the cell cycle, we undertook a comprehensive proteomic characterization of SUMO2/3 modified proteins in mitosis and upon mitotic exit. We developed an efficient tandem affinity purification strategy of SUMO2/3 modified proteins...... from mitotic cells. Combining this purification strategy with cell synchronization procedures and quantitative mass spectrometry allowed for the mapping of numerous novel targets and their dynamics as cells progressed out of mitosis. This identified RhoGDIα as a major SUMO2/3 modified protein...

  20. Deciphering the spatio-temporal regulation of entry and progression through mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheghiani, Lilia; Gavet, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    Mitosis has been studied since the early 1880s as a key event of the cell division cycle where remarkable changes in cellular architecture take place and ultimately lead to an equal segregation of duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. A detailed description of the complex and highly ordered cellular events taking place is now available. Many regulators involved in key steps including entry into mitosis, nuclear envelope breakdown, microtubule (MT) spindle formation, and chromosome attachment, as well as mitotic exit and cytokinesis, have also been identified. However, understanding the precise spatio-temporal contribution of each regulator in the cell reorganization process has been technically challenging. This review will focus on a number of recent advances in our understanding of the spatial distribution of protein activities and the temporal regulation of their activation and inactivation during entry and progression through mitosis by the use of intramolecular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors.

  1. Okadaic acid (1 microM) accelerates S phase and mitosis but inhibits heterochromatin replication and metaphase anaphase transition in Vicia faba meristem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polit, Justyna Teresa; Kazmierczak, Andrzej

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinases and phosphatases are the foremost agents which take part in cell cycle regulation in both plants and other eukaryotes. Protein kinases are a very well examined group of proteins with respect to chemical structure and function. Nowadays protein phosphatases, including PP1 and PP2A belonging to the PSP family, are the focus of interest. Okadaic acid (OA) which is a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase activity is widely used to study them. In the present research, the involvement of OA-sensitive phosphatases in the regulation of progression of the plant cell cycle was analysed (in planta) using Vicia faba root meristems synchronized with hydroxyurea and divided into five series. Each series was treated with 1 muM OA for 3 h for different time periods corresponding to the consecutive cell cycle phases. The results showed that in the OA-treated cells DNA replication and mitosis began earlier than in the control cells, since G(1) and G(2) phases were significantly shorter and the H1 histone kinases activity was higher. Moreover, autoradiography and morphological analyses of mitotic figures revealed that the OA-treated cells entered mitosis before the end of heterochromatin replication. An immunocytochemical search showed that earlier initiation of S phase in the OA-treated cells correlated with more abundant phosphorylation of Rb-like protein in comparison with the control cells. OA also induced significant condensation of metaphase chromosomes and blocked metaphase-anaphase transition.

  2. CDK1-dependent inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4CDT2 ensures robust transition from S Phase to Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzardi, Lindsay F; Coleman, Kate E; Varma, Dileep; Matson, Jacob P; Oh, Seeun; Cook, Jeanette Gowen

    2015-01-02

    Replication-coupled destruction of a cohort of cell cycle proteins ensures efficient and precise genome duplication. Three proteins destroyed during replication via the CRL4(CDT2) ubiquitin E3 ligase, CDT1, p21, and SET8 (PR-SET7), are also essential or important during mitosis, making their reaccumulation after S phase a critical cell cycle event. During early and mid-S phase and during DNA repair, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) loading onto DNA (PCNA(DNA)) triggers the interaction between CRL4(CDT2) and its substrates, resulting in their degradation. We have discovered that, beginning in late S phase, PCNA(DNA) is no longer sufficient to trigger CRL4(CDT2)-mediated degradation. A CDK1-dependent mechanism that blocks CRL4(CDT2) activity by interfering with CDT2 recruitment to chromatin actively protects CRL4(CDT2) substrates. We postulate that deliberate override of replication-coupled destruction allows anticipatory accumulation in late S phase. We further show that (as for CDT1) de novo SET8 reaccumulation is important for normal mitotic progression. In this manner, CDK1-dependent CRL4(CDT2) inactivation contributes to efficient transition from S phase to mitosis.

  3. Cdc25B and Cdc25C differ markedly in their properties as initiators of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, C; Katich, S; Hagting, A; Hoffmann, I; Pines, J

    1999-08-09

    We have used time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to study the properties of the Cdc25B and Cdc25C phosphatases that have both been implicated as initiators of mitosis in human cells. To differentiate between the functions of the two proteins, we have microinjected expression constructs encoding Cdc25B or Cdc25C or their GFP-chimeras into synchronized tissue culture cells. This assay allows us to express the proteins at defined points in the cell cycle. We have followed the microinjected cells by time-lapse microscopy, in the presence or absence of DNA synthesis inhibitors, and assayed whether they enter mitosis prematurely or at the correct time. We find that overexpressing Cdc25B alone rapidly causes S phase and G2 phase cells to enter mitosis, whether or not DNA replication is complete, whereas overexpressing Cdc25C does not cause premature mitosis. Overexpressing Cdc25C together with cyclin B1 does shorten the G2 phase and can override the unreplicated DNA checkpoint, but much less efficiently than overexpressing Cdc25B. These results suggest that Cdc25B and Cdc25C do not respond identically to the same cell cycle checkpoints. This difference may be related to the differential localization of the proteins; Cdc25C is nuclear throughout interphase, whereas Cdc25B is nuclear in the G1 phase and cytoplasmic in the S and G2 phases. We have found that the change in subcellular localization of Cdc25B is due to nuclear export and that this is dependent on cyclin B1. Our data suggest that although both Cdc25B and Cdc25C can promote mitosis, they are likely to have distinct roles in the controlling the initiation of mitosis.

  4. VISUALIZACIÓN DE LA MITOSIS CON EL MICROSCOPIO DE FUERZA ATÓMICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de Lourdes Segura-Valdez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En eucariontes, la división celular generalmente ocurre por medio de la mitosis. En estudios previos hemos documentado la posibilidad de estudiar la estructura celular in situ con el microscopio de fuerza atómica, con énfasis en la estructura nuclear en interfase. En este trabajo mostramos que las diferentes etapas de la mitosis pueden ser visualizadas con este instrumento, lo que abre la posibilidad de estudiar este fenómeno en el rango nanométrico.

  5. Positive Feedback Keeps Duration of Mitosis Temporally Insulated from Upstream Cell-Cycle Events

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo, Ana Rita; Gelens, Lendert; Sheriff, Rahuman; Santos, Silvia D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Cell division is characterized by a sequence of events by which a cell gives rise to two daughter cells. Quan- titative measurements of cell-cycle dynamics in sin- gle cells showed that despite variability in G1-, S-, and G2 phases, duration of mitosis is short and remarkably constant. Surprisingly, there is no corre- lation between cell-cycle length and mitotic duration, suggesting that mitosis is temporally insulated from variability in earlier cell-cycle phases. By combining live cell imag...

  6. Demographic Aspects In The Use Of Music- Action Integration In Teaching Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Joseph E. Matillano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Music and action integration had been used in a lot of pedagogical studies in the field of science education. This study sought to situatedemographic factors such as sex and educational background to use it as a tool in teaching mitosis. Using experimental- correlational design the level of significance was identified using t-test for the performance based on the pre and posttests. Results showed that music-action integration was an effective tool in teaching mitosis compared to the traditional lecture discussion. Factors such as sex and educational background did not affect students performance.

  7. Gradual meiosis-to-mitosis transition in the early mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Aurélien; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The transition from meiosis to mitosis is a fundamental process to guarantee the successful development of the embryo. In the mouse, the transition includes extensive reorganisation of the division machinery, centrosome establishment and changes in spindle proprieties and characteristic. Recent findings indicate that this transition is gradual and lasts until the late blastocyst stage. In-depth knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the transition would provide new insight into de novo centrosome formation and regulation of spindle size and proprieties. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of acentrosomal spindle formation, centriole establishment and the meiosis-to-mitosis transition in the mouse pre-implantation embryo.

  8. Human geminin promotes pre-RC formation and DNA replication by stabilizing CDT1 in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Melixetian, Marina; Zamponi, Raffaella

    2004-01-01

    -mediated degradation by inhibiting its ubiquitination. In particular, Geminin ensures basal levels of CDT1 during S phase and its accumulation during mitosis. Consistently, inhibition of Geminin synthesis during M phase leads to impairment of pre-RC formation and DNA replication during the following cell cycle....... Moreover, we show that inhibition of CDK1 during mitosis, and not Geminin depletion, is sufficient for premature formation of pre-RCs, indicating that CDK activity is the major mitotic inhibitor of licensing in human cells. Taken together with recent data from our laboratory, our results demonstrate...

  9. Role of substrate concentration in mitosis and hyphal extension of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Christian; Spohr, Anders Bendsen; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    The filamentous fungi Aspergillus oryzae and A. niger grow by apical extension of multinucleate hyphae that are subdivided into compartments by cross-walls called septa. Submerged cultivation, image analysis, and fluorescence microscopy were used to study the role of the carbon source on mitosis...... of a high glucose concentration, whereas a short apical compartment with few nuclei was the result of a low glucose concentration. This is the first study of the influence of glucose concentration on nuclear mitosis and septation in filamentous fungi grown submerged. In addition, this is the first time...

  10. How unfinished business from S-phase affects mitosis and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mankouri, H.W.; Huttner, D.; Hickson, I.D.

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic cell cycle is conventionally viewed as comprising several discrete steps, each of which must be completed before the next one is initiated. However, emerging evidence suggests that incompletely replicated, or unresolved, chromosomes from S-phase can persist into mitosis, where...... they present a potential threat to the faithful segregation of sister chromatids. In this review, we provide an overview of the different classes of loci where this 'unfinished S-phase business' can lead to a variety of cytogenetically distinct DNA structures throughout the various steps of mitosis...

  11. Fission Yeast dim1 + Encodes a Functionally Conserved Polypeptide Essential for Mitosis

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Lynne D.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    1997-01-01

    In a screen for second site mutations capable of reducing the restrictive temperature of the fission yeast mutant cdc2-D217N, we have isolated a novel temperature-sensitive mutant, dim1-35. When shifted to restrictive temperature, dim1-35 mutant cells arrest before entry into mitosis or proceed through mitosis in the absence of nuclear division, demonstrating an uncoupling of proper DNA segregation from other cell cycle events. Deletion of dim1 from the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome produc...

  12. VISUALIZACIÓN DE LA MITOSIS CON EL MICROSCOPIO DE FUERZA ATÓMICA

    OpenAIRE

    María de Lourdes Segura-Valdez; Sarai de Jesús Cruz-Gómez; Roberto López-Cruz; Guadalupe Zavala; Luis Felipe Jiménez-García

    2008-01-01

    En eucariontes, la división celular generalmente ocurre por medio de la mitosis. En estudios previos hemos documentado la posibilidad de estudiar la estructura celular in situ con el microscopio de fuerza atómica, con énfasis en la estructura nuclear en interfase. En este trabajo mostramos que las diferentes etapas de la mitosis pueden ser visualizadas con este instrumento, lo que abre la posibilidad de estudiar este fenómeno en el rango nanométrico.

  13. Inhibitory effect of Polo-like kinase 1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xue-Hua; Lan, Bin; Qu, Ying; ZHANG, XIAO-QING; Cai, Qu; Liu, Bing-Ya; Zhu, Zheng-Gang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) serine/threonine kinase plays a vital role in multiple phases of mitosis in gastric cancer cells. To investigate the effect of PLK1 depletion on mitosis and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells.

  14. Uncoupling of S phase and mitosis in cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes lacking the winged-helix transcription factor Trident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korver, W.; Schilham, M.W.; Moerer, P.; Hoff, M.J. van den; Dam, K.; Lamers, W.H.; Medema, R.H.; Clevers, H.C.

    1998-01-01

    In order to maintain a stable karyotype, the eukaryotic cell cycle is coordinated such that only one round of S phase precedes each mitosis, and mitosis is not initiated until DNA replication is completed. Several checkpoints and regulatory proteins have been defined in lower eukaryotes that govern

  15. Intracellular detection of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions through a quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based new fluorogenic differential chemosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Anup; Anbu, Sellamuthu; Sharma, Gunjan; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Guedes da Silva, M Fátima C; Koch, Biplob; Pombeiro, Armando J L

    2015-10-14

    A new quinazoline functionalized benzimidazole-based fluorogenic chemosensor H3L is synthesized and fully characterized by conventional techniques including single crystal X-ray analysis. It acts as a highly selective colorimetric and fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) ions in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Reaction of H3L with CuCl2 forms a mononuclear copper(ii) [Cu(Cl)(H2L)(H2O)] (H2L-Cu(2+)) complex which is characterized by conventional techniques and quantum chemical calculations. Electronic absorption and fluorescence titration studies of H3L with different metal cations show a distinctive recognition only towards Cu(2+) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting ions such as Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+). Moreover, H2L-Cu(2+) acts as a metal based highly selective and sensitive chemosensor for S(2-) ions even in the presence of other commonly coexisting anions such as F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), SO4(2-), SCN(-), AcO(-), H2PO4(-), PO4(3-), NO3(-), ClO4(-), NO2(-), HSO4(-), HSO4(2-), S2O3(2-), S2O8(2-), CN(-), CO3(2-) and HCO3(-) in DMF/0.02 M HEPES (1 : 1, v/v, pH = 7.4) medium. Quantification analysis indicates that these receptors, H3L and H2L-Cu(2+), can detect the presence of Cu(2+) and S(2-) ions at very low concentrations of 1.6 × 10(-9) M and 5.2 × 10(-6) M, respectively. The propensity of H3L as a bio-imaging fluorescent probe for detection of Cu(2+) ions and sequential detection of S(2-) ions by H2L-Cu(2+) in Dalton lymphoma (DL) cancer cells is also shown.

  16. Excess free histone H3 localizes to centrosomes for proteasome-mediated degradation during mitosis in metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Candice L; Graves, Hillary K; Wason, Arpit; Hawkins, Reva; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Schumacher, Jill; Tyler, Jessica K

    2016-08-17

    The cell tightly controls histone protein levels in order to achieve proper packaging of the genome into chromatin, while avoiding the deleterious consequences of excess free histones. Our accompanying study has shown that a histone modification that loosens the intrinsic structure of the nucleosome, phosphorylation of histone H3 on threonine 118 (H3 T118ph), exists on centromeres and chromosome arms during mitosis. Here, we show that H3 T118ph localizes to centrosomes in humans, flies, and worms during all stages of mitosis. H3 abundance at the centrosome increased upon proteasome inhibition, suggesting that excess free histone H3 localizes to centrosomes for degradation during mitosis. In agreement, we find ubiquitinated H3 specifically during mitosis and within purified centrosomes. These results suggest that targeting of histone H3 to the centrosome for proteasome-mediated degradation is a novel pathway for controlling histone supply, specifically during mitosis.

  17. Mitotic phosphorylation of VCIP135 blocks p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totsukawa, Go; Matsuo, Ayaka; Kubota, Ayano; Taguchi, Yuya; Kondo, Hisao, E-mail: hk228@med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •VCIP135 is mitotically phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2. •Phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97ATPase. •The phosphorylation of VCIP135 inhibits p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. -- Abstract: In mammals, the Golgi apparatus is disassembled early mitosis and reassembled at the end of mitosis. For Golgi disassembly, membrane fusion needs to be blocked. Golgi biogenesis requires two distinct p97ATPase-mediated membrane fusion, the p97/p47 and p97/p37 pathways. We previously reported that p47 phosphorylation on Serine-140 and p37 phosphorylation on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 result in mitotic inhibition of the p97/p47 and the p97/p37 pathways, respectively [11,14]. In this study, we show another mechanism of mitotic inhibition of p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. We clarified that VCIP135, an essential factor in both p97 membrane fusion pathways, is phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2 at mitosis and that this phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97. An in vitro Golgi reassembly assay revealed that VCIP135(T760E, S767E), which mimics mitotic phosphorylation, caused no cisternal regrowth. Our results indicate that the phosphorylation of VCIP135 on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 inhibits p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion at mitosis.

  18. EGF stimulates the activation of EGF receptors and the selective activation of major signaling pathways during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Ping; Shi, Huaiping; Jiang, Jennifer; Wang, Yuluan; Wang, Zhixiang

    2015-03-01

    Mitosis and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) are both targets for cancer therapy. The role of EGFR signaling in mitosis has been rarely studied and poorly understood. The limited studies indicate that the activation of EGFR and downstream signaling pathways is mostly inhibited during mitosis. However, we recently showed that EGFR is phosphorylated in response to EGF stimulation in mitosis. Here we studied EGF-induced EGFR activation and the activation of major signaling pathways downstream of EGFR during mitosis. We showed that EGFR was strongly activated by EGF during mitosis as all the five major tyrosine residues including Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 were phosphorylated to a level similar to that in the interphase. We further showed that the activated EGFR is able to selectively activate some downstream signaling pathways while avoiding others. Activated EGFR is able to activate PI3K and AKT2, but not AKT1, which may be responsible for the observed effects of EGF against nocodazole-induced cell death. Activated EGFR is also able to activate c-Src, c-Cbl and PLC-γ1 during mitosis. However, activated EGFR is unable to activate ERK1/2 and their downstream substrates RSK and Elk-1. While it activated Ras, EGFR failed to fully activate Raf-1 in mitosis due to the lack of phosphorylation at Y341 and the lack of dephosphorylation at pS259. We conclude that contrary to the dogma, EGFR is activated by EGF during mitosis. Moreover, EGFR-mediated cell signaling is regulated differently from the interphase to specifically serve the needs of the cell in mitosis.

  19. RB/PLK1-dependent induced pathway by SLAMF3 expression inhibits mitosis and control hepatocarcinoma cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlal, Hicham; Singh, Amrathlal Rabbind; Ossart, Christèle; Reignier, Aline; Hocini, Hakim; Fouquet, Gregory; Baghami, Mohammed Al; Eugenio, Mélanie Simoes; Nguyen-Khac, Eric; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Marcq, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Polo-like kinase PLK1 is a cell cycle protein that plays multiple roles in promoting cell cycle progression. Among the many roles, the most prominent role of PLK1 is to regulate the mitotic spindle formation checkpoint at the M-phase. Recently we reported the expression of SLAMF3 in Hepatocytes and show that it is down regulated in tumor cells of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We also show that the forced high expression level of SLAMF3 in HCC cells controls proliferation by inhibiting the MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways. In the present study, we provide evidence that the inhibitory effect of SLAMF3 on HCC proliferation occurs through Retinoblastoma (RB) factor and PLK1-dependent pathway. In addition to the inhibition of MAPK ERK/JNK and the mTOR pathways, expression of SLAMF3 in HCC retains RB factor in its hypophosphorylated active form, which in turn inactivates E2F transcription factor, thereby repressing the expression and activation of PLK1. A clear inverse correlation was also observed between SLAMF3 and PLK expression in patients with HCC. In conclusion, the results presented here suggest that the tumor suppressor potential of SLAMF3 occurs through activation of RB that represses PLK1. We propose that the induction of a high expression level of SLAMF3 in cancerous cells could control cellular mitosis and block tumor progression. PMID:26799423

  20. A PSTAIRE CDK-like protein localizes in nuclei and cytoplasm of Physarum polycephalum and functions in the mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gui Ying; Xing, Miao; Hu, Bo

    2004-04-01

    CDKs play key roles in controlling cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes. In plants, multiple CDKs are present, among which the best characterized CDKs are PSTAIRE CDKs. In this study, we carried out Western blot, immunoelectron microscopy and antibody treatment with an anti-PSTAIRE monoclonal antibody to explore the subcellular localization and functions of PSTAIRE CDKs in Physarum polycephalum. The results of western blot and immunoelectron microscopy showed that in P. polycephalum, a PSTAIRE CDK-like protein was 34 kD in molecular weight and located in both nuclei and cytoplasm. In nuclei, the protein was mainly associated with chromosomes and nucleoli. The expression of the PSTAIRE CDK-like protein in both the plasmodia and nuclei showed little fluctuation through the whole cell cycle. When treated with an anti-PSTAIRE monoclonal antibody at early S phase, the cells were arrested in S phase, and the mitotic onset of P. polycephalum was blocked for about 1 h when treated at early G2 phase. Our data indicated that the PSTAIRE CDK- like protein has a direct bearing on the mitosis.

  1. A PSTAIRE CDK-like protein localizes in nuclei and cytoplasm of Physarum polycephalum and functions in the mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    CDKs play key roles in controlling cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes. In plants, multiple CDKs are present,among which the best characterized CDKs are PSTAIRE CDKs. In this study, we carried out Western blot,immunoelectron microscopy and antibody treatment with an anti-PSTAIRE monoclonal antibody to explore the subcellular localization and functions of PSTAIRE CDKs in Physarum polycephalum. The results of Western blot and immunoelectron microscopy showed that in P. polycephalum, a PSTAIRE CDK-like protein was 34 kD in molecular weight and located in both nuclei and cytoplasm. In nuclei, the protein was mainly associated with chromosomes and nucleoli. The expression of the PSTAIRE CDK-like protein in both the plasmodia and nuclei showed little fluctuation through the whole cell cycle. When treated with an anti-PSTAIRE monoclonal antibody at early S phase, the cells were arrested in S phase, and the mitotic onset of P. polycephalum was blocked for about 1 h when treated at early G2 phase.Our data indicated that the PSTAIRE CDK- like protein has a direct bearing on the mitosis.

  2. Histone deacetylation is required for progression through mitosis in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Butenko, Yana; Grafi, Gideon

    2005-02-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histone proteins play a key role in chromatin structure and function. Here, we study histone post-translational modifications during reentry of protoplasts derived from tobacco mesophyll cells into the cell cycle and evaluate their significance for progression through mitosis. Methylation of histone H3 at lysine residues 4 and 9 persisted in chromosomes during all phases of the cell cycle. However, acetylation of H4 and H3 was dramatically reduced during mitosis in a stage-specific manner; while deacetylation of histone H4 commenced at prophase and persisted up to telophase, histone H3 remained acetylated up to metaphase but was deacetylated at anaphase and telophase. Phosphorylation of histone H3 at serine 10 was initiated at prophase, concomitantly with deacetylation of histone H4, and persisted up to telophase. Preventing histone deacetylation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) led to accumulation of protoplasts at metaphase-anaphase, and reduced S10 phosphorylation during anaphase and telophase; in cultured tobacco cells, TSA significantly reduced the frequency of mitotic figures. Our results indicate that deacetylation of histone H4 and H3 in tobacco protoplasts occurs during mitosis in a phase-specific manner, and is important for progression through mitosis.

  3. Translocation of histone H1 subtypes between chromatin and cytoplasm during mitosis in normal human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gréen, Anna; Lönn, Anita; Peterson, Kajsa Holmgren; Ollinger, Karin; Rundquist, Ingemar

    2010-05-01

    Histone H1 is an important constituent of chromatin, which undergoes major structural rearrangements during mitosis. However, the role of H1, multiple H1 subtypes, and H1 phosphorylation is still unclear. In normal human fibroblasts, phosphorylated H1 was found located in nuclei during prophase and in both cytoplasm and condensed chromosomes during metaphase, anaphase, and telophase as detected by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, we detected remarkable differences in the distribution of the histone H1 subtypes H1.2, H1.3, and H1.5 during mitosis. H1.2 was found in chromatin during prophase and almost solely in the cytoplasm of metaphase and early anaphase cells. In late anaphase, it appeared in both chromatin and cytoplasm and again in chromatin during telophase. H1.5 distribution pattern resembled that of H1.2, but H1.5 was partitioned between chromatin and cytoplasm during metaphase and early anaphase. H1.3 was detected in chromatin in all cell cycle phases. We propose therefore, that H1 subtype translocation during mitosis is controlled by phosphorylation, in combination with H1 subtype inherent affinity. We conclude that H1 subtypes, or theirphosphorylated forms, may leave chromatin in a regulated way to give access for chromatin condensing factors or transcriptional regulators during mitosis.

  4. CDK-1 Inhibition in G2 Stabilizes Kinetochore-Microtubules in the following Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayek, A Sophia; Ohi, Ryoma

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation is driven by cyclical activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), which produce distinct biochemical cell cycle phases. Mitosis (M phase) is orchestrated by CDK-1, complexed with mitotic cyclins. During M phase, chromosomes are segregated by a bipolar array of microtubules called the mitotic spindle. The essential bipolarity of the mitotic spindle is established by the kinesin-5 Eg5, but factors influencing the maintenance of spindle bipolarity are not fully understood. Here, we describe an unexpected link between inhibiting CDK-1 before mitosis and bipolar spindle maintenance. Spindles in human RPE-1 cells normally collapse to monopolar structures when Eg5 is inhibited at metaphase. However, we found that inhibition of CDK-1 in the G2 phase of the cell cycle improved the ability of RPE-1 cells to maintain spindle bipolarity without Eg5 activity in the mitosis immediately after release from CDK-1 inhibition. This improved bipolarity maintenance correlated with an increase in the stability of kinetochore-microtubules, the subset of microtubules that link chromosomes to the spindle. The improvement in bipolarity maintenance after CDK-1 inhibition in G2 required both the kinesin-12 Kif15 and increased stability of kinetochore-microtubules. Consistent with increased kinetochore-microtubule stability, we find that inhibition of CDK-1 in G2 impairs mitotic fidelity by increasing the incidence of lagging chromosomes in anaphase. These results suggest that inhibition of CDK-1 in G2 causes unpredicted effects in mitosis, even after CDK-1 inhibition is relieved.

  5. Dance of the Chromosomes: A Kinetic Learning Approach to Mitosis and Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiser, Brian; Hairston, Rosalina

    2007-01-01

    Understanding mitosis and meiosis is fundamental to understanding the basics of Mendelian inheritance, yet many students find these concepts challenging or confusing. Here we present a visually and physically stimulating activity using minimal supplies to supplement traditional instruction in order to engage the students and facilitate…

  6. Novel functions for the endocytic regulatory proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, James B; Katafiasz, Dawn; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    During interphase, recycling endosomes mediate the transport of internalized cargo back to the plasma membrane. However, in mitotic cells, recycling endosomes are essential for the completion of cytokinesis, the last phase of mitosis that promotes the physical separation the two daughter cells. Despite recent advances, our understanding of the molecular determinants that regulate recycling endosome dynamics during cytokinesis remains incomplete. We have previously demonstrated that Molecule Interacting with CasL Like-1 (MICAL-L1) and C-terminal Eps15 Homology Domain protein 1 (EHD1) coordinately regulate receptor transport from tubular recycling endosomes during interphase. However, their potential roles in controlling cytokinesis had not been addressed. In this study, we show that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 regulate mitosis. Depletion of either protein resulted in increased numbers of bi-nucleated cells. We provide evidence that bi-nucleation in MICAL-L1- and EHD1-depleted cells is a consequence of impaired recycling endosome transport during late cytokinesis. However, depletion of MICAL-L1, but not EHD1, resulted in aberrant chromosome alignment and lagging chromosomes, suggesting an EHD1-independent function for MICAL-L1 earlier in mitosis. Moreover, we provide evidence that MICAL-L1 and EHD1 differentially influence microtubule dynamics during early and late mitosis. Collectively, our new data suggest several unanticipated roles for MICAL-L1 and EHD1 during the cell cycle.

  7. Nuclear envelope expansion is crucial for proper chromosomal segregation during a closed mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Ai; Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Li, Juan-Juan; Jeffery, Linda; Yamatsugu, Kenzo; Elemento, Olivier; Nurse, Paul

    2016-03-15

    Here, we screened a 10,371 library of diverse molecules using a drug-sensitive fission yeast strain to identify compounds which cause defects in chromosome segregation during mitosis. We identified a phosphorium-ylide-based compound Cutin-1 which inhibits nuclear envelope expansion and nuclear elongation during the closed mitosis of fission yeast, and showed that its target is the β-subunit of fatty acid synthase. A point mutation in the dehydratase domain of Fas1 conferred in vivo and in vitro resistance to Cutin-1. Time-lapse photomicrography showed that the bulk of the chromosomes were only transiently separated during mitosis, and nucleoli separation was defective. Subsequently sister chromatids re-associated leading to chromosomal mis-segregation. These segregation defects were reduced when the nuclear volume was increased and were increased when the nuclear volume was reduced. We propose that there needs to be sufficient nuclear volume to allow the nuclear elongation necessary during a closed mitosis to take place for proper chromosome segregation, and that inhibition of fatty acid synthase compromises nuclear elongation and leads to defects in chromosomal segregation.

  8. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, En-Ju; Hung, Liang-Yi; Tang, Chieh-Ju C; Hsu, Wen-Bin; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Pao-Chi; Tang, Tang K

    2016-03-29

    CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM) dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity.

  9. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K; Bergman, Heidi A; Himanen, Samu V; Kallio, Marko J; Roos-Mattjus, Pia; Sistonen, Lea

    2014-09-15

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis.

  10. Fanconi anaemia proteins are associated with sister chromatid bridging in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ying, Songmin; Hickson, Ian D

    2011-01-01

    that specifically occur during chromosome segregation in mitosis. The BS protein, BLM, was shown recently to define a novel class of anaphase DNA bridge structures that, in some cases, also contain FA proteins. We will discuss the possible source of these bridges and the role that FA proteins and BLM might play...

  11. Phosphorylation by Cdk1 induces Plk1-mediated vimentin phosphorylation during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Goto, Hidemasa; Yokoyama, Tomoya; Silljé, Herman; Hanisch, Anja; Uldschmid, Andreas; Takai, Yasushi; Oguri, Takashi; Nigg, Erich A; Inagaki, Masaki

    2005-01-01

    Several kinases phosphorylate vimentin, the most common intermediate filament protein, in mitosis. Aurora-B and Rho-kinase regulate vimentin filament separation through the cleavage furrow-specific vimentin phosphorylation. Cdk1 also phosphorylates vimentin from prometaphase to metaphase, but its si

  12. Mitosis Counting in Breast Cancer : Object-Level Interobserver Agreement and Comparison to an Automatic Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J; Jiwa, Mehdi; Al-Janabi, Shaimaa; Pluim, JPW

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tumor proliferation speed, most commonly assessed by counting of mitotic figures in histological slide preparations, is an important biomarker for breast cancer. Although mitosis counting is routinely performed by pathologists, it is a tedious and subjective task with poor reproducibilit

  13. Parkin Regulates Mitosis and Genomic Stability through Cdc20/Cdh1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.B.; Kim, J.J.; Nam, H.J.; Gao, B.; Yin, P.; Qin, B.; Yi, S.Y.; Ham, H.; Evans, D.; Kim, S.H.; Zhang, Jun; Deng, M.; Liu, T.; Zhang, H.; Billadeau, D.D.; Wang, L.; Giaime, E.; Shen, J.; Pang, Y.P.; Jen, J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Lou, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease. Parkin has also been implicated in mitosis through mechanisms that are unclear. Here we show that Parkin interacts with anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 to mediate th

  14. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075281775; Willems, Stefan M.; Madabhushi, Anant; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gonzalez, Fabio; Larsen, Anders B L; Vestergaard, Jacob S.; Dahl, Anders B.; Cireşan, Dan C.; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M.; Tek, F. Boray; Walter, Thomas; Wang, Ching Wei; Kondo, Satoshi; Matuszewski, Bogdan J.; Precioso, Frederic; Snell, Violet; Kittler, Josef; de Campos, Teofilo E.; Khan, Adnan M.; Rajpoot, Nasir M.; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Lacle, Miangela M.; Viergever, Max A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/108781828; Pluim, JPW|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/224274333

    2015-01-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low i

  15. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J.; Willems, Stefan M.

    2014-01-01

    inter-observer agreement. With the wider acceptance of whole slide images in pathology labs, automatic image analysis has been proposed as a potential solution for these issues.In this paper, the results from the Assessment of Mitosis Detection Algorithms 2013 (AMIDA13) challenge are described...

  16. Antagonistic effect of polyamines on ABA-induced suppression of mitosis in Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Arpana; Sharma, Shashi

    2009-02-01

    Effect of abscisic acid (ABA) and polyamines (PAs) [putrescine (Put), spermidine (Spd) and spermine (Spm)] on mitosis in root tips of A. cepa was studied. Treatment with ABA (0.1 to 100 microM) for 24 hr suppressed the mitosis, measured as mitotic index (MI), in a concentration-dependent manner with approx. 50% suppression at 10 microM of ABA. Treatment with different PAs (1 to 100 microM) had differential mitosis suppression effect. Spm was most inhibitory followed by Spd and Put, respectively. The higher concentrations of PAs (1 mM Put; 0.1 and 1 mM Spd or Spm) caused cell distortion. Remarkably, a 24 hr pretreatment of root tips with PAs prior to ABA (100 microM) treatment resulted in a general concentration-dependent reversal of ABA-induced suppression of MI. Catalase (CAT) activity in the root tips, an indicator of redox metabolism, increased due to ABA treatment in a concentration-dependent manner, remained unaltered in response to Put and declined due to Spd and Spm (> or = 0.1 mM). However, all PAs, irrespective of their individual effects, generally antagonized the ABA-dependent increase in CAT activity. Data indicate the possibility of ABA-PA interaction in the regulation of mitosis.

  17. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J.; Willems, Stefan M.; Madabhushi, Anant; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gonzalez, Fabio; Larsen, Anders B L; Vestergaard, Jacob S.; Dahl, Anders B.; Cireşan, Dan C.; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M.; Tek, F. Boray; Walter, Thomas; Wang, Ching Wei; Kondo, Satoshi; Matuszewski, Bogdan J.; Precioso, Frederic; Snell, Violet; Kittler, Josef; de Campos, Teofilo E.; Khan, Adnan M.; Rajpoot, Nasir M.; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Lacle, Miangela M.; Viergever, Max A.; Pluim, JPW

    2015-01-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low i

  18. Creating a Double-Spring Model to Teach Chromosome Movement during Mitosis & Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peigao

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis is essential for understanding genetic transmission, but students often find this process difficult to grasp in a classroom setting. I propose a "double-spring model" that incorporates a physical demonstration and can be used as a teaching tool to help students understand this…

  19. A polycomb group protein is retained at specific sites on chromatin in mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole E Follmer

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of gene expression, including by Polycomb Group (PcG proteins, may depend on heritable chromatin states, but how these states can be propagated through mitosis is unclear. Using immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we find PcG proteins associated with mitotic chromosomes in Drosophila S2 cells. Genome-wide sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP-SEQ from mitotic cells indicates that Posterior Sex Combs (PSC is not present at well-characterized PcG targets including Hox genes in mitosis, but does remain at a subset of interphase sites. Many of these persistent sites overlap with chromatin domain borders described by Sexton et al. (2012, which are genomic regions characterized by low levels of long range contacts. Persistent PSC binding sites flank both Hox gene clusters. We hypothesize that disruption of long-range chromatin contacts in mitosis contributes to PcG protein release from most sites, while persistent binding at sites with minimal long-range contacts may nucleate re-establishment of PcG binding and chromosome organization after mitosis.

  20. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  1. Centrosomes split in the presence of impaired DNA integrity during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Lemstra, W; Blaauw, EH; van Cappellen, GWA; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    A well-established function of centrosomes is their role in accomplishing a successful mitosis that gives rise to a pair of identical daughter cells. We recently showed that DNA replication defects and DNA damage in Drosophila embryos trigger centrosomal changes, but it remained unclear whether

  2. A Polycomb Group Protein Is Retained at Specific Sites on Chromatin in Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follmer, Nicole E.; Wani, Ajazul H.; Francis, Nicole J.

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression, including by Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins, may depend on heritable chromatin states, but how these states can be propagated through mitosis is unclear. Using immunofluorescence and biochemical fractionation, we find PcG proteins associated with mitotic chromosomes in Drosophila S2 cells. Genome-wide sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitations (ChIP–SEQ) from mitotic cells indicates that Posterior Sex Combs (PSC) is not present at well-characterized PcG targets including Hox genes in mitosis, but does remain at a subset of interphase sites. Many of these persistent sites overlap with chromatin domain borders described by Sexton et al. (2012), which are genomic regions characterized by low levels of long range contacts. Persistent PSC binding sites flank both Hox gene clusters. We hypothesize that disruption of long-range chromatin contacts in mitosis contributes to PcG protein release from most sites, while persistent binding at sites with minimal long-range contacts may nucleate re-establishment of PcG binding and chromosome organization after mitosis. PMID:23284300

  3. Creating a Double-Spring Model to Teach Chromosome Movement during Mitosis & Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peigao

    2012-01-01

    The comprehension of chromosome movement during mitosis and meiosis is essential for understanding genetic transmission, but students often find this process difficult to grasp in a classroom setting. I propose a "double-spring model" that incorporates a physical demonstration and can be used as a teaching tool to help students understand this…

  4. Parkin Regulates Mitosis and Genomic Stability through Cdc20/Cdh1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.B.; Kim, J.J.; Nam, H.J.; Gao, B.; Yin, P.; Qin, B.; Yi, S.Y.; Ham, H.; Evans, D.; Kim, S.H.; Zhang, Jun; Deng, M.; Liu, T.; Zhang, H.; Billadeau, D.D.; Wang, L.; Giaime, E.; Shen, J.; Pang, Y.P.; Jen, J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Lou, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin have been linked to familial Parkinson's disease. Parkin has also been implicated in mitosis through mechanisms that are unclear. Here we show that Parkin interacts with anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) coactivators Cdc20 and Cdh1 to mediate

  5. Centrosomes split in the presence of impaired DNA integrity during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hut, HMJ; Lemstra, W; Blaauw, EH; van Cappellen, GWA; Kampinga, HH; Sibon, OCM

    2003-01-01

    A well-established function of centrosomes is their role in accomplishing a successful mitosis that gives rise to a pair of identical daughter cells. We recently showed that DNA replication defects and DNA damage in Drosophila embryos trigger centrosomal changes, but it remained unclear whether comp

  6. Phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A Maintains Spindle Pole Integrity during Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-Ju Chou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CPAP is required for centriole elongation during S/G2 phase, but the role of CPAP in mitosis is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CPAP maintains spindle pole integrity through its phosphorylation by Aurora-A during mitosis. Depletion of CPAP induced a prolonged delay in mitosis, pericentriolar material (PCM dispersion, and multiple mitotic abnormalities. Further studies demonstrated that CPAP directly interacts with and is phosphorylated by Aurora-A at serine 467 during mitosis. Interestingly, the dispersal of the PCM was effectively rescued by ectopic expression of wild-type CPAP or a phospho-mimic CPAP-S467D mutant, but not a non-phosphorylated CPAP-S467A mutant. Finally, we found that CPAP-S467D has a low affinity for microtubule binding but a high affinity for PCM proteins. Together, our results support a model wherein CPAP is required for proper mitotic progression, and phosphorylation of CPAP by Aurora-A is essential for maintaining spindle pole integrity.

  7. Synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling study of some new methoxylated 2-benzylthio-quinazoline-4(3H)-ones as nonclassical antifolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Messery, Shahenda M; Hassan, Ghada S; Nagi, Mahmoud N; Habib, El-Sayed E; Al-Rashood, Sarah T; El-Subbagh, Hussein I

    2016-10-01

    A new series of 2,3,6-substituted-quinazolin-4-ones was designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their in vitro DHFR inhibition, antimicrobial, and antitumor activities. Compounds 28 and 61 proved to be active DHFR inhibitors with IC50 0.02 and 0.01μM, respectively. Molecular modeling studies concluded that recognition with the key amino acid Phe34 is essential for binding and hence DHFR inhibition. Compounds 34, 56 and 66 showed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity comparable to Gentamicin and Ciprofloxacin. Compounds 40 and 64 showed broad spectrum antitumor activity toward several tumor cell lines and proved to be 10 fold more active than 5-FU, with GI50 MG-MID values of 2.2 and 2.4μM, respectively.

  8. A new 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)quinazolin-4(3H)-one derived acylhydrazone for fluorescence recognition of Al3 +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lijun; Ding, Shuangli; Zhong, Keli; Hou, Shuhua; Bian, Yanjiang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2017-03-01

    A new 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl)quinazolin-4(3H)-one derived acylhydrazone (QP) was designed and synthesized as a fluorescent sensor. In Tris • HCl buffer (10 mM, pH 7.4)/ethanol (1/9, v/v) solution, QP exhibits a highly selective fluorescence response to Al3 + over other metal ions with a significant blue-shifted and enhanced emission at 473 nm. QP interacts with Al3 + reversibly through a 1:2 binding ratio with a detection limit of 4.79 × 10- 8 M. Potential applicability of QP for Al3 + detection in tap and lake water samples were also examined by 'proof-of-concept' experiments.

  9. Synthesis of Bioactive 2-(Arylaminothiazolo[5,4-f]-quinazolin-9-ones via the Hügershoff Reaction or Cu- Catalyzed Intramolecular C-S Bond Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Hédou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A library of thirty eight novel thiazolo[5,4-f]quinazolin-9(8H-one derivatives (series 8, 10, 14 and 17 was prepared via the Hügershoff reaction and a Cu catalyzed intramolecular C-S bond formation, helped by microwave-assisted technology when required. The efficient multistep synthesis of the key 6-amino-3-cyclopropylquinazolin-4(3H-one (3 has been reinvestigated and performed on a multigram scale from the starting 5-nitroanthranilic acid. The inhibitory potency of the final products was evaluated against five kinases involved in Alzheimer’s disease and showed that some molecules of the 17 series described in this paper are particularly promising for the development of novel multi-target inhibitors of kinases.

  10. Novel 2-phenyl-3-{4’-[N-(4”-aminophenylcarbamoyl]-phenyl}-quinazoline-4(3Hone-6-sulphonic acidbased mono azo reactive dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIVYESH R. PATEL

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of new heterocyclic mono azo reactive dyes 7a–m were prepared by diazotization of 2-phenyl-3-{4’-[N-(4”-aminophenylcarbamoyl]-phenyl}-quinazoline-4(3H-one-6-sulphonic acid (3 and coupling with various cyanurated coupling components 6a–m and their dyeing performance on silk, wool and cotton fibres was assessed. These dyes were found to give a variety of colour shades with very good depth and levelness on the fibres. All the compounds were identified by conventional method (IR and 1H-NMR and elemental analyses. The percentage dye bath exhaustion on different fibres was reasonably good and acceptable. The dyed fibre showed moderate to very good fastness to light, washing and rubbing.

  11. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  12. Evolutionary consequences of polyploidy in prokaryotes and the origin of mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Alexander V; Kaznacheev, Ilya S

    2016-06-08

    The origin of eukaryote-specific traits such as mitosis and sexual reproduction remains disputable. There is growing evidence that both mitosis and eukaryotic sex (i.e., the alternation of syngamy and meiosis) may have already existed in the basal eukaryotes. The mating system of the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii probably represents an intermediate stage between typical prokaryotic and eukaryotic sex. H. volcanii is highly polyploid, as well as many other Archaea. Here, we use computer simulation to explore genetic and evolutionary outcomes of polyploidy in amitotic prokaryotes and its possible role in the origin of mitosis, meiosis and eukaryotic sex. Modeling suggests that polyploidy can confer strong short-term evolutionary advantage to amitotic prokaryotes. However, it also promotes the accumulation of recessive deleterious mutations and the risk of extinction in the long term, especially in highly mutagenic environment. There are several possible strategies that amitotic polyploids can use in order to reduce the genetic costs of polyploidy while retaining its benefits. Interestingly, most of these strategies resemble different components or aspects of eukaryotic sex. They include asexual ploidy cycles, equalization of genome copies by gene conversion, high-frequency lateral gene transfer between relatives, chromosome exchange coupled with homologous recombination, and the evolution of more accurate chromosome distribution during cell division (mitosis). Acquisition of mitosis by an amitotic polyploid results in chromosome diversification and specialization. Ultimately, it transforms a polyploid cell into a functionally monoploid one with multiple unique, highly redundant chromosomes. Specialization of chromosomes makes the previously evolved modes of promiscuous chromosome shuffling deleterious. This can result in selective pressure to develop accurate mechanisms of homolog pairing, and, ultimately, meiosis. Emergence of mitosis and the first

  13. 3-[Benzimidazo- and 3-[benzothiadiazoleimidazo-(1,2-c)quinazolin-5-yl]-2H-chromene-2-ones as potent antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuarm, B Suresh; Reddy, Y Thirupathi; Madhav, J Venu; Crooks, Peter A; Rajitha, B

    2011-01-01

    A series of 3-[benzimidazo(1,2-c)quinazolin-5-yl]-2H-chromene-2-one (6a-6f) and 3-[benzothiadiazole- imidazo(1,2-c)quinazolin-5-yl]-2H-chromene-2-one derivatives (7a-7f) that incorporate a variety of substituents at the 6- and/or 8-positions of the coumarin moieties have been synthesized utilizing cellulose sulfuric acid as an efficient catalyst under both conventional heating and microwave irradiation procedures. These analogs were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes (Gram-positive bacteria), Escherichia Coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Salmonella typhimurium (Gram-negative bacteria), and Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, and Aspergillus flavus (Fungi). Two analogs, 6c (a 6,8-dichloro analog, MIC([SA]) = 2.5 μg/mL; MIC([ST]) = 2.5 μg/mL) and 7d (a 6,8-dibromo analog, MIC([ST]) = 2.5 μg/mL) were identified as potent antibacterial agents, and two analogs, 6b (a 6-bromo analog, MIC([AF]) = 10 μg/mL) and 6d (a 6,8-dibromo analog, MIC([AF]) = 15 μg/mL; MIC([CA]) = 15μg/mL), were identified as potent antifungal agents. Based on the MIC data, analogs 6b, 6c, 6d, and 7d were identified as the most potent antimicrobial agents in the series. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Combined 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking study on multi-acting quinazoline derivatives as HER2 kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaie, Sako; Monajjemi, Majid; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Fathi, Fardin; Jamalan, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    A series of new quinazoline derivatives has been recently reported as potent multi-acting histone deacetylase (HDAC), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) inhibitors. HER2 is one of the major targets for the treatment of breast cancer and other carcinomas. Three-dimensional structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) is a well-known technique, which is used to drug design and development. This technique is used for quantitatively predicting the interaction between a molecule and the active site of a specific target. For each 3D-QSAR study, a three-dimensional model is created from a large curve fit to find a fitting between computational descriptors and biological activity. This model could be used as a predictive tool in drug design. The best model has the highest correlation between theoretical and experimental data. Self-Organizing Molecular Field Analysis (SOMFA), a grid-based and alignment-dependent 3D-QSAR method, is employed to study the correlation between the molecular properties and HER2 inhibitory potency of the quinazoline derivatives. Before presentation of inhibitor structures to SOMFA study, conformation of inhibitors was determined by AutoDock4, HyperChem and AutoDock Vina, separately. Overall, six independent models were produced and evaluated by the statistical partial least square (PLS) analysis. Among the several generated 3D-QSARs, the best model was selected on the basis of its statistical significance and predictive potential. The model derived from the superposition of docked conformation with AutoDock Vina with reasonable cross-validated q(2) (0.767), non cross-validated r(2) (0.815) and F-test (97.22) values showed a desirable predictive capability. Analysis of SOMFA model could provide some useful information in the design of novel HER2 kinase inhibitors with better spectrum of activity.

  15. Negative regulation of the endocytic adaptor disabled-2 (Dab2) in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetrit, David; Barzilay, Lior; Horn, Galit; Bielik, Tom; Smorodinsky, Nechama I; Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2011-02-18

    Mitotic cells undergo extensive changes in shape and size through the altered regulation and function of their membrane trafficking machinery. Disabled 2 (Dab2), a multidomain cargo-specific endocytic adaptor and a mediator of signal transduction, is a potential integrator of trafficking and signaling. Dab2 binds effectors of signaling and trafficking that localize to different intracellular compartments. Thus, differential localization is a putative regulatory mechanism of Dab2 function. Furthermore, Dab2 is phosphorylated in mitosis and is thus regulated in the cell cycle. However, a detailed description of the intracellular localization of Dab2 in the different phases of mitosis and an understanding of the functional consequences of its phosphorylation are lacking. Here, we show that Dab2 is progressively displaced from the membrane in mitosis. This phenomenon is paralleled by a loss of co-localization with clathrin. Both phenomena culminate in metaphase/anaphase and undergo partial recovery in cytokinesis. Treatment with 2-methoxyestradiol, which arrests cells at the spindle assembly checkpoint, induces the same effects observed in metaphase cells. Moreover, 2-methoxyestradiol also induced Dab2 phosphorylation and reduced Dab2/clathrin interactions, endocytic vesicle motility, clathrin exchange dynamics, and the internalization of a receptor endowed with an NPXY endocytic signal. Serine/threonine to alanine mutations, of residues localized to the central region of Dab2, attenuated its phosphorylation, reduced its membrane displacement, and maintained its endocytic abilities in mitosis. We propose that the negative regulation of Dab2 is part of an accommodation of the cell to the altered physicochemical conditions prevalent in mitosis, aimed at allowing endocytic activity throughout the cell cycle.

  16. Effects of tyrosine kinase and phosphatase inhibitors on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, Ya A; Yemets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J P; Blume, Ya B

    2012-01-01

    To test whether reversible tubulin phosphorylation plays any role in the process of plant mitosis the effects of inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, herbimycin A, genistein and tyrphostin AG 18, and of an inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatases, sodium orthovanadate, on microtubule organization and mitosis progression in a synchronized BY-2 culture has been investigated. It was found that treatment with inhibitors of tyrosine kinases of BY-2 cells at the G2/M transition did not lead to visible disturbances of mitotic microtubule structures, while it did reduce the frequency of their appearance. We assume that a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation level could alter the microtubule dynamic instability parameters during interphase/prophase transition. All types of tyrosine kinase inhibitors used caused a prophase delay: herbimycin A and genistein for 2 h, and tyrphostin AG18 for 1 h. Thereafter the peak of mitosis was displaced for 1 h by herbimycin A or genistein exposure, but after tyrphostin AG18 treatment the timing of the mitosis-peak was comparable to that in control cells. Enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation induced by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor resulted in the opposite effect on BY-2 mitosis transition. Culture treatment with sodium orthovanadate during 1 h resulted in an accelerated start of the prophase and did not lead to the alteration in time of the mitotic index peak formation, as compared to control cells. We suppose that the reversible tyrosine phosphorylation can be involved in the regulation of interphase to M phase transition possibly through regulation of microtubule dynamics in plant cells.

  17. Zebrafish Noxa promotes mitosis in early embryonic development and regulates apoptosis in subsequent embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, J-X; Zhou, L; Li, Z; Wang, Y; Gui, J-F

    2014-06-01

    Noxa functions in apoptosis and immune system of vertebrates, but its activities in embryo development remain unclear. In this study, we have studied the role of zebrafish Noxa (zNoxa) by using zNoxa-specifc morpholino knockdown and overexpression approaches in developing zebrafish embryos. Expression pattern analysis indicates that zNoxa transcript is of maternal origin, which displays a uniform distribution in early embryonic development until shield stage, and the zygote zNoxa transcription is initiated from this stage and mainly localized in YSL of the embryos. The zNoxa expression alterations result in strong embryonic development defects, demonstrating that zNoxa regulates apoptosis from 75% epiboly stage of development onward, in which zNoxa firstly induces the expression of zBik, and then cooperates with zBik to regulate apoptosis. Moreover, zNoxa knockdown also causes a reduction in number of mitotic cells before 8 h.p.f., suggesting that zNoxa also promotes mitosis before 75% epiboly stage. The effect of zNoxa on mitosis is mediated by zWnt4b in early embryos, whereas zMcl1a and zMcl1b suppress the ability of zNoxa to regulate mitosis and apoptosis at different developmental stages. In addition, mammalian mouse Noxa (mNoxa) mRNA was demonstrated to rescue the arrest of mitosis when zNoxa was knocked down, suggesting that mouse and zebrafish Noxa might have similar dual functions. Therefore, the current findings indicate that Noxa is a novel regulator of early mitosis before 75% epiboly stage when it translates into a key mediator of apoptosis in subsequent embryogenesis.

  18. Downregulation of Wip1 phosphatase modulates the cellular threshold of DNA damage signaling in mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macurek, Libor; Benada, Jan; Müllers, Erik; Halim, Vincentius A.; Krejčíková, Kateřina; Burdová, Kamila; Pecháčková, Sona; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lindqvist, Arne; Medema, René H.; Bartek, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Cells are constantly challenged by DNA damage and protect their genome integrity by activation of an evolutionary conserved DNA damage response pathway (DDR). A central core of DDR is composed of a spatiotemporally ordered net of post-translational modifications, among which protein phosphorylation plays a major role. Activation of checkpoint kinases ATM/ATR and Chk1/2 leads to a temporal arrest in cell cycle progression (checkpoint) and allows time for DNA repair. Following DNA repair, cells re-enter the cell cycle by checkpoint recovery. Wip1 phosphatase (also called PPM1D) dephosphorylates multiple proteins involved in DDR and is essential for timely termination of the DDR. Here we have investigated how Wip1 is regulated in the context of the cell cycle. We found that Wip1 activity is downregulated by several mechanisms during mitosis. Wip1 protein abundance increases from G1 phase to G2 and declines in mitosis. Decreased abundance of Wip1 during mitosis is caused by proteasomal degradation. In addition, Wip1 is phosphorylated at multiple residues during mitosis, and this leads to inhibition of its enzymatic activity. Importantly, ectopic expression of Wip1 reduced γH2AX staining in mitotic cells and decreased the number of 53BP1 nuclear bodies in G1 cells. We propose that the combined decrease and inhibition of Wip1 in mitosis decreases the threshold necessary for DDR activation and enables cells to react adequately even to modest levels of DNA damage encountered during unperturbed mitotic progression. PMID:23255129

  19. Cdc15 Phosphorylates the C-terminal Domain of RNA Polymerase II for Transcription during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit Kumar; Rastogi, Shivangi; Shukla, Harish; Asalam, Mohd; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2017-03-31

    In eukaryotes, the basal transcription in interphase is orchestrated through the regulation by kinases (Kin28, Bur1, and Ctk1) and phosphatases (Ssu72, Rtr1, and Fcp1), which act through the post-translational modification of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The CTD comprises the repeated Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser motif with potential epigenetic modification sites. Despite the observation of transcription and periodic expression of genes during mitosis with entailing CTD phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, the associated CTD specific kinase(s) and its role in transcription remains unknown. Here we have identified Cdc15 as a potential kinase phosphorylating Ser-2 and Ser-5 of CTD for transcription during mitosis in the budding yeast. The phosphorylation of CTD by Cdc15 is independent of any prior Ser phosphorylation(s). The inactivation of Cdc15 causes reduction of global CTD phosphorylation during mitosis and affects the expression of genes whose transcript levels peak during mitosis. Cdc15 also influences the complete transcription of clb2 gene and phosphorylates Ser-5 at the promoter and Ser-2 toward the 3' end of the gene. The observation that Cdc15 could phosphorylate Ser-5, as well as Ser-2, during transcription in mitosis is in contrast to the phosphorylation marks put by the kinases in interphase (G1, S, and G2), where Cdck7/Kin28 phosphorylates Ser-5 at promoter and Bur1/Ctk1 phosphorylates Ser-2 at the 3' end of the genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Phosphorylation of SAF-A/hnRNP-U Serine 59 by Polo-Like Kinase 1 Is Required for Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Morrice, Nicholas; Britton, Sébastien; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2015-08-01

    Scaffold attachment factor A (SAF-A), also called heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP-U), is phosphorylated on serine 59 by the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) in response to DNA damage. Since SAF-A, DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6), which interacts with DNA-PKcs, have all been shown to have roles in mitosis, we asked whether DNA-PKcs phosphorylates SAF-A in mitosis. We show that SAF-A is phosphorylated on serine 59 in mitosis, that phosphorylation requires polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) rather than DNA-PKcs, that SAF-A interacts with PLK1 in nocodazole-treated cells, and that serine 59 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mitosis. Moreover, cells expressing SAF-A in which serine 59 is mutated to alanine have multiple characteristics of aberrant mitoses, including misaligned chromosomes, lagging chromosomes, polylobed nuclei, and delayed passage through mitosis. Our findings identify serine 59 of SAF-A as a new target of both PLK1 and PP2A in mitosis and reveal that both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of SAF-A serine 59 by PLK1 and PP2A, respectively, are required for accurate and timely exit from mitosis.

  1. Human Cdc14B promotes progression through mitosis by dephosphorylating Cdc25 and regulating Cdk1/cyclin B activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Tumurbaatar

    Full Text Available Entry into and progression through mitosis depends on phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of key substrates. In yeast, the nucleolar phosphatase Cdc14 is pivotal for exit from mitosis counteracting Cdk1-dependent phosphorylations. Whether hCdc14B, the human homolog of yeast Cdc14, plays a similar function in mitosis is not yet known. Here we show that hCdc14B serves a critical role in regulating progression through mitosis, which is distinct from hCdc14A. Unscheduled overexpression of hCdc14B delays activation of two master regulators of mitosis, Cdc25 and Cdk1, and slows down entry into mitosis. Depletion of hCdc14B by RNAi prevents timely inactivation of Cdk1/cyclin B and dephosphorylation of Cdc25, leading to severe mitotic defects, such as delay of metaphase/anaphase transition, lagging chromosomes, multipolar spindles and binucleation. The results demonstrate that hCdc14B-dependent modulation of Cdc25 phosphatase and Cdk1/cyclin B activity is tightly linked to correct chromosome segregation and bipolar spindle formation, processes that are required for proper progression through mitosis and maintenance of genomic stability.

  2. Single-Cell Dynamic Analysis of Mitosis in Haploid Embryonic Stem Cells Shows the Prolonged Metaphase and Its Association with Self-diploidization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ao Guo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent establishment of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs provides new possibilities for genetic screening and for understanding genome evolution and function. However, the dynamics of mitosis in haploid ESCs is still unclear. Here, we report that the duration of mitosis in haploid ESCs, especially the metaphase, is significantly longer than that in diploid ESCs. Delaying mitosis by chemicals increased self-diploidization of haploid ESCs, while shortening mitosis stabilized haploid ESCs. Taken together, our study suggests that the delayed mitosis of haploid ESCs is associated with self-diploidization.

  3. Regioselective Multi-component Synthesis of 7-Aryl-benzo[h][1,2,4]-triazolo[5,1-b]quinazoline-5,6-diones Catalyzed by n-Propylsulfonated γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weilin; Tian, Shuanbao; Wu, Liqiang [Xinxiang Medical Univ., Xinxiang (China)

    2013-09-15

    We have developed a straightforward method for the synthesis of 7-aryl-benzo[h][1,2,4]-triazolo[5,1-b] quinazoline-5,6-dione derivatives by nano n-propylsulfonated γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyzed three-component reaction of aldehyde, 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. A series of 7-aryl-benzo[h][1,2,4]-triazolo[5,1-b]quinazoline-5,6-dione derivatives have been synthesized in excellent yield (85-96%). The catalyst can be recycled up to six cycles without much decrease in catalytic activity. Environment friendly catalyst, high regioselectivity and good yield are the advantages of the method. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report on synthesis of 7-aryl-benzo[h][1,2,4]-triazolo[5,1-b]quinazoline-5,6-dione derivatives. We are evaluating anticancer activity of 4, which will be published elsewhere. Naphthoquinones constitute a major class of naturally occurring compounds, and interests in their chemistry continues unabated because of their wide range of biological and therapeutic properties such as antioxidant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, antiviral, and anticancer activity.

  4. SiO2-NaHSO4as an Efficient Reusable Heterogeneous Catalyst for the One-Pot Three-Component Synthesis of Octahydro-quinazolin-2,5-diones in Water%SiO2-NaHSO4 as an Efficient Reusable Heterogeneous Catalyst for the One-Pot Three-Component Synthesis of Octahydro-quinazolin-2,5-diones in Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sadeq Hamood Saleh AZZAM; Aisha SIDDEKHA; Aatika NIZAM; Mohamed Afzal PASHA

    2012-01-01

    An environmentally benign method for the synthesis of octahydro-quinazolin-2,5-diones by the reaction of aromatic aldehydes,dimedone,and urea in the presence of SiO2-NaHSO4 is reported.SiO2-NaHSO4 acts as an efficient,mild,and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst to give excellent yields within a short reaction time in water at 60-80 ℃.

  5. [Effect of inhibitors serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases on mitosis progression of synchronized tobacco by-2 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheremet, Ia A; Emets, A I; Azmi, A; Vissenberg, K; Verbelen, J-P; Blium, Ia B

    2012-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of various serine/ threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases in the regulation of mitosis progression in plant cells the influence of cyclin-dependent (olomoucine) and Ca2+ -calmodulin-dependent (W7) protein kinases inhibitors, as well as protein kinase C inhibitors (H7 and staurosporine) and protein phosphatases inhibitor (okadaic acid) on mitosis progression in synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells has been studied. It was found that BY-2 culture treatment with inhibitors of cyclin dependent protein kinases and protein kinase C causes prophase delay, reduces the mitotic index and displaces of mitotic peak as compare with control cells. Inhibition of Ca2+ -calmodulin dependent protein kinases enhances the cell entry into prophase and delays their exit from mitosis. Meanwhile inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases insignificantly enhances of synchronized BY-2 cells entering into all phases of mitosis.

  6. Systematic Analysis of the Crosstalk between Mitosis and DNA Damage by a Live Cell siRNA Screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronni Sølvhøi

    Recent research has shown, that the biological processes of DNA replication, DNA damage, cell cycle and mitosis cannot be considered as isolated cellular functions but are mechanistically linked in many ways. For instance, when cells are exposed to replication stress and enter mitosis with unreso......Recent research has shown, that the biological processes of DNA replication, DNA damage, cell cycle and mitosis cannot be considered as isolated cellular functions but are mechanistically linked in many ways. For instance, when cells are exposed to replication stress and enter mitosis...... complemented by immunofluorescence (IF) analysis in fixed cells, we were able to correlate the impact of mitotic perturbations with the occurrence of DNA damage. Surprisingly, we saw that siRNA-mediated knockdown of only a subset of mitotic genes was accompanied by an increase in DNA damage, showing that even...

  7. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activity for Mitosis, Meiosis and the Fundamentals of Heredity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark F.

    1988-01-01

    Described is an exercise which uses inexpensive and easy-to-make materials to demonstrate the basic fundamentals of heredity. Discusses two approaches using a hypothetical insert to demonstrate inheritance, mitosis, meiosis, and genotypic and phenotypic frequencies. (CW)

  8. The ABNORMAL GAMETOPHYTES (AGM) gene product of Arabidopsis demonstrates a role in mitosis during gamete development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Anna-Marie; Kroeber, Sandra; Saedler, Heinz

    2004-07-01

    Screening a T-DNA mutagenized population of Arabidopsis thaliana for reduced seed set and segregation distortion led to the isolation of the ABNORMAL GAMETOPHYTES (AGM) mutant. Homozygous plants were never recovered, but heterozygous plants showed mitotic defects during gametogenesis resulting in approximately 50% abortion of both the male and female gametes. Isolation of the genomic sequence flanking the co-segregating T-DNA element led to the identification of a gene located on chromosome 5, predicted to encode a transmembrane protein. BLAST homology searches identified two homologous proteins that are not redundant, as is clear from the existence of the agm mutant. Unexpectedly, expression studies using the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene suggest that AGM and its closest Arabidopsis homolog are mostly expressed in cells undergoing mitosis. Thus, AGM is not a gametophytic gene as originally speculated on the basis of segregation distortion, but rather classified as an essential gene crucial to the process of mitosis in plants.

  9. The acetyllysine reader BRD3R promotes human nuclear reprogramming and regulates mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Ruowen; Khodadadi-Jamayran, Alireza; Chen, Bo; Crowley, Michael R; Festok, Muhamad A; Crossman, David K; Townes, Tim M; Hu, Kejin

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that both recipient cells and donor nuclei demonstrate a mitotic advantage as observed in the traditional reprogramming with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, it is not known whether a specific mitotic factor plays a critical role in reprogramming. Here we identify an isoform of human bromodomain-containing 3 (BRD3), BRD3R (BRD3 with Reprogramming activity), as a reprogramming factor. BRD3R positively regulates mitosis during reprogramming, upregulates a large set of mitotic genes at early stages of reprogramming, and associates with mitotic chromatin. Interestingly, a set of the mitotic genes upregulated by BRD3R constitutes a pluripotent molecular signature. The two BRD3 isoforms display differential binding to acetylated histones. Our results suggest a molecular interpretation for the mitotic advantage in reprogramming and show that mitosis may be a driving force of reprogramming.

  10. PICH promotes sister chromatid disjunction and co-operates with topoisomerase II in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christian F; Huttner, Diana; Bizard, Anna H; Hirano, Seiki; Li, Tian-Neng; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Bjerregaard, Victoria A; Liu, Ying; Nigg, Erich A; Wang, Lily Hui-Ching; Hickson, Ian D

    2015-01-01

    PICH is a SNF2 family DNA translocase that binds to ultra-fine DNA bridges (UFBs) in mitosis. Numerous roles for PICH have been proposed from protein depletion experiments, but a consensus has failed to emerge. Here, we report that deletion of PICH in avian cells causes chromosome structural abnormalities, and hypersensitivity to an inhibitor of Topoisomerase II (Topo II), ICRF-193. ICRF-193-treated PICH(-/-) cells undergo sister chromatid non-disjunction in anaphase, and frequently abort cytokinesis. PICH co-localizes with Topo IIα on UFBs and at the ribosomal DNA locus, and the timely resolution of both structures depends on the ATPase activity of PICH. Purified PICH protein strongly stimulates the catalytic activity of Topo II in vitro. Consistent with this, a human PICH(-/-) cell line exhibits chromosome instability and chromosome condensation and decatenation defects similar to those of ICRF-193-treated cells. We propose that PICH and Topo II cooperate to prevent chromosome missegregation events in mitosis.

  11. The roles of cohesins in mitosis, meiosis, and human health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Amanda S.; Berkowitz, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitosis and meiosis are essential processes that occur during development. Throughout these processes, cohesion is required to keep the sister chromatids together until their separation at anaphase. Cohesion is created by multi-protein subunit complexes called cohesins. Although the subunits differ slightly in mitosis and meiosis, the canonical cohesin complex is composed of four subunits that are quite diverse. The cohesin complexes are also important for DNA repair, gene expression, development, and genome integrity. Here we provide an overview of the roles of cohesins during these different events, as well as their roles in human health and disease, including the cohesinopathies. Although the exact roles and mechanisms of these proteins are still being elucidated, this review will serve as a guide for the current knowledge of cohesins. PMID:24906316

  12. MicroRNAs and DNA methylation as epigenetic regulators of mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chencheng; Liu, Yun; Sun, Min; Niu, Minghui; Yuan, Qingqing; Hai, Yanan; Guo, Ying; Chen, Zheng; Hou, Jingmei; Liu, Yang; He, Zuping

    2015-07-01

    Spermatogenesis is composed of three distinctive phases, which include self-renewal of spermatogonia via mitosis, spermatocytes undergoing meiosis I/II and post-meiotic development of haploid spermatids via spermiogenesis. Spermatogenesis also involves condensation of chromatin in the spermatid head before transformation of spermatids to spermatozoa. Epigenetic regulation refers to changes of heritably cellular and physiological traits not caused by modifications in the DNA sequences of the chromatin such as mutations. Major advances have been made in the epigenetic regulation of spermatogenesis. In this review, we address the roles and mechanisms of epigenetic regulators, with a focus on the role of microRNAs and DNA methylation during mitosis, meiosis and spermiogenesis. We also highlight issues that deserve attention for further investigation on the epigenetic regulation of spermatogenesis. More importantly, a thorough understanding of the epigenetic regulation in spermatogenesis will provide insightful information into the etiology of some unexplained infertility, offering new approaches for the treatment of male infertility.

  13. The roles of cohesins in mitosis, meiosis, and human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Amanda S; Berkowitz, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    Mitosis and meiosis are essential processes that occur during development. Throughout these processes, cohesion is required to keep the sister chromatids together until their separation at anaphase. Cohesion is created by multiprotein subunit complexes called cohesins. Although the subunits differ slightly in mitosis and meiosis, the canonical cohesin complex is composed of four subunits that are quite diverse. The cohesin complexes are also important for DNA repair, gene expression, development, and genome integrity. Here we provide an overview of the roles of cohesins during these different events as well as their roles in human health and disease, including the cohesinopathies. Although the exact roles and mechanisms of these proteins are still being elucidated, this review serves as a guide for the current knowledge of cohesins.

  14. Mitosis gives a brief window of opportunity for a change in gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Halley-Stott

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell differentiation is remarkably stable but can be reversed by somatic cell nuclear transfer, cell fusion, and iPS. Nuclear transfer to amphibian oocytes provides a special opportunity to test transcriptional reprogramming without cell division. We show here that, after nuclear transfer to amphibian oocytes, mitotic chromatin is reprogrammed up to 100 times faster than interphase nuclei. We find that, as cells traverse mitosis, their genes pass through a temporary phase of unusually high responsiveness to oocyte reprogramming factors (mitotic advantage. Mitotic advantage is not explained by nuclear penetration, DNA modifications, histone acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, nor by salt soluble chromosomal proteins. Our results suggest that histone H2A deubiquitination may account, at least in part, for the acquisition of mitotic advantage. They support the general principle that a temporary access of cytoplasmic factors to genes during mitosis may facilitate somatic cell nuclear reprogramming and the acquisition of new cell fates in normal development.

  15. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J; Willems, Stefan M; Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gonzalez, Fabio; Larsen, Anders B L; Vestergaard, Jacob S; Dahl, Anders B; Cireşan, Dan C; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Tek, F Boray; Walter, Thomas; Wang, Ching-Wei; Kondo, Satoshi; Matuszewski, Bogdan J; Precioso, Frederic; Snell, Violet; Kittler, Josef; de Campos, Teofilo E; Khan, Adnan M; Rajpoot, Nasir M; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Lacle, Miangela M; Viergever, Max A; Pluim, Josien P W

    2015-02-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low inter-observer agreement. With the wider acceptance of whole slide images in pathology labs, automatic image analysis has been proposed as a potential solution for these issues. In this paper, the results from the Assessment of Mitosis Detection Algorithms 2013 (AMIDA13) challenge are described. The challenge was based on a data set consisting of 12 training and 11 testing subjects, with more than one thousand annotated mitotic figures by multiple observers. Short descriptions and results from the evaluation of eleven methods are presented. The top performing method has an error rate that is comparable to the inter-observer agreement among pathologists.

  16. Cytological evidence for assortment mitosis leading to loss of heterozygosity in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Richard R-C; Li, Xiaomei; Chatterton, N Jerry

    2006-05-01

    In the root meristem cells of the rice line AMR, which causes loss of heterozygosity in its hybrids, both normal and assortment mitoses were observed. During normal mitosis, chromosomes did not form homologous pairs at metaphase; all chromosomes lined up at the equatorial plate and 2 chromatids of each chromosome disjoined at the centromere and moved toward opposite poles. During assortment mitosis, varying numbers of paired homologues were observed at mitotic metaphase. Two groups of 12 chromosomes separated and moved towards the opposite poles of daughter cells with few chromosomes having their chromatids separated at anaphase. These observations support the proposed mechanism that is responsible for early genotype fixation in rice hybrids involving AMR.

  17. Cytotoxic Effects of (5 Medicinal Plants on Mitosis in Allium cepa Root Tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Udo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to investigate the effects that plant extracts from 5 medicinal plants may have on mitosis in Allium cepa. Root of A .cepa were immersed in alcoholic extracts at the concentrations of 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg/mL, respectively for each of the following plants: Gnetum africanum Welw., Lasianther aafricana P. Beauv, Ocimum gratissimum Linn., Telfairia occidentalis Hook F. and Vernonia amygdalina Del. Leafy vegetable which are commonly used in herbal medicine. Results obtained show that the various concentrations of the extracts from test plants had toxic effects on the cells, which caused significant reduction (p<0.05 in the mitotic index when compared with the control. Other effects were prophase inhibition, the delay of mitosis and nuclear lesion. The cytotoxic effect makes a case for a precaution in the use of the leafy extracts in herbal medicine practice.

  18. [Effect of temperature on the duration of mitosis in mammalian cells cultivated outside the body].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, F V; Smirnova, T M; Savik, Z F

    1978-02-01

    Nine cell strains of different origin were cultivated at 28--36 degrees with the interval of 2 degrees. During the phase of logarithmic culture growth, the duration of mitosis (Tm) was determined by means of colchicine method. A strict temperatural dependence Tm, obeyed to Arrenius' law was revealed. Temperature range within which Arreinius' law is valid in different cell strains is not alike. Cultivation of L cells and connective tissue cells from Chinese hamster to 39, 41and 42 degrees demonstrated their upper critical point Tm to be for L cells 39 degrees, for connective tissue cells from the Chinese hamster--41 degrees. Electron microscopic investigations demonstrated that cell cultivation within physiological (mitosis destroying) range of temperatures does not notably effect their ultrastructural organization.

  19. Electron-microscope observations of mitosis and cytokinesis in multinucleate protoplasts of soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowke, L C; Bech-Hansen, C W; Gamborg, O L; Constabel, F

    1975-08-01

    Multinucleate soybean protoplasts produced by spontaneous fusion during enzyme digestion of the cell wall initiated cell division after approximately 40 h in culture. The structure of these protoplasts during mitosis and cytokinesis was studied with both light and electron microscopes. Most nuclei did not fuse but divided synchronously. Interphase nuclei was commonly connected by short narrow nuclear bridges. At prophase and metaphase the nuclei appeared typical of those in most higher plants; technical difficulties prevented an adequate examination of protoplasts at anaphase. Telophase was characterized by cytokinesis involving phragmoplast and cell plate formation; however, complete partitioning of the cytoplasm by cell plants was not observed. Numerous coated vesicles were present near to or continuous with the cell plate and plasmalemma. The presence of a few dividing protoplasts with at least double the normal chromosome number suggests that some nuclear fusion occurred prior to mitosis. Very little cell wall material was detected at the margin of the dividing protoplasts.

  20. Molecular Regulation of the Mitosis/Meiosis Decision in Multicellular Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Judith

    2011-01-01

    A major step in the journey from germline stem cell to differentiated gamete is the decision to leave the mitotic cell cycle and begin progression through the meiotic cell cycle. Over the past decade, molecular regulators of the mitosis/meiosis decision have been discovered in most of the major model multicellular organisms. Historically, the mitosis/meiosis decision has been closely linked with controls of germline self-renewal and the sperm/egg decision, especially in nematodes and mice. Molecular explanations of those linkages clarify our understanding of this fundamental germ cell decision, and unifying themes have begun to emerge. Although the complete circuitry of the decision is not known in any organism, the recent advances promise to impact key issues in human reproduction and agriculture. PMID:21646377

  1. Tau excess impairs mitosis and kinesin-5 function, leading to aneuploidy and cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Bougé

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD, cell cycle defects and associated aneuploidy have been described. However, the importance of these defects in the physiopathology of AD and the underlying mechanistic processes are largely unknown, in particular with respect to the microtubule (MT-binding protein Tau, which is found in excess in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of affected individuals. Although it has long been known that Tau is phosphorylated during mitosis to generate a lower affinity for MTs, there is, to our knowledge, no indication that an excess of this protein could affect mitosis. Here, we studied the effect of an excess of human Tau (hTau protein on cell mitosis in vivo. Using the Drosophila developing wing disc epithelium as a model, we show that an excess of hTau induces a mitotic arrest, with the presence of monopolar spindles. This mitotic defect leads to aneuploidy and apoptotic cell death. We studied the mechanism of action of hTau and found that the MT-binding domain of hTau is responsible for these defects. We also demonstrate that the effects of hTau occur via the inhibition of the function of the kinesin Klp61F, the Drosophila homologue of kinesin-5 (also called Eg5 or KIF11. We finally show that this deleterious effect of hTau is also found in other Drosophila cell types (neuroblasts and tissues (the developing eye disc, as well as in human HeLa cells. By demonstrating that MT-bound Tau inhibits the Eg5 kinesin and cell mitosis, our work provides a new framework to consider the role of Tau in neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judit Pampalona

    Full Text Available Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  3. Chromosome Bridges Maintain Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment throughout Mitosis and Rarely Break during Anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalona, Judit; Roscioli, Emanuele; Silkworth, William T; Bowden, Brent; Genescà, Anna; Tusell, Laura; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during cell division is essential to maintain genome stability, and chromosome segregation errors are causally linked to genetic disorders and cancer. An anaphase chromosome bridge is a particular chromosome segregation error observed in cells that enter mitosis with fused chromosomes/sister chromatids. The widely accepted Breakage/Fusion/Bridge cycle model proposes that anaphase chromosome bridges break during mitosis to generate chromosome ends that will fuse during the following cell cycle, thus forming new bridges that will break, and so on. However, various studies have also shown a link between chromosome bridges and aneuploidy and/or polyploidy. In this study, we investigated the behavior and properties of chromosome bridges during mitosis, with the idea to gain insight into the potential mechanism underlying chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. We find that only a small number of chromosome bridges break during anaphase, whereas the rest persist through mitosis into the subsequent cell cycle. We also find that the microtubule bundles (k-fibers) bound to bridge kinetochores are not prone to breakage/detachment, thus supporting the conclusion that k-fiber detachment is not the cause of chromosome bridge-induced aneuploidy. Instead, our data suggest that while the microtubules bound to the kinetochores of normally segregating chromosomes shorten substantially during anaphase, the k-fibers bound to bridge kinetochores shorten only slightly, and may even lengthen, during anaphase. This causes some of the bridge kinetochores/chromosomes to lag behind in a position that is proximal to the cell/spindle equator and may cause the bridged chromosomes to be segregated into the same daughter nucleus or to form a micronucleus.

  4. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) influences spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfang; Beauchemin, Myriam; Bertrand, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Functional analysis of a series of phosphorylation mutants reveals that Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) influences cell entry into anaphase and mitotic exit in taxol-exposed cells compared with cells expressing wild-type Bcl-xL or a series of other phosphorylation mutants, an effect that appears to be independent of its anti-apoptotic activity. During normal mitosis progression, Bcl-xL(Ser62) is strongly phosphorylated by PLK1 and MAPK14/SAPKp38α at the prometaphase, metaphase, and the anaphase boundaries, while it is de-phosphorylated at telophase and cytokinesis. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) localizes in centrosomes with γ-tubulin and in the mitotic cytosol with some spindle-assembly checkpoint signaling components, including PLK1, BubR1, and Mad2. In taxol- and nocodazole-exposed cells, phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) also binds to Cdc20- Mad2-, BubR1-, and Bub3-bound complexes, while Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) does not. Silencing Bcl-xL expression and expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) lead to an increased number of cells harboring mitotic spindle defects including multipolar spindle, chromosome lagging and bridging, aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h. Together, the data indicate that during mitosis, Bcl-xL(Ser62) phosphorylation impacts on spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, influencing chromosome stability. Observations of mitotic cells harboring aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h were also made with cells expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49Ala) and dual mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49/62Ala).

  5. Cell death associated with abnormal mitosis observed by confocal imaging in live cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiel, Asher; Visochek, Leonid; Mittelman, Leonid; Zilberstein, Yael; Dantzer, Francoise; Izraeli, Shai; Cohen-Armon, Malka

    2013-08-21

    Phenanthrene derivatives acting as potent PARP1 inhibitors prevented the bi-focal clustering of supernumerary centrosomes in multi-centrosomal human cancer cells in mitosis. The phenanthridine PJ-34 was the most potent molecule. Declustering of extra-centrosomes causes mitotic failure and cell death in multi-centrosomal cells. Most solid human cancers have high occurrence of extra-centrosomes. The activity of PJ-34 was documented in real-time by confocal imaging of live human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with vectors encoding for fluorescent γ-tubulin, which is highly abundant in the centrosomes and for fluorescent histone H2b present in the chromosomes. Aberrant chromosomes arrangements and de-clustered γ-tubulin foci representing declustered centrosomes were detected in the transfected MDA-MB-231 cells after treatment with PJ-34. Un-clustered extra-centrosomes in the two spindle poles preceded their cell death. These results linked for the first time the recently detected exclusive cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 in human cancer cells with extra-centrosomes de-clustering in mitosis, and mitotic failure leading to cell death. According to previous findings observed by confocal imaging of fixed cells, PJ-34 exclusively eradicated cancer cells with multi-centrosomes without impairing normal cells undergoing mitosis with two centrosomes and bi-focal spindles. This cytotoxic activity of PJ-34 was not shared by other potent PARP1 inhibitors, and was observed in PARP1 deficient MEF harboring extracentrosomes, suggesting its independency of PARP1 inhibition. Live confocal imaging offered a useful tool for identifying new molecules eradicating cells during mitosis.

  6. Subcellular localization of the APOBEC3 proteins during mitosis and implications for genomic DNA deamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Lela; Law, Emily K; Brown, William L; Harris, Reuben S

    2013-03-01

    Humans have seven APOBEC3 DNA cytosine deaminases. The activity of these enzymes allows them to restrict a variety of retroviruses and retrotransposons, but may also cause pro-mutagenic genomic uracil lesions. During interphase the APOBEC3 proteins have different subcellular localizations: cell-wide, cytoplasmic or nuclear. This implies that only a subset of APOBEC3s have contact with nuclear DNA. However, during mitosis, the nuclear envelope breaks down and cytoplasmic proteins may enter what was formerly a privileged zone. To address the hypothesis that all APOBEC3 proteins have access to genomic DNA, we analyzed the localization of the APOBEC3 proteins during mitosis. We show that APOBEC3A, APOBEC3C and APOBEC3H are excluded from condensed chromosomes, but become cell-wide during telophase. However, APOBEC3B, APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are excluded from chromatin throughout mitosis. After mitosis, APOBEC3B becomes nuclear, and APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G become cytoplasmic. Both structural motifs as well as size may be factors in regulating chromatin exclusion. Deaminase activity was not dependent on cell cycle phase. We also analyzed APOBEC3-induced cell cycle perturbations as a measure of each enzyme's capacity to inflict genomic DNA damage. AID, APOBEC3A and APOBEC3B altered the cell cycle profile, and, unexpectedly, APOBEC3D also caused changes. We conclude that several APOBEC3 family members have access to the nuclear compartment and can impede the cell cycle, most likely through DNA deamination and the ensuing DNA damage response. Such genomic damage may contribute to carcinogenesis, as demonstrated by AID in B cell cancers and, recently, APOBEC3B in breast cancers.

  7. Tau excess impairs mitosis and kinesin-5 function, leading to aneuploidy and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougé, Anne-Laure; Parmentier, Marie-Laure

    2016-03-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), cell cycle defects and associated aneuploidy have been described. However, the importance of these defects in the physiopathology of AD and the underlying mechanistic processes are largely unknown, in particular with respect to the microtubule (MT)-binding protein Tau, which is found in excess in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid of affected individuals. Although it has long been known that Tau is phosphorylated during mitosis to generate a lower affinity for MTs, there is, to our knowledge, no indication that an excess of this protein could affect mitosis. Here, we studied the effect of an excess of human Tau (hTau) protein on cell mitosis in vivo. Using the Drosophila developing wing disc epithelium as a model, we show that an excess of hTau induces a mitotic arrest, with the presence of monopolar spindles. This mitotic defect leads to aneuploidy and apoptotic cell death. We studied the mechanism of action of hTau and found that the MT-binding domain of hTau is responsible for these defects. We also demonstrate that the effects of hTau occur via the inhibition of the function of the kinesin Klp61F, the Drosophila homologue of kinesin-5 (also called Eg5 or KIF11). We finally show that this deleterious effect of hTau is also found in other Drosophila cell types (neuroblasts) and tissues (the developing eye disc), as well as in human HeLa cells. By demonstrating that MT-bound Tau inhibits the Eg5 kinesin and cell mitosis, our work provides a new framework to consider the role of Tau in neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Seasonal temperature variations influence tapetum mitosis patterns associated with reproductive fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Umesh C; Basu, Surochita; Kushwaha, Jyotsana Singh; Lavania, Seshu

    2014-09-01

    Environmental stress in plants impacts many biological processes, including male gametogenesis, and affects several cytological mechanisms that are strongly interrelated. To understand the likely impact of rising temperature on reproductive fitness in the climate change regime, a study of tapetal mitosis and its accompanying meiosis over seasons was made to elucidate the influence of temperature change on the cytological events occurring during microsporogenesis. For this we used two species of an environmentally sensitive plant system, i.e., genus Cymbopogon Sprengel (Poaceae), namely Cymbopogon nardus (L.) Rendle var. confertiflorus (Steud.) Bor (2n = 20) and Cymbopogon jwaruncusha (Jones) Schult. (2n = 20). Both species flower profusely during extreme summer (48 °C) and mild winter (15 °C) but support low and high seed fertility, respectively, in the two seasons. We have shown that tapetal mitotic patterns over seasons entail differential behavior for tapetal mitosis. During the process of tapetum development there are episodes of endomitosis that form either (i) an endopolyploid genomically imbalanced uninucleate and multinucleate tapetum, and (or) (ii) an acytokinetic multinucleate genomically balanced tapetum, with the progression of meiosis in the accompanying sporogenous tissue. The relative frequency of occurrence of the two types of tapetum mitosis patterns is significantly different in the two seasons, and it is found to be correlated with the temperature conditions. Whereas, the former (genomically imbalanced tapetum) are prevalent during the hot summer, the latter (genomically balanced tapetum) are frequent under optimal conditions. Such a differential behaviour in tapetal mitosis vis-à-vis temperature change is also correspondingly accompanied by substantial disturbances or regularity in meiotic anaphase disjunction. Both species show similar patterns. The study underpins that tapetal mitotic behaviour per se could be a reasonable indicator to

  9. Cell degeneration and mitosis in the buccopharyngeal and branchial membranes in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelmann, R E; Dubois, S V; Hermsen, C; Smits-van Prooije, A E; Vermeij-Keers, C

    1985-01-01

    The frequencies of cell degeneration and mitosis were investigated in the rupturing buccopharyngeal membrane (BPM) and in the persistent first branchial membrane (BM). In the BPM, cell degeneration starts many hours before rupture is visible, but mitotic figures are absent. In the BM this situation is reversed: mitotic figures are regularly observed, but a degenerating cell only occasionally. It is concluded that the ratio between the numbers of degenerating and dividing cells regulates the fate of both the BPM and the BM.

  10. The mitosis-regulating and protein-protein interaction activities of astrin are controlled by aurora-A-induced phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Shao-Chih; Chen, Jo-Mei Maureen; Wei, Tong-You Wade; Cheng, Tai-Shan; Wang, Ya-Hui Candice; Ku, Chia-Feng; Lian, Chiao-Hsuan; Liu, Chun-Chih Jared; Kuo, Yi-Chun; Yu, Chang-Tze Ricky

    2014-09-01

    Cells display dramatic morphological changes in mitosis, where numerous factors form regulatory networks to orchestrate the complicated process, resulting in extreme fidelity of the segregation of duplicated chromosomes into two daughter cells. Astrin regulates several aspects of mitosis, such as maintaining the cohesion of sister chromatids by inactivating Separase and stabilizing spindle, aligning and segregating chromosomes, and silencing spindle assembly checkpoint by interacting with Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein (SKAP) and cytoplasmic linker-associated protein-1α (CLASP-1α). To understand how Astrin is regulated in mitosis, we report here that Astrin acts as a mitotic phosphoprotein, and Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin at Ser(115). The phosphorylation-deficient mutant Astrin S115A abnormally activates spindle assembly checkpoint and delays mitosis progression, decreases spindle stability, and induces chromosome misalignment. Mechanistic analyses reveal that Astrin phosphorylation mimicking mutant S115D, instead of S115A, binds and induces ubiquitination and degradation of securin, which sequentially activates Separase, an enzyme required for the separation of sister chromatids. Moreover, S115A fails to bind mitosis regulators, including SKAP and CLASP-1α, which results in the mitotic defects observed in Astrin S115A-transfected cells. In conclusion, Aurora-A phosphorylates Astrin and guides the binding of Astrin to its cellular partners, which ensures proper progression of mitosis.

  11. Duck hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA appears to survive hepatocyte mitosis in the growing liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaiche-Miller, Georget Y.; Thorpe, Michael; Low, Huey Chi; Qiao, Qiao; Scougall, Catherine A. [School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Mason, William S.; Litwin, Samuel [Institute for Cancer Research, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Jilbert, Allison R., E-mail: allison.jilbert@adelaide.edu.au [School of Molecular and Biomedical Science, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues that inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA replication are typically used as monotherapy for chronically infected patients. Treatment with a nucleos(t)ide analogue eliminates most HBV DNA replication intermediates and produces a gradual decline in levels of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for viral RNA synthesis. It remains uncertain if levels of cccDNA decline primarily through hepatocyte death, or if loss also occurs during hepatocyte mitosis. To determine if cccDNA survives mitosis, growing ducklings infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were treated with the nucleoside analogue, Entecavir. Viremia was suppressed at least 10{sup 5}-fold, during a period when average liver mass increased 23-fold. Analysis of the data suggested that if cccDNA synthesis was completely inhibited, at least 49% of cccDNA survived hepatocyte mitosis. However, there was a large duck-to-duck variation in cccDNA levels, suggesting that low level cccDNA synthesis may contribute to this apparent survival through mitosis. - Highlights: • The hepatitis B virus nuclear template is covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA). • cccDNA was studied during liver growth in duck hepatitis B virus infected ducks. • Virus DNA replication and new cccDNA synthesis were inhibited with Entecavir. • At least 49% of cccDNA appeared to survive hepatocyte mitosis. • Low level virus DNA synthesis may contribute to survival of cccDNA through mitosis.

  12. Multispectral band selection and spatial characterization: Application to mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, H; Gouaillard, A; Roux, L; Racoceanu, D

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is the second most frequent cancer. The reference process for breast cancer prognosis is Nottingham grading system. According to this system, mitosis detection is one of the three important criteria required for grading process and quantifying the locality and prognosis of a tumor. Multispectral imaging, as relatively new to the field of histopathology, has the advantage, over traditional RGB imaging, to capture spectrally resolved information at specific frequencies, across the electromagnetic spectrum. This study aims at evaluating the accuracy of mitosis detection on histopathological multispectral images. The proposed framework includes: selection of spectral bands and focal planes, detection of candidate mitotic regions and computation of morphological and multispectral statistical features. A state-of-the-art of the methods for mitosis classification is also provided. This framework has been evaluated on MITOS multispectral dataset and achieved higher detection rate (67.35%) and F-Measure (63.74%) than the best MITOS contest results (Roux et al., 2013). Our results indicate that the selected multispectral bands have more discriminant information than a single spectral band or all spectral bands for mitotic figures, validating the interest of using multispectral images to improve the quality of the diagnostic in histopathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The mitosis and immunocytochemistry of olfactory ensheathing cells from nasal olfactory mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-bo; TANG Tian-si; GONG Ai-hua; SHENG Wei-hua; YANG Ji-cheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To culture olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) of rats in vitro and to investigate its morphology, mitosis and immunocytochemistry, and to explore if the OECs could be a new donation for transplantation. Methods: OECs were harvested from olfactory mucosa of Sprague Dawleys rats based on the differing rates of attachment of the various cell types, followed by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nerve growth factor (NGF), anti-low affinity receptor for NGF (NGFRp75), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and S-100 immunocytochemistry. The morphological changes and mitosis were observed under a phase contrast microscope at different culture time.Results: Three morphologically distinct types of cells, bipolar,multipolar and flat morphology were present in the primary culture of adult rat olfactory mucosa. Mitosis was characterized by a retraction of all processes, forming a sphere that divided into spherical daughter cells, the daughter cells sent out their processes. The OECs were immunoreactive for GFAP, NGFRp75, S-100, NGF, BDNF and NT-3. Conclusions: The OECs from nasal olfactory mucosa cultivated in the medium with fetal bovine serum could survive, divide, differentiate, and express the neurotrophin. It may become an accessible source for autologous grafting in spinal cord injury.

  14. A role for Caenorhabditis elegans importin IMA-2 in germ line and embryonic mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geles, Kenneth G; Johnson, Jeffrey J; Jong, Sena; Adam, Stephen A

    2002-09-01

    The importin alpha family of nuclear-cytoplasmic transport factors mediates the nuclear localization of proteins containing classical nuclear localization signals. Metazoan animals express multiple importin alpha proteins, suggesting their possible roles in cell differentiation and development. Adult Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodites express three importin alpha proteins, IMA-1, IMA-2, and IMA-3, each with a distinct expression and localization pattern. IMA-2 was expressed exclusively in germ line cells from the early embryonic through adult stages. The protein has a dynamic pattern of localization dependent on the stage of the cell cycle. In interphase germ cells and embryonic cells, IMA-2 is cytoplasmic and nuclear envelope associated, whereas in developing oocytes, the protein is cytoplasmic and intranuclear. During mitosis in germ line cells and embryos, IMA-2 surrounded the condensed chromosomes but was not directly associated with the mitotic spindle. The timing of IMA-2 nuclear localization suggested that the protein surrounded the chromosomes after fenestration of the nuclear envelope in prometaphase. Depletion of IMA-2 by RNA-mediated gene interference (RNAi) resulted in embryonic lethality and a terminal aneuploid phenotype. ima-2(RNAi) embryos have severe defects in nuclear envelope formation, accumulating nucleoporins and lamin in the cytoplasm. We conclude that IMA-2 is required for proper chromosome dynamics in germ line and early embryonic mitosis and is involved in nuclear envelope assembly at the conclusion of mitosis.

  15. Citron kinase is a regulator of mitosis and neurogenic cytokinesis in the neocortical ventricular zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoTurco, Joseph J; Sarkisian, Mathew R; Cosker, Laurie; Bai, Jilin

    2003-06-01

    Successful cell division in neural progenitors in the neocortical ventricular zone (VZ), as in all dividing cells, depends critically upon coordinating chromosome segregation during mitosis with cytokinesis. This coordination further suggests that common molecular regulators may link events in mitosis with those in cytokinesis. Recent genetic evidence indicates that cytokinesis in CNS neuronal progenitors, but not in most other cell types of the body, requires the function of citron kinase. In neocortex, citron kinase is most critical for neurogenic cytokinesis. In citron kinase null mutants, a large proportion of neuronal cells within neocortex are binucleate; however, very few glial cells are binucleate. In addition, confocal time-lapse imaging of mitoses at the VZ surface shows that citron kinase is also necessary for phases of the cell cycle just prior to cytokinesis. Deficits in mitosis seen in mutants indicate aberrant mitotic spindle function, and like deficits in cytokinesis, occur in some but not all cells at the VZ surface. Citron kinase is therefore an essential multifunctional regulator of cell divisions in the VZ, and may serve to coordinate chromosome segregation with cytokinesis in neuronal precursors.

  16. The mitotic spindle and associated membranes in the closed mitosis of trichomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Karla Consort; Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Benchimol, Marlene

    2002-06-01

    In the present work, we followed the several phases of Tritrichomonas foetus and Trichomonas vaginalis cell cycles using immunofluorescence, serial thin sections, three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, and transmission electron microscopy. In motile trichomonad cells or in pseudocyst forms, the nuclear envelope persists throughout mitosis, and the spindle is extranuclear. We found three types of spindle microtubules: pole-to-nucleus microtubules which are attached to the nuclear envelope, pole-to-pole microtubules forming a cylindrical, cytoplasmic groove on the nuclear compartment in pseudocysts of T. foetus cells, and pole-to-cytosol microtubules which extend freely into the cytoplasm. We demonstrated that: (1) in T. foetus, the spindle is assembled from an MTOC located at the base of the costa, underneath one of the basal bodies; (2) the spindle presents an unusual arc shape during the initial phases of mitosis in motile trophozoites; (3) the spindle microtubules are glutamylated, but not acetylated; (4) several membranes similar to those of the endoplasmic reticulum follow the spindle microtubules; (5) finger-like projections extend from the nucleus towards the cell poles in pseudocysts and multinucleated cells; and (6) vesicles formed in between the two nuclear membranes are seen in the course of mitosis in both trophozoite and pseudocyst forms.

  17. Monitoring impedance changes associated with motility and mitosis of a single cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghenim, Lamya; Kaji, Hirokazu; Hoshino, Yu; Ishibashi, Takeshi; Haguet, Vincent; Gidrol, Xavier; Nishizawa, Matsuhiko

    2010-10-07

    We present a device enabling impedance measurements that probe the motility and mitosis of a single adherent cell in a controlled way. The micrometre-sized electrodes are designed for adhesion of an isolated cell and enhanced sensitivity to cell motion. The electrode surface is switched electro-chemically to favour cell adhesion, and single cells are attracted to the electrode using positive dielectrophoresis. Periods of linear variation in impedance with time correspond to the motility of a single cell adherent to the surface estimated at 0.6 μm h(-1). In the course of our study we observed the impedance changes associated with mitosis of a single cell. Electrical measurements, carried out concomitantly with optical observations, revealed three phases, prophase, metaphase and anaphase in the time variation of the impedance during cell division. Maximal impedance was observed at metaphase with a 20% increase of the impedance. We argue that at mitosis, the changes detected were due to the charge density distribution at the cell surface. Our data demonstrate subtle electrical changes associated with cell motility and for the first time with division at the single-cell level. We speculate that this could open up new avenues for characterizing healthy and pathological cells.

  18. DNA replication and spindle checkpoints cooperate during S phase to delay mitosis and preserve genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiera, Maria M; Gueydon, Elisabeth; Schwob, Etienne

    2014-01-20

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and chromosome segregation must occur in ordered sequence to maintain genome integrity during cell proliferation. Checkpoint mechanisms delay mitosis when DNA is damaged or upon replication stress, but little is known on the coupling of S and M phases in unperturbed conditions. To address this issue, we postponed replication onset in budding yeast so that DNA synthesis is still underway when cells should enter mitosis. This delayed mitotic entry and progression by transient activation of the S phase, G2/M, and spindle assembly checkpoints. Disabling both Mec1/ATR- and Mad2-dependent controls caused lethality in cells with deferred S phase, accompanied by Rad52 foci and chromosome missegregation. Thus, in contrast to acute replication stress that triggers a sustained Mec1/ATR response, multiple pathways cooperate to restrain mitosis transiently when replication forks progress unhindered. We suggest that these surveillance mechanisms arose when both S and M phases were coincidently set into motion by a unique ancestral cyclin-Cdk1 complex.

  19. Unreplicated DNA remaining from unperturbed S phases passes through mitosis for resolution in daughter cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Alberto; Carrington, Jamie T; Albergante, Luca; Al Mamun, Mohammed; Haagensen, Emma J; Komseli, Eirini-Stavroula; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Newman, Timothy J; Blow, J Julian

    2016-09-27

    To prevent rereplication of genomic segments, the eukaryotic cell cycle is divided into two nonoverlapping phases. During late mitosis and G1 replication origins are "licensed" by loading MCM2-7 double hexamers and during S phase licensed replication origins activate to initiate bidirectional replication forks. Replication forks can stall irreversibly, and if two converging forks stall with no intervening licensed origin-a "double fork stall" (DFS)-replication cannot be completed by conventional means. We previously showed how the distribution of replication origins in yeasts promotes complete genome replication even in the presence of irreversible fork stalling. This analysis predicts that DFSs are rare in yeasts but highly likely in large mammalian genomes. Here we show that complementary strand synthesis in early mitosis, ultrafine anaphase bridges, and G1-specific p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) nuclear bodies provide a mechanism for resolving unreplicated DNA at DFSs in human cells. When origin number was experimentally altered, the number of these structures closely agreed with theoretical predictions of DFSs. The 53BP1 is preferentially bound to larger replicons, where the probability of DFSs is higher. Loss of 53BP1 caused hypersensitivity to licensing inhibition when replication origins were removed. These results provide a striking convergence of experimental and theoretical evidence that unreplicated DNA can pass through mitosis for resolution in the following cell cycle.

  20. Spatial separation of Golgi and ER during mitosis protects SREBP from unregulated activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, René; Sun, Li-Ping; Bisel, Blaine; Wei, Jen-Hsuan; Seemann, Joachim

    2008-04-09

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are membrane-bound transcription factors that reside as inactive precursors in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. After sterol depletion, the proteins are transported to the Golgi apparatus, where they are cleaved by site-1 protease (S1P). Cleavage releases the active transcription factors, which then enter the nucleus to induce genes that regulate cellular levels of cholesterol and phospholipids. This regulation depends on the spatial separation of the Golgi and the ER, as mixing of the compartments induces unregulated activation of SREBPs. Here, we show that S1P is localized to the Golgi, but cycles continuously through the ER and becomes trapped when ER exit is inhibited. During mitosis, S1P is associated with mitotic Golgi clusters, which remain distinct from the ER. In mitotic cells, S1P is active, but SREBP is not cleaved as S1P and SREBP reside in different compartments. Together, these results indicate that the spatial separation of the Golgi and the ER is maintained during mitosis, which is essential to protect the S1P substrate SREBP from unregulated activation during mitosis.

  1. Phosphorylation of human Sgo1 by NEK2A is essential for chromosome congression in mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guosheng Fu; Xia Ding; Kai Yuan; Felix Aikhionbare; Jianhui Yao; Xin Cai; Kai Jiang; Xuebiao Yao

    2007-01-01

    Chromosome segregation in mitosis is orchestrated by the interaction of the kinetochore with spindle microtubules. Our recent study shows that NEK2A interacts with MAD1 at the kinetochore and possibly functions as a novel integrator of spindle checkpoint signaling. However, it is unclear how NEK2 A regulates kinetochore-microtubule attachment in mitosis. Here we show that NEK2A phosphorylates human Sgol and such phosphorylation is essential for faithful chromosome congression in mitosis. NEK2A binds directly to HsSgol in vitro and co-distributes with HsSgol to the kinetochore of mitotic cells. Our in vitro phosphorylation experiment demonstrated that HsSgol is a substrate of NEK2A and the phosphorylation sites were mapped to Ser14 and Ser507 as judged by the incorporation of 32P. Although such phosphorylation is not required for assembly of HsSgol to the kinetochore, expression of non-phosphorylatable mutant HsSgol perturbed chromosome congression and resulted in a dramatic increase in microtubule attachment errors, including syntelic and monotelic attachments. These findings reveal a key role for the NEK2A-mediated phosphorylation of HsSgol in orchestrating dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction. We propose that NEK2A-mediated phosphorylation of human Sgol provides a link between centromeric cohesion and spindle microtubule attachment at the kinetochores.

  2. Unreplicated DNA remaining from unperturbed S phases passes through mitosis for resolution in daughter cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Alberto; Carrington, Jamie T.; Al Mamun, Mohammed; Haagensen, Emma J.; Komseli, Eirini-Stavroula; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Newman, Timothy J.; Blow, J. Julian

    2016-01-01

    To prevent rereplication of genomic segments, the eukaryotic cell cycle is divided into two nonoverlapping phases. During late mitosis and G1 replication origins are “licensed” by loading MCM2-7 double hexamers and during S phase licensed replication origins activate to initiate bidirectional replication forks. Replication forks can stall irreversibly, and if two converging forks stall with no intervening licensed origin—a “double fork stall” (DFS)—replication cannot be completed by conventional means. We previously showed how the distribution of replication origins in yeasts promotes complete genome replication even in the presence of irreversible fork stalling. This analysis predicts that DFSs are rare in yeasts but highly likely in large mammalian genomes. Here we show that complementary strand synthesis in early mitosis, ultrafine anaphase bridges, and G1-specific p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) nuclear bodies provide a mechanism for resolving unreplicated DNA at DFSs in human cells. When origin number was experimentally altered, the number of these structures closely agreed with theoretical predictions of DFSs. The 53BP1 is preferentially bound to larger replicons, where the probability of DFSs is higher. Loss of 53BP1 caused hypersensitivity to licensing inhibition when replication origins were removed. These results provide a striking convergence of experimental and theoretical evidence that unreplicated DNA can pass through mitosis for resolution in the following cell cycle. PMID:27516545

  3. Less understood issues: p21(Cip1) in mitosis and its therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreis, N-N; Louwen, F; Yuan, J

    2015-04-01

    p21(Cip1) is a multifunctional protein and a key player in regulating different cellular processes. The transcription of p21 is regulated by p53-dependent and -independent pathways. The expression of p21 is increased in response to various cellular stresses to arrest the cell cycle and ensure genomic stability. p21 has been shown to be a tumor suppressor and an oncogene as well. The function of p21 in mitosis has been proposed but not systematically studied. We have recently shown that p21 binds to and inhibits the activity of Cdk1/cyclin B1, and is important for a fine-tuned mitotic progression. Loss of p21 prolongs the duration of mitosis and results in severe mitotic defects like chromosome segregation and cytokinesis failures promoting consequently genomic instability. Moreover, p21 is dramatically stabilized in mitotic tumor cells upon treatment with mitotic agents like paclitaxel or mitotic kinase inhibitors. Increased p21 is mainly localized in the cytoplasm and associates with cell survival indicating a crucial role of p21 in susceptibility to mitotic agents in tumor cells. In this review we will briefly summarize the structure and general physiological functions as well as regulation of p21, discuss in detail its role in mitosis and its potential to serve as a therapeutic target.

  4. The nucleoporin Mlp2 is involved in chromosomal distribution during mitosis in trypanosomatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelle, Christelle; Sterkers, Yvon; Crobu, Lucien; MBang-Benet, Diane-Ethna; Kuk, Nada; Portalès, Pierre; Bastien, Patrick; Pagès, Michel; Lachaud, Laurence

    2015-04-30

    Nucleoporins are evolutionary conserved proteins mainly involved in the constitution of the nuclear pores and trafficking between the nucleus and cytoplasm, but are also increasingly viewed as main actors in chromatin dynamics and intra-nuclear mitotic events. Here, we determined the cellular localization of the nucleoporin Mlp2 in the 'divergent' eukaryotes Leishmania major and Trypanosoma brucei. In both protozoa, Mlp2 displayed an atypical localization for a nucleoporin, essentially intranuclear, and preferentially in the periphery of the nucleolus during interphase; moreover, it relocated at the mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. In T. brucei, where most centromeres have been identified, TbMlp2 was found adjacent to the centromeric sequences, as well as to a recently described unconventional kinetochore protein, in the periphery of the nucleolus, during interphase and from the end of anaphase onwards. TbMlp2 and the centromeres/kinetochores exhibited a differential migration towards the poles during mitosis. RNAi knockdown of TbMlp2 disrupted the mitotic distribution of chromosomes, leading to a surprisingly well-tolerated aneuploidy. In addition, diploidy was restored in a complementation assay where LmMlp2, the orthologue of TbMlp2 in Leishmania, was expressed in TbMlp2-RNAi-knockdown parasites. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Mlp2 is involved in the distribution of chromosomes during mitosis in trypanosomatids.

  5. Regulation of NDR1 activity by PLK1 ensures proper spindle orientation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Maomao; Chu, Lingluo; Qin, Bo; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Xing; Jin, Changjiang; Zhang, Guanglan; Gomez, Marta; Hergovich, Alexander; Chen, Zhengjun; He, Ping; Gao, Xinjiao; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires the physical separation of sister chromatids which depends on correct position of mitotic spindle relative to membrane cortex. Although recent work has identified the role of PLK1 in spindle orientation, the mechanisms underlying PLK1 signaling in spindle positioning and orientation have not been fully illustrated. Here, we identified a conserved signaling axis in which NDR1 kinase activity is regulated by PLK1 in mitosis. PLK1 phosphorylates NDR1 at three putative threonine residues (T7, T183 and T407) at mitotic entry, which elicits PLK1-dependent suppression of NDR1 activity and ensures correct spindle orientation in mitosis. Importantly, persistent expression of non-phosphorylatable NDR1 mutant perturbs spindle orientation. Mechanistically, PLK1-mediated phosphorylation protects the binding of Mob1 to NDR1 and subsequent NDR1 activation. These findings define a conserved signaling axis that integrates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction and spindle orientation control to genomic stability maintenance.

  6. Chromatids segregate without centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis in a Ran- and CLASP-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahaboo, Wallis; Zouak, Melissa; Askjaer, Peter; Delattre, Marie

    2015-06-01

    During mitosis, chromosomes are connected to a microtubule-based spindle. Current models propose that displacement of the spindle poles and/or the activity of kinetochore microtubules generate mechanical forces that segregate sister chromatids. Using laser destruction of the centrosomes during Caenorhabditis elegans mitosis, we show that neither of these mechanisms is necessary to achieve proper chromatid segregation. Our results strongly suggest that an outward force generated by the spindle midzone, independently of centrosomes, is sufficient to segregate chromosomes in mitotic cells. Using mutant and RNAi analysis, we show that the microtubule-bundling protein SPD-1/MAP-65 and BMK-1/kinesin-5 act as a brake opposing the force generated by the spindle midzone. Conversely, we identify a novel role for two microtubule-growth and nucleation agents, Ran and CLASP, in the establishment of the centrosome-independent force during anaphase. Their involvement raises the interesting possibility that microtubule polymerization of midzone microtubules is continuously required to sustain chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  7. Cdk1/cyclin B-mediated phosphorylation stabilizes SREBP1 during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria T; Ericsson, Johan

    2006-08-01

    Members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors control the biosynthesis of cholesterol and other lipids, and lipid synthesis is critical for cell growth and proliferation. We recently found that the mature forms of SREBP1a and SREBP1c are hyperphosphorylated in mitotic cells, giving rise to a phosphoepitope recognized by the mitotic protein monoclonal-2 (MPM-2) antibody. In addition, we found that mature SREBP1 was stabilized in a phosphorylation-dependent manner during mitosis. We have now mapped the major MPM-2 epitope to a serine residue, S439, in the C terminus of mature SREBP1. Using phosphorylation-specific antibodies, we demonstrate that endogenous SREBP1 is phosphorylated on S439 specifically during mitosis. Mature SREBP1 interacts with the Cdk1/cyclin B complex in mitotic cells and we demonstrate that Cdk1 phosphorylates S439, both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that Cdk1-mediated phosphorylation of S439 stabilizes mature SREBP1 during mitosis, thereby preserving a critical pool of active transcription factors to support lipid synthesis. Taken together with our previous work, the current study suggests that SREBP1 may provide a link between lipid synthesis, proliferation and cell growth. This hypothesis was supported by our observation that siRNA-mediated inactivation of SREBP1 arrested cells in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, thereby attenuating cell growth.

  8. ANKRD53 interacts with DDA3 and regulates chromosome integrity during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seul; Jang, Chang-Young

    2016-02-12

    Spindle dynamics drives chromosome movement and mitotic progression during mitosis. Microtubule (MT)-associated proteins (MAPs) regulate MT stabilization/destabilization and MT polymerization/depolymerization for congression of sister chromatids at the mitotic equator and subsequent segregation toward the spindle poles. Here, we identified ANKRD53 as a novel DDA3-interacting protein through proteomic analysis. Based on expression profiles, ANKRD53 is phosphorylated by mitotic kinases during mitosis. In ANKRD53-depleted HeLa cells, the progression of mitosis was delayed and the number of unaligned chromosomes increased substantially. In addition, spindle MT polymerization decreased and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) was concomitantly activated by the decreased spindle dynamics in ANKRD53-depleted cells. Although ANKRD53 is recruited to the mitotic spindle by DDA3, it counteracts the activity of DDA3 for spindle MT polymerization. Furthermore, ANKRD53 depletion increased the number of bi-nuclei and polylobed nuclei. Thus, ANKRD53 is recruited to the mitotic spindle by DDA3 and acts as a regulator of spindle dynamics and cytokinesis.

  9. Real-time fluorescence imaging of the DNA damage repair response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Yamamoto, Mako; Matsumoto, Yasunori; Uehara, Fuminari; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Toneri, Makoto; Murakami, Takashi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Efimova, Elena V; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-04-01

    The response to DNA damage during mitosis was visualized using real-time fluorescence imaging of focus formation by the DNA-damage repair (DDR) response protein 53BP1 linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) (53BP1-GFP) in the MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) pancreatic cancer cell line. To observe 53BP1-GFP foci during mitosis, MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells were imaged every 30 min by confocal microscopy. Time-lapse imaging demonstrated that 11.4 ± 2.1% of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells had increased focus formation over time. Non-mitotic cells did not have an increase in 53BP1-GFP focus formation over time. Some of the mitotic MiaPaCa-2(Tet-On) 53BP1-GFP cells with focus formation became apoptotic. The results of the present report suggest that DNA strand breaks occur during mitosis and undergo repair, which may cause some of the mitotic cells to enter apoptosis in a phenomenon possibly related to mitotic catastrophe.

  10. Incoming human papillomavirus type 16 genome resides in a vesicular compartment throughout mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Luszczek, Wioleta; Keiffer, Timothy R; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Guion, Lucile G M; Sapp, Martin J

    2016-05-31

    During the entry process, the human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is trafficked to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), whereupon it enters the nucleus during mitosis. We previously demonstrated that the minor capsid protein L2 assumes a transmembranous conformation in the TGN. Here we provide evidence that the incoming viral genome dissociates from the TGN and associates with microtubules after the onset of mitosis. Deposition onto mitotic chromosomes is L2-mediated. Using differential staining of an incoming viral genome by small molecular dyes in selectively permeabilized cells, nuclease protection, and flotation assays, we found that HPV resides in a membrane-bound vesicle until mitosis is completed and the nuclear envelope has reformed. As a result, expression of the incoming viral genome is delayed. Taken together, these data provide evidence that HPV has evolved a unique strategy for delivering the viral genome to the nucleus of dividing cells. Furthermore, it is unlikely that nuclear vesicles are unique to HPV, and thus we may have uncovered a hitherto unrecognized cellular pathway that may be of interest for future cell biological studies.

  11. Polo-like kinase 1 inhibits DNA damage response during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benada, Jan; Burdová, Kamila; Lidak, Tomáš; von Morgen, Patrick; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    In response to genotoxic stress, cells protect their genome integrity by activation of a conserved DNA damage response (DDR) pathway that coordinates DNA repair and progression through the cell cycle. Extensive modification of the chromatin flanking the DNA lesion by ATM kinase and RNF8/RNF168 ubiquitin ligases enables recruitment of various repair factors. Among them BRCA1 and 53BP1 are required for homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, respectively. Whereas mechanisms of DDR are relatively well understood in interphase cells, comparatively less is known about organization of DDR during mitosis. Although ATM can be activated in mitotic cells, 53BP1 is not recruited to the chromatin until cells exit mitosis. Here we report mitotic phosphorylation of 53BP1 by Plk1 and Cdk1 that impairs the ability of 53BP1 to bind the ubiquitinated H2A and to properly localize to the sites of DNA damage. Phosphorylation of 53BP1 at S1618 occurs at kinetochores and in cytosol and is restricted to mitotic cells. Interaction between 53BP1 and Plk1 depends on the activity of Cdk1. We propose that activity of Cdk1 and Plk1 allows spatiotemporally controlled suppression of 53BP1 function during mitosis.

  12. Resonant microchannel volume and mass measurements show that suspended cells swell during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sungmin; Kang, Joon Ho; Oh, Seungeun; Kirschner, Marc W; Mitchison, T J; Manalis, Scott

    2015-11-23

    Osmotic regulation of intracellular water during mitosis is poorly understood because methods for monitoring relevant cellular physical properties with sufficient precision have been limited. Here we use a suspended microchannel resonator to monitor the volume and density of single cells in suspension with a precision of 1% and 0.03%, respectively. We find that for transformed murine lymphocytic leukemia and mouse pro-B cell lymphoid cell lines, mitotic cells reversibly increase their volume by more than 10% and decrease their density by 0.4% over a 20-min period. This response is correlated with the mitotic cell cycle but is not coupled to nuclear osmolytes released by nuclear envelope breakdown, chromatin condensation, or cytokinesis and does not result from endocytosis of the surrounding fluid. Inhibiting Na-H exchange eliminates the response. Although mitotic rounding of adherent cells is necessary for proper cell division, our observations that suspended cells undergo reversible swelling during mitosis suggest that regulation of intracellular water may be a more general component of mitosis than previously appreciated.

  13. A spindle checkpoint functions during mitosis in the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encalada, Sandra E; Willis, John; Lyczak, Rebecca; Bowerman, Bruce

    2005-03-01

    During mitosis, chromosome segregation is regulated by a spindle checkpoint mechanism. This checkpoint delays anaphase until all kinetochores are captured by microtubules from both spindle poles, chromosomes congress to the metaphase plate, and the tension between kinetochores and their attached microtubules is properly sensed. Although the spindle checkpoint can be activated in many different cell types, the role of this regulatory mechanism in rapidly dividing embryonic animal cells has remained controversial. Here, using time-lapse imaging of live embryonic cells, we show that chemical or mutational disruption of the mitotic spindle in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos delays progression through mitosis. By reducing the function of conserved checkpoint genes in mutant embryos with defective mitotic spindles, we show that these delays require the spindle checkpoint. In the absence of a functional checkpoint, more severe defects in chromosome segregation are observed in mutants with abnormal mitotic spindles. We also show that the conserved kinesin CeMCAK, the CENP-F-related proteins HCP-1 and HCP-2, and the core kinetochore protein CeCENP-C all are required for this checkpoint. Our analysis indicates that spindle checkpoint mechanisms are functional in the rapidly dividing cells of an early animal embryo and that this checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation defects during mitosis.

  14. Effect of hypothermia (20-25 degrees C) on mitosis in PtK1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, C L

    1981-06-01

    PtK1 cells enter prophase and complete mitosis at 24-25 degrees C but are inhibited from entering prophase at 20-21 degrees C. Cells which have progressed up to midprophase at 24-37 degrees C return to interphase when cooled to 20-21 degrees C, but those in late prophase complete a normal, although prolonged mitosis. If prophase cells which have reverted to interphase at 20-21 degrees C are incubated at 24-37 degrees C they reenter prophase and complete mitosis. This temperature-induced prophase-interphase-prophase transition can be repeated several times on the same cell. At 24-25 degrees C the process of spindle formation (i.e. prometaphase to the initiation of anaphase) encompasses approximately 75% of the total mitotic interval, with a duration of 8-12 h, compared to about 50% of the mitotic interval and a duration of 0.5 to 1.0 h at 37 degrees C.

  15. PKR is activated by cellular dsRNAs during mitosis and acts as a mitotic regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoosik; Lee, Jung Hyun; Park, Jong-Eun; Cho, Jun; Yi, Hyerim; Kim, V Narry

    2014-06-15

    dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme well known for its roles in immune response. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation, and the phosphorylated PKR (pPKR) regulates translation and multiple signaling pathways in infected cells. Here, we found that PKR is activated in uninfected cells, specifically during mitosis, by binding to dsRNAs formed by inverted Alu repeats (IRAlus). While PKR and IRAlu-containing RNAs are segregated in the cytosol and nucleus of interphase cells, respectively, they interact during mitosis when nuclear structure is disrupted. Once phosphorylated, PKR suppresses global translation by phosphorylating the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). In addition, pPKR acts as an upstream kinase for c-Jun N-terminal kinase and regulates the levels of multiple mitotic factors such as cyclins A and B and Polo-like kinase 1 and phosphorylation of histone H3. Disruption of PKR activation via RNAi or expression of a transdominant-negative mutant leads to misregulation of the mitotic factors, delay in mitotic progression, and defects in cytokinesis. Our study unveils a novel function of PKR and endogenous dsRNAs as signaling molecules during the mitosis of uninfected cells.

  16. INDEKS MITOSIS UJUNG AKAR KECAMBAH CABE BESAR (Capsicum annuum L. SETELAH PERLAKUAN SUSPENSI Trichoderma sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PetroneLa Deno Raja

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui indeks mitosis ujung akar kecambah cabe besar (Capsicum annuum L. setelah perlakuan suspensi Trichoderma sp. Penelitian ini dilakukan di laboratorium Struktur Perkembangan Tumbuhan Jurusan Biologi FMIPA, Universitas Udayana dari Oktober 2013-November 2013. Metode yang digunakan adalah metode squash, biji cabe untuk kontrol direndam dalam air ± 6 jam, untuk perlakuan biji setelah direndam air, direndam lagi dalam suspensi Trichoderma sp. 10-7 selama ± 6 jam, selanjutnya dikecambahkan. Ujung akar kecambah 2 mm dipotong, difiksasi dalam larutan farmer ± 2-24 jam, dihidrolisis dalam larutan 3N HCL ± 2-5 menit dan kemudian pewarnaan dengan aceto orcein ± 5 menit. Pengamatan dilakukan dengan mikroskop binokuler, data pembelahan tiap fase mitosis dihitung (%, dicatat dan difoto, dan dianalisis dengan menggunakan uji paired T tes.Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa Trichoderma sp. berpengaruh terhadap indeks mitosis sel ujung akar Capsicum annuum L.,  pada fase metafase berbeda nyata antara kontrol dan perlakuan, sedangkan pada fase profase, anafase dan telofase berbeda tidak nyata.  Pada perlakuan persentase fase profase, metafase, anafase dan telofase (77,14%; 12,96 %; 5,88 % dan 5,23 % lebih tinggi dari kontrol (66,40 %; 5,44 %; 4,96 % dan 4,66 %.

  17. MST2 phosphorylation at serine 385 in mitosis inhibits its tumor suppressing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingcheng; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2016-12-01

    Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1/2 (MST1/2) are core tumor suppressors in the Hippo signaling pathway. MST1/2 have been shown to regulate mitotic progression. Here, we report a novel mechanism for phospho-regulation of MST2 in mitosis and its biological significance in cancer. We found that the mitotic kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) phosphorylates MST2 in vitro and in vivo at serine 385 during antimitotic drug-induced G2/M phase arrest. This phosphorylation occurs transiently during unperturbed mitosis. Mitotic phosphorylation of MST2 does not affect its kinase activity or Hippo-YAP signaling. We further showed that mitotic phosphorylation-deficient mutant MST2-S385A possesses higher activity in suppressing cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Together, our findings reveal a novel layer of regulation for MST2 in mitosis and its role in tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Proteomic analysis of polyribosomes identifies splicing factors as potential regulators of translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviner, Ranen; Hofmann, Sarah; Elman, Tamar; Shenoy, Anjana; Geiger, Tamar; Elkon, Ran; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2017-06-02

    Precise regulation of mRNA translation is critical for proper cell division, but little is known about the factors that mediate it. To identify mRNA-binding proteins that regulate translation during mitosis, we analyzed the composition of polysomes from interphase and mitotic cells using unbiased quantitative mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that mitotic polysomes are enriched with a subset of proteins involved in RNA processing, including alternative splicing and RNA export. To demonstrate that these may indeed be regulators of translation, we focused on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) as a test case and confirmed that it is recruited to elongating ribosomes during mitosis. Then, using a combination of pulsed SILAC, metabolic labeling and ribosome profiling, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP C affects both global and transcript-specific translation rates and found that hnRNP C is specifically important for translation of mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate how proteomic analysis of polysomes can provide insight into translation regulation under various cellular conditions of interest and suggest that hnRNP C facilitates production of translation machinery components during mitosis to provide daughter cells with the ability to efficiently synthesize proteins as they enter G1 phase. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. The NIMA Kinase Is Required To Execute Stage-Specific Mitotic Functions after Initiation of Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraghavan, Meera; Lad, Alisha A.

    2014-01-01

    The G2-M transition in Aspergillus nidulans requires the NIMA kinase, the founding member of the Nek kinase family. Inactivation of NIMA results in a late G2 arrest, while overexpression of NIMA is sufficient to promote mitotic events independently of cell cycle phase. Endogenously tagged NIMA-GFP has dynamic mitotic localizations appearing first at the spindle pole body and then at nuclear pore complexes before transitioning to within nuclei and the mitotic spindle and back at the spindle pole bodies at mitotic exit, suggesting that it functions sequentially at these locations. Since NIMA is indispensable for mitotic entry, it has been difficult to determine the requirement of NIMA for subaspects of mitosis. We show here that when NIMA is partially inactivated, although mitosis can be initiated, a proportion of cells fail to successfully generate two daughter nuclei. We further define the mitotic defects to show that normal NIMA function is required for the formation of a bipolar spindle, nuclear pore complex disassembly, completion of chromatin segregation, and the normal structural rearrangements of the nuclear envelope required to generate two nuclei from one. In the remaining population of cells that enter mitosis with inadequate NIMA, two daughter nuclei are generated in a manner dependent on the spindle assembly checkpoint, indicating highly penetrant defects in mitotic progression without sufficient NIMA activity. This study shows that NIMA is required not only for mitotic entry but also sequentially for successful completion of stage-specific mitotic events. PMID:24186954

  20. The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of nuclear SREBP1 during mitosis links lipid metabolism and cell growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria Teresa; Ericsson, Johan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SREBP transcription factors are major regulators of lipid metabolism. Disturbances in lipid metabolism are at the core of several health issues facing modern society, including cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes. In addition, the role of lipid metabolism in cancer cell growth is receiving increased attention. Transcriptionally active SREBP molecules are unstable and rapidly degraded in a phosphorylation-dependent manner by Fbw7, a ubiquitin ligase that targets several cell cycle regulatory proteins for degradation. We have previously demonstrated that active SREBP1 is stabilized during mitosis. We have now delineated the mechanisms involved in the stabilization of SREBP1 in mitotic cells. This process is initiated by the phosphorylation of a specific serine residue in nuclear SREBP1 by the mitotic kinase Cdk1. The phosphorylation of this residue creates a docking site for a separate mitotic kinase, Plk1. Plk1 interacts with nuclear SREBP1 in mitotic cells and phosphorylates a number of residues in the C-terminal domain of the protein, including a threonine residue in close proximity of the Fbw7 docking site in SREBP1. The phosphorylation of these residues by Plk1 blocks the interaction between SREBP1 and Fbw7 and attenuates the Fbw7-dependent degradation of nuclear SREBP1 during cell division. Inactivation of SREBP1 results in a mitotic defect, suggesting that SREBP1 could regulate cell division. We propose that the mitotic phosphorylation and stabilization of nuclear SREBP1 during cell division provides a link between lipid metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, the current study provides additional support for the emerging hypothesis that SREBP-dependent lipid metabolism may be important for cell growth. PMID:27579997

  1. JNK controls the onset of mitosis in planarian stem cells and triggers apoptotic cell death required for regeneration and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Almuedo-Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of lost tissues depends on the precise interpretation of molecular signals that control and coordinate the onset of proliferation, cellular differentiation and cell death. However, the nature of those molecular signals and the mechanisms that integrate the cellular responses remain largely unknown. The planarian flatworm is a unique model in which regeneration and tissue renewal can be comprehensively studied in vivo. The presence of a population of adult pluripotent stem cells combined with the ability to decode signaling after wounding enable planarians to regenerate a complete, correctly proportioned animal within a few days after any kind of amputation, and to adapt their size to nutritional changes without compromising functionality. Here, we demonstrate that the stress-activated c-jun-NH2-kinase (JNK links wound-induced apoptosis to the stem cell response during planarian regeneration. We show that JNK modulates the expression of wound-related genes, triggers apoptosis and attenuates the onset of mitosis in stem cells specifically after tissue loss. Furthermore, in pre-existing body regions, JNK activity is required to establish a positive balance between cell death and stem cell proliferation to enable tissue renewal, remodeling and the maintenance of proportionality. During homeostatic degrowth, JNK RNAi blocks apoptosis, resulting in impaired organ remodeling and rescaling. Our findings indicate that JNK-dependent apoptotic cell death is crucial to coordinate tissue renewal and remodeling required to regenerate and to maintain a correctly proportioned animal. Hence, JNK might act as a hub, translating wound signals into apoptotic cell death, controlled stem cell proliferation and differentiation, all of which are required to coordinate regeneration and tissue renewal.

  2. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB.

  3. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...... yield lines around the block leads to simple interaction formulas similar to other interaction formulas in the codes.......Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  4. Design, synthesis, anti-tumor activity, and molecular modeling of quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ju; Wan, Shanhe; Wang, Guangfa; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Zhonghuang; Tian, Yuanxin; Yu, Yonghuan; Wu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Jiajie

    2016-08-08

    Three series of novel quinazoline and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit EGFR tyrosine kinase and a panel of five human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, A549, BT-474, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-231). Bioassay results indicated that five of these prepared compounds (12c-12e and 13c-13d) exhibited remarkably higher inhibitory activities against EGFR and SK-BR-3 cell line. Compounds 12c and 12e displayed the most potent EGFR inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.97 nM and 3.58 nM, respectively) and good anti-proliferative effect against SK-BR-3 cell with the IC50 values of 3.10 μM and 5.87 μM, respectively. Furthermore, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies verified that compound 12c and 12e shared similar binding pattern with gefitinib in the binding pocket of EGFR. MM-GBSA binding free energy revealed that the compound 12c and 12e have almost the same inhibitory activity against EGFR as gefitinib, and that the dominating effect of van der Waals interactions drives the binding process.

  5. Synthesis, Modelling, and Anticonvulsant Studies of New Quinazolines Showing Three Highly Active Compounds with Low Toxicity and High Affinity to the GABA-A Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, Mohamed F; Ihmaid, Saleh K; Ahmed, Hany E A; El-Adl, Khaled; Asiri, Ahmed M; Omar, Abdelsattar M

    2017-01-24

    Some novel fluorinated quinazolines (5a-j) were designed and synthesized to be evaluated for their anticonvulsant activity and their neurotoxicity. Structures of all newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by their infrared (IR), mass spectrometry (MS) spectra, ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), (13)C-NMR, and elemental analysis (CHN). The anticonvulsant activity was evaluated by a subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) test and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure test, while neurotoxicity was evaluated by a rotorod test. The molecular docking was performed for all newly-synthesized compounds to assess their binding affinities to the GABA-A receptor in order to rationalize their anticonvulsant activities in a qualitative way. The data obtained from the molecular modeling was correlated with that obtained from the biological screening. These data showed considerable anticonvulsant activity for all newly-synthesized compounds. Compounds 5b, 5c, and 5d showed the highest binding affinities toward the GABA-A receptor, along with the highest anticonvulsant activities in experimental mice. These compounds also showed low neurotoxicity and low toxicity in the median lethal dose test compared to the reference drugs. A GABA enzymatic assay was performed for these highly active compounds to confirm the obtained results and explain the possible mechanism for anticonvulsant action. The most active compounds might be used as leads for future modification and optimization.

  6. Design, synthesis, molecular docking and anticonvulsant evaluation of novel 6-iodo-2-phenyl-3-substituted-quinazolin-4(3H-ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed-Kamal Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A new series of 6-iodo-2-phenyl-3-substituted-quinazolin-4(3H-one (5–12a–b derivatives were synthesized, evaluated for their anticonvulsant activity against pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced seizures and maximal electroshock test and compared with the reference drugs phenobarbital sodium and methaqualone. The neurotoxicity was assessed using rotarod test. The molecular docking was performed for all the synthesized compounds to assess their binding affinities to GABA-A receptor in order to rationalize their anticonvulsant activities in a qualitative way. The data obtained from the molecular modeling were correlated with those obtained from the biological screening. Compounds 9a, 9b, 12a and 7a showed the highest anticonvulsant activities of this series with relatively low neurotoxicity and low toxicity in the median lethal dose test when compared with the reference drugs. The obtained results proved that the most active compounds could be a useful model for future design, adaptation and investigation to construct more active analogs.

  7. BLOCK H-MATRICES AND SPECTRUM OF BLOCK MATRICES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄廷祝; 黎稳

    2002-01-01

    The block H-matrices are studied by the concept of G-functions, several concepts of block matrices are introduced. Equivalent characters of block H-matrices are obtained. Spectrum localizations claracterized by Gfunctions for block matrices are got.

  8. Block TERM factorization of block matrices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHE Yiyuan; HAO Pengwei

    2004-01-01

    Reversible integer mapping (or integer transform) is a useful way to realize Iossless coding, and this technique has been used for multi-component image compression in the new international image compression standard JPEG 2000. For any nonsingular linear transform of finite dimension, its integer transform can be implemented by factorizing the transform matrix into 3 triangular elementary reversible matrices (TERMs) or a series of single-row elementary reversible matrices (SERMs). To speed up and parallelize integer transforms, we study block TERM and SERM factorizations in this paper. First, to guarantee flexible scaling manners, the classical determinant (det) is generalized to a matrix function, DET, which is shown to have many important properties analogous to those of det. Then based on DET, a generic block TERM factorization,BLUS, is presented for any nonsingular block matrix. Our conclusions can cover the early optimal point factorizations and provide an efficient way to implement integer transforms for large matrices.

  9. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability.

  10. Identification of novel mitosis regulators through data mining with human centromere/kinetochore proteins as group queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tipton Aaron R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins functioning in the same biological pathway tend to be transcriptionally co-regulated or form protein-protein interactions (PPI. Multiple spatially and temporally regulated events are coordinated during mitosis to achieve faithful chromosome segregation. The molecular players participating in mitosis regulation are still being unravelled experimentally or using in silico methods. Results An extensive literature review has led to a compilation of 196 human centromere/kinetochore proteins, all with experimental evidence supporting the subcellular localization. Sixty-four were designated as “core” centromere/kinetochore components based on peak expression and/or well-characterized functions during mitosis. By interrogating and integrating online resources, we have mined for genes/proteins that display transcriptional co-expression or PPI with the core centromere/kinetochore components. Top-ranked hubs in either co-expression or PPI network are not only enriched with known mitosis regulators, but also contain candidates whose mitotic functions are not yet established. Experimental validation found that KIAA1377 is a novel centrosomal protein that also associates with microtubules and midbody; while TRIP13 is a novel kinetochore protein and directly interacts with mitotic checkpoint silencing protein p31comet. Conclusions Transcriptional co-expression and PPI network analyses with known human centromere/kinetochore proteins as a query group help identify novel potential mitosis regulators.

  11. Parvoviruses cause nuclear envelope breakdown by activating key enzymes of mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porwal, Manvi; Cohen, Sarah; Snoussi, Kenza; Popa-Wagner, Ruth; Anderson, Fenja; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Wodrich, Harald; Dinsart, Christiane; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen A; Panté, Nelly; Kann, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is essential in mitosis and apoptosis requiring multiple coordinated enzymatic activities in nucleus and cytoplasm. Activation and coordination of the different activities is poorly understood and moreover complicated as some factors translocate between cytoplasm and nucleus in preparatory phases. Here we used the ability of parvoviruses to induce nuclear membrane breakdown to understand the triggers of key mitotic enzymes. Nuclear envelope disintegration was shown upon infection, microinjection but also upon their application to permeabilized cells. The latter technique also showed that nuclear envelope disintegration was independent upon soluble cytoplasmic factors. Using time-lapse microscopy, we observed that nuclear disassembly exhibited mitosis-like kinetics and occurred suddenly, implying a catastrophic event irrespective of cell- or type of parvovirus used. Analyzing the order of the processes allowed us to propose a model starting with direct binding of parvoviruses to distinct proteins of the nuclear pore causing structural rearrangement of the parvoviruses. The resulting exposure of domains comprising amphipathic helices was required for nuclear envelope disintegration, which comprised disruption of inner and outer nuclear membrane as shown by electron microscopy. Consistent with Ca⁺⁺ efflux from the lumen between inner and outer nuclear membrane we found that Ca⁺⁺ was essential for nuclear disassembly by activating PKC. PKC activation then triggered activation of cdk-2, which became further activated by caspase-3. Collectively our study shows a unique interaction of a virus with the nuclear envelope, provides evidence that a nuclear pool of executing enzymes is sufficient for nuclear disassembly in quiescent cells, and demonstrates that nuclear disassembly can be uncoupled from initial phases of mitosis.

  12. Parvoviruses cause nuclear envelope breakdown by activating key enzymes of mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvi Porwal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Disassembly of the nuclear lamina is essential in mitosis and apoptosis requiring multiple coordinated enzymatic activities in nucleus and cytoplasm. Activation and coordination of the different activities is poorly understood and moreover complicated as some factors translocate between cytoplasm and nucleus in preparatory phases. Here we used the ability of parvoviruses to induce nuclear membrane breakdown to understand the triggers of key mitotic enzymes. Nuclear envelope disintegration was shown upon infection, microinjection but also upon their application to permeabilized cells. The latter technique also showed that nuclear envelope disintegration was independent upon soluble cytoplasmic factors. Using time-lapse microscopy, we observed that nuclear disassembly exhibited mitosis-like kinetics and occurred suddenly, implying a catastrophic event irrespective of cell- or type of parvovirus used. Analyzing the order of the processes allowed us to propose a model starting with direct binding of parvoviruses to distinct proteins of the nuclear pore causing structural rearrangement of the parvoviruses. The resulting exposure of domains comprising amphipathic helices was required for nuclear envelope disintegration, which comprised disruption of inner and outer nuclear membrane as shown by electron microscopy. Consistent with Ca⁺⁺ efflux from the lumen between inner and outer nuclear membrane we found that Ca⁺⁺ was essential for nuclear disassembly by activating PKC. PKC activation then triggered activation of cdk-2, which became further activated by caspase-3. Collectively our study shows a unique interaction of a virus with the nuclear envelope, provides evidence that a nuclear pool of executing enzymes is sufficient for nuclear disassembly in quiescent cells, and demonstrates that nuclear disassembly can be uncoupled from initial phases of mitosis.

  13. GSK3β-Dzip1-Rab8 cascade regulates ciliogenesis after mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Boyan; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Guopeng; Wang, Gang; Chi, Wangfei; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2015-04-01

    The primary cilium, which disassembles before mitotic entry and reassembles after mitosis, organizes many signal transduction pathways that are crucial for cell life and individual development. However, how ciliogenesis is regulated during the cell cycle remains largely unknown. Here we show that GSK3β, Dzip1, and Rab8 co-regulate ciliogenesis by promoting the assembly of the ciliary membrane after mitosis. Immunofluorescence and super-resolution microscopy showed that Dzip1 was localized to the periciliary diffusion barrier and enriched at the mother centriole. Knockdown of Dzip1 by short hairpin RNAs led to failed ciliary localization of Rab8, and Rab8 accumulation at the basal body. Dzip1 preferentially bound to Rab8GDP and promoted its dissociation from its inhibitor GDI2 at the pericentriolar region, as demonstrated by sucrose gradient centrifugation of purified basal bodies, immunoprecipitation, and acceptor-bleaching fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays. By means of in vitro phosphorylation, in vivo gel shift, phospho-peptide identification by mass spectrometry, and GST pulldown assays, we demonstrated that Dzip1 was phosphorylated by GSK3β at S520 in G0 phase, which increased its binding to GDI2 to promote the release of Rab8GDP at the cilium base. Moreover, ciliogenesis was inhibited by overexpression of the GSK3β-nonphosphorylatable Dzip1 mutant or by disabling of GSK3β by specific inhibitors or knockout of GSK3β in cells. Collectively, our data reveal a unique cascade consisting of GSK3β, Dzip1, and Rab8 that regulates ciliogenesis after mitosis.

  14. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V.; Hunt, Patricia A.; Müller, Erich A.; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  15. Role of the first mitosis in the remodeling of the parental genomes in mouse embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Lin LIU; Kentaro T.HARA; Fugaku AOKI

    2005-01-01

    Although male and female pronuclei reside in the same zygotic cytoplasm, they differ in many respects, such as volume and transcriptional activity. The aim of this study is to investigate whether these differences are lost during the first mitosis. For this purpose, a new method was developed to inhibit the mixing of two parental chromosomes during mitosis, thus to induce the formation of two nuclei after they exit from the mitotic phase. In this method, one-cell embryos are arrested at metaphase by treatment with nocodazole, and whn exitting from the mitotic phase, two nuclei were formed in a single karyocyte following treatment with 6-dimethylaminopurine (6-DMAP). These embryos were designated as post-mitotic embryos (PM-embryos), in which the two nuclei were derived from the male and female genomes. We found that in the control one-cell embryos that had not been treated with the reagents, the volume of the male pronucleus was about 1.65-fold greater than that of the female pronucleus, whereas the volumes of the two nuclei in the PM-embryos were similar (volume ratio of 1.01). Although a two-fold difference in transcriptional activity was detected between the male and female pronuclei in the control embryos, no difference in transcriptional activity was detected between the two nuclei of PM-embryos. The ratio of transcriptional activity in the nucleus derived from the paternal genome to that from the maternal genome was 1.02, for which no significant difference was detected by the x2fitness test. Therefore, the volumes and transcriptional activities of the male and female nuclei were approximately equal in PM-embryos, which suggests that the asymmetries of pronuclear volume and transcriptional activity between male and female genomes are somehow losted during the first mitosis.

  16. Nucleoporin MOS7/Nup88 is required for mitosis in gametogenesis and seed development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Guen Tae; Frost, Jennifer M; Park, Jin-Sup; Kim, Tae Ho; Lee, Jong Seob; Oh, Sung Aeong; Twell, David; Brooks, Janie Sue; Fischer, Robert L; Choi, Yeonhee

    2014-12-23

    Angiosperm reproduction is characterized by alternate diploid sporophytic and haploid gametophytic generations. Gametogenesis shares similarities with that of animals except for the formation of the gametophyte, whereby haploid cells undergo several rounds of postmeiotic mitosis to form gametes and the accessory cells required for successful reproduction. The mechanisms regulating gametophyte development in angiosperms are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the nucleoporin Nup88-homolog MOS7 (Modifier of Snc1,7) plays a crucial role in mitosis during both male and female gametophyte formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using a mutagenesis screen, we identify the mos7-5 mutant allele, which causes ovule and pollen abortion in MOS7/mos7-5 heterozygous plants, and preglobular stage embryonic lethality in homozygous mos7-5 seeds. During interphase, we show that MOS7 is localized to the nuclear membrane but, like many nucleoporins, is associated with the spindle apparatus during mitosis. We detect interactions between MOS7 and several nucleoporins known to control spindle dynamics, and find that in pollen from MOS7/mos7-5 heterozygotes, abortion is accompanied by a failure of spindle formation, cell fate specification, and phragmoplast activity. Most intriguingly, we show that following gamete formation by MOS7/mos7-5 heterozygous spores, inheritance of either the MOS7 or the mos7-5 allele by a given gamete does not correlate with its respective survival or abortion. Instead, we suggest a model whereby MOS7, which is highly expressed in the Pollen- and Megaspore Mother Cells, enacts a dosage-limiting effect on the gametes to enable their progression through subsequent mitoses.

  17. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liling; Schwartz, Cindi; Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2007-07-01

    Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE) in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC)-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

  18. The spindle pole bodies facilitate nuclear envelope division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liling Zheng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Many organisms divide chromosomes within the confines of the nuclear envelope (NE in a process known as closed mitosis. Thus, they must ensure coordination between segregation of the genetic material and division of the NE itself. Although many years of work have led to a reasonably clear understanding of mitotic spindle function in chromosome segregation, the NE division mechanism remains obscure. Here, we show that fission yeast cells overexpressing the transforming acid coiled coil (TACC-related protein, Mia1p/Alp7p, failed to separate the spindle pole bodies (SPBs at the onset of mitosis, but could assemble acentrosomal bipolar and antiparallel spindle structures. Most of these cells arrested in anaphase with fully extended spindles and nonsegregated chromosomes. Spindle poles that lacked the SPBs did not lead the division of the NE during spindle elongation, but deformed it, trapping the chromosomes within. When the SPBs were severed by laser microsurgery in wild-type cells, we observed analogous deformations of the NE by elongating spindle remnants, resulting in NE division failure. Analysis of dis1Delta cells that elongate spindles despite unattached kinetochores indicated that the SPBs were required for maintaining nuclear shape at anaphase onset. Strikingly, when the NE was disassembled by utilizing a temperature-sensitive allele of the Ran GEF, Pim1p, the abnormal spindles induced by Mia1p overexpression were capable of segregating sister chromatids to daughter cells, suggesting that the failure to divide the NE prevents chromosome partitioning. Our results imply that the SPBs preclude deformation of the NE during spindle elongation and thus serve as specialized structures enabling nuclear division during closed mitosis in fission yeast.

  19. Mitosis-meiosis and sperm-oocyte fate decisions are separable regulatory events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Clinton T; Noble, Daniel; Kimble, Judith

    2013-02-26

    Germ cell fate decisions are poorly understood, despite their central role in reproduction. One fundamental question has been whether germ cells are regulated to enter the meiotic cell cycle (i.e., mitosis-meiosis decision) and to be sperm or oocyte (i.e., sperm-oocyte decision) through one or two cell fate choices. If a single decision is used, a male-specific or female-specific meiotic entry would lead necessarily toward spermatogenesis or oogenesis, respectively. If two distinct decisions are used, meiotic entry should be separable from specification as sperm or oocyte. Here, we investigate the relationship of these two decisions with tools uniquely available in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Specifically, we used a temperature-sensitive Notch allele to drive germ-line stem cells into the meiotic cell cycle, followed by chemical inhibition of the Ras/ERK pathway to reprogram the sperm-oocyte decision. We found that germ cells already in meiotic prophase can nonetheless be sexually transformed from a spermatogenic to an oogenic fate. This finding cleanly uncouples the mitosis-meiosis decision from the sperm-oocyte decision. In addition, we show that chemical reprogramming occurs in a germ-line region where germ cells normally transition from the mitotic to the meiotic cell cycle and that it dramatically changes the abundance of key sperm-oocyte fate regulators in meiotic germ cells. We conclude that the C. elegans mitosis-meiosis and sperm-oocyte decisions are separable regulatory events and suggest that this fundamental conclusion will hold true for germ cells throughout the animal kingdom.

  20. PGRMC1 participates in late events of bovine granulosa cells mitosis and oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, L; Tessaro, I; Raucci, F; Merico, V; Mazzini, G; Garagna, S; Zuccotti, M; Franciosi, F; Lodde, V

    2016-08-02

    Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (PGRMC1) is expressed in both oocyte and ovarian somatic cells, where it is found in multiple cellular sub-compartments including the mitotic spindle apparatus. PGRMC1 localization in the maturing bovine oocytes mirrors its localization in mitotic cells, suggesting a possible common action in mitosis and meiosis. To test the hypothesis that altering PGRMC1 activity leads to similar defects in mitosis and meiosis, PGRMC1 function was perturbed in cultured bovine granulosa cells (bGC) and maturing oocytes and the effect on mitotic and meiotic progression assessed. RNA interference-mediated PGRMC1 silencing in bGC significantly reduced cell proliferation, with a concomitant increase in the percentage of cells arrested at G2/M phase, which is consistent with an arrested or prolonged M-phase. This observation was confirmed by time-lapse imaging that revealed defects in late karyokinesis. In agreement with a role during late mitotic events, a direct interaction between PGRMC1 and Aurora Kinase B (AURKB) was observed in the central spindle at of dividing cells. Similarly, treatment with the PGRMC1 inhibitor AG205 or PGRMC1 silencing in the oocyte impaired completion of meiosis I. Specifically the ability of the oocyte to extrude the first polar body was significantly impaired while meiotic figures aberration and chromatin scattering within the ooplasm increased. Finally, analysis of PGRMC1 and AURKB localization in AG205-treated oocytes confirmed an altered localization of both proteins when meiotic errors occur. The present findings demonstrate that PGRMC1 participates in late events of both mammalian mitosis and oocyte meiosis, consistent with PGRMC1's localization at the mid-zone and mid-body of the mitotic and meiotic spindle.

  1. Water droplet excess free energy determined by cluster mitosis using guided molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Gabriel V; Hunt, Patricia A; Müller, Erich A; Jackson, George; Ford, Ian J

    2015-12-28

    Atmospheric aerosols play a vital role in affecting climate by influencing the properties and lifetimes of clouds and precipitation. Understanding the underlying microscopic mechanisms involved in the nucleation of aerosol droplets from the vapour phase is therefore of great interest. One key thermodynamic quantity in nucleation is the excess free energy of cluster formation relative to that of the saturated vapour. In our current study, the excess free energy is extracted for clusters of pure water modelled with the TIP4P/2005 intermolecular potential using a method based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics and the Jarzynski relation. The change in free energy associated with the "mitosis" or division of a cluster of N water molecules into two N/2 sub-clusters is evaluated. This methodology is an extension of the disassembly procedure used recently to calculate the excess free energy of argon clusters [H. Y. Tang and I. J. Ford, Phys. Rev. E 91, 023308 (2015)]. Our findings are compared to the corresponding excess free energies obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as internally consistent classical theory (ICCT). The values of the excess free energy that we obtain with the mitosis method are consistent with CNT for large cluster sizes but for the smallest clusters, the results tend towards ICCT; for intermediate sized clusters, we obtain values between the ICCT and CNT predictions. Furthermore, the curvature-dependent surface tension which can be obtained by regarding the clusters as spherical droplets of bulk density is found to be a monotonically increasing function of cluster size for the studied range. The data are compared to other values reported in the literature, agreeing qualitatively with some but disagreeing with the values determined by Joswiak et al. [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4267 (2013)] using a biased mitosis approach; an assessment of the differences is the main motivation for our current study.

  2. A Novel CAD System for Mitosis detection Using Histopathology Slide Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashk, Ashkan; Helfroush, Mohammad Sadegh; Danyali, Habibollah; Akbarzadeh, Mojgan

    2014-04-01

    Histopathology slides are one of the most applicable resources for pathology studies. As observation of these kinds of slides even by skillful pathologists is a tedious and time-consuming activity, computerizing this procedure aids the experts to have faster analysis with more case studies per day. In this paper, an automatic mitosis detection system (AMDS) for breast cancer histopathological slide images is proposed. In the proposed AMDS, the general phases of an automatic image based analyzer are considered and in each phase, some special innovations are employed. In the pre-processing step to segment the input digital histopathology images more precisely, 2D anisotropic diffusion filters are applied to them. In the training segmentation phase, the histopathological slide images are segmented based on RGB contents of their pixels using maximum likelihood estimation. Then, the mitosis and non-mitosis candidates are processed and hence that their completed local binary patterns are extracted object-wise. For the classification phase, two subsequently non-linear support vector machine classifiers are trained pixel-wise and object-wise, respectively. For the evaluation of the proposed AMDS, some object and region based measures are employed. Having computed the evaluation criteria, our proposed method performs more efficient according to f-measure metric (70.94% for Aperio XT scanner images and 70.11% for Hamamatsu images) than the methods proposed by other participants at Mitos-ICPR2012 contest in breast cancer histopathological images. The experimental results show the higher performance of the proposed AMDS compared with other competitive systems proposed in Mitos-ICPR2012 contest.

  3. Lesson Thirteen Trifascicular Block

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2005-01-01

    @@ A complete trifascicular block would result in complete AV block. The idio ventricular rhythm has a slower rate and a wide QRS complex because the pacemaker is located at the peripheral part of the conduction system distal to the sites of the block1. Such a rhythm may be difficult to differentiate from bifascicular or bundle branch block combined with complete block at a higher level such as the AV node or His bundle2. Besides a slower ventricular rate, a change in the morphology of the QRS complex from a previous known bifascicular pattern would be strongly suggestive of a trifascicular origin of the complete AV block3. A His bundle recording is required for a definitive diagnosis, however.

  4. 3-(Dipropylamino)-5-hydroxybenzofuro[2,3-f]quinazolin-1(2H)-one (DPA-HBFQ-1) plays an inhibitory role on breast cancer cell growth and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, Pietro; Pellegrino, Michele; Caruso, Anna; Iacopetta, Domenico; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Rault, Sylvain; Lancelot, Jean Charles; El-Kashef, Hussein; Lesnard, Aurelien; Rochais, Christophe; Dallemagne, Patrick; Saturnino, Carmela; Giordano, Francesca; Catalano, Stefania; Andò, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    A series of unknown 3-(alkyl(dialkyl)amino)benzofuro[2,3-f]quinazolin-1(2H)-ones 4-17 has been synthesized as new ellipticine analogs, in which the carbazole moiety and the pyridine ring were replaced by a dibenzofuran residue and a pyrimidine ring, respectively. The synthesis of these benzofuroquinazolinones 4-17 was performed in a simple one-pot reaction using 3-aminodibenzofuran or its 2-methoxy derivative, as starting materials. From 3-(dipropylamino)-5-methoxybenzofuro[2,3-f] quinazolin-1(2H)-one (13), we prepared 3-(dipropylamino)-5-hydroxybenzofuro[2,3-f]quinazolin-1(2H)-one (18), referred to as DPA-HBFQ-1. The cytotoxic activities of all the synthesized compounds, tested in different human breast cancer cell lines, revealed that DPA-HBFQ-1 was the most active compound. In particular, the latter was able to inhibit anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth and to induce apoptosis in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)-positive and -negative breast cancer cells. It did not affect proliferation and apoptotic responses in MCF-10A normal breast epithelial cells. The observed effects have been ascribed to an enhanced p21(Cip1/WAF1) expression in a p53-dependent manner of tumor suppressor and to a selective inhibition of human topoisomerase II. In addition, DPA-HBFQ-1 exerted growth inhibitory effects also in other cancer cell lines, even though with a lower cytotoxic activity. Our results indicate DPA-HBFQ-1 as a good candidate to be useful as cancer therapeutic agent, particularly for breast cancer.

  5. Meeting at mitosis: cell cycle-specific regulation of c-Src by RPTPalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustelin, Tomas; Hunter, Tony

    2002-01-15

    Exquisite regulation is required for cells to properly enter and exit the phases of the cell cycle. The transmembrane receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha, an important protein that participates in the transition of the cell cycle from G2 to mitosis activates the protein tyrosine kinase c-Src in vivo. Mustelin and Hunter discuss new findings that describe the highly regulated activation of RPTPalpha and c-Src that occurs just before entry into the mitotic phase. These findings also raise several questions that pertain to redistribution of RPTPalpha in the cell, and the role of phosphorylation and dimerization in regulating RPTPalpha activity.

  6. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the performance

  7. Cascaded ensemble of convolutional neural networks and handcrafted features for mitosis detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e. undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). While handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely unsupervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal to attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. In this paper, we present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing performance by

  8. A thermodynamic approach to the 'mitosis/apoptosis' ratio in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto; Ponzetto, Antonio; Deisboeck, Thomas S.

    2015-10-01

    Cancer can be considered as an open, complex, (bio-thermo)dynamic and self-organizing system. Consequently, an entropy generation approach has been employed to analyze its mitosis/apoptosis ratio. Specifically, a novel thermodynamic anticancer strategy is suggested, based on the variation of entropy generation caused by the application of external fields, for example electro-magnetic fields, for therapeutic purposes. Eventually, this innovative approach could support conventional therapies, particularly for inoperable tumors or advanced stages of cancer, when larger tumor burden is diagnosed, and therapeutic options are often limited.

  9. Effect of water extract from leaves of Nerium oleander L. on mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Tarkowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of water extract from leaves of Nerium oleander L. on the mitosis in meristematic cells of Allium cepa L. root tips has been studied. Observations were made on the changes during incubation and postincubation. Significant disturbances were observed in the development of the mitotic spindle leading to the formation of polyploid and hypoploid nuclei capable of further division. Substances contained in the water extract, and causing the disturbances, are water soluble glycosides. Introductory observations under an electron microscope indicate that the glycosides desorganize the continuous fibres of the spindle which can be considered as the direct cause of the observed disturbances.

  10. Cdc16p, Cdc23p and Cdc27p form a complex essential for mitosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lamb, J. R.; Michaud, W A; Sikorski, R S; Hieter, P A

    1994-01-01

    Cdc16p, Cdc23p and Cdc27p are all essential proteins required for cell cycle progression through mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All three proteins contain multiple tandemly repeated 34 amino acid tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). Using two independent assays, two-hybrid analysis in vivo and co-immunoprecipitation in vitro, we demonstrate that Cdc16p, Cdc23p and Cdc27p self associate and interact with one another to form a macromolecular complex. A temperature sensitive mutation in the m...

  11. NMS-P937, a 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline derivative as potent and selective Polo-like kinase 1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beria, Italo; Bossi, Roberto T; Brasca, Maria Gabriella; Caruso, Michele; Ceccarelli, Walter; Fachin, Gabriele; Fasolini, Marina; Forte, Barbara; Fiorentini, Francesco; Pesenti, Enrico; Pezzetta, Daniele; Posteri, Helena; Scolaro, Alessandra; Re Depaolini, Stefania; Valsasina, Barbara

    2011-05-15

    As part of our drug discovery effort, we identified and developed 4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline derivatives as PLK1 inhibitors. We now report the optimization of this class that led to the identification of NMS-P937, a potent, selective and orally available PLK1 inhibitor. Also, in order to understand the source of PLK1 selectivity, we determined the crystal structure of PLK1 with NMS-P937. The compound was active in vivo in HCT116 xenograft model after oral administration and is presently in Phase I clinical trials evaluation.

  12. Synthesis, Polymorphism, and Insecticidal Activity of Methyl 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-8-iodo-2-methyl-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-4H-pyrimido[2,1-b]quinazoline-3-Carboxylate Against Anopheles arabiensis Mosquito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopala, Katharigatta N; Nayak, Susanta K; Gleiser, Raquel M; Sanchez-Borzone, Mariela E; Garcia, Daniel A; Odhav, Bharti

    2016-07-01

    Mosquitoes are the major vectors of pathogens and parasites including those causing malaria, the most deadly vector-borne disease. The negative environmental effects of most synthetic compounds combined with widespread development of insecticide resistance encourage an interest in finding and developing alternative products against mosquitoes. In this study, pyrimido[2,1-b]quinazoline derivative DHPM3 has been synthesized by three-step chemical reaction and screened for larvicide, adulticide, and repellent properties against Anopheles arabiensis, one of the dominant vectors of malaria in Africa. The title compound emerged as potential larvicide agent for further research and development, because it exerted 100% mortality, while adulticide activity was considered moderate.

  13. Design of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands in quinuclidine, tropane and quinazoline series. Chemistry, molecular modeling, radiochemistry, in vitro and in rats evaluations of a [(18)F] quinuclidine derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin, Frédéric; Vercouillie, Johnny; Ouach, Aziz; Mavel, Sylvie; Gulhan, Zuhal; Chicheri, Gabrielle; Jarry, Christian; Massip, Stephane; Deloye, Jean-Bernard; Guilloteau, Denis; Suzenet, Franck; Chalon, Sylvie; Routier, Sylvain

    2014-07-23

    In this report, we describe the synthesis of a novel library of α7 nAChR ligands based on the modulation of the quinuclidine, quinazoline and tropane moieties. Spirane derivatives were newly synthesized under stereo specific 1,3 dipolar cylcoadditions. Only amide derivatives bonded efficiently to the receptor with Ki measured between 14 and 133 nM. The best fluorinated candidate was selected and radiolabeled. The potent [(18)F]4 PET tracer was evaluated in rats and its brain accumulation quantified.

  14. CDy6, a photostable probe for long-term real-time visualization of mitosis and proliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yun-Mi; Duanting, Zhai; Hennig, Holger; Samanta, Animesh; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Carpenter, Anne E; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-02-19

    Long-term real-time visualization of lysosomal dynamics has been challenging at the onset of mitosis due to the lack of fluorescent probes enabling convenient imaging of dividing cells. We developed a long-term real-time photostable mitotic or proliferating marker, CDy6, a BODIPY-derived compound of designation yellow 6, which labels lysosome. In long-term real-time, CDy6 displayed a sharp increase in intensity and change in localization in mitosis, improved photostability, and decreased toxicity compared with other widely used lysosomal and DNA markers, and the ability to label cells in mouse xenograft models. Therefore, CDy6 may open new possibilities to target and trace lysosomal contents during mitosis and to monitor cell proliferation, which can further our knowledge of the basic underlying biological mechanisms in the management of cancer.

  15. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 regulates cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, C W; Olsen, B B; Meek, D

    2008-01-01

    Cell-cycle transition from the G(2) phase into mitosis is regulated by the cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDK1) in complex with cyclin B. CDK1 activity is controlled by both inhibitory phosphorylation, catalysed by the Myt1 and Wee1 kinases, and activating dephosphorylation, mediated by the CDC...... interference results in delayed cell-cycle progression at the onset of mitosis. Knockdown of CK2beta causes stabilization of Wee1 and increased phosphorylation of CDK1 at the inhibitory Tyr15. PLK1-Wee1 association is an essential event in the degradation of Wee1 in unperturbed cell cycle. We have found...... regulatory subunit, identifying it as a new component of signaling pathways that regulate cell-cycle progression at the entry of mitosis.Oncogene advance online publication, 12 May 2008; doi:10.1038/onc.2008.146....

  16. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  17. Electric fields generated by synchronized oscillations of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes regulate the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Zhan, Qimin

    2012-07-02

    Super-macromolecular complexes play many important roles in eukaryotic cells. Classical structural biological studies focus on their complicated molecular structures, physical interactions and biochemical modifications. Recent advances concerning intracellular electric fields generated by cell organelles and super-macromolecular complexes shed new light on the mechanisms that govern the dynamics of mitosis and meiosis. In this review we synthesize this knowledge to provide an integrated theoretical model of these cellular events. We suggest that the electric fields generated by synchronized oscillation of microtubules, centrosomes, and chromatin fibers facilitate several events during mitosis and meiosis, including centrosome trafficking, chromosome congression in mitosis and synapsis between homologous chromosomes in meiosis. These intracellular electric fields are generated under energy excitation through the synchronized electric oscillations of the dipolar structures of microtubules, centrosomes and chromosomes, three of the super-macromolecular complexes within an animal cell.

  18. TopBP1 is required at mitosis to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard; Kruse, Thomas; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    mitotic entry. In early mitosis, TopBP1 marks sites of and promotes unscheduled DNA synthesis. Moreover, TopBP1 is required for focus formation of the structure-selective nuclease and scaffold protein SLX4 in mitosis. Persistent TopBP1 foci transition into 53BP1 nuclear bodies (NBs) in G1 and precise...... temporal depletion of TopBP1 just before mitotic entry induced formation of 53BP1 NBs in the next cell cycle, showing that TopBP1 acts to reduce transmission of DNA damage to G1 daughter cells. Based on these results, we propose that TopBP1 maintains genome integrity in mitosis by controlling chromatin...

  19. Developmental Control of Cell-Cycle Compensation Provides a Switch for Patterned Mitosis at the Onset of Chordate Neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yosuke; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2016-04-18

    During neurulation of chordate ascidians, the 11th mitotic division within the epidermal layer shows a posterior-to-anterior wave that is precisely coordinated with the unidirectional progression of the morphogenetic movement. Here we show that the first sign of this patterned mitosis is an asynchronous anterior-to-posterior S-phase length and that mitotic synchrony is reestablished by a compensatory asynchronous G2-phase length. Live imaging combined with genetic experiments demonstrated that compensatory G2-phase regulation requires transcriptional activation of the G2/M regulator cdc25 by the patterning genes GATA and AP-2. The downregulation of GATA and AP-2 at the onset of neurulation leads to loss of compensatory G2-phase regulation and promotes the transition to patterned mitosis. We propose that such developmentally regulated cell-cycle compensation provides an abrupt switch to spatially patterned mitosis in order to achieve the coordination between mitotic timing and morphogenesis.

  20. Transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ binds to the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome and promotes mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedgwick, G.G.; Townsend, K.; Martin, A.

    2013-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an ubiquitin ligase that functions during mitosis. Here we identify the transcriptional regulator, transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ, TIF1γ, as an APC/C-interacting protein that regulates APC/C function. TIF1γ is not a substrate for APC....../C-dependent ubiquitylation but instead, associates specifically with the APC/C holoenzyme and Cdc20 to affect APC/C activity and progression through mitosis. RNA interference studies indicate that TIF1γ knockdown results in a specific reduction in APC/C ubiquitin ligase activity, the stabilization of APC/C substrates......, and an increase in the time taken for cells to progress through mitosis from nuclear envelope breakdown to anaphase. TIF1γ knockdown cells are also characterized by the inappropriate presence of cyclin A at metaphase, and an increase in the number of cells that fail to undergo metaphase-to-anaphase transition...

  1. Polo kinase regulates the localization and activity of the chromosomal passenger complex in meiosis and mitosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Mar; Lombardia, Miguel Ortiz; Ogawa, Hiromi; Earnshaw, William C

    2014-11-01

    Cell cycle progression is regulated by members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), Polo and Aurora families of protein kinases. The levels of expression and localization of the key regulatory kinases are themselves subject to very tight control. There is increasing evidence that crosstalk between the mitotic kinases provides for an additional level of regulation. We have previously shown that Aurora B activates Polo kinase at the centromere in mitosis, and that the interaction between Polo and the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) component INCENP is essential in this activation. In this report, we show that Polo kinase is required for the correct localization and activity of the CPC in meiosis and mitosis. Study of the phenotype of different polo allele combinations compared to the effect of chemical inhibition revealed significant differences in the localization and activity of the CPC in diploid tissues. Our results shed new light on the mechanisms that control the activity of Aurora B in meiosis and mitosis.

  2. Comparative analysis of mitosis-specific antibodies for bulk purification of mitotic populations by fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Amy E; Hsiung, Chris C-S; Blobel, Gerd A

    2014-01-01

    Mitosis entails complex chromatin changes that have garnered increasing interest from biologists who study genome structure and regulation-fields that are being advanced by high-throughput sequencing (Seq) technologies. The application of these technologies to study the mitotic genome requires large numbers of highly pure mitotic cells, with minimal contamination from interphase cells, to ensure accurate measurement of phenomena specific to mitosis. Here, we optimized a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based method for isolating formaldehyde-fixed mitotic cells--at virtually 100% mitotic purity and in quantities sufficient for high-throughput genomic studies. We compared several commercially available antibodies that react with mitosis-specific epitopes over a range of concentrations and cell numbers, finding antibody MPM2 to be the most robust and cost-effective.

  3. Blocked Urethral Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blocked Urethral Valves Health Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Blocked Urethral Valves Page Content Article Body Urine leaves the bladder through a tube called the urethra, which in boys passes through the penis. Rarely, small membranes form across the urethra in ...

  4. Related Drupal Nodes Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Related Drupal Nodes Block This module exposes a block that uses Latent Semantic Analysis (Lsa) internally to suggest three nodes that are relevant to the node a user is viewing. This module performs three tasks. 1) It periodically indexes a Drupal site and generates a Lsa Term Document Matrix. Inde

  5. Types of Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... P wave as it normally would. If an electrical signal is blocked before it reaches the ventricles, they won't contract and pump blood to the lungs and the rest of the body. Second-degree heart block is divided into two ...

  6. Related Drupal Nodes Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Vegt, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Related Drupal Nodes Block This module exposes a block that uses Latent Semantic Analysis (Lsa) internally to suggest three nodes that are relevant to the node a user is viewing. This module performs three tasks. 1) It periodically indexes a Drupal site and generates a Lsa Term Document Matrix. Inde

  7. Nucleoporin translocated promoter region (Tpr) associates with dynein complex, preventing chromosome lagging formation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Hashizume, Chieko; Wong, Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Gain or loss of whole chromosomes is often observed in cancer cells and is thought to be due to aberrant chromosome segregation during mitosis. Proper chromosome segregation depends on a faithful interaction between spindle microtubules and kinetochores. Several components of the nuclear pore complex/nucleoporins play critical roles in orchestrating the rapid remodeling events that occur during mitosis. Our recent studies revealed that the nucleoporin, Rae1, plays critical roles in maintaining spindle bipolarity. Here, we show association of another nucleoporin, termed Tpr (translocated promoter region), with the molecular motors dynein and dynactin, which both orchestrate with the spindle checkpoints Mad1 and Mad2 during cell division. Overexpression of Tpr enhanced multinucleated cell formation. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Tpr caused a severe lagging chromosome phenotype and disrupted spindle checkpoint proteins expression and localization. Next, we performed a series of rescue and dominant negative experiments to confirm that Tpr orchestrates proper chromosome segregation through interaction with dynein light chain. Our data indicate that Tpr functions as a spatial and temporal regulator of spindle checkpoints, ensuring the efficient recruitment of checkpoint proteins to the molecular motor dynein to promote proper anaphase formation.

  8. Kinetochore-Dependent Microtubule Rescue Ensures Their Efficient and Sustained Interactions in Early Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Sapan R.; Gierliński, Marek; Mino, Akihisa; Tanaka, Kozo; Kitamura, Etsushi; Clayton, Lesley; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U.

    2011-01-01

    Summary How kinetochores regulate microtubule dynamics to ensure proper kinetochore-microtubule interactions is unknown. Here, we studied this during early mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When a microtubule shrinks and its plus end reaches a kinetochore bound to its lateral surface, the microtubule end attempts to tether the kinetochore. This process often fails and, responding to this failure, microtubule rescue (conversion from shrinkage to growth) occurs, preventing kinetochore detachment from the microtubule end. This rescue is promoted by Stu2 transfer (ortholog of vertebrate XMAP215/ch-TOG) from the kinetochore to the microtubule end. Meanwhile, microtubule rescue distal to the kinetochore is also promoted by Stu2, which is transported by a kinesin-8 motor Kip3 along the microtubule from the kinetochore. Microtubule extension following rescue facilitates interaction with other widely scattered kinetochores, diminishing long delays in collecting the complete set of kinetochores by microtubules. Thus, kinetochore-dependent microtubule rescue ensures efficient and sustained kinetochore-microtubule interactions in early mitosis. PMID:22075150

  9. Spatio-temporal regulation of the human licensing factor Cdc6 in replication and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza M; Berg, Elke; Christensen, Morten O; Linka, René M; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Boege, Fritz; Mielke, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, the thousands of replication origins of mammalian genomes must only initiate replication once per cell cycle. This is achieved by a strict temporal separation of ongoing replication in S phase, and the formation of pre-replicative complexes in the preceding G1 phase, which "licenses" each origin competent for replication. The contribution of the loading factor Cdc6 to the timing of the licensing process remained however elusive due to seemingly contradictory findings concerning stabilization, degradation and nuclear export of Cdc6. Using fluorescently tagged Cdc6 (Cdc6-YFP) expressed in living cycling cells, we demonstrate here that Cdc6-YFP is stable and chromatin-associated during mitosis and G1 phase. It undergoes rapid proteasomal degradation during S phase initiation followed by active export to the cytosol during S and G2 phases. Biochemical fractionation abolishes this nuclear exclusion, causing aberrant chromatin association of Cdc6-YFP and, likely, endogenous Cdc6, too. In addition, we demonstrate association of Cdc6 with centrosomes in late G2 and during mitosis. These results show that multiple Cdc6-regulatory mechanisms coexist but are tightly controlled in a cell cycle-specific manner.

  10. Arrangement of nuclear structures is not transmitted through mitosis but is identical in sister cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Darya Yu; Stixová, Lenka; Kozubek, Stanislav; Gierman, Hinco J; Šustáčková, Gabriela; Chernyshev, Andrei V; Medvedev, Ruslan N; Legartová, Soňa; Versteeg, Rogier; Matula, Pavel; Stoklasa, Roman; Bártová, Eva

    2012-11-01

    Although it is well known that chromosomes are non-randomly organized during interphase, it is not completely clear whether higher-order chromatin structure is transmitted from mother to daughter cells. Therefore, we addressed the question of how chromatin is rearranged during interphase and whether heterochromatin pattern is transmitted after mitosis. We additionally tested the similarity of chromatin arrangement in sister interphase nuclei. We noticed a very active cell rotation during interphase, especially when histone hyperacetylation was induced or transcription was inhibited. This natural phenomenon can influence the analysis of nuclear arrangement. Using photoconversion of Dendra2-tagged core histone H4 we showed that the distribution of chromatin in daughter interphase nuclei differed from that in mother cells. Similarly, the nuclear distribution of heterochromatin protein 1β (HP1β) was not completely identical in mother and daughter cells. However, identity between mother and daughter cells was in many cases evidenced by nucleolar composition. Moreover, morphology of nucleoli, HP1β protein, Cajal bodies, chromosome territories, and gene transcripts were identical in sister cell nuclei. We conclude that the arrangement of interphase chromatin is not transmitted through mitosis, but the nuclear pattern is identical in naturally synchronized sister cells. It is also necessary to take into account the possibility that cell rotation and the degree of chromatin condensation during functionally specific cell cycle phases might influence our view of nuclear architecture.

  11. PCTAIRE1 phosphorylates p27 and regulates mitosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Teruki; Krajewska, Maryla; Matsuzawa, Shu-ichi; Reed, John C

    2014-10-15

    PCTAIRE1 is distant relative of the cyclin-dependent kinase family that has been implicated in spermatogenesis and neuronal development, but it has not been studied in cancer. Here, we report that PCTAIRE1 is expressed in prostate, breast, and cervical cancer cells, where its RNAi-mediated silencing causes growth inhibition with aberrant mitosis due to defects in centrosome dynamics. PCTAIRE1 was not similarly involved in proliferation of nontransformed cells, including diploid human IMR-90 fibroblasts. Through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified tumor suppressor p27 as a PCTAIRE1 interactor. In vitro kinase assays showed PCTAIRE1 phosphorylates p27 at Ser10. PCTAIRE1 silencing modulated Ser10 phosphorylation on p27 and led to its accumulation in cancer cells but not in nontransformed cells. In a mouse xenograft model of PPC1 prostate cancer, conditional silencing of PCTAIRE1 restored p27 protein expression and suppressed tumor growth. Mechanistic studies in HeLa cells showed that PCTAIRE1 phosphorylates p27 during the S and M phases of the cell cycle. Notably, p27 silencing was sufficient to rescue cells from mitotic arrest caused by PCTAIRE1 silencing. Clinically, PCTAIRE1 was highly expressed in primary breast and prostate tumors compared with adjacent normal epithelial tissues. Together our findings reveal an unexpected role for PCTAIRE1 in regulating p27 stability, mitosis, and tumor growth, suggesting PCTAIRE1 as a candidate cancer therapeutic target.

  12. A microtubule interactome: complexes with roles in cell cycle and mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R Hughes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The microtubule (MT cytoskeleton is required for many aspects of cell function, including the transport of intracellular materials, the maintenance of cell polarity, and the regulation of mitosis. These functions are coordinated by MT-associated proteins (MAPs, which work in concert with each other, binding MTs and altering their properties. We have used a MT cosedimentation assay, combined with 1D and 2D PAGE and mass spectrometry, to identify over 250 MAPs from early Drosophila embryos. We have taken two complementary approaches to analyse the cellular function of novel MAPs isolated using this approach. First, we have carried out an RNA interference (RNAi screen, identifying 21 previously uncharacterised genes involved in MT organisation. Second, we have undertaken a bioinformatics analysis based on binary protein interaction data to produce putative interaction networks of MAPs. By combining both approaches, we have identified and validated MAP complexes with potentially important roles in cell cycle regulation and mitosis. This study therefore demonstrates that biologically relevant data can be harvested using such a multidisciplinary approach, and identifies new MAPs, many of which appear to be important in cell division.

  13. Epithelial tricellular junctions act as interphase cell shape sensors to orient mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Markova, Olga; Guirao, Boris; Martin, Charlotte; Wang, Zhimin; Pierre, Anaëlle; Balakireva, Maria; Gaugue, Isabelle; Ainslie, Anna; Christophorou, Nicolas; Lubensky, David K; Minc, Nicolas; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-25

    The orientation of cell division along the long axis of the interphase cell--the century-old Hertwig's rule--has profound roles in tissue proliferation, morphogenesis, architecture and mechanics. In epithelial tissues, the shape of the interphase cell is influenced by cell adhesion, mechanical stress, neighbour topology, and planar polarity pathways. At mitosis, epithelial cells usually adopt a rounded shape to ensure faithful chromosome segregation and to promote morphogenesis. The mechanisms underlying interphase cell shape sensing in tissues are therefore unknown. Here we show that in Drosophila epithelia, tricellular junctions (TCJs) localize force generators, pulling on astral microtubules and orienting cell division via the Dynein-associated protein Mud independently of the classical Pins/Gαi pathway. Moreover, as cells round up during mitosis, TCJs serve as spatial landmarks, encoding information about interphase cell shape anisotropy to orient division in the rounded mitotic cell. Finally, experimental and simulation data show that shape and mechanical strain sensing by the TCJs emerge from a general geometric property of TCJ distributions in epithelial tissues. Thus, in addition to their function as epithelial barrier structures, TCJs serve as polarity cues promoting geometry and mechanical sensing in epithelial tissues.

  14. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Weronika E; Groocock, Lynda M; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation 'switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation.

  15. LOX is a novel mitotic spindle-associated protein essential for mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufraqech, Myriem; Wei, Darmood; Weyemi, Urbain; Zhang, Lisa; Quezado, Martha; Kalab, Petr; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-01-01

    LOX regulates cancer progression in a variety of human malignancies. It is overexpressed in aggressive cancers and higher expression of LOX is associated with higher cancer mortality. Here, we report a new function of LOX in mitosis. We show that LOX co-localizes to mitotic spindles from metaphase to telophase, and p-H3(Ser10)-positive cells harbor strong LOX staining. Further, purification of mitotic spindles from synchronized cells show that LOX fails to bind to microtubules in the presence of nocodazole, whereas paclitaxel treated samples showed enrichment in LOX expression, suggesting that LOX binds to stabilized microtubules. LOX knockdown leads to G2/M phase arrest; reduced p-H3(Ser10), cyclin B1, CDK1, and Aurora B. Moreover, LOX knockdown significantly increased sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that target microtubules. Our findings suggest that LOX has a role in cancer cell mitosis and may be targeted to enhance the activity of microtubule inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:27296552

  16. An organelle-exclusion envelope assists mitosis and underlies distinct molecular crowding in the spindle region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Nina; Pawar, Nisha; Weiss, Matthias; Maiato, Helder

    2015-08-31

    The mitotic spindle is a microtubular assembly required for chromosome segregation during mitosis. Additionally, a spindle matrix has long been proposed to assist this process, but its nature has remained elusive. By combining live-cell imaging with laser microsurgery, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells, we uncovered a microtubule-independent mechanism that underlies the accumulation of molecules in the spindle region. This mechanism relies on a membranous system surrounding the mitotic spindle that defines an organelle-exclusion zone that is conserved in human cells. Supported by mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that organelle exclusion by a membrane system causes spatio-temporal differences in molecular crowding states that are sufficient to drive accumulation of mitotic regulators, such as Mad2 and Megator/Tpr, as well as soluble tubulin, in the spindle region. This membranous "spindle envelope" confined spindle assembly, and its mechanical disruption compromised faithful chromosome segregation. Thus, cytoplasmic compartmentalization persists during early mitosis to promote spindle assembly and function.

  17. Breast cancer mitosis detection in histopathological images with spatial feature extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Abdülkadir; Bilgin, Gökhan

    2013-12-01

    In this work, cellular mitosis detection in histopathological images has been investigated. Mitosis detection is very expensive and time consuming process. Development of digital imaging in pathology has enabled reasonable and effective solution to this problem. Segmentation of digital images provides easier analysis of cell structures in histopathological data. To differentiate normal and mitotic cells in histopathological images, feature extraction step is very crucial step for the system accuracy. A mitotic cell has more distinctive textural dissimilarities than the other normal cells. Hence, it is important to incorporate spatial information in feature extraction or in post-processing steps. As a main part of this study, Haralick texture descriptor has been proposed with different spatial window sizes in RGB and La*b* color spaces. So, spatial dependencies of normal and mitotic cellular pixels can be evaluated within different pixel neighborhoods. Extracted features are compared with various sample sizes by Support Vector Machines using k-fold cross validation method. According to the represented results, it has been shown that separation accuracy on mitotic and non-mitotic cellular pixels gets better with the increasing size of spatial window.

  18. Label-free mitosis detection in tumor spheroids using tissue dynamics imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ran; Jeong, Kwan; Turek, John; Nolte, David

    2012-03-01

    The detection of cellular mitosis inside three-dimensional living tissue at depths up to 1 mm has been beyond the detection limits of conventional microscopies. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of motility contrast imaging and fluctuation spectroscopy to detect motional signatures that we attribute to mitotic events within groups of 100 cells in multicellular tumor spheroids. Motility contrast imaging is a coherence-domain speckle-imaging technique that uses low-coherence off-axis holography as a coherence gate to localize dynamic light scattering from selected depths inside tissue. Fluctuation spectroscopy is performed on a pervoxel basis to generate micro-spectrograms that display frequency content vs. time. Mitosis, especially in Telophase and Cytokinesis, is a relatively fast and high-amplitude phenomenon that should display energetic features within the micro-spectrograms. By choosing an appropriate frequency range and threshold, we detect energetic events with a density and rate that are comparable to the expected mitotic fraction in the UMR cell line. By studying these mitotic events in tumors of two different sizes, we show that micro-spectrograms contain characteristically different information content than macro-spectrograms (averaged over many voxels) in which the mitotic signatures (which are overall a low-probability event) are averaged out. The detection of mitotic fraction in thick living tissue has important consequences for the use of tissue-based assays for drug discovery.

  19. The long and viscous road: uncovering nuclear diffusion barriers in closed mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eder Zavala

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion barriers are effective means for constraining protein lateral exchange in cellular membranes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, they have been shown to sustain parental identity through asymmetric segregation of ageing factors during closed mitosis. Even though barriers have been extensively studied in the plasma membrane, their identity and organization within the nucleus remains poorly understood. Based on different lines of experimental evidence, we present a model of the composition and structural organization of a nuclear diffusion barrier during anaphase. By means of spatial stochastic simulations, we propose how specialised lipid domains, protein rings, and morphological changes of the nucleus may coordinate to restrict protein exchange between mother and daughter nuclear lobes. We explore distinct, plausible configurations of these diffusion barriers and offer testable predictions regarding their protein exclusion properties and the diffusion regimes they generate. Our model predicts that, while a specialised lipid domain and an immobile protein ring at the bud neck can compartmentalize the nucleus during early anaphase; a specialised lipid domain spanning the elongated bridge between lobes would be entirely sufficient during late anaphase. Our work shows how complex nuclear diffusion barriers in closed mitosis may arise from simple nanoscale biophysical interactions.

  20. STAG2 promotes error correction in mitosis by regulating kinetochore-microtubule attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleyman, Marianna; Kabeche, Lilian; Compton, Duane A

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in the STAG2 gene are present in ∼20% of tumors from different tissues of origin. STAG2 encodes a subunit of the cohesin complex, and tumors with loss-of-function mutations are usually aneuploid and display elevated frequencies of lagging chromosomes during anaphase. Lagging chromosomes are a hallmark of chromosomal instability (CIN) arising from persistent errors in kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) attachment. To determine whether the loss of STAG2 increases the rate of formation of kMT attachment errors or decreases the rate of their correction, we examined mitosis in STAG2-deficient cells. STAG2 depletion does not impair bipolar spindle formation or delay mitotic progression. Instead, loss of STAG2 permits excessive centromere stretch along with hyperstabilization of kMT attachments. STAG2-deficient cells display mislocalization of Bub1 kinase, Bub3 and the chromosome passenger complex. Importantly, strategically destabilizing kMT attachments in tumor cells harboring STAG2 mutations by overexpression of the microtubule-destabilizing enzymes MCAK (also known as KIF2C) and Kif2B decreased the rate of lagging chromosomes and reduced the rate of chromosome missegregation. These data demonstrate that STAG2 promotes the correction of kMT attachment errors to ensure faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis.

  1. The selective elimination of messenger RNA underlies the mitosis-meiosis switch in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2010-01-01

    The cellular programs for meiosis and mitosis must be strictly distinguished but the mechanisms controlling the entry to meiosis remain largely elusive in higher organisms. In contrast, recent analyses in yeast have shed new light on the mechanisms underlying the mitosis-meiosis switch. In this review, the current understanding of these mechanisms in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is discussed. Meiosis-inducing signals in this microbe emanating from environmental conditions including the nutrient status converge on the activity of an RRM-type RNA-binding protein, Mei2. This protein plays pivotal roles in both the induction and progression of meiosis and has now been found to govern the meiotic program in a quite unexpected manner. Fission yeast contains an RNA degradation system that selectively eliminates meiosis-specific mRNAs during the mitotic cell cycle. Mmi1, a novel RNA-binding protein of the YTH-family, is essential for this process. Mei2 tethers Mmi1 and thereby stabilizes the transcripts necessary for the progression of meiosis.

  2. Lamin A reassembly at the end of mitosis is regulated by its SUMO-interacting motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriuchi, Takanobu; Kuroda, Masaki; Kusumoto, Fumiya; Osumi, Takashi; Hirose, Fumiko

    2016-03-01

    Modification of proteins with small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO; SUMOylation) is involved in the regulation of various biological processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that noncovalent associations between SUMOylated proteins and co-operative proteins containing SUMO-interacting motifs (SIMs) are important for the spatiotemporal organization of many protein complexes. In this study, we demonstrate that interactions between lamin A, a major component of the nuclear lamina, and SUMO isoforms are dependent on one of the four SIMs (SIM3) resided in lamin A polypeptide in vitro. Live cell imaging and immunofluorescence staining showed that SIM3 is required for accumulation of lamin A on the chromosomes during telophase, and subsequent evaluation of a panel of deletion mutants determined that a 156-amino acid region spanning the carboxyl-terminal Ig-fold domain of lamin A is sufficient for this accumulation. Notably, mutation of SIM3 abrogated the dephosphorylation of mitosis-specific phosphorylation at Ser-22 of lamin A, which normally occurs during telophase, and the subsequent nuclear lamina reorganization. Furthermore, expression of a conjugation-defective SUMO2 mutant, which was previously shown to inhibit endogenous SUMOylation in a dominant-negative manner, also impaired the accumulation of wild type lamin A on telophase chromosomes. These findings suggest that interactions between SIM3 of lamin A and a putative SUMO2-modified protein plays an important role in the reorganization of the nuclear lamina at the end of mitosis.

  3. Multipolar mitosis and aneuploidy after chrysotile treatment: a consequence of abscission failure and cytokinesis regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Beatriz Araujo; Rezende-Teixeira, Paula; Redick, Sambra; Doxsey, Stephen; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia Maria

    2016-02-23

    Chrysotile, like other types of asbestos, has been associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis. However, the cellular abnormalities induced by these fibers involved in cancer development have not been elucidated yet. Previous works show that chrysotile fibers induce features of cancer cells, such as aneuploidy, multinucleation and multipolar mitosis. In the present study, normal and cancer derived human cell lines were treated with chrysotile and the cellular and molecular mechanisms related to generation of aneuploid cells was elucidated. The first alteration observed was cytokinesis regression, the main cause of multinucleated cells formation and centrosome amplification. The multinucleated cells formed after cytokinesis regression were able to progress through cell cycle and generated aneuploid cells after abnormal mitosis. To understand the process of cytokinesis regression, localization of cytokinetic proteins was investigated. It was observed mislocalization of Anillin, Aurora B, Septin 9 and Alix in the intercellular bridge, and no determination of secondary constriction and abscission sites. Fiber treatment also led to overexpression of genes related to cancer, cytokinesis and cell cycle. The results show that chrysotile fibers induce cellular and molecular alterations in normal and tumor cells that have been related to cancer initiation and progression, and that tetraploidization and aneuploid cell formation are striking events after fiber internalization, which could generate a favorable context to cancer development.

  4. MOB1, an essential yeast gene required for completion of mitosis and maintenance of ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, F C; Winey, M

    1998-01-01

    Mob1p is an essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein, identified from a two-hybrid screen, that binds Mps1p, a protein kinase essential for spindle pole body duplication and mitotic checkpoint regulation. Mob1p contains no known structural motifs; however MOB1 is a member of a conserved gene family and shares sequence similarity with a nonessential yeast gene, MOB2. Mob1p is a phosphoprotein in vivo and a substrate for the Mps1p kinase in vitro. Conditional alleles of MOB1 cause a late nuclear division arrest at restrictive temperature. MOB1 exhibits genetic interaction with three other yeast genes required for the completion of mitosis, LTE1, CDC5, and CDC15 (the latter two encode essential protein kinases). Most haploid mutant mob1 strains also display a complete increase in ploidy at permissive temperature. The mechanism for the increase in ploidy may occur through MPS1 function. One mob1 strain, which maintains stable haploidy at both permissive and restrictive temperature, diploidizes at permissive temperature when combined with the mps1-1 mutation. Strains containing mob2Delta also display a complete increase in ploidy when combined with the mps1-1 mutation. Perhaps in addition to, or as part of, its essential function in late mitosis, MOB1 is required for a cell cycle reset function necessary for the initiation of the spindle pole body duplication.

  5. Cdc16p, Cdc23p and Cdc27p form a complex essential for mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, J R; Michaud, W A; Sikorski, R S; Hieter, P A

    1994-09-15

    Cdc16p, Cdc23p and Cdc27p are all essential proteins required for cell cycle progression through mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All three proteins contain multiple tandemly repeated 34 amino acid tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). Using two independent assays, two-hybrid analysis in vivo and co-immunoprecipitation in vitro, we demonstrate that Cdc16p, Cdc23p and Cdc27p self associate and interact with one another to form a macromolecular complex. A temperature sensitive mutation in the most highly conserved TPR domain of Cdc27p results in a greatly reduced ability to interact with Cdc23p, but has no effect on interactions with wild-type Cdc27p or Cdc16p. The specificity of this effect indicates that TPRs can mediate protein-protein interactions and that this mutation may define an essential interaction for cell cycle progression in yeast. The conservation of at least two of the three proteins from yeast to man suggests that this protein complex is essential for mitosis in a wide range of eukaryotes.

  6. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Weronika E.; Groocock, Lynda M.; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation ‘switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. PMID:26243668

  7. The Block Neighborhood

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We define the block neighborhood of a reversible CA, which is related both to its decomposition into a product of block permutations and to quantum computing. We give a purely combinatorial characterization of the block neighborhood, which helps in two ways. First, it makes the computation of the block neighborhood of a given CA relatively easy. Second, it allows us to derive upper bounds on the block neighborhood: for a single CA as function of the classical and inverse neighborhoods, and for the composition of several CAs. One consequence of that is a characterization of a class of "elementary" CAs that cannot be written as the composition of two simpler parts whose neighborhoods and inverse neighborhoods would be reduced by one half.

  8. Regulation of nuclear envelope dynamics via APC/C is necessary for the progression of semi-open mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Keita; Shiwa, Yuh; Takada, Hiraku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Niki, Hironori

    2013-09-01

    Three types of mitosis, which are open, closed or semi-open mitosis, function in eukaryotic cells, respectively. The open mitosis involves breakage of the nuclear envelope before nuclear division, whereas the closed mitosis proceeds with an intact nuclear envelope. To understand the mechanism and significance of three types of mitotic division in eukaryotes, we investigated the process of semi-open mitosis, in which the nuclear envelope is only partially broken, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces japonicus. In anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) mutants of Sz. japonicus, the nuclear envelope remained relatively intact during anaphase, resulting in impaired semi-open mitosis. As a suppressor of apc2 mutant, a mutation of Oar2, which was a 3-oxoacyl-[acyl carrier protein] reductase, was obtained. The level of the Oar2, which had two destruction-box motifs recognized by APC/C, was increased in APC/C mutants. Furthermore, the defective semi-open mitosis observed in an apc2 mutant was restored by mutated oar2+. Based on these findings, we propose that APC/C regulates the dynamics of the nuclear envelope through degradation of Oar2 dependent on APC/C during the metaphase-to-anaphase transition of semi-open mitosis in Sz. japonicus.

  9. A semi-Markov model for mitosis segmentation in time-lapse phase contrast microscopy image sequences of stem cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, An-An; Li, Kang; Kanade, Takeo

    2012-02-01

    We propose a semi-Markov model trained in a max-margin learning framework for mitosis event segmentation in large-scale time-lapse phase contrast microscopy image sequences of stem cell populations. Our method consists of three steps. First, we apply a constrained optimization based microscopy image segmentation method that exploits phase contrast optics to extract candidate subsequences in the input image sequence that contains mitosis events. Then, we apply a max-margin hidden conditional random field (MM-HCRF) classifier learned from human-annotated mitotic and nonmitotic sequences to classify each candidate subsequence as a mitosis or not. Finally, a max-margin semi-Markov model (MM-SMM) trained on manually-segmented mitotic sequences is utilized to reinforce the mitosis classification results, and to further segment each mitosis into four predefined temporal stages. The proposed method outperforms the event-detection CRF model recently reported by Huh as well as several other competing methods in very challenging image sequences of multipolar-shaped C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells. For mitosis detection, an overall precision of 95.8% and a recall of 88.1% were achieved. For mitosis segmentation, the mean and standard deviation for the localization errors of the start and end points of all mitosis stages were well below 1 and 2 frames, respectively. In particular, an overall temporal location error of 0.73 ± 1.29 frames was achieved for locating daughter cell birth events.

  10. Mitosis detection in breast cancer histological images An ICPR 2012 contest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Roux

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the framework of the Cognitive Microscope (MICO project, we have set up a contest about mitosis detection in images of H and E stained slides of breast cancer for the conference ICPR 2012. Mitotic count is an important parameter for the prognosis of breast cancer. However, mitosis detection in digital histopathology is a challenging problem that needs a deeper study. Indeed, mitosis detection is difficult because mitosis are small objects with a large variety of shapes, and they can thus be easily confused with some other objects or artefacts present in the image. We added a further dimension to the contest by using two different slide scanners having different resolutions and producing red-green-blue (RGB images, and a multi-spectral microscope producing images in 10 different spectral bands and 17 layers Z-stack. 17 teams participated in the study and the best team achieved a recall rate of 0.7 and precision of 0.89. Context: Several studies on automatic tools to process digitized slides have been reported focusing mainly on nuclei or tubule detection. Mitosis detection is a challenging problem that has not yet been addressed well in the literature. Aims: Mitotic count is an important parameter in breast cancer grading as it gives an evaluation of the aggressiveness of the tumor. However, consistency, reproducibility and agreement on mitotic count for the same slide can vary largely among pathologists. An automatic tool for this task may help for reaching a better consistency, and at the same time reducing the burden of this demanding task for the pathologists. Subjects and Methods: Professor Frιdιrique Capron team of the pathology department at Pitiι-Salpκtriθre Hospital in Paris, France, has selected a set of five slides of breast cancer. The slides are stained with H and E. They have been scanned by three different equipments: Aperio ScanScope XT slide scanner, Hamamatsu NanoZoomer 2.0-HT slide scanner and 10 bands

  11. Synthesis and biological investigation of 2,4-substituted quinazolines as highly potent inhibitors of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Michael K; Gallus, Jennifer; Wiese, Michael

    2017-08-10

    Expression of ABCG2, a member of the ABC transporter superfamily, has been correlated to the clinical outcome of multiple cancers and is often associated with the occurrence of multidrug resistance (MDR) in chemotherapy. Inhibition of the transport protein by potent and selective inhibitors might be a way to treat cancer more efficiently and improve the therapy of cancer patients. Recently we reported the synthesis of new inhibitors based on a quinazoline scaffold. In the present study more structural variations were explored. Compounds with 3,4-dimethoxy groups and meta or para nitro substituents were found to be highly potent inhibitors of ABCG2. The most potent compound was more than five-fold more potent than Ko143, one of the best inhibitors of ABCG2. To determine the new compounds selectivity toward ABCG2 their inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC1 were also investigated identifying selective as well as broadspectrum inhibitors. Furthermore, intrinsic cytotoxicity and efficacy regarding the reversal of multidrug resistance toward SN-38 and mitoxantrone were explored. The most potent compounds were able to reverse the resistance toward the cytostatic agents with EC50 values below 20 nM. Additionally, the type of interaction between inhibitors and the ABCG2 substrate Hoechst 33342 was investigated yielding competitive and non-competitive interactions suggesting different modes of binding. Finally the effect of the derivatives on vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity of ABCG2 was determined. According to the different effects on ATPase activity we conclude the existence of different binding sites. This study provides the structural requirements for high potency inhibition and elucidates the interaction with ABCG2 setting the basis for further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. 3D-QSAR Study of 7,8-Dialkyl-1,3-diaminopyrrolo-[3,2-f]Quinazolines with Anticancer Activity as DHFR Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-can Chen; Lan-mei Chen; Si-yan Liao; Li Qian; Kang-cheng Zheng

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) study of a series of 7,8-dialkyl-1,3-diaminopyrrolo-[3,2-f]quinazolines with anticancer activity as dihydrofo-late reductase (DHFR) inhibitors was carried out by using the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), on the basis of our reported 2D-QSAR of these compounds. The es-tablished 3D-QSAR model has good quality of statistics and good prediction ability; the non cross-validation correlation coefficient and the cross-validation value of this model are 0.993 and 0.619, respectively, the F value is 193.4, and the standard deviation SD is 0.208. This model indicates that the steric field factor plays a much more important role than the electrostatic one, in satisfying agreement with the published 2D-QSAR model. However, the 3D-QSAR model offers visual imagcs of the steric field and the electrostatic field. The 3D-QSAR study further suggests the following: to improve the activity, the substituent R' should be selected to be a group with an adaptive bulk like Et or i-Pr, and the substituent R should be sclected to be a larger alkyl. In particular, based on our present 3D-QSAR as well as the published 2D-QSAR, the experimentally-proposed hydrophobic binding mechanism on the receptor-binding site of the DHFR can be further explained in theory. Therefore, the QSAR studies help to further understand the "hydrophobic binding" action mechanism of this kind of compounds, and to direct the molecular design of new drugs with higher activity.

  13. Structural Exploration of Quinazolin-4(3H)-ones as Anticonvulsants: Rational Design, Synthesis, Pharmacological Evaluation, and Molecular Docking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugale, Vinod G; Bari, Sanjay B

    2016-11-01

    Anticonvulsants effective against multiple seizures are of wide interest as antiepileptic drugs, especially if active against pharmaco-resistant seizures. Herein, we synthesized 16 different, rationally designed 2-((6,7-dimethoxy-4-oxo-2-phenylquinazolin-3(4H)-yl)amino)-N-(substituted phenyl)acetamides and screened for anticonvulsant activities through in vivo experiments. Compound 4d emerged as prototype with excellent anti-seizure action in mice against electroshock, chemically induced and pharmaco-resistant 6-Hz seizure models with no symptoms of neurotoxicity and hepatotoxicity (ED50  = 23.5 mg/kg, MES, mice, i.p.; ED50  = 32.6 mg/kg, scPTZ, mice, i.p.; ED50  = 45.2 mg/kg, 6-Hz, mice, i.p.; TD50  = 325.9 mg/kg, mice, i.p.). In addition, investigation of compound 4l in mice for its pharmacological profile proved it as safer anticonvulsant, devoid of the side effects such as motor dysfunction and hepatotoxicity of classical antiepileptic drugs (ED50  = 26.1 mg/kg, MES, mice, i.p.; ED50  = 79.4 mg/kg, scPTZ, mice, i.p.; TD50  = 361.2 mg/kg, mice, i.p.). We also predicted physiochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of structurally optimized quinazolin-4(3H)-ones by a computational protocol. A combination of in vivo anticonvulsant profile, ex vivo toxicity, and in silico studies suggested that the synthesized compounds may be useful as broad-spectrum anti-seizure drug candidates with favorable pharmacokinetic parameters. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Anti-arthritis effect of a novel quinazoline derivative through inhibiting production of TNF-α mediated by TNF-α converting enzyme in murine collagen-induced arthritis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yuzhi; Cao, Dong; Xie, Caifeng; Pei, Heying; Li, Dan; Tang, Minghai; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-07-10

    TNF-α is a dominant inflammatory mediator in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis. In our research, we discovered 2-chloro-N-(4-(2-morpholinoethoxy)phenyl)quinazolin-4-amine (9c) exhibited an outstanding anti-inflammatory activity on inhibiting TNF-α production with an IC50 of 8.86 μM in RAW264.7 cells. Interestingly, 9c had no effect on mRNA level of TNF-α but up-regulated the precursor of TNF-α (pro-TNF-α). Then, we studied TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE), which is the most important proteases responsible for the release of TNF-α from pro-TNF-α to soluble TNF-α. The results showed 9c reduced TACE both on the levels of mRNA and protein in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo study, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice were treated by 9c orally. 9c exhibited significant anti-arthritis effect by ameliorating arthritic score, reducing inflammatory cell infiltration, protecting joints from destruction and decreasing the production of systemic TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β. The underlying mechanism of 9c on CIA was coincided with the in vitro, which was mediated by TACE. In conclusion, we discovered a novel quinazoline derivative which ameliorates arthritis through inhibiting production of TNF-α mediated by TACE for the first time.

  15. The MAP kinase pathway is required for entry into mitosis and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqi; Yan, Shi; Zhou, Tianhua; Terada, Yasuhiko; Erikson, Raymond L

    2004-01-22

    In this communication, we examined the role of the MAP kinase pathway in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Activation of the Plk1 and MAP kinase pathways was initially evaluated in FT210 cells, which arrest at G2 phase at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C), due to a mutation in the cdc2 gene. Previous studies had shown that these cells enter mitosis at the nonpermissive temperature upon incubation with okadaic acid, a protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitor. We show that treatment of FT210 cells at 39 degrees C with okadaic acid activated Plk1, as shown by hyperphosphorylation and elevated protein kinase activity, and also induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway. The specific Mek inhibitor PD98059 antagonized the okadaic acid-induced activation of both Plk1 and MAP kinases. This suggests that activation of the MAP kinase pathway may contribute to the okadaic acid-induced activation of Plk1 in FT210 cells at 39 degrees C. We also found that PD98059 strongly attenuated progression of HeLa cells through mitosis, and active Mek colocalizes with Plk1 at mitotic structures. To study the potential function of the MAP kinase pathway during mitosis, RNAi was used to specifically deplete five members of this pathway (Raf1, Mek1/2, Erk1/2). Each of these five protein kinases is required for cell proliferation and survival, and depletion of any of these proteins eventually leads to apoptosis. Treatment with Mek inhibitors also inhibited cell proliferation and caused apoptosis. A dramatic increase of Plk1 activities and a moderate increase of Cdc2 activities in Raf1-depleted cells indicate that Raf1-depleted cells arrest in the late G2 or M phase. Mek1 and Erk1 depletion also caused cell cycle arrest at G2, suggesting that these enzymes are required for the G2/M transition, whereas the loss of Mek2 or Erk2 caused arrest at G1.

  16. Preferential Phosphorylation on Old Histones during Early Mitosis in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Han, Yumiao; Marchione, Dylan M; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2016-07-15

    How histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are inherited through the cell cycle remains poorly understood. Canonical histones are made in the S phase of the cell cycle. Combining mass spectrometry-based technologies and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we question the distribution of multiple histone PTMs on old versus new histones in synchronized human cells. We show that histone PTMs can be grouped into three categories according to their distributions. Most lysine mono-methylation and acetylation PTMs are either symmetrically distributed on old and new histones or are enriched on new histones. In contrast, most di- and tri-methylation PTMs are enriched on old histones, suggesting that the inheritance of different PTMs is regulated distinctly. Intriguingly, old and new histones are distinct in their phosphorylation status during early mitosis in the following three human cell types: HeLa, 293T, and human foreskin fibroblast cells. The mitotic hallmark H3S10ph is predominantly associated with old H3 at early mitosis and becomes symmetric with the progression of mitosis. This same distribution was observed with other mitotic phosphorylation marks, including H3T3/T6ph, H3.1/2S28ph, and H1.4S26ph but not S28/S31ph on the H3 variant H3.3. Although H3S10ph often associates with the neighboring Lys-9 di- or tri-methylations, they are not required for the asymmetric distribution of Ser-10 phosphorylation on the same H3 tail. Inhibition of the kinase Aurora B does not change the distribution despite significant reduction of H3S10ph levels. However, K9me2 abundance on the new H3 is significantly reduced after Aurora B inhibition, suggesting a cross-talk between H3S10ph and H3K9me2. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Block copolymer battery separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  18. Hawaii Census 2000 Blocks

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer represents Census 2000 demographic data derived from the PL94-171 redistricting files and SF3. Census geographic entities include blocks, blockgroups...

  19. Using the Stern Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Margaret

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from "Experimenting with Numbers" by Margaret Stern demonstrate the use of Stern Blocks to develop the conceptual base on which learning disabled students can build further mathematical skills. (DB)

  20. Steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, JMKH; Mori, K; Ohmura, A; Toyooka, H; Hatano, Y; Shingu, K; Fukuda, K

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964 approximately 20 steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents have been evaluated clinically. Pancuronium, a bisquaternary compound designed on the drawingboard, was the first steroidal relaxant introduced into clinical practice worldwide in the 1970's. Although a major improvement, pancuroniu

  1. Block copolymer battery separator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  2. Recipient block TMA technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirlacher, Martina; Simon, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    New high-throughput screening technologies have led to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. One way to prioritize the leads obtained in such studies is to analyze a large number of tissues for candidate gene expression. The TMA methodology is now an established and frequently used tool for high-throughput tissue analysis. The recipient block technology is the "classical" method of TMA making. In this method, minute cylindrical tissue punches typically measuring 0.6 mm in diameter are removed from donor tissue blocks and are transferred into empty "recipient" paraffin blocks. Up to 1,000 different tissues can be analyzed in one TMA block. The equipment is affordable and easy to use in places where basic skills in histology are available.

  3. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  4. Block Cipher Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miolane, Charlotte Vikkelsø

    ensurethat no attack violatesthe securitybounds specifiedbygeneric attack namely exhaustivekey search and table lookup attacks. This thesis contains a general introduction to cryptography with focus on block ciphers and important block cipher designs, in particular the Advanced Encryption Standard...... by an analytic and systematic approach that allows insight to the techniques. Moreover a new procedure of generating and applying probabilistic equations in algebraic attacks on block cipher is proposed and examined. Also, we present practical results, which to our knowledge are the best algebraic results...... on small scale variants of AES. In the final part of the thesis we present a new block cipher proposal Present and examine its security against algebraic and differential cryptanalysis in particular....

  5. Contributions of the axostyle and flagella to closed mitosis in the protists Tritrichomonas foetus and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, K C; Monteiro-Leal, L H; Benchimol, M

    2000-01-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus and Trichomonas vaginalis are protists that undergo closed mitosis: the nuclear envelope remains intact and the spindle remains extranuclear. Here we show, in disagreement with previous studies, that the axostyle does not disappear during mitosis but rather actively participates in it. We document the main structural modifications of the cell during its cell cycle using video enhanced microscopy and computer animation, bright field light microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. We propose six phases in the trichomonad's cell cycle: an orthodox interphase, a pre-mitotic phase, and four stages during the cell division process. We report that in T. foetus and T. vaginalis: a) all skeletal structures such as the costa, pelta-axostyle system, basal bodies, flagella, and associated filaments of the mastigont system are duplicated in a pre-mitotic phase; b) the axostyle does not disappear during mitosis, otherwise playing a fundamental role in this process; c) axostyles participate in the changes in the cell shape, contortion of the anterior region of the cell, and karyokinesis; d) flagella are not under assembly during mitosis, as previously stated by others, but completely formed before it; and e) cytokinesis is powered in part by cell locomotion.

  6. Mik1 levels accumulate in S phase and may mediate an intrinsic link between S phase and mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Bentley, N J; Martinho, R G;

    2000-01-01

    . By studying the mitotic inhibitor Mik1, we have identified evidence for an intrinsic link between unperturbed S phase and mitosis. We propose a model in which S/M linkage can be generated by the production and stabilization of Mik1 protein during S phase. The production of Mik1 during unperturbed S phase...

  7. The multi zinc-finger protein Trps1 acts as a regulator of histone deacetylation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuelling, Manuela; Pasdziernik, Markus; Moll, Carina N; Thiesen, Andrea M; Schneider, Sabine; Johannes, Christian; Vortkamp, Andrea

    2013-07-15

    TRPS1, the gene mutated in human "Tricho-Rhino-Phalangeal syndrome," encodes a multi zinc-finger nuclear regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Here, we have identified a new function of Trps1 in controlling mitotic progression in chondrocytes. Loss of Trps1 in mice leads to an increased proportion of cells arrested in mitosis and, subsequently, to chromosome segregation defects. Searching for the molecular basis of the defect, we found that Trps1 acts as regulator of histone deacetylation. Trps1 interacts with two histone deacetylases, Hdac1 and Hdac4, thereby increasing their activity. Loss of Trps1 results in histone H3 hyperacetylation, which is maintained during mitosis. Consequently, chromatin condensation and binding of HP1 is impaired, and Trps1-deficient chondrocytes accumulate in prometaphase. Overexpression of Hdac4 rescues the mitotic defect of Trps1-deficient chondrocytes, identifying Trps1 as an important regulator of chromatin deacetylation during mitosis in chondrocytes. Our data provide the first evidence that the control of mitosis can be linked to the regulation of chondrocyte differentiation by epigenetic consequences of altered Hdac activity.

  8. JMJD5 (Jumonji Domain-containing 5) Associates with Spindle Microtubules and Is Required for Proper Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Su, Xiaonan; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Lixia; Wei, Huimin; Fang, Qiang; Li, Haitao; Wang, Da-Liang; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2016-02-26

    Precise mitotic spindle assembly is a guarantee of proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Chromosome instability caused by disturbed mitosis is one of the major features of various types of cancer. JMJD5 has been reported to be involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus, but little is known about its function in mitotic process. Here we report the unexpected localization and function of JMJD5 in mitotic progression. JMJD5 partially accumulates on mitotic spindles during mitosis, and depletion of JMJD5 results in significant mitotic arrest, spindle assembly defects, and sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Inactivating SAC can efficiently reverse the mitotic arrest caused by JMJD5 depletion. Moreover, JMJD5 is found to interact with tubulin proteins and associate with microtubules during mitosis. JMJD5-depleted cells show a significant reduction of α-tubulin acetylation level on mitotic spindles and fail to generate enough interkinetochore tension to satisfy the SAC. Further, JMJD5 depletion also increases the susceptibility of HeLa cells to the antimicrotubule agent. Taken together, these results suggest that JMJD5 plays an important role in regulating mitotic progression, probably by modulating the stability of spindle microtubules.

  9. Unraveling the biomolecular snapshots of mitosis in healthy and cancer cells using plasmonically-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikkanvalappil, Sajanlal R; Hira, Steven M; Mahmoud, Mahmoud A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2014-11-12

    Owing to the dynamic and complex nature of mitosis, precise and timely executions of biomolecular events are critical for high fidelity cell division. In this context, visualization of such complex events at the molecular level can provide vital information on the biomolecular processes in abnormal cells. Here, we explored the plasmonically enhanced light scattering properties of functionalized gold nanocubes (AuNCs) together with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to unravel the complex and dynamic biological processes involved in mitosis of healthy and cancerous cells from its molecular perspectives. By monitoring various stages of mitosis using SERS, we noticed that relatively high rate of conversion of mitotic proteins from their α-helix structure to β-sheet conformation is likely in the cancer cells during meta-, ana-, and telophases. Unique biochemical modifications to the lipid and amino acid moieties, associated with the observed protein conformational modifications, were also identified. However, in healthy cells, the existence of proteins in their β conformation was momentary and was largely in the α-helix form. The role of abnormal conformational modifications of mitotic proteins on the development of anomalous mitotic activities was further confirmed by looking at plasmonic nanoparticle-induced cytokinesis failure in cancer cells. Our findings illustrate the vast possibilities of SERS in real-time tracking of complex, subtle, and momentary modifications of biomolecules in live cells, which could provide new insights to the role of protein conformation dynamics during mitosis on the development of cancer and many other diseases.

  10. Duck hepatitis B virus covalently closed circular DNA appears to survive hepatocyte mitosis in the growing liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaiche-Miller, Georget Y; Thorpe, Michael; Low, Huey Chi; Qiao, Qiao; Scougall, Catherine A; Mason, William S; Litwin, Samuel; Jilbert, Allison R

    2013-11-01

    Nucleos(t)ide analogues that inhibit hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA replication are typically used as monotherapy for chronically infected patients. Treatment with a nucleos(t)ide analogue eliminates most HBV DNA replication intermediates and produces a gradual decline in levels of covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA), the template for viral RNA synthesis. It remains uncertain if levels of cccDNA decline primarily through hepatocyte death, or if loss also occurs during hepatocyte mitosis. To determine if cccDNA survives mitosis, growing ducklings infected with duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) were treated with the nucleoside analogue, Entecavir. Viremia was suppressed at least 10(5)-fold, during a period when average liver mass increased 23-fold. Analysis of the data suggested that if cccDNA synthesis was completely inhibited, at least 49% of cccDNA survived hepatocyte mitosis. However, there was a large duck-to-duck variation in cccDNA levels, suggesting that low level cccDNA synthesis may contribute to this apparent survival through mitosis.

  11. Golgi twins in late mitosis revealed by genetically encoded tags for live cell imaging and correlated electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaietta, Guido M; Giepmans, Ben N G; Deerinck, Thomas J; Smith, W Bryan; Ngan, Lucy; Llopis, Juan; Adams, Stephen R; Tsien, Roger Y; Ellisman, Mark H

    2006-01-01

    Combinations of molecular tags visible in light and electron microscopes become particularly advantageous in the analysis of dynamic cellular components like the Golgi apparatus. This organelle disassembles at the onset of mitosis and, after a sequence of poorly understood events, reassembles after

  12. Mik1 levels accumulate in S phase and may mediate an intrinsic link between S phase and mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Bentley, N J; Martinho, R G

    2000-01-01

    . By studying the mitotic inhibitor Mik1, we have identified evidence for an intrinsic link between unperturbed S phase and mitosis. We propose a model in which S/M linkage can be generated by the production and stabilization of Mik1 protein during S phase. The production of Mik1 during unperturbed S phase...

  13. Golgi twins in late mitosis revealed by genetically encoded tags for live cell imaging and correlated electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaietta, Guido M; Giepmans, Ben N G; Deerinck, Thomas J; Smith, W Bryan; Ngan, Lucy; Llopis, Juan; Adams, Stephen R; Tsien, Roger Y; Ellisman, Mark H

    2006-01-01

    Combinations of molecular tags visible in light and electron microscopes become particularly advantageous in the analysis of dynamic cellular components like the Golgi apparatus. This organelle disassembles at the onset of mitosis and, after a sequence of poorly understood events, reassembles after

  14. Tug-of-war between opposing molecular motors explains chromosomal oscillation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S; Paul, R

    2014-03-07

    Chromosomes move towards and away from the centrosomes during the mitosis. This oscillation is observed when the kinetochore, a specific protein structure on the chromosome is captured by centrosome-nucleated polymer called microtubules. We present a computational model, incorporating activities of various molecular motors and microtubule dynamics, to demonstrate the observed oscillation. The model is robust and is not restricted to any particular cell type. Quantifying the average velocity, amplitude and periodicity of the chromosomal oscillation, we compare numerical results with the available experimental data. Our analysis supports a tug-of-war like mechanism between opposing motors that changes the course of chromosomal oscillation. It turns out that, various modes of oscillation can be fully understood by assembling the dynamics of molecular motors. Near the stall regime, when opposing motors are engaged in a tug-of-war, sufficiently large kinetochore-microtubule generated force may prolong the stall durations.

  15. Automatic detection of cell divisions (mitosis) in live-imaging microscopy images using Convolutional Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkolyar, Anat; Gefen, Amit; Benayahu, Dafna; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-08-01

    We propose a semi-automated pipeline for the detection of possible cell divisions in live-imaging microscopy and the classification of these mitosis candidates using a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN). We use time-lapse images of NIH3T3 scratch assay cultures, extract patches around bright candidate regions that then undergo segmentation and binarization, followed by a classification of the binary patches into either containing or not containing cell division. The classification is performed by training a Convolutional Neural Network on a specially constructed database. We show strong results of AUC = 0.91 and F-score = 0.89, competitive with state-of-the-art methods in this field.

  16. Function of nuclear membrane proteins in shaping the nuclear envelope integrity during closed mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Iwamoto, Masaaki; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-06-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) not only protects the genome from being directly accessed by detrimental agents but also regulates genome organization. Breaches in NE integrity threaten genome stability and impede cellular function. Nonetheless, the NE constantly remodels, and NE integrity is endangered in dividing or differentiating cells. Specifically, in unicellular eukaryotes undergoing closed mitosis, the NE expands instead of breaking down during chromosome segregation. The newly assembling nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) penetrate the existing NE in interphase. A peculiar example of NE remodelling during nuclear differentiation in Tetrahymena involves formation of the redundant NE and clustered NPCs. Even under these conditions, the NE remains intact. Many recent studies on unicellular organisms have revealed that nuclear membrane proteins, such as LEM-domain proteins, play a role in maintaining NE integrity. This review summarizes and discusses how nuclear membrane proteins participate in NE integrity. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Control of Outer Radial Glial Stem Cell Mitosis in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget E.L. Ostrem

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex is partially attributed to a relative abundance of neural stem cells in the fetal brain called outer radial glia (oRG. oRG cells display a characteristic division mode, mitotic somal translocation (MST, in which the soma rapidly translocates toward the cortical plate immediately prior to cytokinesis. MST may be essential for progenitor zone expansion, but the mechanism of MST is unknown, hindering exploration of its function in development and disease. Here, we show that MST requires activation of the Rho effector ROCK and nonmuscle myosin II, but not intact microtubules, centrosomal translocation into the leading process, or calcium influx. MST is independent of mitosis and distinct from interkinetic nuclear migration and saltatory migration. Our findings suggest that disrupted MST may underlie neurodevelopmental diseases affecting the Rho-ROCK-myosin pathway and provide a foundation for future exploration of the role of MST in neocortical development, evolution, and disease.

  18. Cellular Tug-of-War: Forces at Work and DNA Stretching in Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Brian; Kilfoil, Maria L.

    2013-03-01

    In the microscopic world of the cell dominated by thermal noise, a cell must be able to successfully segregate its DNA with high fidelity in order to pass its genetic information on to its progeny. In this process of mitosis in eukaryotes, driving forces act on the cytoskeleton-based architecture called the mitotic spindle to promote this division. Our preliminary data demonstrates that the dynamics of this process in yeast cells is universal. Moreover, the dynamics suggest an increasing load as the chromosomes are pulled apart. To investigate this, we use three-dimensional imaging to track the dynamics of the poles of this architecture and the points of attachment to chromosomes simultaneously and with high spatial resolution. We analyze the relative motions of chromosomes as they are organized before segregation and as they are pulled apart, using this data to investigate the force-response behavior of this cytoskeleton-chromosome polymer system.

  19. Mitosis and microtubule organizational changes in rice root-tip cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUSHIXIONG(SYZEE); CHUNGUILI; CHENGZHU

    1993-01-01

    The pattern of change of the microtubule cytoskeleton of the root-tip cells of rice during mitosis was studied using immunofluorescence technic and confocal laser scanning microscopy. All the major stages of ceil division including preprophase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase were observed. The most significant finding was that in the preprophase cells microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface to the cortex were frequently seen. During development these microtubules became closely associated with the preprophase band and prophase spindie indicating that the microtubules radiating from the nuclear surface, the preprophase band and the prophazc spindle were structurally and functionally closely related to each other. Granule-like anchorage sites for the radiating microtubules at the muclear surface were often seen and the possibility that these gramle-like anchorage sites might represent the microtubule organizing centres was discussed.

  20. Optical volume and mass measurements show that mammalian cells swell during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotek-Zlotkiewicz, Ewa; Monnier, Sylvain; Cappello, Giovanni; Le Berre, Mael; Piel, Matthieu

    2015-11-23

    The extent, mechanism, and function of cell volume changes during specific cellular events, such as cell migration and cell division, have been poorly studied, mostly because of a lack of adequate techniques. Here we unambiguously report that a large range of mammalian cell types display a significant increase in volume during mitosis (up to 30%). We further show that this increase in volume is tightly linked to the mitotic state of the cell and not to its spread or rounded shape and is independent of the presence of an intact actomyosin cortex. Importantly, this volume increase is not accompanied by an increase in dry mass and thus corresponds to a decrease in cell density. This mitotic swelling might have important consequences for mitotic progression: it might contribute to produce strong pushing forces, allowing mitotic cells to round up; it might also, by lowering cytoplasmic density, contribute to the large change of physicochemical properties observed in mitotic cells.