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Sample records for quietus-quercus petraea ectomycorrhizas

  1. Quercus petraea in België

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompaey, van E.

    1957-01-01

    Naar aanleiding van het artikel over Quercus petraea in het Corr. bl. no. 4 zend ik u hierbij een kopie van de Belgische verspreidingskaart, omdat daar m.i. wel een en ander uit af te leiden is, dat ook Nederland aanbelangt: 1. Bij bet massale verspreidingsgebied ten Z. van de lijn Samber-Maas (de l

  2. Macrosiphonia petraea: Variantes poblacionales con potencial decorativo

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    FONTANA, H

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ResumenMacrosiphonia petraea crece sobre suelos franco-arenosos, es perenne y sus flores blancas son vespertinas. En un ensayo en macetas bajo invernáculo en Buenos Aires se evaluó el comportamiento en dichas condiciones, la existencia de polimorfismos y se identificó a los individuos atractivos. Los caracteres considerados fueron números de tallos, de flores y de días desde la siembra hasta la aparición de la primera flor de cada planta. También se midió la longitud de los tallos y se estimó la extensión del período de floración. Se halló que la floración se concentró en verano con picos en enero y en febrero y se identificaron individuos de tallos péndulos o erectos. El número de tallos fue un carácter importante para la calidad subjetivamente determinada siendo más atractivos los individuos compactos, con un mayor número de tallos. Las plantas mostraron susceptibilidad a plagas insectiles, manteniendo la turgencia aún con temperaturas altas. Se concluyó que existen polimorfismos para los caracteres observados y que por su rusticidad M. petraea podría posicionarse como una opción decorativa de bajo mantenimiento en nichos comerciales tales como jardines de roca en lugares con actividad nocturna. La selección, un programa de fertilización comercial y un manejoen exterior a partir del inicio de la época cálida, probablemente permitirían obtener un número superior flores y mejor estado sanitario.AbstractMacrosiphonia petraea grows on sandy loam soils, is perennial and its white flowers are vespertine. In a greenhouse test in pots carried out in Buenos Aires, behaviour in those conditions was evaluated, the existence of polymorphisms and attractive individuals were identified. Features considered were number of stalks, number of flowers and days since planting up to appearance of first flower in each plant. Length of stalks was also measured and length of flowering period was estimated. Flowering concentrated during

  3. A discrimination between Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.G.; Dam, van B.C.; Eck, van H.J.; Jacobsen, E.

    2001-01-01

    In natural populations, Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Matt.) Liebl. comprise a morphological continuum due to hybridization and/or an overlap in variation between the two species. In order to obtain diagnostic markers to investigate these morphological intermediate forms, leaf morphology and AFLP

  4. Ellagitannins and complex tannins from Quercus petraea bark.

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    König, M; Scholz, E; Hartmann, R; Lehmann, W; Rimpler, H

    1994-10-01

    The ellagitannins 2,3-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-glucose, pedunculagin, vescalagin, and castalagin; the flavanoellagitannins acutissimin A, acutissimin B, eugenigrandin A, guajavin B, and stenophyllanin C; and the procyanidinoellagitannin mongolicanin have been isolated from the bark of Quercus petraea. The ellagitannin fraction had a weak antisecretory effect.

  5. Isolation of bacteria from ectomycorrhizae of Tuber aestivum Vittad

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    Milana Gryndler

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen different cultivation media were used to isolate bacteria with the idea to obtain taxa specifically associated with ectomycorrhizae of Tuber aestivum. Ectomycorrhizae were collected at the sampling points previously analyzed for bacterial molecular diversity. We isolated 183 bacterial strains and identified them on the basis of the partial sequence of 16S rDNA. Out of these isolates, only 4 corresponded to operational taxonomic units significantly associated with T. aestivum ectomycorrhizae in previous molecular study. Preliminary study of the effect of 12 selected isolates on growth of T. aestivum mycelium showed no stimulation and one isolate induced the damage of hyphae. Different isolation strategy has to be developed to increase the probability of cultivation of potentially important components of T. aestivum mycorrhizosphere.

  6. Types of ectomycorrhizae and mycobioindication of forest site pollution

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    Kraigher, H.; Batic, F.; Agerer, R. [Slovenian Forestry Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1996-12-31

    Types of ectomycorrhizae on Norway spruce were determined in soil cores from two differently polluted forest research plots from the emission zone of the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (TPP), Slovenia. 17 types of ectomycorrhizae were determined on 28443 root tips in soil cores from the polluted plot (Zavodnje). On the less polluted plot (Mislinja) 24 different types were determined on 38502 root tips in equal volume and number, of soil cores. In the discussion of mycobioindication of forest site pollution the authors employed a supposedly pollution sensitive (Hydnum rufescens), and supposedly unsensitive (Paxillus involutus) fungal species in ectomycorrhizae. However, further screening of comparable forest sites differently influenced by pollution is needed to confirm the choice of species.

  7. Fine roots and ectomycorrhizas as indicators of environmental change.

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    Cudlin, P.; Kieliszewska-Rokicka, B.; Rudawska, M.; Grebenc, T.; Alberton, O.; Lehto, T.; Bakker, M.R.; Borja, I.; Konopka, B.; Leski, T.; Kraigher, H.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2007-01-01

    Human-induced and natural stress factors can affect fine roots and ectomycorrhizas. Therefore they have potential utility as indicators of environmental change. We evaluated, through meta-analysis, the magnitude of the effects of acidic deposition, nitrogen deposition, increased ozone levels,

  8. Bioclimatic characteristic of oak species Quercus macranthera subsp. syspirensis and Quercus petraea subsp. pinnatiloba in Turkey.

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    Kargioglu, Mustafa; Serteser, Ahmet; Senkul, Cetin; Konuk, Muhsin

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine some bioclimatic characteristics such as humidity category (Q2), winter variant (m), the length of the dry season (LDS) and the dry season water deficit (DSWD) of naturally growing two endemic oak taxa, Quercus macranthera subsp. syspirensis and Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba, living in Turkey. Our findings showed that bioclimatic tolerance range of Q. macranthera subsp. syspirensis possess 7 different types of Mediterranean bioclimate while Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba had 8 of them. Although Q. macranthera subsp. syspirensis was ranging among the semiarid, freezing and very cold, Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba was among sub-humid, freezing and very cold ambient. It was briefly established that Q. macranthera subsp. syspirensis prefers semi-arid and very cold/freezing conditions and Q. petraea subsp. pinnatiloba prefers sub-humid and cold/very cold climatic conditions.

  9. Calcium oxalate crystals in eucalypt ectomycorrhizae: morphochemical characterization.

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    Victor Satler Pylro

    Full Text Available Ectomycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous in forest ecosystems, benefitting plants principally by increasing the uptake of water and nutrients such as calcium from the soil. Previous work has demonstrated accumulation of crystallites in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas, but detailed morphological and chemical characterization of these crystals has not been performed. In this work, cross sections of acetic acid-treated and cleared ectomycorrhizal fragments were visualized by polarized light microscopy to evaluate the location of crystals within cortical root cells. Ectomycorrhizal sections were also observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive x-ray (EDS microprobe analysis. The predominant forms of crystals were crystal sand (granules and concretions. Calcium, carbon and oxygen were detected by EDS as constituent elements and similar elemental profiles were observed between both crystal morphologies. All analyzed crystalline structures were characterized as calcium oxalate crystals. This is the first report of the stoichiometry and morphology of crystals occurring in eucalypt ectomycorrhizas in tropical soils. The data corroborates the role of ectomycorrhizae in the uptake and accumulation of calcium in the form of calcium oxalate crystals in hybrid eucalypt plants.

  10. Elliptic Fourier analysis of crown shapes in Quercus petraea trees

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    Ovidiu Hâruţa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Shape is a fundamental morphological descriptor, significant in taxonomic research as well as in ecomorphology, one method of estimation being from digitally processed images. In the present study, were analysed shapes of Q. petraea crowns, pertaining to five different stem diameter classes, from three similar stands. Based on measurements on terrestrial digital vertical photos, crown size analysis was performed and correlations between crown and stem variables were tested. Linear regression equations between crown volumes and dbh, and crown volumes and stem volumes were derived, explaining more than half of data variability. Employment of elliptic Fourier analysis (EFA, a powerful analysis tool, permitted the extraction of the mean shape from crowns, characterized by high morphological variability. The extracted, most important, coefficients were used to reconstruct the average shape of the crowns, using Inverse Fourier Transform. A mean shape of the crown, corresponding to stand conditions in which competition is added as influential shaping factor, aside genetic program of the species, is described for each stem diameter class. Crown regions with highest shape variability, from the perspective of stage development of the trees, were determined. Accordingly, the main crown shape characteristics are: crown elongation, centroid position, asymmetry with regard to the main axis, lateral regions symmetrical and asymmetrical variations. 

  11. Elliptic Fourier analysis of crown shapes in Quercus petraea trees

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    Ovidiu Hâruţa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Shape is a fundamental morphological descriptor, significant in taxonomic research as well as in ecomorphology, one method of estimation being from digitally processed images. In the present study, were analysed shapes of Q. petraea crowns, pertaining to five different stem diameter classes, from three similar stands. Based on measurements on terrestrial digital vertical photos, crown size analysis was performed and correlations between crown and stem variables were tested. Linear regression equations between crown volumes and dbh, and crown volumes and stem volumes were derived, explaining more than half of data variability. Employment of elliptic Fourier analysis (EFA, a powerful analysis tool, permitted the extraction of the mean shape from crowns, characterized by high morphological variability. The extracted, most important, coefficients were used to reconstruct the average shape of the crowns, using Inverse Fourier Transform. A mean shape of the crown, corresponding to stand conditions in which competition is added as influential shaping factor, aside genetic program of the species, is described for each stem diameter class. Crown regions with highest shape variability, from the perspective of stage developmentof the trees, were determined. Accordingly, the main crown shape characteristics are: crown elongation, mass center, asymmetry with regard to the main axis, lateral regions symmetrical and asymmetrical variations.

  12. Ectomycorrhizae reduce damage to Russian larch by Otiorhyncus larvae

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    Halldorsson, Gudmundur; Oddsdottir, E.S. [Iceland Forest Research Station, Mosfellsbaer (Iceland); Sverrisson, Halldor [Agricultural Research Inst., Reykjavik (Iceland); Eyjolfsdottir, G.G. [Icelandic Inst. of Natural History, Akureyri (Iceland)

    2000-07-01

    The effect of ectomycorrhizae on damage caused by Otiorhyncus larvae and on plant growth was evaluated in a 3-yr field experiment. Russian larch seedlings, inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi, were compared with uninoculated plants. Assessment of larval damage at the end of the first growing season showed a significant effect of treatment on damage intensity, but not on damage incidence: 11.2 % of uninoculated seedlings were severely damaged, but only 3.5% of inoculated plants. There was a significant effect of treatment on plant mortality. The accumulated mortality at the end of the third growing season was 34.5% for uninoculated plants, but 17.6% for inoculated plants. The height increment of inoculated plants (4.5 cm) was significantly greater than that of uninoculated plants (2.7 cm) in the first growing season. No difference in height increment between treatments was observed during the second and third growing seasons.

  13. Application and Research Development of Ectomycorrhizae on Forest Disease Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGYuan; JIAXiuzhen; LIANGJun; ZHANGXingyao

    2004-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) is becoming the research hotspot because it can improve plant nutrient cycling and storage and strengthen plant resistance to adversity and disease. It is well known that ECM can enhance plant resistance to soil-borne and stem diseases. The mechanisms mainly include: plant tender roots will be protected well by sheath; ECM can facilitate uptake and transport capacity of nutrition and water to roots and increase plants vigor; ECM can control or block pathogens to invade trees; ECM can activate resistance-related enzymes of the hosts; it also can form rhizosphere microbial colony and establish root-rhizosphere micro-ecological environment. So mycorrhizal technology has become one of the most important methods of ecological control and biological control of plant diseases. This paper summarizes the application and development of ECM in forest disease control and also raises some ideas on their theory and application researches in the future.

  14. Ectomycorrhizas and water relations of trees: a review.

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    Lehto, Tarja; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2011-02-01

    There is plenty of evidence for improved nutrient acquisition by ectomycorrhizas in trees; however, their role in water uptake is much less clear. In addition to experiments showing improved performance during drought by mycorrhizal plants, there are several studies showing reduced root hydraulic conductivity and reduced water uptake in mycorrhizal roots. The clearest direct mechanism for increased water uptake is the increased extension growth and absorbing surface area, particularly in fungal species with external mycelium of the long-distance exploration type. Some studies have found increased aquaporin function and, consequently, increased root hydraulic conductivity in ectomycorrhizal plants while other studies showed no effect of ectomycorrhizal associations on root water flow properties. The aquaporin function of the fungal hyphae is also likely to be important for the uptake of water by the ectomycorrhizal plant, but more work needs to be done in this area. The best-known indirect mechanism for mycorrhizal effects on water relations is improved nutrient status of the host. Others include altered carbohydrate assimilation via stomatal function, possibly mediated by changes in growth regulator balance; increased sink strength in mycorrhizal roots; antioxidant metabolism; and changes in osmotic adjustment. None of these possibilities has been sufficiently explored. The mycorrhizal structure may also reduce water movement because of different fine root architecture (thickness), cell wall hydrophobicity or the larger number of membranes that water has to cross on the way from the soil to the xylem. In future studies, pot experiments comparing mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal plants will still be useful in studying well-defined physiological details. However, the quantitative importance of ectomycorrhizas for tree water uptake and water relations can only be assessed by field studies using innovative approaches. Hydraulic redistribution can support nutrient uptake

  15. Increased trehalose biosynthesis in Hartig net hyphae of ectomycorrhizas.

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    López, Mónica Fajardo; Männer, Philipp; Willmann, Anita; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    To obtain photoassimilates in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, the fungus has to create a strong sink, for example, by conversion of plant-derived hexoses into fungus-specific compounds. Trehalose is present in large quantities in Amanita muscaria and may thus constitute an important carbon sink. In Amanita muscaria-poplar (Populus tremula x tremuloides) ectomycorrhizas, the transcript abundances of genes encoding key enzymes of fungal trehalose biosynthesis, namely trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP) and trehalose phosphorylase (TP), were increased. When mycorrhizas were separated into mantle and Hartig net, TPS, TPP and TP expression was specifically enhanced in Hartig net hyphae. Compared with the extraradical mycelium, TPS and TPP expression was only slightly increased in the fungal sheath, while the increase in the expression of TP was more pronounced. TPS enzyme activity was also elevated in Hartig net hyphae, displaying a direct correlation between transcript abundance and turnover rate. In accordance with enhanced gene expression and TPS activity, trehalose content was 2.7 times higher in the Hartig net. The enhanced trehalose biosynthesis at the plant-fungus interface indicates that trehalose is a relevant carbohydrate sink in symbiosis. As sugar and nitrogen supply affected gene expression only slightly, the strongly increased expression of the investigated genes in mycorrhizas is presumably developmentally regulated.

  16. Ectomycorrhizas of Cortinarius helodes and Gyrodon monticola with Alnus acuminata from Argentina.

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    Becerra, Alejandra; Nouhra, Eduardo; Daniele, Graciela; Domínguez, Laura; McKay, Donaraye

    2005-01-01

    Field ectomycorrhizas of Cortinarius helodes Moser, Matheny & Daniele (sp. nov) and Gyrodon monticola Sing. on Alnus acuminata Kunth (Andean alder, aliso del cerro) are described based on morphological and anatomical features. Ectomycorrhizal roots were sampled beneath fruitbodies of C. helodes and G. monticola from two homogeneous A. acuminata forest sites located in Tucuman and Catamarca Provinces in Argentina. C. helodes ectomycorrhizas showed a thick white to beige mantle exuding a milky juice when injured, were bluish toward the apex, and had hyphal strands in the mantle. G. monticola ectomycorrhizas showed some conspicuous features like highly differentiated rhizomorphs, inflated brown cells on the mantle surface, and hyaline and brown emanating hyphae with dolipores. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the nuclear rDNA internal transcribed spacer provided a distinctive profile for each of the collections of fruitbodies and the mycorrhizal morphotypes.

  17. Recovery of ectomycorrhiza after ‘nitrogen saturation’ of a conifer forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Högberg, Peter; Johannisson, Christian; Yarwood, Stephanie;

    2011-01-01

    -term impact of N loading and the recovery of ectomycorrhiza after high N loading on a Pinus sylvestris forest. We analysed the N% and abundance of the stable isotope 15N in tree needles and soil, soil microbial fatty acid biomarkers and fungal DNA. Needles in N-loaded plots became enriched in 15N, reflecting...

  18. Antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of Moltkia petraea (Tratt.) Griseb. flower, leaf and stem infusions.

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    Koncić, M Zovko; Kremer, D; Gruz, J; Strnad, M; Bisevac, G; Kosalec, I; Samec, D; Piljac-Zegarac, J; Karlović, K

    2010-06-01

    Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities as well as the quantity of phenolic substances (total phenol, flavonoid and phenolic acid contents) were determined in aqueous extracts of leaves, stems and flowers of Moltkia petraea (Tratt.) Griseb. from two mountainous localities (Sveti Jure and Snijeznica) in Croatia. In addition, the profile of phenolic acids was analyzed by UPLC-MS/MS. Antioxidant activities of all extracts in different test systems, namely the DPPH radical scavenging, reducing power assay and chelating activity, increased with extract concentration. Activity of the extracts from Snijeznica in beta-carotene-linoleic acid assay did not differ from the activity of standard, BHA. The leaf extracts from Snijeznica demonstrated superior antioxidant activity in most of the assays, while the stem extract from the same locality was the most effective Fe(2+) ion chelator. In general, the extracts from Snijeznica were more effective antioxidants than the corresponding extracts from Sveti Jure. The aqueous extracts of M. petraea did not show antimicrobial activity against bacteria and fungi tested in the diffusion and dilution assays. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Climate Change on Litter Production in a Quercetum petraeae-cerris Forest in Hungary

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    KOTROCZÓ, Zsolt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is a global problem. During the last century the increase of annual averagetemperature was 0.68°C, while the decrease of annual average of precipitation was 83 mm in Hungary.According to the long term meteorological data of Síkfkút forest ILTER site the annual averagetemperature increased while average of yearly precipitation decreased, the forest climate becamewarmer and dryer. These processes could considerably contribute to forest decline, not only in theQuercetum petraeae-cerris stand of Síkfkút, but everywhere in the country. Species composition andstructure of the forest have changed considerably, as 68% of sessile oak (Quercus petraea and 16% ofTurkey oak (Quercus cerris have died. Forest decline resulted in the breaking up of the formerlyclosed canopy, and consequently, in the formation of gaps in the forest. In the gaps, a secondary canopy developed with tree species of less forestry value. As a consequence, mass regeneration of field maple (Acer campestre appeard in the gaps. The formation of gaps accelerated the warming and aridity of forests. In the article we answer the following question: how did climatic change and changing forest structure influence the leaf-litter production in the last four decades?

  20. Secondary metabolites with ecologic and medicinal implications in Anthemis cretica subsp. petraea from Majella National Park

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    Alessandro Venditti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Anthemis cretica subsp. petraea (Ten. Greuter is a plant belonging to the Asteraceae family and endemic of central Italy. In this paper, the first analysis of the ethanolic fraction of samples collected in the Majella National Park is reported. Seven compounds were isolated and identified namely parthenolide (1, 9α-acetoxyparthenolide (2, tamarixetin (3, 7-hydroxycoumarin (4, 4'-hydroxyacetophenone (5, leucanthemitol (conduritol F (6, and proto-quercitol (7. Isolation of the compounds was achieved by means of column chromatography (CC, while their identification was achieved through spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques. The presence of these compounds is of great relevance. Compounds 1 and 2 are chemosystematic markers of the family, thus confirming the correct botanical classification of the species. Conversely, compounds 3, 5, and 7 were identified for the first time in the species and, instead, confirm the tendency of endemic entities to develop characteristic metabolite patterns in respect to cosmopolite species. Moreover, the presence of compounds 6 and 7 has ecologic implications and may be linked to this taxon’s adaption to dry environments. The production of these osmolytes may, in fact, represent the reason why this species is able to survive in extreme conditions of aridity. Lastly, from a medicinal standpoint, the isolated compounds are endowed with interesting biological activities and may justify, on a molecular base, the widespread traditional uses of the Anthemis species, as well as a basis for the use of the subspecies petraea.

  1. Ectomycorrhizae between Alnus acuminata H.B.K. and Naucoria escharoides (Fr.:Fr.) Kummer from Argentina.

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    Becerra, Alejandra; Daniele, Graciela; Domínguez, Laura; Nouhra, Eduardo; Horton, Tom

    2002-04-01

    Field ectomycorrhizae of Naucoria escharoides on Alnus acuminata ("andean alder", "aliso del cerro") are described in detail for the first time. Naturally occurring ectomycorrhizal roots were sampled beneath sporocarps of N. escharoides. The samples were taken from four natural forest plots at two homogeneous A. acuminata sites (Tucumán and Catamarca Provinces, Argentina). The ectomycorrhizae were characterized morphologically and compared by means of PCR/RFLP analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the nuclear rDNA. The most important morphological features of the ectomycorrhizae are a white to pale yellow mantle, simple to monopodial branches, hyaline emanating hyphae, abundant hyphal bundles emerging more or less perpendicularly from a plectenchymatous mantle, and an acute or rounded apex with or without a mantle. N. escharoides fruitbodies have white basal mycelium with emanating hyphae similar to those of andean alder ectomycorrhizae. The RFLP profiles of sporocarps and mycorrhizae were the same.

  2. QUERCUS ROBUR, Q. CERRIS AND Q. PETRAEA AS HOT SPOTS OF BIODIVERSITY

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    Ecaterina FODOR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three different bipartite networks (pathogenic, ectomycorrhizal and galling insects established by Quercus robur L., Q. cerris L. and Q. petraea (Matt. Liebl. were merged in order to investigate the topological properties of the complex network, shading light on how biodiversity was organized through complex interactions. The complex network contains 290 species – 137 are pathogens (parasitic interaction, 72 are mycorrhizal fungi (mutualists and 81 species of galling insects (herbivores. Most relevant network descriptors, connectivity, nestedness and modularity were analyzed. The main network and subnetworks displayed different behaviors in terms of topological properties, three of four networks showing significant modularity (galling insects network was marginally significant in what regards modularity. High connectivity and different degrees of nestedness characterized all networks. Clustering and Non Metric Multidimensional scaling refined the information provided by network analysis showing that networks occupy distant positions in ordination space and there are differences in terms of resemblance patterns.

  3. Investigation of horizontal gene transfer in poplar/Amanita muscaria ectomycorrhizas.

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    Zhang, Chi; Hampp, Rüdiger; Nehls, Uwe

    2005-01-01

    Fine roots of forest trees form together with certain soil fungi symbiotic structures (ectomycorrhizas), where fungal hyphae are in intimate contact with plant cells. Due to root cell degeneration, plant DNA is released and could be taken up by the fungus. The possibility that horizontal gene transfer might result in a risk for the environment should be evaluated before a massive release of genetically engineered trees into nature occurs, even though only a few convincing examples of horizontal gene transfer are known. Transgenic poplars containing a construct of the Streptomyces hygroscopicus bar gene under the control of the Cochliobolus heterostrophus GPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) promoter were generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The functionality of this construct in the ectomycorrhizal model fungus Amanita muscaria was previously verified by protoplast-based fungal transformation. 35,000 ectomycorrhizas, formed between transgenic poplars and non-transgenic A. muscaria hyphae, were isolated and transferred to selective agar plates. Putative herbicide-resistant fungal colonies were obtained after the first round of selection. However, none of these colonies survived a transfer onto fresh selection medium, nor did they contain the bar gene, indicating that no horizontal gene transfer from poplar to A. muscaria occurred during symbiosis under axenic conditions. However, since ectomycorrhizas are associated under natural conditions with viruses, bacteria and other fungi, these additional associations should be evaluated in future.

  4. Imprints of natural selection along environmental gradients in phenology-related genes of Quercus petraea.

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    Alberto, Florian J; Derory, Jérémy; Boury, Christophe; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Kremer, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    We explored single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in candidate genes for bud burst from Quercus petraea populations sampled along gradients of latitude and altitude in Western Europe. SNP diversity was monitored for 106 candidate genes, in 758 individuals from 32 natural populations. We investigated whether SNP variation reflected the clinal pattern of bud burst observed in common garden experiments. We used different methods to detect imprints of natural selection (FST outlier, clinal variation at allelic frequencies, association tests) and compared the results obtained for the two gradients. FST outlier SNPs were found in 15 genes, 5 of which were common to both gradients. The type of selection differed between the two gradients (directional or balancing) for 3 of these 5. Clinal variations were observed for six SNPs, and one cline was conserved across both gradients. Association tests between the phenotypic or breeding values of trees and SNP genotypes identified 14 significant associations, involving 12 genes. The results of outlier detection on the basis of population differentiation or clinal variation were not very consistent with the results of association tests. The discrepancies between these approaches may reflect the different hierarchical levels of selection considered (inter- and intrapopulation selection). Finally, we obtained evidence for convergent selection (similar for gradients) and clinal variation for a few genes, suggesting that comparisons between parallel gradients could be used to screen for major candidate genes responding to natural selection in trees.

  5. Geographical variation in the response to nitrogen deposition in Arabidopsis lyrata petraea.

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    Vergeer, Philippine; van den Berg, Leon L J; Bulling, Mark T; Ashmore, Mike R; Kunin, William E

    2008-01-01

    The adaptive responses to atmospheric nitrogen deposition for different European accessions of Arabidopsis lyrata petraea were analysed using populations along a strong atmospheric N-deposition gradient. Plants were exposed to three N-deposition rates, reflecting the rates at the different locations, in a full factorial design. Differences between accessions in the response to N were found for important phenological and physiological response variables. For example, plants from low-deposition areas had higher nitrogen-use efficiencies (NUE) and C : N ratios than plants from areas high in N deposition when grown at low N-deposition rates. The NUE decreased in all accessions at higher experimental deposition rates. However, plants from high-deposition areas showed a limited capacity to increase their NUE at lower experimental deposition rates. Plants from low-deposition areas had faster growth rates, higher leaf turnover rates and shorter times to flowering, and showed a greater increase in growth rate in response to N deposition than those from high-deposition areas. Indications for adaptation to N deposition were found, and results suggest that adaptation of plants from areas high in N deposition to increased N deposition has resulted in the loss of plasticity.

  6. The macrofungal diversity and community of Atlantic oak (Quercus petraea and Q. robur forests in Ireland

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    Harrington, Thomas J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The oak species Quercus petraea and Q. Robur are dominant canopy tree species of native deciduous forests in Ireland and coastal regions of Western Europe. These forests are typically plant species-rich, and can also have a rich fungal flora. This survey examined macrofungi found in five native oak sites across Ireland over three years. Overall, 94 macrofungal species belonging to 39 genera were discovered with Mycena, Lactarius, Russula and Cortinarius the most species-rich genera. The species accumulation curve did not show signs of levelling off, indicating that more sampling would reveal more new species. Species richness estimation using the Chao2 estimator indicated that up to 135 species may be present across all of our plots, with individual plots receiving estimates from 19 to 61 species per plot. Sampled-based rarefaction analysis showed no significant differences in macrofungal species richness between our plots. The five most common species were Laccaria amethystina, L. laccata, Stereum hirsutum, Armillaria mellea and Cortinarius flexipes. Comparisons of the results with results from oak forests in similar regions found that the communities in Great Britain were most similar to those found in Ireland. There were some key oak forest distinguishing fungal species from the family Boletaceae lacking from Irish oak forests. It is hypothesised that the historic deforestation of Ireland, caused a reduction of suitable habitats for Irish oak associated macrofungi, leading to the unspecific mycota found in the oak forests of this study. The threats to Atlantic oak forests in Ireland are briefly discussed.Las especies de Quercus petraea y Q. Robur se encuentran en bosques de Irlanda y regiones de influencia atlántica de Europa Occidental. Estos bosques, típicamente ricos en especies de plantas, presentan una abundante micobiota. Este estudio examina la diversidad de macromicetes en cinco bosques naturales de roble en Irlanda durante un

  7. Carbon allocation in ectomycorrhizas: identification and expression analysis of an Amanita muscaria monosaccharide transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, U; Wiese, J; Guttenberger, M; Hampp, R

    1998-03-01

    Ectomycorrhizas are formed between certain soil fungi and fine roots of predominantly woody plants. An important feature of this symbiosis is the supply of plant-derived carbohydrates to the fungus. As a first step toward a better understanding of the molecular basis of this process, we cloned a monosaccharide transporter from the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed to match conserved regions from known fungal sugar transporters. A cDNA fragment of the transporter was obtained from mycorrhizal mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. This fragment was used to identify a clone (AmMst1) encoding the entire monosaccharide transporter in a Picea abies/A. muscaria mycorrhizal cDNA library. The cDNA codes for an open reading frame of 520 amino acids, showing best homology to a Neurospora crassa monosaccharide transporter. The function of AmMST1 as monosaccharide transporter was confirmed by heterologous expression of the cDNA in a Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutant lacking a monosaccharide uptake system. AmMst1 was constitutively expressed in fungal hyphae under all growth conditions. Nevertheless, in mycorrhizas as well as in hyphae grown at monosaccharide concentrations above 5 mM, the amount of AmMst1 transcript increased fourfold. We therefore suggest that AmMst1 is upregulated in ectomycorrhizas by a monosaccharide-controlled mechanism.

  8. Ectomycorrhiza-mediated repression of the high-affinity ammonium importer gene AmAMT2 in Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Anita; Weiss, Michael; Nehls, Uwe

    2007-02-01

    A main function of ectomycorrhizas, a symbiosis between certain soil fungi and fine roots of woody plants, is the exchange of plant-derived carbohydrates for fungus-derived nutrients. As it is required in large amounts, nitrogen is of special interest. A gene (AmAMT2) coding for a putative fungal ammonium importer was identified in an EST project of functional Amanita muscaria/poplar ectomycorrhizas. Heterologous expression of the entire AmAMT2 coding region in yeast revealed the corresponding protein to be a high-affinity ammonium importer. In axenically grown Amanita hyphae AmAMT2 expression was strongly repressed by nitrogen, independent of whether the offered nitrogen source was transported by AmAMT2 or not. In functional ectomycorrhizas the AmAMT2 transcript level was further decreased in both hyphal networks (sheath and Hartig net), while extraradical hyphae revealed strong gene expression. Together our data suggest that (1) AmAMT2 expression is regulated by the endogenous nitrogen content of hyphae and (2) fungal hyphae in ectomycorrhizas are well supported with nitrogen even when the extraradical mycelium is nitrogen limited. As a consequence of AmAMT2 repression in mycorrhizas, ammonium can be suggested as a potential nitrogen source delivered by fungal hyphae in symbiosis.

  9. [Two cases of homicide from the pre-ceramic neolithic era of Arabia Petraea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrer-Ertl, O; Frey, K W

    1987-01-01

    Human remains from Basta 1 (P PN B, 6. Mill. B.C.) and Sabra 1 (Khiamian, 7. Mill. B.C.) were prepared and studied; the results show that Basta 1 was a permanent settlement and Sabra 1 was a temporary summer camp. Both settlements are located in Arabia Petraea. Basta 1, No. 3477: The calvarium of a boy, aged 8 to 9 a, from Basta 1 was studied. The race can be determined as orientalide, according v. Eickstedt's classification. The boy was killed; as evidence by 2 blows to the skull occurring while he was alive. The cause of death has been reconstructed, using parallels taken from ethnological and forensic medical research. First, the boy received a light blow on the left forehead, with a sharp weapon. The authors present as a working hypothesis that the motivation for the death was rape, taking place as the boy was (probably) in a semi-conscious state. After recovering and rising to his feet, the boy suffered a deadly blow on the back of the skull (rabbit punch). A blunt instrument was used for the second blow. The body lay where it fell over 1 a or more; afterwards it was found by members of his own group. They removed the calvarium and buried it in their permanent settlement. The manner in which burial took place, would seem to indicate, that no further religious or ritual ceremony was involved. This type of crime has been observed e.g. as occurring among purely male groups-such as temporary herdsmen. In case of the boy from Basta 1, this would the earliest evidence for the occurrence of this type of sexual delinquency in prehistoric times. Sabra 1, No. 4088: Skull fragments of 2 individuals were recovered from a camp fire shifted by humans, in Sabra 1. Individual I is a male, aged 25 to 30 a; Individual II is a female of 25 to 30 a (or perhaps even younger). The examination showed that the bone fragments had been subjected to temperatures less than or equal to 200 degrees C (examination of bone material) and around 100 degrees C (evidence of charcoal material

  10. Description and identification of Alnus acuminata ectomycorrhizae from Argentinean alder stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritsch, Karin; Becerra, Alejandra; Põlme, Sergei; Tedersoo, Leho; Schloter, Michael; Agerer, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the morphological and anatomical features of five unidentified ectomycorrhizal types of Alnus acuminata and to complement their identification based on ITS-rDNA sequence analysis. The combined approach of morphotyping and sequence analysis based on ITS sequence comparison with sequences contained in GenBank and the UNITE database let us assign three of the five field-collected ectomycorrhiza morphotypes to the tomentella-thelephora lineage that closely matched European and North American species. The sequencing results within Tomentella point toward alder specific clades within T. sublilacina, T. ellisii and T. stuposa sensu lato. The two other EcM morphotypes matched Lactarius omphaliiformis and a Russula sp. Better focused, concomitant fruit body surveys are needed for accurate identification of South American ectomycorrhizal fungi because of the evidence of cryptic speciation in both agaricoid and resupinate mycobionts.

  11. The ectomycorrhizas of Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae associated with Alnus acuminata in Central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia; Bandala, Victor M; Garay-Serrano, Edith

    2015-08-01

    Two pure Alnus acuminata stands established in a montane forest in central Mexico (Puebla State) were monitored between 2010 and 2013 to confirm and recognize the ectomycorrhizal (EcM) systems of A. acuminata with Lactarius cuspidoaurantiacus and Lactarius herrerae, two recently described species. Through comparison of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizas sampled in the forest stands, we confirmed their ectomycorrhizal association. The phytobiont was corroborated by comparing ITS sequences obtained from EcM root tips and leaves collected in the study site and from other sequences of A. acuminata available in Genbank. Detailed morphological and anatomical descriptions of the ectomycorrhizal systems are presented and complemented with photographs.

  12. Vegetatiekundig en oecologisch-geografisch onderzoek van het Quercion robori-petraeae in de Nederlandse zandgebieden ten Zuiden van de Waal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    In this thesis are given the results of an investigation of the vegetation, habitat and distribution of the Quercion robori petraeae (oak-birch-woods) in the sandy regions of N-Brabant and Limburg and in the ,Rijk van Nijmegen'. Data obtained from literature and from investigations by

  13. Vegetatiekundig en oecologisch-geografisch onderzoek van het Quercion robori-petraeae in de Nederlandse zandgebieden ten Zuiden van de Waal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.G.

    1969-01-01

    In this thesis are given the results of an investigation of the vegetation, habitat and distribution of the Quercion robori petraeae (oak-birch-woods) in the sandy regions of N-Brabant and Limburg and in the ,Rijk van Nijmegen'. Data obtained from literature and from investigations by t

  14. Pregnanes and other constituents of the roots of Macrosiphonia petraea (A. St.-Hil.) Kuntze (Apocynaceae); Pregnanos e outros constituintes das raizes de Macrosiphonia petraea (A. St.-Hil.) Kuntze (Apocynaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis Junior, Luiz Roberto de; Garcez, Fernanda Rodrigues; Garcez, Walmir Silva, E-mail: walmir.garcez@ufms.br [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologia; Guterres, Zaira da Rosa [Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Mundo Novo, MS (Brazil)

    2013-09-01

    Macrosiphonia petraea (A. St.-Hil.) Kuntze is a plant popularly known as 'velame'. Its root infusion is used in the folk medicine of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Phytochemical investigation of the roots of this species led to the identification of 17 compounds belonging to four different classes: two pregnanes, 12{beta}-hydroxypregna-4,6,16-triene-3,20-dione, neridienone A, and 12{beta}-hydroxypregna-4,6-diene-3,20-dione, cybisterol, one hydroxylated fatty acid, 5-hydroxy-octadeca-6(E)-8(Z)-dienoic acid, two lignoids, pinoresinol and 8{alpha}-hydroxypinoresinol, ten pentacyclic triterpenoids, and two steroids. (author)

  15. UV light impact on ellagitannins and wood surface colour of European oak ( Quercus petraea and Quercus robur)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahri, S.; Belloncle, C.; Charrier, F.; Pardon, P.; Quideau, S.; Charrier, B.

    2007-03-01

    Two European oak species ( Q. petraea and Q. robur) have a high content of phenols which may participate in the alteration of colour upon UV irradiation. To study the photodegradation process of oak surfaces, the two oak species extractives, vescalagin, castalagin, ellagic acid and gallic acid were analysed quantitatively by HPLC before and after UV irradiation. Irradiation time was altered between 3, 24, 72, 96, 120, 144, 192 and 216 h. In parallel, any colour changes of Oak wood surface was followed after 120 h of UV-irradiation by measuring CIELAB parameters (DL*, Da*, Db* and DE*). We observed that 60% of total phenol content of extractives decreased after the maximal exposure time. Our findings also showed that castalagin and gallic acid were destroyed after 216 h and vescalagin and ellagic acid after 72 h. This study proves the photosenibility of oakwood extractives which, supplementary to lignin degradation, would strongly result in the discolouration of oak heartwood.

  16. Pregnanos e outros constituintes das raízes de Macrosiphonia petraea (A. St.-Hil. Kuntze (Apocynaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Roberto de Assis Junior

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrosiphonia petraea (A. St.-Hil. Kuntze is a plant popularly known as "velame". Its root infusion is used in the folk medicine of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Phytochemical investigation of the roots of this species led to the identification of 17 compounds belonging to four different classes: two pregnanes, 12β-hydroxypregna-4,6,16-triene-3,20-dione, neridienone A, and 12β-hydroxypregna-4,6-diene-3,20-dione, cybisterol, one hydroxylated fatty acid, 5-hydroxy-octadeca-6(E-8(Zdienoic acid, two lignoids, pinoresinol and 8a-hydroxypinoresinol, ten pentacyclic triterpenoids, and two steroids.

  17. Development of the Poplar-Laccaria bicolor Ectomycorrhiza Modifies Root Auxin Metabolism, Signaling, and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssières, Alice; Pěnčík, Ales; Felten, Judith; Kohler, Annegret; Ljung, Karin; Martin, Francis; Legué, Valérie

    2015-09-01

    Root systems of host trees are known to establish ectomycorrhizae (ECM) interactions with rhizospheric fungi. This mutualistic association leads to dramatic developmental modifications in root architecture, with the formation of numerous short and swollen lateral roots ensheathed by a fungal mantle. Knowing that auxin plays a crucial role in root development, we investigated how auxin metabolism, signaling, and response are affected in poplar (Populus spp.)-Laccaria bicolor ECM roots. The plant-fungus interaction leads to the arrest of lateral root growth with simultaneous attenuation of the synthetic auxin response element DR5. Measurement of auxin-related metabolites in the free-living partners revealed that the mycelium of L. bicolor produces high concentrations of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Metabolic profiling showed an accumulation of IAA and changes in the indol-3-pyruvic acid-dependent IAA biosynthesis and IAA conjugation and degradation pathways during ECM formation. The global analysis of auxin response gene expression and the regulation of AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX PROTEIN5, AUXIN/IAA, and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR expression in ECM roots suggested that symbiosis-dependent auxin signaling is activated during the colonization by L. bicolor. Taking all this evidence into account, we propose a model in which auxin signaling plays a crucial role in the modification of root growth during ECM formation.

  18. Ectomycorrhizas impede phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) both within and beyond the rhizosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joner, Erik J. [Laboratoire des Interactions Microorganismes-Mineraux-Matiere Organique dans les Sols (LIMOS), Universite H. Poincare Nancy 1, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)]. E-mail: erik.joner@jordforsk.no; Leyval, Corinne [Laboratoire des Interactions Microorganismes-Mineraux-Matiere Organique dans les Sols (LIMOS), Universite H. Poincare Nancy 1, P.O. Box 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Colpaert, Jan V. [Centre for Environmental Sciences, Environmental Biology Group, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2006-07-15

    Exploitation of mycorrhizas to enhance phytoremediation of organic pollutants has received attention recently due to their positive effects on establishment of plants in polluted soils. Some evidence exist that ectomycorrhizas enhance the degradation of pollutants of low recalcitrance, while less easily degradable polyaromatic molecules have been degraded only by some of these fungi in vitro. Natural polyaromatic (humic) substances are degraded more slowly in soil where ectomycorrhizal fungi are present, thus phytoremediation of recalcitrant pollutants may not benefit from the presence of these fungi. Using a soil spiked with three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and an industrially polluted soil (1 g kg{sup -1} of {sigma}12 PAHs), we show that the ectomycorrhizal fungus Suillus bovinus, forming hydrophobic mycelium in soil that would easily enter into contact with hydrophobic pollutants, impedes rather than promotes PAH degradation. This result is likely to be a nutrient depletion effect caused by fungal scavenging of mineral nutrients. - The ectomycorrhizal fungus S. bovinus impeded degradation of PAHs in soil, probably due to its negative effect on the availability of mineral nutrients of more potent PAH degraders.

  19. The role of mycorrhization helper bacteria in the establishment and action of ectomycorrhizae associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonte, Tatiana Alves; Pylro, Victor Satler; Duarte, Gabriela Frois

    2010-10-01

    More than 95 % short roots of most terrestrial plants are colonized by mycorrhizal fungi as soon as they emerge in the upper soil profiles. The establishment of mycorrhizal association involves profound morphological and physiological changes in root and fungus. It is affected by other rhizospheric microorganisms, specifically by the bacteria. Bacteria may have developed mechanisms of selective interaction with surrounding microorganisms, with neutral or positive effects on mycorrhizal associations, but negative effect on root pathogens in general. Because of the beneficial effect of bacteria on mycorrhizae, the concept of Mycorrhization Helper Bacteria (MHB) was created. Five main actions of MHB on mycorrhizae were proposed: in the receptivity of root to the mycobiont, in root-fungus recognition, in fungal growth, in the modification of rhizospheric soil and in the germination of fungal propagules. MHB appear to develop a gradation of specificity for the mycobiont, but little or no specificity for the host plant in symbiosis. One of the main groups of MHB is the fluorescent Pseudomonas, well represented in diversity and cell density studies of mycorrhizal associations. This review covers the activity of MHB in the establishment of ectomycorrhizae, taking as model the effects of Pseudomonas sp. described in scientific literature.

  20. The effects of acid precipitation and ozone on the ectomycorrhizae of red spruce saplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, D.R.; Fahey, T.J. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Natural Resources

    1998-04-01

    The effects of acid precipitation and ozone on the composition of the ectomycorrhizal community of red spruce saplings were evaluated. In 1986, saplings were excavated from a site in Maine that had been clear-cut in 1979. Saplings were then potted in native soil and transported to Ithaca, New York. With the exception of an ambient control treatment, trees were grown in open-top chambers. Saplings were exposed to five levels of ozone and three levels of acid precipitation beginning in July 1987. Ectomycorrhizae were sampled in 1988 and 1991 after one and four years of treatment, respectively. Although the percentage of root tips infected by ectomycorrhizal fungi was not affected by treatments, a shift in the composition of the ectomycorrhizal community occurred in response to acid precipitation treatments for both sampling years. Among the seven ectomycorrhizal morphotypes identified, the percent composition of one morphotype increased and another decreased in response to higher rain acidity. Alone, ozone treatments did not influence ectomycorrhizal composition however, a significant interactive response to ozone and acid precipitation was observed in the organic soil horizon in 1988. Such shifts in the composition of the ectomycorrhizal community may indicate that the experimental trees were stressed by pollution treatments. 38 refs.

  1. Peering into the Mediterranean black box: Lactifluus rugatus ectomycorrhizas on Cistus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Marco; Comandini, Ornella; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2016-12-01

    We describe the morpho-anatomical features of the ectomycorrhizas (ECMs) formed by Lactifluus rugatus on Cistus, a genus of about 20 species of woody shrubs typical of the Mediterranean maquis. The description of L. rugatus mycorrhizas on Cistus is the first ECM description of a species belonging to Lactifluus subgen. Pseudogymnocarpi. The ECM identity was verified through molecular tools. Anatomically, the characteristic of L. rugatus mycorrhiza is the presence of abundant, long "bottle-shaped" cystidia on mantle surface. Indeed, the overwhelming majority of milkcap mycorrhizas are acystidiate. This is the third Lactarius/Lactifluus mycorrhiza to have been described associated with Cistus, the others being Lactarius cistophilus and L. tesquorum. The phylogenetic distance between all these taxa is reflected by the diversity of the principal features of their ECMs, which share host-depending ECM features known for Cistus, but are otherwise distinguishable on the host roots. Comparison of Lactifluus rugatus ECM with those formed by L. vellereus and L. piperatus on Fagus reveals elevated intrageneric diversity of mycorrhizal structures. Such a diversity is supported by analysis of ITS sequences of relevant species within European Lactifluus species. Our study extends knowledge of Cistus mycorrhizal biology and confirms the informative value of mycorrhizal structures in understanding phylogenetic relationships in ECM fungi.

  2. Comparison of the autoecology of Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Mattuschka Liebl. stands in the Northwest of the Iberian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rodriguez-Campos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is to characterize the functioning of the ecosystems of semideciduous and deciduous Atlantic oaks in the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula. The studied species were: Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Mattuschka Liebl. To advance in the knowledge of the autecology of these species it is necessary to descend at the regional level and describe in detail the variability of the environment to determine their potential, and to decide the silvicultural treatments to be applied to preserve them and to analyze future actuations in order to a possible expansion. The analysis of the results allows knowing differences in continentalityand site conditions, with more precipitation, soil variability and humidification in Q. petraea forests respect to Q. robur. These information represent appropriate measures for the sustainable and multifunctional management of these forests, useful as indicators environmental and forestry parameters as well as the conservationstatus of these formations.

  3. In vitro EVALUATION OF EUCALYPTUS ECTOMYCORRHIZAE ON SUBSTRATE WITH PHOSPHORUS DOSES FOR FUNGAL PRE-SELECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidiomar Soares Costa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The benefit promoted by ectomycorrhizal depends on the interaction between symbionts and phosphorus (P contents. Phosphorus effect on ectomycorrhizal formation and the effectiveness of these in promoting plant growth for fungal pre-selection were assessed under in vitro conditions. For P effect evaluation, Eucalyptus urophylla seedlings inoculated with four Pisolithus sp. isolates and others non-inoculated were grown on substrate containing 0.87, 1.16 and 1.72 mg P per plant. For evaluation of effectiveness and fungal pre-selection, other 30 isolates of Pisolithus sp., Pisolithus microcarpus ITA06 isolate, Amanita muscaria AM16 isolate, Scleroderma areolatum SC129 isolate were studied. D26 isolate promoted the highest plant heights for the three P doses, D51 at the lower dose and D72 at the intermediate dose. P doses did not influenced shoot fresh weight and fungal colonization. In the pre-selection of fungi, 14 isolates of Pisolithus sp., P. microcarpus ITA06 isolate and S. areolatum SC129isolate increased plant height and fresh weight. D82 isolate of Pisolithus sp. had effect singly on plant height while D17 and D58 on fresh weight. Of these, only D15, D17, D58 and ITA06 had typical ectomycorrhizae. The cultivation in vitro has shown adequate for pre-selection of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Colonization and benefits depend on species and isolate. D15, D17 and D58 of Pisolithus sp. and P. microcarpus isolate ITA06 are the most promising for nursery studies.

  4. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals, metalloids, and chlorine in ectomycorrhizae from smelter-polluted area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejpková, Jaroslava; Gryndler, Milan; Hršelová, Hana; Kotrba, Pavel; Řanda, Zdeněk; Synková, Iva; Borovička, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi contribute to the survival of host trees on metal-rich soils by reducing the transfer of toxic metals into roots. However, little is known about the ability of ECM fungi to accumulate elements in ectomycorrhizae (ECMs). Here we report Ag, As, Cd, Cl, Cu, Sb, V, and Zn contents in wild-grown Norway spruce ECMs collected in a smelter-polluted area at Lhota near Příbram, Czech Republic. The ECMs data were compared with the element concentrations determined in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal fine roots, soils, and soil extracts. Bioaccumulation factors were calculated to differentiate the element accumulation ability of ECMs inhabited by different mycobionts, which were identified by ITS rDNA sequencing. Among the target elements, the highest contents were observed for Ag, Cl, Cd, and Zn; Imleria badia ECMs showed the highest capability to accumulate these elements. ECMs of Amanita muscaria, but not of other species, accumulated V. The analysis of the proportions of I. badia and A. muscaria mycelia in ECMs by using species-specific quantitative real-time PCR revealed variable extent of the colonization of roots, with median values close to 5% (w/w). Calculated Ag, Cd, Zn and Cl concentrations in the mycelium of I. badia ECMs were 1 680, 1 510, 2 670, and 37,100 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively, indicating substantial element accumulation capacity of hyphae of this species in ECMs. Our data strengthen the idea of an active role of ECM fungi in soil-fungal-plant interactions in polluted environments.

  5. The role of ectomycorrhizae of Arolla pine in mediating soil priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menyailo, Oleg; Matvienko, Anastasia; Cheng, Chih-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    Ectomycorhizae is playing a vital role in soil C cycle. However, the role is controversial. Mycorrhizae could be a major source of soil C promoting C sequestration. On the other hand, mycorrhizal fungi could compete with soil free-living microorganisms for resources, accelerating their decomposition of soil organic matter, therefore leading to soil C losses. We studied the contribution of ectomycorrhizae of Arolla pine, a popular tree species in Siberia, in soil priming, a short term changes in decomposition of soil organic matter after addition of glucose. We used in-growth mesh collars where mycorrhizal hyphae could or could not grow in. We applied 13C labeled glucose and measured evolution of CO2 thereafter, and determined 13C-CO2 using Picarro 2131 iCO2 analyzer. The CO2 produced from soil was enriched 13C only during the first 48 hours, thereafter the enrichment declined to the natural abundance level. The maximum δ13C-CO2 was observed during the first 20 min after glucose amendment. It is surprising that not more than 3% of applied C-glucose was recovered as C-CO2 suggesting extremely high C use efficiency (97%). The glucose addition caused CO2 flux to increase by 25-30% during the first two days, the amount of primed C-CO2 was 7 times higher than emitted from applied C. The presence of mycorrhizae shifted both CUE and the priming. Mycorrhizae apparently competed with heterotrophs reducing their CUE by factor of 2, and increasing the priming by factor of 1.5. Overall, mycorrhizae could amplify the priming effect increasing C losses. However, the most part of applied C was incorporated into microbial biomass, resulting at least at the short time scale in net C sequestration. Future studies should be directed to understanding of the long-term fate of C incorporated into microbial biomass.

  6. Root vitality of Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea Liebl. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in mature mixed forest stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grygoruk Dorota

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main task of the present study was to investigate the root vitality of common beech Fagus sylvatica L., sessile oak Quercus petraea Liebl. and sycamore maple Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the optimal g rowth conditions in south-western Poland. The study was carried out in 130-year-old mixed stand located within natural range of studied tree species. The density of roots (g/100 cm3 of soil and biomass of fine roots (g/m2 in topsoil layers (0-5 cm, 5-15 cm were determined in the tree biogroups of the same species. The mean total root density ranged from 0.248 to 0.417 g/100 cm3 in the 0-5 cm soil layer, and it decreased in the deeper soil layer (5-15 cm. There were found no statistically significant differences of total root densities between tree biogroups in topsoil layers. Diversity of fine root biomass was comparable in the tree biogroups (H’ = 1.5, but common beech showed more intensive growth of fine roots in the topsoil 0-15 cm when compared to sessile oak and sycamore maple. The results of the study point out the stability of the multi-species structure of the mixed stand studied, and consequently - the ability of beech, sessile oak and sycamore maple trees to coexist in the mixed stands - in the area of natural range of these species.

  7. Genome scanning for interspecific differentiation between two closely related oak species [Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Matt.) Liebl.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti-Saintagne, Caroline; Mariette, Stéphanie; Porth, Ilga; Goicoechea, Pablo G; Barreneche, Teresa; Bodénès, Catherine; Burg, Kornel; Kremer, Antoine

    2004-11-01

    Interspecific differentiation values (G(ST)) between two closely related oak species (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) were compiled across different studies with the aim to explore the distribution of differentiation at the genome level. The study was based on a total set of 389 markers (isozymes, AFLPs, SCARs, microsatellites, and SNPs) for which allelic frequencies were estimated in pairs of populations sampled throughout the sympatric distribution of the two species. The overall distribution of G(ST) values followed an L-shaped curve with most markers exhibiting low species differentiation (G(ST) 10% levels. Twelve percent of the loci exhibited significant G(ST) deviations to neutral expectations, suggesting that selection contributed to species divergence. Coding regions expressed higher differentiation than noncoding regions. Among the 389 markers, 158 could be mapped on the 12 linkage groups of the existing Q. robur genetic map. Outlier loci with large G(ST) values were distributed over 9 linkage groups. One cluster of three outlier loci was found within 0.51 cM; but significant autocorrelation of G(ST) was observed at distances <2 cM. The size and distribution of genomic regions involved in species divergence are discussed in reference to hitchhiking effects and disruptive selection.

  8. Photosynthetic activity of Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt Liebl. in a mixed stand at Maljen mountain

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    Popović Zorica

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of the photosynthetic performance of co-existing tree species with pronounced differences in ecophysiological context (Aranda et al. 1996 Leuschner et al. 2001 could provide insight into their vitality and competitive abilities at a particular site. Gas exchange, composition of photosynthetic pigments, and the water status of beech (Fagus sylvatica L and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt Liebl were studied in the present work. The investigation was performed on Mt. Maljen (Western Serbia, near the town of Mionica at an altitude of 950 m, in an ecotope within the confines of the mountain's beech forest belt. Codominant samplings [three of each species, 30-years old (n=6, 10-12 m high] were selected for the measurements, which were conducted on fully developed leaves from the out­ermost branches and from the innermost canopy. Photosynthetic measurements were performed using an LI-6200 closed photo­synthesis system (LI-Cor. Inc, Lincoln, NE, USA, while irradiance was detected with a selenium cell mounted on the leaf chamber. Parameters of gas exchange are expressed on the basis of leaf area, using the AREAMETER software (Karadžić et al. 1999. Chlorophyll content was spectrophotometrically determined based on light absorption of the solution obtained after extraction with dMSO (Hiscox and Israelstam, 1979. The midday water saturation deficit was determined according to Turner (1981. For data analysis, we used the Statistic for Windows program package. The ANOVA one-way break­down was applied to compare differences within (leaves inside vs. leaves outside the surface of the tree canopy and between species for all investigated parameters at the 0.05 level of significance.

  9. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenta, Tanaka; Edwards, Jessica E M; Butlin, Roger K; Burke, Terry; Quick, W Paul; Urwin, Peter; Davey, Matthew P

    2016-12-07

    While genotype-environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates-a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and "somaclonal" variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system). We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype-environment interaction related to adaptively-relevant phenotypes, such as cold response, in

  10. Tissue Culture as a Source of Replicates in Nonmodel Plants: Variation in Cold Response in Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea

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    Tanaka Kenta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While genotype–environment interaction is increasingly receiving attention by ecologists and evolutionary biologists, such studies need genetically homogeneous replicates—a challenging hurdle in outcrossing plants. This could be potentially overcome by using tissue culture techniques. However, plants regenerated from tissue culture may show aberrant phenotypes and “somaclonal” variation. Here, we examined somaclonal variation due to tissue culturing using the response to cold treatment of photosynthetic efficiency (chlorophyll fluorescence measurements for Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII, representing maximum efficiency of photosynthesis for dark- and light-adapted leaves, and the actual electron transport operating efficiency, respectively, which are reliable indicators of photoinhibition and damage to the photosynthetic electron transport system. We compared this to variation among half-sibling seedlings from three different families of Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea. Somaclonal variation was limited, and we could detect within-family variation in change in chlorophyll fluorescence due to cold shock successfully with the help of tissue-culture derived replicates. Icelandic and Norwegian families exhibited higher chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting higher performance after cold shock, than a Swedish family. Although the main effect of tissue culture on Fv/Fm, Fv′/Fm′, and ΦPSII was small, there were significant interactions between tissue culture and family, suggesting that the effect of tissue culture is genotype-specific. Tissue-cultured plantlets were less affected by cold treatment than seedlings, but to a different extent in each family. These interactive effects, however, were comparable to, or much smaller than the single effect of family. These results suggest that tissue culture is a useful method for obtaining genetically homogenous replicates for studying genotype–environment interaction related to adaptively

  11. Early summer drought stress during the first growing year stimulates extra shoot growth in oak seedlings (Quercus petraea

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    Arion eTurcsán

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available More severe summer droughts are predicted for mid-latitudes in Europe. To evaluate the impact on forest ecosystems and more specifically on forest regeneration, we studied the response to summer drought in oak seedlings (Quercus petraea. Acorns were collected from different mother trees in three stands in Belgium, sown in pots and grown in non-heated greenhouse conditions. We imposed severe drought on the seedlings in early summer by first watering the pots to saturation and then stopping any watering. Weight of the pots and stomatal conductance were regularly measured. Re-watering followed this drought period of five weeks. Height of the seedlings and apical bud development were observed. Stomatal resistance increased towards the end of the experiment in the drought-treated group and was restored after re-watering. The seedlings from the drought treatment displayed a higher probability to produce additional shoot growth after re-watering (p ≤ 0.05. A higher competition for resources (two plants per pot increased this chance. Although this chance was also higher for smaller seedlings, the actual length of the extra growth after re-watering was higher for larger seedlings (p ≤ 0.01. Both in the drought-treated and in the control group the autochthonous provenance growing on a xeric site produced less extra shoots compared to the two other provenances. Finally, stressed plants showed less developed apical buds compared to the control group after re-watering, suggesting a phenological effect on the growth cycle of oaks (p ≤ 0.0001. The higher chance for an extra shoot growth after the drought period can be considered as a compensation for the induced growth arrest during the drought period.

  12. Contrasting patterns of genetic structuring in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata Subsp. petraea across different regions in northern Europe.

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    Mohsen Falahati-Anbaran

    Full Text Available Level and partitioning of genetic diversity is expected to vary between contrasting habitats, reflecting differences in strength of ecological and evolutionary processes. Therefore, it is necessary to consider processes acting on different time scales when trying to explain diversity patterns in different parts of species' distributions. To explore how historical and contemporary factors jointly may influence patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation, we compared genetic composition in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea from the northernmost parts of its distribution range on Iceland to that previously documented in Scandinavia. Leaf tissue and soil were sampled from ten Icelandic populations of A. lyrata. Seedlings were grown from soil samples, and tissue from above-ground and seed bank individuals were genotyped with 21 microsatellite markers. Seed bank density in Icelandic populations was low but not significantly different from that observed in Norwegian populations. While within-population genetic diversity was relatively high on Iceland (H(E = 0.35, among-population differentiation was low (F(ST = 0.10 compared to Norwegian and Swedish populations. Population differentiation was positively associated with geographical distance in both Iceland and Scandinavia, but the strength of this relationship varied between regions. Although topography and a larger distribution range may explain the higher differentiation between mountainous Norwegian relative to lowland populations in Sweden, these factors cannot explain the lower differentiation in Icelandic compared to Swedish populations. We propose that low genetic differentiation among Icelandic populations is not caused by differences in connectivity, but is rather due to large historical effective population sizes. Thus, rather than contemporary processes, historical factors such as survival of Icelandic lineages in northern refugia during the last glacial

  13. Contrasting patterns of genetic structuring in natural populations of Arabidopsis lyrata Subsp. petraea across different regions in northern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahati-Anbaran, Mohsen; Lundemo, Sverre; Ansell, Stephen W; Stenøien, Hans K

    2014-01-01

    Level and partitioning of genetic diversity is expected to vary between contrasting habitats, reflecting differences in strength of ecological and evolutionary processes. Therefore, it is necessary to consider processes acting on different time scales when trying to explain diversity patterns in different parts of species' distributions. To explore how historical and contemporary factors jointly may influence patterns of genetic diversity and population differentiation, we compared genetic composition in the perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea from the northernmost parts of its distribution range on Iceland to that previously documented in Scandinavia. Leaf tissue and soil were sampled from ten Icelandic populations of A. lyrata. Seedlings were grown from soil samples, and tissue from above-ground and seed bank individuals were genotyped with 21 microsatellite markers. Seed bank density in Icelandic populations was low but not significantly different from that observed in Norwegian populations. While within-population genetic diversity was relatively high on Iceland (H(E) = 0.35), among-population differentiation was low (F(ST) = 0.10) compared to Norwegian and Swedish populations. Population differentiation was positively associated with geographical distance in both Iceland and Scandinavia, but the strength of this relationship varied between regions. Although topography and a larger distribution range may explain the higher differentiation between mountainous Norwegian relative to lowland populations in Sweden, these factors cannot explain the lower differentiation in Icelandic compared to Swedish populations. We propose that low genetic differentiation among Icelandic populations is not caused by differences in connectivity, but is rather due to large historical effective population sizes. Thus, rather than contemporary processes, historical factors such as survival of Icelandic lineages in northern refugia during the last glacial period may have

  14. Anatomical and molecular characterization of Lactarius aff. omphaliformis, Russula alnijorullensis and Cortinarius tucumanensis ectomycorrhizae on Alnus acuminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Alejandra; Beenken, Ludwig; Pritsch, Karin; Daniele, Graciela; Schloter, Michael; Agerer, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizae (ECM) of Lactarius aff. omphaliformis Romagn., Russula alnijorullensis (Sing.) Sing. and Cortinarius tucumanensis Mos. on Andean alder (Alnus acuminata Kunth) were characterized and identified. The identification of the fungal symbionts was achieved by morpho-anatomical observations of mycorrhizae and by comparison of ITS-RFLP patterns obtained from ECM and fruitbodies. L. aff omphaliformis ECM differed in some morphological details such as ramification and mantle type from ECM of the same species on A. glutinosa. L. aff omphaliformis ECM show an orange to ochre mantle containing latex cells, which stain with sulpho-vanillin, emanating hyphae without clamps. R. alnijorullensis ECM represent a typical Russula-type-ECM, light yellow to pinkish, the outer mantle being composed of triangular latex-filled cells staining with sulpho-vanillin, emanating hyphae without clamps. C. tucumanensis ECM exhibit a white (silvery) to yellowish brown mantle covered with soil particles, emanating hyphae with clamps.

  15. Development of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L on the foliage of Quercus cerris L., Q. Petraea (matt Liebl. and Q. Robur L. in the controlled conditions

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    Milanović Slobodan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of Gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L was monitored in laboratory conditions, on the foliage of the species Quercus cerris L. Quercus petraea (Matt Liebl. and Quercus robur L. The experiment was established in the controlled environmental conditions, at the temperature of 25°C, photoperiod 14:10 (day: night and relative humidity 70%. The objective of the research was to determine the suitability of the study host plant species for gypsy moth development. The study results show that Gypsy moth caterpillars cultivated on Q. petraea foliage had a lower survival, higher number of moultings, longer preadult development and lower fecundity, which makes this species less suitable compared to the other two. Gypsy moth caterpillars cultivated on Q. cerris foliage had the highest survival degree the lowest number of moultings, the shortest preadult development and the highest fecundity, which makes this species the most favourable for gypsy moth development. Q. robur was between the former two species in this respect.

  16. Phosphate status and acid phosphatase activity in soil and ectomycorrhizas in two mature stands of scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. exposed to different levels of anthropogenic pollution

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    Barbara Kieliszewska-Rokicka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The relations between anthropogenic environmental pollution and the level of inorganic phosphorus in soil, enzyme activities of extracellular soil acid phosphatase and the surface acid phosphatase of excised ectomycorrhizas of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. were studied. Soil and root samples were taken from two Scots pine stands in central Poland: a polluted site exposed to long-term pollution from a steelworks and the city of Warsaw and a reference plot (control free from direct impact of pollution. The polluted site was characterised by high concentration of trace elements (Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr and low level of inorganic phosphate in soil. This site had significantly lower enzyme activities of soil acid phosphatase (0.54 µmoles p-nitrophenol released g-1 dry weight h-1 and surface acid phosphatase of pine ectomycorrhizas (3.37 µmoles p-nitrophenol released g-1 fresh weight h-1 than the control site (1.36 µmoles p-nitrophenol released g-1 dry weight h-1 and 12.46 µmoles p-nitrophenol released g-1 fresh weight h-1, respectively. The levels of phosphate, carbon and nitrogen in pine fine roots were also analysed. Low concentrations of P04-P and high N: P ratio in pine fine roots from polluted site were found. The results suggest that soil pollutants may have a negative effect on the extracellular acid phosphatase of soil and Scots pine ectomycorrhizas and on the phosphorus status in fine roots of the plant.

  17. Patterns in root traits of woody species hosting arbuscular and ectomycorrhizas: implications for the evolution of belowground strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, Louise H; Callahan, Hilary S; Midford, Peter E

    2014-08-01

    Root traits vary enormously among plant species but we have little understanding of how this variation affects their functioning. Of central interest is how root traits are related to plant resource acquisition strategies from soil. We examined root traits of 33 woody species from northeastern US forests that form two of the most common types of mutualisms with fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and ectomycorrhizas (EM). We examined root trait distribution with respect to plant phylogeny, quantifying the phylogenetic signal (K statistic) in fine root morphology and architecture, and used phylogenetically independent contrasts (PICs) to test whether taxa forming different mycorrhizal associations had different root traits. We found a pattern of species forming roots with thinner diameters as species diversified across time. Given moderate phylogenetic signals (K = 0.44-0.68), we used PICs to examine traits variation among taxa forming AM or EM, revealing that hosts of AM were associated with lower branching intensity (r PIC = -0.77) and thicker root diameter (r PIC = -0.41). Because EM evolved relatively more recently and intermittently across plant phylogenies, significant differences in root traits and colonization between plants forming AM and EM imply linkages between the evolution of these biotic interactions and root traits and suggest a history of selection pressures, with trade-offs for supporting different types of associations. Finally, across plant hosts of both EM and AM, species with thinner root diameters and longer specific root length (SRL) had less colonization (r PIC = 0.85, -0.87), suggesting constraints on colonization linked to the evolution of root morphology.

  18. A nitrogen fertilization field study of carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 transfers in ectomycorrhizas of Pinus sabiniana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, María Victoria; Six, Johan; Houlton, Benjamin Z; Bledsoe, Caroline S

    2013-12-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi form relationships with higher plants; plants transfer C to fungi, and fungi transfer nutrients to their host. While evidence indicates that this interaction is largely mutualistic, less is known about how nutrient supply and EM associates may alter C and nutrient exchanges, especially in intact plant-soil-microbe systems in the field. In a dual-labeling experiment with N fertilization, we used C and N stable isotopes to examine in situ transfers in EM pine trees in a Pinus sabiniana woodland in northern California. We added (15)NH4SO2 and (13)CO2 to track (13)C transfer from pine needles to EM roots and (15)N transfer from soil to EM roots and pine needles. Transfers of (13)C and (15)N differed with EM morphotype and with N fertilization. The brown morphotype received the least C per unit of N transferred (5:1); in contrast red and gold morphotypes gained more C and transferred less N (17:1 and 25:1, respectively). N fertilization increased N retention by ectomycorrhizas (EMs) but did not increase N transfer from EMs to pine needles. Therefore N fertilization positively affected both nutrient and C gains by EMs, increasing net C flows and N retention in EMs. Our work on intact and native trees/EM associations thereby extends earlier conclusions based on pot studies with young plants and culturable EM fungi; our results support the concept that EM-host relationships depend on species-level differences as well as responses to soil resources such as N.

  19. The allotetraploid Arabidopsis thaliana-Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea as an alternative model system for the study of polyploidy in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Julien; Jean, Martine; Belzile, François

    2009-04-01

    Polyploidy is known to be common in plants and recent work has focused on the rapid changes in genome structure and expression that occur upon polyploidization. In Arabidopsis, much of this work has been done on a synthetic allotetraploid obtained by crossing a tetraploid Arabidopsis thaliana (2n = 4x = 20) with A. arenosa (2n = 4x = 32). To explore an alternative route to polyploidy in this model species, we have developed a synthetic allopolyploid by crossing two diploid species: A. thaliana (2n = 2x = 10) and Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. petraea (2n = 2x = 16). F(1) hybrids were easy to obtain and phenotypically more similar to A. lyrata. Spontaneous chromosome doubling events occurred in about 25% of the F(1)s, thus restoring fertility. The resulting allotetraploids (2n = 26) exhibited many genomic changes typically reported upon polyploidization. Nucleolar dominance was observed as only the A. lyrata rDNA loci were expressed in the F(1) and allotetraploids. Changes in the degree of methylation were observed at almost 25% of the loci examined by MSAP analysis. Finally, structural genomic alterations did occur as a large deletion covering a significant portion of the upper arm of chromosome II was detected but no evidence of increased mobility of transposons was obtained. Such allotetraploids derived from two parents with sequenced (or soon to be sequenced) genomes offer much promise in elucidating the various changes that occur in newly synthesized polyploids.

  20. Humus characteristics and seasonal changes of soil arthropod communities in a natural sessile oak (Quercus petraea L.) stand and adjacent Austrian pine (Pinus nigra Arnold) plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Meric; Makineci, Ender

    2013-11-01

    In order to assess the effects of conversion of natural stands into plantations, soil invertebrate micro- and macroarthropod communities were evaluated for their abundance and richness in a sessile oak (SO; Quercus petraea L.) stand and adjacent Austrian pine (AP; Pinus nigra Arnold) plantation. Sites were sampled four times a year in 3-month intervals from May 2009 to February 2010. Humus characteristics such as total mass; carbon, lignin, and cellulose contents; and C/N ratio were significantly different between SO and AP. Statistically significant differences were detected on soil pH, carbon and nitrogen contents, and electrical conductivity between the two sites. The number of microarthropods was higher in AP than in the SO site. The annual mean abundance values of microarthropods in a square meter were 67,763 in AP and 50,542 in SO, and the annual mean abundance values of macroarthropods were 921 m(-2) in AP and 427 m(-2) in SO. Among the soil microarthropods, Acari and Collembola were the dominant groups. Shannon's diversity index was more affected by evenness than species number despite the species diversity (H') of soil arthropods being generally higher in the SO stand. The abundance of microarthropods showed clear seasonal trends depending upon the humidity of the soil.

  1. Age-related variation in carbon allocation at tree and stand scales in beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) using a chronosequence approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, H; Bréda, N; Dufrêne, E

    2010-02-01

    Two types of physiological mechanisms can contribute to growth decline with age: (i) the mechanisms leading to the reduction of carbon assimilation (input) and (ii) those leading to modification of the resource economy. Surprisingly, the processes relating to carbon allocation have been little investigated as compared to research on the processes governing carbon assimilation. The objective of this paper was thus to test the hypothesis that growth decrease related to age is accompanied by changes in carbon allocation to the benefit of storage and reproductive functions in two contrasting broad-leaved species: beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.). Age-related changes in carbon allocation were studied using a chronosequence approach. Chronosequences, each consisting of several even-aged stands ranging from 14 to 175 years old for beech and from 30 to 134 years old for sessile oak, were divided into five or six age classes. In this study, carbon allocations to growth, storage and reproduction were defined as the relative amount of carbon invested in biomass increment, carbohydrate increment and seed production, respectively. Tree-ring width and allometric relationships were used to assess biomass increment at the tree and stand scales. Below-ground biomass was assessed using a specific allometric relationship between root:shoot ratio and age, established from the literature review. Seasonal variations of carbohydrate concentrations were used to assess carbon allocation to storage. Reproduction effort was quantified for beech stands by collecting seed and cupule production. Age-related flagging of biomass productivity was assessed at the tree and stand scales, and carbohydrate quantities in trees increased with age for both species. Seed and cupule production increased with stand age in beech from 56 gC m(-)(2) year(-1) at 30 years old to 129 gC m(-2) year(-1) at 138 years old. In beech, carbon allocation to storage and

  2. Repeated summer drought and re-watering during the first growing year of oak (Quercus petraea delay autumn senescence and bud burst in the following spring

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    Kristine Vander Mijnsbrugge

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Climate change predicts harsher summer droughts for mid-latitudes in Europe. To enhance our understanding of the putative impacts on forest regeneration, we studied the response of oak seedlings (Quercus petraea to water deficit. Potted seedlings originating from three locally sourced provenances were subjected to two successive drought periods during the first growing season each followed by a plentiful re-watering. Here we describe survival and phenological responses after the second drought treatment, applying general linear mixed modelling. From the 441 drought treated seedlings 189 subsisted with higher chances of survival among smaller plants and among single plants per pot compared to doubles. Remarkably, survival was independent of the provenance, although relatively more plants had died off in two provenances compared to the third one with mean plant height being higher in one provenance and standard deviation of plant height being higher in the other. Timing of leaf senescence was clearly delayed after the severe drought treatment followed by re-watering, with two seedlings per pot showing a lesser retardation compared to single plants. This delay can be interpreted as a compensation time in which plants recover before entering the subsequent developmental process of leaf senescence, although it renders seedlings more vulnerable to early autumn frosts because of the delayed hardening of the shoots. Onset of bud flush in the subsequent spring still showed a significant but small delay in the drought treated group, independent of the number of seedlings per pot, and can be considered as an after effect of the delayed senescence. In both phenological models significant differences among the three provenances were detected independent from the treatment. The only provenance that is believed to be local of origin, displayed the earliest leaf senescence and the latest flushing, suggesting an adaptation to the local maritime climate. This

  3. 太白山自然保护区外生菌根及菌根真菌调查研究%A study on ectomycorrhiza and mycorrhiza fungi in Taibai Mountain Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴重华; 王吉忍; 杨俊秀; 吴国华

    2001-01-01

    报道了太白山自然保护区外生菌根及菌根真菌的调查研究结果。共获得外生菌根真菌28种,隶属6科18属;查明主要菌根树种是巴山冷杉(Abies fargesii Franch)和太白红杉(Larix chinensis Beissn)。主要菌根真菌是红菇(Russuluceae)和牛肝菌(Boletaceae)。并对其生态分布进行了分析,以亚高山(Subalpine belt)南坡2 850~3 300 m、北坡3 000~3 200 m区带最适合于菌根(Mycorrhiza)及菌根真菌子实体(Mycorrhiza fungi fruit bodies)的形成。%An investigation result on Ectomycorrhiza and Ectomycorrhiza fungi in Taibai Mountain Nature Reserve is reported in this paper.28 species of Ectomycorrhiza fungi are found,they belong to 18 genus of 6 subjects;and Abies forgesii Franch and Larix chinensii are found to be the major hosts,and Russulaceae and Boletareae are major mycorrhiza fungi. The Ecologic distribution of Ectomycorrhiza and Mcorrhiza Fungi are also studied,it is most suit to form mycorrhiza and mycorrhiza fungi fruit bodies in the south slope between 2 850~3 300 m and the north slope between 3 000~3 200 m area of subalpine belt.

  4. Time and dose of irrigation impact Tuber melanosporum ectomycorrhiza proliferation and growth of Quercus ilex seedling hosts in young black truffle orchards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, Antoni; Bonet, José Antonio; Oliach, Daniel; Colinas, Carlos

    2014-04-01

    In Mediterranean climate, young truffle-oak orchards are subjected to drought episodes that can compromise the development of Tuber melanosporum. We investigated the responses of T. melanosporum to water supply in three periods: May to July, August to October, and May to October. In each period, five water doses were established: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100% of the reference evapotranspiration (ETo). Five orchards were planted with Quercus ilex inoculated with T. melanosporum, and in each orchard, we arranged a two-factorial design with irrigation period and irrigation dose as main factors to test their combined effects on the development of both T. melanosporum and Q. ilex after 3 years in the field. Irrigation period significantly interacted with irrigation doses for the absolute presence per seedling of T. melanosporum mycorrhizae. Irrigation in May-July increased significantly T. melanosporum colonization in seedlings irrigated with 50% ETo dose compared to the 0% ETo dose. A similar pattern with smaller differences in means was observed in August-October period, but the irrigation doses did not change T. melanosporum colonization when we watered from May to October. We found ectomycorrhizae different from T. melanosporum in 51% of the seedlings studied, but their presence was marginal. Our results suggest that a moderate irrigation dose promotes seedling growth and number of fine root tips per unit of fine root length, which may be potentially colonized by T. melanosporum.

  5. Promoter-dependent expression of the fungal transporter HcPT1.1 under Pi shortage and its spatial localization in ectomycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kevin; Haider, Muhammad Zulqurnain; Delteil, Amandine; Corratgé-Faillie, Claire; Conéjero, Geneviève; Tatry, Marie-Violaine; Becquer, Adeline; Amenc, Laurie; Sentenac, Hervé; Plassard, Claude; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal exchange of nutrients between fungi and host plants involves a specialization and polarization of the fungal plasma membrane adapted for the uptake from the soil and for secretion of nutrient ions towards root cells. In addition to the current progress in identification of membrane transport systems of both symbiotic partners, data concerning the transcriptional and translational regulation of these proteins are needed to elucidate their role for symbiotic functions. To answer whether the formerly described Pi-dependent expression of the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 from Hebeloma cylindrosporum is the result of its promoter activity, we introduced promoter-EGFP fusion constructs in the fungus by Agrotransformation. Indeed, HcPT1.1 expression in pure fungal cultures quantified and visualized by EGFP under control of the HcPT1.1 promoter was dependent on external Pi concentrations, low Pi stimulating the expression. Furthermore, to study expression and localization of the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 in symbiotic conditions, presence of transcripts and proteins was analyzed by the in situ hybridization technique as well as by immunostaining of proteins. In ectomycorrhiza, expression of the phosphate transporter was clearly enhanced by Pi-shortage indicating its role in Pi nutrition in the symbiotic association. Transcripts were detected in external hyphae and in the hyphal mantle, proteins in addition also within the Hartig net. Exploiting the transformable fungus H. cylindrosporum, Pi-dependent expression of the fungal transporter HcPT1.1 as result from its promoter activity as well as transcript and protein localization in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis are shown.

  6. Ectomycorrhizae-induced mitigation mechanisms against the damages of acid rain on plants: A review%外生菌根缓解植物酸雨胁迫的机理研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慰; 陈展; 邓仕槐; 尚鹤

    2012-01-01

    森林作为陆地生态系统的主体,是酸雨污染的主要受体,酸雨对生态系统产生着巨大的影响.菌根是菌根真菌与植物营养根的共生体.外生菌根真菌与宿主植物间互惠互利,在森林生态系统中,外生菌根在维持生态系统的养分平衡和改善树木营养等方面有重要的作用.本文综述了国内外关于菌根和酸雨关系的研究,酸雨能抑制外生菌根的形成,降低其活力;但另一方面,外生菌根能够缓解酸雨造成的植物危害,提高植株对酸雨的耐受力.外生菌根主要通过以下几方面缓解酸雨胁迫:(1)菌根形态结构的物理屏蔽作用;(2)增加养分吸收,增加御酸能力;(3)增强酶活性,提高植物生存能力;(4)产生有机酸或其他物质.%As a main body of terrestrial ecosystem, forest is a major receptor of acid rain pollu tion. Acid rain has severe impact on forest ecosystem. Ectomycorrhizal fungi symbiose with plant roots, and protect their hosts against various aggressions, including that from acid rain. Many of the macrofungi form symbiotic ectomycorrhizae with forest trees, playing an important role in maintaining the nutrient balance of the trees and protecting the trees against pathogens. This paper reviewed the research advances in the relationships between mycorrhizae and acid rain. Acid rain can inhibit and reduce ectomycorrhizal formation and vitality, whereas ectomycorrhizae can alleviate the damage of acid rain to host plants and improve the hosts' tolerance against acid rain. The ectomycorrhizae-induced mitigation mechanisms against the acid rain stress on plants are: 1) physical shielding effect of ectomycorrhizal morphological structure, 2) promoting host plant nutrient uptake and increasing host plant acid-defense capability, 3) improving host plant enzyme activities and host plant viability, and 4) secreting organic acids or other substances.

  7. Comparing the intra-annual wood formation of three European species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea and Pinus sylvestris) as related to leaf phenology and non-structural carbohydrate dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelot, Alice; Simard, Sonia; Rathgeber, Cyrille; Dufrêne, Eric; Damesin, Claire

    2012-08-01

    Monitoring cambial phenology and intra-annual growth dynamics is a useful approach for characterizing the tree growth response to climate change. However, there have been few reports concerning intra-annual wood formation in lowland temperate forests with high time resolution, especially for the comparison between deciduous and coniferous species. The main objective of this study was to determine how the timing, duration and rate of radial growth change between species as related to leaf phenology and the dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) under the same climatic conditions. We studied two deciduous species, Fagus sylvatica L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., and an evergreen conifer, Pinus sylvestris L. During the 2009 growing season, we weekly monitored (i) the stem radial increment using dendrometers, (ii) the xylem growth using microcoring and (iii) the leaf phenology from direct observations of the tree crowns. The NSC content was also measured in the eight last rings of the stem cores in April, June and August 2009. The leaf phenology, NSC storage and intra-annual growth were clearly different between species, highlighting their contrasting carbon allocation. Beech growth began just after budburst, with a maximal growth rate when the leaves were mature and variations in the NSC content were low. Thus, beech radial growth seemed highly dependent on leaf photosynthesis. For oak, earlywood quickly developed before budburst, which probably led to the starch decrease quantified in the stem from April to June. For pine, growth began before the needles unfolding and the lack of NSC decrease during the growing season suggested that the substrates for radial growth were new assimilates of the needles from the previous year. Only for oak, the pattern determined from the intra-annual growth measured using microcoring differed from the pattern determined from dendrometer data. For all species, the ring width was significantly influenced by growth duration

  8. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in an interspecific F1 poplar cross and differential expression of genes in ectomycorrhizas of the two parents: Populus deltoides and Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Jorge, Veronique [INRA, Nancy, France; Vion, Patrice [INRA, Nancy, France; Marcais, Benoit [INRA, Nancy, France; Bastien, Catherine [INRA, Orleans, France; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France

    2011-01-01

    A Populus deltoides Populus trichocarpa F1 pedigree was analyzed for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting ectomycorrhizal development and for microarray characterization of gene networks involved in this symbiosis. A 300 genotype progeny set was evaluated for its ability to form ectomycorrhiza with the basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor. The percentage of mycorrhizal root tips was determined on the root systems of all 300 progeny and their two parents. QTL analysis identified four significant QTLs, one on the P. deltoides and three on the P. trichocarpa genetic maps. These QTLs were aligned to the P. trichocarpa genome and each contained several megabases and encompass numerous genes. NimbleGen whole-genome microarray, using cDNA from RNA extracts of ectomycorrhizal root tips from the parental genotypes P. trichocarpa and P. deltoides, was used to narrow the candidate gene list. Among the 1,543 differentially expressed genes (p value 0.05; 5.0-fold change in transcript level) having different transcript levels in mycorrhiza of the two parents, 41 transcripts were located in the QTL intervals: 20 in Myc_d1, 14 in Myc_t1, and seven in Myc_t2, while no significant differences among transcripts were found in Myc_t3. Among these 41 transcripts, 25 were overrepresented in P. deltoides relative to P. trichocarpa; 16 were overrepresented in P. trichocarpa. The transcript showing the highest overrepresentation in P. trichocarpa mycorrhiza libraries compared to P. deltoides mycorrhiza codes for an ethylene-sensitive EREBP-4 protein which may repress defense mechanisms in P. trichocarpa while the highest overrepresented transcripts in P. deltoides code for proteins/genes typically associated with pathogen resistance.

  9. In vitro ectomycorrhiza formation by monokaryotic and dikaryotic isolates of Pisolithus microcarpus in Eucalyptus grandis Formação de ectomicorrizas in vitro por isolados monocarióticos e dicarióticos de Pisolithus microcarpus em Eucalyptus grandis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Dutra Costa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of ectomycorrhizas by monokaryotic and dikaryotic isolates of Pisolithus microcarpus (Cooke & Massee G. Cunn. in Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maid. was studied by in vitro synthesis in Petri dishes. The formation of ectomycorrhizas was observed for all strains tested. Ectomycorrhizas formed by the monokaryotic strains presented a sheath of hyphae around the roots and a Hartig net limited to the epidermis layer, typical of the angiosperm ectomycorrhizas. Colonization rates, a measure of the number of ectomycorrhizas in relation to the total number of lateral root tips, varied from 23 to 62%. Some monokaryotic strains stimulated the formation of lateral roots, promoting increases of up to 109% above the control. The presence of some of the isolates in the in vitro synthesis medium stimulated the production of thicker lateral root tips. The dimensions of the lateral roots tips and ectomycorrhizas varied from one isolate to the next, indicating a variation in their capacity to provoke morphological changes in the host plant roots. The dikaryotic strain M5M11 presented higher values for lateral root yield, number of ectomycorrhizas, and colonization percentage than the corresponding monokaryotic strains, M5 and M11. This indicated the possibility of selecting compatible performing monokaryotic isolates for the yield of superior dikaryotic strains. The set of monokaryotic strains tested varied greatly in their ability to colonize E. grandis roots and cause secondary metabolism-related morphological changes in roots, providing a wealth of model systems for the study of genetic, physiological, and morphogenetic processes involved in Pisolithus-Eucalyptus ectomycorrhiza formation.A formação de ectomicorrizas por isolados monocarióticos e dicarióticos de Pisolithus microcarpus (Cooke & Massee G. Cunn. em Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maid. foi estudada usando-se o método de síntese in vitro em placas de Petri. A formação de

  10. Molecular and morphological diversity of pezizalean ectomycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedersoo, Leho; Hansen, Karen; Perry, Brian A

    2006-01-01

    , particularly thick cell walls and stout hyphae. This study demonstrates that Pezizales species constitute a considerable proportion of the mycobionts in EcM fungal communities in mature boreal deciduous and coniferous forests, in several soil types. Fruit-body sequences and EcM descriptions will facilitate...

  11. Mycorrhization helper bacteria: a case of specificity for altering ectomycorrhiza architecture but not ectomycorrhiza formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspray, Thomas J; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Jones, Julie E; Whipps, John M; Garbaye, Jean; Bending, Gary D

    2006-11-01

    Mycorrhization helper bacteria (MHB), isolated from phylogenetically distinct ectomycorrhizal symbioses involving Lactarius rufus, Laccaria bicolor or Suillus luteus, were tested for fungus specificity to enhance L. rufus-Pinus sylvestris or L. bicolor-P. sylvestris mycorrhiza formation. As MHB isolated from the L. rufus and S. luteus mycorrhiza were originally characterised using a microcosm system, we assessed their ability to enhance mycorrhiza formation in a glasshouse system in order to determine the extent to which MHB are system-specific. Paenibacillus sp. EJP73, an MHB for L. rufus in the microcosm, significantly enhanced L. bicolor mycorrhiza formation in the glasshouse, demonstrating that the MHB effect of this bacterium is neither fungus-specific nor limited to the original experimental system. Although the five MHB strains studied were unable to significantly enhance L. rufus mycorrhiza formation, two of them did have a significant effect on dichotomous short root branching by L. rufus. The effect was specific to Paenibacillus sp. EJP73 and Burkholderia sp. EJP67, the two strains isolated from L. rufus mycorrhiza, and was not associated with auxin production. Altered mycorrhiza architecture rather than absolute number of mycorrhizal roots may be an important previously overlooked parameter for defining MHB effects.

  12. Acúmulo de ácido oxálico e cristais de cálcio em ectomicorrizas de eucalipto.: II- formação de cristais de oxalato de cálcio induzida por fungos ectomicorrízicos em raízes laterais finas Accumulation of oxalic acid and calcium crystals in ectomycorrhizas of eucalypt.: II- calcium oxalate crystal formation induced by ectomicorrhizal fungi in fine lateral roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon Alexander Zambrano Gonzalez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O eucalipto é eficiente na aquisição de Ca do solo, mas pouco se sabe sobre a participação das ectomicorrizas e dos ácidos orgânicos nesse processo em campo. O acúmulo de cristais de Ca (CaOx foi avaliado em, aproximadamente, 2.100 raízes laterais finas e ectomicorrizas do híbrido de Eucalyptus grandis x Eucalyptus urophylla, cultivado por 2,5 anos em área com topografia típica em meia laranja, com vertente côncavo-convexa, na região de Viçosa, MG. Técnicas de microscopia óptica e microscopia eletrônica de varredura foram usadas para a visualização dos CaOx. Em 73,7 % das raízes, ocorreu abundante acúmulo de drusas e grânulos de CaOx nas células do córtex. A presença conspícua de CaOx foi observada em 56,2 % das ectomicorrizas e em 17,5 % das raízes laterais finas não colonizadas, evidenciando o papel das micorrizas no acúmulo de Ca em eucalipto. A forma predominante dos CaOx foram as drusas nas ectomicorrizas e os grânulos cristalinos nas raízes. Os dez morfotipos de ectomicorrizas observados na área diferiram quanto à presença e à morfologia dos CaOx, o que pode representar distintas capacidades dos fungos ectomicorrízicos em fornecer Ca para a planta hospedeira. A análise da superfície do manto das ectomicorrizas por microscopia eletrônica de varredura não evidenciou a presença de CaOx nessa estrutura, confirmando que, nas condições avaliadas, o acúmulo de cristais limita-se ao córtex radicular. Este é o primeiro relato da ocorrência de CaOx em ectomicorrizas de eucalipto no Brasil, com dados que comprovam que há mecanismos de armazenamento de Ca nas ectomicorrizas em áreas com baixa disponibilidade do elemento.Eucalypt is efficient at taking up Ca from the soil, however little is known about the contribution of ectomycorrhizas and organic acids to this process under field conditions. The accumulation of calcium oxalate crystals (CaOx was evaluated in, approximately, 2,100 fine lateral roots

  13. Caracterización morfológica y genética de las ectomicorrizas formadas entre Pinus montezumae y los hongos presentes en los bancos de esporas en la Faja Volcánica Transmexicana Morphologic and genetic characterization of ectomycorrhizae formed by Pinus montezumae and spore bank fungi in the Transmexican Volcanic Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Garibay-Orijel

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Los hongos ectomicorrízicos son indispensables para el establecimiento y funcionamiento de los bosques templados. Algunos de ellos tienen esporas u otros propágulos resistentes y longevos; éstos se acumulan en el suelo forestal formando bancos de propágulos que constituyen la fuente de inóculo más importante después de disturbios severos. En este trabajo caracterizamos morfológica y genéticamente las ectomicorrizas formadas entre Pinus montezumae y los hongos presentes en los bancos de esporas de la Faja Volcánica Transmexicana. Las micorrizas se obtuvieron por medio de un bioensayo del suelo de 8 de los volcanes más representativos, con plántulas de P. montezumae cultivadas durante 7 meses. La identidad taxonómica de los hongos se obtuvo por la similitud genética de la región de los ITS. Se presentan las descripciones de 27 ectomicorrizas; de éstas, 20 no habían sido publicadas previamente. Geopora sp., Hebeloma helodes, H. leucosarx, Peziza sp. 1, P. aff. ostracoderma, Pezizaceae sp. 1, sp. 2, sp. 4, Pulvinula constellatio, Sebacina sp. 1, sp. 2, Sordariales sp. 1, sp. 2 y Tuber separans, no se habían encontrado en bancos de propágulos. Estas especies podrían usarse para reforestar con plantas y hongos endémicos, lo que aumentaría la sobrevivencia, pues ambos simbiontes estarían adaptados a las condiciones ambientales locales.Ectomycorrhizal fungi are keystone in temperate forest establishment and functioning. Some of them have resistant and long living spores and propagules. These use to accumulate in soil, forming the so-called spore banks, which are the main inoculum resource after an intense disturbance. In this paper, we provide the morphological and genetic characterization of ectomycorrhizae formed by Pinus montezumae and the spore bank fungi from the Transmexican Volcanic Belt. We made a bioassay with P. montezumae and soil from 9 of the most representative volcanoes. Mycorrhizae were dissected after 7 months of

  14. Variation among matsutake ectomycorrhizae in four clones of Pinus sylvestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaario, Lu-Min; Lu, Jinrong; Koistinen, Arto; Tervahauta, Arja; Aronen, Tuija

    2015-04-01

    Tricholoma matsutake is an ectomycorrhizal fungus that forms commercially important mushrooms in coniferous forests. In this study, we explored the ability of T. matsutake to form mycorrhizae with Pinus sylvestris by inoculating emblings produced through somatic embryogenesis (SE) in an aseptic culture system. Two months after inoculation, clones with less phenolic compounds in the tissue culture phase formed mycorrhizae with T. matsutake, while clones containing more phenols did not. Effects of inoculation on embling growth varied among clones; two of the four tested showed a significant increase in biomass and two had a significant increase in root density. In addition, results suggest that clones forming well-developed mycorrhizae absorbed more Al, Fe, Na, P, and Zn after 8 weeks of inoculation. This study illustrates the value of SE materials in experimental work concerning T. matsutake as well as the role played by phenolic compounds in host plant response to infection by mycorrhizal fungi.

  15. Adaptive and plastic responses of Quercus petraea populations to climate across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sáenz-Romero, Cuauhtémoc; Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Ducousso, Alexis

    2017-01-01

    of differential population responses to climate (genetic differentiation due to past divergent climatic selection vs. plastic responses to ongoing climate change) and (ii) to explore which climatic variables (temperature or precipitation) trigger the population responses. Tree growth and survival were modeled...... for contemporary climate and then projected using data from four regional climate models for years 2071–2100, using two greenhouse gas concentration trajectory scenarios each. Overall, results indicated a moderate response of tree height and survival to climate variation, with changes in dryness (either annual.......5) predicted minor decreases in height and survival, while the most extreme model (CCLM4-GEM2-ES; rcp8.5) predicted large decreases in survival and growth for southern and southeastern edge populations (Hungary and Turkey). Other nonmarginal populations with continental climates were predicted to be severely...

  16. Types of ectomycorrhiza as pollution stress indicators: case studies in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraigher, Hojka; Al Sayegh Petkovsek, Samar; Grebenc, Tine; Simoncic, Primoz

    2007-05-01

    Mycorrhiza is the main spatial and temporal linkage between different constituents in a forest ecosystem. The functional compatibility and stress tolerance of ectomycorrhizal types is species specific, and therefore the information on the ectomycorrhizal community structure can add to the understanding of processes in forest ecosystems and can also be applied as tools for bioindication of pollution stress in forest soils. We have studied the effects of pollution (N and S) on trees and forest soils by: (1) quantification of ECM types diversity as in situ indicators in forest stands, (2) determination and quantification of pollution-sensitive or -insensitive ECM types as passive monitors, (3) root growth and development of ECM on nonmycorrhizal spruce seedlings, planted at the studied sites (active monitors), and (4) ECM infection (a bioassay based on mycorrhizal inoculum potential) of seedlings in an experimental set-up as ex situ testers. ECM species richness for Norway spruce trees (Picea abies) showed higher values in unpolluted sites than in polluted ones, while the differences were not significant for European beech trees (Fagus sylvatica). As pollution-sensitive or -insensitive ECM species in spruce forests, we suggest Hydnum rufescens (sensitive) and Paxillus involutus (unsensitive). Mycorrhizal potential in Norway spruce seedlings as a bioassay for soil N and S pollution was effective, and is suggested as an additional, standardized and widely comparable system in bioindication of soil pollution.

  17. Persistence of ectomycorrhizas by Thelephora terrestris on outplanted Scots pine seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Hilszczańska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thelephora terrestris (Erhr. Fr. is a very common ectomycorrhizal symbiont (ECM in conifer trees, however the role of this ubiquitous fungus in nurseries and Scots pine plantations is still unknown. It is described as tolerant of high nitrogen availability and therefore was taken into consideration as an important ECM partner of seedlings, particularly after replanting on post agricultural land. In laboratory the seedlings of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. were inoculated with T. terrestris (Tt/IBL/2 or not inoculated (control and grown in containers in two different regimes of nitrogen fertilization (4g N x kg-1 and 6 g N x kg-1. Next year these seedlings were outplanted in post agricultural land and 6 months later, the number and identity of some mycorrhizas were studied. It was found, that mycorrhizal abundance was higher in the inoculated treatments than in non-inoculated ones. PCR RFLP analysis confirmed share of two different isolates of Thelephora engaged in mycorrhizal symbiosis. Part of mycorrhizas had the same pattern of RFLP as the isolate used to inoculation. Similar results were obtained in second year of experimental study in the field what confirmed the persistence of artificially introduced T. terrestris in post agricultural soil as an important component of the ECM community.

  18. Hartig' net formation of Tricholoma vaccinum-spruce ectomycorrhiza in hydroponic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Catarina; Jung, Elke-Martina; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    For re-forestation of metal-contaminated land, ectomycorrhizal trees may provide a solution. Hence, the study of the interaction is necessary to allow for comprehensive understanding of the mutually symbiotic features. On a structural level, hyphal mantle and the Hartig' net formed in the root apoplast are essential for plant protection and mycorrhizal functioning. As a model, we used the basidiomycete Tricholoma vaccinum and its host spruce (Picea abies). Using an optimized hydroponic cultivation system, both features could be visualized and lower stress response of the tree was obtained in non-challenged cultivation. Larger spaces in the apoplasts could be shown with high statistical significance. The easy accessibility will allow to address metal stress or molecular responses in both partners. Additionally, the proposed cultivation system will enable for other experimental applications like addressing flooding, biological interactions with helper bacteria, chemical signaling, or other biotic or abiotic challenges relevant in the natural habitat.

  19. Segregation of nitrogen use between ammonium and nitrate of ectomycorrhizas and beech trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leberecht, Martin; Dannenmann, Michael; Tejedor, Javier; Simon, Judy; Rennenberg, Heinz; Polle, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Here, we characterized nitrogen (N) uptake of beech (Fagus sylvatica) and their associated ectomycorrhizal (EM) communities from NH4(+) and NO3(-) . We hypothesized that a proportional fraction of ectomycorrhizal N uptake is transferred to the host, thereby resulting in the same uptake patterns of plants and their associated mycorrhizal communities. (15) N uptake was studied under various field conditions after short-term and long-term exposure to a pulse of equimolar NH4(+) and NO3(-) concentrations, where one compound was replaced by (15) N. In native EM assemblages, long-term and short-term (15) N uptake from NH4(+) was higher than that from NO3(-) , regardless of season, water availability and site exposure, whereas in beech long-term (15) N uptake from NO3(-) was higher than that from NH4(+) . The transfer rates from the EM to beech were lower for (15) N from NH4(+) than from NO3(-) . (15) N content in EM was correlated with (15) N uptake of the host for (15) NH4(+) , but not for (15) NO3(-) -derived N. These findings suggest stronger control of the EM assemblage on N provision to the host from NH4(+) than from NO3(-) . Different host and EM accumulation patterns for inorganic N will result in complementary resource use, which might be advantageous in forest ecosystems with limited N availability.

  20. ASSESSING ABUNDANCE DISTRIBUTIONS IN NATURAL COMMUNITIES OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAS ALONG AN ENVIRONMENTAL GRADIENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha diversity indices often fail to distinguish between natural populations that a more detailed investigation of the distribution of ramets among types would show are quite different. We studied the effectiveness of applying SHE analyses to morphotype classifications of ectom...

  1. Bio-Mobilization of Potassium from Clay Minerals: I. By Ectomycorrhizas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A pot experiment was carried out to investigate effect of ectomycorrhizal fungi on eucalyptus growth and K bio-mobilization from soils and clay minerals. In the experiment, sands mixed with soil, KCl-saturated vermiculate and mica, respectively, were used to nurse eucalyptus seedlings which were nonectomycorrhized or ectomycorrhized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius strain XC1 (Pt XC1) isolated from a forest soil from Xichang, Sichuan Province, China, and a worldwide well-known ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius strain 2 144 (Pt 2 144) obtained in Australia. More depletion of HCl-soluble K by mycorrhizas from the soil and minerals than nonmycorrhizas suggested that mycorrhizas had a great ability to mobilize K present in the interlayer and feldspar. Mycorrhizal seedlings depressed greatly K digested with HF-HClO4 from substrates after consecutive extractions of soils and minerals by water, ammonium acetate and boiling HCl, while nonmycorrhizal seedlings reduced it little if any, showing that the mycorrhizal seedlings could mobilize and then utilize the structural K in mineral lattice. Ectomycorrhizal fungi played a very important role not only in promoting the growth of eucalyptus seedlings but also in mobilizing K in soils and minerals. The infection of Pt XC1 led to a better growth of eucalyptus seedlings and more K accumulation in the seedlings than that of Pt 2 144. The large differences in K accumulation by the seedlings might be due to different abilities of the two ectomycorrhizal fungi to mobilize K in interlayer and lattice pools in the clay minerals.

  2. Ectomycorrhizae of Tuber huidongense and T. liyuanum with Castanea mollissima and Pinus armandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shan-Ping; Yu, Fu-Qiang; Tang, Li; Wang, Ran; Wang, Yun; Liu, Pei-Gui; Wang, Xiang-Hua; Zheng, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Tuber huidongense and T. liyuanum are common commercial white truffles in China that belong to the Rufum and Puberulum groups of the genus Tuber, respectively. Their mycorrhizae were successfully synthesized with two native trees--Castanea mollissima and Pinus armandii--under greenhouse conditions. The identities of the mycorrhizae were confirmed through internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analyses, and their morphological characteristics were described. All of the obtained mycorrhizae have an interlocking pseudoparenchymatous mantle, which is a typical feature of truffle mycorrhizae. The mycorrhizae of T. huidongense on the two trees have hyaline branched emanating hyphae, similar to the documented mycorrhizae of the Rufum group. The unramified, spiky, and hyaline cystidia on the mycorrhizae of T. liyuanum with both C. mollissima and P. armandii further confirmed that this characteristic is constant for the mycorrhizae of the Puberulum group. The successful mycorrhizal syntheses on the two nut-producing trees will be of economic importance in the cultivation of the two truffles.

  3. Evolution of ectomycorrhizas as a driver of diversification and biogeographic patterns in the model mycorrhizal mushroom genus Laccaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew W; Hosaka, Kentaro; Mueller, Gregory M

    2017-03-01

    A systematic and evolutionary ecology study of the model ectomycorrhizal (ECM) genus Laccaria was performed using herbarium material and field collections from over 30 countries covering its known geographic range. A four-gene (nrITS, 28S, RPB2, EF1α) nucleotide sequence dataset consisting of 232 Laccaria specimens was analyzed phylogenetically. The resulting Global Laccaria dataset was used for molecular dating and estimating diversification rates in the genus. Stable isotope analysis of carbon and nitrogen was used to evaluate the origin of Laccaria's ECM ecology. In all, 116 Laccaria molecular species were identified, resulting in a near 50% increase in its known diversity, including the new species described herein: Laccaria ambigua. Molecular dating indicates that the most recent common ancestor to Laccaria existed in the early Paleocene (56-66 million yr ago), probably in Australasia. At this time, Laccaria split into two lineages: one represented by the new species L. ambigua, and the other reflecting a large shift in diversification that resulted in the remainder of Laccaria. L. ambigua shows a different isotopic profile than all other Laccaria species. Isotopes and diversification results suggest that the evolution of the ECM ecology was a key innovation in the evolution of Laccaria. Diversification shifts associated with Laccaria's dispersal to the northern hemisphere are attributed to adaptations to new ecological niches. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Aluminum-Tolerant Pisolithus Ectomycorrhizas Confer Increased Growth, Mineral Nutrition, and Metal Tolerance to Eucalyptus in Acidic Mine Spoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Egerton-Warburton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM may increase the tolerance of their host plants to Al toxicity by immobilizing Al in fungal tissues and/or improving plant mineral nutrition. Although these benefits have been demonstrated in in vitro (pure culture or short-term nutrient solution (hydroponic experiments, fewer studies have examined these benefits in the field. This study examined the growth, mineral nutrition, and Al levels in two Eucalyptus species inoculated with three Pisolithus ecotypes that varied in Al tolerance (in vitro and grown in mine spoil in the greenhouse and field. All three ecotypes of Pisolithus improved Eucalyptus growth and increased host plant tolerance to Al in comparison to noninoculated plants. However, large variations in plant growth and mineral nutrition were detected among the Pisolithus-inoculated plants; these differences were largely explained by the functional properties of the Pisolithus inoculum. Seedlings inoculated with the most Al-tolerant Pisolithus inoculum showed significantly higher levels of N, P, Ca, Mg, and K and lower levels of Al than seedlings inoculated with Al-sensitive ecotypes of Pisolithus. These findings indicate an agreement between the fungal tolerance to Al in vitro and performance in symbiosis, indicating that both ECM-mediated mineral nutrient acquisition and Al accumulation are important in increasing the host plant Al tolerance.

  5. Mitigation of antagonistic effects on plant growth due to root co-colonization by dark septate endophytes and ectomycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N

    2013-12-01

    Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are very common root colonizers of woody plant species. Ascomycetes of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) are the main representatives of DSE fungi in forest ecosystems. PAC and mycorrhizal fungi share the same habitat, but interactions among PAC, mycorrhizal fungi and plants are poorly understood. We compared the effects of single and dual inoculation of Norway spruce seedlings with PAC and the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungus Hebeloma crustuliniforme on host growth, degree of mycorrhization and density of endophytic PAC biomass. Single colonization by H. crustuliniforme or PAC significantly reduced plant biomass. Dual colonization reduced or neutralized plant growth depression caused by single fungal colonization. The degree of mycorrhization was independent on PAC colonization, and mycorrhization significantly reduced endophytic PAC biomass. Plant biomass of dually colonized plants positively correlated with PAC biomass. These results demonstrate the ability of dual inoculation of PAC and H. crustuliniforme to neutralize plant growth depression caused by single fungal inoculation. Our explanations of enhanced plant growth in dually inoculated plants are the inhibition of PAC during root colonization by the ECM mantle and ECM-mediated access to plant growth-promoting nutrients resulting from the mineralization of the potting medium by PAC.

  6. Upgrading Root Physiology for Stress Tolerance by Ectomycorrhizas: Insights from Metabolite and Transcriptional Profiling into Reprogramming for Stress Anticipation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhi-Bin Luo; Dennis Janz; Xiangning Jiang; Cornelia Göbel; Henning Wildhagen; Yupeng Tan; Heinz Rennenberg; Ivo Feussner; Andrea Polle

    2009-01-01

    .... To elucidate the basis of EM-induced physiological changes and their involvement in stress adaptation, we investigated metabolic and transcriptional profiles in EM and non-EM roots of gray poplar (Populus × canescens...

  7. Hydrophobins in ectomycorrhizas: heterologous transcription of the Pisolithus HydPt-1 gene in yeast and Hebeloma cylindrosporum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Tagu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophobins are fungal cell wall proteins involved in aggregation of hyphae. Upon the development of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between tree roots and fungal hyphae, the transcripts of hydrophobin genes markedly accumulated. As the precise role of these proteins in symbiosis is not yet known, we develop heterologous expression system of the Pisolithus hydrophobin HYDPt-1. This gene has been introduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Hebeloma cylindrosporum. Introns were required for hydPt-1 transcript accumulation in the basidiomycete H. cylindrosporum. Heterologous transcript accumulation did not alter the phenotype of either species. The lack of altered phenotype resulted from the absence of HYDPt-1 polypeptide accumulation in transformed strains.

  8. Involvement of reactive oxygen species during early stages of ectomycorrhiza establishment between Castanea sativa and Pisolithus tinctorius

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Paula; Martins, Anabela; Pais, M.S.; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Lino-Neto, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Evidence for the participation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant systems in ectomycorrhizal(ECM) establishment is lacking. In this paper, we evaluated ROS production and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) during the early contact of the ECM fungus Pisolithus tinctorius with the roots of Castanea sativa (chestnut tree). Roots were placed in contact with P. tinctorius mycelia, and ROS production was evaluated by determining the level...

  9. Transfer of (13) C between paired Douglas-fir seedlings reveals plant kinship effects and uptake of exudates by ectomycorrhizas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, Brian J; Wilhelm, Roland; Asay, Amanda K; Hahn, Aria S; Simard, Suzanne W; Mohn, William W

    2017-04-01

    Processes governing the fixation, partitioning, and mineralization of carbon in soils are under increasing scrutiny as we develop a more comprehensive understanding of global carbon cycling. Here we examined fixation by Douglas-fir seedlings and transfer to associated ectomycorrhizal fungi, soil microbes, and full-sibling or nonsibling neighbouring seedlings. Stable isotope probing with 99% (13) C-CO2 was applied to trace (13) C-labelled photosynthate throughout plants, fungi, and soil microbes in an experiment designed to assess the effect of relatedness on (13) C transfer between plant pairs. The fixation and transfer of the (13) C label to plant, fungal, and soil microbial tissue was examined in biomass and phospholipid fatty acids. After a 6 d chase period, c. 26.8% of the (13) C remaining in the system was translocated below ground. Enrichment was proportionally greatest in ectomycorrhizal biomass. The presence of mesh barriers (0.5 or 35 μm) between seedlings did not restrict (13) C transfer. Fungi were the primary recipients of (13) C-labelled photosynthate throughout the system, representing 60-70% of total (13) C-enriched phospholipids. Full-sibling pairs exhibited significantly greater (13) C transfer to recipient roots in two of four Douglas-fir families, representing three- and fourfold increases (+ c. 4 μg excess (13) C) compared with nonsibling pairs. The existence of a root/mycorrhizal exudation-hyphal uptake pathway was supported.

  10. Effects of Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L. and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Mattusch. Liebl. on the forest soil chemical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miltner Stanislav

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L. is one of the most important introduced tree species in the Czech Republic, occupying about 6,000 ha with ca. 900,000 m3 of the standing volume. The presented study aims to evaluate its soil forming effects on natural oak sites. Soil chemistry of the upper soil layers (F+H, Ah, B horizons was studied in three pairs of stands of both species. In each stand, four bulk samples were taken separately for particular horizons, each consisting of 5 soil-borer cores. The soil characteristics analysed were: pH (active and potential, soil adsorption complex characteristics (content of bases, exchangeable cation capacity, base saturation, exchangeable acidity (exchangeable Al and H, total carbon and nitrogen content, and plant available nutrients content (P, K, Ca, Mg. Total macronutrient content (P, K, Ca, Mg was analysed only in holorganic horizons. Results confirmed acidification effects of red oak on the upper forest soil layers such as decreased pH, base content, base saturation, all nutrient contents in total as well as plant-available form and increased soil exchangeable acidity (exchangeable Al in comparison to the sessile oak stands, especially in holorganic horizons and in the uppermost mineral layer (Ah horizon. Northern red oak can be considered as a slightly site-soil degrading species in the studied sites and environmental conditions in comparison to native oak species.

  11. Tree Species Richness and Stand Productivity in Low-Density Cluster Plantings with Oaks (Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Mattuschka Liebl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kuehne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Low density plantings complemented by natural regeneration is an increasingly common reforestation technique to ensure growth of a sufficient number of trees from desired species while maintaining natural processes such as succession. One such form of low density planting that aims at lowering establishment costs—oak clusters—has been developed as an alternative to row planting since the 1980s in central Europe. However, whether cluster planting provides higher species richness and productivity than high density row planting has not previously been analyzed. Here, we compare tree species richness and productivity (measured as stand basal area between oak cluster plantings and conventional row planting in young (10–26 years old forest stands at seven study sites in Germany. Tree species richness was significantly higher in cluster plantings than in row plantings, whereas total basal areas were comparable. Naturally regenerated trees contributed on average to 43% of total stand basal area in cluster plantings, which was significantly higher than in row plantings. Total stand basal area in cluster planting was significantly related to the density of naturally regenerated trees. In turn, tree species diversity, density and basal area of naturally regenerated trees were increased with the size of unplanted area between clusters. Our results demonstrate that the admixture of naturally regenerated, early and mid-successional tree species compensates for a possible loss in productivity from planting fewer oaks. Low density cluster plantings can offer significant environmental benefits, at least for the first few decades of stand development, without compromising productivity.

  12. Effects of fertilization on the vascular ground vegetation of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Lieb.) stands

    OpenAIRE

    Misson, Laurent; Gaëtan Du Bus De Warnaffe,; Jonard, Mathieu

    2001-01-01

    International audience; The objective of this study was to assess the effects of base cation (Ca, Mg, K) and phosphorous (P) fertilization on the vascular ground vegetation in mature European beech and sessile oak stands located on acid brown soils. Two types of treatment were applied next to control plots (dolomite lime, dolomite lime + natural phosphate + potassium sulphate). Specific richness, total cover (% ), equitability coefficient as well as the Ecological Group of the ground vegetati...

  13. Quantitative trait loci analysis of mineral element concentrations in an Arabidopsis halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata petraea F2 progeny grown on cadmium-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Glenda; Frérot, Hélène; Gennen, Jérôme; Salis, Pietro; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2010-07-01

    This study describes the quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), iron (Fe), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg) and calcium (Ca) accumulation in the pseudometallophyte Arabidopsis halleri under conditions of Cd excess using an interspecific A. halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata F(2) population. *Our data provide evidence for the implication of one major QTL in Cd hyperaccumulation in A. halleri, and suggests that Cd tolerance and accumulation are not independent in A. halleri. Moreover, the major loci responsible for Zn hyperaccumulation in the absence of Cd appear to be the same when Cd is present at high concentrations. *More than twofold higher Fe concentrations were measured in A. halleri shoots than in A. lyrata, suggesting a different regulation of Fe accumulation in the hyperaccumulator. *With the exception of Ca, the accumulation of Cd was significantly correlated with the accumulation of all elements measured in the F(2) progeny, suggesting pleiotropic gene action. However, QTL analysis identified pleiotropic QTLs only for Cd, Zn and Fe. Mg accumulation was negatively correlated with Cd accumulation, as well as with dry shoot biomass, suggesting that it might indicate cellular damage.

  14. LIFETIME AND TEMPORAL OCCURRENCE OF ECTOMYCORRHIZAE ON PONDEROSA PINE (PINUS PONDEROSA LAWS.) SEEDLINGS GROWN UNDER VARIED ATMOSPHERIC CO-2 AND NITROGEN LEVELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change(elevated atmospheric CO-2,and altered air temperatures,precipitation amounts and seasonal patterns)may affect ecosystem processes by altering carbon allocation in plants,and carbon flux from plants to soil.Mycorrhizal fungi,as carbon sinks, are among the first soil...

  15. Small-scale soil water repellency in pine rizhosphere associated with ectomycorrhiza is affected by nutrient patchiness: a soil microcosms study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Elena; Hallett, Paul; Johnson, David; Moore, Lucy; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Jiménez-Pinilla, Patricia; Arcenegui, Victoria

    2014-05-01

    Soil water repellency (SWR) or hydrophobicity has been commonly related to organic compounds released from the roots or decomposition of different plant species (Doerr et al., 2000). In addition, fungi and microorganisms that are associated with specific plants, could also influence SWR through the production of exudates or cellular material that form hydrophobic coatings on soil surfaces (Feeney et al., 2004; Hallett and Young, 1999) or act as surfactants. Nutrient availability, microbial biomass, organic matter and specific exudates have all been associated with the development of SWR. In terms of plant productivity, these impacts can be significant as their interaction with pore structure changes at the root-soil interface regulates both water transport and storage (Sperry et al., 1998). In boreal forests, basidiomycetous fungi are known to have a large impact on the development of SWR. These fungi are important degraders of organic material and symbionts forming ectomycorrhizal fungi (EF) associations with trees. Although many researchers have suggested a strong positive impact of EF on the ability of plants to capture water from soils, their impact on SWR at the root-soil interface and spatially within soil with a patchy nutrient distribution has not yet been investigated. This study used microcosms with mycelia systems of the EF extending from Pinus sylvestris host plants. Each microcosm was incubated during 15 days and contained plastic cup with 33P under the roots. The transfer of P from the mycelium to the host plant was monitored using a radioactive tracers and a non-destructive electronic autoradiography system in another study (data not published). SWR was measured using different approaches; as repellency index, R using a microinfiltrometer with a contact radius of 0.1 mm (modified from Hallet et al., 2002) and with the water drop penetration time test (WDPT). Sorptivity and SWR were measured between 40-50 points/microcosms. Results obtained with both approaches were correlated (Spearmans' rho correlation coefficient = 0.698*). Most of the points measured along the microcosms showed hydrophobicity. Preliminary results indicate that the presence/absence in each point of visual roots along the microcosms was not related with a higher hydrophobicity (P>0.05). However, the distance from each point to the cups of 33P was significant (P

  16. Importance of Ectomycorrhiza fungi to make nutrients available and reduce nitrogen losses in forests. Final report; Ektomykorrhizasvarnpars betydelse foer att frigoera naering och motverka kvaevefoerluster i skogar. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallander, Haakan [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology

    2004-09-01

    All our forest trees live in symbiosis with ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi and these fungi are important for the nutrient uptake of the trees. The mycelia grow out from root tips and colonize the soil, which increase the nutrient-absorbing surface. Our results suggest that the composition of EM species changes after wood ash fertilization and the amount of EM mycelia increases. We did not find any indication that wood ash fertilization reduced the capacity of EM fungi to take up nutrients from the soil. Whole tree harvesting had no measurable effect on the EM fungi. Our results do not suggest that EM fungi influence dissolution of wood ash but we have seen that some EM fungi can increase dissolution of P containing minerals such as apatite, especially if the trees are deficient in P. No similar increase in dissolution of K containing minerals was found. These results are important when modelling long-term productivity of forests. We did not find any important role of EM fungi in releasing heavy metals from wood ash. We found that EM fungi can retain considerable amounts of N in the soil and that EM mycelia are important in reducing nitrate leaching from forest soil.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhizas and ectomycorrhizas of Uapaca bojeri L. (Euphorbiaceae): sporophore diversity, patterns of root colonization, and effects on seedling growth and soil microbial catabolic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanankierana, Naina; Ducousso, Marc; Rakotoarimanga, Nirina; Prin, Yves; Thioulouse, Jean; Randrianjohany, Emile; Ramaroson, Luciano; Kisa, Marija; Galiana, Antoine; Duponnois, Robin

    2007-05-01

    The main objectives of this study were (1) to describe the diversity of mycorrhizal fungal communities associated with Uapaca bojeri, an endemic Euphorbiaceae of Madagascar, and (2) to determine the potential benefits of inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi [ectomycorrhizal and/or arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi] on the growth of this tree species and on the functional diversity of soil microflora. Ninety-four sporophores were collected from three survey sites. They were identified as belonging to the ectomycorrhizal genera Afroboletus, Amanita, Boletus, Cantharellus, Lactarius, Leccinum, Rubinoboletus, Scleroderma, Tricholoma, and Xerocomus. Russula was the most frequent ectomycorrhizal genus recorded under U. bojeri. AM structures (vesicles and hyphae) were detected from the roots in all surveyed sites. In addition, this study showed that this tree species is highly dependent on both types of mycorrhiza, and controlled ectomycorrhization of this Uapaca species strongly influences soil microbial catabolic diversity. These results showed that the complex symbiotic status of U. bojeri could be managed to optimize its development in degraded areas. The use of selected mycorrhizal fungi such the Scleroderma Sc1 isolate in nursery conditions could be of great interest as (1) this fungal strain is very competitive against native symbiotic microflora, and (2) the fungal inoculation improves the catabolic potentialities of the soil microflora.

  18. Fungal transcript pattern during the preinfection stage (12 h) of ectomycorrhiza formed between Pisolithus tinctorius and Castanea sativa roots, identified using cDNA microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acioli-Santos, Bartolomeu; Sebastiana, Mónica; Pessoa, Fernando; Sousa, Lisete; Figueiredo, Andreia; Fortes, Ana Margarida; Baldé, Aladje; Maia, Leonor C; Pais, Maria S

    2008-12-01

    Transcriptional changes in Pisolithus tinctorius leading to ectomycorrhizal formation in P. tinctorius- Castanea sativa were investigated using a 12-h fungal interaction in vitro system. Using a 3107-cDNA clone microarray, 34 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were found to be differentially expressed. These ESTs represent 14 known genes, 5 upregulated and 9 downregulated, and 20 orphan sequences. Some transcripts of upregulated genes (with unknown function) were previously identified in other mycorrhizal Pisolithus spp. associations. ESTs for S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase and several orphan sequences were identified in our system. The identified transcript of downregulated genes involved hydrophobins, 5S, 18S, and 28S ribosomal RNA genes, large subunits of ribosomal RNA (mitochondrial gene), and two types of heat shock proteins. This study demonstrates the high complexity of molecular events involved in the preinfection steps and suggests the utilization of different fungal gene repertories before ectomycorrhizal formation. These data constitute a first contribution for the molecular understanding of early signaling events between P. tinctorius and C. sativa roots during ectomycorrhizal formation.

  19. Effects of soil type, fertilization and drought on carbon allocation to root growth and partitioning between secondary metabolism and ectomycorrhizae of Betula papyrifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleczewski, Nathan M; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2010-07-01

    Paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh) seedlings were grown in a greenhouse in either subsoil or topsoil in factorial combination with two fertilization and drought regimes to investigate how different soil environments and nutrient availability drive belowground partitioning between growth, secondary metabolism and ectomycorrhizal (EM) associations, and impact drought tolerance of paper birch. Root and total seedling dry biomass, starch, soluble sugars, soluble phenolics, lignin and EM abundance were quantified. In unfertilized topsoil, total plant biomass and root biomass were approximately nine times higher than in unfertilized subsoil, but the root weight ratios did not differ between soils. Root soluble phenolics and lignin were higher in unfertilized subsoil than in unfertilized topsoil, whereas EM abundance was significantly higher in unfertilized topsoil than in unfertilized subsoil. In topsoil, fertilization decreased root biomass and EM abundance and increased root phenolics and lignin. In contrast, fertilization of subsoil increased root biomass but decreased root phenolics and lignin, while EM abundance was unaffected. In both soil types, fertilization reduced root weight ratios. Across soil types, EM abundance was negatively correlated with root soluble sugars, root phenolics and lignin, but this was driven mainly by the responses in the topsoil treatment. Our results show that soil fertility mediates carbon tradeoffs among defense, growth and EM associations.

  20. Seasonal dynamics of fungal communities in a temperate oak forest soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voříšková, Jana; Brabcová, Vendula; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2014-01-01

    .... Vertical stratification of and seasonal changes in fungal abundance, activity and community composition were investigated in the litter, organic and upper mineral soils of a temperate Quercus petraea...

  1. Books received by the Rijksherbarium library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1988-01-01

    The increasing interest in and importance of ectomycorrhizae make it more and more desirable that ectomycorrhizae taken from the soil can be identified. In this loose-leaf colour atlas, expected to contain 200—300 plates in the future, each mycorrhiza treated is illustrated on one plate with four go

  2. Dicty_cDB: FC-IC1683 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available equence. 44 0.16 2 CD269836 |CD269836.1 T143A02135F (FHIG:A) Ectomycorrhiza plate...70770.1 T143A01691F (FHIG:A) Ectomycorrhiza plate culture Betula pendula/Paxillus involutus mixed EST librar

  3. Books received by the Rijksherbarium library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1988-01-01

    The increasing interest in and importance of ectomycorrhizae make it more and more desirable that ectomycorrhizae taken from the soil can be identified. In this loose-leaf colour atlas, expected to contain 200—300 plates in the future, each mycorrhiza treated is illustrated on one plate with four

  4. Mycorrhizal synthesis between Boletus edulis species complex and rockroses (Cistus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; Fernández-Toirán, Luz Marina; Cisneros, Oscar; de Miguel, Ana María; Modrego, María Pilar; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Pera, Joan

    2008-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizas of Boletus aereus, Boletus edulis, and Boletus reticulatus were synthesized with Cistus sp. under laboratory conditions using synthesis tubes filled with a mixture of sterilized peat-vermiculite and nutrient solution. The fungal strains isolated from sporocarps were identified by molecular techniques. The inoculated seedlings were grown for 4-5 months. The ectomycorrhizas formed were described based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The three ectomycorrhizas described were very similar, with white monopodial-pinnate morphology, a three-layered plectenchymatous mantle on plan view and boletoid rhizomorphs.

  5. Enzymatic Characterization of NADP-dependent Isocitrate Dehydrogenization inPinus sylvestris var.mongolica Ectomycorrhiza%樟子松外生菌根中NADP-依赖型异柠檬酸脱氢酶的酶学性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王一超; 姚庆智; 朱和平; 陈丽霞; 郭欣; 杨倩倩; 闫伟

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to purify the isocitrate dehydrogenase(IDH)in mycorrhizal tissue ofSuillus luteus-Pinus sylvestrisvar. mongolica, root tissue ofP. sylvestrisvar. mongolica and cultured fungal mycelia ofS. luteus, and identify their enzymatic characterizations. The IDHs of 3 sources were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and glucan gel chromatography and tested by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and enzymatic characterizations were studied. The Km for NADP+ of mycorrhiza, root and cultured fungal mycelia were 10.7μmol/L, 11.4μmol/L and 22.1μmol/L, respectively;the Kmfor isocitrate were 71.7μmol/L, 79.3μmol/L and 87.8μmol/L, respectively. The optimal pH of mycorrhiza, root and cultured fungal mycelia were 8.2, 8.0 and 7.5 respectively;they were all slightly in alkaline. The optimal temperatures of the IDHs were 45℃ for mycorrhiza and root, and 42℃ for the fungus. The activities of 3 IDHs relied on the binding of divalent metal ions, the maximum activities of IDHs were observed when assayed with Mn2+ or Mg2+ as metal cofactor;however, Ca2+, Co2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ dramatically inhibited the activity of IDHs. Conclusively, protein content and enzyme activity of mycorrhizal IDH have been increased.%对褐环乳牛肝菌-樟子松菌根组织、樟子松根组织及褐环乳牛肝菌纯培养菌丝的异柠檬酸脱氢酶(isocitrate dehydrogenase,IDH)进行纯化和酶学性质鉴定。通过硫酸铵分级沉淀及葡聚糖凝胶层析纯化后的IDH进行SDS-PAGE电泳检测,并进行3种来源酶的酶学性质鉴定。菌根组织、根组织及真菌纯培养菌丝NADP-IDH对NADP+的Km值分别为10.7μmol/L、11.4μmol/L和22.1μmol/L;对异柠檬酸的Km值分别为71.7μmol/L、79.3μmol/L和87.8μmol/L。最适pH分别为8.2、8.0和7.5,略偏碱性。菌根IDH和根IDH的最适反应温度为45℃,真菌IDH的最适反应温度为42℃。3种IDH的活性依赖于不同的二价金属阳离子的存在, Mn2+、Mg2+存在时酶活性最强,Ca2+、Co2+、Cu2+和Zn2+对酶的活性有较强抑制作用。菌根真菌与樟子松形成外生菌根之后异柠檬酸脱氢酶的蛋白含量及酶活力都得到了提高。

  6. Leaf Growth and Photosynthetic Performance of Two Co-existing Oak Species in Contrasting Growing Seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SZŐLLŐSI, Erzsébet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecophysiological investigations of Quercus petraea and Quercus cerris were performed atthe Sikfkút research site in the dry and humid growing seasons of 2003 and 2004. The resultssuggested that leaf growth and the photosynthetic apparatus of Q. petraea exhibited higher sensitivityto drought in 2003 than that of Q. cerris. In leaves of Q. petraea, chlorophyll content showed largerinter-annual and within-canopy variability than in those of Q. cerris. Fully developed leaves ofQ petraea showed lower SLM which indicated higher leaf cell wall elasticity allowing them tomaintain a water spending strategy, while high specific leaf mass (SLM values reflected a watersaving strategy for Q. cerris. Water use efficiency of Q. cerris was higher than in the case ofQ. petraea, which may provide an advantage for this species in dry periods. In the contrasting yearsthe final leaf area and leaf mass of both species were determined by the amount of rainfall andtemperature conditions during the period of early exponential phase of leaf growth. As indicated bythe low values of the Fv/Fm chlorophyll fluorescence parameter the photosynthetic apparatus of bothspecies exhibited high susceptibility to abiotic stress factors in early spring. A large VAZ cycle poolindicated that zeaxanthin dependent heat dissipation was the main contributor to photoprotection ofphotosynthetic apparatus in young leaves but in fully developed leaves the relatively high lightsaturated ETR and low Pmax as well as the maintenance of high Fv/Fm even in severe dry periodsreflected the potential involvement of photorespiratory electron transport in photoprotection of bothspecies in summer. Drought in 2003 may have resulted in serious depletion of dry matter reservesinfluencing the vitality of trees in following year. Q. petraea showed lower photochemical activity inthe successive vegetation period after the dry year than Q. cerris which suggested lower tolerance todrought in the long term.

  7. Identification of adaptation-specific differences in mRNA expression of sessile and pedunculate oak based on osmotic-stress-induced genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Ilga; Koch, Margit; Berenyi, Maria; Burg, Agnes; Burg, Kornel

    2005-10-01

    Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. and Q. robur L. hybridize frequently and occupy similar, though distinct, ecological niches. So far, genetic discrimination between these species at the molecular level has been based mainly on neutral markers. Because such markers often exhibit low species differentiation because of high genetic compatibility and exchange between Q. robur and Q. petraea at these loci, we used adaptation-related expressed genes as markers. Accordingly, we identified osmotic-stress-induced genes in a Q. petraea cell line grown under moderate osmotic stress conditions. Two subtraction libraries were established from callus cells cultured under hyperosmotic stress for 1 or 48 h. Thirty-three differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) (from 70 originally isolated) were classified according to their putative functions. At least five of these gene products may contribute to osmotic-stress tolerance in oak: betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, two trans-acting transcription factors (one abscsic acid (ABA)-responsive, the other ABA-independent), a glutathione-S- transferase and a heat-shock cognate protein. Seven genes were selected based on their putative function and their expression monitored in vivo. Leaf tissue from Q. petraea and Q. robur plantlets grown hydroponically under hyperosmotic conditions was harvested after 0, 1, 6, 24 or 72 h and analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found indications of osmotic stress adaptation in Q. petraea based on up-regulation of genes related to protective functions, whereas down-regulation of these genes was evident in Q. robur. Thus, genetic markers related to adaptive traits may be useful for differentiating Q. petraea and Q. robur genotypes.

  8. Analysis of mycorrhizal associations formed by Cistus incanus transformed root clones with Terfezia boudieri isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, M; Kagan-Zur, V; Mills, D; Roth-Bejerano, N

    2006-02-01

    One clone (M-2), out of several Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformed root clones of Cistus incanus, formed ecto- or endomycorrhiza in vitro with two isolates of Terfezia boudieri collected in Israel. All other clone-fungal isolate combinations formed ectomycorrhiza. The endomycorrhiza-forming isolate secreted smaller amounts of auxin than an ectomycorrhiza-forming isolate. Addition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) led to ectomycorrhiza formation by the M-2 clone on low P medium. Endomycorrhizas were formed by both M-2 and a control clone with the same T. boudieri isolates on high P medium with 2,4-D. The M-2 clone of C. incanus exhibited greater sensitivity to exogenous auxins (IAA and 2,4-D) than other clones, and clonal sensitivity to auxin was increased tenfold under low P conditions. Results are discussed in relation to phosphate and auxin influence on T. boudieri-C. incanus interaction.

  9. Monitoring for pests and diseases in native oak woodlands: the case of acute oak decline in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan Brown; Stephen Parnell; Frank van den Bosch; Mike Jeger; Sandra Denman

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, a novel form of decline has been observed in southern and central England. This syndrome has been termed acute oak decline (AOD) and affects native oak, Quercus petraea and Q. robur. Typical symptoms include bark cracks that weep dark exudates, which are caused by necrotic patches in the...

  10. Nitrosomonas europaea-like bacteria detected as the dominant b-subclass Proteobacteria ammonia oxidisers in reference and limed acid forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnol, M.; Kowalchuk, G.A.; De Boer, W.

    2002-01-01

    Net nitrification in intact soil cores and the community of ammonia-oxidising bacteria were studied in acid Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt. Lieb.)) soils (Haute Ardenne, east Belgium) 18 months after treatment with 5tha1 dolomite lime. Liming caused a s

  11. Intrapopulation and Interpopulation Genetic Variation ofQuercus in Denmark in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Jensen, Jan Svejgaard

    2001-01-01

    -Weinberg proportions, suggesting a low level of inbreeding. The differentiation of the Q. petraea and Q. robur populations was quanti. ed with Wright's F-statistics. The within-species component was populations was quanti. ed with Wright's -statistics. The within-species component was low, 0.022, re¿ ecting the wind-pollinated...

  12. High rates of gene flow by pollen and seed in oak populations across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerber, S.; Chadoeuf, J.; Gugerli, F.; Lascoux, M.; Buiteveld, J.; Cottrell, J.; Dounavi, A.; Fineschi, S.; Forrest, L.; Fogelqvist, J.; Goicoechea, P.G.; Jensen, J.S.; Salvini, D.; Vendramin, G.G.; Kremer, A.

    2014-01-01

    Gene flow is a key factor in the evolution of species, influencing effective population size, hybridisation and local adaptation. We analysed local gene flow in eight stands of white oak (mostly Quercus petraea and Q. robur, but also Q. pubescens and Q. faginea) distributed across Europe. Adult tree

  13. Abbreviated Environmental Assessment for the Northwest Infrastructure, Phase II Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    iM---/nclucll!np ........... - .J (+•~.t/td; O•no~ ·•1111111-olltct; U• unkno..,-) + 0 . u 7. AIR INSTAU.ATION ~ PI \\ TliiLE USE ZONEAANO USE...petraea Traubeneiche Ses.~i le Oak rubus idaeus Himbeere Red Raspberry salix fragilis Bruchweidc Crack Willow sam bucus nigra Schwarz.~r Holw1der

  14. Korte mededelingen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rompaey, van E.

    1960-01-01

    Quercus x rosacea Bechst. in de Kempen. Op 9 augustus 1959 vonden J.G. Sloff en ondergetekende in de “duinen” ten Z. van het Grote Meer, gemeente Huijbergen, een rijk met vruchten beladen eik, die op het eerste gezicht gedetermineerd werd als Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl., maar bij nader onderzoek

  15. Litterfall and growth dynamics relationship with the meteorological variability in three forests in the Montseny natural park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bou Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the influence of some environmental conditions (temperature and rainfall on the litterfall and BAI (basal area increment, in three close forests in the Montseny massif (NE part of the Iberian peninsula, Spain. Two of them are composed of deciduous species Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea, and the other one is a Mediterranean evergreen species, Quercus ilex. We have collected monthly data about litterfall and radial growth since 2007. For each forest there are tree plots, with litterfall traps and band dendrometers. This data has been related with the meteorological parameters of meteorological station closed to the study area. Our results show that F. sylvatica recorded the biggest drop in annual litterfall (6 Mg·ha−1·year−1, followed by Q. ilex (4.34 Mg·ha−1·year−1 and Quercus petraea (4.4 Mg·ha−1·year−1 and that all the values were similar to those observed in other forests and mountains with the same state of maturity. Regarding the litterfall, the investigation found a decline in the leaves fall in deciduous trees in years with hot summers. In addition, these warm summers produce a decline in the F. sylvatica BAI, but not in Q. petraea. Concerning growth, we found that Q. petraea increases the BAI on the study period while F. sylvatica does not. In conclusion, we believe that in the future Q. petraea will be more tolerant to the warm conditions than F. sylvatica, making the former a possible replacement of the second species.

  16. Morphological and molecular identification of the ectomycorrhizal association of Lactarius fumosibrunneus and Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana trees in eastern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay-Serrano, Edith; Bandala, Victor Manuel; Montoya, Leticia

    2012-11-01

    A population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana (covering ca. 4.7 ha) is established in a montane cloud forest refuge at Acatlan Volcano in eastern Mexico (Veracruz State), and it represents one of only ten populations of this species known to occur in the country (each stand covers ca. 2-35 ha in extension) and one of the southernmost in the continent. Sporocarps of several ectomycorrhizal macrofungi have been observed in the area, and among them, individuals of the genus Lactarius are common in the forest. However, the morphological and molecular characterization of ectomycorrhizae is still in development. Currently, two species of Lactarius have been previously documented in the area. Through the phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region from basidiomes and ectomycorrhizae, we identified the Lactarius fumosibrunneus ectomycorrhiza. The host, F. grandifolia var. mexicana, was determined comparing the amplified ITS sequence from ectomycorrhizal root tips in the GenBank database with Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. The mycorrhizal system of L. fumosibrunneus is monopodial-pyramidal, characterized by its shiny, white to silver and pruinose surface, secreting a white latex when damaged, composed of three plectenchymatous mantle layers, with diverticulated terminal elements at the outer mantle. It lacks emanating hyphae, rhizomorphs, and sclerotia. A detailed morphological and anatomical description, illustrations, and photographs of the ectomycorrhiza are presented. The comparison of L. fumosibrunneus and other Lactarius belonging to subgenus Plinthogalus is presented.

  17. Books received by the Rijksherbarium library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1992-01-01

    The fifth issue of this series comprises extended keys for the determination of 148 species of Ectomycorrhizae (Abies 1, Betula 17, Carpinus 1, Fagus 31, Larix 10, Picea 51, Pinus 33, Pseudotsuga 4, and Quercus 2). The glossary, synoptic tables, literature as well as proposals for the arrangement of

  18. Mycorrhizae on dipterocarps in rubber agroforests (RAF) in Sumatra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tata, M.H.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326163832

    2008-01-01

    In tropical lowland forests, which dominated by trees of Dipterocarpaceae family, trees and fungi are strongly linked, through ectomycorrhiza (EcM) formation. However, as part of rapid deforestation and forest transformation, mixed dipterocarp forests have been replaced by other vegetation and land

  19. Oaks belowground: mycorrhizas, truffles, and small mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan Frank; Seth Barry; Joseph Madden; Darlene Southworth

    2008-01-01

    Oaks depend on hidden diversity belowground. Oregon white oaks (Quercus garryana) form ectomycorrhizas with more than 40 species of fungi at a 25-ha site. Several of the most common oak mycorrhizal fungi form hypogeous fruiting bodies or truffles in the upper layer of mineral soil. We collected 18 species of truffles associated with Oregon white...

  20. Differential benefits of arbuscular mycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal infection of salix repens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.

    2001-01-01

    The functional significance of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and ectomycorrhiza (EcM) for Salix repens, a dual mycorrhizal plant, was investigated over three harvest periods (12, 20 and 30 weeks). Cuttings of S. repens were collected in December (low shoot P) and March (high shoot P). Glomus mosseae

  1. Mycorrhizal associations of trees have different indirect effects on organic matter decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanie K. Taylor; Richard A. Lankau; Nina Wurzburger; Franciska de Vries

    2016-01-01

    1. Organic matter decomposition is the main process by which carbon (C) is lost from terrestrialecosystems, and mycorrhizal associations of plants (i.e. arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and ectomycorrhizas(ECM)) may have different indirect effects on this loss pathway. AM and ECM plants differin the soil...

  2. Diversity and dynamics of mycorrhizal associations in tropical rain forests with different disturbance regimes in South Cameroon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onguene, N.A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study documents the occurrence of mycorrhizal associations in the rain forests of south Cameroon. All species investigated are mycorrhizal. Most timber species form arbuscular mycorrhiza, but some timber species, which usually occur in clumps, form ectomycorrhiza. Species

  3. Three-way interactions among ectomycorrhizal mutualists, scale insects, and resistant and susceptible pinyon pines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, C.A.; Cobb, N.S.; Whitham, T.G. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Herbivores and mycorrhizal fungi are important associates of most plants, but little is known about how these organisms interact. In a 9-yr experiment, we examined how the pinyon needle scale (Matsucoccus acalyptus) affects and is affected by the ectomycorrhizal mutualists found on the roots of scale-resistant and -susceptible pinyon pines (Pinus edulis). Three major results emerged. First, removal experiments demonstrated that scales negatively affected ectomycorrhiza. Second, although ectomycorrhiza could either positively or negatively influence scale performance by improving plant vigor or increasing plant investment in antiherbivore defenses, we found no ectomycorrhizal effect on scale mortality when we experimentally enhanced levels of ectomycorrhiza. This represented the first test of whether ectomycorrhiza promote plant resistance and contrasted with studies showing that arbuscular mycorrhiza negatively affected herbivores. Third, pinyon resistance to scales mediated the asymmetrical interaction between fungal mutualists and scale herbivores. High scale densities suppressed ectomycorrhizal colonization, but only on trees susceptible to scales. Similarities between mycorrhiza-herbivore interactions and competitive interactions among herbivores suggest broader generalities in the way aboveground herbivores interact with belowground plant associates. However, because mycorrhiza are mutualists, mycorrhiza-herbivore interactions do not fit within traditional competition paradigms. The widespread occurrence and importance of both herbivores and mycorrhiza argue for incorporating their interactions into ecological theory. 53 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Inoculation of Loblolly Pine Seedlings at Planting with Basidiospores of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in Chip Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Beckjord; Marla S. McIntosh; Edward Hacskaylo; John H. Jr. Melhuish; John H. Jr. Melhuish

    1984-01-01

    Basidiospores of the ectomycorrhizae-forming fungi Pisolithus tinctorius and Scleroderma auranteum incorporated into an organic hydrocolloid can be used successfully in field inoculation. Containerized loblolly pine seedlings were inoculated during outplanting by this method. This study showed that basidiospore chips were effective inocula in this investigation.

  5. A RAPID DNA EXTRACTION METHOD IS SUCCESSFULLY APPLIED TO ITS-RFLP ANALYSIS OF MYCORRHIZAL ROOT TIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid method for extracting DNA from intact, single root tips using a Xanthine solution was developed to handle very large numbers of analyses of ectomycorrhizas. By using an extraction without grinding we have attempted to bias the extraction towards the fungal DNA in the man...

  6. Three-way interactions among ectomycorrhizal mutualists, scale insects, and resistant and susceptible pinyon pines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, C A; Cobb, N S; Whitham, T G

    1997-05-01

    Herbivores and mycorrhizal fungi are important associates of most plants, but little is known about how these organisms interact. In a 9-yr experiment, we examined how the pinyon needle scale (Matsucoccus acalyptus) affects and is affected by the ectomycorrhizal mutualists found on the roots of scale-resistant and -susceptible pinyon pines (Pinus edulis). Three major results emerged. First, removal experiments demonstrated that scales negatively affected ectomycorrhiza. Second, although ectomycorrhiza could either positively or negatively influence scale performance by improving plant vigor or increasing plant investment in antiherbivore defenses, we found no ectomycorrhizal effect on scale mortality when we experimentally enhanced levels of ectomycorrhiza. This represented the first test of whether ectomycorrhiza promote plant resistance and contrasted with studies showing that arbuscular mycorrhiza negatively affected herbivores. Third, pinyon resistance to scales mediated the asymmetrical interaction between fungal mutualists and scale herbivores. High scale densities suppressed ectomycorrhizal colonization, but only on trees susceptible to scales. Similarities between mycorrhiza-herbivore interactions and competitive interactions among herbivores suggest broader generalities in the way aboveground herbivores interact with belowground plant associates. However, because mycorrhiza are mutualists, mycorrhiza-herbivore interactions do not fit within traditional competition paradigms. The widespread occurrence and importance of both herbivores and mycorrhiza argue for incorporating their interactions into ecological theory.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12426-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 634175 ) Uncultured ectomycorrhiza (Tuber) 6098 internal t... 48 1.1 1 ( DQ927304 ) Tetrahymena paravorax st...1 ( EU202708 ) Uncultured Tuber clone Y2OM20 18S ribosomal RNA g... 48 1.1 1 ( AY

  8. Ectomycorrhizin Synthesis and Polypeptide Changes during the Early Stage of Eucalypt Mycorrhiza Development 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Jean-Louis; Costa, Guy; Martin, Francis

    1991-01-01

    In functioning eucalypt ectomycorrhizas, biochemical alterations are accompanied by a differential accumulation of polypeptides including the synthesis of symbiosis-related proteins (JL Hilbert, Martin FM [1988] New Phytol 110: 339-346). In the present study, protein biosynthesis in the early stages of ectomycorrhiza formation on Eucalyptus globulus subsp. bicostata Kirkp. was examined using compatible and incompatible isolates of the basidiomycete Pisolithus tinctorius (Coker & Couch). Changes in polypeptide composition were observed within hours following contact of the compatible mycelium with the roots, well before the differentiation of typical symbiotic tissues. At this stage, at least seven symbiosis-related proteins (ectomycorrhizins) accumulated in root tissues. In vivo incorporation of [35S]methionine by ectomycorrhizas followed by electrophoresis of the labeled proteins revealed that most of these differences in polypeptide concentrations, including the ectomycorrhizin accumulation, are the result of differential protein biosynthesis rather than posttranslational modifications of the polypeptides. The initial development of eucalypt ectomycorrhizas, therefore, coincides with the synthesis of symbiosis-related proteins and the data presented here provide essential evidence to ascribe a functional developmental role to these proteins. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:16668539

  9. Mycorrhizal associations of Salix repens L. communities in succession of dune ecosystems I Above-ground and below-ground views of ectomycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.; Vries, de F.W.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of ectomycorrhizal (EcM) communities in 16 stands of Salix repens L. growing under a variety of environmental conditions was studied by repeated sampling of EcM sporocarps and ectomycorrhizas, to assess the possible correspondence between above- and below-ground views of fungal taxa. A

  10. Root hydraulic conductivity and xylem sap levels of zeatin riboside and abscisic acid in ectomycorrhizal Douglas fir seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Coleman; Caroline S. Bledsoe; Barbara A. Smit

    1990-01-01

    Mechanistic hypotheses to explain mycorrhizal enhancement of root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) suggest that phosphorus (P) nutrition, plant growth substances and/or altered morphology may be responsible. Such ideas are based on work with VA (vesicular-arbuscular) mycorrhizas. Since VA mycorrhizas and ectomycorrhizas differ in many respects, they...

  11. Books received by the Rijksherbarium library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1991-01-01

    The fourth issue of this loose-leaf colour atlas of ectomycorrhizae comprises an extended key to the 83 species of mycorrhizae treated thus far. An extra key is provided for the identification of boreal and temperate European forest trees by the anatomy of their roots. This key is elucidated by 16 p

  12. Pairwise Transcriptomic Analysis of the Interactions Between the Ectomycorrhizal Fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N and Three Beneficial, Neutral and Antagonistic Soil Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deveau, A.; Barret, M.; Diedhiou, A.G.; Leveau, J.; Boer, de W.; Martin, F.; Frey-Klett, P.

    2015-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by bacterial communities with which they interact physically and metabolically during their life cycle. These bacteria can have positive or negative effects on the formation and the functioning of ectomycorrhizae. However, relatively little is known about the mec

  13. Using 13C and 15N isotopes to study allocation patterns in oak seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura M. Suz; María V. Albarracín; Caroline S. Bledsoe

    2008-01-01

    In California’s oak woodlands, survival and growth of oaks may depend on a symbiosis between oak roots and fungi that form ectomycorrhizas. Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi are major players in carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) utilization and cycling because they facilitate water and nutrient uptake from the soil into the plant. The ECM fungi also benefit because plants supply...

  14. Ecological strategies of ectomycorrhizal fungi of Salix repens: root manipulation versus root replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der E.W.; Kuyper, T.W.

    2003-01-01

    The ecological significance of a range of ectomycorrhizal fungal species, associated with Salix repens, was investigated under controlled conditions. Different ectomycorrhizas increased plant benefits in various ways. Effects of 12 ectomycorrhizal fungi on short-term (12 weeks) and long-term (20 and

  15. Dipterocarps and Mycorrhiza. An ecological adaptation and a factor in forest regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, W.Th.M.

    1983-01-01

    Each dipterocarp has its own species of fungus, forming an ectomycorrhiza. From literature and experiments (in East Kalimantan and in vitro) ecological consequences are explored. These help explain the clumping of dipterocarp trees in the forest, the lack of hybrids, the poor dispersal, and speciati

  16. PtSRR1, a putative Pisolithus tinctorius symbiosis related receptor gene is expressed during the first hours of mycorrhizal interaction with Castanea sativa roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acioli-Santos, B; Malosso, E; Calzavara-Silva, C E; Lima, C E P; Figueiredo, A; Sebastiana, M; Pais, M S

    2009-04-01

    PtSRR1 EST was previously identified in the first hours of Pisolithus tinctorius and Castanea sativa interaction. QRT-PCR confirmed PtSRR1 early expression and in silico preliminary translated peptide analysis indicated a strong probability that PtSRR1 be a transmembrane protein. These data stimulate the PtSRR1 gene research during ectomycorrhiza formation.

  17. Books received by the Rijksherbarium library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1997-01-01

    The ninth issue of this colour atlas of ectomycorrhizae provides 6 colour plates, descriptions and micrographs of mycorrhizae of Pisolithus tinctorius (host Shorea parviflora Dyer), Quercirhiza squamosa and Xerocomus subtomentosus (host Quercus robur L.), and three truffles, Tuber melanosporum, T. m

  18. Piracy in the high trees: ectomycorrhizal fungi from an aerial 'canopy soil' microhabitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlovich, David A; Draffin, Suzy J; Daly, Robert A; Stephenson, Steven L

    2013-01-01

    The mantle of dead organic material ("canopy soil") associated with the mats of vascular and nonvascular epiphytes found on the branches of trees in the temperate rainforests along the southwestern coast of the South Island of New Zealand were examined for evidence of ectomycorrhizal fungi. DNA sequencing and cluster analysis were used to identify the taxa of fungi present in 74 root tips collected from the canopy soil microhabitat of three old growth Nothofagus menziesii trees in the South West New Zealand World Heritage Area. A diverse assemblage of ectomycorrhizal fungi was found to infect an extensive network of adventitious canopy roots of Nothofagus menziesii in this forest, including 14 phylotypes from nine genera of putative ectomycorrhizal fungi. Seven of the genera identified previously were known to form ectomycorrhizas with terrestrial roots of Nothofagus: Cortinarius, Russula, Cenococcum, Thelephora/Tomentella, Lactarius and Laccaria; two, Clavulina and Leotia, previously have not been reported forming ectomycorrhizas with Nothofagus. Canopy ectomycorrhizas provide an unexpected means for increased host nutrition that may have functional significance in some forest ecosystems. Presumably, canopy ectomycorrhizas on host adventitious roots circumvent the tree-ground-soil nutrient cycle by accessing a wider range of nutrients directly in the canopy than would be possible for non-mycorrhizal or arbuscular mycorrhizal canopy roots. In this system, both host and epiphytes would seem to be in competition for the same pool of nutrients in canopy soil.

  19. Caractérisation des contraintes biotiques et abiotiques sur la phénologie printanière du chêne : expliquer les patrons de diversité et prédire les changements futurs

    OpenAIRE

    Dantec, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Budburst phenology is a major adaptive trait of trees to the environment in temperateclimate. Our aim was to characterize the biotic (powdery mildew) and abiotic (winter and springtemperatures / spring frost) constraints acting on budburst in view to explain the patterns of intra and interpopulations’ phenological variation observed in sessile oak (Quercus petraea) along an elevation gradient.We based our approach on in situ monitoring, experimentation and modeling. Our results highlight that...

  20. Genetic architecture of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri: the essential role of QTL x environment interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Frerot, H; Faucon, Michel-Pierre; Willems, G.; Godé, C; Courseaux, A; Darracq, A; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Saumitou-Laprade, P

    2010-01-01

    This study sought to determine the main genomic regions that control zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri and to examine genotype · environment effects on phenotypic variance. To do so, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using an interspecific A. halleri · Arabidopsis lyrata petraea F2 population. • The F2 progeny as well as representatives of the parental populations were cultivated on soils at two different Zn concentrations. A linkage map was constructed using 70 mark...

  1. Zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation are genetically independent characters.

    OpenAIRE

    Macnair, M R; Bert, V; Huitson, S B; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Petit, D.

    1999-01-01

    The hyperaccumulation of metals by a rare class of plants is a fascinating and little understood phenomenon. No genetic analysis has been possible since no intraspecific variation is known for this character. Here, we report on crosses between the zinc-hyperaccumulating and -tolerant species Arabidopsis halleri and the non-hyperaccumulating, non-tolerant species Arabidopsis petraea. The F2 segregates for both characters and it appears that the two characters are genetically independent. The d...

  2. Morphological characterization of mycorrhizae formed between three Terfezia species (desert truffles) and several Cistaceae and Aleppo pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitouni-Haouar, Fatima El-Houaria; Fortas, Zohra; Chevalier, Gerard

    2014-07-01

    Six Cistaceae species, Helianthemum ledifolium, Helianthemum lippii, Fumana procumbens, Cistus albidus, Cistus incanus, Cistus salvifolius, and Pinus halepensis (Aleppo pine) were inoculated with three mycorrhizal desert truffles, Terfezia leptoderma, Terfezia boudieri, and Terfezia claveryi under greenhouse conditions, on soil originating from desert truffle natural habitat in Algeria. The syntheses have led to the formation of typical endomycorrhizae in annual Cistaceae (H. ledifolium) and perennial ones (H. lippii and F. procumbens) and an ectomycorrhiza with a less developed sheath in Cistus species and Aleppo pine. These results demonstrate the plasticity of Terfezia species to form different mycorrhizal types. The formation of an endomycorrhiza with H. ledifolium and F. procumbens and a sheathing ectomycorrhiza with P. halepensis inoculated by T. leptoderma in in vivo culture conditions was obtained for the first time.

  3. Characterization of Tuber borchii and Arbutus unedo mycorrhizas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Enrico; Iotti, Mirco; Zambonelli, Alessandra; Franceschini, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    For the first time, arbutoid mycorrhizas established between Tuber borchii and Arbutus unedo were described. Analyzed mycorrhizas were from one T. borchii natural truffle ground, dominated by Pinus pinea, as well as synthesized in greenhouse conditions. A. unedo mycorrhizas presented some typical characteristics of ectomycorrhizas of T. borchii. However, as in arbutoid mycorrhizas, ramification was cruciform and intracellular colonization in epidermal cells was present. The ability of T. borchii to form ectomycorrhizas with A. unedo opens up the possibility to also use this fruit plant for truffle cultivation. This represents an important economic opportunity in Mediterranean areas by combining both the cultivation of precious truffles and the production of edible fruits which are used fresh or in food delicacies.

  4. Characterisation of seven Inocybe ectomycorrhizal morphotypes from a semiarid woody steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seress, Diána; Dima, Bálint; Kovács, Gábor M

    2016-04-01

    Ectomycorrhizas (ECM) of Inocybe species (Inocybaceae, Basidiomycota) formed by three host plant species (Populus alba, Salix rosmarinifolia and Pinus nigra) in a semiarid woody steppe of Hungary were studied. To identify the fungal partners, we performed phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences for the internal transcribed spacer region of nuclear DNA (nrDNA ITS) together with sequences gained from public databases. Seven Inocybe ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were morpho-anatomically characterised. Five morphotypes were identified (I. phaeoleuca, I. psammophila, I. semifulva, I. splendens and I. subporospora), whereas two morphotypes represented unidentified Inocybe species. Differences were discernible among the morphotypes, and they showed general anatomical characteristics of Inocybe ECM, such as the slightly organised plectenchymatic mantle (types A, B and E and the gelatinous C). The ECM of I. subporospora and I. phaeoleuca were detected from the introduced Pinus nigra. These two fungi are probably native to the area but capable of forming a novel ectomycorrhizal association with the invasive host.

  5. Morphological and molecular characterization of selected Ramaria mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhra, Eduardo R; Horton, Thomas R; Cazares, Efren; Castellano, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Ramaria species are conspicuous mycorrhizal symbionts of conifers in the Pacific Northwest. Here we collected and identified sporocarps and associated ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria acrisiccescens Marr & Stuntz, R. cyaneigranosa Marr & Stuntz, R. sandaracina Marr & Stuntz, R. celerivirescens Marr & Stuntz, and R. flavobrunnescens var. aromatica Marr & Stuntz. An internal transcribed spacer (ITS)- restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern was observed for each of the Ramaria species and used as a diagnostic tool to support the identification of mycorrhizae occurring in mats below the sporocarps. We provide a description of ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria, which exhibit similar macro- and microscopic characteristics such as ramification pattern, coloration, abundance of mycelial strands and emanating hyphae, mantle morphology and chemical reactions of mantle and mycelial strands with KOH, FeSO4 and Melzer's reagent. Sequences of the ITS region for each of the species are deposited in the GenBank.

  6. New species of Tomentella (Thelephorales) from the Patagonian Andes forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhar, Francisco; Barroetaveña, Carolina; Rajchenberg, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The genus Tomentella forms abundant ectomycorrhizae in coniferous and deciduous forests worldwide. Molecular identification of root tips suggests undescribed species in the Nothofagus forests of Patagonia, Argentina. Tomentella tenuissima, T. pulvinulata and T. patagonica are described here as new to science based on morphological and molecular analyses. Their host range is addressed using available soil sequences. The identity of previous records of T. galzinii and T. radiosa are discussed with morphological and molecular evidence. © 2016 by The Mycological Society of America.

  7. Large scale transcriptome analysis reveals interplay between development of forest trees and a beneficial mycorrhiza helper bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    Kurth, Florence; Feldhahn, Lasse; Bönn, Markus; Herrmann, Sylvie; Buscot, François; Tarkka, Mika T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pedunculate oak, Quercus robur is an abundant forest tree species that hosts a large and diverse community of beneficial ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMFs), whereby ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation is stimulated by mycorrhiza helper bacteria such as Streptomyces sp. AcH 505. Oaks typically grow rhythmically, with alternating root flushes (RFs) and shoot flushes (SFs). We explored the poorly understood mechanisms by which oaks integrate signals induced by their beneficial microbes and endoge...

  8. Books received by the Rijksherbarium library

    OpenAIRE

    NN

    1997-01-01

    The ninth issue of this colour atlas of ectomycorrhizae provides 6 colour plates, descriptions and micrographs of mycorrhizae of Pisolithus tinctorius (host Shorea parviflora Dyer), Quercirhiza squamosa and Xerocomus subtomentosus (host Quercus robur L.), and three truffles, Tuber melanosporum, T. mesentericum, and T. rufum with the host Corylus avellana. In addition (updated) keys are given for the identification of mycorrhizae on Quercus, Corylus, and Shorea as well as additional references...

  9. Molecular and morpho-anatomical description of mycorrhizas of Lactarius rimosellus on Quercus sp., with ethnomycological notes on Lactarius in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandini, Ornella; Erős-Honti, Zsolt; Jakucs, Erzsébet; Arzú, Roberto Flores; Leonardi, Marco; Rinaldi, Andrea C

    2012-05-01

    Guatemala is one of the richest biodiversity hotspots worldwide, bursting a wild array of ecosystems that range from pine and mixed forests in the highlands to tropical rain forests in the extensive El Petén area, bordering Belize and Mexico. Despite this biological wealth, however, current knowledge on the Guatemalan mycobiota is particularly scant, in part because of the prolonged civil war that has prevented exploration of many ecological niches. In the present paper, we report on the occurrence of Lactarius rimosellus Peck-a rarely discussed species-in oak-pine mixed forests in the Guatemalan highlands and describe the relevant ectomycorrhizae formed with Quercus sp. by means of molecular and morpho-anatomical tools. On the phylogenetic trees constructed on the basis of the partial LSU sequence, sporocarp- and ectomycorrhizae-derived sequences formed a common, statistically supported clade. The structural features of the ectomycorrhizae of L. rimosellus were generally found to match those described on various hosts for other Lactarius species belonging to the subgenus Russularia, where L. rimosellus has been traditionally assigned. These mycorrhizae are characterized by a pseudoparenchymatous outer mantle layer, with epidermoid or angular hyphal cells, and a plectenchymatous inner mantle layer; lactifers are embedded either in the middle and/or inner mantle layer. In the framework of a more general, ongoing study of the ethnomycology of the Maya populations in the Guatemalan highlands, we also report on the traditional knowledge about Lactarius mushrooms and their uses among native people. © Springer-Verlag 2012

  10. The ectomycorrhizal morphotype Pinirhiza sclerotia is formed by Acephala macrosclerotiorum sp. nov., a close relative of Phialocephala fortinii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzenberger, Babette; Bubner, Ben; Wöllecke, Jens; Sieber, Thomas N; Bauer, Robert; Fladung, Matthias; Hüttl, Reinhard F

    2009-09-01

    Relatively few ectomycorrhizal fungal species are known to form sclerotia. Usually, sclerotia are initiated at the extraradical mycelium. In this study, we present anatomical and ultrastructural evidence for the formation of sclerotia directly in the hyphal mantle of the mycorrhizal morphotype Pinirhiza sclerotia. A dark-pigmented fungal strain was isolated from Pinirhiza sclerotia and identified by molecular tools as Acephala macrosclerotiorum sp. nov., a close relative of Phialocephala fortinii s.l. As dark septate fungi are known to be mostly endophytic, resyntheses with Pinus sylvestris and A. macrosclerotiorum as well as Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides and A. macrosclerotiorum or P. fortinii s.l. were performed under axenic conditions. No mycorrhizas were found when hybrid aspen was inoculated with A. macrosclerotiorum or P. fortinii. However, A. macrosclerotiorum formed true ectomycorrhizas in vitro with P. sylvestris. Anatomical and ultrastructural features of this ectomycorrhiza are presented. The natural and synthesized ectomycorrhizal morphotypes were identical and characterized by a thin hyphal mantle that bore sclerotia in a later ontogenetic stage. The Hartig net was well-developed and grew up to the endodermis. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence at the anatomical and ultrastructural level that a close relative of P. fortinii s.l. forms true ectomycorrhizas with a coniferous host.

  11. Observations on the mycorrhizal status of Polygonum viviparum in the Polish Tatra Mts. (Western Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Ronikier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Polygonum viviparum is one of very few herbaceous plants known to form ectomycorrhiza; in the Tatra Mts. it is one of dominants in the alpine zone, but also descends down to the feet of the massif. Specimens of this plant were collected from 5 sites at the altitude range 900– 2150 m, from granite and limestone. It allowed an estimation of the ectomycorrhizal diversity as well as preliminary ecological observations. Roots were also stained in order to check potential presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization. Ectomycorrhizae were present in all specimens (with 2–5 morphotypes observed on single plants. In total, 17 morphotypes were observed and briefly described. The most widespread were the mycorrhiza of Cenococcum geophilum and a brightly coloured morphotype resembling the ectomycorrhizae of Russula sp. No important differences in ectomycorrhizal colonization between low and high localities were found. Observed general differences in abundance and diversity of mycorrhiza in P. viviparum between sites could most probably be connected with plant community composition (presence/absence of ectomycorrhizal shrubs maintaining ectomycorrhizal fungi, although mycorrhizae were present also in sites devoid of other ectomycorrhizal plants. Structures associated to arbuscular colonization (vesicles, hyphal coils were occassionally observed, but without formation of arbuscules.

  12. Using isotopic patterns of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi to elucidate fungal sources of carbon and nitrogen in a Norway spruce stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Janet; Rinne-Garmston, Katja; Penttilä, Reijo; Hobbie, Erik; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    To predict effects of global change on fungal community structure and the consequential effects on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling, we first need to understand different fungal sources of C and N. We determined sources of C and N by measuring δ15N and δ13C of an extensive collection of ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic sporocarps and their potential substrates from Norway spruce (Picea abies) stands in southern Finland. The substrates included organic soil, roots in organic soil, mineral soil, roots in mineral soil, moss, needles, needles in litter, branches, twigs in litter, wood and decay wood from stages I-V. Notably, δ15N and δ13C analysis of wood in decay stages I-V was a novel measurement, as were our associations between wood decay fungi and the decay stage of trees. Decay stage of wood significantly correlated with the δ15N and δ13C of associated saprotrophic wood decay fungi species. Fungi were lower in δ15N by 0.3-0.7‰ when associated with decay wood in stages II and III compared to I and IV and higher in δ13C by 0.9-1.2‰ when associated with decay stage I compared to decay stages II-IV. The ectomycorrhizal fungi, Piloderma fallax, was significantly correlated with 15N enrichment of decay wood upon its introduction in decay stages III and IV that continued to the later decay stage V, with δ15N of decay stage V 1.5‰ higher than decay stage IV. These results indicate that wood decay fungi rely on C and N from various wood decay stages and influence C and N pools of wood as well. Litter decay fungi were lower in δ13C than wood decay fungi by 1.9‰ and higher in δ15N by 3‰ and isotopically tracked their C and N sources. Calocera viscosa, Gymnopus acervatus, and Leotia lubrica were highly 15N-enriched compared to other saprotrophic fungi and they had δ15N values similar to fungi with hydrophobic ectomycorrhizae indicating function more similar to ectomycorrhizal fungi or N sources similar to this functional group. Similar to other

  13. Inter- and intra-specific variability in isoprene production and photosynthesis of Central European oak species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, R; Contran, N; Gugerli, F; Schnitzler, J-P; Zimmer, I; Menard, T; Günthardt-Goerg, M S

    2013-01-01

    European deciduous oaks are closely related and are known for their strong emission of volatile isoprenoids. They are chemo-taxonomically diverse, but hybridise frequently. Four-year-old oak seedlings growing together in a model ecosystem facility under near-natural conditions were studied. The leaves were morphologically classified in the three oak species Quercus robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petraea (with four provenances each) and further investigated by a molecular-genetic approach. Q. robur was morphologically and genetically clearly different from Q. pubescens and Q. petraea, whereas Q. pubescens and Q. petraea individuals used in this study were morphologically and genetically more similar. There was a minor impact of among and within species variability on isoprene synthesis, isoprene emission and photosynthesis. Isoprene emission rates normalised to 25 °C leaf temperature ranged from 5.78 to 10.66 nmol m(-2)  s(-1) , whereas photosynthesis ranged from 12.8 to 17.6 μmol m(-2)  s(-1) . On cloudy days, among the provenances of each species, only net photosynthesis of the Q. robur provenance Hünenberg was reduced and isoprene synthase activity of the Q. pubescens provenance Promotogno increased. On sunny days, photosynthesis did not differ among the provenances. Over all provenances, gas exchange on cloudy days did not differ significantly from sunny days. In the combined data of cloudy and sunny days, no differences between the studied provenances and oak species were detected in isoprene emission and photosynthesis. Thus, isoprene emission and photosynthesis rates were remarkably stable among oak species and provenances. The results indicate that taxonomic differences in the studied oak species are not reflected in isoprene emission and photosynthesis, probably because of the high plasticity of gene expression resulting in high phenotypic flexibility.

  14. High Genetic Differentiation among European White Oak Species (Quercus spp. at a Dehydrin Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacob CRĂCIUNESC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dehydryn genes are involved in plant response to environmental stress and may be useful to examine functional diversity in relation to adaptive variation. Recently, a dehydrin gene (DHN3 was isolated in Quercus petraea and showed little differentiation between populations of the same species in an altitudinal transect. In the present study, inter- and intraspecific differentiation patterns in closely related and interfertile oaks were investigated for the first time at the DHN3 locus. A four-oak-species stand (Quercus frainetto Ten., Q. petraea (Matt. Liebl., Q. pubescens Willd., Q. robur L. and two populations for each of five white oak species (Q. frainetto Ten., Q. petraea (Matt. Liebl., Q. pubescens Willd., Q. robur L. and Q. pedunculiflora K. Koch were analyzed. Three alleles shared by all five oak species were observed. However, only two alleles were present in each population, but with different frequencies according to the species. At population level, all interspecific pairs of populations showed significant differentiation, except for pure Q. robur and Q. pedunculiflora populations. In contrast, no significant differentiation (p > 0.05 was found among conspecific populations. The DHN3 locus proved to be very useful to differentiate Q. frainetto and Q. pubescens from Q. pedunculiflora (FST = 0.914 and 0.660, respectively and Q. robur (FST = 0.858 and 0.633, respectively. As expected, the lowest level of differentiation was detected between the most closely related species, Q. robur and Q. pedunculiflora (FST = 0.020. Our results suggest that DHN3 can be an important genetic marker for differentiating among European white oak species.

  15. Preliminary results of entomological studies of diseased oaks in Lower Austria. [Scolytus intricatus; Agrilus; Andricus quercusradicus; Homoptera; Xiphydria; Xyleborus; Cerambycidae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schopf, A.

    1987-03-01

    Entomological studies on diseased Quercus petraea at several localities in Lower Austria show that numerous insect species are involved in the lethal course of the disease. As expected, Scolytus intricatus and Agrilus species as well as two coccid species were frequently present. Particular importance is attached to the massive infestation of young branches by Andricus quercusradicus and egg deposition by an as yet undetermined leafhopper species (Homoptera). Wood-boring insects (Xiphydria, Xyleborus, Cerambycidae) attack the trunk at an early stage of the disease and devalue the wood.

  16. Intrapopulation and Interpopulation Genetic Variation ofQuercus in Denmark in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegismund, Hans Redlef; Jensen, Jan Svejgaard

    2001-01-01

    Native Danish oak stands are fragmented and decreasing because of the extensive use of foreign seed sources. Therefore, the population structure of natural Danish oak stands was analysed by means of six polymorphic enzyme loci. A total of 17 stands of Quercus robur L. (including an ‘‘outgroup......-Weinberg proportions, suggesting a low level of inbreeding. The differentiation of the Q. petraea and Q. robur populations was quanti. ed with Wright's F-statistics. The within-species component was populations was quanti. ed with Wright's -statistics. The within-species component was low, 0.022, re¿ ecting the wind...

  17. Macromycetes of oak forests in the Łagiewnicki Forest (Central Poland - monitoring studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ławrynowicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycological observations were carried out in the years 1994- 1996 in two permanent plots in a ca. 90-year-old oak forest (Calamagrostio-Quercetum petraeae in the Las Łagiewnicki Forest, a large forest complex within the borders of the city of Łódź. The study was conducted in the frame of the international project "Mycological monitoring in European oak forests". During the 3 years (15 observations 124 species of macromycetes were identified: 50 mycorrhizal, 72 saprobic and 2 parasitic species. Among them, 7 species inscribed on the Red List of threatened macromycetes in Poland (Wojewoda and Ławrynowicz 1992 were found.

  18. Paleoatmospheric signatures in Neogene fossil leaves; Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands). Lab. of Paleobotany and Palynology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgh, J. van der; Visscher, H.; Dilcher, D.L.; Kuerschner, W.M.

    1993-06-18

    An increase in the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) concentration results in a decrease in the number of leaf stomata. This relation is known both from historical observations of vegetation over the past 200 years and from experimental manipulations of microenvironments. Evidence from stomatal frequencies of fossil [ital Quercus petraea] leaves indicates that this relation can be applied as a bioindicator for changes in paleoatmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations during the last 10 million years. The data suggest that late Neogene CO[sub 2] concentrations fluctuated between about 280 and 370 parts per million by volume. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Zinc tolerance and hyperaccumulation are genetically independent characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnair, M R; Bert, V; Huitson, S B; Saumitou-Laprade, P; Petit, D

    1999-11-07

    The hyperaccumulation of metals by a rare class of plants is a fascinating and little understood phenomenon. No genetic analysis has been possible since no intraspecific variation is known for this character. Here, we report on crosses between the zinc-hyperaccumulating and -tolerant species Arabidopsis halleri and the non-hyperaccumulating, non-tolerant species Arabidopsis petraea. The F2 segregates for both characters and it appears that the two characters are genetically independent. The data for tolerance are consistent with a single major gene for this character (although the number of genes for hyperaccumulation cannot be determined), and is probably not very large.

  20. Wood in the Ban's house at Artiče, Slovenia, as a historical archive

    OpenAIRE

    Čufar, Katarina; Strgar, Dušan; Merela, Maks; Brus, Robert

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a survey of wood and performed dendrochronological dating of beams from the external walls of the old Ban’s House in the village of Artiče near Brežice. The logs were made of different wood species, with different oaks among them, i.e. sessile oak (Quercus petraea), pedunculate oak (Quercus robur) and Turkey oak (Quercus cerris), as well as sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Based on dendrochronological dating of the outermost tree-rings, the bea...

  1. Mycorrhizal bioestimulation with essential oil on Enterolobium contorsiliquum and Bauhinia forficata seedlings in soil contaminated with copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Ferreira da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of native tree species inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungus can be an alternative for revegetation of soil contaminated with copper. The objective was to evaluate the interference of eucalyptus essential oil copper and ectomycorrhiza on growth and quality of seedlings timbaúva-preta (Enterolobium contorsiliquum and pata-de-vaca (Bauhinia forficata. The study was conducted in greenhouse for 120 days using as substrate the layer of 0-20 cm of a Red Oxisol with very clayey texture. The experimental design was completely randomized factorial (2 x 2 x 2, and “ with and without “ inoculant ectomycorrhizal essential oil and addition of 150 mg kg-1 of copper in the soil . Was evaluated the plant height, stem diameter, dry mass of shoots, roots and total length and specific surface area and root seedling quality of relations between: shoot height and stem diameter, shoot height and dry mass of shoots and the quality index of Dickson. The formation of ectomycorrhiza was identified by visualization of fungal structures and surface morphology internal and external morphology of the root system. Addition of copper reduced de stems diameter and dry mass of de aerial part of the pata-de-vaca seedlings regardless of the addition of inoculant and oil. There was no formation of ectomycorrhiza, even when applied in the essential oil of seedlings timbaúva-preta and pata-de-vaca. Growth of timbaúva-preta seedlings is stimulated by the addition of 150 mg kg – 1 of copper and has a higher rate of seedling quality in relation to pata-de-vaca.

  2. The potential of Dark Septate Endophytes to form root symbioses with ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal middle European forest plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza Lukešová

    Full Text Available The unresolved ecophysiological significance of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE may be in part due to existence of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species in the most common Phialocephala fortinii s. l.--Acephala applanata species complex (PAC. We inoculated three middle European forest plants (European blueberry, Norway spruce and silver birch with 16 strains of eight PAC cryptic species and other DSE and ectomycorrhizal/ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and focused on intraradical structures possibly representing interfaces for plant-fungus nutrient transfer and on host growth response. The PAC species Acephala applanata simultaneously formed structures resembling ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM and DSE microsclerotia in blueberry. A. macrosclerotiorum, a close relative to PAC, formed ectomycorrhizae with spruce but not with birch, and structures resembling ErM in blueberry. Phialocephala glacialis, another close relative to PAC, formed structures resembling ErM in blueberry. In blueberry, six PAC strains significantly decreased dry shoot biomass compared to ErM control. In birch, one A. macrosclerotiorum strain increased root biomass and the other shoot biomass in comparison with non-inoculated control. The dual mycorrhizal ability of A. macrosclerotiorum suggested that it may form mycorrhizal links between Ericaceae and Pinaceae. However, we were unable to detect this species in Ericaceae roots growing in a forest with presence of A. macrosclerotiorum ectomycorrhizae. Nevertheless, the diversity of Ericaceae mycobionts was high (380 OTUs with individual sites often dominated by hitherto unreported helotialean and chaetothyrialean/verrucarialean species; in contrast, typical ErM fungi were either absent or low in abundance. Some DSE apparently have a potential to form mycorrhizae with typical middle European forest plants. However, except A. applanata, the tested representatives of all hitherto described PAC cryptic species formed typical DSE

  3. The potential of Dark Septate Endophytes to form root symbioses with ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal middle European forest plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukešová, Tereza; Kohout, Petr; Větrovský, Tomáš; Vohník, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The unresolved ecophysiological significance of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) may be in part due to existence of morphologically indistinguishable cryptic species in the most common Phialocephala fortinii s. l.--Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). We inoculated three middle European forest plants (European blueberry, Norway spruce and silver birch) with 16 strains of eight PAC cryptic species and other DSE and ectomycorrhizal/ericoid mycorrhizal fungi and focused on intraradical structures possibly representing interfaces for plant-fungus nutrient transfer and on host growth response. The PAC species Acephala applanata simultaneously formed structures resembling ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) and DSE microsclerotia in blueberry. A. macrosclerotiorum, a close relative to PAC, formed ectomycorrhizae with spruce but not with birch, and structures resembling ErM in blueberry. Phialocephala glacialis, another close relative to PAC, formed structures resembling ErM in blueberry. In blueberry, six PAC strains significantly decreased dry shoot biomass compared to ErM control. In birch, one A. macrosclerotiorum strain increased root biomass and the other shoot biomass in comparison with non-inoculated control. The dual mycorrhizal ability of A. macrosclerotiorum suggested that it may form mycorrhizal links between Ericaceae and Pinaceae. However, we were unable to detect this species in Ericaceae roots growing in a forest with presence of A. macrosclerotiorum ectomycorrhizae. Nevertheless, the diversity of Ericaceae mycobionts was high (380 OTUs) with individual sites often dominated by hitherto unreported helotialean and chaetothyrialean/verrucarialean species; in contrast, typical ErM fungi were either absent or low in abundance. Some DSE apparently have a potential to form mycorrhizae with typical middle European forest plants. However, except A. applanata, the tested representatives of all hitherto described PAC cryptic species formed typical DSE colonization without

  4. Occurrence and succession of mycorrhizas in Alnus incana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arveby, A.S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Section of Forest Ecophysiology; Granhall, U. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology

    1998-12-31

    The occurrence of different mycorrhizas of the grey alder, Alnus incana (L.) Moench., in Sweden was investigated. Root sampling was carried out in planted and natural grey alder stands, representing different soil types, geographical sites, and plant ages. Mycorrhizal infection of roots was found to be frequent at all investigated sites, except for some planted peat bogs, where alders do not occur naturally. At the latter sites, mycorrhizal infection was less frequent and consisted only of ectomycorrhizas. Young trees here were non-mycorrhizal. At all other sites vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) was found to be the almost exclusive type of mycorrhiza in first-year seedlings. In trees older than one year ectomycorrhiza was the dominating type. In the planted stands up to five years of age no fruitbodies of ectomycorrhizal fungi were found. In such stands the ectomycorrhizas generally had thin, translucent mantles and could be observed only by microscopic examination. In one old plantation (27 years) and in the natural stands sporocarps of several specific `alder fungi` were found. Here, the mycorrhizal root tips had thick, mostly whitish mantles. The Hartig net was in all cases confined to penetration between epidermal cells. Soil collected from one alder site and two non-alder biotopes readily infected grey alder seedlings with Frankia and VAM fungi whereas a peat soil failed to infect seedlings with any symbiont. In vitro inoculation of nodulated seedlings with Glomus mossae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe resulted in VAM-infection. Simultaneous syntheses with isolates of alder-specific, and other, ectomycorrhizal fungi, using three different methods, failed. On the basis of these results an endomycorrhizal-ectomycorrhizal succession after the first growth season in Alnus incana is concluded. A subsequent succession of ectomycorrhizal species from early-stage to late-stage ones is discussed 58 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  5. The Genome of Laccaria Bi color Provides Insights into Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F [UMR, France; Aerts, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ahren, D [Lund University, Sweden; Brun, A [UMR, France; Duchaussoy, F [UMR, France; Gibon, J [UMR, France; Kohler, A [UMR, France; Lindquist, E [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pereda, V [UMR, France; Salamov, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Shapiro, HJ [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wuyts, J [UMR, France; Blaudez, D [UMR, France; Buee, M [UMR, France; Brokstein, P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Canbeck, B [Lund University, Sweden; Cohen, D [UMR, France; Courty, PE [UMR, France; Coutinho, PM [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Danchin, E [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Delaruelle, C [UMR, France; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deveau, A [UMR, France; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Duplessis, S [UMR, France; Fraissinet-Tachet, L [Universite de Lyon, France; Lucic, E [UMR, France; Frey-Klett, P [UMR, France; Fourrey, C [UMR, France; Feussner, I [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Gay, G [Universite de Lyon, France; Grimwood, Jane [Stanford University; Hoegger, P J [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Jain, P [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Kilaru, S [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Labbe, J [UMR, France; Lin, Y C [Ghent University, Belgium; Legue, V [UMR, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Marmeisse, R [Universite de Lyon, France; Melayah, D [Universite de Lyon, France; Montanini, B [UMR, France; Muratet, M [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Nehls, U [Eberhard-Karls-Universitat, Tubingen, Germany; Niculita-Hirzel, H [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Oudot-Le Secq, M P [UMR, France; Peter, M [UMR, France; Quesneville, H [Unite de Recherches en Genomique-Info,Evry Cedex; Rajashekar, B [Lund University, Sweden; Reich, M [UMR, France; Rouhler, N [UMR, France; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Chalot, M [UMR, France; Henrissat, B [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Kues, U [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Lucas, S [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Van de Peer, Y [Ghent University, Belgium; Podila, G [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Polle, A [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Pukkila, P J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rouze, P [Ghent University, Belgium; Sanders, I R [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Stajich, J E [University of California, Berkeley; Tunlid, A [Lund University, Sweden; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Grigoriev, I. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and

  6. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F [UMR, France; Aerts, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ahren, D [Lund University, Sweden; Brun, A [UMR, France; Danchin, E [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Duchaussoy, F [UMR, France; Gibon, J [UMR, France; Kohler, A [UMR, France; Lindquist, E [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pereda, V [UMR, France; Salamov, A. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Shapiro, HJ [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wuyts, J [UMR, France; Blaudez, D. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France; Buee, M [UMR, France; Brokstein, P [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Canbeck, B [Lund University, Sweden; Cohen, D [UMR, France; Courty, PE [UMR, France; Coutinho, PM [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Delaruelle, C [UMR, France; Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deveau, A [UMR, France; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University; Duplessis, S [UMR, France; Fraissinet-Tachet, L [Universite de Lyon, France; Lucic, E [UMR, France; Frey-Klett, P [UMR, France; Fourrey, C [UMR, France; Feussner, I [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Gay, G [Universite de Lyon, France; Grimwood, Jane [Stanford University; Hoegger, P J [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Jain, P [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Kilaru, S [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Labbe, J [UMR, France; Lin, Y C [Ghent University, Belgium; Legue, V [UMR, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Marmeisse, R [Universite de Lyon, France; Melayah, D [Universite de Lyon, France; Montanini, B [UMR, France; Muratet, M [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Nehls, U [Eberhard-Karls-Universitat, Tubingen, Germany; Niculita-Hirzel, H [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Oudot-Le Secq, M P [UMR, France; Peter, M [UMR, France; Quesneville, H [Unite de Recherches en Genomique-Info,Evry Cedex; Rajashekar, B [Lund University, Sweden; Reich, M [UMR, France; Rouhler, N [UMR, France; Schmutz, Jeremy [Stanford University; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Chalot, M [UMR, France; Henrissat, B [Architecture et Fonction des Macromolecules Biologiques, UMR 6098 CNRS and Unive; Kues, U [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Lucas, S [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Van de Peer, Y [Ghent University, Belgium; Podila, G [University of Alabama, Huntsville; Polle, A [Georg-August Universitat Gottingen Germany; Pukkila, P J [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rouze, P [Ghent University, Belgium; Sanders, I R [University of Lausanne, Switzerland; Stajich, J E [University of California, Berkeley; Tunlid, A [Lund University, Sweden; Grigoriev, I. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants1,2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  7. The genome of Laccaria bicolor provides insights into mycorrhizal symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F.; Aerts, A.; Ahren, D.; Brun, A.; Danchin, E. G. J.; Duchaussoy, F.; Gibon, J.; Kohler, A.; Lindquist, E.; Peresa, V.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H. J.; Wuyts, J.; Blaudez, D.; Buee, M.; Brokstein, P.; Canback, B.; Cohen, D.; Courty, P. E.; Coutinho, P. M.; Delaruelle, C.; Detter, J. C.; Deveau, A.; DiFazio, S.; Duplessis, S.; Fraissinet-Tachet, L.; Lucic, E.; Frey-Klett, P.; Fourrey, C.; Feussner, I.; Gay, G.; Grimwood, J.; Hoegger, P. J.; Jain, P.; Kilaru, S.; Labbe, J.; Lin, Y. C.; Legue, V.; Le Tacon, F.; Marmeisse, R.; Melayah, D.; Montanini, B.; Muratet, M.; Nehls, U.; Niculita-Hirzel, H.; Secq, M. P. Oudot-Le; Peter, M.; Quesneville, H.; Rajashekar, B.; Reich, M.; Rouhier, N.; Schmutz, J.; Yin, T.; Chalot, M.; Henrissat, B.; Kues, U.; Lucas, S.; Van de Peer, Y.; Podila, G. K.; Polle, A.; Pukkila, P. J.; Richardson, P. M.; Rouze, P.; Sanders, I. R.; Stajich, J. E.; Tunlid, A.; Tuskan, G.; Grigoriev, I. V.

    2007-08-10

    Mycorrhizal symbioses the union of roots and soil fungi are universal in terrestrial ecosystems and may have been fundamental to land colonization by plants 1, 2. Boreal, temperate and montane forests all depend on ectomycorrhizae1. Identification of the primary factors that regulate symbiotic development and metabolic activity will therefore open the door to understanding the role of ectomycorrhizae in plant development and physiology, allowing the full ecological significance of this symbiosis to be explored. Here we report the genome sequence of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Laccaria bicolor (Fig. 1) and highlight gene sets involved in rhizosphere colonization and symbiosis. This 65-megabase genome assembly contains 20,000 predicted protein-encoding genes and a very large number of transposons and repeated sequences. We detected unexpected genomic features, most notably a battery of effector-type small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown function, several of which are only expressed in symbiotic tissues. The most highly expressed SSP accumulates in the proliferating hyphae colonizing the host root. The ectomycorrhizae-specific SSPs probably have a decisive role in the establishment of the symbiosis. The unexpected observation that the genome of L. bicolor lacks carbohydrate-active enzymes involved in degradation of plant cell walls, but maintains the ability to degrade non-plant cell wall polysaccharides, reveals the dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle of the mycorrhizal fungus that enables it to grow within both soil and living plant roots. The predicted gene inventory of the L. bicolor genome, therefore, points to previously unknown mechanisms of symbiosis operating in biotrophic mycorrhizal fungi. The availability of this genome provides an unparalleled opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the processes by which symbionts interact with plants within their ecosystem to perform vital functions in the carbon and nitrogen cycles that are

  8. Co-existing ericaceous plant species in a subarctic mire community share fungal root endophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Olsrud, Maria; Michelsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, culture-independent identification tools have widened our knowledge of fungi colonizing ericaceous roots including ericoid mycorrhizal fungi. One focal interest has been to identify fungi, which simultaneously can establish ericoid and ectomycorrhiza, while knowledge about......, was studied. From each of these plants, in each of five plots, clone libraries were established using fungal specific ITS-PCR followed by cloning, PCR–RFLP and sequencing. The clone libraries were dominated by potential ericoid mycorrhizal fungi, particularly Rhizoscyphus ericae, fungi belonging...

  9. Ectomycorrhizal association of three Lactarius species with Carpinus and Quercus trees in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamus, Valentina; Montoya, Leticia; Aguilar, Carlos J; Bandala, Victor M; Ramos, David

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi are being monitored in the Santuario del Bosque de Niebla in the central region of Veracruz (eastern Mexico). Based on the comparison of DNA sequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips, we discovered the EM symbiosis of Lactarius indigo, L. areolatus and L. strigosipes with Carpinus caroliniana, Quercus xalapensis and Quercus spp. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). Descriptions coupled with photographs of ectomycorrhizas and basidiomes are presented.

  10. Biology and applications of mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Madan, M; Vasudevan, P

    1997-12-01

    Mycorrhizae have been shown to increase growth and yield of plants. They have been identified with both nutrient mobilization and nutrient cycling. Arbuscular (or endo-) mycorrhizae play a significant role in agriculture and most natural ecosystems, whereas ectomycorrhizae have a great potential in forestry and wasteland regeneration. The use of mycorrhizal fungi would reduce dependence on chemical fertilizers besides minimizing environmental pollution. The present review addresses the progress that there has been in the area of the ecto- and endomycorrhizae. It also examines the potential of field applications of mycorrhizal biotechnology in agriculture and forestry.

  11. Effects of heavy metals and some biotic factors on ectomycorrhizal Scots pine in northern Finland; Effekter av tungmetaller och naagra biotiska faktorer paa tall och dess ektomykorrhiza i norra Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen-Jonnarth, U.

    1996-04-01

    In this work, nickel and copper exposure on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) was studied experimentally under field conditions. The significance of some biotic factors was also studied. We wanted to test whether the understorey lichen layer has a protective role against nickel exposure, and whether it has any effects on pine seedlings. Effects of defoliation, simulating sawfly grazing, were also examined, since the reduced photosynthesis can be assumed to affect root growth and ectomycorrhiza negatively. Ectomycorrhizal colonization has been found to decrease in pinyon pine due to defoliation. 19 refs

  12. Factors affecting the conversion of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd in soils - the system of plants in forest; Faktorer som paavirker omsetning av Zn, Cu, Pb og Cd i jord - plantesystemet i skog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthelsen, B.O.

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper relates the factors affecting the conversion of long-range transported heavy metals in soils with the focus on the system of forest plants. The paper discusses themes like the mobility of metals in forest soils under the influence of artificial acidification, contribution from metal accumulation in ectomycorrhiza to metal levels in organic surface soils, importance of cutting areas for accumulation and transport of metals in surface soils, concentration of metals in forest vegetation in relation to temporal and geographic differences in the atmospheric precipitation of metals. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Oak protein profile alterations upon root colonization by an ectomycorrhizal fungus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sebastiana, Mónica; Martins, Joana; Figueiredo, Andreia

    2017-01-01

    to ectomycorrhizae formation using a proteomics approach complemented by biochemical analysis of carbohydrate levels. Comparative proteome analysis between mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal cork oak plants revealed no differences at the foliar level. However, the protein profile of 34 unique oak proteins was altered...... accommodation in colonized roots are also suggested by the results. The suggested improvement in root capacity to take up nutrients accompanied by an increase of root biomass without apparent changes in aboveground biomass strongly re-enforces the potential of mycorrhizal inoculation to improve cork oak forest...

  14. Arabidopsis hybrid speciation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmickl, Roswitha; Koch, Marcus A

    2011-08-23

    The genus Arabidopsis provides a unique opportunity to study fundamental biological questions in plant sciences using the diploid model species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis lyrata. However, only a few studies have focused on introgression and hybrid speciation in Arabidopsis, although polyploidy is a common phenomenon within this genus. More recently, there is growing evidence of significant gene flow between the various Arabidopsis species. So far, we know Arabidopsis suecica and Arabidopsis kamchatica as fully stabilized allopolyploid species. Both species evolved during Pleistocene glaciation and deglaciation cycles in Fennoscandinavia and the amphi-Beringian region, respectively. These hybrid studies were conducted either on a phylogeographic scale or reconstructed experimentally in the laboratory. In our study we focus at a regional and population level. Our research area is located in the foothills of the eastern Austrian Alps, where two Arabidopsis species, Arabidopsis arenosa and A. lyrata ssp. petraea, are sympatrically distributed. Our hypothesis of genetic introgression, migration, and adaptation to the changing environment during the Pleistocene has been confirmed: We observed significant, mainly unidirectional gene flow between the two species, which has given rise to the tetraploid A. lyrata. This cytotype was able to escape from the narrow ecological niche occupied by diploid A. lyrata ssp. petraea on limestone outcrops by migrating northward into siliceous areas, leaving behind a trail of genetic differentiation.

  15. Changes in the dynamics of foliar N metabolites in oak saplings by drought and air warming depend on species and soil type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Hu

    Full Text Available Climate change poses direct or indirect influences on physiological mechanisms in plants. In particular, long living plants like trees have to cope with the predicted climate changes (i.e. drought and air warming during their life span. The present study aimed to quantify the consequences of simulated climate change for foliar N metabolites over a drought-rewetting-drought course. Saplings of three Central European oak species (i.e. Quercus robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens were tested on two different soil types (i.e. acidic and calcareous. Consecutive drought periods increased foliar amino acid-N and soluble protein-N concentrations at the expense of structural N in all three oak species. In addition, transient effects on foliar metabolite dynamics were observed over the drought-rewetting-drought course. The lowest levels of foliar soluble protein-N, amino acid-N and potassium cation with a minor response to drought and air warming were found in the oak species originating from the driest/warmest habitat (Q. pubescens compared to Q. robur and Q. petraea. Higher foliar osmolyte-N and potassium under drought and air warming were observed in all oak species when grown on calcareous versus acidic soil. These results indicate that species-specific differences in physiological mechanisms to compensate drought and elevated temperature are modified by soil acidity.

  16. Non Destructive Method for Biomass Prediction Combining TLS Derived Tree Volume and Wood Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hackenberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for predicting the above ground leafless biomass of trees in a non destructive way. We utilize terrestrial laserscan data to predict the volume of the trees. Combining volume estimates with density measurements leads to biomass predictions. Thirty-six trees of three different species are analyzed: evergreen coniferous Pinus massoniana, evergreen broadleaved Erythrophleum fordii and leafless deciduous Quercus petraea. All scans include a large number of noise points; denoising procedures are presented in detail. Density values are considered to be a minor source of error in the method if applied to stem segments, as comparison to ground truth data reveals that prediction errors for the tree volumes are in accordance with biomass prediction errors. While tree compartments with a diameter larger than 10 cm can be modeled accurately, smaller ones, especially twigs with a diameter smaller than 4 cm, are often largely overestimated. Better prediction results could be achieved by applying a biomass expansion factor to the biomass of compartments with a diameter larger than 10 cm. With this second method the average prediction error for Q. petraea could be reduced from 33.84% overestimation to 3.56%. E. fordii results could also be improved reducing the average prediction error from

  17. Ectomycorrhizal Influence on Particle Size, Surface Structure, Mineral Crystallinity, Functional Groups, and Elemental Composition of Soil Colloids from Different Soil Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil, we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P>0.05. These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O–H stretching and bending, C–H stretching, C=O stretching, etc. by 3–26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz by 40–300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12–35% decreases in most functional groups, 15–55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P<0.05. These different responses sharply decreased element ratios (C : O, C : N, and C : Si in soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  18. Identity and specificity of the fungi forming mycorrhizas with the rare mycoheterotrophic orchid Rhizanthella gardneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougoure, Jeremy; Ludwig, Martha; Brundrett, Mark; Grierson, Pauline

    2009-10-01

    Fully subterranean Rhizanthella gardneri (Orchidaceae) is obligately mycoheterotrophic meaning it is nutritionally dependent on the fungus it forms mycorrhizas with. Furthermore, R. gardneri purportedly participates in a nutrient sharing tripartite relationship where its mycorrhizal fungus simultaneously forms ectomycorrhizas with species of Melaleuca uncinata s.l. Although the mycorrhizal fungus of R. gardneri has been morphologically identified as Thanatephorus gardneri (from a single isolate), this identification has been recently questioned. We sought to clarify the identification of the mycorrhizal fungus of R. gardneri, using molecular methods, and to identify how specific its mycorrhizal relationship is. Fungal isolates taken from all sites where R. gardneri is known to occur shared almost identical ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences. The fungal isolate rDNA most closely matched that of other Ceratobasidiales species, particularly within the Ceratobasidium genus. However, interpretation of results was difficult as we found two distinct ITS sequences within all mycorrhizal fungal isolates of R. gardneri that we assessed. All mycorrhizal fungal isolates of R. gardneri readily formed ectomycorrhizas with a range of M. uncinata s.l. species. Consequently, it is likely that R. gardneri can form a nutrient sharing tripartite relationship where R. gardneri is connected to autotrophic M. uncinata s.l. by a common mycorrhizal fungus. These findings have implications for better understanding R. gardneri distribution, evolution and the ecological significance of its mycorrhizal fungus, particularly in relation to nutrient acquisition.

  19. Mycorrhizal symbionts of Pisonia grandis and P. sechellarum in Seychelles: identification of mycorrhizal fungi and description of new Tomentella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvi, Triin; Tedersoo, Leho; Abarenkov, Kessy; Beaver, Katy; Gerlach, Justin; Kõljalg, Urmas

    2010-01-01

    Nyctaginaceae includes species that are predominantly non-mycorrhizal or form arbuscular or ectomycorrhiza. Root-associated fungi were studied from P. grandis and P. sechellarum roots collected respectively on the islands of Cousin and Silhouette in Seychelles. In addition fungal sporocarps were collected from the sampling area. Fungal symbionts were identified from the roots by anatomotyping and rDNA sequencing; sporocarps collected were examined microscopically and sequenced. Three distantly related ectomycorrhizal fungal species belonging to Thelephoraceae were identified from the roots of P. grandis. Sporocarps also were found for two symbionts and described as new Tomentella species. In addition Tomentella species collected from other Seychelles islands were studied and described as new species if there was no close resemblance to previously established species. P. sechellarum was determined to be an arbuscular mycorrhizal plant; three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species were detected from the roots. P. grandis is probably associated only with species of Thelephoraceae throughout its area. Only five Tomentella species are known to form ectomycorrhiza with P. grandis and they never have been found to be associated with another host, suggesting adaptation of these fungi to extreme environmental conditions in host's habitat.

  20. Metatranscriptomic Study of Common and Host-Specific Patterns of Gene Expression between Pines and Their Symbiotic Ectomycorrhizal Fungi in the Genus Suillus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ling Liao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF represent one of the major guilds of symbiotic fungi associated with roots of forest trees, where they function to improve plant nutrition and fitness in exchange for plant carbon. Many groups of EMF exhibit preference or specificity for different plant host genera; a good example is the genus Suillus, which grows in association with the conifer family Pinaceae. We investigated genetics of EMF host-specificity by cross-inoculating basidiospores of five species of Suillus onto ten species of Pinus, and screened them for their ability to form ectomycorrhizae. Several Suillus spp. including S. granulatus, S. spraguei, and S. americanus readily formed ectomycorrhizae (compatible reaction with white pine hosts (subgenus Strobus, but were incompatible with other pine hosts (subgenus Pinus. Metatranscriptomic analysis of inoculated roots reveals that plant and fungus each express unique gene sets during incompatible vs. compatible pairings. The Suillus-Pinus metatranscriptomes utilize highly conserved gene regulatory pathways, including fungal G-protein signaling, secretory pathways, leucine-rich repeat and pathogen resistance proteins that are similar to those associated with host-pathogen interactions in other plant-fungal systems. Metatranscriptomic study of the combined Suillus-Pinus transcriptome has provided new insight into mechanisms of adaptation and coevolution of forest trees with their microbial community, and revealed that genetic regulation of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis utilizes universal gene regulatory pathways used by other types of fungal-plant interactions including pathogenic fungal-host interactions.

  1. The alpha-tubulin gene AmTuba1: a marker for rapid mycelial growth in the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkka, Mika T; Schrey, Silvia; Nehls, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The apical extension of hyphae is of central importance for extensive spread of fungal mycelium in forest soils and for effective ectomycorrhiza development. Since the tubulin cytoskeleton is known to be important for fungal tip growth, we have investigated the expression of an alpha-tubulin gene from the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Amanita muscaria (AmTuba1). The phylogenetic analysis of protein sequences revealed the existence of two subgroups of alpha-tubulins in homobasidiomycetes, clearly distinguishable by defined amino acids. AmTuba1 belongs to subgroup1. The AmTuba1 transcript level is related to mycelial growth rate. Growth induction of carbohydrate starved (non-growing) hyphae resulted in an enhanced AmTuba1 expression as soon as hyphal growth started, reaching a maximum at highest mycelial growth rate. Bacterium-induced hyphal elongation also leads to increased AmTuba1 transcript levels. In mature A. muscaria/P. abies ectomycorrhizas, where fungal hyphae are highly branched, and slowly growing, AmTuba1 expression were even lower than in carbohydrate-starved mycelium, indicating a further down-regulation of gene expression in symbiosis. In conclusion, our analyses show that the AmTuba1 gene can be used as a marker for active apical extension in fly agaric, and that alpha-tubulin proteins are promising tools for the classification of fungi.

  2. DAMPAK PERLAKUAN PEMANASAN INOKULUM TANAH TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN EKTOMIKORIZA UNTUK MENGKOLONISASI AKAR Shorea javanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melya Riniarti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Shorea javanica was a high dependent plant to ectomycorrhizal symbiosis, dealing with its growth. In Lampung Province, S.javanica standing stock have been hundreds of years, known as repong damar.  It's threatened by some deforestation, such as forest fire.  This study aimed to analyze the impact of heating on the ability of ectomycorrhizal colonization and analyze the effect of ectomycorrhizal inoculation on the growth of S. javanica.  The experiment arranged by randomized complete design with 5 treatments, which were without inoculum, unheated inoculum, soil inoculums heat to 40oC, 70oC and 100°C for 24 hours. Soil inoculums are taken under S. javanica standing, at Krui, Pesisir Barat District, Lampung Province. The result analyzed by ANOVA and continued with LSD test.  The experiment was conducted for four months.  The results show that colonization ectomycorrhiza still existed up to 100oC and ectomycorrhiza could enhance growth variables, including height, leaves number, leaf area, root length and root dry weight. The best colonization and growth were on 100oC heating. The heat treatments seem killed some fungus.  Only a few fungi could resist and colonize S. javanica roots.  Without any competitors, the resist ectomycorrhizal could develop broadly.

  3. An overview of Cistus ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandini, O; Contu, M; Rinaldi, A C

    2006-09-01

    The genus Cistus comprises a group of about 20 shrub species found in wide areas throughout the whole Mediterranean region to the Caucasus. Being one of the main constituents of the Mediterranean-type maquis, this plant genus is peculiar in that it has developed a range of specific adaptations to resist summer drought and frequent disturbance events, such as fire and grazing. In addition, it can form both ectomycorrhizas and arbuscular mycorrhizas. In this paper, we review the information available on the ectomycorrhizal fungi of Cistus across its entire geographic range, as gathered and critically sifted from both published literature sources and personal observations. Although the resulting data matrix was based primarily on accounts of sporocarp inventories in the field, existing knowledge on the features of Cistus natural and synthesized ectomycorrhizas was also included and discussed. In total, more than 200 fungal species belonging to 40 genera have been reported so far to be associated with Cistus. An analysis of the pattern of ectomycorrhizal diversity and host specificity revealed that members of the Cortinariaceae and Russulaceae make the most of both Cistus-aspecific and Cistus-specific mycobionts. Further studies are needed to expand our preliminary knowledge of the mycorrhizal ecology and biology of Cistus and its fungal associates, focusing on topics such as mycobiont diversity, host specificity, fungal succession, mycorrhizal influence on stress tolerance, and impact of disturbances, while comparing the findings with those from other ecosystems.

  4. Diversity of ectomycorrhizal Thelephoraceae in Tuber melanosporum-cultivated orchards of Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Miguel, Ana María; Águeda, Beatriz; Sáez, Raimundo; Sánchez, Sergio; Parladé, Javier

    2016-04-01

    Truffles are edible hypogeous ascomycetes highly appreciated worldwide, especially the black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.). In recent decades, the cultivation of the black truffle has expanded across the Mediterranean climate regions in and outside its native range. Members of the Thelephoraceae (Thelephorales, Agaricomycetes, Basidiomycota) are commonly found in truffle plantations, but their co-occurrence with Tuber species and other members of the fungal community has been scarcely reported. Thelephoraceae is one of the most represented families of the ectomycorrhizal fungal community in boreal and Mediterranean forests. To reveal the diversity of these fungi in T. melanosporum-cultivated plantations, ten orchards located in the Navarra region (Northern Spain) were surveyed for 2 years. Morphological and molecular approaches were used to detect and identify the Thelephoraceae ectomycorrhizas present in those plantations. Ten different mycorrhizal types were detected and described. Four of them were morphologically identified as Tomentella galzinii, Quercirhiza cumulosa, Q. squamosa, and T39 Thelephoraceae type. Molecular analyses revealed 4-6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), depending on the nucleotide database used, but similarities remained under 95 % and no clear species assignments could be done. The results confirm the diversity and abundance of this fungal family in the ectomycorrhizal community of black truffle plantations, generally established in Mediterranean areas. The occurrence and relative abundance of Thelephoraceae ectomycorrhizas is discussed in relation to their possible influence on truffle production.

  5. Ostryopsis davidiana seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi facilitate formation of mycorrhizae on Pinus tabulaeformis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shu-Lan; Li, Guo-Lei; Liu, Yong; Kasten Dumroese, R; Lv, Rui-Heng

    2009-08-01

    Reforestation in China is important for reversing anthropogenic activities that degrade the environment. Pinus tabulaeformis is desired for these activities, but survival and growth of seedlings can be hampered by lack of ectomycorrhizae. When outplanted in association with Ostryopsis davidiana plants on reforestation sites, P. tabulaeformis seedlings become mycorrhizal and survival and growth are enhanced; without O. davidiana, pines often remain without mycorrhizae and performance is poorer. To better understand this relationship, we initiated an experiment using rhizoboxes that restricted root and tested the hypothesis that O. davidiana seedlings facilitated ectomycorrhizae formation on P. tabulaeformis seedlings through hyphal contact. We found that without O. davidiana seedlings, inocula of five indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi were unable to grow and associate with P. tabulaeformis seedlings. Inocula placed alongside O. davidiana seedlings, however, resulted in enhanced growth and nutritional status of O. davidiana and P. tabulaeformis seedlings, and also altered rhizosphere pH and phosphatase activity. We speculate that these species form a common mycorrhizal network and this association enhances outplanting performance of P. tabulaeformis seedlings used for forest restoration.

  6. Ectomycorrhizal influence on particle size, surface structure, mineral crystallinity, functional groups, and elemental composition of soil colloids from different soil origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Wang, Huimei; Wang, Wenjie; Yang, Lei; Zu, Yuangang

    2013-01-01

    Limited data are available on the ectomycorrhizae-induced changes in surface structure and composition of soil colloids, the most active portion in soil matrix, although such data may benefit the understanding of mycorrhizal-aided soil improvements. By using ectomycorrhizae (Gomphidius viscidus) and soil colloids from dark brown forest soil (a good loam) and saline-alkali soil (heavily degraded soil), we tried to approach the changes here. For the good loam either from the surface or deep soils, the fungus treatment induced physical absorption of covering materials on colloid surface with nonsignificant increases in soil particle size (P > 0.05). These increased the amount of variable functional groups (O-H stretching and bending, C-H stretching, C=O stretching, etc.) by 3-26% and the crystallinity of variable soil minerals (kaolinite, hydromica, and quartz) by 40-300%. However, the fungus treatment of saline-alkali soil obviously differed from the dark brown forest soil. There were 12-35% decreases in most functional groups, 15-55% decreases in crystallinity of most soil minerals but general increases in their grain size, and significant increases in soil particle size (P soil colloids from saline-alkali soil, moving them close to those of the good loam of dark brown forest soil.

  7. Caracterización de micorrizas establecidas entre dos hongos comestibles silvestres y pinos nativos de México Characterization of mycorrhizas established between two wild edible mushrooms and native pines of Mexico

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    Violeta Carrasco-Hernández

    Full Text Available Las especies forestales dependen de la simbiosis que realizan con los hongos ectomicorrízicos, para un crecimiento óptimo. Adicionalmente México es un importante reservorio cultural y biológico de especies de hongos silvestres comestibles a nivel mundial. A pesar de la gran importancia ecológica, antropológica y práctica, existen escasas descripciones de las ectomicorrizas formadas entre hongos ectomicorrizicos comestibles y plantas nativas de México. En el presente trabajo, se realizó la descripción morfológica de las ectomicorrizas de los hongos comestibles Laccaria bicolor y L. proxima en asociación con Pinus patula y P. pseudostrobus. La síntesis de las micorrizas estudiadas se efectuó mediante la inoculación con esporas en un sustrato estéril, bajo condiciones de invernadero. Se describen las ectomicorrizas formadas en plantas 397 días después de la siembra de pinos y de la inoculación con las especies fúngicas. Se observaron diferencias en la micromorfología de las ectomicorrizas de ambas especies fúngicas, siendo los principales caracteres distintivos, la longitud de la ectomicorriza, el tipo de ramificación, la forma de las puntas no ramificadas y el color de los ápices. Ambas especies presentaron el mismo arreglo anatómico de la capa externa del manto. Se adiciona también la descripción de las esporomas de Laccaria bicolor y L. proxima. Este estudio se realizó en el laboratorio de micorrizas del Programa de Edafología del Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agrícolas (CP en 2009.For an optimum growth, forest species depend on the symbiosis with ectomycorrhizal mushrooms. Additionally, Mexico is an important cultural and biological reserve of species of wild edible mushrooms at world level. In spite of huge ecological, anthropological and practical importance, there are scarce descriptions of ectomycorrhizas formed between edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms and native plants of Mexico. In this work was done

  8. Characterization of the Oxygen Transmission Rate of Oak Wood Species Used in Cooperage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Alamo-Sanza, María; Cárcel, Luis Miguel; Nevares, Ignacio

    2017-01-25

    The oxygen that wine receives while aged in barrels is of interest because it defines the reactions that occur during aging and, therefore, the final properties of the wine. This study is intended to make up for the lack of information concerning the oxygen permeability of eight different woods of Quercus alba L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl. commonly used. In addition, it shows how oxygen transfer evolves with the liquid contact time during testing under similar aging conditions to those in wine barrels. French oak woods permitted a higher oxygenation rate than American ones in all cases. A decrease in the oxygen entry caused by impregnation of the wood during the process was observed in all of the species studied. This process is determined by the thickness of the flooded wood layer containing free water, although differently in the two species, possibly due to the anatomical structure and the logging process for each.

  9. Typification of taxa of subfamily Silenoideae (Caryophyllaceae Juss. from Siberia and Russian Far East based on materials kept in the Herbarium of the Komarov Botanical Institute (LE

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    G. A. Lazkov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Data on type material of previously not typified taxa of the subfamily Silenoideae (Caryophyllaceae Juss., kept in the Herbarium of the Komarov Botanical Institute (LE are summarized in the paper. All relevant taxa including eight species (or subsequently accepted as species: Gastrolychnis violascens Tolm., Gypsophila stricta Bunge, Heterochroa petraea Bunge, Lychnis ajanensis var. villosula Trautv. [L. villosula (Trautv. Gorschk.], L. fulgens var. wilfordi Regel [L. wilfordi (Regel Maxim.], L. tristis Bunge, Melandrium olgae Maxim., Silene melandriiformis Maxim., five varieties (Melandrium affine var. Intermedium Tolm., Silene repens var. pratensis Kom., S. repens var. alpina Kom., S. repens var. angustifolia Turcz., S. repens var. latifolia Turcz., and one form (Silene repens f. densa Kom. are lectotypified.Key words: Caryophyllaceae, Silenoideae, type specimens, typification, Komarov Botanical Institute (LE, Siberia, Far East. 

  10. Caractérisation des contraintes biotiques et abiotiques sur la phénologie printanière du chêne. Expliquer les patrons de diversité et prédire les changements futurs

    OpenAIRE

    Dantec, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    La phénologie du débourrement est un caractère majeur d’adaptation des arbres à leur environnement en milieu tempéré. Notre objectif a été de caractériser les contraintes biotiques (oïdium) et abiotiques (températures hivernales et printanières / gels tardifs) s’exerçant sur le débourrement afin d’expliquer les patrons de variation phénologique intra et inter populationnelle observés chez le chêne (Quercus petraea) le long d’un gradient altitudinal. Nous avons utilisé une approche combinant o...

  11. Comparison between the contribution of ellagitannins of new oak barrels and one-year-used barrels

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    Navarro María

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the botanical origin (French oak: Quercus petraea and American oak: Quercus alba, toasting level and if the barrel were new of previously used during one year have been studied. Results indicate that French oak released significant higher amounts of ellagitannins than American oak. Toasting level also exert a great influence. The higher the toasting level the lower the ellagitannin concentration in wines. Finally, the use during one year of the barrels drastically decreases the ellagitannin concentration in wines. Consequently, it can be concluded that the origin of oak, the toasting level and especially the previous use of the barrels have a very significant influence on the final ellagitannin concentration in wine, and probably on its sensory impact.

  12. Leaflet anatomy verifies relationships within Syagrus (Arecaceae and aids in identification

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    Larry Noblick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The current investigation was carried out to examine how palm anatomy may coincide with the current molecular analysis including the three recognized clades of Syagrus Mart. and to justify the splitting of acaulescent Syagrus species (e.g. S. petraea (Mart. Becc. into several species. Free-hand cross-sections of leaflets were made and the comparison of these verifies the relationships suggested by the molecular data. Free-hand leaflet sections were also found to be useful in the identification of otherwise difficult-to-identify acaulescent Syagrus species. The result and conclusion is that anatomical data is valuable in helping to verify molecular data and that splitting the acaulescent species of Syagrus is justified by the differences discovered in their field habit and anatomy. These differences were used to produce an identification key that is based on the anatomy.

  13. Macromycetes of oak forests in the Jurassic Landscape Park (Częstochowa Upland - monitoring studies

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    Maria Ławrynowicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycological observations were carried out between 1994-1996 in two representative plots (1000 m2 each in 80-year-old oak plantation (Quercus robur and Qu. petraea on calcareous hill in the Mstów village in the Jurassic Landscape Park. The project was carried out in the frame of international network of the „Mycological monitoring in European oak forests". During 24 visits in the plots a total of 190 species of macromycetes was recorded: 80 mycorrhizal and 110 saprobic fungi. Among them 2 species are new to Poland and 16 are inscribed in the Red List of threatened macromycetes in Poland (Wojewoda and Ławrynowicz 1992.

  14. Fractal dimension does not adequately describe the complexity of leaf margin in seedlings of Quercus species

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    Camarero, Jesús Julio

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available We quantified the complexity of leaf margin in a set of Quercus tree species using fractal dimension estimated by the box-counting method (FDb. Leaves were sampled from seedlings in a set of 15 Quercus species with a wide range of leaf morphology (Q. agrifolia, Q. alba, Q. cerris, Q. chrysolepis, Q. coccifera, Q.faginea, Q. frainetto, Q. ilex subsp. ballota, Q. ilex subsp. ilex, Q. petraea, Q. pyrenaica, Q. robur, Q. rubra, Q. suber, and Q. velutina. To describe leaf-edge roughness, we used simple indices: P/L - the ratio of leaf perimeter (P to maximum leaf length (L along the main nerve; P/A - the ratio of leaf perimeter to leaf-blade area (A and its dimensionless version (P/A0'; and WM/Wm -the ratio of maximum distance from the lobe tip to the main nerve (WM to minimum distance from the lobe incision to the main nerve (Wm. There was a strong positive relationship between FDb and P/A. Clustering analysis revealed the existence of three groups of leaves, namely those with: smooth or spiny margins (e.g., Q. coccifera, Q. velutina, shallow lobes (e.g., Q. petraea, and deep lobes (e.g., Q. pyrenaica. In the studied Quercus species, the ratio WM/Wm is a simple and suitable leaflobation index. It is suggested that the flux rate along the leaf edge is related to the complexity of this boundary.Se ha cuantificado la complejidad del margen de las hojas de varias especies arboreas del genero Quercus utilizando la dimension fractal estimada mediante el modo del recuento de cajas (FDb. Se tomaron hojas procedentes de plantulas pertenecientes a 15 especies de Quercus con un amplio rango de morfologfa foliar (Q. agrifolia, Q. alba, Q. cerris, Q. chrysolepis, Q. coccifera, Q. faginea, Q. frainetto, Q. ilex subsp. ballota, Q. ilex subsp. ilex, Q. petraea, Q. pyrenaica, Q. robur, Q. rubra, Q. suber y Q. velutina. Se usaron varios Indices sencillos para describir la complejidad del borde de la hoja: P/L, la relation entre el perimetro foliar (P y la longitud

  15. The influence of nitrogen in stemflow and precipitation on epiphytic bryophytes, Isothecium myosuroides Brid., Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp of Atlantic oakwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, I D; Mitchell, R J; Truscott, A-M; Cape, J N; van Dijk, N; Smith, R I; Fowler, D; Sutton, M A

    2008-09-01

    The spatial relationship between the concentration and deposition of the major ions in precipitation and stemflow and their influence on the tissue nitrogen concentration of three epiphytic bryophytes on Quercus petraea (Matt) Liebl. and Q. robur L. was investigated at seven UK Atlantic oak woodland sites with a range of total N deposition of 55-250 mmol m(-2). The main driver of change in tissue N concentrations of three epiphytic bryophytes (Isothecium myosuroides Brid. (Eurhynchium myosuroides (Brid.) Schp.), Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp.) was total N deposition in stemflow, dominated by ammonium deposition. The three epiphytic species also showed strong relationships between tissue N concentration and total N deposition in rainfall but a poor correlation with total N ion concentration in rainfall. This study shows that epiphytic bryophytes utilise stemflow N and thus increase their risk from inputs of total N deposition compared to terricolous species at the same site.

  16. Morphological characteristics and DNA sequence analysis of Petriella setifera and Oidiodendron setiferum from twigs of diseased oak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kwaśna

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Examination of isolates of Petriella setifera and Oidiodendron setiferum revealed new diagnostic morphological charactcristics. Chlamydosporcs formed by P. setifera, isolated from twigs of sessile oak (Quercus petraea showing symptoms of oak decline, are described for the first time. The first pictures of P. setifera anamorphs since the publication of its original description in 1912 are presented. Isolates of O. setiferum, from sessile oak twigs and from a log of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris, were found to have swollen, hyaline, thin-walled, sterile apices on the non-fertile hairs surrounding the fertile heads of conidiophores. They also had numerous coils formed by thin hyphae in the submerged mycelium in agar culture. The taxonomy of both fungi was confirmed by rDNA sequence analysis.

  17. Phytosociological studies of the forests with sessile oak and Norway spruce from South-Eastern Transylvania

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    Adrian Indreica

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The forests with sessile oak (Quercus petraea and Norway spruce (Picea abies from south-eastern Transylvania represent a peculiar type of phytocenoses, rather unusual for the present-day vegetation of Romania’s territory. Aim of the study is to provide a detailed description of the vegetation and to identify the phytosociological and typological units to which it could belong. Beside this, stand structure and regeneration status of the main tree species are illustrated. The studied area is located around Carpathian intermountain depressions Braşov and Ciuc, where vegetation had a peculiar history and today sessile oak forests on high altitude exists, interfering with spruce forests. The hypothesis of the process naturalness is supported by vegetation history in the area, climate, stand structure and peculiarities of herb layer composition (the mixture of relic of both mountain-boreal origin and south-European origin, like Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Pyrola rotundifolia and respectively Potentilla micrantha, Lathyrus venetus respectively. Sintaxonomically, studied phytocenoses with sessile oak and spruce belong mainly to acidophilus oak forests (Luzulo luzuloidis-Quercetum petraeae, but some of them resemble oak-hornbeam forests (Carici pilosae-Carpinetum, indicating a more recent change in stand structure and suggesting that not the soil, but the climate is the driving force of succession. Regeneration of sessile oak is at least satisfactory, but the expansion of spruce in such stands could seriously restrict the survival of sessile oak. A new typological unit will be appropriate,for a better management of sessile oak forests with spruce admixture.

  18. Nomenclatura popular de Quercus (Fagaceae: en los valles meridionales de Cantabria (España

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    Pardo de Santayana, Manuel

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the Ethnotaxonomy and Ethnonomenclature of southern Cantabria Quercus (Q- faginea subsp. faginea, Q. ilex subsp. ilex, Q. petraea, Q. pyrenaica, Q. robur is presented. An extensive vocabulary associated with these popular species has been compiled. The analysis of this lexicón shows the richness and complexity of folk plant taxonomy and nomenclature. In total 28 vernacular ñames, which are different forms of 12 principal lexemes, have been compiled. Maps with the geographical distribution of the ñames let us delimit lingüistical áreas. An analysis of this rich lexicón is also presented. The meaning of the ñames, often polisemic, theiretymologies and geographical distribution is studied.Se presenta un estudio sobre la etnotaxonomía y etnonomenclatura de los Quercus (Q. faginea subsp. faginea, Q. ilex subsp. ilex, Q. petraea, Q. pyrenaica, Q. robar que viven en el S de Cantabria. Se ha desarrollado un abundante léxico en tomo a estas especies tan cotidianas, que sirve de ejemplo para estudiar la complejidad y riqueza de la nomenclatura popular. Se han recopilado 28 nombres vernáculos, variantes de 12 lexemas principales. Se han realizado mapas de distribución de los nombres recopilados que permiten delimitar zonas lingüísticas. Además se presenta un análisis de este rico léxico en el que se hace hincapié en su significado, muchas veces polisémico, etimología y distribución geográfica.

  19. Assessing future suitability of tree species under climate change by multiple methods: a case study in southern Germany

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    Helge Walentowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We compared results derived using three different approaches to assess the suitability of common tree species on the Franconian Plateau in southern Germany under projected warmer and drier climate conditions in the period 2061-2080. The study area is currently a relatively warm and dry region of Germany. We calculated species distribution models (SDMs using information on species’ climate envelopes to predict regional species spectra under 63 different climate change scenarios. We complemented this with fine-scale ecological niche analysis using data from 51 vegetation surveys in seven forest reserves in the study area, and tree-ring analysis (TRA from local populations of five tree species to quantify their sensitivity to climatic extreme years. The SDMs showed that predicted future climate change in the region remains within the climate envelope of certain species (e.g. Quercus petraea, whilst for e.g. Fagus sylvatica, future climate conditions in one third of the scenarios are too warm and dry. This was confirmed by the TRA: sensitivity to drought periods is lower for Q. petraea than for F. sylvatica. The niche analysis shows that the local ecological niches of Quercus robur and Fraxinus excelsior are mainly characterized by soils providing favorable water supply than by climate, and Pinus sylvestris (planted is strongly influenced by light availability. The best adapted species for a warmer and potentially drier climate in the study region are Acer campestre, Sorbus torminalis, S. aria, Ulmus minor, and Tilia platyphyllos, which should therefore play a more prominent role in future climate-resilient mixed forest ecosystems.

  20. Carbon pools and temporal dynamics along a rotation period in sessile oak dominated high forest and coppice with standards stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckman, V. J.; Yan, S.; Hochbichler, E.; Glatzel, G.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon pools in two Quercus petraea (sessile oak) dominated chronosequences under different forest management (high forest and coppice with standards) were investigated. The objective was to study temporal carbon dynamics, in particular carbon sequestration in the soil and woody biomass production, in common forest management systems in eastern Austria along with stand development. The chronosequence approach was used to substitute time-for-space to enable coverage of a full rotation period in each system. Carbon content was determined in the following compartments: aboveground biomass, litter, soil to a depth of 50 cm, living root biomass and decomposing residues in the mineral soil horizons. Biomass carbon pools, except fine roots and residues, were estimated using species-specific allometric functions. Total carbon pools were on average 143 Mg ha-1 in the high forest stand (HF) and 213 Mg ha-1 in the coppice with standards stand (CS). The mean share of the total organic carbon pool (TOC) which is soil organic carbon (SOC) differs only marginally between HF (43.4%) and CS (42.1%), indicating the dominance of site factors, particularly climate, in controlling this ratio. While there was no significant change in O-layer and SOC stores over stand development, we found clear relationships between living biomass (aboveground and belowground) pools and C:N ratio in topsoil horizons with stand age. SOC pools seem to be very stable and an impact of silvicultural interventions was not detected with the applied method. Rapid decomposition and mineralization of litter, indicated by low O-horizon pools with wide C:N ratios of residual woody debris at the end of the vegetation period, suggests high rates of turnover in this fraction. CS, in contrast to HF benefits from rapid resprouting after coppicing and hence seems less vulnerable to conditions of low rainfall and drying topsoil. Keywords: carbon dynamics; soil carbon; chronosequence; Quercus petraea; coppice; high forest

  1. Wood anatomical responses of oak saplings exposed to air warming and soil drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonti, P; Heller, O; Cherubini, P; Rigling, A; Arend, M

    2013-01-01

    Water is vital for plant performance and survival. Its scarcity, induced by a seasonal decline in soil water availability or an increase of evaporative demand, can cause failures of the water conducting system. An adequate tolerance to drought and the ability to acclimate to changing hydraulic conditions are important features for the survival of long-lived woody plants in dry environments. In this study we examine secondary growth and xylem anatomical acclimation of 6 year old saplings of three European oak species (Quercus robur, Q. petraea, Q. pubescens) during the third consecutive year of exposure to soil drought and/or air warming (from 2007 to 2009). Intra-annual pinning was applied to mark the development of the formation of the annual ring 2009. Vessel size, parenchyma cell density and fiber size produced at different time of the growing season 2009 were compared between drought and warming treatments and species. Drought reduced secondary growth and induced changes in xylem structure while air warming had little effect on wood anatomical traits. Results indicate that drought-exposed saplings adjust their xylem structure to improve resistance and repairing abilities after cavitation. All species show a significant radial growth reduction, a reduced vessel size with diminished conductivity and a slightly increased density of parenchyma cells. Comparisons between species fostered our understanding of the relationship between the inter-specific xylem hydraulic plasticity and the ecological response to drought. The stronger changes observed for Q. robur and Q. petraea indicate a lower drought tolerance than Q. pubescens.

  2. Single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery and validation in high-density SNP array for genetic analysis in European white oaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepoittevin, C; Bodénès, C; Chancerel, E; Villate, L; Lang, T; Lesur, I; Boury, C; Ehrenmann, F; Zelenica, D; Boland, A; Besse, C; Garnier-Géré, P; Plomion, C; Kremer, A

    2015-11-01

    An Illumina Infinium SNP genotyping array was constructed for European white oaks. Six individuals of Quercus petraea and Q. robur were considered for SNP discovery using both previously obtained Sanger sequences across 676 gene regions (1371 in vitro SNPs) and Roche 454 technology sequences from 5112 contigs (6542 putative in silico SNPs). The 7913 SNPs were genotyped across the six parental individuals, full-sib progenies (one within each species and two interspecific crosses between Q. petraea and Q. robur) and three natural populations from south-western France that included two additional interfertile white oak species (Q. pubescens and Q. pyrenaica). The genotyping success rate in mapping populations was 80.4% overall and 72.4% for polymorphic SNPs. In natural populations, these figures were lower (54.8% and 51.9%, respectively). Illumina genotype clusters with compression (shift of clusters on the normalized x-axis) were detected in ~25% of the successfully genotyped SNPs and may be due to the presence of paralogues. Compressed clusters were significantly more frequent for SNPs showing a priori incorrect Illumina genotypes, suggesting that they should be considered with caution or discarded. Altogether, these results show a high experimental error rate for the Infinium array (between 15% and 20% of SNPs potentially unreliable and 10% when excluding all compressed clusters), and recommendations are proposed when applying this type of high-throughput technique. Finally, results on diversity levels and shared polymorphisms across targeted white oaks and more distant species of the Quercus genus are discussed, and perspectives for future comparative studies are proposed.

  3. Diurnal and Seasonal Changes in Stem Radius Increment and Sap Flow Density Indicate Different Responses of Two Co-existing Oak Species to Drought Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MÉSZÁROS, Ilona

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using continuous monitoring of stem radius combined with sap flow measurements weassessed the effects of environmental conditions on tree radial growth and water status of two coexistingoak species (Quercus petraea and Quercus cerris at high resolution time in growingseasons of 2008 and 2009. The forest (95–100 yr is situated in a xeric site in the transition zonebetween forested and forest-steppe regions in north-eastern Hungary, Bükk mountains (47o90’N,20o46’E, elevation 320–340 m a.s.l.. Weather conditions in the growing season of 2008 (totalrainfall 354 mm, mean daily temperature 17.0 oC was less extreme than in 2009 (total rainfall299 mm, temperature 17.9 oC. Rainfall strongly determined the course of radial growth incrementin trees. Radial growth of trees was limited in 2009 due to the drought in spring. The maximumradial increment of both species was achieved three weeks earlier (4th week of June than in 2008(4th week of July. We used dendrometer monitoring data for estimation of stem (tree waterdeficit (W by measuring water-related changes in stem radius (Zweifel et al. 2005. Themagnitude of tree water deficit variation (W was always smaller in Q. cerris than in Q. petraea.In contrast, Quercus cerris always exhibited larger daytime averages and maxima of sap flowdensity. In August of 2009 when drought became severe there were larger increases in tree waterdeficit (W (50–55 % in both species compared to July as it could be expected from the extentof decreases in sap flow density (24–28%. Our data suggested that due to the low SWC thetranspiration was supported mainly from the inner water storage of trees during prolonged droughtwhich resulted in high stem water deficit (W.

  4. Octaviania asterosperma (hypogeous Basidiomycota. Recent data to ecology and distribution

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    Piotr Mleczko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic analyses place Octaviania asterosperma in the Boletales, with Leccinum being the closest relative. Results of the structural investigation of O. asterosperma ectomycorrhiza with Fagus sylvatica confirm this systematic position. In Europe the species is an ectomycorrhizal partner of broad-leaved trees, such as Carpinus, Corylus, Fagus, Quercus and Tilia. This paper aims at presenting the new data to the distribution of O. asterosperma in Central Europe. The description of the basidiocarps discovered in Poland in the recent years is also given, together with evidence for the parasitic relationship of Sepedonium laevigatum with O. asterosperma. We also present the information concerning all known localities of the species in Poland and its distribution map. Data on the ecologz, distribution and status O. asterosperma in Europe, and some structural aspects of basidiocarps and spores, are also summarized.

  5. Linking mycorrhizas to sporocarps: a new species, Geopora cercocarpi, on Cercocarpus ledifolius (Rosaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southworth, Darlene; Frank, Jonathan L

    2011-01-01

    Mycorrhizal assemblages characterized by molecular data frequently differ from collections of mycorrhizal sporocarps at the same site. Geopora species are frequent mycobionts of ectomycorrhizal roots, but except for G. cooperi they are rarely identified to species by molecular methods. Among the mycobionts of ectomycorrhizas with Cercocarpus ledifolius (Rosaceae) was a fungal species with a 91% BLAST match to G. arenicola. To determine the species of Geopora we surveyed for hypogeous sporocarps under C. ledifolius at sites in southern Oregon where the Geopora mycorrhizas had been collected and identified by DNA sequences of the ITS region. We found sporocarps of a Geopora species with 100% BLAST match to the mycorrhizas. Morphological characters of a white hymenium, inrolled entire margin and large spores, along with a hypogeous habit and a mycorrhizal host of C. ledifolius, distinguished these specimens from previously described species. Here we describe a new species, Geopora cercocarpi.

  6. Heavy metal distribution in Suillus luteus mycorrhizas - as revealed by micro-PIXE analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turnau, K. E-mail: ubturnau@cyf-kr.edu.pl; Przybylowicz, W.J.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J

    2001-07-01

    Suillus luteus/Pinus sylvestris mycorrhizas, collected from zinc wastes in Southern Poland, were selected as potential biofilters on the basis of earlier studies carried out with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) microanalytical system coupled to scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Using the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) nuclear microprobe, elemental concentrations in the ectomycorrhiza parts were for the first time estimated quantitatively. Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) true elemental maps from freeze-dried and chemically fixed mycorrhizas revealed strong accumulation of Ca, Fe, Zn and Pb within the fungal mantle and in the rhizomorph. Vascular tissue was enriched with P, S and K, while high concentrations of Si and Cl were present in the endodermis. Cu was the only element showing elevated concentrations in the cortex region. Elemental losses and redistributions were found in mycorrhizas prepared by chemical fixation. Some problems related to elemental imaging are discussed.

  7. Evolution of mycorrhiza systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, J. W. G.

    Most terrestrial plants live in mutualistic symbiosis with root-infecting mycorrhizal fungi. Fossil records and molecular clock dating suggest that all extant land plants have arisen from an ancestral arbuscular mycorrhizal condition. Arbuscular mycorrhizas evolved concurrently with the first colonisation of land by plants some 450-500 million years ago and persist in most extant plant taxa. Ectomycorrhizas (about 200million years ago) and ericoid mycorrhizas (about 100million years ago) evolved subsequently as the organic matter content of some ancient soils increased and sclerophyllous vegetation arose as a response to nutrient-poor soils respectively. Mycorrhizal associations appear to be the result of relatively diffuse coevolutionary processes. While early events in the evolution of mycorrhizal symbioses may have involved reciprocal genetic changes in ancestral plants and free-living fungi, available evidence points largely to ongoing parallel evolution of the partners in response to environmental change.

  8. The (oxalato)aluminate complex as an antimicrobial substance protecting the "shiro" of Tricholoma matsutake from soil micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Katsutoshi; Shiro, Misao; Okura, Ryuki; Oizumi, Kazuya; Fujita, Toru; Sasamori, Takahiro; Tokitoh, Norihiro; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Muneyoshi; Hiradate, Syuntaro; Hirai, Nobuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, a basidiomycete, forms ectomycorrhizas with Pinus densiflora as the host tree. Its fruiting body, "matsutake" in Japanese, is an edible and highly prized mushroom, and it grows in a circle called a fairy ring. Beneath the fairy ring of T. matsutake, a whitish mycelium-soil aggregated zone, called "shiro" in Japanese, develops. The front of the shiro, an active mycorrhizal zone, functions to gather nutrients from the soil and roots to nourish the fairy ring. Bacteria and sporulating fungi decrease from the shiro front, whereas they increase inside and outside the shiro front. Ohara demonstrated that the shiro front exhibited antimicrobial activity, but the antimicrobial substance has remained unidentified for 50 years. We have identified the antimicrobial substance as the (oxalato)aluminate complex, known as a reaction product of oxalic acid and aluminum phosphate to release soluble phosphorus. The complex protects the shiro from micro-organisms, and contributes to its development.

  9. Heavy metal distribution in Suillus luteus mycorrhizas - as revealed by micro-PIXE analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnau, K.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.

    2001-07-01

    Suillus luteus/Pinus sylvestris mycorrhizas, collected from zinc wastes in Southern Poland, were selected as potential biofilters on the basis of earlier studies carried out with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) microanalytical system coupled to scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Using the National Accelerator Centre (NAC) nuclear microprobe, elemental concentrations in the ectomycorrhiza parts were for the first time estimated quantitatively. Micro-proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) true elemental maps from freeze-dried and chemically fixed mycorrhizas revealed strong accumulation of Ca, Fe, Zn and Pb within the fungal mantle and in the rhizomorph. Vascular tissue was enriched with P, S and K, while high concentrations of Si and Cl were present in the endodermis. Cu was the only element showing elevated concentrations in the cortex region. Elemental losses and redistributions were found in mycorrhizas prepared by chemical fixation. Some problems related to elemental imaging are discussed.

  10. USO DE ECTOMICORRIZAS NA BIORREMEDIAÇÃO FLORESTAL

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    Alvaro Boson de Castro Faria

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of the aspects of mycorrhizas and their use in forest species and bioremediation. The information gathered from the literature had already indicated that ectomycorrhizal fungi may be very important to stimulate the growth of seedlings and trees. As for bioremediation, these fungi are promising in the ability to degrade pollutants in contaminated soils. In this sense, the benefits and uses of these microorganisms, and the characteristics of ectomycorrhizae (ECM are presented herein, which are promising for use in these processes. Also, information on the potential use of ECM for the remediation of persistent organic pollutants and heavy metals is presented, as well as some results already searched. It is shown that internationally, the focus of the research on mycorrhizae has occurred with new perspectives, beyond the conventional use to stimulate plant growth.

  11. EFFECTS OF PISOLITHUS TINCTORIUS AND LACCARIA FRATERNA ON THE GROWTH AND MYCORRfflZAL DEVELOPMENT OF PINUSPATULA SEEDLINGS

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    M. SUDHAKARA REDDY

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetative inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius and Laccariafraterna were inoculated to Pinuspatula seedlings grown in both steam sterilized and unsterilized shola soil. After 4 months of seedling growth, 10 seedlings from each treatment were harvested and various growth parameters were studied. Inoculation of these two fungi resulted in the production of ectomycorrhizas and increase in growth of P. patula seedlings when compared to uninoculated seedlings. Laccariafraterna inoculated seedlings showed more number of mycorrhizas than P. tinctorius inoculated seedlings at the end of one year. Both these fungi poorly colonized the root system in both soil treatments. There was no significant difference between these two fungi in improving the seedling growth in the nursery.

  12. Nitrogen availability is a primary determinant of conifer mycorrhizas across complex environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Filipa; Barsoum, Nadia; Lilleskov, Erik A; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2010-09-01

    Global environmental change has serious implications for functional biodiversity in temperate and boreal forests. Trees depend on mycorrhizal fungi for nutrient uptake, but predicted increases in nitrogen availability may alter fungal communities. To address a knowledge gap regarding the effects of nitrogen availability on mycorrhizal communities at large scales, we examine the relationship between nitrogen and ectomycorrhizas in part of a European biomonitoring network of pine forest plots. Our analyses show that increased nitrogen reduces fungal diversity and causes shifts in mycorrhizal community composition across plots, but we do not find strong evidence that within-plot differences in nitrogen availability affect ectomycorrhizal communities. We also carry out exploratory analyses to determine the relative importance of other environmental variables in structuring mycorrhizal communities, and discuss the potential use of indicator species to predict nitrogen-induced shifts in fungal communities.

  13. Influence of copper and formalin on the mycorrhiza of pine (Pinus kesiya Royle ex Gordon

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    G. D. Sharma

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Various concentrations of copper sulphate and formalin were tested for their effect on the efficiency of mycorrhizal functioning in pine seedlings. Low and higher doses of copper applied to the container grown seedling exhibited a less stimulatory effect than nedium doses. When applied in higher concentrations, the formalin caused mortality in young pine seedlings. The seedling yield and phosphate uptake was found maximum in 100 ppm applied concentration of copper. while słów growth and lower phosphate concentration was observed in the seedlings not given any copper treatment. Formalin at 50 ppm concentration slightly improved the seedling growth and phosphate uptake in mycorrhizal seedling as compared with untreated ones. Variation in the development and spread of ectomycorrhiza on the surface of roots of pine seedlings was also recorded in responses to copper and formalin treatments.

  14. Lifestyle Influence on the Content of Copper, Zinc and Rubidium in Wild Mushrooms

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    J. A. Campos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of 18 trace elements in several species of fungi (arranged in three groups: ectomycorrhizae, saprobes, and epiphytes has been determined. The measurements were made using the methodology of X-ray fluorescence. Higher contents of Cu and Rb (with statistical support have been found in the ectomycorrhizal species. The Zn content reached higher concentrations in the saprophytic species. According to the normality test and the search for outliers, the species Clitocybe maxima and Suillus bellini accumulate large amounts of Cu and Rb, respectively, so that both can be named as “outliers.” The leftwards displacement of the density curves and their nonnormality are attributed to the presence of these two species, which exhibit hyperaccumulation skills for Cu and Rb, respectively. Regarding Zn absorption, no particular species were classified as outlier; therefore it can be assumed that the observed differences between the different groups of fungi are due to differences in their nutritional physiology.

  15. Characterisation of ectomycorrhizal formation by the exotic fungus Amanita muscaria with Nothofagus cunninghamii in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunk, Christopher William; Lebel, Teresa; Keane, Philip J

    2012-02-01

    The occurrence of the exotic ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria in a mixed Nothofagus-Eucalyptus native forest was investigated to determine if A. muscaria has switched hosts to form a successful association with a native tree species in a natural environment. A mycorrhizal morphotype consistently found beneath A. muscaria sporocarps was examined, and a range of morphological and anatomical characteristics in common with those described for ectomycorrhizae formed by A. muscaria on a broad range of hosts were observed. A full description is provided. The likely plant associate was determined to be Nothofagus cunninghamii based upon anatomy of the roots. Analysis of ITS-1 and ITS-2 regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences confirmed the identities of both fungal and plant associates. These findings represent conclusive evidence of the invasion of a non-indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungus into native forest and highlight the ecological implications of this discovery.

  16. Influence of resting and pine sawdust application on chemical changes in post-agricultural soil and the ectomycorrhizal community of growing Scots pine saplings

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    Małecka Monika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in chemical compounds and in ectomycorrhizal structure were determined for Scots pine growing on post agricultural soil lying fallow for 3, 6 and 15 years, after amendment with pine sawdust. Soil without any amendments was used as the control treatment. Comparing the ectomycorrhizal structure 15 years after the application of pine sawdust revealed no significant differences in abundance or species richness between soil with and without organic enrichment. The results showed that the ectomycorrhizal status depends on soil conditions (soil pH, nitrogen content, which remain unaffected by saw dust application. In all treatments, the most frequently occurring ectomycorrhizae genera were Dermocybe, Hebeloma, Suillus, Tomentella and Tricholoma. Two species (Paxillus involutus, Amanita muscaria were specific to the control plots that lay fallow for 15 years.

  17. Pairwise transcriptomic analysis of the interactions between the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N and three beneficial, neutral and antagonistic soil bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Aurélie; Barret, Matthieu; Diedhiou, Abdala G; Leveau, Johan; de Boer, Wietse; Martin, Francis; Sarniguet, Alain; Frey-Klett, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by bacterial communities with which they interact physically and metabolically during their life cycle. These bacteria can have positive or negative effects on the formation and the functioning of ectomycorrhizae. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms by which ectomycorrhizal fungi and associated bacteria interact. To understand how ectomycorrhizal fungi perceive their biotic environment and the mechanisms supporting interactions between ectomycorrhizal fungi and soil bacteria, we analysed the pairwise transcriptomic responses of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor (Basidiomycota: Agaricales) when confronted with beneficial, neutral or detrimental soil bacteria. Comparative analyses of the three transcriptomes indicated that the fungus reacted differently to each bacterial strain. Similarly, each bacterial strain produced a specific and distinct response to the presence of the fungus. Despite these differences in responses observed at the gene level, we found common classes of genes linked to cell-cell interaction, stress response and metabolic processes to be involved in the interaction of the four microorganisms.

  18. PtSRR1, a putative Pisolithus tinctorius symbiosis related receptor gene is expressed during the first hours of mycorrhizal interaction with Castanea sativa roots PtSRR1, um possível receptor simbiose-regulado de Pisolithus tinctorius é expresso nas primeiras horas de interação ectomicorrízica com raízes de Castanea sativa

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    B. Acioli-Santos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available PtSRR1 EST was previously identified in the first hours of Pisolithus tinctorius and Castanea sativa interaction. QRT-PCR confirmed PtSRR1 early expression and in silico preliminary translated peptide analysis indicated a strong probability that PtSRR1 be a transmembrane protein. These data stimulate the PtSRR1 gene research during ectomycorrhiza formation.PtSRR1 foi isolado preliminarmente de P. tinctorius nas primeiras horas da interação com raízes de C. sativa. Análises de QRT-PCR confirmaram sua expressão positiva (12 h e seu peptídeo putativo indicou forte possibilidade para proteína transmembranar. Estes dados estimulam o estudo do PtSRR1 durante a formação de ectomicorrizas.

  19. Mycorrhizal synthesis of Lactarius indigo (Schw.) Fr. with five Neotropical pine species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, R; Díaz, G; Honrubia, M

    2005-11-01

    This paper describes for the first time the ectomycorrhiza synthesized between two Guatemalan strains of Lactarius indigo (Schw.) Fr. and the Neotropical species Pinus ayacahuite var. ayacahuite Ehren, P. hartwegii Lindl., P. oocarpa Schiede ex Schltdl. var oocarpa, P. pseudostrobus Lindl. and P. rudis Endl. The synthesis was carried out in a controlled growth chamber using plastic containers with peat moss-vermiculite substrate and mycelial inoculum. Mycorrhiza were obtained 25 days after inoculation. A description of the morphology, appearance and structure of mantle and Hartig net is given for each combination. Mycorrhiza were saffron to cinnamon greenish with age, with a net of saffron laticifers visible through outer mantle; orange latex secreted when injured. Cystidia-like emanating hyphae were observed on the mantle surface of young mycorrhiza. Plectenchymatous mantle with abundant interhyphal gelatinous material.

  20. Uniting Tricholoma sulphureum and T. bufonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comandini, Ornella; Haug, Ingeborg; Rinaldi, Andrea C; Kuyper, Thomas W

    2004-10-01

    The taxonomic status and relationship of Tricholoma sulphureum and the similar T. bufonium were investigated using different sets of characters. These included morphological data on fruit bodies, ecological and chorological data, and analysis of the sequence data obtained for the ITS of basidiomes of different ecological and geographic origin. Moreover, the ectomycorrhizas formed by T. bufonium on Abies alba and Quercus sp. were characterised, and anatomical features compared with those of T. sulphureum mycorrhizas on coniferous and broad-leaved host trees. Our results revealed extensive ITS variation in members of the T. sulphureum group, but this variation was not correlated with morphology, ecology, or geographical distribution. We conclude that T. bufonium cannot be maintained as an autonomous taxon and should be treated as an infraspecific variant of T. sulphureum.

  1. Belowground carbon trade among tall trees in a temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tamir; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Körner, Christian

    2016-04-15

    Forest trees compete for light and soil resources, but photoassimilates, once produced in the foliage, are not considered to be exchanged between individuals. Applying stable carbon isotope labeling at the canopy scale, we show that carbon assimilated by 40-meter-tall spruce is traded over to neighboring beech, larch, and pine via overlapping root spheres. Isotope mixing signals indicate that the interspecific, bidirectional transfer, assisted by common ectomycorrhiza networks, accounted for 40% of the fine root carbon (about 280 kilograms per hectare per year tree-to-tree transfer). Although competition for resources is commonly considered as the dominant tree-to-tree interaction in forests, trees may interact in more complex ways, including substantial carbon exchange.

  2. Tracking mycorrhizas and extraradical mycelium of the edible fungus Lactarius deliciosus under field competition with Rhizopogon spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortal, Sara; Pera, Joan; Parladé, Javier

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the field persistence of the edible ectomycorrhizal fungus Lactarius deliciosus in competition with two ubiquitous soil fungi. Couples of plants inoculated with either L. deliciosus, Rhizopogon roseolus, or R. luteolus were transplanted, 10 cm apart, in two different sites at the following combinations: L. deliciosus-R. roseolus, L. deliciosus-R. luteolus, L. deliciosus-control (non-inoculated), control-R. roseolus, control-R. luteolus, and control-control. Eight months after transplantation, root colonization and extraradical soil mycelium for each fungal species were quantified. For mycelium quantification, soil cores equidistant to the two plants in each couple were taken, and total deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed using specific primers and TaqMan Minor groove binding (MGB) probes designed in the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region of each fungal species. Field site significantly influenced persistence of both mycorrhizas and extraradical mycelium of L. deliciosus. Extraradical mycelium quantity was positively correlated with the final percentage of ectomycorrhizas for the three fungal species. Different competitive pressure between the two Rhizopogon species on L. deliciosus persistence was observed, with R. luteolus having no effect on L. deliciosus survival. Negative correlation between the final percentage of mycorrhizas of L. deliciosus and R. roseolus was observed. However, no relationship was determined between extraradical mycelia of both fungal species. The results obtained suggest that competition between L. deliciosus and R. roseolus takes place in the root system, for ectomycorrhiza formation in available roots, rather than in the extraradical phase.

  3. TREES AND REGENERATION IN RUBBER AGROFORESTS AND OTHER FOREST-DERIVED VEGETATION IN JAMBI (SUMATRA, INDONESIA

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    Hesti L. Tata

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The rubber  agroforests  (RAF  of Indonesia provide  a dynamic interface  between natural  processes  of forest  regeneration and  human’s management   targeting  the harvesting  of latex  with  minimum investment  of time  and financial  resources.  The composition  and species richness  of higher  plants  across an intensification gradient from forest to monocultures of tree crops have been investigated  in six land use types (viz. secondary forest, RAF, rubber monoculture, oil palm plantation, cassava field and Imperata grassland  in Bungo,  Jambi  Province,  Indonesia.  We emphasize  comparison of four different  strata  (understory, seedling,  sapling  and tree of vegetation  between forest and RAF,  with  specific interest  in plant  dependence  on ectomycorrhiza fungi. Species richness  and species accumulation curves for seedling  and sapling  stages were similar  between forest and RAF,  but in the tree stratum  (trees > 10 cm dbh selective thinning by farmers was evident in a reduction  of species diversity and an increase in the proportion of trees with edible parts. Very few trees dependent on ectomycorrhiza fungi were encountered  in the RAF. However, the relative distribution of early and late successional species as evident from the wood density distribution showed no difference between RAF and forest.

  4. Effect of raw humus under two adult Scots pine stands on ectomycorrhization, nutritional status, nitrogen uptake, phosphorus uptake and growth of Pinus sylvestris seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Horst; Schäfer, Tina; Storbeck, Veronika; Härtling, Sigrid; Rudloff, Renate; Köck, Margret; Buscot, François

    2012-01-01

    Ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation improves tree growth and nutrient acquisition, particularly that of nitrogen (N). Few studies have coupled the effects of naturally occurring EM morphotypes to the nutrition of host trees. To investigate this, pine seedlings were grown on raw humus substrates collected at two forest sites, R2 and R3. Ectomycorrhiza morphotypes were identified, and their respective N uptake rates from organic (2-(13)C, (15)N-glycine) and inorganic ((15)NH(4)Cl, Na(15)NO(3), (15)NH(4)NO(3), NH(4)(15)NO(3)) sources as well as their phosphate uptake rates were determined. Subsequently, the growth and nutritional status of the seedlings were analyzed. Two dominant EM morphotypes displayed significantly different mycorrhization rates in the two substrates. Rhizopogon luteolus Fr. (RL) was dominant in R2 and Suillus bovinus (Pers.) Kuntze (SB) was dominant in R3. (15)N uptake of RL EM was at all times higher than that of SB EM. Phosphate uptake rates by the EM morphotypes did not differ significantly. The number of RL EM correlated negatively and the number of SB EM correlated positively with pine growth rate. Increased arginine concentrations and critical P/N ratios in needles indicated nutrient imbalances of pine seedlings from humus R2, predominantly mycorrhizal with RL. We conclude that different N supply in raw humus under Scots pine stands can induce shifts in the EM frequency of pine seedlings, and this may lead to EM formation by fungal strains with different ability to support tree growth.

  5. Comparison of the carbon stock in forest soil of sessile oak and beech forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Adrienn; Bene, Zsolt; Bidló, András

    2016-04-01

    Forest ecosystems are the most important carbon sinks. The forest soils play an important role in the global carbon cycle, because the global climate change or the increase of atmospheric CO2 level. We do not have enough data about the carbon stock of soils and its change due to human activities, which have similar value to carbon content of biomass. In our investigation we measured the carbon stock of soil in 10 stands of Quercus petraea and Fagus sylvatica. We took a 1.1 m soil column with soil borer and divided to 11 samples each column. The course organic and root residues were moved. After evaluation, we compared our results with other studies and the carbon stock of forests to each other. Naturally, the amount of SOC was the highest in the topsoil layers. However, we found significant difference between forest stands which stayed on the same homogenous bedrock, but very close to each other (e.g. distance was 1 or 2 km). We detected that different forest utilizations and tree species have an effect on the forest carbon as the litter as well (amount, composition). In summary, we found larger amount (99.1 C t/ha on average) of SOC in soil of stands, where sessile oak were the main stand-forming tree species. The amount of carbon was the least in turkey oak-sessile oak stands (85.4 C t/ha on average). We found the highest SOC (118.3 C t/ha) in the most mixed stand (silver lime-beech-red oak). In the future, it will be very important: How does climate change affect the spread of tree species or on carbon storage? Beech is more sensitive, but even sessile oak. These species are expected to replace with turkey oak, which is less sensitive to drought. Thus, it is possible in the future that we can expect to decrease of forest soil carbon stock capacity, which was confirmed by our experiment. Keywords: carbon sequestration, mitigation, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, litter Acknowledgements: Research is supported by the "Agroclimate.2" (VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034) EU

  6. Habitat use by wild boar Sus scrofa in Moncayo Nature Park, Spain

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    Rodrigues, Patrícia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Habitat use by wild boar Sus scrofaz was examined during a three-year period in Moncayo Nature Park, a protected mountain area in the Iberian mountain system, Spain. Tracking indirect signs of activity was used to collect data on the species occurrence, according to vegetation type, topography, hunting activity, and season. The data were analysed using binary logistic regression. Habitat used by wild boar differed according seasons, management practices, and vegetation. Main selected habitats were at medium elevations (1,101-1,600 m in areas dominated by holm oak (Quercus ilex, beech (Fagus sylvatica and oak woods of Q. robur, Q. petraea and Q. pyrenaica. Non-hunting areas were selected over hunting areas. We found a seasonal variation in the habitat use of wild boar, with areas dominated by holm oak being used disproportionately in spring, and areas at medium elevations selected only during summer. The results also support the view that non-hunting areas provide a refuge for this species inside the protected area.Estudiamos el uso del hábitat por parte del jabalí Sus scrofa a lo largo de tres años en el Parque Natural del Moncayo, un área protegida de montaña en el Sistema Ibérico, España. Para ello rastreamos las huellas y señales de su actividad en función de la vegetación, topografía, actividad cinegética y estacionalidad. Los datos fueron analizados utilizando regresiones logísticas binarias. El hábitat usado por el jabalí difiere según las estaciones, gestión y vegetación. Los hábitat mayoritariamente seleccionados fueron las altitudes medias (1101-1600 m en áreas dominadas por la encina (Quercus ilex, haya (Fagus sylvatica y robles (Q. robur, Q. petraea y Q. pirenaica. Las zonas no cinegéticas fueron seleccionadas frente a las cinegéticas. Encontramos diferencias estacionales en el uso del hábitat, con un uso mayor al esperado de los encinares en primavera así como de altitudes medias durante el verano. Los

  7. Species-specific climate response of oaks (Quercus spp. under identical environmental conditions

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    Sanders TGM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oak forests play a major role in Britain due to their economic, social and historic value. Sudden oak death and general decline symptoms have therefore caused major concerns in the forestry sector over the past decade. Several strategies have been proposed to preserve the economic and social value of oak forests, including the planting of native species with more southerly origins, or non-native species of oak that may be better suited to the projected climate of the future. The Ovington research plots, established 50 years ago at the Bedgebury Pinetum in southeast England, provided the opportunity to compare annual growth rates and climate-growth relationships of five oak species growing adjacent to each other on the same soil type and under the same climatic conditions. Clear differences were evident in annual increment and climate-growth responses for the five Quercus species. Growth rates were significantly lower (p<0.05 for the two species native to the UK (Q. petraea and Q. robur compared to the southern European and American species. A partitioning analysis using key climatic variables separates Q. coccinea from the other species due to its negative response to low temperatures. These results were confirmed by pointer year analysis. The analysis suggests that Q. robur is likely to be the more resilient of the two native species of oak to the future climate of southern Britain. Of the non-native species of oak evaluated, Q. coccinea represents an alternative species to Q. robur and Q. petraea on very dry, nutrient-poor sites. Q. palustris may also have some potential under current conditions for species diversification, but its requirement for higher summer precipitation than the other four species suggests that this potential may not be sustained as climate change progresses. However, if alternative species are selected as more resilient to climate change in terms of growth, it will be essential to consider a range of other issues

  8. World checklist of Geranium L. (Geraniaceae

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    Aedo, Carlos

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of the genus Geranium L. (Geraniaceae is presented. Four hundred and twenty three species are recognized in 3 subgenera and 18 sections. Our classification differs from Yeo's only in some aspects of subg. Erodioidea and Geranium. Section Brasiliensia is included in subg. Erodioidea, and sect. Neurophyllodes, Paramensia and Azorelloida in subg. Geranium. Section Azorelloida is proposed as an avowed substitute (nom. nov. for sect. Petraea R. Knuth, nom. illeg. G. collae is proposed as avowed substitute (nom. nov. for G. intermedium Colla, nom. illeg. An identification key to subgenera and sections is presented. A thorough revision of available names in the genus, and a review of their nomenclatural status were carried out. Correct name, place of publication and distribution are given for each species. Geographical distributions are given at region and botanical country leveis following the International Working Group on Taxonomic Databases (TDWG standard. When possible, selected references with relevant information are also included.Se presenta una "checklist" del género Geranium L. (Geraniaceae en la que se aceptan 423 especies, repartidas en 3 subgéneros y 18 secciones. Seguimos la clasificación propuesta por Yeo, aunque reconocemos la sección Brasiliensia en el subg. Erodioidea, y las secciones Neurophyllodes, Paramensia y Azorelloida en el subg. Geranium. La sect. Azorelloida es propuesta como nombre nuevo para la sect. Petraea R. Knuth, nom. illeg. Asimismo se propone G. collae como nombre nuevo para G. intermedium Colla, nom. illeg. Se incluye una clave para la identificación de los subgéneros y secciones. Después de revisar la práctica totalidad de los nombres publicados en Geranium se da el nombre correcto, el lugar de publicación y el área de distribución de cada especie aceptada, así como las referencias bibliográficas más importantes para cada una de ellas. Para codificar las distribuciones geográficas, en los

  9. Planting sentinel European trees in eastern Asia as a novel method to identify potential insect pest invaders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Roques

    Full Text Available Quarantine measures to prevent insect invasions tend to focus on well-known pests but a large proportion of the recent invaders were not known to cause significant damage in their native range, or were not even known to science before their introduction. A novel method is proposed to detect new potential pests of woody plants in their region of origin before they are introduced to a new continent. Since Asia is currently considered to be the main supplier of insect invaders to Europe, sentinel trees were planted in China during 2007-2011 as an early warning tool to identify the potential for additional Asian insect species to colonize European trees. Seedlings (1-1.5 m tall of five broadleaved (Quercus petraea, Q. suber, Q. ilex, Fagus sylvatica, and Carpinus betulus and two conifer species (Abies alba and Cupressus sempervirens were planted in blocks of 100 seedlings at two widely separated sites (one in a nursery near Beijing and the other in a forest environment near Fuyang in eastern China, and then regularly surveyed for colonization by insects. A total of 104 insect species, mostly defoliators, were observed on these new hosts, and at least six species were capable of larval development. Although a number of the insects observed were probably incidental feeders, 38 species had more than five colonization events, mostly infesting Q. petraea, and could be considered as being capable of switching to European trees if introduced to Europe. Three years was shown to be an appropriate duration for the experiment, since the rate of colonization then tended to plateau. A majority of the identified species appeared to have switched from agricultural crops and fruit trees rather than from forest trees. Although these results are promising, the method is not appropriate for xylophagous pests and other groups developing on larger trees. Apart from the logistical problems, the identification to species level of the specimens collected was a major

  10. Study on Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi Diversity and Inoculation Effect of Prunus mongolica%蒙古扁桃AMF多样性及其AMF接种效应研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王琚钢; 白淑兰; 盖京苹; 慈忠玲; 方亮

    2011-01-01

    Mycorrhizal status of Prunus mongolica of western Inner Mongolia in the desert region was studied by observing the ectomycorrhiza morphological and the arbuscular mycrrhizal structure of the nutritive root.Ectomycorrhiza colonization was not found in the present study, while arbuscular mycrrhiza colonized quite well, and the highest frequency of colonization was 97%. Eleven arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species of four genera and one uncertain species were identified by the morphologiacal identification of the spores, among which Acaulosopra rehmii and Glomus mosseae were the dominant species. In addition, Glomus mosseae and Glomous versiforme were inoculated on Prunus mongolica, and the result showed that the nutritive root of Prunus mongolica and the Glomus mosseae could form the typical arbuscular mycrrhizal structure as hyphae,vesicles and arbuscular, but not with the Glomous versiforme. Glomus mosseae promoted the growth of Prunus mongolica.%以内蒙古西部沙漠地区蒙古扁(Prunus mongokica)为对象,对野外采集的蒙古扁桃营养根进行外生菌根形态观察及采用Phillips & Hayman染色方法观察根内丛枝菌根结构,同时通过形态学方法对根际孢子进行鉴定.结果表明:所采样品未发现外生菌根侵染,而丛枝菌根的侵染频度高达97%以上.在根际土中共鉴定出丛枝菌根真菌4属11种,和1个未知种,其中瑞氏无梗囊霉和摩西球囊霉是蒙古扁桃根际土中的优势种.另外,在实验室条件下,用摩西球囊霉和地表球囊霉对蒙古扁桃进行人工接种试验,结果表明:摩西球囊霉接种处理下,蒙古扁桃营养根细胞内形成菌丝、丛枝、泡囊等典型的丛枝菌根结构,而地表球囊霉接种处理在蒙古扁桃营养根内未形成丛枝菌根结构;摩西球囊霉在形成丛枝菌根后明显促进了蒙古扁桃的生长.

  11. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  12. The Effects of Pre-Fermentative Addition of Oenological Tannins on Wine Components and Sensorial Qualities of Red Wine

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    Kai Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Today in the wine industry, oenological tannins are widely used to improve wine quality and prevent oxidation in wine aging. With the development of tannin products, new oenological tannins are developed with many specific functions, such as modifying antioxidant effect, colour stabilization and aroma modifications. The aim of this work is to investigate effects of pre-fermentative addition of oenological tannins on wine colour, anthocyanins, volatile compounds and sensorial properties. In this case, Syrah juice was extracted with classic flash thermovinification from fresh must in order to release more colour and tannins. Three types of oenological tannins, which are, respectively, derived from grape skin, seed (Vitis vinifera and French oak (Quercus robur and Querrus petraea, were selected to carry out the experiments with seven treatments. Results indicated that tannin treatments significantly improved wine aroma complexity and sensorial properties. However, the concentration of some stable pigments such as Vitisin A, Vitisin A-Ac and Vitisin B was negatively affected by tannin additions. Nevertheless, by means of cluster analysis and principal component analysis, it was observed that higher alcohols were significantly promoted by grape seed tannin while most anthocyanins can be improved by addition of grape tannins. In conclusion, low amount of oenological tannin derived from grape seed is a promising method to be applied especially for young red wine making.

  13. Effects of Drought and Rewetting on Growth and Gas Exchange of Minor European Broadleaved Tree Species

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    Jörg Kunz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Widespread and economically important European tree species such as Norway spruce, Scots pine, and European beech are projected to be negatively affected by the increasing intensity and frequency of dry and hot conditions in a future climate. Hence, there is an increasing need to investigate the suitability of presumably more drought tolerant species to ensure future ecological stability, biodiversity, and productivity of forests. Based on their distribution patterns and climatic envelopes, the rare, minor broadleaved tree species Sorbus torminalis ((L. CRANTZ, S. domestica (L., Acer campestre (L., and A. platanoides (L. are assumed to be drought tolerant, however, there is only limited experimental basis to support that notion. This study aimed at quantifying growth and gas exchange of seedlings of these species during drought conditions, and their capacity to recover following drought. For that purpose, they were compared to the common companion species Quercus petraea ((MATTUSCHKA LIEBL. and Fagus sylvatica (L.. Here, potted seedlings of these species were exposed to water limitation followed by rewetting cycles in a greenhouse experiment. Photosynthesis and transpiration rates, stomatal conductance as well as root and shoot growth rates indicated a high drought resistance of A. campestre and A. platanoides. Sorbus domestica showed a marked ability to recover after drought stress. Therefore, we conclude that these minor tree species have the potential to enrich forests on drought-prone sites. Results from this pot experiment need to be complemented by field studies, in which the drought response of the species is not influenced by restrictions to root development.

  14. Recent Trends of Tree Growth in Relation to Climate Change in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOMOGYI, Zoltán

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses two related issues. One is whether, and how, growth patterns of standmean height have changed in Hungary in the last few decades, and the other is whether recentlyobserved increases in mean annual temperature might have caused changes in growth trends. Changesin tree growth were investigated for beech (Fagus sylvatica, sessile oak (Quercus petraea andTurkey oak (Quercus cerris by comparing stand mean heights over age using data from the forestinventories of 1981 and 2001, and for sessile oak using stand mean height data from permanentsample plots since 1961. Tree growth was found to have accelerated for each species mentioned, withTurkey oak showing the largest acceleration. To study the second issue, stand mean height was relatedto elevation, wich in turn was related to mean annual temperature and precipitation. For theseanalyses, too, data of many thousands of stands in the forest inventory was used. Stand mean heightwas found to increase with decreasing elevation, i.e. with increasing mean annual temperature, foreach of the three species. As the annual precipitation and air humidity decreases with decreasingelevation, it was concluded that increases of mean annual temperature could positively have affectedtree growth in the last few decades. However, this effect is expected to be soon limited by wateravailability.

  15. Carbon and nitrogen accumulation in forest floor and surface soil under different geographic origins of Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton.) plantations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, E.; Oral, H. V.; Akburak, S.; Makineci, E.; Yilmaz, E.

    2013-09-01

    Aim of study: To determine if plantations consisting of different geographic origins of the Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton.) could have altered C and N stocks in the forest floor and surface soils. Area of study: Forest floor and mineral soil C and N stocks were measured in four adjacent plantations of different geographic origins of Maritime pine (Gironde, Toulon, Corsica and Spain) and adjacent primary native Sessile oak (Quercus petraea L.) at Burunsuz region in Belgrad Forest where is located in the Istanbul province in the Marmara geographical region between 41° 09’-41° 12’ N latitude and 28° 54’-29° 00’ E longitude in Turkey. Material and methods: Plots were compared as common garden experiments without replications. 15 surface soil (0-10 cm) and 15 forest floor samples were taken from each Maritime pine origins and adjacent native Sessile oak forest. C and N contents were determined on LECO Truspec 2000 CN analyzer. The statistical significance of the results was evaluated by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Research highlights: Forest floor carbon mass, nitrogen concentration and nitrogen mass of forest floor showed a significant difference among origins. Soil carbon mass and nitrogen mass did not significantly differ among investigated plots. (Author)

  16. Carbon and nitrogen accumulation in forest floor and surface soil under different geographic origins of Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton. plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ozdemir

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study : To determine if plantations consisting of different geographic origins of the Maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Aiton. could have altered C and N stocks in the forest floor and surface soils.Area of study : Forest floor and mineral soil C and N stocks were measured in four adjacent plantations of different geographic origins of Maritime pine (Gironde, Toulon, Corsica and Spain and adjacent primary native Sessile oak (Quercus petraea L. at Burunsuz region in Belgrad Forest where is located in the Istanbul province in the Marmara geographical region between 41°09' -41°12' N latitude and 28°54' - 29°00' E longitude in Turkey.Material and Methods : Plots were compared as common garden experiments without replications. 15 surface soil (0-10 cm and 15 forest floor samples were taken from each Maritime pine origins and adjacent native Sessile oak forest. C and N contents were determined on LECO Truspec 2000 CN analyzer. The statistical significance of the results was evaluated by one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA.Research highlights : Forest floor carbon mass, nitrogen concentration and nitrogen mass of forest floor showed a significant difference among origins. Soil carbon mass and nitrogen mass did not significantly differ among investigated plots.Keywords: carbon sequestration; C/N ratio; decomposition; exotic; tree provenance.

  17. Characteristics of radial growth and stable isotopes in a single oak tree to be used in climate studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigl, Martin [Competence Center for Wood Composites and Wood Chemistry, Competence Center Wood GmbH, St.-Peter-Str. 25, A-4021 Linz (Austria); University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, Peter Jordan Str. 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: m.weigl@kplus-wood.at; Grabner, Michael [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, Peter Jordan Str. 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria); Helle, Gerhard; Schleser, Gerhard H. [Institute for Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, ICG-V: Sedimentary Systems, Research Centre Juelich (FZJ), Leo-Brandt-Strasse D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Wimmer, Rupert [University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, Peter Jordan Str. 82, A-1190 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-04-01

    In this study we have analyzed the variability of tree-ring widths and stable isotopes ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O) of a single sessile oak tree (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) since these parameters are critical in reconstructing the environment, particularly climatic conditions. Tree rings were separated into early- and latewood (EW{sub t}; LW{sub t}), tree ring (TR{sub t}), and transfer tree ring (TTR{sub t}, the latter being the latewood plus the earlywood of the subsequent year. Mean sensitivity, simple correlation, partial correlation and autocorrelation analyses were applied to describe data and relationships. Although this research focused on a single tree, the results compared well with average site data. Widths and {delta}{sup 18}O values showed generally low autocorrelation for all tree-ring components, whereas {delta}{sup 13}C revealed highly significant autocorrelations for most tree-ring components. Mean sensitivity of the standardized values turned out to be high for {delta}{sup 18}O, marginally lower for width and the lowest for {delta}{sup 13}C. Correlation analyses have proven that the relationships within the tree-ring widths or within the isotope parameters are much stronger than across widths and isotope parameters. The study demonstrates the unique potential of all measured tree-ring data to be used as climate proxies.

  18. The Effects of Pre-Fermentative Addition of Oenological Tannins on Wine Components and Sensorial Qualities of Red Wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Escott, Carlos; Loira, Iris; Del Fresno, Juan Manuel; Morata, Antonio; Tesfaye, Wendu; Calderon, Fernando; Benito, Santiago; Suárez-Lepe, Jose Antonio

    2016-10-31

    Today in the wine industry, oenological tannins are widely used to improve wine quality and prevent oxidation in wine aging. With the development of tannin products, new oenological tannins are developed with many specific functions, such as modifying antioxidant effect, colour stabilization and aroma modifications. The aim of this work is to investigate effects of pre-fermentative addition of oenological tannins on wine colour, anthocyanins, volatile compounds and sensorial properties. In this case, Syrah juice was extracted with classic flash thermovinification from fresh must in order to release more colour and tannins. Three types of oenological tannins, which are, respectively, derived from grape skin, seed (Vitis vinifera) and French oak (Quercus robur and Querrus petraea), were selected to carry out the experiments with seven treatments. Results indicated that tannin treatments significantly improved wine aroma complexity and sensorial properties. However, the concentration of some stable pigments such as Vitisin A, Vitisin A-Ac and Vitisin B was negatively affected by tannin additions. Nevertheless, by means of cluster analysis and principal component analysis, it was observed that higher alcohols were significantly promoted by grape seed tannin while most anthocyanins can be improved by addition of grape tannins. In conclusion, low amount of oenological tannin derived from grape seed is a promising method to be applied especially for young red wine making.

  19. Variability in morphology of Microsphaera alphitoides Griffon et Maubl. in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Ufnalski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify descriptions of the morphology of the fungus responsible for powdery mildew on oak leaves of nursery seedlings and of young trees in forest stands. Infected, fully developed leaves from apical parts of stems of Quercus robur or Q. petraea were collected in two national parks and in six forest districts in Poland. The taxonomic characteres of all specimens were generally consistent with those given in keys for Microsphaera alphitoides. However, the limoniform shape of conidia, characteristic of two sites (nurseries, has not been found in available synopses. Limoniform conidia were significantly longer and wider than others. Agreat variety of forms of mycelium on leaves were observed. The mycelium appeared in three forms: (1 floccose or felted oval patches (always with yellow or brown discoloration, (2 faveolate oval patches (often with yellow or brown discoloration, and (3 felted or mealy mycelium along veins (rarely with discoloration. Mycelium without limoniform conidia appeared in all forms, while mycelium with limoniform conidia appeared only in the form of patches, always causing leaf discoloration.

  20. THE COPĂCEL HILL FOREST, BETWEEN BĂLA AND ERCEA, A FUTURE RESERVE OF MUREŞ COUNTY

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    OROIAN SILVIA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The forest lies in the region known as the “Transylvanian Plain”, on the Copăcel hill, between Băla and Ercea. The specific landscape of this region is characterized by medium altitude hills, with wide and soft slopes. In this forest, the presence of the Delphinium simonkaianum Pawł. var. psilocarpum (Simk. Pawł species, a threatened endemic taxon, was reported in 1953. In 2011, this globally threatened taxon was identified, after 58 years, on the upper side of the Copăcel slope, in a mixed oak and hornbeam forest. These oak and hornbeam mixtures are the result of impacts exerted on oak forests. The identified association, Melampyro bihariensis-Carpinetum (Borza 1941 Soó 1964 em. Coldea 1975, has three distinct layers: the arborescent layer dominated by Carpinus betulus and Quercus petraea, along with Quercus robur, Prunus avium, Acer campestre, Ulmus glabra, etc., with good canopy cover (0.8-0.9; the shrub layer, represented by species such as: Crataegus monogyna, Corylus avellana, Cornus mas, Ligustrum vulgare, Rosa canina, Sambucus nigra, Staphylea pinnata, etc., is relatively poor in individuals, which are present particularly in forest clearings or at the edge of the forest. Grass synusia is well developed, sometimes forming an almost continuous cover (Asarum europaeum, Convallaria majalis, Dactylis glomerata ssp. aschersoniana, Galium odoratum, Melampyrum bihariense, Stellaria holostea, Aconitum anthora, Aconitum moldavicum, Lilium martagon, Arum orientale.

  1. Variance analysis on different trees species depending on soil type – uncontaminated and heavy metals contaminated ones

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    Monica MARIAN

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes our research work regarding the dynamics of vegetation growth of miscellaneous species of trees planted and monitored in the particular environment of the tailing pond in Bozanta Mare (Maramures County. The structure of soil bearing high content of heavy metals and cyanides considerably impacts the ecologic conditions of tailing ponds. Aspects related to soil characteristics (such as structure, size of particles, porosity, texture, chemical composition are included. Vegetal species that have accommodated within the tail pond are included as well. In the framework of our experiment we have planted seedlings belonging to four species of trees: Quercus petraea, Populus tremula, Betula verrucosa, Salix caprea. We have planted the seedlings in different location contexts in the tailing pond (“in situ”, as we have also planted “ex situ” witness trees. Our aim was to monitor the dynamics of growth of the stem and of cuttings. Our contribution, based on the outcomes of our research, consists in the formulation of functional correlations spotted between cormophites and micro biota, between the species of trees and their environmental underlying conditions, with the overarching goal to optimize the activities undertaken in order to alleviate the tailing ponds inherent to mining activities.

  2. Metabarcoding of Bacteria Associated with the Acute Oak Decline Syndrome in England

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    Melanie Sapp

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of acute oak decline (AOD have been documented in England from 2006. Both species of native oaks (Quercus robur and Quercus petraea are affected. To complement isolation efforts for identification of putative causative biotic agents and increase our understanding of bacteria associated with oak tissue, five sites in England were chosen for this study. Samples of outer bark, inner bark, sapwood and heartwood were taken from healthy oak and trees with symptoms at varying stages of the syndrome. Furthermore, larval galleries attributed to infestation with Agrilus biguttatus were included. After DNA extraction and amplification of the V3–V5 fragment of the bacterial 16S rRNA genes by pyrosequencing, the dataset was analyzed to identify patterns in bacterial communities in oak tissue samples with and without AOD symptoms at each site. The composition of bacterial communities differed greatly according to the site from which the samples were obtained. Within each site, the composition of the bacteria associated with symptomatic tissue varied between advanced stages of the syndrome and healthy tissue. Key players in healthy and symptomatic tissue were identified and included members of the Gammaproteobacteria related to Pseudomonas sp. or Brenneria goodwinii and members of the Firmicutes.

  3. THE CLASS QUERCO-FAGETEA SYLVATICAE IN SICILY: AN EXAMPLE OF BOREO-TEMPERATE VEGETATION IN THE CENTRAL MEDITERRANEAN REGION

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    C. Brullo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A syntaxonomical revision of the class Querco-Fagetea sylvaticae in Sicily, based on literature data and unpublished relevés, is presented. This class groups the mesophilous woods characterized by the dominance of deciduous trees (e.g. Fagus sylvatica, Quercus sp. pl., Acer sp. pl., and more rarely by conifers (Taxus baccata, Pinus nigra subsp. calabrica, as well as by other broadleaved trees, such as Betula aetnensis, Populus tremula, Castanea sativa. In Sicily, these woody communities are widespread in the northern and north-eastern districts of the island, chiefly on the highest peaks (Madonie, Nebrodi, Peloritani, and Etna. This class is represented in Sicily by two, both floristically and ecologically well differentiated orders: Fagetalia sylvaticae, with the sole alliance Geranio versicoloris-Fagion sylvaticae, and Quercetalia pubescenti-petraeae, with the endemic alliance Pino calabricae-Quercion congestae. On the whole, 22 associations have been recognized within the class Querco-Fagetea and for each of them nomenclature, floristic assessment, ecology, syndinamic relationships, and chorology are examined.

  4. Direct Effects of Carpophagous Insects on the Germination Ability and Early Abscission of Oak Acorns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CSÓKA, György

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carpophagous insects play an important role in decreasing the viability of acorns in bothdirect and indirect ways. Therefore they significantly influence the reproductive potential of oaks. As adirect effect, their feeding on the embryo and on the cotyledons may prevent the germination of theacorn and on the other hand, their damage causes premature acorn abscission. During 3 years, 60acorn samples from five oak species (Turkey oak – Quercus cerris, pedunculate oak – Quercus robur,sessile oak – Quercus petraea, downy oak – Quercus pubescens, red oak – Quercus rubra have beeninvestigated. The average rate of damage varied a lot between years, but was always significant (2000:36%, 2001: 61%, 2002: 51%. The insects’ influence causing premature acorn abscission wassignificant both for pedunculate and Turkey oaks. The premature acorn abscission was 34% of thetotal crop in 2000 for pedunculate oak (Curculio spp. 26%, Cydia spp. 2% and Andricusquercuscalicis 6% and 39% in 2001 (Curculio spp. 14%, Cydia spp. 2%, Andricus quercuscalicis13%, Callirhytis glandium 10%. In case of Turkey oak it was 29% in 2001 (C. glandium 16%,Neuroterus saliens 13%, and 12% in 2002 (C. glandium 10%, N. saliens 2%.

  5. Ecological indicator values of forest communities in Çitdere Region (Yenice-Karabük

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    Süleyman Çoban

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Indicator species system, which has been used widely in Europe, has many advantages in vegetation analysis. It allows quick interpretation of ecological conditions using floristic data without doing any measurements about site conditions. Considering the amount of phytosociological studies carried out in Turkey, this system may provide important information about plants or plant communities if required modifications are done. In this study, Pignatti-Ellenberg indicator values (EIVs modified for the check list of Flora Europea were used to analyse and compare forest communities of Çitdere region in terms of light (radiation, temperature, moisture, continentality, soil reaction and soil nutrient in order to test how effectively mean EIVs indicate ecological conditions. Main differences were found between communities which occur on sunny and shady exposures in terms of moisture, soil nutrient, light and temperature indicator values. When normal and original permutation tests were used, all of six indicator values were significant. With the modified permutation test, only mean temperature and light indicator values showed significant differences among 8 forest communities of the region. Pinus sylvestris and Quercus petraea forest communities which have relatively narrow distribution area showed higher correlation with temperature and continentality indicator values when weighted average by species cover was used.

  6. Growth Inhibition of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Produced Water from the Petroleum Industry Using Essential Oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Pamella Macedo de; Goulart, Fátima Regina de Vasconcelos; Marques, Joana Montezano; Bizzo, Humberto Ribeiro; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Groposo, Claudia; Sousa, Maíra Paula de; Vólaro, Vanessa; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Moreno, Daniela Sales Alviano; Seldin, Lucy

    2017-04-19

    Strategies for the control of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in the oil industry involve the use of high concentrations of biocides, but these may induce bacterial resistance and/or be harmful to public health and the environment. Essential oils (EO) produced by plants inhibit the growth of different microorganisms and are a possible alternative for controlling SRB. We aimed to characterize the bacterial community of produced water obtained from a Brazilian petroleum facility using molecular methods, as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EO from different plants and their major components against Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 and against SRB growth directly in the produced water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of the genera Pelobacter and Marinobacterium, Geotoga petraea, and the SRB Desulfoplanes formicivorans in our produced water samples. Sequencing of dsrA insert-containing clones confirmed the presence of sequences related to D. formicivorans. EO obtained from Citrus aurantifolia, Lippia alba LA44 and Cymbopogon citratus, as well as citral, linalool, eugenol and geraniol, greatly inhibited (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) = 78 µg/mL) the growth of D. alaskensis in a liquid medium. The same MIC was obtained directly in the produced water with EO from L. alba LA44 (containing 82% citral) and with pure citral. These findings may help to control detrimental bacteria in the oil industry.

  7. Growth Inhibition of Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria in Produced Water from the Petroleum Industry Using Essential Oils

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    Pamella Macedo de Souza

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for the control of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB in the oil industry involve the use of high concentrations of biocides, but these may induce bacterial resistance and/or be harmful to public health and the environment. Essential oils (EO produced by plants inhibit the growth of different microorganisms and are a possible alternative for controlling SRB. We aimed to characterize the bacterial community of produced water obtained from a Brazilian petroleum facility using molecular methods, as well as to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of EO from different plants and their major components against Desulfovibrio alaskensis NCIMB 13491 and against SRB growth directly in the produced water. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of the genera Pelobacter and Marinobacterium, Geotoga petraea, and the SRB Desulfoplanes formicivorans in our produced water samples. Sequencing of dsrA insert-containing clones confirmed the presence of sequences related to D. formicivorans. EO obtained from Citrus aurantifolia, Lippia alba LA44 and Cymbopogon citratus, as well as citral, linalool, eugenol and geraniol, greatly inhibited (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC = 78 µg/mL the growth of D. alaskensis in a liquid medium. The same MIC was obtained directly in the produced water with EO from L. alba LA44 (containing 82% citral and with pure citral. These findings may help to control detrimental bacteria in the oil industry.

  8. Revegetation of a uranium mine dump by using fertilizer treated sessile oaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian A; Böcker, Lutz; Katzur, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    The rehabilitation of contaminated sites and the establishment of suitable trees for revegetation purposes is often problematic due to the mostly suboptimal nutrient supply and the poor humus reservoir. For these reasons hydrogels (Stockosorb) and novel humus substitutes (NOVIHUM), serving as long lasting fertilizer (LLF), were recently tested successfully. At the beginning of this multiyear study, those LLFs were administered to the root zone of young sessile oaks (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.), growing in test trials on a uranium mine dump in Schlema (Germany). To quantify the effect of LLFs on plant vitality, chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements and JIP test analyses were used. The results revealed up to 49% higher average photosynthetic vitality (PI(ABS)) of the LLF treated plants compared to controls. Particularly in the first test year, the efficiency of photosynthetic electron transport was strongly increased. This stimulation of photosynthetic activity was supported by direct measurements showing up to 129% increased diameter growth of the treated plants after a four year experimental period. Furthermore an increase of the maximum water holding capacity of the dump soil was attained by using LLFs. Overall, the findings reported here represent a feasible, ecologically justifiable reforestation method with a low environmental hazard potential.

  9. Bud burst and flowering phenology in a mixed oak forest from Eastern Romania

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    Ecaterina Nicoleta Chesnoiu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Bud burst and flowering phenology have been observed in year 2008 ina natural white oak species complex situated in eastern Romania. A total of 300 mature individuals was mapped and identified based on leaf morphology. The community consists of four oak species: Quercus pedunculiflora, Q. robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petraea. A set of 28 individuals could not be unambiguously classified to one or another species. Data on bud burst showed a normal distribution and the differences among species were small. The "very late" flushing was recorded on 15th of April, three weeks later when compared to early flushing individuals. The time period between the bud burst and the complete development of leaves was nearly the same in all oak species, varying on average, between 18.4 and 20.6 days. The spatialdistribution of phenological groups within the complex appears to be non-randomly, because in many parts of the study plot exist groups in which most of the trees belong to the same phenological category. Our results indicate an overlap in flowering time for all oak species which occur in the area. The data support the hypothesis that interspecific gene flow is possible between closely related oak species.

  10. Bud burst and flowering phenology in a mixed oak forest from Eastern Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ecaterina Nicoleta Chesnoiu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Bud burst and flowering phenology have been observed in year 2008 in a natural white oak species complex situated in eastern Romania. A total of 300 mature individuals was mapped and identified based on leaf morphology. The community consists of four oak species: Quercus pedunculiflora, Q. robur, Q. pubescens and Q. petraea. A set of 28 individuals could not be unambiguously classified to one or another species. Data on bud burst showed a normal distribution and the differences among species were small. The "very late" flushing was recorded on 15th of April, three weeks later when compared to early flushing individuals. The time period between the bud burst and the complete development of leaves was nearly the same in all oak species, varying on average, between 18.4 and 20.6 days. The spatial distribution of phenological groups within the complex appears to be non-randomly, because in many parts of the study plot exist groups in which most of the trees belong to the same phenological category. Our results indicate an overlap in flowering time for all oak species which occur in the area. The data support the hypothesis that interspecific gene flow is possible between closely related oak species.

  11. The amount of carbon in the undergrowth biomass of main types of forests stands in Poland

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    Janyszek Sławomir

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The sequestration of carbon in biomass of herb and moss layers of forest ecosystems is relatively less studied, than analogical processes in trees biomass and soil organic mass. The paper presents mean values of carbon concentration and mean amounts of dry mass of plant material in the herb and moss layer of phytocoenoses formed under canopy of stands of main forest-forming species of trees in Poland. The parameters were studied for beech, birch, oak, alder, pine, fir and spruce forest stands, for most of the particular age classes. The studied plots were contained in following plant associations and communities: Ribo nigri-Alnetum, Fraxino-Alnetum, Galio odorati-Fagetum, Luzulo luzuloidis-Fagetum, Molinio caeruleae-Quercetum roboris, Calamagrostio-Quercetum petraeae, Abietetum polonicum, Abieti-Piceetum montanum, Calamagrostio villosae-Piceetum, as well as anthropogenic communities: Betula pendula comm. on Leucobryo-Pinetum habitat, Larix decidua comm. on Tilio-Carpinetum habitat, Pinus sylvestris comm. on Tilio-Carpinetum habitat, Picea abies comm. on Luzulo pilosae-Fagetum habitat (in lowland and Picea abies comm. on Luzulo luzuloidis-Fagetum habitat (in lower mountain localities. The relatively highest carbon amount was observed in oak forests, pine forests and in older age classes of lowland beech forest, where the carbon concentration in dry mass reaches from 60 to 81%. The lowest concentrations were determined for lowland spruce forests, highland fir forests and for alder forests. The carbon concentration reached in these types of ecosystems from 39 to 41%.

  12. A quantitative trait loci analysis of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms of metal hyperaccumulation are still not understood, so we conducted a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, in a cross between this and its sister species, A. petraea, in order to determine the number and approximate location of the genomic regions significantly contributing to this adaptation. An F2 cross between the two species was made, and the leaf Zn concentration of 92 individuals was measured at both low (10 microm) and high (100 microm) Zn concentrations. Twenty-five markers were established that were distributed on all of the eight chromosomes. Mapping of the markers established that they were essentially collinear with previous studies. QTLs exceeding a logarithm to the base 10 of the odds (LOD) value of 3 were found on chromosomes 4 (low Zn), 6 (high Zn) and 7 (both high and low Zn). Evidence for a QTL on chromosome 3 (low Zn) was also found. This analysis validates a previously used method of QTL analysis, based on microarray analysis of segregating families. Genes that have altered during the evolution of this character should also be QTL: this analysis calls into question a number of candidate genes from consideration as such primary genes because they do not appear to be associated with QTLs.

  13. Genetic architecture of zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri: the essential role of QTL x environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frérot, Hélène; Faucon, Michel-Pierre; Willems, Glenda; Godé, Cécile; Courseaux, Adeline; Darracq, Aude; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-07-01

    This study sought to determine the main genomic regions that control zinc (Zn) hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri and to examine genotype x environment effects on phenotypic variance. To do so, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) were mapped using an interspecific A. halleri x Arabidopsis lyrata petraea F(2) population. *The F(2) progeny as well as representatives of the parental populations were cultivated on soils at two different Zn concentrations. A linkage map was constructed using 70 markers. *In both low and high pollution treatments, zinc hyperaccumulation showed high broad-sense heritability (81.9 and 74.7%, respectively). Five significant QTLs were detected: two QTLs specific to the low pollution treatment (chromosomes 1 and 4), and three QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3, 6 and 7). These QTLs explained 50.1 and 36.5% of the phenotypic variance in low and high pollution treatments, respectively. Two QTLs identified at both treatments (chromosomes 3 and 6) showed significant QTL x environment interactions. *The QTL on chromosome 3 largely colocalized with a major QTL previously identified for Zn and cadmium (Cd) tolerance. This suggests that Zn tolerance and hyperaccumulation share, at least partially, a common genetic basis and may have simultaneously evolved on heavy metal-contaminated soils.

  14. Frequent cytoplasmic exchanges between oak species that are not closely related: Quercus suber and Q. ilex in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belahbib, N; Pemonge, M H; Ouassou, A; Sbay, H; Kremer, A; Petit, R J

    2001-08-01

    Chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) DNA variation were studied in 97 populations of cork oak (Quercus suber) in Morocco; in 31 of these populations, holm oak (Quercus ilex), a clearly distinct species, also occurred and was compared with Q. suber. Three cpDNA and one mtDNA primer pairs were used in the survey, each in combination with one restriction enzyme. Six haplotypes belonging to two very divergent lineages were detected; one lineage predominates in each species, and is probably ancestral, as inferred from comparisons with other oak species. In the mixed-species populations, cytoplasmic genomes were frequently shared across species, as indicated by an introgression ratio of 0.63. This index is a new measure of the propensity of species to share locally genetic markers, varying from zero (complete differentiation) to one (no differentiation). By contrast, more closely related deciduous oak species (Q. robur, Q. petraea and Q. pubescens) have introgression ratios varying from 0.82 to 0.97. The introgression events appear to have been more frequent in the direction Q. ilex (female) x Q. suber (male), a finding which seems attributable to the flowering phenology of these two species. This asymmetry may have favoured immigration of Q. suber beyond its main range, in regions already colonized by Q. ilex. There, rare hybridization and further introgression through long distance pollen flow have established populations that are morphologically indistinguishable from Q. suber but that have cytoplasmic genomes originating from the local Q. ilex populations.

  15. Tannins in tropical woods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doat, J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary study was made of the chemistry of pyrogallol- and catecholtannins, their general properties and methods of extraction and determination. Three methods of estimation - Lowenthal, powdered hide and spectrophotometry - were compared using two control solutions, four samples of wood and one of bark. Using the empirical powdered hide method, tannins of both types were estimated in wood and bark of various tropical species (some separately and some as a mixture), Moroccan oaks (Quercus suber and Q. ilex), and European oak 9Q. petraea). Further tests were made on the wood and bark of the two mangrove species, Rhizophora mangle and R. racemosa, by subjecting them to successive extraction with a range of solvents. None of the woods tested had as much as the 10% of tannins considered necessary in economic sources. The bark of the two mangroves, of Eucalyptus urophylla and of Prosopis africana had tannin contents over 10% and the latter two species had very favorable tannin/non-tannin ratios. All the tropical species, with the probable exception of E. urophylla, had only catecholtannins. Only the oaks and E. urophylla bark gave positive results when tested for gallotannins.

  16. Isoprenoid emission of oak species typical for the Mediterranean area: Source strength and controlling variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Rainer; Hauff, Karin; Rabong, Richard; Steinbrecher, Jutta

    Measurements of isoprenoid emission on five Mediterranean oak species in the field revealed that Quercus frainetto, Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens are strong emitters of isoprene. In contrast Quercus cerris and Quercus suber emitted no significant amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes. For Q. pubenscens and Q. frainetto median emission factors of 16.68 nmol m -2 s -1 (86.06 μg g -1 dw h -1) and 30.72 nmol m -2 s -1 (133.95 μg g -1 dw h -1 were calculated, respectively. The 25 to 75 percentiles span of the emission factor data sets ranged from - 53% to + 56% of the median values. Light and temperature are the main controlling factors for isoprene emission. The influence of other environmental and plant physiological parameters on the isoprene emission is discussed. The "Guenther" emission algorithm is able to predict the daily maximum of the isoprene emission within the plant specific uncertainty range. However, the morning increase and the afternoon drop in the isoprene emission is not well parameterized. On the basis of process oriented models for the synthesis of isoprene in plants, a further reduction in the uncertainty may be achieved resulting in a more reliable prediction of short-time variation in isoprene emission.

  17. THE POTENTILLO MICRANTHAE-QUERCETUM DALECHAMPII ASSOCIATION IN THE LOWER BASIN OF THE MOTRU RIVER - ROMANIA

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    COSTACHE IULIAN

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available From the geographical point of view, the Lower Basin of the Motru River lies in the western part of the Getic Piedmont, with the coordinates: 44055' north latitude and 23045' east longitude. The studied area covers 691 Km2. The physical-geographical position and the pedo-climatic particularities specific to the territory under research confer the vegetation a mosaic nature with a particular specificity, determined by the quite strong Balkan and sub-Mediterranean influences. With the territory under research located just on the line between the nemoral area (of the oak forests and the floor of the hilly common oak (up to the sub-Carpathian Hills, we cannot talk about the presence of the acidophilus common oak forests, which is characteristic to the sub-Carpathian region. In this transition area, between the altitudes (200 250 and 380 (402 m, we have identified mixed common oak forests, associated with Hungarian oak and Turkey oak, belonging to the association Potentillo micranthae-Quercetum dalechampii A.O.Horvát 1981 (Syn.: Potentillo micranthae-Quercetum (petraeae resp. dalechampii-cerris A.O.Horvát (1956 1959. The affiliation of these phytocoenoses to the above mentioned association is done according to its transition association nature, between the silvosteppe forests and the mesophyle, acidophilus forests in the sub-Carpathian area of Oltenia.

  18. Chloroplast DNA Diversity of Oak Species in Eastern Romania

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    Ioan Calin MOLDOVAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The chloroplast DNA of 34 sessile oak (Quercus petraea and 27 pedunculate oak (Q. robur populations covering the entire natural distribution of the two oak species in Eastern Romania was investigated using four large regions of the chloroplast genome by PCR and RFLP technique. A total of seven chloroplast DNA haplotypes sensu lato have been observed by analysing 305 mature trees. However, due to the high resolution of the electrophoresis method a total of 22 chloroplast variants could have been detected, with new mutations and fragment combinations in two of the amplified regions: psbC/trnD and trnT/trnF. All of the haplotypes belong to the phylogenetic lineages A and E, which originate from the Balkan Peninsula. Most of genetic diversity is distributed among populations (GST=0.779. The chloroplast DNA haplotypes are shared by the two oak species. Different dispersal abilities may explain the higher value of genetic differentiation among populations in sessile oak than in pedunculate oak.

  19. Investigation Of The Color Changing Properties Of Wood Stain Derived From Pinar Leaves

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    Abdi Atılgan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to develop an environmentally friendly wood stain derived pinar (Quercus aucheri leaves and determine the color stability of this stain when exposed to UV light irradiation. Wood stains derived from pinar leaves were prepared from aqueous solution with %3 iron (FeSO4.7H2O , % 5 alum ((KAl(SO42.12H2O, and % 10 vinegar mordant mixtures. Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L., Turkish oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky and oak (Quercus petraea L. wood specimens were used as staining substrates. After treatment with the stain, the wood panels were exposed to UV light irradiation for periods of 100, 200, and 300 hours and determinated the total color changes was according to ISO 2470 standards. Results showed that wood stain derived from pinar extract provided some color stability after UV irradiation. According to results, Scots pine specimens treated with the pinar extract + iron mixture provided the smallest total color changes. Meanwhile the highest total color change provided on the Scots pine treated with pinar extract+alum mixture.

  20. EFFECTS OF SOME IMPREGNATION CHEMICALS ON COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LAMINATED VENEER LUMBER (LVL PRODUCED WITH OAK AND POPLAR VENEERS

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    Seref Kurt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of impregnation chemicals on the combustion properties of 3-ply laminated veneer lumber (LVL made of Oak (Quercus petraea subsp. İberica and Poplar (Populus tremula L.. For this purpose, oak wood was used as the outer ply and poplar used for the core ply in LVL. Borax (BX, boric acid (BA, borax+boric acid (BX+BA, and di-ammonium phosphate (DAP were used as impregnation chemicals, and urea formaldehyde (UF, phenol formaldehyde (PF, and melamine-urea-formaldehyde (MUF adhesives as bonding agent were used to produce LVLs. The vacuum – pressure method was used for the impregnation process. The combustion test was performed according to the procedure defined in the ASTM–E 69 standards, and during the test the mass reduction, temperature, and released gas (CO, O2 were determined for each 30 seconds. As a result, di-ammonium phosphate was found to be the most successful fire retardant chemical in LVL with MUF adhesive. LVL produced from a combination of oak and poplar veneers with MUF adhesive and impregnated with DAP can be recommended to be used as a fire resistant building material where required.

  1. High-resolution isotope measurements resolve rapid ecohydrological dynamics at the soil-plant interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmann, Till H M; Haberer, Kristine; Gessler, Arthur; Weiler, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Plants rely primarily on rainfall infiltrating their root zones - a supply that is inherently variable, and fluctuations are predicted to increase on most of the Earth's surface. Yet, interrelationships between water availability and plant use on short timescales are difficult to quantify and remain poorly understood. To overcome previous methodological limitations, we coupled high-resolution in situ observations of stable isotopes in soil and transpiration water. We applied the approach along with Bayesian mixing modeling to track the fate of (2) H-labeled rain pulses following drought through soil and plants of deciduous tree ecosystems. We resolve how rainwater infiltrates the root zones in a nonequilibrium process and show that tree species differ in their ability to quickly acquire the newly available source. Sessile oak (Quercus petraea) adjusted root uptake to vertical water availability patterns under drought, but readjustment toward the rewetted topsoil was delayed. By contrast, European beech (Fagus sylvatica) readily utilized water from all soil depths independent of water depletion, enabling faster uptake of rainwater. Our results demonstrate that species-specific plasticity and responses to water supply fluctuations on short timescales can now be identified and must be considered to predict vegetation functional dynamics and water cycling under current and future climatic conditions.

  2. Growth cessation uncouples isotopic signals in leaves and tree rings of drought-exposed oak trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, Ellen E; Siegwolf, R; Buchmann, N; Dobbertin, M; Kuster, T M; Günthardt-Goerg, M S; Arend, M

    2015-10-01

    An increase in temperature along with a decrease in summer precipitation in Central Europe will result in an increased frequency of drought events and gradually lead to a change in species composition in forest ecosystems. In the present study, young oaks (Quercus robur L. and Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) were transplanted into large mesocosms and exposed for 3 years to experimental warming and a drought treatment with yearly increasing intensities. Carbon and oxygen isotopic (δ(13)C and δ(18)O) patterns were analysed in leaf tissue and tree-ring cellulose and linked to leaf physiological measures and tree-ring growth. Warming had no effect on the isotopic patterns in leaves and tree rings, while drought increased δ(18)O and δ(13)C. Under severe drought, an unexpected isotopic pattern, with a decrease in δ(18)O, was observed in tree rings but not in leaves. This decrease in δ(18)O could not be explained by concurrent physiological analyses and is not supported by current physiological knowledge. Analysis of intra-annual tree-ring growth revealed a drought-induced growth cessation that interfered with the record of isotopic signals imprinted on recently formed leaf carbohydrates. This missing record indicates isotopic uncoupling of leaves and tree rings, which may have serious implications for the interpretation of tree-ring isotopes, particularly from trees that experienced growth-limiting stresses.

  3. HOW ARE PLANT SPECIES IN CENTRAL EUROPEAN BEECH (FAGUS SYLVATICA L. FORESTS AFFECTED BY TEMPERATURE CHANGES? SHIFT OF POTENTIAL SUITABLE HABITATS UNDER GLOBAL WARMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Jantsch

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reveals which temperature range is favoured or avoided by 156 forest plant species and how the distribution of potential suitable habitats of species in beech forests may change in the future. We performed 140 phytosociological relevés along a temperature gradient (4.1 to 9.8 °C in Bavaria, southern Germany, on south exposed slopes. One half of the plots were located on acidic substrate, the other half on base-rich substrate. Generalized linear models (GLM were used to analyse species occurrence along the temperature gradient and to model habitats for species in beech forests under a present (1971-2000 and a future climate (2071-2100 scenario assuming a temperature increase of 1.8 °C. Herb species of beech forests are more adapted to lower temperatures and tree species more to higher temperatures. Current habitats will clearly change under increasing temperatures. We found large habitat losses for Luzula sylvatica (Huds. Gaudin, Maianthemum bifolium (L. F. W. Schmidt, Picea abies (L. H. Karst., Prenanthes purpurea L. and large habitat gains for Carpinus betulus L., Impatiens parviflora DC., Prunus avium (L. L. and Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. on both substrates. Forestry will be affected positively as well as negatively with a change in tree cultivation. Losses in biodiversity might be strong for mountainous forests and must also be considered in future conservation plans.

  4. The detection of thermophilous forest hotspots in Poland using geostatistical interpolation of plant richness

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    Marcin Kiedrzyński

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to study biodiversity hotspots on a regional scale should combine compositional and functionalist criteria. The detection of hotspots in this study uses one ecologically similar group of high conservation value species as hotspot indicators, as well as focal habitat indicators, to detect the distribution of suitable environmental conditions. The method is assessed with reference to thermophilous forests in Poland – key habitats for many rare and relict species. Twenty-six high conservation priority species were used as hotspot indicators, and ten plant taxa characteristic of the Quercetalia pubescenti-petraeae phytosociological order were used as focal habitat indicators. Species distribution data was based on a 10 × 10 km grid. The number of species per grid square was interpolated by the ordinary kriging geostatistical method. Our analysis largely determined the distribution of areas with concentration of thermophilous forest flora, but also regional disjunctions and geographical barriers. Indicator species richness can be interpreted as a reflection of the actual state of habitat conditions. It can also be used to determine the location of potential species refugia and possible past and future migration routes.

  5. Linking biodiversity to mutualistic networks – woody species and ectomycorrhizal fungi

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    Ecaterina Fodor

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutualistic interactions are currently mapped by bipartite networkswith particular architecture and properties. The mycorrhizae connectthe trees and permit them to share resources, therefore relaxing thecompetition. Ectomycorrhizal macrofungi associated with woody species(Quercus robur, Q. cerris, Q. petraea, Tilia tomentosa, Carpinus betulus, Corylus avellana, and Q. pubescens growing in a temperate, broadleaved mixed forest, from a hilly area near the city of Cluj–Napoca, central Romania were included in a bipartite mutualistic network. Community structure was investigated using several network metrics, modularity and nestedness algorithms in conjunction with C-score index cluster analysis and nonmetric multidimensional scaling (the Kulczynski similarity was index used as most appropriate metric selected by minimal stress criterion. The results indicate that the network presents high asymmetry (hosts are outnumbered by mycobionts at a great extent, high connectance, low modularity, andhigh nestedness, competition playing a secondary role in community assemblage (non significant difference between simulated and observed Cscore.The nestedness pattern is non-random and is comparable to previouslypublished results for other similar interactions containing plants. Inthe proposed network, woody species function exclusively as generalists. Modularity analysis is a finer tool were identifying species roles than centrality measures, however, the two types of algorithms permit the separation of species according to their roles as for example connectors (generalist species and ultraperipheral species (specialists. Supergeneralist woody species function as hubs for the diverse ectomycorrhizal community while supergeneralistectomycorrhizal fungi glue the hubs into a coherent aggregate.

  6. Evaluation of cambial electrical resistance for the appraisal of tree vitality on reclaimed coal lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith Plamping; Martin Haigh; Michael J. Cullis; Rhian E. Jenkins [Earthwatch Europe, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2009-03-15

    Cambium electrical resistance (CER) is explored as a rapid-assessment method of measuring of forest vitality and disease damage. A five year study in a 10-year-old mixed plantation of Alder (Alnus glutinosa, L.) and Oak (Quercus petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.) created for the reclamation of surface-coal mined land in South Wales found a negative correlation between CER and tree maturity and no correlation between CER and fertiliser treatment levels. However, it detected strong significant correlations between CER and both a tree vitality index and diameter breast height (DBH) after five years. In fact, CER shows very strong and significant negative correlations with DBH recorded in 2007 and 2002, while tree vitality correlates more strongly with DBH than CER. Partial correlation of the data finds that when these data are controlled for the effect of DBH-the correlation between CER and vitality is no longer significant, while partial correlations between vitality and DBH in both 2002 and 2007-controlled for CER-remain highly significant. The conclusion is that while CER may act as a useful measure and predictor of tree vitality-DBH is better.

  7. The influence of nitrogen in stemflow and precipitation on epiphytic bryophytes, Isothecium myosuroides Brid., Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp of Atlantic oakwoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leith, I.D. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: idl@ceh.ac.uk; Mitchell, R.J.; Truscott, A.-M. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Banchory, Hill of Brathens, Banchory, Aberdeenshire, AB31 4BW (United Kingdom); Cape, J.N.; Dijk, N. van; Smith, R.I.; Fowler, D.; Sutton, M.A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Edinburgh, Bush Estate, Penicuik, Midlothian, EH26 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    The spatial relationship between the concentration and deposition of the major ions in precipitation and stemflow and their influence on the tissue nitrogen concentration of three epiphytic bryophytes on Quercus petraea (Matt) Liebl. and Q. robur L. was investigated at seven UK Atlantic oak woodland sites with a range of total N deposition of 55-250 mmol m{sup -2}. The main driver of change in tissue N concentrations of three epiphytic bryophytes (Isothecium myosuroides Brid. (Eurhynchium myosuroides (Brid.) Schp.), Dicranum scoparium Hewd. and Thuidium tamariscinum (Hewd.) Schimp.) was total N deposition in stemflow, dominated by ammonium deposition. The three epiphytic species also showed strong relationships between tissue N concentration and total N deposition in rainfall but a poor correlation with total N ion concentration in rainfall. This study shows that epiphytic bryophytes utilise stemflow N and thus increase their risk from inputs of total N deposition compared to terricolous species at the same site. - Stemflow increases the tissue N concentration of epiphytic bryophytes.

  8. Dynamics of nitrogenous substances content in the diet of the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus

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    Ladislav Čepelka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The representation of nitrogenous substances in the stomach content of Apodemus sylvaticus was determined using the NIRS (near-infrared spectroscopy method. Out of the total of 247 examined stomachs, 66 were male and 181 female. Sampling of study material was conducted in 2003–2010 at three isolated forest sites in South Moravia with different habitat conditions and different type of management (old semi-natural forest with dominance of English Oak (Quercus robur; production forest with dominant Sessile Oak (Quercus petraea and Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia; pheasantry with variable mixture of forest plots. The determined nitrogenous substances content ranged from 9.5–64.4% of dry matter. With respect to nitrogenous substances content, the habitat, site and sex factors were assessed as statistically insignificant. On the other hand, the factor of a given year (χ2 = 31.14; p < 0.000 and that of sexual activity (χ2 = 7.86; p = 0.005 showed significant differences. In relation to season, both the average nitrogenous substances content in diet and the standard deviation oscillated. The highest average nitrogenous substances content was determined in winter months, when the most significant dispersion in values was determined as well. In years following mast years (2004 and 2007 high values of standard deviations in dietary nitrogenous compounds content were determined.

  9. Impact of stereoide fungi on decomposition of oak wood and possibility of its protection

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    Mirić Milenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Four stereoide fungi, causers of decay of oak wood, have been investigated as follows: Stereum hirsutum, Chondrostereum purpureum, Stereum rugosum and Xylobolus frustulatus. The field tests have been undertaken in order to determine the influence of the stereoide fungi on the wood of Sessile oak (Quercus petraea and Austrian oak (Quercus robur. Artificial inoculations with mycelia have been provoked in vital standing trees, as well as in laying trunks. The appearance of dying back symptoms, the rate of mycelia spread through the stem, speed of wound callusing and appearance of fruit bodies or decay symptoms, have been observed. The protection possibility of trunks has been tested as well by using preservatives based on chromo-cupric boron salts, dichlorfluanide and chlorinepyriphos, cupric naphtenates, as well as with antiseptic paste. Microscopically analysis of attacked oak wood has been performed by utilizing of scanning electron (SEM and standard optical microscope providing normal, fluorescence, polarized and UV light, so that anatomical changes of the wood structure elements influenced by fungal activity have been noted.

  10. Forest defoliator pests alter carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüning, Maren; Simon, Judy; Reinhardt, Annett-Barbara; Lamersdorf, Norbert; Thies, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Climate change may foster pest epidemics in forests, and thereby the fluxes of elements that are indicators of ecosystem functioning. We examined compounds of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in insect faeces, leaf litter, throughfall and analysed the soils of deciduous oak forests (Quercus petraea L.) that were heavily infested by the leaf herbivores winter moth (Operophtera brumata L.) and mottled umber (Erannis defoliaria L.). In infested forests, total net canopy-to-soil fluxes of C and N deriving from insect faeces, leaf litter and throughfall were 30- and 18-fold higher compared with uninfested oak forests, with 4333 kg C ha−1 and 319 kg N ha−1, respectively, during a pest outbreak over 3 years. In infested forests, C and N levels in soil solutions were enhanced and C/N ratios in humus layers were reduced indicating an extended canopy-to-soil element pathway compared with the non-infested forests. In a microcosm incubation experiment, soil treatments with insect faeces showed 16-fold higher fluxes of carbon dioxide and 10-fold higher fluxes of dissolved organic carbon compared with soil treatments without added insect faeces (control). Thus, the deposition of high rates of nitrogen and rapidly decomposable carbon compounds in the course of forest pest epidemics appears to stimulate soil microbial activity (i.e. heterotrophic respiration), and therefore, may represent an important mechanism by which climate change can initiate a carbon cycle feedback. PMID:27853551

  11. Springtime Leaf Development of Mature Sessile Oak Trees as Based on Multi-Seasonal Monitoring Data

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    NYITRAI, Balázs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a four year leaf growth data-set we modelled the thermal time-dependent leafontogeny in upper and lower canopy layers of mature sessile oak trees, in a Quercetum petraeae-cerrisforest stand (NE Hungary. Our regression models revealed no considerable differences between thetiming of leaf unfolding and leaf expansion of different canopy layers. On the other hand seasonalcourse in leaf mass-to-area ratio (LMA indicated that sun leaves needed considerably longer thermaltime to fully develop their anatomical structures compared to shade leaves. LMA of sun leaves washigher during the whole leaf maturation process suggesting that ‘sun’ and ‘shade’ characteristicsdevelop in very early stage of leaf ontogeny. Functioning of photosynthetic apparatus (Fv/Fo in shadeleaves have built up faster and performed better in all developmental stages which could be attributedto two main factors: 1 very early determination of leaf traits as a function of light environment and 2evolving shading effect of upper canopy layer eliminates photoinhibition in lower leaves.

  12. Introduction to Distribution and Ecology of Sterile Conks of Inonotus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min-Woong; Hur, Hyeon; Chang, Kwang-Choon; Lee, Tae-Soo; Ka, Kang-Hyeon; Jankovsky, L

    2008-12-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a fungus that causes white heart rot on several broad-leaved species. This fungus forms typical charcoal-black, sterile conks (chaga) or cinder conks on infected stems of the birche (Betula spp). The dark brown pulp of the sterile conk is formed by a pure mycelial mass of fungus. Chaga are a folk remedy in Russia, reflecting the circumboreal distribution of I. obliquus in boreal forest ecosystems on Betula spp. and in meridional mountain forests on beech (Fagus spp.) in Russia, Scandinavia, Central Europe, and Eastern Europe. Distribution at lower latitudes in Western and Southern Europe, Northern America, Asia, Japan, and Korea is rare. Infected trees grow for many years without several symptoms of decline. The infection can penetrate through stem injuries with exterior sterile conks developing later. In the Czech Republic, cinder conk is found on birches inhabiting peat bogs and in mountain areas with a colder and more humid climate, although it is widespread in other broad leaved species over the Czech Republic. The most common hosts are B. pendula, B. pubescens, B. carpatica, and F. sylvatica. Less frequent hosts include Acer campestre, Acer pseudoplatanus, Alnus glutinosa, Alnus incana, Fraxinus excelsior, Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. delachampii, and Ulmus sp.

  13. Two Lactarius species associated with a relict Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana population in a Mexican montane cloud forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, L; Haug, I; Bandala, V M

    2010-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (EM) fleshy fungi are being monitored in a population of Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana persisting in a montane cloud forest refuge on a volcano in a subtropical region of central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). The population of Fagus studied represents one of the 10 recognized forest fragments still housing this tree genus in Mexico. This is the first attempt to document EM fungi associated with this tree species in Mexico. We present evidence of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis for Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus with this endemic tree. Species identification of Lactarius on Fagus grandifolia var. mexicana was based on the comparison of DNAsequences (ITS rDNA) of spatiotemporally co-occurring basidiomes and EM root tips. The host of the EM tips was identified by comparison of the large subunit of the ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase gene (rbcL). The occurrence of Lactarius badiopallescens and L. cinereus populations in the area of study represent the southernmost record known to date of these two species in North America and are new for the Neotropical Lactarius mycota. Descriptions coupled with illustrations of macro- and micromorphological features of basidiomes as well as photographs of ectomycorrhizas are presented.

  14. Phenolic compounds in ectomycorrhizal interaction of lignin modified silver birch

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    Chiang Vincent L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monolignol biosynthetic pathway interconnects with the biosynthesis of other secondary phenolic metabolites, such as cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids and condensed tannins. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether genetic modification of the monolignol pathway in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth. would alter the metabolism of these phenolic compounds and how such alterations, if exist, would affect the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Results Silver birch lines expressing quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides L. caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase (PtCOMT under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV promoter showed a reduction in the relative expression of a putative silver birch COMT (BpCOMT gene and, consequently, a decrease in the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl composition ratio. Alterations were also detected in concentrations of certain phenolic compounds. All PtCOMT silver birch lines produced normal ectomycorrhizas with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus (Batsch: Fr., and the formation of symbiosis enhanced the growth of the transgenic plants. Conclusion The down-regulation of BpCOMT in the 35S-PtCOMT lines caused a reduction in the syringyl/guaiacyl ratio of lignin, but no significant effect was seen in the composition or quantity of phenolic compounds that would have been caused by the expression of PtCOMT under the 35S or UbB1 promoter. Moreover, the detected alterations in the composition of lignin and secondary phenolic compounds had no effect on the interaction between silver birch and P. involutus.

  15. Spatio-temporal dynamic of Tuber magnatum mycelium in natural truffle grounds.

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    Mirco Iotti

    Full Text Available Tuber magnatum produces the world's most expensive truffle. This fungus produces very rare ectomycorrhizas which are difficult or even impossible to detect in the field. A "real-time" PCR assay was recently developed to quantify and to track T. magnatum mycelium in soil. Here, this technique was used to investigate the spatial distribution of T. magnatum extra-radical mycelium in soil productive patches and its dynamic across seasons. This study was carried out in four different natural T. magnatum truffle grounds located in different Italian regions. During the fruiting seasons, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher around the fruiting points and decreased going farther away from them. Moreover, T. magnatum mycelium inside the productive patches underwent seasonal fluctuations. In early spring, the amount of T. magnatum mycelium was significantly higher than in summer. In summer, probably due to the hot and dry season, T. magnatum mycelium significantly decreased, whereas in autumn it increased again and was concentrated at the putative fruiting points. These results give new insights on T. magnatum ecology and are useful to plan the most appropriate sampling strategy for evaluating the management of a truffle ground.

  16. Ectomycorrhizal communities in a Tuber aestivum Vittad. orchard in Poland

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    Hilszczańska Dorota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of the Burgundy truffle, Tuber aestivum Vittad., has become a new agricultural alternative in Poland. For rural economies, the concept of landscaping is often considerably more beneficial than conventional agriculture and promotes reforestation, as well as land-use stability. Considering examples from France, Italy, Hungary and Spain, truffle cultivation stimulates economic and social development of small, rural communities. Because there is no long tradition of truffle orchards in Poland, knowledge regarding the environmental factors regulating the formation of fruiting bodies of T. aestivum is limited. Thus, knowledge concerning ectomycorrhizal communities of T. aestivum host species is crucial to ensuring successful Burgundy truffle production. We investigated the persistence of T. aestivum ectomycorrhizae on roots of hazel (Corylus avellana L. and oak (Quercus robur L. and checked the host-species influence on community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi. The study was conducted in an experimental plantation located in eastern Poland and established in 2008. We demonstrated that the number of fungal taxa was not significantly different between oak and hazel. However, the species composition differed between these two host trees. During the three-year study, we observed that species richness did not increase with the age of the plantation.

  17. Shifts in soil fungal communities in Tuber melanosporum plantations over a 20-year transition from agriculture fields to oak woodlands

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    Liu Bing

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To explore the diversity of soil fungi found in black truffle (Tuber melanosporum plantations following the introduction of the mycorrhizal-colonized host tree, (Quercus ilex, through the development of the brûlé and production of mature sporocarps.Area of study: This research was carried out province of Teruel, Aragon (central eastern Spain.Material and Methods: Soil samples from 6 plantations were collected beneath Q. ilex trees inoculated with T. melanosporum, of 3, 5, 7, 10, 14 and 20 years after out planting in truffle plantations. Soil DNA was extracted, PCR-amplified and sequenced to compare soil fungi present at different ages.Main results: As tree age increased, we observed an increased frequency of T. melanosporum (from 8% to 71% of sequenced colonies and concomitant decrease in the combined frequency of Fusarium spp. and Phoma spp. (from 64% to 3%.Research highlights: There are important shifts in species richness and in functional groups in the soil fungal communities in maturing black truffle-oak woodland plantations. The observed inverse relationship between the frequency of soil endophytic and/or pathogenic fungi and that of the mycorrhizal mutualist T. melanosporum provides support to continue a deeper analysis of shifts in fungal communities and functional groups where there is a transition from agriculture fields to woodlands.Abbreviations used: Ectomycorrhiza (ECM fungus; Vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM; Operational taxonomic unit (OTU.

  18. Tuber melanosporum spread within sub-optimal climatic zones is controlled by fruiting triggers and not mycorrhiza survival

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    Paul W. Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tuber melanosporum is the most valuable of all cultivatable truffle species. Farming of this species spans every continent with the exception of Antarctica. Tuber aestivum (syn. T. uncinatum and Tuber brumale are truffle species that have similar host plant preference and a similar affinity for calcareous soils as T. melanosporum, but occur over a broader geographic zone. The geographic limit of T. melanosporum is thought to be climatically dictated but it is not known whether this is due to an impact on mycorrhizal survival or climatically-derived fruiting triggers. Here, data is compiled from five cultivated research sites in the climatically sub-optimal conditions of the UK in order to address this question. Here we show: (iTuber melanosporum mycorrhiza can survive and grow in sub-optimal climatic conditions. (iiIt is climatically-derived fruiting triggers and not ectomycorrhiza survival that dictate the climatic preferences and geographic spread of T. melanosporum. (iiiImportant climatic parameters for potential fruiting triggers are sunshine hours, summer rainfall and summer temperatures.   The data presented here not only aid our understanding of the ecological parameters of T. melanosporum but also have a practical application for truffle cultivators in choosing suitable locations for a plantation.

  19. Ectomycorrhizal fungal community structure of pinyon pines growing in two environmental extremes

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    Gehring, C.A.; Theimer, T.C.; Whitham, T.G.; Keim, P. [Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1998-07-01

    The authors used molecular techniques to examine the ectomycorrhizal fungal community associated with pinyon pine (Pinus edulis) growing in two soil types in a semiarid region of northern Arizona. Pinyon performance (e.g., growth, reproduction, water stress) has been shown to be markedly lower in cinder than in sandy-loam environments. Fungal community composition and richness were determined using RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis of ectomycorrhizal root tips collected from three sites within each soil type. Several patterns emerged from these analyses. First, communities in both cinder and sandy-loam soils were dominated by one or a few abundant ectomytcorrhizal types, a species abundance pattern common to many plant and animal communities. Second, unlike the pattern for many other organisms, ectomycorrhizal fungal type richness was not correlated with measures of ecosystem productivity such as soil nutrient and moisture levels; cinder and sandy-loam soils had similar numbers of ectomycorrhizal fungal types. Third, soil type and fungal community composition were linked, as cluster analysis demonstrated greater similarity of fungal communities from sites within soil types than between them. Fourth, a preliminary survey of 14--45 ectomycorrhizal root tips from each of 20 trees at one cinder site indicated that trees were dominated by one or a few ectomycorrhizal RFLP types. Fifth, the RFLP patterns of some fungal sporocarps matched those of ectomycorrhizal root tips, but many did not, indicating that many of the ectomycorrhizal fungi at these sites fruit infrequently, whereas other fungi with more abundant sporocarps may not form ectomycorrhiza.

  20. Mycorrhizal Fungal Community of Poplars Growing on Pyrite Tailings Contaminated Site near the River Timok

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    Marina Katanić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Mycorrhizal fungi are of high importance for functioning of forest ecosystems and they could be used as indicators of environmental stress. The aim of this research was to analyze ectomycorrhizal community structure and to determine root colonization rate with ectomycorrhizal, arbuscular mycorrhizal and endophytic fungi of poplars growing on pyrite tailings contaminated site near the river Timok (Eastern Serbia. Materials and Methods: Identification of ectomycorrhizal types was performed by combining morphological and anatomical characterization of ectomycorrhizae with molecular identification approach, based on sequencing of the nuclear ITS rRNA region. Also, colonization of poplar roots with ectomycorrhizal, arbuscular mycorrhizal and dark septated endophytic fungi were analysed with intersection method. Results and Conclusions: Physico-chemical analyses of soil from studied site showed unfavourable water properties of soil, relatively low pH and high content of heavy metals (copper and zinc. In investigated samples only four different ectomycorrhizal fungi were found. To the species level were identified Thelephora terrestris and Tomentella ellisi, while two types remained unidentified. Type Thelephora terrestris made up 89% of all ectomycorrhizal roots on studied site. Consequently total values of Species richness index and Shannon-Weaver diversity index were 0.80 and 0.43, respectively. No structures of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were recorded. Unfavourable environmental conditions prevailing on investigated site caused decrease of ectomycorrhizal types diversity. Our findings point out that mycorrhyzal fungal community could be used as an appropriate indicator of environmental changes.

  1. Environmental drivers of ectomycorrhizal communities in Europe's temperate oak forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suz, Laura M; Barsoum, Nadia; Benham, Sue; Dietrich, Hans-Peter; Fetzer, Karl Dieter; Fischer, Richard; García, Paloma; Gehrman, Joachim; Kristöfel, Ferdinand; Manninger, Miklós; Neagu, Stefan; Nicolas, Manuel; Oldenburger, Jan; Raspe, Stephan; Sánchez, Gerardo; Schröck, Hans Werner; Schubert, Alfred; Verheyen, Kris; Verstraeten, Arne; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2014-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi are major ecological players in temperate forests, but they are rarely used in measures of forest condition because large-scale, high-resolution, standardized and replicated belowground data are scarce. We carried out an analysis of ectomycorrhizas at 22 intensively monitored long-term oak plots, across nine European countries, covering complex natural and anthropogenic environmental gradients. We found that at large scales, mycorrhizal richness and evenness declined with decreasing soil pH and root density, and with increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Shifts in mycorrhizas with different functional traits were detected; mycorrhizas with structures specialized for long-distance transport related differently to most environmental variables than those without. The dominant oak-specialist Lactarius quietus, with limited soil exploration abilities, responds positively to increasing nitrogen inputs and decreasing pH. In contrast, Tricholoma, Cortinarius and Piloderma species, with medium-distance soil exploration abilities, show a consistently negative response. We also determined nitrogen critical loads for moderate (9.5-13.5 kg N/ha/year) and drastic (17 kg N/ha/year) changes in belowground mycorrhizal root communities in temperate oak forests. Overall, we generated the first baseline data for ectomycorrhizal fungi in the oak forests sampled, identified nitrogen pollution as one of their major drivers at large scales and revealed fungi that individually and/or in combination with others can be used as belowground indicators of environmental characteristics.

  2. Combining microtomy and confocal laser scanning microscopy for structural analyses of plant-fungus associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Magnus; Grolig, Franz; Haueisen, Janine; Imhof, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    The serious problem of extended tissue thickness in the analysis of plant-fungus associations was overcome using a new method that combines physical and optical sectioning of the resin-embedded sample by microtomy and confocal microscopy. Improved tissue infiltration of the fungal-specific, high molecular weight fluorescent probe wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to Alexa Fluor® 633 resulted in high fungus-specific fluorescence even in deeper tissue sections. If autofluorescence was insufficient, additional counterstaining with Calcofluor White M2R or propidium iodide was applied in order to visualise the host plant tissues. Alternatively, the non-specific fluorochrome acid fuchsine was used for rapid staining of both, the plant and the fungal cells. The intricate spatial arrangements of the plant and fungal cells were preserved by immobilization in the hydrophilic resin Unicryl™. Microtomy was used to section the resin-embedded roots or leaves until the desired plane was reached. The data sets generated by confocal laser scanning microscopy of the remaining resin stubs allowed the precise spatial reconstruction of complex structures in the plant-fungus associations of interest. This approach was successfully tested on tissues from ectomycorrhiza (Betula pendula), arbuscular mycorrhiza (Galium aparine; Polygala paniculata, Polygala rupestris), ericoid mycorrhiza (Calluna vulgaris), orchid mycorrhiza (Limodorum abortivum, Serapias parviflora) and on one leaf-fungus association (Zymoseptoria tritici on Triticum aestivum). The method provides an efficient visualisation protocol applicable with a wide range of plant-fungus symbioses.

  3. Sporocarps of Pisolithus albus as an ecological niche for fluorescent pseudomonads involved in Acacia mangium Wild - Pisolithus albus ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duponnois, Robin; Lesueur, Didier

    2004-09-01

    Fresh sporocarps and root and soil samples were collected under a monospecific forest plantation of Acacia mangium in Dagana in Northern Senegal and checked for the presence of fluorescent pseudomonads. No bacteria were detected except from sporocarps collected with adhering soil and hyphal strands. Pisolithus sporocarps were dried at 30 degrees C for 2 weeks, ground, passed through a 2-mm sieve and mixed together. This dry sporocarp powder (DSP) was used to inoculate and form mycorrhizas on A. mangium seedlings in a glasshouse experiment. After 3 months culture, plant growth was increased in the DSP treatment but no ectomycorrhizas were present on the A. mangium root systems; however fluorescent pseudomonads were recorded in the cultural soil. The stimulatory effects on the plant growth were maintained for 6 months. However, fluorescent pseudomonads were no longer detected and 35% of the short roots were ectomycorrhizal. Some of the fluorescent pseudomonad isolates detected after 3 months stimulated the radial fungal growth in axenic conditions. These observations suggest that these bacteria are closely associated with the Pisolithus fructifications and could interact with the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis establishment.

  4. Is nitrogen transfer among plants enhanced by contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies?

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    Teste, François P; Veneklaas, Erik J; Dixon, Kingsley W; Lambers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) transfer among plants has been found where at least one plant can fix N2 . In nutrient-poor soils, where plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies (without N2 fixation) co-occur, it is unclear if N transfer exists and what promotes it. A novel multi-species microcosm pot experiment was conducted to quantify N transfer between arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM), ectomycorrhizal (EM), dual AM/EM, and non-mycorrhizal cluster-rooted plants in nutrient-poor soils with mycorrhizal mesh barriers. We foliar-fed plants with a K(15) NO3 solution to quantify one-way N transfer from 'donor' to 'receiver' plants. We also quantified mycorrhizal colonization and root intermingling. Transfer of N between plants with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies occurred at both low and high soil nutrient levels with or without root intermingling. The magnitude of N transfer was relatively high (representing 4% of donor plant N) given the lack of N2 fixation. Receiver plants forming ectomycorrhizas or cluster roots were more enriched compared with AM-only plants. We demonstrate N transfer between plants of contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies, and a preferential enrichment of cluster-rooted and EM plants compared with AM plants. Nutrient exchanges among plants are potentially important in promoting plant coexistence in nutrient-poor soils.

  5. In vitro mycorrhization and acclimatization of Amanita caesareoides and its relatives on Pinus densiflora.

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    Endo, Naoki; Gisusi, Seiki; Fukuda, Masaki; Yamada, Akiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Amanita caesareoides is a sister species of Amanita caesarea, also known as Caesar's mushroom and one of the most desirable edible mycorrhizal mushrooms. However, cultivation of Caesar's mushrooms has not yet been successful due to the difficulties involved in establishing pure cultures. In this study, we established pure cultures of four Asian Caesar's mushroom species, i.e., A. caesareoides, Amanita javanica, Amanita esculenta, and Amanita similis, which were identified by sequence analysis of their rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region. Five selected isolates in A. caesareoides, A. javanica, and A. esculenta were tested for ectomycorrhizal syntheses with axenic Pinus densiflora seedlings in vitro. Ectomycorrhizal tips of each fungal isolate tested were observed on pine lateral roots within 5 months of inoculation. Seventeen pine seedlings that formed ectomycorrhizas in vitro with these three Amanita species were acclimatized under non-sterile conditions. Seven months following acclimatization, ectomycorrhizal colonization by A. caesareoides was observed on newly grown root tips, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the fungal rDNA ITS region. Two other Amanita species also survived during ectomycorrhizal acclimatization. These results suggest that the cultivation of A. caesareoides and its relatives can be attempted through mycorrhizal synthesis using P. densiflora as a host. This is the first report of in vitro mycorrhization of Asian Caesar's mushrooms and their acclimatization under non-sterile conditions.

  6. In vitro ectomycorrhizal specificity between the Asian red pine Pinus densiflora and Tricholoma matsutake and allied species from worldwide Pinaceae and Fagaceae forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Akiyoshi; Kobayashi, Hisayasu; Murata, Hitoshi; Kalmiş, Erbil; Kalyoncu, Fatih; Fukuda, Masaki

    2010-06-01

    Tricholoma matsutake produces commercially valuable, yet uncultivable, mushrooms (matsutake) in association with pines in the Far East and Scandinavia and with both pines and oaks in the foothills of Tibet. Other matsutake mushrooms, such as Tricholoma anatolicum from the Mediterranean regions and Tricholoma magnivelare and Tricholoma sp. from the North Pacific Coast area of Canada and North America as well as Mexico, respectively, are associated with pines or oaks in their natural habitats. Tricholoma bakamatsutake and Tricholoma fulvocastaneum from Asia produce moderately valuable matsutake mushrooms and are solely associated with Fagaceae in nature. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that matsutake mushrooms from Scandinavia, Mediterranean regions, North America, and Tibet form ectomycorrhizae with Pinus densiflora similar to the Far East T. matsutake. In general, worldwide T. matsutake and the symbionts of Pinaceae colonize the rhizospheres of P. densiflora as well as T. matsutake isolated from the host plant. However, T. fulvocastaneum and T. bakamatsutake formed a discontinuous Hartig net and no Hartig net, respectively, and colonized to a lesser extent as compared to T. matsutake. The data suggest that conifer-associated matsutake mushrooms in their native habitat will associate symbiotically with the Asian red pine.

  7. Pseudotsuga menziesii invasion in native forests of Patagonia, Argentina: What about mycorrhizas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado Salomón, María Eugenia; Barroetaveña, Carolina; Rajchenberg, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Pseudotsuga menziesii is one of the most widely planted conifers in the Patagonian Andes of Argentina, with invading characteristics that are widely reported. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of its obligate mycorrhizal associations in limiting or fostering the establishment of invading seedlings. We studied the richness and abundance of endo- (AM) and ectomycorrhizae (EM) present in P. menziesii seedlings growing in six Nothofagus forests invaded by P. menziesii seedlings (Nothofagus + P. menziesii) matrices. One transect along the maximum effective recruitment distance (ERA) was established at each site in order to wrench seedlings and sample soils. P. menziesii showed effective associations with a wide range of mycorrhizal symbionts: AM (ranging between 13.21 and 37.11%), EM (ranging between 79.91 and 89.14%) and Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE). Seedlings' mycorrhization percentages were always high, suggesting a good nursery effect provided by neighboring plantations. Mycorrhizal abundance (AM% and EM%), EM morphotypes richness and evenness showed significant differences between sites, indicating that P. menziesii displays a high plasticity being capable to select the more convenient mycorrhizal arrangement at each invaded site.

  8. Hydraulic conductivity and aquaporin transcription in roots of trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by Laccaria bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Cooke, Janice E K; Kemppainen, Minna; Pardo, Alejandro G; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2016-07-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi have been reported to increase root hydraulic conductivity (L pr) by altering apoplastic and plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP)-mediated cell-to-cell water transport pathways in associated roots, or to have little effect on root water transport, depending on the interacting species and imposed stresses. In this study, we investigated the water transport properties and PIP transcription in roots of aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings colonized by the wild-type strain of Laccaria bicolor and by strains overexpressing a major fungal water-transporting aquaporin JQ585595. Inoculation of aspen seedlings with L. bicolor resulted in about 30 % colonization rate of root tips, which developed dense mantle and the Hartig net that was restricted in the modified root epidermis. Transcript abundance of the aspen aquaporins PIP1;2, PIP2;1, and PIP2;2 decreased in colonized root tips. Root colonization by JQ585595-overexpressing strains had no significant impact on seedling shoot water potentials, gas exchange, or dry mass; however, it led to further decrease in transcript abundance of PIP1;2 and PIP2;3 and the significantly lower L pr than in non-inoculated roots. These results, taken together with our previous study that showed enhanced root water hydraulics of L. bicolor-colonized white spruce (Picea glauca), suggest that the impact of L. bicolor on root hydraulics varies by the ectomycorrhiza-associated tree species.

  9. Diversity of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi Associated with Eucalyptus in Africa and Madagascar

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    Marc Ducousso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of the Australian genus Eucalyptus in short rotation plantations in Africa and Madagascar has developed over the last century to such an extent that it is becoming the most frequently planted genus in Africa. In order to find ecologically well-adapted eucalypts, foresters have tested different species of various origins and the number of tested Eucalyptus species now exceeds 150 in Africa. Due to the ability of eucalypts to naturally form ectomycorrhizae, even in the absence of any controlled introduction of compatible ectomycorrhizal fungal partners, their introduction in new ecosystems has direct consequences for ectomycorrhizal fungus communities. A bibliographical compilation, together with original field observations on putative ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with eucalypts in Africa and in Madagascar, has been drawn up in two lists: one for Africa and one for Madagascar where surprisingly high fungal diversity was observed. The level of diversity, the putative origin of the fungi, and their potential impact on native ectomycorrhizal fungi are discussed. The development of eucalypts plantations will inexorably lead to the increase of exotic fungal species being potentially invasive in the considered region.

  10. [Characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in three types of plantations in southern subtropical area of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Xia; Shi, Zuo-Min; Luo, Da; Liu, Shi-Rong; Lu, Li-Hua

    2013-07-01

    By using fumigation-extraction method and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) analysis, this paper studied the characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in the Erythrophleum fordii, Castanopsis hystrix, and Pinus massoniana plantations in south subtropical China. The soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, bacterial PLFAs, and fungal PLFAs in the plantations were significantly affected by the plantation type and season, and the soil microbial biomass, total PLFAs, and individual PLFA signatures were higher in dry season than in rainy season. The C. hystrix plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass carbon and total PLFAs, while the E. fordii plantation had the highest soil microbial biomass nitrogen. There was a significant positive correlation between the soil pH and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) PLFA (16:1omega5c). The soil total PLFAs, gram-positive bacterial PLFAs, saprophytic fungal PLFA (18:2omega6,9c), and the ratio of gram-positive to gram-negative bacterial PLFAs were significantly positively correlated with soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus, suggesting that the soil organic carbon, total nitrogen, and total phosphorus contents were the most important nutrient factors affecting the numbers and types of the soil microorganisms. In addition, the ectomycorrhizae fungal PLFA (18:1omega9c) and AMF PLFA were significantly correlated with the soil C/N ratio.

  11. Soil analysis reveals the presence of an extended mycelial network in a Tuber magnatum truffle-ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Elisa; Murat, Claude; Cagnasso, Matteo; Bonfante, Paola; Mello, Antonietta

    2010-01-01

    Truffles are hypogeous ectomycorrhizal fungi. They belong to the genus Tuber and are currently considered a hot spot in fungal biology due to their ecological and economic relevance. Among all the species, Tuber magnatum is the most appreciated because of its special taste and aroma. The aim of this work was to set up a protocol to detect T. magnatum in soil and to assess its distribution in a natural truffle-ground. We used the beta-tubulin gene as a marker to identify T. magnatum in the soil. This gene allowed us to trace the distribution of the fungus over the entire truffle-ground. Tuber magnatum was found, in one case, 100 m from the productive host plant. This study highlights that T. magnatum mycelium is more widespread than can be inferred from the distribution of truffles and ectomycorrhizas. Interestingly, a new haplotype - never described from fruiting body material - was identified. The specific detection of T. magnatum in the soil will allow to unravel the ecology of this fungus, following its mycelial network. Moreover, this new tool may have practical importance in projects aimed to increase large-scale truffle production, checking for T. magnatum persistence in plantations.

  12. Ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of Alnus acuminata from Calilegua National Park (Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Alejandra; Zak, Marcelo R; Horton, Thomas R; Micolini, Jorge

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine patterns of ectomycorrhizas (ECM) and arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) colonization associated with Alnus acuminata (Andean alder), in relation to soil parameters (electrical conductivity, field H(2)O holding capacity, pH, available P, organic matter, and total N) at two different seasons (autumn and spring). The study was conducted in natural forests of A. acuminata situated in Calilegua National Park (Jujuy, Argentina). Nine ECM morphotypes were found on A. acuminata roots. The ECM colonization was affected by seasonality and associated positively with field H(2)O holding capacity, pH, and total N and negatively associated with organic matter. Two morphotypes (Russula alnijorullensis and Tomentella sp. 3) showed significant differences between seasons. Positive and negative correlations were found between five morphotypes (Alnirhiza silkacea, Lactarius omphaliformis, Tomentella sp. 1, Tomentella sp. 3, and Lactarius sp.) and soil parameters (total N, pH, and P). A significant negative correlation was found between field H(2)O holding capacity and organic matter with AM colonization. Results of this study provide evidence that ECM and AM colonization of A. acuminata can be affected by some soil chemical edaphic parameters and indicate that some ECM morphotypes are sensitive to changes in seasonality and soil parameters.

  13. Vesicular-arbuscular-/ecto-mycorrhiza succession in seedlings of. Eucalyptus spp.

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    Santos Vera Lúcia dos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM and ectomycorrhizae (ECM in the same root system was observed when species of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook f., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell. and E. camaldulensis Dehnh were simultaneously inoculated with Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per. Cocker & Couch, isolate Pt 90A. The succession between the two fungi was observed. In general ectomycorrhizal colonization increased followed by a decrease in AM. Pisolithus tinctorius was favored in simultaneous inoculation with G. etunicatum, and the positive effect of the simultaneous inoculation of both fungi in the percent colonization by the AM fungus occurred up to 60 days after inoculation. After 120 days, colonization of roots by G. etunicatum decreased in the presence of P. tinctorius. When inoculated simultaneously, the proportion of AM and ECM varied with evaluation time, while the combined percentage of mycorrhizal roots approached the maximum and remained more or less constant after 60 days, suggesting that there could be competition between the fungi for limiting substrate. The maximum percent mycorrhizal colonization varied with Eucalyptus species and the highest value was observed for E. camaldulensis, followed in order by E. citriodora, E. urophylla, E. grandis and E. cloeziana.

  14. Implication of evolution and diversity in arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscot, François

    2015-01-01

    Being highly sensitive to ecological variations, symbiotic associations should inherently have a limited occurrence in nature. To circumvent this sensitivity and reach their universal distribution, symbioses used three strategies during their evolution, which all generated high biodiversity levels: (i) specialization to a specific environment, (ii) protection of one partner via its internalization into the other, (iii) frequent partner exchange. Mycorrhizal associations follow the 3rd strategy, but also present traits of internalization. As most ancient type, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formed by a monophyletic fungal group with reduced species richness did constantly support the mineral nutrition of terrestrial plants and enabled their ecological radiation and actual biodiversity level. In contrast ectomycorrhiza (EM) evolved later and independently within different taxa of fungi able to degrade complex organic plant residues, and the diversity levels of EM fungal and tree partners are balanced. Despite their different origins and diversity levels, AM and EM fungi display similar patterns of diversity dynamics in ecosystems. At each time or succession interval, a few dominant and many rare fungi are recruited by plants roots from a wide reservoir of propagules. However, the dominant fungal partners are frequently replaced in relation to changes in the vegetation or ecological conditions. While the initial establishment of AM and EM fungal communities corresponds to a neutral recruitment, their further succession is rather driven by niche differentiation dynamics.

  15. Mycorrhizal detection of native and non-native truffles in a historic arboretum and the discovery of a new North American species, Tuber arnoldianum sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Rosanne A; Zurier, Hannah; Bonito, Gregory; Smith, Matthew E; Pfister, Donald H

    2016-10-01

    During a study comparing the ectomycorrhizal root communities in a native forest with those at the Arnold Arboretum in Massachusetts (USA), the European species Tuber borchii was detected on the roots of a native red oak in the arboretum over two successive years. Since T. borchii is an economically important edible truffle native to Europe, we conducted a search of other roots in the arboretum to determine the extent of colonization. We also wanted to determine whether other non-native Tuber species had been inadvertently introduced into this 140-year-old Arboretum because many trees were imported into the site with intact soil and roots prior to the 1921 USDA ban on these horticultural practices in the USA. While T. borchii was not found on other trees, seven other native and exotic Tuber species were detected. Among the North American Tuber species detected from ectomycorrhizae, we also collected ascomata of a previously unknown species described here as Tuber arnoldianum. This new species was found colonizing both native and non-native tree roots. Other ectomycorrhizal taxa that were detected included basidiomycetes in the genera Amanita, Russula, Tomentella, and ascomycetes belonging to Pachyphlodes, Helvella, Genea, and Trichophaea. We clarify the phylogenetic relationships of each of the Tuber species detected in this study, and we discuss their distribution on both native and non-native host trees.

  16. Identification of differentially expressed genes of the fungus Hydnangium sp. during the pre-symbiotic phase of the ectomycorrhizal association with Eucalyptus grandis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Coelho, Irene; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; Costa, Maurício Dutra; Kasuya, Maria Catarina Megumi; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes

    2010-11-01

    The pre-symbiotic phase that precedes physical contact between symbionts is a crucial phase in determining their compatibility, allowing the formation of the ectomycorrhiza. A subtractive cDNA library representing the differentially expressed genes of the fungus Hydnangium sp. in the pre-symbiotic phase was constructed using fungal mycelia obtained through the in vitro mycorrhization technique. The fungus was cultured in the presence of Eucalyptus grandis roots, but with no contact between the hyphae and the root system of the host plant. Genes that code for proteins related to carbohydrate, amino acid, and energy metabolisms, transcription, and protein synthesis, cellular communication, signal transduction, stress response, transposons, and proteins related to the biogenesis of cell components were identified among the 131 expressed sequence tags. Expression of the genes that code for acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, ATP synthase, a voltage-dependent protein from the selective ion channel, and hydrophobin was evaluated by the RT-qPCR technique, confirming the activation of these genes in this phase of the association.

  17. The spatial distribution of acid phosphatase activity in ectomycorrhizal tissues depends on soil fertility and morphotype, and relates to host plant phosphorus uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Díaz, Leila Milena; Villanueva, Claudia Añazco; Heyser, Wolfgang; Boeckx, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Acid phosphatase (ACP) enzymes are involved in the mobilization of soil phosphorus (P) and polyphosphate accumulated in the fungal tissues of ectomycorrhizal roots, thereby influencing the amounts of P that are stored in the fungus and transferred to the host plant. This study evaluated the effects of ectomycorrhizal morphotype and soil fertility on ACP activity in the extraradical mycelium (ACP(myc)), the mantle (ACP(mantle)) and the Hartig net region (ACP(Hartig)) of ectomycorrhizal Nothofagus obliqua seedlings. ACP activity was quantified in vivo using enzyme-labelled fluorescence-97 (ELF-97) substrate, confocal laser microscopy and digital image processing routines. There was a significant effect of ectomycorrhizal morphotype on ACP(myc), ACP(mantle) and ACP(Hartig), while soil fertility had a significant effect on ACP(myc) and ACP(Hartig). The relative contribution of the mantle and the Hartig net region to the ACP activity on the ectomycorrhizal root was significantly affected by ectomycorrhizal morphotype and soil fertility. A positive correlation between ACP(Hartig) and the shoot P concentration was found, providing evidence that ACP activity at the fungus:root interface is involved in P transfer from the fungus to the host. It is concluded that the spatial distribution of ACP in ectomycorrhizas varies as a function of soil fertility and colonizing fungus.

  18. Mycorrhizal Associations and Trophic Modes in Coexisting Orchids: An Ecological Continuum between Auto- and Mixotrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jacquemyn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Two distinct nutritional syndromes have been described in temperate green orchids. Most orchids form mycorrhizas with rhizoctonia fungi and are considered autotrophic. Some orchids, however, associate with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with surrounding trees and derive their carbon from these fungi. This evolutionarily derived condition has been called mixotrophy or partial mycoheterotrophy and is characterized by 13C enrichment and high N content. Although it has been suggested that the two major nutritional syndromes are clearly distinct and tightly linked to the composition of mycorrhizal communities, recent studies have challenged this assumption. Here, we investigated whether mycorrhizal communities and nutritional syndromes differed between seven green orchid species that co-occur under similar ecological conditions (coastal dune slacks. Our results showed that mycorrhizal communities differed significantly between orchid species. Rhizoctonia fungi dominated in Dactylorhiza sp., Herminium monorchis, and Epipactis palustris, which were autotrophic based on 13C and N content. Conversely, Liparis loeselii and Epipactis neerlandica associated primarily with ectomycorrhizal fungi but surprisingly, 13C and N content supported mixotrophy only in E. neerlandica. This, together with the finding of some ectomycorrhizal fungi in rhizoctonia-associated orchids, suggests that there exists an ecological continuum between the two syndromes. The presence of a large number of indicator species associating with individual orchid species further confirms previous findings that mycorrhizal fungi may be important factors driving niche-partitioning in terrestrial orchids and therefore contribute to orchid coexistence.

  19. Conservative ecological and evolutionary patterns in liverwort–fungal symbioses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidartondo, Martin I.; Duckett, Jeffrey G.

    2010-01-01

    Liverworts, the most ancient group of land plants, form a range of intimate associations with fungi that may be analogous to the mycorrhizas of vascular plants. Most thalloid liverworts contain arbuscular mycorrhizal glomeromycete fungi similar to most vascular plants. In contrast, a range of leafy liverwort genera and one simple thalloid liverwort family (the Aneuraceae) have switched to basidiomycete fungi. These liverwort switches away from glomeromycete fungi may be expected to parallel switches undergone by vascular plants that target diverse lineages of basidiomycete fungi to form ectomycorrhizas. To test this hypothesis, we used a cultivation-independent approach to examine the basidiomycete fungi associated with liverworts in varied worldwide locations by generating fungal DNA sequence data from over 200 field collections of over 30 species. Here we show that eight leafy liverwort genera predominantly and consistently associate with members of the Sebacina vermifera species complex and that Aneuraceae thalloid liverworts associate nearly exclusively with Tulasnella species. Furthermore, within sites where multiple liverwort species co-occur, they almost never share the same fungi. Our analyses reveal a strikingly conservative ecological and evolutionary pattern of liverwort symbioses with basidiomycete fungi that is unlike that of vascular plant mycorrhizas. PMID:19812075

  20. Degradation of Root Community Traits as Indicator for Transformation of Tropical Lowland Rain Forests into Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edy, Nur; Meyer, Marike; Corre, Marife D.; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of tropical forests into intensely managed plantations is a threat to ecosystem functions. On Sumatra, Indonesia, oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantations are rapidly expanding, displacing rain forests and extensively used rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) agro-forests. Here, we tested the influence of land use systems on root traits including chemical traits (carbon, nitrogen, mineral nutrients, potentially toxic elements [aluminium, iron] and performance traits (root mass, vitality, mycorrhizal colonization). Traits were measured as root community-weighed traits (RCWTs) in lowland rain forests, in rubber agro-forests mixed with rain forest trees, in rubber and oil palm plantations in two landscapes (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan, Sumatra). We hypothesized that RCWTs vary with land use system indicating increasing transformation intensity and loss of ecosystem functions. The main factors found to be related to increasing transformation intensity were declining root vitality and root sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, manganese concentrations and increasing root aluminium and iron concentrations as well as increasing spore densities of arbuscular mycorrhizas. Mycorrhizal abundance was high for arbuscular and low for ectomycorrhizas and unrelated to changes in RCWTs. The decline in RCWTs showed significant correlations with soil nitrogen, soil pH and litter carbon. Thus, our study uncovered a relationship between deteriorating root community traits and loss of ecosystem functionality and showed that increasing transformation intensity resulted in decreasing root nutrition and health. Based on these results we suggest that land management that improves root vitality may enhance the ecological functions of intense tropical production systems. PMID:26366576

  1. Giving and receiving: measuring the carbon cost of mycorrhizas in the green orchid, Goodyera repens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Duncan D; Johnson, Irene; Read, David J; Leake, Jonathan R

    2008-01-01

    Direct measurement of the carbon (C) 'cost' of mycorrhizas is problematic. Although estimates have been made for arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal symbioses, these are based on incomplete budgets or indirect measurements. Furthermore, the conventional model of unidirectional plant-to-fungus C flux is too simplistic. Net fungus-to-plant C transfer supports seedling establishment in c. 10% of plant species, including most orchids, and bidirectional C flows occur in ectomycorrhiza utilizing soil amino acids. Here, the C cost of mycorrhizas to the green orchid Goodyera repens was determined by measurement of simultaneous bidirectional fluxes of 14C labelled sources using a monoxenic system with the fungus Ceratobasidium cornigerum. Transfer of C from fungus to plant ('up-flow') occurs in the photosynthesizing orchid G. repens (max. 0.06 microg) whereas over five times more current assimilate (min. 0.355 microg) is simultaneously allocated in the reverse direction to the mycorrhizal fungus ('down-flow') after 8 d. Carbon is transferred rapidly, being detected in plant-fungal respiration within 31 h of labelling. This study provides the most complete C budget for an orchid-mycorrhizal symbiosis, and clearly shows net plant-to-fungus C flux. The rapidity of bidirectional C flux is indicative of dynamic transfer at an interfacial apoplast as opposed to reliance on digestion of fungal pelotons.

  2. Phylogenetic distribution and evolution of mycorrhizas in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Qiu, Y-L

    2006-07-01

    A survey of 659 papers mostly published since 1987 was conducted to compile a checklist of mycorrhizal occurrence among 3,617 species (263 families) of land plants. A plant phylogeny was then used to map the mycorrhizal information to examine evolutionary patterns. Several findings from this survey enhance our understanding of the roles of mycorrhizas in the origin and subsequent diversification of land plants. First, 80 and 92% of surveyed land plant species and families are mycorrhizal. Second, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is the predominant and ancestral type of mycorrhiza in land plants. Its occurrence in a vast majority of land plants and early-diverging lineages of liverworts suggests that the origin of AM probably coincided with the origin of land plants. Third, ectomycorrhiza (ECM) and its derived types independently evolved from AM many times through parallel evolution. Coevolution between plant and fungal partners in ECM and its derived types has probably contributed to diversification of both plant hosts and fungal symbionts. Fourth, mycoheterotrophy and loss of the mycorrhizal condition also evolved many times independently in land plants through parallel evolution.

  3. Growing poplars for research with and without mycorrhizas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eMüller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the importance of the genus Populus increased because the poplar genome has been sequenced and molecular tools for basic research are available. Furthermore, poplar species occur in different habitats and harbour large genetic variation, which can be exploited for economic applications and for increasing our knowledge on the basic molecular mechanisms of the woody life style. Poplars are, therefore, employed to unravel the molecular mechanisms of wood formation, stress tolerance, tree nutrition and interaction with other organisms such as pathogens or mycorrhiza. The basis of these investigations is the reproducible production of homogeneous plant material. In this method paper we describe techniques and growth conditions for the in vitro propagation of different poplar species (Populus × canescens, P. trichocarpa, P. tremula and P. euphratica and ectomycorrhizal fungi (Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus as well as for their co-cultivation for ectomycorrhizal synthesis. Maintenance and plant preparation require different multiplication and rooting media. Growth systems to cultivate poplars under axenic conditions in agar and sand cultures with and without mycorrhizal fungi are described. Transfer of the plants from in vitro to in situ conditions is critical and hardening is important to prevent high mortality. Growth and vitality of the trees in vitro and outdoors with and without ectomycorrhizas are reported.

  4. Mycorrhizas and soil ecosystem function of co-existing woody vegetation islands at the alpine tree line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Otgonsuren, Burenjargal; Godbold, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Rhododendron ferrugineum co-exist at the alpine tree line, and can have different mycorrhizal communities. The activity and diversity of mycorrhizal fungi are considered to be important factors in regulation of soil function. At a tree line site and a lower elevation site in the Austrian Alps, the community structure of ectomycorrhiza on Picea abies and Pinus mugo was determined. The activity of surface enzymes was determined on ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal roots. In soils, the activity of a range of enzymes, nitrogen (N) mineralization and biomass decomposition were determined. The community structure of the ectomycorrhizal community of Picea abies and Pinus mugo differed strongly, but the average activity of surface enzymes of the ectomycorrhizal communities was similar. A lower root surface enzyme activity was determined on Rhododendron ferrugineum. Soil N-mineralization under Rhododendron ferrugineum was significantly lower than under Picea abies and Pinus mugo. In soil, the activity of a range of enzymes did not differ at the tree line but differed between the tree line and the lower elevation sites. The different ectomycorrhizal communities on Picea abies and Pinus mugo and ericoid mycorrhizas on Rhododendron ferrugineum support similar ecosystem functions in soil.

  5. Role of fungal trehalose and bacterial thiamine in the improved survival and growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N and the helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Brulé, C; Palin, B; Champmartin, D; Rubini, P; Garbaye, J; Sarniguet, A; Frey-Klett, P

    2010-08-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 enhances the establishment of Laccaria bicolor S238N ectomycorrhizae by improving the pre-symbiotic growth and survival of the fungus. Nothing is known about the effect of the ectomycorrhizal fungus on the helper bacteria or the molecules that are involved in the interaction. In this study, we have monitored the population density of the helper strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 in soils inoculated with L. bicolor and in control soils and found that the ectomycorhizal fungus improves the survival of the helper bacteria. We investigated the identity of the fungal and bacterial metabolites involved in this reciprocal growth-promoting effect using a combination of growth measurements, chemoattractant assays, HPLC and in silico genome analyses. We showed that trehalose, a disaccharide that accumulates to high levels in the fungal hyphae, chemoattracted and promoted the growth of the helper bacteria. Meanwhile, P. fluorescens BBc6R8 produced thiamine at concentrations that enhanced the fungal growth in vitro. Altogether our data indicate that the interaction between the two microorganisms is beneficial for both species and relies, at least in part, on trophic mutualism.

  6. Morphological and physiological damages of the mycorrhiza-root-system of the beech, due to soil contamination and possibilities of regeneration. Morphologische und physiologische Schaedigungen des Mykorrhiza-Wurzel-Systems bei der Buche als Folge von Bodenbelastungen und Moeglichkeiten der Regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heumann, H.G.; Hofmann, H.P.; Kubach, D.; Linert, U.

    1989-08-01

    Field and laboratory examinations were carried out in order to find out whether mycorrhizae of beeches are damaged by acid deposits or experimental changes of the substrate. The examined samples of mycorrhizae collected from areas of severely damaged beeches and from areas of undamaged beeches showed no significant correlation to the visible damage of trees in respect to frequency, vitality or structural organization. Laboratory experiments for artificial mycorrhizal formation of beech seedlings with Cenococcum geophilum in sloping plastic plate cultures and in a vermiculite/peat/sand substrate were successful. Metal treatments reduced shoot and root weights, whereby copper and nickel effected the mycorrhizal seedlings more than the non-mycorrhizal ones. Cytological examinations revealed that in the damaged plants cortical root cells are often destroyed by intracellular infections of C. geophilum. Our findings show that the positive effect of ectomycorrhizae on metal tolerance of trees cannot be generalized with respect to either metal, or fungal symbiont. (orig.) With 34 refs., 8 tabs., 62 figs.

  7. Auxofuran, a Novel Metabolite That Stimulates the Growth of Fly Agaric, Is Produced by the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacterium Streptomyces Strain AcH 505†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D.; Tarkka, Mika T.; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-01-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 μM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 μM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce. PMID:16672502

  8. Similar biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi in set-aside plantations and ancient old-growth broadleaved forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spake, Rebecca; van der Linde, Sietse; Newton, Adrian C.; Suz, Laura M.; Bidartondo, Martin I.; Doncaster, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Setting aside overmature planted forests is currently seen as an option for preserving species associated with old-growth forests, such as those with dispersal limitation. Few data exist, however, on the utility of set-aside plantations for this purpose, or the value of this habitat type for biodiversity relative to old-growth semi-natural ecosystems. Here, we evaluate the contribution of forest type relative to habitat characteristics in determining species richness and composition in seven forest blocks, each containing an ancient old-growth stand (> 1000 yrs) paired with a set-aside even-aged planted stand (ca. 180 yrs). We investigated the functionally important yet relatively neglected ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF), a group for which the importance of forest age has not been assessed in broadleaved forests. We found that forest type was not an important determinant of EMF species richness or composition, demonstrating that set-aside can be an effective option for conserving ancient EMF communities. Species richness of above-ground EMF fruiting bodies was principally related to the basal area of the stand (a correlate of canopy cover) and tree species diversity, whilst richness of below-ground ectomycorrhizae was driven only by tree diversity. Our results suggest that overmature planted forest stands, particularly those that are mixed-woods with high basal area, are an effective means to connect and expand ecological networks of ancient old-growth forests in historically deforested and fragmented landscapes for ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:26917858

  9. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Karen M; Janos, David P; Nichols, Scott; Bowman, David M J S

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer vs. mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT) followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations.

  10. Inhibitory potential of naphthoquinones leached from leaves and exuded from roots of the invasive plant Impatiens glandulifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckli, Regina; Hesse, Katharina; Glauser, Gaetan; Rusterholz, Hans-Peter; Baur, Bruno

    2014-04-01

    Exploring the effects of allelopathic plant chemicals on the growth of native vegetation is essential to understand their ecological roles and importance in exotic plant invasion. Naphthoquinones have been identified as potential growth inhibitors produced by Impatiens glandulifera, an exotic annual plant that recently invaded temperate forests in Europe. However, naphthoquinone release and inhibitory potential have not been examined. We quantified the naphthoquinone content in cotyledons, leaves, stems, and roots from plants of different ages of both the invasive I. glandulifera and native Impatiens noli-tangere as well as in soil extracts and rainwater rinsed from leaves of either plant species by using ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). We identified the compound 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (2-MNQ) exclusively in plant organs of I. glandulifera, in resin bags buried into the soil of patches invaded by I. glandulifera, and in rainwater rinsed from its leaves. This indicates that 2-MNQ is released from the roots of I. glandulifera and leached from its leaves by rain. Specific bioassays using aqueous shoot and root extracts revealed a strong inhibitory effect on the germination of two native forest herbs and on the mycelium growth of three ectomycorrhiza fungi. These findings suggest that the release of 2-MNQ may contribute to the invasion success of I. glandulifera and support the novel weapons hypothesis.

  11. Mastering ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: the impact of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhiza formation is the consequence of a mutualistic interaction between certain soil fungi and plant roots that helps to overcome nutritional limitations faced by the respective partners. In symbiosis, fungi contribute to tree nutrition by means of mineral weathering and mobilization of nutrients from organic matter, and obtain plant-derived carbohydrates as a response. Support with easily degradable carbohydrates seems to be the driving force for fungi to undergo this type of interaction. As a consequence, the fungal hexose uptake capacity is strongly increased in Hartig net hyphae of the model fungi Amanita muscaria and Laccaria bicolor. Next to fast carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, storage carbohydrates are of special interest. In functional A. muscaria ectomycorrhizas, expression and activity of proteins involved in trehalose biosynthesis is mainly localized in hyphae of the Hartig net, indicating an important function of trehalose in generation of a strong carbon sink by fungal hyphae. In symbiosis, fungal partners receive up to approximately 19 times more carbohydrates from their hosts than normal leakage of the root system would cause, resulting in a strong carbohydrate demand of infected roots and, as a consequence, a more efficient plant photosynthesis. To avoid fungal parasitism, the plant seems to have developed mechanisms to control carbohydrate drain towards the fungal partner and link it to the fungus-derived mineral nutrition. In this contribution, current knowledge on fungal strategies to obtain carbohydrates from its host and plant strategies to enable, but also to control and restrict (under certain conditions), carbon transfer are summarized.

  12. Mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces AcH 505 induces differential gene expression in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrey, Silvia D; Schellhammer, Michael; Ecke, Margret; Hampp, Rüdiger; Tarkka, Mika T

    2005-10-01

    The interaction between the mycorrhiza helper bacteria Streptomyces nov. sp. 505 (AcH 505) and Streptomyces annulatus 1003 (AcH 1003) with fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and spruce (Picea abies) was investigated. The effects of both bacteria on the mycelial growth of different ectomycorrhizal fungi, on ectomycorrhiza formation, and on fungal gene expression in dual culture with AcH 505 were determined. The fungus specificities of the streptomycetes were similar. Both bacterial species showed the strongest effect on the growth of mycelia at 9 wk of dual culture. The effect of AcH 505 on gene expression of A. muscaria was examined using the suppressive subtractive hybridization approach. The responsive fungal genes included those involved in signalling pathways, metabolism, cell structure, and the cell growth response. These results suggest that AcH 505 and AcH 1003 enhance mycorrhiza formation mainly as a result of promotion of fungal growth, leading to changes in fungal gene expression. Differential A. muscaria transcript accumulation in dual culture may result from a direct response to bacterial substances.

  13. Amanita muscaria (Basidiomycota y su asociación micorríca con Cedrus Deodara (Pinaceae en las Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina Amanita muscaria (Basidiomycota and its mycorrhizal association with Cedrus deodara (Pinaceae in the Sierras de Córdoba, Argentina

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    Graciela Daniele

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se cita por primera vez para el centro de Argentina, la presencia de fructificaciones de Amanita muscaria (L. ex Fr. Hooker asociadas con Cedrus deodara (Roxb Loud. Se describen los esporocarpos hallados y se caracteriza morfo-anatómicamente la ectomicorriza con C. deodara. La ectomicorriza presenta ramificaciones simples a dicotómicas, escasas hifas emanantes y un manto blanco con abundantes partículas de suelo adheridas, constituido por tres capas, la externa plectenquimática con hifas formando un arreglo en forma de anillo.This is the first record of A. muscaria (L. ex Fr. Hooker basidiocarps in the center of Argentina in association with Cedrus deodara (Roxb Loud. Morphological and anatomical characteristics of the mycorrhizal association between A. muscaria and C. deodara are described and illustrated for the first time. The ectomycorrhizae is characterized by the presence of simple to dichotomous branches, few emanating hyphae and a white mantle with abundant soil particles with three layers, the plectenquimatic outer layer characterized by a ring-like arrangement.

  14. Auxofuran, a novel metabolite that stimulates the growth of fly agaric, is produced by the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedlinger, Julia; Schrey, Silvia D; Tarkka, Mika T; Hampp, Rüdiger; Kapur, Manmohan; Fiedler, Hans-Peter

    2006-05-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Streptomyces strain AcH 505 improves mycelial growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi and formation of ectomycorrhizas between Amanita muscaria and spruce but suppresses the growth of plant-pathogenic fungi, suggesting that it produces both fungal growth-stimulating and -suppressing compounds. The dominant fungal-growth-promoting substance produced by strain AcH 505, auxofuran, was isolated, and its effect on the levels of gene expression of A. muscaria was investigated. Auxofuran and its synthetic analogue 7-dehydroxy-auxofuran were most effective at a concentration of 15 microM, and application of these compounds led to increased lipid metabolism-related gene expression. Cocultivation of strain AcH 505 and A. muscaria stimulated auxofuran production by the streptomycete. The antifungal substances produced by strain AcH 505 were identified as the antibiotics WS-5995 B and C. WS-5995 B completely blocked mycelial growth at a concentration of 60 microM and caused a cell stress-related gene expression response in A. muscaria. Characterization of these compounds provides the foundation for molecular analysis of the fungus-bacterium interaction in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between fly agaric and spruce.

  15. Effect of Afforestation on Soil Properties and Mycorrhizal Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. KAHLE; C. BAUM; B. BOELCKE

    2005-01-01

    A study was conducted on Cambisols in Northern Germany to analyze the effect of fast growing trees (Salix and Populus spp.) used in agroforestry on soil chemical and physical properties and also on endo- and ectomycorrhizal colonization measure the topsoil inventories at the very beginning and after six (GUL), seven (VIP) and ten (ROS) years of afforestation with fast growing trees. The effect on soil organic carbon, plant available nutrients, reaction, bulk density, porosity and water conditions was analyzed. Arable soils without tree coppice were used as controls. Additionally, the endoand ectomycorrhizal colonization of two Salix and two Populus clones were investigated at one site (GUL) in 2002. The amounts of organic carbon in the topsoil increased significantly (P<0.01) presumably induced by leaf and root litter and also by the lack of tillage. The soil bulk density significantly decreased and the porosity of the soil increased significantly (both P<0.01). The proportion of medium pores in the soil also rose significantly (P<0.05 and 0.01). Generally,afforestation of arable soils improved soil water retention. Ectomycorrhizas dominated the mycorrhizal formation of the Salix and Populus clones, with the accumulation of organic matter in the topsoil suspected of supporting the ectomycorrhizal formation. Thus, agroforestry with Salix and Populus spp. conspicuously affected chemical and additionally physical properties of the top layer of Cambisols within a period of six years.

  16. Mycorrhiza of the host-specific Lactarius deterrimus on the roots of Picea abies and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlmann, O; Göbl, F

    2006-06-01

    The ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete species Lactarius deterrimus Gröger is considered to be a strictly host-specific mycobiont of Picea abies (L.) Karst. However, we identified arbutoid mycorrhiza formed by this fungus on the roots of Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (L.) Spreng. in a mixed stand at the alpine timberline; typical ectomycorrhiza of P. abies were found in close relation. A. uva-ursi is known as an extremely unspecific phytobiont. The mycorrhizae of both associations are described and compared morphologically. The mycorrhiza formed by L. deterrimus on both A. uva-ursi and P. abies show typical ectomycorrhizal features such as a hyphal mantle and a Hartig net. The main difference between the mycorrhizal symbioses with the different phytobionts is the occurrence of intracellular hyphae in the epidermal cells of A. uva-ursi. This emphasizes the importance of the plant partner for mycorrhizal anatomy. This is the first report of a previously considered host-specific ectomycorrhizal fungus in association with A. uva-ursi under natural conditions. The advantages of this loose specificity between the fungus and plant species is discussed.

  17. Morphological characterization of the mycorrhiza formed by Helianthemum almeriense Pau with Terfezia claveryi Chatin and Picoa lefebvrei (Pat.) Maire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, A; Morte, A; Honrubia, M

    2003-12-01

    This work presents the first anatomical description of the mycorrhizal systems of Helianthemum almeriense, and of the structure and ultrastructure of the mycorrhizae formed by this plant species with the ascomycetes Terfezia claveryi and Picoa lefebvrei. Four different mycorrhizal systems are described, the club-shaped mycorrhiza being the most abundant. The type of mycorrhiza formed depended on the mycorrhiza culture conditions, but not on the fungal species. For both fungal species, H. almeriense formed an endomycorrhiza in natural field conditions, an ecto- and ectendomycorrhiza without a sheath in pot cultures, and an ectomycorrhiza with a characteristic sheath and Hartig net in in vitro cultures. This is the first report of a typical sheath in Helianthemum-desert truffle mycorrhizal associations. The results support the idea that culture conditions can induce changes in mycorrhiza morphology and that there is no clear barrier between the two main types of mycorrhiza organization in Helianthemum species. The ultrastructural study confirmed the regular presence of T. claveryi intracellular hyphae in direct contact with the host wall, a localization which seems to be a characteristic of the T. claveryi mycorrhiza organization. The P. lefebvrei mycorrhiza organization was characterized by intracellular hyphae with large amounts of electron-dense globules, probably with a lipidic content, and a warty ornamentation on the wall of the root external hyphae.

  18. Host associations between fungal root endophytes and boreal trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernaghan, Gavin; Patriquin, Glenn

    2011-08-01

    Fungal root endophytes colonize root tissue concomitantly with mycorrhizal fungi, but their identities and host preferences are largely unknown. We cultured fungal endophytes from surface-sterilized Cenococcum geophilum ectomycorrhizae of Betula papyrifera, Abies balsamea, and Picea glauca from two boreal sites in eastern Canada. Isolates were initially grouped on the basis of cultural morphology and then identified by internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequencing or by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence data revealed 31 distinct phylotypes among the isolates, comprising mainly members of the ascomycete families Helotiaceae, Dermateaceae, Myxotrichaceae, and Hyaloscyphaceae, although other fungi were also isolated. Multivariate analyses indicate a clear separation among the endophyte communities colonizing each host tree species. Some phylotypes were evenly distributed across the roots of all three host species, some were found preferentially on particular hosts, and others were isolated from single hosts only. The results indicate that fungal root endophytes of boreal trees are not randomly distributed, but instead form relatively distinct assemblages on different host tree species.

  19. Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühdorf, Katja; Münzenberger, B; Begerow, D; Gómez-Laurito, J; Hüttl, R F

    2015-02-01

    Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where this plant species grows together with Quercus costaricensis. We provide here the first evidence of mycorrhizal status for the Ascomycete Leotia cf. lubrica (Helotiales) that was so far under discussion as saprophyte or mycorrhizal. This fungus formed arbutoid mycorrhiza with C. arbutoides. The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically. Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses. Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

  20. Studies on the ectomycorrhizal community in a declining Quercus suber L. stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Enrico; Franceschini, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    This survey was carried out in a Quercus suber L. stand with many trees affected by the disease "oak decline". Its aim was to obtain information about both the belowground ectomycorrhizal fungal community in a declining Q. suber stand as a whole, and the ectomycorrhizal fungal community of individual tree (EFT) detected in healthy and diseased plants. To this end, we first categorized the trees into four different decline classes (one for healthy plants and three for diseased plants) and then, by using morphological and molecular tools, we identified the ectomycorrhizas isolated from samples collected near the trees with different declining classes. The ectomycorrhizal community as a whole was seen to be composed of numerous ectomycorrhizal fungal species, only some of which appeared to be dominant (Cenococcum geophilum, Lactarius chrysorrheus, and some species of Tomentella genus), while most occurred sporadically. Results show that all root tips observed are mycorrhized and that decline class does not influence the number of ectomycorrhizal root tips found in the EFTs, thus oak decline does not impact the investment in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. However, some statistical differences can be observed in the values of evenness and taxonomic distinctness in the EFT associated with trees with different states of health. Finally, both the analysis of similarity test and the ordination technique highlight a compositional difference between the EFT associated with trees in different health conditions, but also suggest that other factors may play a role in causing these differences.

  1. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic versus mineral soil horizons

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    Karen eBarry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer versus mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations.

  2. Potassium nutrition of ectomycorrhizal Pinus pinaster: overexpression of the Hebeloma cylindrosporum HcTrk1 transporter affects the translocation of both K(+) and phosphorus in the host plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kevin; Delteil, Amandine; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Becquer, Adeline; Plassard, Claude; Sentenac, Hervé; Zimmermann, Sabine

    2014-02-01

    Mycorrhizal associations are known to improve the hydro-mineral nutrition of their host plants. However, the importance of mycorrhizal symbiosis for plant potassium nutrition has so far been poorly studied. We therefore investigated the impact of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum on the potassium nutrition of Pinus pinaster and examined the involvement of the fungal potassium transporter HcTrk1. HcTrk1 transcripts and proteins were localized in ectomycorrhizas using in situ hybridization and EGFP translational fusion constructs. Importantly, an overexpression strategy was performed on a H. cylindrosporum endogenous gene in order to dissect the role of this transporter. The potassium nutrition of mycorrhizal pine plants was significantly improved under potassium-limiting conditions. Fungal strains overexpressing HcTrk1 reduced the translocation of potassium and phosphorus from the roots to the shoots of inoculated plants in mycorrhizal experiments. Furthermore, expression of HcTrk1 and the phosphate transporter HcPT1.1 were reciprocally linked to the external inorganic phosphate and potassium availability. The development of these approaches provides a deeper insight into the role of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis on host plant K(+) nutrition and in particular, the K(+) transporter HcTrk1. The work augments our knowledge of the link between potassium and phosphorus nutrition via the mycorrhizal pathway.

  3. Availability of ectomycorrhizal fungi to black spruce above the present treeline in Eastern Labrador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reithmeier, Laura; Kernaghan, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECMF) are an important biotic factor in the survival of conifer seedlings under stressful conditions and therefore have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment into alpine and tundra habitats. In order to assess patterns of ectomycorrhizal availability and community structure above treeline, we conducted soil bioassays in which Picea mariana (black spruce) seedlings were grown in field-collected soils under controlled conditions. Soils were collected from distinct alpine habitats, each dominated by a different ectomycorrhizal host shrub: Betula glandulosa, Arctostaphylos alpina or Salix herbacaea. Within each habitat, half of the soils collected contained roots of ectomycorrhizal shrubs (host (+)) and the other half were free of host plants (host(-)). Forest and glacial moraine soils were also included for comparison. Fungi forming ectomycorrhizae during the bioassays were identified by DNA sequencing. Our results indicate that ECMF capable of colonizing black spruce are widespread above the current tree line in Eastern Labrador and that the level of available inoculum has a significant influence on the growth of seedlings under controlled conditions. Many of the host(-) soils possessed appreciable levels of ectomycorrhizal inoculum, likely in the form of spore banks. Inoculum levels in these soils may be influenced by spore production from neighboring soils where ectomycorrhizal shrubs are present. Under predicted temperature increases, ectomycorrhizal inoculum in soils with host shrubs as well as in nearby soils without host shrubs have the potential to facilitate conifer establishment above the present tree line.

  4. Ectomycorrhizal Fungus-Induced Changes of Cu and Cd speciation in the rhizosphere of Chinese Pine Seedlings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yi; LI Ting; HUANG Zhi-Ji; FEI Ying-Heng

    2008-01-01

    To understand the role of ectomycorrhizas in improving the tolerance of its host to excessive heavy metals in soil, this study was conducted to exam the patterns of four fractions (the exchangeable, the carbonate-bound, the Fe-Mn oxide-bound and the organically bound) of both Cu and Cd in the rhizosphere of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis) seedlings grown in excessive Cu and Cd environment. The results showed that the speciation of Cu and Cd in the rhizosphere was significantly influenced by inoculation of ectomycorrhizal fungus Boletus edulis. Compared to the rhizosphere, the content of exchangeable Cu slightly decreased in the mycorrhizosphere of the seedlings grown in 166 and 400 mg kg-1Cu contaminated soil, whereas the exchangeable Cd in the mycorrhizosphere decreased remarkably to only 33% and to 60% that of the rhizosphcre at 0.75 and 1.50 mg kg-1 Cd levels, respectively. These indicate the potential capacity of mycorrhizas to alleviate the damage of heavy metals to the host plants by reducing the bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. Distribution of the 4 tested fractions of Cu and Cd at different contamination levels showed that there was a strong tendency of changing from loosely associatcd fractions to strongly associated fractions in the mycorrhizosphere. The most stable Cd fraction, organically bound Cd, was significantly larger in the mycorrhizosphere than in the rhizosphere at different Cd contamination levels. This phenomenon was also observed for Cu but the difference was not statistically significant.

  5. 菌根真菌促进植物磷吸收研究进展%Advance of plant phosphorus uptake improved by mycorrhiza fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹庆芹; 冯永庆; 刘玉芬; 郭献平; 张国庆; 秦岭

    2011-01-01

    In the soil the concentration of soluble phosphorus is very scarce, which is one of main factors limiting plant growth. Plant-fungus has evolved a symbiosis way called mycorrhiza to significantly increase plant Pi uptake ability from soil, and improve plant growth. Here we first summarize the morphological characters of two types of mycorrhizae including ecto-mycorrhiza and arbuscular mycorrhiza. Then we summarize the studies on mechanisms of improving Pi absorbance, and the mycorrhiza-specific and inducible phosphate transporter identified in plant.Finally we introduce the current understanding of signaling pathway during arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis.%土壤中低浓度的有效磷水平成为限制植物生长发育的主要因素.植物-真菌菌根共生可以显著提高植物吸收土壤中磷的能力,促进植物生长发育.该文对土壤中磷酸盐的形式、丛枝状菌根和外生菌根两种菌根类型的形态学特征和促磷吸收的发生机制、植物中已克隆的菌根特异性或诱导性磷转运蛋白,以及丛枝状真菌共生信号转导途径等进行了综述.

  6. A.B. Frank and mycorrhizae: the challenge to evolutionary and ecologic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, James M

    2005-06-01

    A. B. Frank's observations and hypotheses about mycorrhizae in 1885 flew in the face of conventional thinking of the time. He reported that what we now term ectomycorrhizae were widespread on root systems of many woody plant species in a great diversity of habitats and soils. He hypothesized that mycorrhizae represent a pervasive mutualistic symbiosis in which fungus and host nutritionally rely on each other; that the fungus extracts nutrients from both mineral soil and humus and translocates them to the tree host; and that the tree, in turn, nourishes the fungus. Initially opposed by much of the scientific community, nearly all of Frank's major hypotheses have since been unequivocally demonstrated, although many decades were required to achieve conclusive evidence. Nonetheless, the revolution in thinking about plant and fungal evolution, ecology and physiology generated by Frank is still in the process of acceptance by much of the scientific community, 120 years and tens of thousands of scientific papers since he coined the term "mycorrhiza". The reasons for this extraordinary lag time in themselves present an intriguing research subject.

  7. Oak protein profile alterations upon root colonization by an ectomycorrhizal fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastiana, Mónica; Martins, Joana; Figueiredo, Andreia; Monteiro, Filipa; Sardans, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Silva, Anabela; Roepstorff, Peter; Pais, Maria Salomé; Coelho, Ana Varela

    2017-02-01

    An increased knowledge on the real impacts of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis in forest species is needed to optimize forest sustainable productivity and thus to improve forest services and their capacity to act as carbon sinks. In this study, we investigated the response of an oak species to ectomycorrhizae formation using a proteomics approach complemented by biochemical analysis of carbohydrate levels. Comparative proteome analysis between mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal cork oak plants revealed no differences at the foliar level. However, the protein profile of 34 unique oak proteins was altered in the roots. Consistent with the results of the biochemical analysis, the proteome analysis of the mycorrhizal roots suggests a decreasing utilization of sucrose for the metabolic activity of mycorrhizal roots which is consistent with an increased allocation of carbohydrates from the plant to the fungus in order to sustain the symbiosis. In addition, a promotion of protein unfolding mechanisms, attenuation of defense reactions, increased nutrient mobilization from the plant-fungus interface (N and P), as well as cytoskeleton rearrangements and induction of plant cell wall loosening for fungal root accommodation in colonized roots are also suggested by the results. The suggested improvement in root capacity to take up nutrients accompanied by an increase of root biomass without apparent changes in aboveground biomass strongly re-enforces the potential of mycorrhizal inoculation to improve cork oak forest resistance capacity to cope with coming climate change.

  8. Degradation of Root Community Traits as Indicator for Transformation of Tropical Lowland Rain Forests into Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations.

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    Josephine Sahner

    Full Text Available Conversion of tropical forests into intensely managed plantations is a threat to ecosystem functions. On Sumatra, Indonesia, oil palm (Elaeis guineensis plantations are rapidly expanding, displacing rain forests and extensively used rubber (Hevea brasiliensis agro-forests. Here, we tested the influence of land use systems on root traits including chemical traits (carbon, nitrogen, mineral nutrients, potentially toxic elements [aluminium, iron] and performance traits (root mass, vitality, mycorrhizal colonization. Traits were measured as root community-weighed traits (RCWTs in lowland rain forests, in rubber agro-forests mixed with rain forest trees, in rubber and oil palm plantations in two landscapes (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan, Sumatra. We hypothesized that RCWTs vary with land use system indicating increasing transformation intensity and loss of ecosystem functions. The main factors found to be related to increasing transformation intensity were declining root vitality and root sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, manganese concentrations and increasing root aluminium and iron concentrations as well as increasing spore densities of arbuscular mycorrhizas. Mycorrhizal abundance was high for arbuscular and low for ectomycorrhizas and unrelated to changes in RCWTs. The decline in RCWTs showed significant correlations with soil nitrogen, soil pH and litter carbon. Thus, our study uncovered a relationship between deteriorating root community traits and loss of ecosystem functionality and showed that increasing transformation intensity resulted in decreasing root nutrition and health. Based on these results we suggest that land management that improves root vitality may enhance the ecological functions of intense tropical production systems.

  9. Degradation of Root Community Traits as Indicator for Transformation of Tropical Lowland Rain Forests into Oil Palm and Rubber Plantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahner, Josephine; Budi, Sri Wilarso; Barus, Henry; Edy, Nur; Meyer, Marike; Corre, Marife D; Polle, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of tropical forests into intensely managed plantations is a threat to ecosystem functions. On Sumatra, Indonesia, oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) plantations are rapidly expanding, displacing rain forests and extensively used rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) agro-forests. Here, we tested the influence of land use systems on root traits including chemical traits (carbon, nitrogen, mineral nutrients, potentially toxic elements [aluminium, iron] and performance traits (root mass, vitality, mycorrhizal colonization). Traits were measured as root community-weighed traits (RCWTs) in lowland rain forests, in rubber agro-forests mixed with rain forest trees, in rubber and oil palm plantations in two landscapes (Bukit Duabelas and Harapan, Sumatra). We hypothesized that RCWTs vary with land use system indicating increasing transformation intensity and loss of ecosystem functions. The main factors found to be related to increasing transformation intensity were declining root vitality and root sulfur, nitrogen, carbon, manganese concentrations and increasing root aluminium and iron concentrations as well as increasing spore densities of arbuscular mycorrhizas. Mycorrhizal abundance was high for arbuscular and low for ectomycorrhizas and unrelated to changes in RCWTs. The decline in RCWTs showed significant correlations with soil nitrogen, soil pH and litter carbon. Thus, our study uncovered a relationship between deteriorating root community traits and loss of ecosystem functionality and showed that increasing transformation intensity resulted in decreasing root nutrition and health. Based on these results we suggest that land management that improves root vitality may enhance the ecological functions of intense tropical production systems.

  10. Molecular signals required for the establishment and maintenance of ectomycorrhizal symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kevin; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Cope, Kevin R; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2015-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizal (ECM) symbioses are among the most widespread associations between roots of woody plants and soil fungi in forest ecosystems. These associations contribute significantly to the sustainability and sustainagility of these ecosystems through nutrient cycling and carbon sequestration. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms controlling the mutual recognition between both partners are still poorly understood. Elegant work has demonstrated that effector proteins from ECM and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi regulate host defenses by manipulating plant hormonal pathways. In parallel, genetic and evolutionary studies in legumes showed that a 'common symbiosis pathway' is required for the establishment of the ancient AM symbiosis and has been recruited for the rhizobia-legume association. Given that genes of this pathway are present in many angiosperm trees that develop ectomycorrhizas, we propose their potential involvement in some but not all ECM associations. The maintenance of a successful long-term relationship seems strongly regulated by resource allocation between symbiotic partners, suggesting that nutrients themselves may serve as signals. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the early and late signal exchanges between woody plants and ECM fungi, and we suggest future directions for decoding the molecular basis of the underground dance between trees and their favorite fungal partners.

  11. Los Cynipidae (Hymenoptera de la Comunidad de Madrid: lista anotada, mapas de distribución, riqueza y estatus de conservación

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    Nieves-Aldrey, J. L.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Acheck list of the Cynipidae from Comunidad de Madrid (Spain is presented for the first time. The data base contains 2189 records of samplings carried out from 1982 to the present in 103 sites in Madrid and 19 in nearby adjacent provinces. The list of 127 cynipid species from Madrid represents 73% of total Cynipidae species from the Iberian Peninsula. A distribution map in Madrid for each cynipid species is presented, showing the sampling sites where it has been found together with the potential distribution area of the species within the territory. Several aspects on the richness and distribution of the Cynipidae from Madrid are commented: potentially present and absent Iberian species, individual and rare species, and areas of high species richness. The area of highest richness for the Cynipidae of Madrid follows a strip of Cretacic and Tertiary soils along the Guadalix-Venturada-Torrelaguna axis, which also shows a high diversity of cynipid host plants, especially Quercus species. Other areas in SE Madrid deserving protection with regard to cynipids are also shown. These areas, some rich in rare and singular Aylacini species, other relictic areas with Quercus petraea in the Northeast and also some small areas with the presence of Quercus suber in parts of the territory of Madrid, deserve maximum protection concerning Cynipid conservation.

    Se presenta por primera vez la lista anotada de especies y los mapas de distribución de los Cynipidae de la Comunidad de Madrid. Los datos corresponden a 2189 registros pertenecientes a muestreos y colectas efectuados desde 1982 hasta la actualidad, en 103 localidades de Madrid y en otras 19 cercanas de provincias adyacentes. Se relacionan 107 especies de cinípidos que representan el 73 % del total de especies ibéricas. Cada especie se acompaña de su correspondiente mapa de distribución en la Comunidad de Madrid, reflejando los puntos de las localidades de muestreo en los que

  12. An empirical study of the wound effect on sap flux density measured with thermal dissipation probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Andreas; Marañón-Jiménez, Sara; Rebmann, Corinna; Herbst, Mathias; Cuntz, Matthias

    2016-12-01

    The insertion of thermal dissipation (TD) sensors on tree stems for sap flux density (SFD) measurements can lead to SFD underestimations due to a wound formation close to the drill hole. However, the wound effect has not been assessed experimentally for this method yet. Here, we propose an empirical approach to investigate the effect of the wound healing on measured sap flux with TD probes. The approach was performed for both, diffuse-porous (Fagus sylvatica (Linnaeus)) and ring-porous (Quercus petraea (Lieblein)) species. Thermal dissipation probes were installed on different dates along the growing season to document the effects of the dynamic wound formation. The trees were cut in autumn and additional sensors were installed in the cut stems, therefore, without potential effects of wound development. A range of water pressures was applied to the stem segments and SFDs were simultaneously measured by TD sensors as well as gravimetrically in the laboratory. The formation of wounds around sensors installed in living tree stems led to underestimation of SFD by 21.4 ± 3 and 47.5 ± 3.8% in beech and oak, respectively. The differences between SFD underestimations of diffuse-porous beech and ring-porous oak were, however, not statistically significant. Sensors with 5-, 11- and 22-week-old wounds also showed no significant differences, which implies that the influence of wound formation on SFD estimates was completed within the first few weeks after perforation. These results were confirmed by time courses of SFD measurements in the field. Field SFD values decreased immediately after sensor installation and reached stable values after ~2 weeks with similar underestimations to the ones observed in the laboratory. We therefore propose a feasible approach to correct directly field observations of SFD for potential underestimations due to the wound effect.

  13. Powdery Mildew Decreases the Radial Growth of Oak Trees with Cumulative and Delayed Effects over Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Didier; Lasnier, Jean-Baptiste; Capdevielle, Xavier; Dugravot, Aline; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Quercus robur and Q. petraea are major European forest tree species. They have been affected by powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe alphitoides for more than a century. This fungus is a biotrophic foliar pathogen that diverts photosynthetate from the plant for its own nutrition. We used a dendrochronological approach to investigate the effects of different levels of infection severity on the radial growth of young oak trees. Oak infection was monitored at individual tree level, at two sites in southwestern France, over a five-year period (2001–2005). Mean infection severity was almost 75% (infected leaf area) at the end of the 2001 growing season, at both sites, but only about 40% in 2002, and 8%, 5% and 2% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Infection levels varied considerably between trees and were positively related between 2001 and 2002. Increment cores were taken from each tree to assess annual ring widths and increases in basal area. Annual radial growth was standardised to take the effect of tree size into account. Annual standardised radial growth was significantly and negatively correlated with infection severity in the same year, for both 2001 and 2002, and at both sites. The decrease in growth reached 70–90% for highly infected trees. The earlywood width was poorly correlated with infection severity, but the proportion of latewood in tree rings was lower in highly infected trees (60%) than in less heavily infected trees (85%). Infection in 2001 and 2002 was found to have a cumulative effect on radial growth in these years, together with a delayed effect detectable in 2003. Thus, even non-lethal pathogens like powdery mildew can have a significant impact on tree functioning. This impact should be taken into account in growth and yield models, to improve predictions of forest net primary production. PMID:27177029

  14. High rates of gene flow by pollen and seed in oak populations across Europe.

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    Sophie Gerber

    Full Text Available Gene flow is a key factor in the evolution of species, influencing effective population size, hybridisation and local adaptation. We analysed local gene flow in eight stands of white oak (mostly Quercus petraea and Q. robur, but also Q. pubescens and Q. faginea distributed across Europe. Adult trees within a given area in each stand were exhaustively sampled (range [239, 754], mean 423, mapped, and acorns were collected ([17,147], 51 from several mother trees ([3], [47], 23. Seedlings ([65,387], 178 were harvested and geo-referenced in six of the eight stands. Genetic information was obtained from screening distinct molecular markers spread across the genome, genotyping each tree, acorn or seedling. All samples were thus genotyped at 5-8 nuclear microsatellite loci. Fathers/parents were assigned to acorns and seedlings using likelihood methods. Mating success of male and female parents, pollen and seed dispersal curves, and also hybridisation rates were estimated in each stand and compared on a continental scale. On average, the percentage of the wind-borne pollen from outside the stand was 60%, with large variation among stands (21-88%. Mean seed immigration into the stand was 40%, a high value for oaks that are generally considered to have limited seed dispersal. However, this estimate varied greatly among stands (20-66%. Gene flow was mostly intraspecific, with large variation, as some trees and stands showed particularly high rates of hybridisation. Our results show that mating success was unevenly distributed among trees. The high levels of gene flow suggest that geographically remote oak stands are unlikely to be genetically isolated, questioning the static definition of gene reserves and seed stands.

  15. A 430 year record of hydroclimate variability for NE-Germany based on stable carbon and oxygen isotopes from pine and oak tree rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Gerhard; Baschek, Heiko; Heinrich, Ingo; Navabzadeh, Nadia; Riedel, Frank; Wilmking, Martin; Heußner, Karl-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    European lowlands experience many direct and indirect influences of global warming, particularly related to the hydrological cycle which lately faces increasing flood and drought events. Although important for humans and the ecosystems in which they live, little is known about the long-term spatiotemporal hydrological changes in various European regions. Here we present the first 430-year stable carbon and oxygen chronologies from tree ring cellulose in lowland oak and pine trees (P. sylvestris, Q. petraea) for the region of NE-Germany and provide annually resolved high quality hydroclimatic reconstructions. When compared to ring width data isotope data can be used with only minor adjustments to their means (besides correction of short juvenile trends) and sample depths of 4-5 trees are normally enough for a significant expressed population signal being representative for a site. For this study more than 20 individual tree ring sub-samples for isotopic analyses were obtained from well replicated tree ring chronologies built using living trees as well as historical timber originating from four different lowland sites (50-90m asl.). By a calibration and verification approach we have evaluated the response to instrumental climate and trends of atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (13C, only) data. While ring widths shows strong correlation to winter temperature, highly significant correlations with summer (JJA) hydroclimate conditions were found for both tree ring 13C and 18O. Strongest relationships were found with summer water vapour pressure deficit (13C and 18O) and Tmax (JJA). Although significant, relationships between 13C and climate data were found considerably weaker than climate/18O relations. On the other hand, the 13C record reveals high similarity with solar irradiance, whereas 18O does not. Based on this profound calibration the presentation will show and discuss annually resolved hydroclimatic variability of the region from our multi-centennial isotope

  16. Chloroplast microsatellites as a tool for phylogeographic studies: the case of white oaks in Poland

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    Chmielewski M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the distribution of chloroplast DNA (cpDNA haplotype variation is useful for studying the phylogeography of angiosperms. In the last two decades the cpDNA phylogeography of white oaks in Europe has been extensively studied, mostly based on the PCR-RFLP technique. However, PCR-RFLPs have low mutation rates and are primarily useful for reconstructing patterns at large geographical scales and lack resolution at fine spatial scales. Here we evaluate the usefulness of chloroplast microsatellites (cpSSR as an alternative to PCR-RFLPs in Polish oak populations which have been underrepresented in previous studies. Eighty-five cpSSR haplotypes were detected using 14 cpSSR loci and a broad collection of 6680 trees sampled throughout Poland. Haplotype diversity was significantly lower in Q. petraea (He = 0.798 than in Q. robur (He = 0.820. Only 17 haplotypes (H01-H17 were found in 13 or more individuals, comprising together 97.9% of the sample. Most frequent cpSSR haplotypes were related to PCR-RFLP haplotypes, establishing the cross-references between the two marker systems. There was significant concordance between the matrices of genetic distances obtained by PCR-RFLP haplotypes and cpSSR haplotypes. Phylogenetic relationships among cpSSR haplotypes supported the existence of the three predominant maternal lineages of oaks in Poland: Iberian (7.8%, Apennine (20.6% and Balkan (65.5%. The results are discussed with regards to the usefulness of cpSSR markers for phylogeographic studies.

  17. Masting in wind-pollinated trees: system-specific roles of weather and pollination dynamics in driving seed production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdziewicz, Michał; Szymkowiak, Jakub; Kasprzyk, Idalia; Grewling, Łukasz; Borowski, Zbigniew; Borycka, Katarzyna; Kantorowicz, Władysław; Myszkowska, Dorota; Piotrowicz, Katarzyna; Ziemianin, Monika; Pesendorfer, Mario B

    2017-10-01

    Masting, the highly variable production of synchronized large seed crops, is a common reproductive strategy in plant populations. In wind-pollinated trees, flowering and pollination dynamics are hypothesized to provide the mechanistic link for the well-known relationship between weather and population-level seed production. Several hypotheses make predictions about the effect of weather on annual pollination success. The pollen coupling hypothesis predicts that weather and plant resources drive the flowering effort of trees, which directly translates into the size of seed crops through efficient pollination. In contrast, the pollination Moran effect hypothesis predicts that weather affects pollination efficiency, leading to occasional bumper crops. Furthermore, the recently formulated phenology synchrony hypothesis predicts that Moran effects can arise because of weather effects on flowering synchrony, which, in turn, drives pollination efficiency. We investigated the relationship between weather, airborne pollen, and seed production in common European trees, two oak species (Quercus petraea and Q. robur) and beech (Fagus sylvatica) with a 19-yr data set from three sites in Poland. Our results show that warm summers preceding flowering correlated with high pollen abundance and warm springs resulted in short pollen seasons (i.e., high flowering synchrony) for all three species. Pollen abundance was the best predictor for seed crops in beech, as predicted under pollen coupling. In oaks, short pollen seasons, rather than pollen abundance, correlated with large seed crops, providing support for the pollination Moran effect and phenology synchrony hypotheses. Fundamentally different mechanisms may therefore drive masting in species of the family Fagacae. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  18. Possible diversifying selection in the imprinted gene, MEDEA, in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Takashi; Takebayashi, Naoki; Wolf, Diana E

    2009-04-01

    Coevolutionary conflict among imprinted genes that influence traits such as offspring growth may arise when maternal and paternal genomes have different evolutionary optima. This conflict is expected in outcrossing taxa with multiple paternity, but not self-fertilizing taxa. MEDEA (MEA) is an imprinted plant gene that influences seed growth. Disagreement exists regarding the type of selection acting on this gene. We present new data and analyses of sequence diversity of MEA in self-fertilizing and outcrossing Arabidopsis and its relatives, to help clarify the form of selection acting on this gene. Codon-based branch analysis among taxa (PAML) suggests that selection on the coding region is changing over time, and nonsynonymous substitution is elevated in at least one outcrossing branch. Codon-based analysis of diversity within outcrossing Arabidopsis lyrata ssp. petraea (OmegaMap) suggests that diversifying selection is acting on a portion of the gene, to cause elevated nonsynonymous polymorphism. Providing further support for balancing selection in A. lyrata, Hudson, Kreitman and Aguadé analysis indicates that diversity/divergence at silent sites in the MEA promoter and genic region is elevated relative to reference genes, and there are deviations from the neutral frequency spectrum. This combination of positive selection as well as balancing and diversifying selection in outcrossing lineages is consistent with other genes influence by evolutionary conflict, such as disease resistance genes. Consistent with predictions that conflict would be eliminated in self-fertilizing taxa, we found no evidence of positive, balancing, or diversifying selection in A. thaliana promoter or genic region.

  19. Production potential of the soil and the basic elements of productivity of the most widely spred sessil types in the u. N.P. „Đerdap”

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    Knežević Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is on the results of the soil and its production potential in the types of forests of sessile oaks (Quercus petraea in the area of the National Park „Đerdap” in the community units of Zlatica, Đerdap, Štrbačko korito, Desna reka and Kožica. There are the most widely spread types of the sprout forests of the sessile oaks in the research area, deep deluvium, luvisoil, eutric cambsoils, and a great number of subtypes of acid brown soil. Considering the fact that the production potential of the defined types of soil depends on the depth, skeleton and other physical characteristics which determine acception, keeping and moving of water and this means that the production value of the studied soils is in the direct correlation with physical-geographical conditions of the environment. Taking into account that solum is well developed and the low contents of skeleton, all the studied soil in the most widely spread types of sessile oaks in the area of N.P. „Đerdap”, are very productive natural habitats. The exception is acid brown soil, which characteristics vary as well as their production potential. Apart from a good production potential of the studied soils within this paper, sessile forests in the researched areas irrationally use production potential of the habitat. In the research area in the last 20 years, the processes of devitalizing and the appearance of decaying of sessile oaks are expressed. In the sessile forests of Serbia, there are forests of the production and protection character, and the structure of the sessile forests at global level is characterized by not normal state with domination of middle aged and in great extent mature withering ingredients, what is the main cause of insufficiently used good potential of the soil.

  20. Determinants of soil organic carbon pools in oak stands in northeastern Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckman, Viktor J.; Hochbichler, Eduard; Yan, Shuai; Glatzel, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    Recently deciduous forests in northeastern Austria received increased attention as potential sources of biomass for energetic utilisation. There are still substantial deficits in the knowledge on carbon pools, -sequestration and -dynamics at these forest sites. The aim of our study was therefore to identify the main determinants which control soil organic carbon (SOC) pools in differently managed Quercus petraea dominated stands. We used the chronosequence approach to test the influence of stand age and management on the SOC pool. Soil samples were systematically collected from 14 plots by means of a 70mm hand auger to a depth of max. 60cm and separated into five geometric horizons. Narrow O-layers and signs of active bioturbation on most sites suggest rapid carbon mineralisation. Carbon pools of the aboveground biomass, the O horizon as well as fine and coarse roots and decay were determined. Soils in our study are cambisols derived from fossil alluvial deposits and loess and calcic chernozems derived from loess. Total soil carbon was determined by means of dry combustion and subtraction of soil inorganic carbon (SIC, by means of the Scheibler-method) if present. Mean SOC contents ranged from 5.3 kg.m-2 to10.4 kg.m-2 in the entire study area. The highest contents were found in calcic chernozem sites (7.2-10.4 kg.m-2) followed by loamy cambisol (6.1-6.8 kg.m-2) and sandy cambisol sites (5.3-6.9 kg.m-2). Among three chronosequence sets, we found strong positive correlations with total nitrogen (Pearson correlation coefficients of +0.91 to +0.93, pcoppice with standards vs. high forest system) in deciduous forests in the northeastern lowlands of Austria has no decisive influence on soil carbon pools.

  1. Comparison of gene expression in segregating families identifies genes and genomic regions involved in a novel adaptation, zinc hyperaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2006-09-01

    One of the challenges of comparative genomics is to identify specific genetic changes associated with the evolution of a novel adaptation or trait. We need to be able to disassociate the genes involved with a particular character from all the other genetic changes that take place as lineages diverge. Here we show that by comparing the transcriptional profile of segregating families with that of parent species differing in a novel trait, it is possible to narrow down substantially the list of potential target genes. In addition, by assuming synteny with a related model organism for which the complete genome sequence is available, it is possible to use the cosegregation of markers differing in transcription level to identify regions of the genome which probably contain quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the character. This novel combination of genomics and classical genetics provides a very powerful tool to identify candidate genes. We use this methodology to investigate zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, the sister species to the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare the transcriptional profile of A. halleri with that of its sister nonaccumulator species, Arabidopsis petraea, and between accumulator and nonaccumulator F(3)s derived from the cross between the two species. We identify eight genes which consistently show greater expression in accumulator phenotypes in both roots and shoots, including two metal transporter genes (NRAMP3 and ZIP6), and cytoplasmic aconitase, a gene involved in iron homeostasis in mammals. We also show that there appear to be two QTLs for zinc accumulation, on chromosomes 3 and 7.

  2. Western Palaearctic Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia Hering and Ectoedemia Busck s. str. (Lepidoptera: Nepticulidae: five new species and new data on distribution, hostplants and recognition

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    Erik van Nieukerken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nine western Palaearctic species of the subgenus Zimmermannia Hering, 1940 and 48 species in the subgenus Ectoedemia Busck, 1907 of the genus Ectoedemia are reviewed. One species in the subgenus Zimmermannia and four species in the subgenus Ectoedemia are described as new: Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia vivesi A. Laštůvka, Z. Laštůvka & Van Nieukerken sp. n. from southern Spain and Cyprus with unknown host plant, Ectoedemia (E. hendrikseni A. Laštůvka, Z. Laštůvka & Van Nieukerken sp. n. from southern France on Quercus suber, E. (E. heckfordi Van Nieukerken, A. Laštůvka & Z. Laštůvka sp. n. from southern England on Quercus petraea and Q. robur, E. (E. phaeolepis Van Nieukerken, A. Laštůvka & Z. Laštůvka sp. n. from Spain and Portugal probably on Quercus ilex and Q. rotundifolia and E. (E. coscoja Van Nieukerken, A. Laštůvka & Z. Laštůvka sp. n. from Spain on Quercus coccifera. The following species are redescribed: Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia hispanica Van Nieukerken, Ectoedemia (Zimmermannia reichli Z. & A. Laštůvka, 1998, Ectoedemia (E. algeriensis van Nieukerken, 1985, E. (E. pseudoilicis Z. & A. Laštůvka, 1998 and E. (E. alnifoliae van Nieukerken, 1985. Ectoedemia albiformae Puplesis & Diškus, 2003 is synonymised with E. spinosella (Joannis, 1908. Ectoedemia jacutica Puplesis, 1988, previously synonymised with E. agrimoniae (Frey, 1858, is here synonymised with E. spiraeae Gregor & Povolný, 1983. Updated keys to the subgenus Zimmermannia and the Quercus feeding Ectoedemia are provided.

  3. Effect of Bleaching on Hardness, Gloss, and Color Change of Weathered Woods

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    Mehmet Budakçı

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to eliminate the problems of hardness, gloss, and color change of some wood materials exposed to weathering conditions using a bleaching procedure to attempt to return the wood material to its natural state. For this, wood samples of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L., Eastern beech (Fagus orientalis L., sessile oak (Quercus petraea L., and chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill. were exposed to weathering conditions based on 12 months ASTM D-1641, followed by a bleaching procedure using 18% solutions of S1 (NaOH + H2O2, S2 (NaOH + Ca(OH2, S3 (KMnO4 + NaHSO3 + H2O2, S4 (NaSiO3 + H2O2, and the commercial product S5 (Cuprinol Decking Restorer- (H2C2O4 + C2H4(OH2. The color, gloss, and hardness changes of samples were determined according to ASTM D 2244-2, EN ISO 2813, and ASTM D 2240 standards. As a result, hardness and gloss values of all woods decreased due to weathering conditions and the wood color turned grey due to degradation. When comparing the weathered samples to the bleached samples, the hardness value was found to be highest in pine wood bleached with the S2 solution, and the gloss value was highest in oak wood bleached with the S1 solution. The greatest color change was found in pine, beech, and chestnut samples bleached with the S4 solution and in oak samples bleached with the S1 solution.

  4. Does Forest Continuity Enhance the Resilience of Trees to Environmental Change?

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    Goddert von Oheimb

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that continuously existing forests and afforestations on previously agricultural land differ with regard to ecosystem functions and services such as carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling and biodiversity. However, no studies have so far been conducted on possible long-term (>100 years impacts on tree growth caused by differences in the ecological continuity of forest stands. In the present study we analysed the variation in tree-ring width of sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. trees (mean age 115-136 years due to different land-use histories (continuously existing forests, afforestations both on arable land and on heathland. We also analysed the relation of growth patterns to soil nutrient stores and to climatic parameters (temperature, precipitation. Tree rings formed between 1896 and 2005 were widest in trees afforested on arable land. This can be attributed to higher nitrogen and phosphorous availability and indicates that former fertilisation may continue to affect the nutritional status of forest soils for more than one century after those activities have ceased. Moreover, these trees responded more strongly to environmental changes - as shown by a higher mean sensitivity of the tree-ring widths - than trees of continuously existing forests. However, the impact of climatic parameters on the variability in tree-ring width was generally small, but trees on former arable land showed the highest susceptibility to annually changing climatic conditions. We assume that incompletely developed humus horizons as well as differences in the edaphon are responsible for the more sensitive response of oak trees of recent forests (former arable land and former heathland to variation in environmental conditions. We conclude that forests characterised by a long ecological continuity may be better adapted to global change than recent forest ecosystems.

  5. Powdery Mildew Decreases the Radial Growth of Oak Trees with Cumulative and Delayed Effects over Years.

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    Didier Bert

    Full Text Available Quercus robur and Q. petraea are major European forest tree species. They have been affected by powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe alphitoides for more than a century. This fungus is a biotrophic foliar pathogen that diverts photosynthetate from the plant for its own nutrition. We used a dendrochronological approach to investigate the effects of different levels of infection severity on the radial growth of young oak trees. Oak infection was monitored at individual tree level, at two sites in southwestern France, over a five-year period (2001-2005. Mean infection severity was almost 75% (infected leaf area at the end of the 2001 growing season, at both sites, but only about 40% in 2002, and 8%, 5% and 2% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Infection levels varied considerably between trees and were positively related between 2001 and 2002. Increment cores were taken from each tree to assess annual ring widths and increases in basal area. Annual radial growth was standardised to take the effect of tree size into account. Annual standardised radial growth was significantly and negatively correlated with infection severity in the same year, for both 2001 and 2002, and at both sites. The decrease in growth reached 70-90% for highly infected trees. The earlywood width was poorly correlated with infection severity, but the proportion of latewood in tree rings was lower in highly infected trees (60% than in less heavily infected trees (85%. Infection in 2001 and 2002 was found to have a cumulative effect on radial growth in these years, together with a delayed effect detectable in 2003. Thus, even non-lethal pathogens like powdery mildew can have a significant impact on tree functioning. This impact should be taken into account in growth and yield models, to improve predictions of forest net primary production.

  6. Fruit production in three masting tree species does not rely on stored carbon reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Günter; Siegwolf, Rolf T W; Keel, Sonja G; Körner, Christian; Han, Qingmin

    2013-03-01

    Fruiting is typically considered to massively burden the seasonal carbon budget of trees. The cost of reproduction has therefore been suggested as a proximate factor explaining observed mast-fruiting patterns. Here, we used a large-scale, continuous (13)C labeling of mature, deciduous trees in a temperate Swiss forest to investigate to what extent fruit formation in three species with masting reproduction behavior (Carpinus betulus, Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea) relies on the import of stored carbon reserves. Using a free-air CO2 enrichment system, we exposed trees to (13)C-depleted CO2 during 8 consecutive years. By the end of this experiment, carbon reserve pools had significantly lower δ(13)C values compared to control trees. δ(13)C analysis of new biomass during the first season after termination of the CO2 enrichment allowed us to distinguish the sources of built-in carbon (old carbon reserves vs. current assimilates). Flowers and expanding leaves carried a significant (13)C label from old carbon stores. In contrast, fruits and vegetative infructescence tissues were exclusively produced from current, unlabeled photoassimilates in all three species, including F. sylvatica, which had a strong masting season. Analyses of δ(13)C in purified starch from xylem of fruit-bearing shoots revealed a complete turn-over of starch during the season, likely due to its usage for bud break. This study is the first to directly demonstrate that fruiting is independent from old carbon reserves in masting trees, with significant implications for mechanistic models that explain mast seeding.

  7. Scaling allometric relationships in pure, crowded, even-aged stands: do tree shade-tolerance, repro-ductive mode and wood productivity matter?

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    Dan Gafta

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tree allometric relationships are likely to be influenced by species tolerance to shade, nutrient availability and plant ontogenetic origin. The aim of this paper was to test to what extent these factors affect the scaling exponents of two allometric relationships in pure, even-aged, canopy-closed forest stands: stem diameter (D versus stem height (H and versus stem density (N. Data were collected by tree species (Betula pendula, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea, wood productivity class and reproductive mode (seed origin and sprouting stands from published forest yield tables. Reduced major axis analysis was used to estimate the slopes of regression lines in the log-log space of H-D and D-N. The scaling exponent of the H-D relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (0.897 versus 0.745, and in low productivity, beech stands as compared with their high productivity counterparts (0.876 versus 0.745. However, no significant difference was detected between high stands and coppices of durmast oak. The scaling exponent of the D-N relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (-0.690 versus -0.558, in low than in high productivity beech stands (-0.694 versus -0.558, and in seed origin than in sprouting stands of durmast oak (-0.609 versus -0.580. We explained these results in terms of plant stem growth strategies and resource availability from a biomechanical perspective. Contrary to certain studies that have reported an invariant scaling relation between stem diameter and density across tree species and communities, but in accordance with other recent studies, we have brought new evidence on species-specific allometric scaling under self-thinning. In addition, we have revealed within-species variance of the scaling exponent of stem diameter-density relationship.

  8. Scaling allometric relationships in pure, crowded, even-aged stands: do tree shade-tolerance, repro-ductive mode and wood productivity matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Gafta

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tree allometric relationships are likely to be influenced by species tolerance to shade, nutrient availability and plant ontogenetic origin. The aim of this paper was to test to what extent these factors affect the scaling exponents of two allometric relationships in pure, even-aged, canopy-closed forest stands: stem diameter (D versus stem height (H and versus stem density (N. Data were collected by tree species (Betula pendula, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea, wood productivity class and reproductive mode (seed origin and sprouting stands from published forest yield tables. Reduced major axis analysis was used to estimate the slopes of regression lines in the log-log space of H-D and D-N. The scaling exponent of the H-D relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (0.897 versus 0.745, and in low productivity, beech stands as compared with their high productivity counterparts (0.876 versus 0.745. However, no significant difference was detected between high stands and coppices of durmast oak. The scaling exponent of the D-N relationship was significantly larger in birch than in beech stands (-0.690 versus -0.558, in low than in high productivity beech stands (-0.694 versus -0.558, and in seed origin than in sprouting stands of durmast oak (-0.609 versus -0.580. We explained these results in terms of plant stem growth strategies and resource availability from a biomechanical perspective.Contrary to certain studies that have reported an invariant scaling relation between stem diameter and density across tree species and communities, but in accordance with other recent studies, we have brought new evidence on species-specific allometric scaling under self-thinning. In addition, we have revealed within-species variance of the scaling exponent of stem diameter-density relationship.

  9. Determination of genetic stability in long-term somatic embryogenic cultures and derived plantlets of cork oak using microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Tina; Pinto, Glória; Loureiro, João; Costa, Armando; Santos, Conceição

    2006-09-01

    Microsatellites were used to test genetic stability in somatic embryos (SE) of Quercus suber L. The SE were obtained by a simple somatic embryogenesis protocol: leaf explants from two adult plants (QsG0, QsG5) and from two juvenile plants (QsGM1, QsGM2) were inoculated on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and zeatin. Calluses with primary embryogenic structures were transferred to MSWH (MS medium without growth regulators) and SE proliferated by secondary somatic embryogenesis. High morphological heterogeneity was found among cotyledonary SE. However, converted plants looked morphologically normal with well-developed rooting systems and shoots. The genetic stability of the plant material during the somatic embryogenesis process was evaluated by using six to eight nuclear microsatellites transferred from Q. myrsinifolia Blume, Q. petraea (Matts.) Liebl. and Q. robur L. Five of eight microsatellites distinguished among the genotypes analyzed, and for QsG0, QsGM1 and QsGM2, uniform microsatellite patterns were generally observed within and between SE and the respective donor genotypes. For genotype QsG5, the same pattern was observed in all samples analyzed except one, where the mutation percentage was 2.5%. We conclude that microsatellite markers can be used to assess genetic stability of clonal materials and to determine genetic stability throughout the process of somatic embryogenesis. The simple somatic embryogenesis protocol described has potential for the commercial propagation of Q. suber because it results in a low percentage of mutations.

  10. The Role of Tree Mortality in Vitality Assessment of Sessile Oak Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Berki

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The drought-induced vitality loss of sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. has been continuously observed in Hungary for more than three decades. The decrease in stand density as a consequence of drought-induced mortality has not been taken into consideration in most of the monitoring methods. Materials and Methods: Forest stands without any forest intervention during the last 30 years were selected. Quadrats were designated for the analysis in 18 sessile oak stands along a climatic transect in which foliage transparency and stand density were measured. Drought stress was defined by the water balance approach. By combining the foliage transparency and the relative stand density, a new cumulative assessment method of stand level vitality was introduced to get a more realistic picture about the effects of long-term drought (lasting for several decades on the sessile oak forests in South-East Europe. Results: The calculated health status (100% - vital; 0% - dead of the sessile oak stands was between 70-90% in the moist South-West Hungary and below 50% close to its xeric limit. The individual tree-based vitality assessment method gave considerably higher values on 17 out of 18 sites. Conclusions: Forest monitoring should also consider stand level-based tree mortality in oak forests while assessing health condition especially close to its xeric limit. The proposed new method provides a more realistic picture about the effects of climate change on sessile oak stands particularly for forest managers interested in changing in the wood stock of forests.

  11. The dynamic of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrêne, E.; François, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-02-01

    The extent to which forest growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (source control) or by cambial activity (sink control) will condition the response of trees to global changes. However, the physiological processes responsible for the limitation of forest growth are still under debate. The aim of this study is to evaluate the key drivers of the annual carbon allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients in five tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex, Quercus robur and Picea abies). Combining field measurements and process-based simulations at 49 sites (931 site-years), we assessed the stand biomass growth dependences at both inter-site and inter-annual scales. Specifically, the relative influence of forest C balance (source control), direct environmental control (water and temperature controls of sink activity) and allocation adjustments related to age, past climate conditions, competition intensity and soil nutrient availability on growth were quantified. The inter-site variability in stand C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by an age-related decline. The direct control of temperature or water stress on sink activity (i.e. independently from their effects on C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual stand woody growth in all the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environment conditions was a significant driver of the annual C allocation to wood. Carbon supply appeared to strongly limit growth only in deciduous temperate species. We provide an evaluation of the spatio-temporal dynamics of annual carbon allocation to wood in European forests. Our study supports the premise that European forest growth is under a complex control including both source and sink limitations. The relative influences of the different growth drivers strongly vary across years and spatial ecological gradients. We suggest a

  12. [Nutrient transfer and growth of Pinus greggii Engelm. inoculated with edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms in two substrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentería-Chávez, María C; Pérez-Moreno, Jesús; Cetina-Alcalá, Víctor M; Ferrera-Cerrato, Ronald; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz

    An ectomycorrhiza is a mutualistic symbiosis of paramount importance in forestry and tree production. One of the selection criteria of ectomycorrhizal fungi that has currently gained importance is their edibility due to the economic, ecological and cultural relevance of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms as a non-timber forest product. The effect of the inoculation with three edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms: Laccaria laccata, Laccaria bicolor y Hebeloma leucosarx, which are widely sold in Mexico, on the growth and nutrient contents of Pinus greggii grown in an experimental substrate and a commercial substrate enriched with a slow-release fertilizer, was evaluated. Two years after sowing, differences in terms of shoot and root biomass and macro and micronutrient contents between inoculated and non-inoculated plants, were recorded independently of the fungal species and the substrate. Despite the fact that plants grown in the commercial substrate had higher growth and nutrient contents, their ectomycorrhizal colonization percentages were smaller than those of the plants grown in the experimental substrate. The differences in the nutrient transfer to the inoculated plant shoots among the evaluated fungal species were recorded. Ca mobilization by L. laccata, Na by L. bicolor and Mn by H. leucosarx were observed in the plants growing in the experimental substrate. It has been demonstrated that the selection of substrates constitutes an important factor in the production of ectomycorrhizal plants and that the three evaluated species of edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms have an enormous potential in the controlled mycorrhization of P. greggii. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality assessment of truffle-inoculated seedlings in Italy: proposing revised parameters for certification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domizia Donnini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: the main aims of this study were to evaluate the quality of truffle-inoculated seedlings produced by commercial nurseries in Italy and to identify their minimum requisites in terms of plant age, health, homogeneity, and cut-off percentage of inoculated Tuber and non-Tuber ectomycorrhizae, based on the analysis of an extensive sample of seedlings subjected to quality control and certification.Area of study: truffle-inoculated seedlings produced by Italian commercial nurseries.Material and Methods: analysis of truffle-inoculated seedlings for health and quality standards; recording of presence of inoculated Tuber spp. and other concurrent fungi according to the official Italian method for certification; selective amplification of ectomycorrhizal DNA by PCR species-specific primers.Main results: We showed that mycorrhization levels in truffle-inoculated seedlings increased with time after truffle-spore inoculation. The highest mean percentage of the inoculated Tuber spp., but also the highest presence of contaminants, were recorded after three years. The mycorrhization level of Tuber melanosporum and T. aestivum was higher in Corylus and Ostrya seedlings than in Q. ilex and Q. pubescens, but the latter two host species showed the lowest presence of other ectomycorrhizal fungi. Mycorrhization level distribution in truffle-inoculated seedlings of suitable batches differed very little from the distribution in only all suitable seedlings. Truffle seedlings with other Tuber spp. were very few and even absent after three years. The general quality of Italian truffle-inoculated seedlings is high but can be improved even further by revising the parameters used for their certification.Research highlights: Mycorrhization assessment in truffle-inoculated seedlings produced by commercial nurseries and a revision of the parameters of quality standards following several years of certification in Italy.Keywords: Truffle cultivation; truffle

  14. Distribution and localization of microsatellites in the Perigord black truffle genome and identification of new molecular markers (2010) Fungal Genetics and Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Riccioni, C [INRA, Nancy, France; Belfiori, B [INRA, Nancy, France; Cichocki, N [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Tisserant, Emilie [INRA, Nancy, France; Paolocci, F [INRA, Nancy, France; Rubini, A [INRA, Nancy, France; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France

    2011-01-01

    The level of genetic diversity and genetic structure in the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) has been debated for several years, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic markers. Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are important for the genome organisation, phenotypic diversity and are one of the most popular molecular markers. In this study, we surveyed the T. melanosporum genome (1) to characterise its SSR pattern; (2) to compare it with SSR patterns found in 48 other fungal and three oomycetes genomes and (3) to identify new polymorphic SSR markers for population genetics. The T. melanosporum genome is rich in SSRs with 22,425 SSRs with mono-nucleotides being the most frequent motifs. SSRs were found in all genomic regions although they are more frequent in non-coding regions (introns and intergenic regions). Sixty out of 135 PCR-amplified mono-, di-, tri-, tetra, penta, and hexanucleotides were polymorphic (44%) within black truffle populations and 27 were randomly selected and analysed on 139 T. melanosporum isolates from France, Italy and Spain. The number of alleles varied from 2 to 18 and the expected heterozygosity from 0.124 to 0.815. One hundred and thirty-two different multilocus genotypes out of the 139 T. melanosporum isolates were identified and the genotypic diversity was high (0.999). Polymorphic SSRs were found in UTR regulatory regions of fruiting bodies and ectomycorrhiza regulated genes, suggesting that they may play a role in phenotypic variation. In conclusion, SSRs developed in this study were highly polymorphic and our results showed that T. melanosporum is a species with an important genetic diversity, which is in agreement with its recently uncovered heterothallic mating system.

  15. Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 mediates growth promotion of crack willow (Salix fragilis) saplings in both clean and metal-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P; De-Leij, F A A M; Lynch, J M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated if the plant growth promoting fungus Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 (also known as "T22") could be used to enhance the establishment and growth of crack willow (Salix fragilis) in a soil containing no organic or metal pollutants and in a metal-contaminated soil by comparing this fungus with noninoculated controls and an ectomycorrhizal formulation commercially used to enhance the establishment of tree saplings. Crack willow saplings were grown in a temperature-controlled growth room over a period of 5 weeks' in a garden center topsoil and over 12 weeks in a soil which had been used for disposal of building materials and sewage sludge containing elevated levels of heavy metals including cadmium (30 mg kg(-1)), lead (350 mg kg(-1)), manganese (210 mg kg(-1)), nickel (210 mg kg(-1)), and zinc (1,100 mg kg(-1)). After 5 weeks' growth in clean soil, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 produced shoots and roots that were 40% longer than those of the controls and shoots that were 20% longer than those of saplings grown with ectomycorrhiza (ECM). T. harzianum T22 saplings produced more than double the dry biomass of controls and more than 50% extra biomass than the ECM-treated saplings. After 12 weeks' growth, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 in the metal-contaminated soil produced 39% more dry weight biomass and were 16% taller than the noninoculated controls. This is the first report of tree growth stimulation by application of Trichoderma to roots, and is especially important as willow is a major source of wood fuel in the quest for renewable energy. These results also suggest willow trees inoculated with T. harzianum T22 could be used to increase the rate of revegetation and phytostabilization of metal-contaminated sites, a property of the fungus never previously demonstrated.

  16. Detection of the edible ectomycorrhizal fungus Lyophyllum shimeji colonising seedlings of cultivated conifer species in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visnovsky, Sandra B; Cummings, Nicholas; Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Wang, Yun; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Kobayashi, Hisayasu; Kawai, Masataka; Pitman, Andrew R

    2014-08-01

    Lyophyllum shimeji is an edible ectomycorrhizal fungus that is widely distributed in East Asia and also present in the northern regions of Europe. In Japan, L. shimeji is a culinary delicacy, considered amongst all edible mushrooms to have the best taste and to be second only to Tricholoma matsutake in price. Traditionally, fruiting bodies of L. shimeji have been collected from the wild but fruiting of L. shimeji is now relatively uncommon and cannot keep up with increasing consumer demand. As a result, methods for its cultivation are being developed for commercial production in Japan and other countries. In this work, techniques were developed to cultivate L. shimeji on coniferous seedlings using a pure culture inoculum. They resulted in successful mycorrhization of Pinus pinaster and Picea abies in only 8 to 10 months. As ectomycorrhizae of L. shimeji are difficult to identify morphologically, mycorrhization was confirmed using an L. shimeji-specific PCR diagnostic, which was designed following a phylogenetic analysis of the Lyophyllum section Difformia using DNA sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS), intergenic spacer (IGS) and elongation factor 1-α (EF1-α) gene. L. shimeji is a member of the Lyophyllum decastes complex in section Difformia, which also includes Lyophyllum fumosum and L. decastes. This analysis confirmed the separation of L. shimeji from closely related Lyophyllum spp. and enabled its unambiguous detection using an IGS-based PCR diagnostic. This is the first report of successful mycorrhization of L. shimeji on P. pinaster and P. abies and provides an opportunity for its commercial cultivation on conifers in New Zealand.

  17. Structure and Expression Profile of the Phosphate Pht1 Transporter Gene Family in Mycorrhizal Populus trichocarpa1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth-Pereda, Verónica; Orsini, Elena; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Lota, Frédéric; Kohler, Annegret; Diss, Loic; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel; Nehls, Uwe; Bucher, Marcel; Martin, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Gene networks involved in inorganic phosphate (Pi) acquisition and homeostasis in woody perennial species able to form mycorrhizal symbioses are poorly known. Here, we describe the features of the 12 genes coding for Pi transporters of the Pht1 family in poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Individual Pht1 transporters play distinct roles in acquiring and translocating Pi in different tissues of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal poplar during different growth conditions and developmental stages. Pi starvation triggered the up-regulation of most members of the Pht1 family, especially PtPT9 and PtPT11. PtPT9 and PtPT12 showed a striking up-regulation in ectomycorrhizas and endomycorrhizas, whereas PtPT1 and PtPT11 were strongly down-regulated. PtPT10 transcripts were highly abundant in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) roots only. PtPT8 and PtPT10 are phylogenetically associated to the AM-inducible Pht1 subfamily I. The analysis of promoter sequences revealed conserved motifs similar to other AM-inducible orthologs in PtPT10 only. To gain more insight into gene regulatory mechanisms governing the AM symbiosis in woody plant species, the activation of the poplar PtPT10 promoter was investigated and detected in AM of potato (Solanum tuberosum) roots. These results indicated that the regulation of AM-inducible Pi transporter genes is conserved between perennial woody and herbaceous plant species. Moreover, poplar has developed an alternative Pi uptake pathway distinct from AM plants, allowing ectomycorrhizal poplar to recruit PtPT9 and PtPT12 to cope with limiting Pi concentrations in forest soils. PMID:21705655

  18. 赤松不定根和愈伤组织与松口蘑外生菌根菌的相互作用%INTERACTION BETWEEN ROOT AND CALLUS OF PINUS DENSIFLORA AND AN ECTOMYCORRHIZAL FUNGUS, TRICHOLOMA MA TSUTAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅禄敏; 铃木和夫

    2003-01-01

    A simple in vitro system is described for interaction between tissues ofPinus densiflora andan ectomycorrhiza fungus, Tricholoma matustake. The callus and roots, which were initiated fromhypocotyl segments, were inoculated with T. matsutake in artificial condition. After two-week incubation,fungal hyphae had colonized the root surface. Fungal hyphae occurred within the root cortex, and Hartignet was formed after three-week. A few fungal hyphae and Hartig net-like structures were also visiblewithin the callus after three-week, while they were rather less abundant in callus as compared with roots.%本实验报道了以简单的离体培养方式来诱导赤松不定根和愈伤组织与松口蘑的菌根反应.不定根和愈伤组织均起源于无菌苗的下胚轴,接种2周后,菌丝体开始包围不定根.接种3周后,菌丝体出现在不定根皮层细胞间,哈蒂氏网型的形成也同时被确认.在愈伤组织培养物中,细胞间也能观察到菌丝体及拟-哈蒂氏网结构.这是第一个离体条件下成功地诱导赤松培养组织与松口蘑形成外生菌根的报道.

  19. Influence of simulated acidic rain on root-infecting fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafer, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Influences of the acidity of simulated rain on root-infecting fungi were investigated. Effects of rain acidity on Phytophthora cinnamomi were studied. Propagule densities in soil depended upon the acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of simulated rain and soil depth (1, 2, 4, or 8 cm). Lowest densities occurred in 1 to 2 cm soil layers exposed to rains at pH 3.2 or 2.4. Sporangium production on radicles of Lupinus angustifolius in Lakeland sand moistened with rain solution at pH 2.4 was 47% less than production with solution at pH 5.6. A linear response to solution acidity was exhibited. Infection of L. angustifolius roots by zoospores demonstrated a linear response to acidity of rain. Approximately 44% fewer lesions occurred on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 2.4 than on roots of seedlings exposed to rain at pH 5.6. The acidity (pH 5.6, 4.0, 3.2, or 2.4) of repeated rains had no consistent effect on disease progress among L. augustifolius seedlings planted in infested soil. The formation of ectomycorrhizae on Pinus taeda seedlings exhibited a quadratic response to acidity of repeated rains. The percentage of short roots that were ectomycorrhizal was greatest among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 2.4 and least among seedlings exposed to rains at pH 4.0. The density of Macrophomina phaseolina propagules in Lakeland sand exposed to repeated rains at pH 2.4 was an average of 20% less than densities associated with rains at pH 5.6, 4.0, or 3.2.

  20. Mycorrhiza reduces adverse effects of dark septate endophytes (DSE) on growth of conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and pathogens.

  1. Arbuscular-mycorrhizal networks inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta seedlings in rain forest soil microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Janos

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks-previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect-probably help to maintain the rain forest-savanna boundary.

  2. Arbuscular-Mycorrhizal Networks Inhibit Eucalyptus tetrodonta Seedlings in Rain Forest Soil Microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janos, David P.; Scott, John; Aristizábal, Catalina; Bowman, David M. J. S.

    2013-01-01

    Eucalyptus tetrodonta, a co-dominant tree species of tropical, northern Australian savannas, does not invade adjacent monsoon rain forest unless the forest is burnt intensely. Such facilitation by fire of seedling establishment is known as the "ashbed effect." Because the ashbed effect might involve disruption of common mycorrhizal networks, we hypothesized that in the absence of fire, intact rain forest arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) networks inhibit E. tetrodonta seedlings. Although arbuscular mycorrhizas predominate in the rain forest, common tree species of the northern Australian savannas (including adult E. tetrodonta) host ectomycorrhizas. To test our hypothesis, we grew E. tetrodonta and Ceiba pentandra (an AM-responsive species used to confirm treatments) separately in microcosms of ambient or methyl-bromide fumigated rain forest soil with or without severing potential mycorrhizal fungus connections to an AM nurse plant, Litsea glutinosa. As expected, C. pentandra formed mycorrhizas in all treatments but had the most root colonization and grew fastest in ambient soil. E. tetrodonta seedlings also formed AM in all treatments, but severing hyphae in fumigated soil produced the least colonization and the best growth. Three of ten E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with intact network hyphae died. Because foliar chlorosis was symptomatic of iron deficiency, after 130 days we began to fertilize half the E. tetrodonta seedlings in ambient soil with an iron solution. Iron fertilization completely remedied chlorosis and stimulated leaf growth. Our microcosm results suggest that in intact rain forest, common AM networks mediate belowground competition and AM fungi may exacerbate iron deficiency, thereby enhancing resistance to E. tetrodonta invasion. Common AM networks–previously unrecognized as contributors to the ashbed effect–probably help to maintain the rain forest–savanna boundary. PMID:23460899

  3. The influence of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Rhizopogon subareolatus on growth and nutrient element localisation in two varieties of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii and var. glauca) in response to manganese stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dučić, Tanja; Parladé, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Acidification of forest ecosystems leads to increased plant availability of the micronutrient manganese (Mn), which is toxic when taken up in excess. To investigate whether ectomycorrhizas protect against excessive Mn by improving plant growth and nutrition or by retention of excess Mn in the hyphal mantle, seedlings of two populations of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), two varieties, one being menziesii (DFM) and the other being glauca (DFG), were inoculated with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Rhizopogon subareolatus in sand cultures. Five months after inoculation, half of the inoculated and non-inoculated seedlings were exposed to excess Mn in the nutrient solution for further 5 months. At the end of this period, plant productivity, nutrient concentrations, Mn uptake and subcellular compartmentalisation were evaluated. Non-inoculated, non-stressed DFM plants produced about 2.5 times more biomass than similarly treated DFG. Excess Mn in the nutrient solution led to high accumulation of Mn in needles and roots but only to marginal loss in biomass. Colonisation with R. subareolatus slightly suppressed DFM growth but strongly reduced that of DFG (−50%) despite positive effects of mycorrhizas on plant phosphorus nutrition. Growth reductions of inoculated Douglas fir seedlings were unexpected since the degree of mycorrhization was not high, i.e. ca. 30% in DFM and 8% in DFG. Accumulation of high Mn was not prevented in inoculated seedlings. The hyphal mantle of mycorrhizal root tips accumulated divalent cations such as Ca, but not Mn, thus not providing a barrier against excessive Mn uptake into the plants associated with R. subareolatus. PMID:18437431

  4. Mycorrhiza Reduces Adverse Effects of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) on Growth of Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. – Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and

  5. Mycorrhiza reduces adverse effects of dark septate endophytes (DSE on growth of conifers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Reininger

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC. These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM. Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce, mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii and Norway spruce (Picea abies seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts

  6. Characterization of Aluminum-Binding Ligands in Pisolithus tinctorius

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, R. L.; Cumming, J.

    2009-12-01

    Highly abundant in soil, Al is found in non-toxic forms under neutral pH conditions. However, when the pH of the soil decreases, the presence of cationic Al increases, creating a toxic environment for plants and fungi. Certain plants and their ectomycorrhizal symbiotic fungi have higher tolerance for Al in the soil and surrounding media. A particular fungus, Pisolithus tinctorius, has been found to produce Al-binding pigments which chelate and detoxify cationic Al in the environment. The objectives of this study are to 1) determine the resistance of different ectomycorrhizal fungi species to Al, 2) characterize the production of Al binding compounds by fungi, and 3) quantify Al partitioning between free and bound forms in the environment. Pisolithus tinctorius, Amanita muscaria, Lacaria bicolor, and Rhizopogon rubescens were grown under varying Al concentration in vitro (0 and 200 µM for all species; 0, 100, 200, and 400 µM for P. tinctorius). Biomass was measured and media was analyzed for Al speciation and organic acid profiles post experiment. The Al-binding exudates of P. tinctorius were isolated using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and further separated with reverse phase HPLC (UV). All fungi were resistant to Al at the concentrations tested. Pisolithus was found to have a significantly higher mass than other ectomycorrhizae studied. Organic Al levels were found to increase with an increase in Al treatment for P. tinctorius. These techniques revealed at least eleven compounds active in the Al-binding IMAC fraction with seven peaks having brown pigmentation. These compounds may assist in Al detoxification by P. tinctorius.

  7. Truffles Regulate Plant Root Morphogenesis via the Production of Auxin and Ethylene1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Splivallo, Richard; Fischer, Urs; Göbel, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Karlovsky, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Truffles are symbiotic fungi that form ectomycorrhizas with plant roots. Here we present evidence that at an early stage of the interaction, i.e. prior to physical contact, mycelia of the white truffle Tuber borchii and the black truffle Tuber melanopsorum induce alterations in root morphology of the host Cistus incanus and the nonhost Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; i.e. primary root shortening, lateral root formation, root hair stimulation). This was most likely due to the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and ethylene by the mycelium. Application of a mixture of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and IAA fully mimicked the root morphology induced by the mycelium for both host and nonhost plants. Application of the single hormones only partially mimicked it. Furthermore, primary root growth was not inhibited in the Arabidopsis auxin transport mutant aux1-7 by truffle metabolites while root branching was less effected in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-LH. The double mutant aux1-7;ein2-LH displayed reduced sensitivity to fungus-induced primary root shortening and branching. In agreement with the signaling nature of truffle metabolites, increased expression of the auxin response reporter DR5∷GFP in Arabidopsis root meristems subjected to the mycelium could be observed, confirming that truffles modify the endogenous hormonal balance of plants. Last, we demonstrate that truffles synthesize ethylene from l-methionine probably through the α-keto-γ-(methylthio)butyric acid pathway. Taken together, these results establish the central role of IAA and ethylene as signal molecules in truffle/plant interactions. PMID:19535471

  8. Mycorrhiza-plant colonization patterns on a subalpine glacier forefront as a model system of primary succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cázares, Efrén; Trappe, James M; Jumpponen, Ari

    2005-09-01

    Lyman glacier in the North Cascades Mountains of Washington has a subalpine forefront characterized by a well-developed terminal moraine, inconspicuous successional moraines, fluting, and outwash. These deposits were depleted of symbiotic fungi when first exposed but colonized by them over time after exposure. Four major groups of plant species in this system are (1) mycorrhiza-independent or facultative mycotrophic, (2) dependent on arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) (3) dependent on ericoid mycorrhiza (ERM) or ectomycorrhizae (EM), and (4) colonized by dark-septate (DS) endophytes. We hypothesized that availability of mycorrhizal propagules was related to the success of mycorrhiza-dependent plants in colonizing new substrates in naturally evolved ecosystems. To test this hypothesis roots samples of 66 plant species were examined for mycorrhizal colonization. The plants were sampled from communities at increasing distances from the glacier terminus to compare the newest communities with successively older ones. Long established, secondary successional dry meadow communities adjacent to the glacier forefront, and nearby high alpine communities were sampled for comparison. DS were common on most plant species on the forefront. Nonmycorrhizal plants predominated in the earlier successional sites, whereas the proportion of mycorrhizal plants generally increased with age of community. AM were present, mostly at low levels, and nearly absent in two sites of the forefront. ERM were present in all species of Ericaceae sampled, and EM in all species of Pinaceae and Salicaceae. Roots of plants in the long established meadow and heath communities adjacent to the forefront and the high alpine community all had one or another of the colonization types, with DS and AM predominating.

  9. Fertility-dependent effects of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities on white spruce seedling nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alistair J H; Potvin, Lynette R; Lilleskov, Erik A

    2015-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcMF) typically colonize nursery seedlings, but nutritional and growth effects of these communities are only partly understood. To examine these effects, Picea glauca seedlings collected from a tree nursery naturally colonized by three dominant EcMF were divided between fertilized and unfertilized treatments. After one growing season seedlings were harvested, ectomycorrhizas identified using DNA sequencing, and seedlings analyzed for leaf nutrient concentration and content, and biomass parameters. EcMF community structure-nutrient interactions were tested using nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) combined with vector analysis of foliar nutrients and biomass. We identified three dominant species: Amphinema sp., Atheliaceae sp., and Thelephora terrestris. NMDS + envfit revealed significant community effects on seedling nutrition that differed with fertilization treatment. PERMANOVA and regression analyses uncovered significant species effects on host nutrient concentration, content, and stoichiometry. Amphinema sp. had a significant positive effect on phosphorus (P), calcium and zinc concentration, and P content; in contrast, T. terrestris had a negative effect on P concentration. In the unfertilized treatment, percent abundance of the Amphinema sp. negatively affected foliar nitrogen (N) concentration but not content, and reduced foliar N/P. In fertilized seedlings, Amphinema sp. was positively related to foliar concentrations of N, magnesium, and boron, and both concentration and content of manganese, and Atheliaceae sp. had a negative relationship with P content. Findings shed light on the community and species effects on seedling condition, revealing clear functional differences among dominants. The approach used should be scalable to explore function in more complex communities composed of unculturable EcMF.

  10. Using next generation transcriptome sequencing to predict an ectomycorrhizal metablome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, P. E.; Sreedasyam, A.; Trivedi, G; Podila, G. K.; Cseke, L. J.; Collart, F. R. (Biosciences Division); (On Assignment, Scientific Staffing); (Univ. of Alabama at Huntsville)

    2011-05-13

    Mycorrhizae, symbiotic interactions between soil fungi and tree roots, are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The fungi contribute phosphorous, nitrogen and mobilized nutrients from organic matter in the soil and in return the fungus receives photosynthetically-derived carbohydrates. This union of plant and fungal metabolisms is the mycorrhizal metabolome. Understanding this symbiotic relationship at a molecular level provides important contributions to the understanding of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycling. We generated next generation short-read transcriptomic sequencing data from fully-formed ectomycorrhizae between Laccaria bicolor and aspen (Populus tremuloides) roots. The transcriptomic data was used to identify statistically significantly expressed gene models using a bootstrap-style approach, and these expressed genes were mapped to specific metabolic pathways. Integration of expressed genes that code for metabolic enzymes and the set of expressed membrane transporters generates a predictive model of the ectomycorrhizal metabolome. The generated model of mycorrhizal metabolome predicts that the specific compounds glycine, glutamate, and allantoin are synthesized by L. bicolor and that these compounds or their metabolites may be used for the benefit of aspen in exchange for the photosynthetically-derived sugars fructose and glucose. The analysis illustrates an approach to generate testable biological hypotheses to investigate the complex molecular interactions that drive ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. These models are consistent with experimental environmental data and provide insight into the molecular exchange processes for organisms in this complex ecosystem. The method used here for predicting metabolomic models of mycorrhizal systems from deep RNA sequencing data can be generalized and is broadly applicable to transcriptomic data derived from complex systems.

  11. Modeling the carbon cost of plant nitrogen acquisition: Mycorrhizal trade-offs and multipath resistance uptake improve predictions of retranslocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Phillips, Richard P.

    2014-08-01

    Accurate projections of the future land carbon (C) sink by terrestrial biosphere models depend on how nutrient constraints on net primary production are represented. While nutrient limitation is nearly universal, current models do not have a C cost for plant nutrient acquisition. Also missing are symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi, which can consume up to 20% of net primary production and supply up to 50% of a plant's nitrogen (N) uptake. Here we integrate simultaneous uptake and mycorrhizae into a cutting-edge plant N model—Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN)—that can be coupled into terrestrial biosphere models. The C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type, with plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae benefiting when N is relatively abundant and plants that support ectomycorrhizae benefiting when N is strongly limiting. Across six temperate forested sites (representing arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated stands and 176 site years), including multipath resistance improved the partitioning of N uptake between aboveground and belowground sources. Integrating mycorrhizae led to further improvements in predictions of N uptake from soil (R2 = 0.69 increased to R2 = 0.96) and from senescing leaves (R2 = 0.29 increased to R2 = 0.73) relative to the original model. On average, 5% and 9% of net primary production in arbuscular mycorrhizal- and ectomycorrhizal-dominated forests, respectively, was needed to support mycorrhizal-mediated acquisition of N. To the extent that resource constraints to net primary production are governed by similar trade-offs across all terrestrial ecosystems, integrating these improvements to FUN into terrestrial biosphere models should enhance predictions of the future land C sink.

  12. The role of mycorrhizal fungi in integrated carbon and nitrogen cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebel, Karin; Phillips, Rich; Fransson, Petra; Brzostek, Eddie; Wassen, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere remains one of the fundamental challenges to predicting future changes in the Earth's climate. Will forests continue to sequester carbon (C) under rising atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen (N) deposition, or will the capacity of trees to build new biomass be constrained by lack of nutrients? Recent research shows that not all tree species react similarly to N-deposition; differences are found in growth rates, survival and C-storage. Mycorrhizal fungi are an important link in coupling the C and N cycles and are critical for tree growth. Mycorrhizal fungi form mutualistic relationships, receiving carbohydrates from their plant hosts and in return enhancing the supply of critical nutrients. The two most abundant mycorrhizal associations are arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) and ectomycorrhizae (EM), both having different mechanisms of N acquisition, which may explain observed differences in tree species response to N-deposition. Changing environmental variables influence mycorrhizal fungi. Increasing CO2 concentration increases mycorrhizal abundance, growth and plant C allocation belowground. However, the effect of N-deposition on mycorrhizae is less clear. N-deposition can have positive, neutral or negative effects on mycorrhizal abundance and growth. It has been hypothesized that the effect of N-deposition on mycorrhizal growth depends on initial soil nutrient status. This soil nutrient status may also determine the nature of the mycorrhizal relationship to the tree, where in nutrient poor conditions, they could be more beneficial than in nutrient rich conditions. In this research, we extend the hypothesis to include growth of trees associated with either EM or AM, as a function of increasing nitrogen deposition and soil nutrient status. Therefore, we take into account the C-cost and the N-gain of the mycorrhizal fungi for the tree in the different nutrient stages.

  13. Mycorrhizal fungi and global land surface models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Fisher, J. B.; Shi, M.; Phillips, R.

    2013-12-01

    In the current generation of Land Surface Models (LSMs), the representation of coupled carbon (C) and nutrient cycles does not account for allocation of C by plants to mycorrhizal fungi in exchange for limiting nutrients. Given that the amount of C transferred to mycorrhizae can exceed 20% of net primary production (NPP), mycorrhizae can supply over half of the nitrogen (N) needed to support NPP, and that large majority of plants form associations with mycorrhizae; integrating these mechanisms into LSMs may significantly alter our understanding of the role of the terrestrial biosphere in mitigating climate change. Here, we present results from the integration of a mycorrhizal framework into a cutting-edge global plant nitrogen model -- Fixation & Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN; Fisher et al., 2010) -- that can be coupled into existing LSMs. In this mycorrhizal framework, the C cost of N acquisition varies as a function of mycorrhizal type with: (1) plants that support arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) benefiting when N is plentiful and (2) plants that support ectomycorrhizae (ECM) benefiting when N is limiting. At the plot scale (15 x 15m), the My-FUN model improved predictions of retranslocation, N uptake, and the amount of C transferred into the soil relative to the base model across 45 plots that vary in mycorrhizal type in Indiana, USA. At the ecosystem scale, when we coupled this new framework into the Community Land Model (CLM-CN), the model estimated lower C uptake than the base model and more accurately predicted C uptake at the Morgan Monroe State Forest AmeriFlux site. These results suggest that the inclusion of a mycorrhizal framework into LSMs will enhance our ability to predict feedbacks between global change and the terrestrial biosphere.

  14. Effects of Mycorrhizae on Carbon Cycling in Response to Extreme Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficken, C. D.; Warren, J.

    2016-12-01

    Plant-mycorrhizal symbioses are being increasingly accepted as drivers of ecosystem-level biogeochemical patterns and play an important role plant resource acquisition. Although some evidence suggests that mycorrhizal association increases plant drought-tolerance, direct comparisons of drought-resilience between mycorrhizal groups (i.e. arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal) are lacking. Indeed, soil CO2 pulses following dry-wet cycles are detectable at the ecosystem scale, but it remains unclear whether these pulses are driven by the activity of mycorrhizae or free-living microbes. These knowledge gaps hinder our ability to predict CO2 fluxes in the face of increased precipitation variability and have broad implications for understanding plant performance during, and recovery following, drought. We predicted that arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) would be more resilient to drought than ectomycorrhizae (ECM) because narrower AM hyphae may access water from smaller soil pores and because AM produce a glycoprotein that increases soil aggregation. To compare the functioning of AM and ECM throughout drought, we examined soil respiration dynamics between AM- and ECM-dominated mesocosms throughout moderate and extreme drought. Mesocosms were partitioned with mesh dividers into chambers (roots+hyphae+microbes; hyphae+microbes; microbes only) to compare the relative functioning of biotic pools throughout drought. We found that respiration responses to drought differed substantially between AM and ECM-dominated systems. Under dry conditions, respiration from both root- and hyphal-exclusion chambers did not differ between AM and ECM mesocosms. In contrast, under wet conditions, respiration was significantly greater from AM than ECM mesocosms. Following rewetting, the respiration pulse in AM systems was largely due to to free-living microbes (+330% C flux above dry conditions), whereas in ECM systems there was a proportionally greater increase from mycorrhizal chambers (+130%). This

  15. The importance of associations with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi among fully mycoheterotrophic orchids is currently under-estimated: novel evidence from sub-tropical Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-I; Yang, Chih-Kai; Gebauer, Gerhard

    2015-09-01

    Most fully mycoheterotrophic (MH) orchids investigated to date are mycorrhizal with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with forest trees. Only a few MH orchids are currently known to be mycorrhizal with saprotrophic, mostly wood-decomposing, fungi instead of ectomycorrhizal fungi. This study provides evidence that the importance of associations between MH orchids and saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi is currently under-estimated. Using microscopic techniques and molecular approaches, mycorrhizal fungi were localized and identified for seven MH orchid species from four genera and two subfamilies, Vanilloideae and Epidendroideae, growing in four humid and warm sub-tropical forests in Taiwan. Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope natural abundances of MH orchids and autotrophic reference plants were used in order to elucidate the nutritional resources utilized by the orchids. Six out of the seven MH orchid species were mycorrhizal with either wood- or litter-decaying saprotrophic fungi. Only one orchid species was associated with ectomycorrhizal fungi. Stable isotope abundance patterns showed significant distinctions between orchids mycorrhizal with the three groups of fungal hosts. Mycoheterotrophic orchids utilizing saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi as a carbon and nutrient source are clearly more frequent than hitherto assumed. On the basis of this kind of nutrition, orchids can thrive in deeply shaded, light-limiting forest understoreys even without support from ectomycorrhizal fungi. Sub-tropical East Asia appears to be a hotspot for orchids mycorrhizal with saprotrophic non-Rhizoctonia fungi. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Using next generation transcriptome sequencing to predict an ectomycorrhizal metabolome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cseke Leland J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycorrhizae, symbiotic interactions between soil fungi and tree roots, are ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems. The fungi contribute phosphorous, nitrogen and mobilized nutrients from organic matter in the soil and in return the fungus receives photosynthetically-derived carbohydrates. This union of plant and fungal metabolisms is the mycorrhizal metabolome. Understanding this symbiotic relationship at a molecular level provides important contributions to the understanding of forest ecosystems and global carbon cycling. Results We generated next generation short-read transcriptomic sequencing data from fully-formed ectomycorrhizae between Laccaria bicolor and aspen (Populus tremuloides roots. The transcriptomic data was used to identify statistically significantly expressed gene models using a bootstrap-style approach, and these expressed genes were mapped to specific metabolic pathways. Integration of expressed genes that code for metabolic enzymes and the set of expressed membrane transporters generates a predictive model of the ectomycorrhizal metabolome. The generated model of mycorrhizal metabolome predicts that the specific compounds glycine, glutamate, and allantoin are synthesized by L. bicolor and that these compounds or their metabolites may be used for the benefit of aspen in exchange for the photosynthetically-derived sugars fructose and glucose. Conclusions The analysis illustrates an approach to generate testable biological hypotheses to investigate the complex molecular interactions that drive ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. These models are consistent with experimental environmental data and provide insight into the molecular exchange processes for organisms in this complex ecosystem. The method used here for predicting metabolomic models of mycorrhizal systems from deep RNA sequencing data can be generalized and is broadly applicable to transcriptomic data derived from complex systems.

  17. Impact of mycorrhizal fungus on the growth and nutrient absorption of Cupressus duclouxiana Hichel seedlings under water stress%水分胁迫下菌根真菌对滇柏(Cupressus duclouxiana Hichel)幼苗生长和养分吸收的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王如岩; 于水强; 张金池; 丛日亮; 王群; 陈丽莎; 司登宇

    2011-01-01

    The potted seedlings of Cupressus duclouxiana Hichel were tested to study their response characteristics under three different moisture content conditions, normal moisture(25~30%) , moderate drought (15~20%) and severe drought(5~ 10%). Accordingly, the test include four inoculated groups, control group(A), VAM groupCB, inoculated VAM), ectomycorrhizaKC, inoculated Ectomycorrhiza) and mixture groupCD, VAM + Ectomycorrhiza). The biomass,root morphology and nitrogen content, phosphorus content of Cupressus duclouxiana Hichel seedlings were measured after 150 days. The results show that when the seedlings were inoculated with mycorrhizal fungus under normal moisture, the plant biomass was increased, including above-ground biomass and under-ground biomass. The effect to the contents of nitrogen and phosphorus was mainly on the root. The nitrogen content of roots was respectively increased significantly, by 65.4%, 118. 2% and 117. 7% in B, C and D group under normal moisture, respectively. The root phosphorus content of C and D group was obivious increased 40. 4% and 49. 4% compare to contral group. The effect to root morphology was also significant, the D inoculated treatment were higher than that in controlled treatment on root length and surface area. Under mediate drought, there was significant difference a-mong B,D and A in N content in roots,but signifecant difference among C,D and A in leaves. And there was significant difference among C,D and A in P content in roots and leaves. The trend of positive effect to root morphology was D>OB>A. Under severe drought condition, the mycorrhizal fungi did not affected the plant biomass and nutrient content as well as root morphology. In brief, except for under severe drought condition, the mycorrhizal fungi would improve nutrient absorption and increase the biomass and benefit for enhancing survival rate of C. Duclouxiana Hichel.%在正常水分、中度干旱、重度干旱3个水分条件下,设对照(A)、接种内生菌

  18. Sap flow is Underestimated by Thermal Dissipation Sensors due to Alterations of Wood Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marañón-Jiménez, S.; Wiedemann, A.; van den Bulcke, J.; Cuntz, M.; Rebmann, C.; Steppe, K.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal dissipation technique (TD) is one of the most commonly adopted methods for sap flow measurements. However, underestimations of up to 60% of the tree transpiration have been reported with this technique, although the causes are not certainly known. The insertion of TD sensors within the stems causes damage of the wood tissue and subsequent healing reactions, changing wood anatomy and likely the sap flow path. However, the anatomical changes in response to the insertion of sap flow sensors and the effects on the measured flow have not been assessed yet. In this study, we investigate the alteration of vessel anatomy on wounds formed around TD sensors. Our main objectives were to elucidate the anatomical causes of sap flow underestimation for ring-porous and diffuse-porous species, and relate these changes to sap flow underestimations. Successive sets of TD probes were installed in early, mid and end of the growing season in Fagus sylvatica (diffuse-porous) and Quercus petraea (ring-porous) trees. They were logged after the growing season and additional sets of sensors were installed in the logged stems with presumably no healing reaction. The wood tissue surrounding each sensor was then excised and analysed by X-ray computed microtomography (X-ray micro CT). This technique allowed the quantification of vessel anatomical characteristics and the reconstruction of the 3-D internal microstructure of the xylem vessels so that extension and shape of the altered area could be determined. Gels and tyloses clogged the conductive vessels around the sensors in both beech and oak. The extension of the affected area was larger for beech although these anatomical changes led to similar sap flow underestimations in both species. The higher vessel size in oak may explain this result and, therefore, larger sap flow underestimation per area of affected conductive tissue. The wound healing reaction likely occurred within the first weeks after sensor installation, which

  19. An Empirical Study of the Wound Effects on Sap Flow Measured with Thermal Dissipation Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, A.; Marañón-Jiménez, S.; Herbst, M.; Cuntz, M.; Rebmann, C.

    2014-12-01

    Sap flow sensors are common to assess the contribution of tree transpiration to ecosystem evapotranspiration (ET). Thermal dissipation (TD) is one of the most popular methods for sap measurements but the insertion of TD probes in the tree stems imply wounding of the wood tissue and a consequent alteration of the sap flow. But the determination of sap flux density (SFD) is based on an empirical function developed for freshly drilled holes and it does hence not account for the wound effect. Here we investigate the effect of wound healing on sap flow measurements with TD probes. Our objectives were (1) the establishment of correction factors to account for the wound effect and (2) the determination of the point in time after installation when the correction factors become applicable. For that we performed an experiment in which TD probes were installed successively in diffuse- and ring-porous trees (Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea, resp.) during the growing season. The trees were logged in fall and additional sensors were installed afterwards in the logged stems. SFDs measured by the different TD sensors were compared with gravimetric estimates in the laboratory. Gravimetric flow compared well with SFD estimates from freshly installed sensors without wound formation, with only a slight underestimation by the TDs. In contrast, older sensors, submitted to wound reactions, underestimated SFD by up to 40%. However, sensors with 5, 11 and 22 week old wounds showed no significant differences, which implies that wound healing occurs in the first weeks after scission. Similar sap flow underestimations due to wound effects were observed in both species, oak and beech. This study highlights the relevance of accounting for tree wound reactions for accurate estimation of tree transpiration based on thermal dissipation sensors. We provide a correction factor for the classical Granier TD sensors that can be used from the first weeks after installation in similar species. This

  20. Climate signal detected in sub-fossil and living oak trees data. An analysis of signal frequency components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Nechita; Francisca, Chiriloaei; Maria, Radoane; Ionel, Popa; Nicoae, Radoane

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on analysis the frequency components of the signal detected in living and sub-fossil tree ring series from different time periods. The investigation is oriented to analyze signal frequency components (low and high) of the two categories of trees. The interpretation technique of tree ring width is the instrument most often used to elaborate past climatic reconstructions. The annual resolution, but also, the high capacity of trees to accumulate climatic information are attributes which confer to palaeo-environmental reconstructions the biggest credibility. The main objective of the study refers to the evaluation of climatic signal characteristics, both present day climate and palaeo-climate (last 7000 years BP). Modern dendrochronological methods were applied on 350 samples of sub-fossil trees and 400 living trees. The subfossil trunks were sampled from different fluvial environments (Siret, Suceava, Moldova). Their age was determined using radiocarbon, varying from under 100 years to almost 7000 years BP. The subfossil tree species investigated were Quercus, Alnus, Ulmus. Considering living trees, these were identified on eastern part of Romania, in different actual physico-geographical conditions. The studied living tree species consisted in Quercus species (robur and petraea). Each site was investigated regarding stress factors of the sampled tree. The working methods were applied to the total wood series, both late and early, to detect intra-annual level climate information. Each series has been tested to separate individual trees with climatic signal of other trees with different signals (noises determined by competition between individuals or site stress, or anthropic impact). Comparing dendrochronological series (sub-fossil and living trees) we want to identify what significant causes determined the difference in the signal frequencies. Especially, the human interventions registered in the last 2 centuries will be evaluated by these

  1. An index for the assessment of degraded Mediterranean forest ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Modica

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: Diagnosing the degradation degree of forest ecosystems is the basis for restoration strategies. However, there is no literature documenting how to quantify the forest degradation degree by using synthetic indicators, also because there is not a widely accepted definition for "forest degradation" and "degraded forest". Although there are many definitions of forest degradation that converge on the loss of ecosystem services, still today there are no largely accepted methods that give operational guidance to help in defining it. In the present research, with the aim to assess the degree of forest degradation, an integrated index - FDI, Forest Degradation Index - was developed.Area of study: In this first application, the FDI was applied and validated at stand level in two different Mediterranean forest types in two different case studies: Madonie and Nedrodi regional Parks (Sicily, Italy. The first dominated by sessile oak [Quercus petraea (Matt. Liebl. subsp. austrotyrrhenica Brullo, Guarino & Siracusa], the second dominated by cork oak (Quercus suber L..Material and methods: FDI is a synthetic index structured starting from representative and relatively easily detectable parameters. Here, we propose a set of six indicators that should be assessed to determine the forest degradation: Structural Index (SI, Canopy Cover (CC, Natural Regeneration Density (NRD, Focal Species of Degradation (FSD, Coarse Woody Debris (CWD, and Soil Depth (SD. FDI, here proposed and discussed, has been based on a MCDA (Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis approach using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP technique, and implemented in order to contribute in finding simple indicators useful for forest restoration purposes that have an eco-functional basis.Main results: An integrated index of forest degradation has been defined. FDI values are comprised in the closed interval [0, 10], ranging from class I (Higher ecological functionality to class IV (Lower

  2. Foliar nutrients in Italian forests: results from the 1995-2009 monitoring network sites CONECOFOR

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    De Cinti B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Foliar nutrients in Italian forests: results from the 1995-2009 monitoring network sites CONECOFOR. In 1995, the Italian Forest Service (CFS established the National Network for Forest Ecosystem Monitoring (CONECOFOR with the aim to study the ecological interactions among structural and functional components of forest stands. In the 31 permanent plots of the CONECOFOR Network, surveys are carried out including vegetation, trees crown condition, chemistry of leaves and soils, tree growth, atmospheric deposition, climate, microclimate, ozone and biodiversity. These surveys are carried out by CFS in collaboration with several scientific institutions. In such context, IBAF/CNR is specifically involved in the investigation of foliage chemical content. The foliar nutritional status was analyzed in 25 sites, taking as a reference the values published by the ICP-Forests and those published in the literature. The study involved 7 forest species (Quercus cerris, Q. petraea, Q. robur, Q. ilex, Fagus sylvatica, Carpinus betulus and Picea abies investigating the concentrations of the major macronutrients as nitrogen (N, phosphorus (P, potassium (K, magnesium (Mg, sulfur (S and calcium (Ca and the N/P ratio. In beech, N, S and K were found in quite high concentrations, though without showing imbalances due to concentration excesses. Ca and Mg are present in very high concentrations, highlighting the possibility of imbalances, especially in relation to the other nutrients. For these two nutrients, spruce shows substantially balanced conditions as also for N/P ratio. For deciduous Oaks nutrients arewithin the parameters of normality, with the exception of Ca. This has been observed in 4 out of the 6 studied sites, with potential indication of nutritional imbalances related to Calcium. Nutrient concentrations in Holm oak are within the average of published data, except for Ca and Mg of site TOS-1, the former being slightly low, the latter being unusually high

  3. A fast and cost-effective approach to develop and map EST-SSR markers: oak as a case study

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    Cherubini Marcello

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs are a source of simple sequence repeats (SSRs that can be used to develop molecular markers for genetic studies. The availability of ESTs for Quercus robur and Quercus petraea provided a unique opportunity to develop microsatellite markers to accelerate research aimed at studying adaptation of these long-lived species to their environment. As a first step toward the construction of a SSR-based linkage map of oak for quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping, we describe the mining and survey of EST-SSRs as well as a fast and cost-effective approach (bin mapping to assign these markers to an approximate map position. We also compared the level of polymorphism between genomic and EST-derived SSRs and address the transferability of EST-SSRs in Castanea sativa (chestnut. Results A catalogue of 103,000 Sanger ESTs was assembled into 28,024 unigenes from which 18.6% presented one or more SSR motifs. More than 42% of these SSRs corresponded to trinucleotides. Primer pairs were designed for 748 putative unigenes. Overall 37.7% (283 were found to amplify a single polymorphic locus in a reference full-sib pedigree of Quercus robur. The usefulness of these loci for establishing a genetic map was assessed using a bin mapping approach. Bin maps were constructed for the male and female parental tree for which framework linkage maps based on AFLP markers were available. The bin set consisting of 14 highly informative offspring selected based on the number and position of crossover sites. The female and male maps comprised 44 and 37 bins, with an average bin length of 16.5 cM and 20.99 cM, respectively. A total of 256 EST-SSRs were assigned to bins and their map position was further validated by linkage mapping. EST-SSRs were found to be less polymorphic than genomic SSRs, but their transferability rate to chestnut, a phylogenetically related species to oak, was higher. Conclusion We have generated a bin map for oak

  4. Features of secondary birch young stands in low mountain Pokuttya (Ukrainian Carpathian mts.

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    S. Y. Milevskaya

    2015-06-01

    species evidence the belonging of such groups to the class of Middle European broad-leaved forest Querco-Fagetea. However, there is a reason to believe that they are close to the class of sour oligotrophic and mesotrophic Atlantic deciduous forests Quercetea robori-petraeae. 12 diagnostic species confirm belonging of these groups to the order Fagetalia sylvaticae represented by the European mesophytic deciduous forests. At the level of unions of plant communities no clear association was found. Most of the diagnostic species in phytocenoses under study indicate proximity of the floristic composition of the plants to association Potentillo albae-Quercetum which represents light subcontinental oak forest.

  5. Unravelling spatiotemporal tree-ring signals in Mediterranean oaks: a variance-covariance modelling approach of carbon and oxygen isotope ratios.

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    Shestakova, Tatiana A; Aguilera, Mònica; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Gutiérrez, Emilia; Voltas, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Identifying how physiological responses are structured across environmental gradients is critical to understanding in what manner ecological factors determine tree performance. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal patterns of signal strength of carbon isotope discrimination (Δ(13)C) and oxygen isotope composition (δ(18)O) for three deciduous oaks (Quercus faginea (Lam.), Q. humilis Mill. and Q. petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) and one evergreen oak (Q. ilex L.) co-occurring in Mediterranean forests along an aridity gradient. We hypothesized that contrasting strategies in response to drought would lead to differential climate sensitivities between functional groups. Such differential sensitivities could result in a contrasting imprint on stable isotopes, depending on whether the spatial or temporal organization of tree-ring signals was analysed. To test these hypotheses, we proposed a mixed modelling framework to group isotopic records into potentially homogeneous subsets according to taxonomic or geographical criteria. To this end, carbon and oxygen isotopes were modelled through different variance-covariance structures for the variability among years (at the temporal level) or sites (at the spatial level). Signal-strength parameters were estimated from the outcome of selected models. We found striking differences between deciduous and evergreen oaks in the organization of their temporal and spatial signals. Therefore, the relationships with climate were examined independently for each functional group. While Q. ilex exhibited a large spatial dependence of isotopic signals on the temperature regime, deciduous oaks showed a greater dependence on precipitation, confirming their higher susceptibility to drought. Such contrasting responses to drought among oak types were also observed at the temporal level (interannual variability), with stronger associations with growing-season water availability in deciduous oaks. Thus, our results indicate that Mediterranean deciduous

  6. Distinct effects of water use efficiency increase on growth in Scots pine and sessile oak in the Mediterranean Basin

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    Martínez-Sancho, Elisabet; Dorado-Liñán, Isabel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Emilia; Matiu, Michael; Heinrich, Ingo; Helle, Gerhard; Menzel, Annette

    2017-04-01

    Drought is one of the main drivers of species distribution in the Mediterranean Basin, which will be exacerbated by climate change. The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (Ca) has been related to enhanced tree growth and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE). However, in the Mediterranean Basin this 'fertilizing' effect should compensate the potential drought-induced growth reduction to maintain forest productivity at a comparable level. This is particularly relevant for temperate species reaching their southern distribution limits and/or the limits of their climatic niche in this region. We investigated tree growth and physiological responses of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and sessile oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) stands located at their southern distribution limits using annually resolved tree-ring width and δ13C chronologies for the period 1960-2012. The selected stands were sampled in Spain, France, Italy, Slovenia, Bulgaria, and Romania. Wood cores were extracted at each site and tree-ring width and δ13C were measured. Basal area increment (BAI) was calculated as a surrogate of secondary growth and 13C discrimination (Δ), leaf intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and iWUE were estimated from δ13C values. The temporal trends of BAI, Δ, Ci and iWUE, as well as in climatic variables (i.e. temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration derived from CRU TS3.23 dataset) were calculated per site for the study period. Our specific objectives were (i) to test if rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changes in climate may have induced shifts in tree growth and ecophysiological proxies; (ii) to determine whether and how changes in iWUE are related to radial growth rates; and (iii) to assess site-specific physiological adjustments to increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the studied period. Preliminary results showed a generalized increase in Ci, and consequently in iWUE, at all study sites. Scots pine stands displayed a

  7. Quantifying genetic variations and phenotypic plasticity of leaf phenology and growth for two temperate Fagaceae species (sessile oak and european beech)

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    Delzon, Sylvain; Vitasse, Yann; Alberto, Florian; Bresson, Caroline; Kremer, Antoine

    2010-05-01

    Under current climate change, research on inherent adaptive capacities of organisms is crucial to assess future evolutionary changes of natural populations. Genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity constitute adaptative capacities that could allow populations to respond to new environmental conditions. The aim of the present study was (i) to determine whether there are genetic variations among populations from altitudinal gradients using a lowland common garden experiment and (ii) to assess the magnitude of phenotypic plasticity using a reciprocal transplant experiment (5 elevations from 100 to 1600 m asl.) for leaf phenology (flushing and senescence) and growth of two fagaceae species (Fagus sylvatica and Quercus petraea). We found significant differences in phenology among provenances for most species, and evidenced that these among-population differences in phenology were related to annual temperature of the provenance sites for both species. It's noteworthy that, along the same climatic gradient, the species exhibited opposite genetic clines: beech populations from high elevation flushed earlier than those of low elevation, whereas we observed an opposite trend for oak. Finally, we highlighted that both phenology timing and growth rate were highly consistent year to year. The results demonstrated that in spite of the proximity of the populations in their natural area, altitude led to genetic differentiations in their phenology and growth. Moreover, a high phenological plasticity was found for both species. We evidenced that reaction norms of flushing timing to temperature followed linear clinal trends for both species with an average shift of 5.7 days per degree increase. Timing of leaf senescence exhibited hyperbolic trends for beech and no or slight trends for oak. Furthermore, within species, there was no difference in magnitude of phenological plasticity among populations neither for flushing, nor for senescence. Consequently, for both species, the

  8. Anatomical basis of the change in leaf mass per area and nitrogen investment with relative irradiance within the canopy of eight temperate tree species

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    Aranda, I.; Pardo, F.; Gil, L.; Pardos, J. A.

    2004-05-01

    Changes in leaf mass per area (LMA), nitrogen content on a mass-basis (N m) and on an area basis (N a) with relative irradiance were assessed in leaves of eight temperate species harvested at different depths in a canopy. Relative irradiance (GSF) at the points of leaf sampling was estimated by hemispheric photographs. There was a strong species-dependent positive relationship between LMA and GSF for all species. Shade-tolerant species such as Fagus sylvatica showed lower LMA for the same GSF than less tolerant species as Quercus pyrenaica or Quercus petraea. The only evergreen species in the study, Ilex aquifollium, had the highest LMA, independent of light environment, with minimum values much higher than the rest of the broad-leaved species studied. There was no relation between N m and GSF for most species studied and only a very weak relation for the relative shade-intolerant species Q. pyrenaica. Within each species, the pattern of N a investment with regard to GSF was linked mainly to LMA. At the same relative irradiance, differences in N a among species were conditioned both by the LMA-GSF relationship and by the species N m value. The lowest N m value was measured in I. aquifollium (14.3 ± 0.6 mg g -1); intermediate values in Crataegus monogyna (16.9 ± 0.6 mg g -1) and Prunus avium (19.1 ± 0.6 mg g -1) and higher values, all in a narrow range (21.3 ± 0.6 to 23 ± 0.6 mg g -1), were measured for the other five species. Changes in LMA with the relative irradiance were linked both to lamina thickness (LT) and to palisade/spongy parenchyma ratio (PP/SP). In the second case, the LMA changes may be related to an increase in lamina density as palisade parenchyma involves higher cell packing than spongy parenchyma. However, since PP/SP ratio showed a weak species-specific relationship with LMA, the increase in LT should be the main cause of LMA variation.

  9. Nitrogen addition enhances drought sensitivity of young deciduous tree species

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    Christoph Dziedek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N and drought (D effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a four-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e. combined treatment effects were non-additive, while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e. trait combination, but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role (‘trait portfolio’ that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they

  10. Plan Zadań Ochronnych dla obszaru Natura 2000 Dąbrowy Ceranowskie PLH 140024 w świetle gospodarki leśnej

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    Michał Falkowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Praca przedstawia projekt Planu Zadań Ochronnych dla obszaru Natura 2000 Dąbrowy Ceranowskie PLH140024, w którym przedmiotami ochrony są siedliska przyrodnicze: 9170 Grąd środkowoeuropejski i subkontynentalny (Galio-Carpinetum, Tilio- -Carpinetum i 91I0* Ciepłolubne dąbrowy (Quercetalia pubescenti-petraeae. Celem pracy jest utrzymanie lub odtworzenie właściwego stanu przedmiotów ochrony, który to obowiązek wynika z art. 6(1 Dyrektywy Rady 92/43/EWG zwanej Dyrektywą Siedliskową [Dyrektywa... 1992]. Jest to dokument planistyczny sporządzany na okres 10 lat, będący narzędziem ochrony tego obszaru, a ściślej przedmiotów ochrony znajdujących się w jego obrębie. Stan zachowania grądów w obszarze został określony jako zły (U2. Z kolei stan dąbrów świetlistych oceniono jako niezadawalający (U1. W przypadku grądów brak jest odpowiedniej ilości martwego drewna, nie występują wszystkie fazy rozkładu drzew stojących i leżących kłód. Dla dąbrów ciepłolubnych głównymi zagrożeniami są proces sukcesji oraz wzrastające zacienienie runa. Głównym celem Planu Zadań Ochronnych dla siedliska 9170 jest zachowanie dotychczasowej (około 10% w skali obszaru jego powierzchni oraz poprawa jego struktury i funkcji. W przypadku siedliska przyrodniczego 91I0* celem jest zachowanie dotychczasowej (około 70% w skali ob -szaru powierzchni siedliska, poprawa warunków świetlnych, powstrzymanie procesu sukcesji oraz eliminacji gatunków obcych ekologicznie i geograficznie.

  11. The dynamic of the annual carbon allocation to wood in European tree species is consistent with a combined source-sink limitation of growth: implications for modelling

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    Guillemot, J.; Martin-StPaul, N. K.; Dufrene, E.; Francois, C.; Soudani, K.; Ourcival, J. M.; Delpierre, N.

    2015-05-01

    The extent to which wood growth is limited by carbon (C) supply (i.e. source control) or by cambial activity (i.e. sink control) will strongly determine the responses of trees to global changes. Nevertheless, the physiological processes that are responsible for limiting forest growth are still a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the key determinants of the annual C allocation to wood along large soil and climate regional gradients over France. The study was conducted for five tree species representative of the main European forest biomes (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Quercus ilex, Quercus robur and Picea abies). The drivers of stand biomass growth were assessed on both inter-site and inter-annual scales. Our data set comprised field measurements performed at 49 sites (931 site-years) that included biometric measurements and a variety of stand characteristics (e.g. soil water holding capacity, leaf area index). It was complemented with process-based simulations when possible explanatory variables could not be directly measured (e.g. annual and seasonal tree C balance, bioclimatic water stress indices). Specifically, the relative influences of tree C balance (source control), direct environmental control (water and temperature controls of sink activity) and allocation adjustments related to age, past climate conditions, competition intensity and soil nutrient availability on growth were quantified. The inter-site variability in the stand C allocation to wood was predominantly driven by age-related decline. The direct effects of temperature and water stress on sink activity (i.e. effects independent from their effects on the C supply) exerted a strong influence on the annual stand wood growth in all of the species considered, including deciduous temperate species. The lagged effect of the past environmental conditions (e.g. the previous year's water stress and low C uptake) significantly affected the annual C allocation to wood. The C supply

  12. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

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    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  13. Investigation of the degradation of 13C-labeled fungal biomass in soil - fate of carbon in a soil bioreactor system

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    Schweigert, Michael; Fester, Thomas; Miltner, Anja; Kaestner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Nutrient balances and degradation processes in boreal forests are mainly influenced by interactions of plant roots and ectomycorrhizal fungi. Plants benefit from nitrogen compounds provided by their symbiotic interaction partner. In return ectomycorrhiza are provided by large amounts of carbon from the plants which is used for the synthesis of hyphal networks in soil and for metabolic activity for nutrient uptake. Therefore, ectomycorrhizal fungi play a major role in ecosystems of boreal forests and are consequently an important sink for carbon by building large amount of mycelia. Recently, it has been shown that microbial biomass residues contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation. This suggests that also residues of ectomycorrhizal fungi may be an important source for soil organic matter formation in forest soils where these fungi are abundant. However, the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass residues in soils is unknown. We therefore investigated the fate of ectomycorrhizal biomass in soil in a soil bioreactor system to quantify the contribution of this material to soil organic matter formation. As a model organism, we selected Laccaria bicolor, which was labelled by growing the fungus on 13C glucose. The stable isotope-labeled biomass was then homogenized and incubated in a podzol from a typical forest site in Central Germany. The fate of the labeled biomass was traced by analyzing the amount of 13C mineralized and the amount remaining in the soil. The fungal biomass carbon was mineralized rather rapidly during the first 50 days. Then the mineralization rate slowed down, but mineralization continued until the end of the experiment, when approximately 40% of the 13C was mineralized and 60% remained in soil. In addition, we analyzed biomolecules such as fatty acids to trace the incorporation of the L. bicolor-derived biomass carbon into other microorganisms and to identify potential primary consumers of fungal biomass. By these analyses, we found a

  14. Growth, nutrient uptake and ectomycorrhizal function in Pinus sylvestris plants exposed to aluminium and heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen-Jonnarth, Ulla [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    2000-07-01

    The potential role of aluminium (Al) toxicity to trees has been of particular concern to forest owners and scientists since the early 1980's when Ulrich hypothesised that both Al and heavy metals were involved in forest dieback because of their increased concentrations in soil due to acidification. Since then, numerous studies have examined the effects of metals upon nutrient uptake by plants. However, most of these investigations have been carried out in the absence of mycorrhizal fungi, which, in most ecosystems, are crucial components in nutrient uptake by plants. The present work focused on the effects of elevated concentrations of Al and heavy metals on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and the potential role of ectomycorrhiza in modifying these effects. Ectomycorrhizal colonisation enhanced the growth and nutrient uptake by seedlings. To some extent, colonisation also alleviated reduced nutrient uptake which was a feature of seedlings growing in the presence of the metals. This effect was particularly noticeable with respect to P uptake. In general, mycorrhizal seedlings grew better and had an improved P, K, Mg and S status compared with non-mycorrhizal seedlings. Significant differences were also found in nutrient uptake among seedlings colonised by different fungi. One fungus, Hebeloma cf. longicaudum, was more sensitive to the Al treatment than the pine seedlings. The use of the base cation / Al ratio as an indicator of the potential detrimental effects to trees to acidification and Al is discussed. The production of oxalic acid was found to increase when mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal seedlings were exposed to Al or Cu. Colonisation by Suillus variegatus or Rhizopogon roseolus, in particular, resulted in a marked increase. These results demonstrate that there is a capacity, especially by certain ectomycorrhizal fungi, for increased production of the metal-chelating oxalic acid when root systems are exposed to increased levels of metals. In a field

  15. Paxillus involutus-Facilitated Cd2+ Influx through Plasma Membrane Ca2+-Permeable Channels Is Stimulated by H2O2 and H+-ATPase in Ectomycorrhizal Populus × canescens under Cadmium Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Sa, Gang; Zhang, Yinan; Zhu, Zhimei; Deng, Shurong; Sun, Jian; Li, Nianfei; Li, Jing; Yao, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Rui; Ma, Xujun; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2017-01-01

    Using a Non-invasive Micro-test Technique, flux profiles of Cd2+, Ca2+, and H+ were investigated in axenically grown cultures of two strains of Paxillus involutus (MAJ and NAU), ectomycorrhizae formed by these fungi with the woody Cd2+-hyperaccumulator, Populus × canescens, and non-mycorrhizal (NM) roots. The influx of Cd2+ increased in fungal mycelia, NM and ectomycorrhizal (EM) roots upon a 40-min shock, after short-term (ST, 24 h), or long-term (LT, 7 days) exposure to a hydroponic environment of 50 μM CdCl2. Cd2+ treatments (shock, ST, and LT) decreased Ca2+ influx in NM and EM roots but led to an enhanced influx of Ca2+ in axenically grown EM cultures of the two P. involutus isolates. The susceptibility of Cd2+ flux to typical Ca2+ channel blockers (LaCl3, GdCl3, verapamil, and TEA) in fungal mycelia and poplar roots indicated that the Cd2+ entry occurred mainly through Ca2+-permeable channels in the plasma membrane (PM). Cd2+ treatment resulted in H2O2 production. H2O2 exposure accelerated the entry of Cd2+ and Ca2+ in NM and EM roots. Cd2+ further stimulated H+ pumping activity benefiting NM and EM roots to maintain an acidic environment, which favored the entry of Cd2+ across the PM. A scavenger of reactive oxygen species, DMTU, and an inhibitor of PM H+-ATPase, orthovanadate, decreased Ca2+ and Cd2+ influx in NM and EM roots, suggesting that the entry of Cd2+ through Ca2+-permeable channels is stimulated by H2O2 and H+ pumps. Compared to NM roots, EM roots exhibited higher Cd2+-fluxes under shock, ST, and LT Cd2+ treatments. We conclude that ectomycorrhizal P. × canescens roots retained a pronounced H2O2 production and a high H+-pumping activity, which activated PM Ca2+ channels and thus facilitated a high influx of Cd2+ under Cd2+ stress. PMID:28111579

  16. Potential enzyme activities in cryoturbated organic matter of arctic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, J.; Wild, B.; Rusalimova, O.; Mikutta, R.; Guggenberger, G.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    microbial biomass, was significantly higher in topsoil organic horizons than in cryoturbated and mineral horizons. Changes in the microbial community composition were mainly caused by the relative amount of fungal biomarkers. Within the fungal community the biomarker 18:2w6, which is often associated with ectomycorrhiza, was negatively correlated to the general fungal biomarker 18:1w9. This negative correlation indicates a shift from mycorrhizal to saprotrophic fungi from topsoil towards cryoturbatad and mineral subsoil horizons. In summary, the measured oxidative and hydrolytic (potential) enzyme activities cannot explain the previously observed retarded decomposition in cryoturbated horizons. The measured actual cellulase activity however was strongly reduced in cryoturbated material compared to topsoil horizons. A possible explanation for the observed strong reduction of actual cellulase activity could lie within the fungal community structure which shifted towards saprotrophic fungi from topsoil to cryoturbated horizons.

  17. Las micorrizas: una relación planta-hongo que dura más de 400 millones de años

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    Honrubia, Mario

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of mycorrhiza is considered in a wide sense, as a not necessarily mutualistic symbiosis, covering the trophic relations of mycorrhizal fungi with “inferior” and achlorophyllics plants. A bibliographical review of the origin and diversification of mycorrhizae is made. The pioneering characteristics of the arbuscular mycorrhiza formed by Glomeromycota are discussed, emphasizing its importance during the terrestrialization processes. The chronological appearance of the other types of mycorrhizas is discussed. The independent and recurrent evolution of the ectomycorrhizas formed by Basidiomycota and Ascomycota is discussed; their saprobiont or parasite origin points to the versatile nutritional strategy of these fungi, in adaptative response to environmental changes, as does the origin of the singular ericoid, arbutoid and helianthemoid mycorrhizas. The particular trophic relation between achlorophyllic plants, such as Monotropa and orchids, in their heterotrophic phases, with their “mycorrhizal” fungi is also described. Finally, the recent evolution of the non mycotrophic root systems is commented on.

    Se define el concepto de micorriza en un sentido amplio, como una simbiosis no necesariamente mutualística, para incluir las relaciones tróficas de hongos micorrícicos con plantas “inferiores” y plantas aclorofílicas. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica sobre el origen y diversificación de las micorrizas. Se evidencia el carácter pionero de la micorriza arbuscular formada por los Glomeromycota y se resalta su importancia en el proceso de ‘terrestrialización’. Se comenta la formación cronológica de los restantes tipos de micorrizas. Se denota la evolución independiente y recurrente de las ectomicorrizas, formadas por Basidiomycota y Ascomycota inicialmente saprófitos, que sugiere una versatilidad en las estrategias nutricionales de estos hongos, como respuesta

  18. Microbial weathering of apatite and wollastonite in a forest soil: Evidence from minerals buried in a root-free zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezat, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    Mineral weathering is an important process in biogeochemical cycling because it releases nutrients from less labile pools (e.g., rocks) to the food chain. A field experiment was undertaken to determine the degree to which microbes - both fungi and bacteria - are responsible for weathering of Ca-bearing minerals. The experiment was performed at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in the northeastern USA, where acid deposition has leached plant-available calcium from soils for decades. Trees obtain soil nutrients through root uptake as well as through mycorrhizal fungi with which they are symbiotically associated. These fungi extend their hyphae from the tree roots into the soil and exude organic acids that may enhance mineral dissolution. The two most common types of symbiotic fungal-tree associations are ectomycorrhizae, which are associated with spruce (Picea), fir (Abies), and beech (Fagus); and arbuscular mycorrhizae which are commonly associated with angiosperms, such as maples (Acer). To examine the role of fungi and bacteria in weathering of Ca- and/or P-bearing minerals, mesh bags containing sand-sized grains of quartz (as a control), quartz plus 1% wollastonite (CaSiO3), or quartz plus 1% apatite (Ca5(PO4)3F) were buried ~15 cm deep in mineral soil beneath American beech, sugar maple, and mixed spruce and balsam fir stands at the HBEF. Half of the bags were constructed of 50-μm mesh to exclude roots but allow fungal hyphae and bacteria to enter the bags; the remaining bags had 1-μm mesh to exclude fungi and roots but allow bacteria to enter. The bags were retrieved ~ 1, 2 or 4 years after burial. Microbial community composition and biomass in the mesh bags and surrounding soil were characterized and quantified using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Fungal biomass in the soil and control bags did not differ significantly among stand types. In contrast, the degree of fungal colonization in apatite- and wollastonite-amended bags varied

  19. Diversity of metaxylem vessel elements in three Syagrus palms (Arecaceae of different habits Diversidade dos elementos de vaso do metaxilema em três espécies de Syagrus (Arecaceae de diferentes hábitos

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    Marcelo Rodrigo Pace

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vessel elements in Monocotyledons present morphological differences according to the organ where they occur. Usually such diff erences have been explained from an evolutionary perspective, with few data on how the vessel elements could be infl uenced by the diff erent functions of organs and the growth habits of the plants. To address this question, three vegetative organs of palms of the same genus, Syagrus, growing in similar environments, but with different habits, were analyzed. Accordingly, we aimed to detect whether the vessel elements would present similar features in all species or whether the vessel elements would change according to their different habits. We found that the width and type of perforation plates varied in the same way among all species, while the lengths varied in an unusual form. First, all species presented very long elements in the roots, either as long, or longer than those of the stems and leaves. Second, the vessel elements of the stems varied considerably among the species. Specifi cally, in Syagrus romanzoffi ana, vessel elements of the stem were equal in size to those of the other organs, while in both Syagrus fl exuosa and Syagrus petraea, shorter vessel elements were found in the stems. We surmise that vessel elements in palm roots may be related to the high pressure-potential required to avoid stem embolism. The dimorphism of the vessel elements in the stems most likely reflects the distinct habits of these species. Large stems, such as of those of the arboreal palms, presented much longer vessels than those of subterranean stems. Based on these anatomical findings, we suggest that the diff erences found among the vessel elements of roots, stem, and leaves may have evolved in response not only to phylogenetic and ecological constraints, but also to specificities derived from the different plant habits.Elementos de vasos em monocotiledôneas apresentam diferenças morfológicas de acordo com o órgão onde

  20. Responses of net primary productivity to air temperature change in forests dominated by different mycorrhizal strategies%不同菌根类型的森林净初级生产力对气温变化的响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石兆勇; 王发园; 苗艳芳

    2012-01-01

    Aims Mycorrhizae, as the symbiotic associations between plant roots and mycorrhizal fungi, are almost ubiquitous. Mycorrhizal fungi play a crucial role in the regulation of terrestrial net primary production carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and respond strongly to climatic changes in temperature. Our objective was to explore how interan-nual variations in air temperature influence net primary productivity (NPP) in global forest ecosystems that are classified by the mycorrhizae of the dominant plants. Methods A new database was established including NPP and mean annual air temperature (MAT) of forests dominated by different mycorrhizal strategies based on an existing global forest database. We used this new database to study the responses of NPP of forests dominated by different mycorrhizal strategies to air temperature change. Important findings Total NPP, aboveground NPP and belowground NPP increased with the increase of MAT, although the slopes were different in forests dominated by different mycorrhizal types. Total NPP increased with the rise of MAT in forests dominated by all mycorrhizal strategies out of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and AM + ectomycorrhiza (ECM) + ectendomycorrhiza (EEM). The responses of above- and below-ground NPP of forests to the variation of MAT changed depending on mycorrhizal strategies of dominate forest tree species. The MAT explained 57.27% of the variation of aboveground NPP in AM + ECM forest. Significant regressions between belowground NPP and MAT were observed in ECM and ECM + EEM forests. NPP values of main stem, tree leaf and fine root tended to either increase or decrease with the increase of MAT in the different forests. As far as the comparison between AM and ECM forest was concerned, the NPP, including total NPP and each part, was more sensitive to air temperature change in forest dominated by ECM than forest dominated by AM. We conclude that different mycorrhizae affected the responses of forest NPP to air temperature change by

  1. El aprovechamiento tradicional de la dehesa boyal en un área de montaña del centro de España. Puebla de la Sierra (Madrid

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    Martín Jiménez, Eva

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional management of an open wood for the feeding of ploughing cattle (dehesa boyal, located in a mountain area of Central Spain, was studied. The study area is situated in Puebla de la Sierra (Madrid. The dehesa has 336 ha and is strategically situated between the communal lands of the higher slopes and the village. The main tree species is melojo oak (Quercus pyrenaica with other less frequent species interesting from a conservation point of view like sessile oak (Quercus petraea. The management rules in the dehesa originated in medieval times, with two main types of wood management: the coppice and the open wood pasture (monte hueco. The dehesa of La Puebla was mostly used as an open wood pasture until the 20th century. Characteristics of the traditional management of the dehesa have been recreated through interviews to the old inhabitants of the village. The seasonal grazing by cows, sheep and goats is described for different parts of the dehesa. Lopping for the different tree species and the rules that regulated them are described. Also are discussed the effects of traditional management on the structure and composition of the dehesa wood. Finally, the importance of the woodland traditional management for nature conservation is analysed. The utility of the management rules studied, which does not change a large quantity of the forest characteristics (large trees, diversity, heterogeneity, etc., is pointed out. Also is highlighted to integrate the traditional management for local people, scientific support for the improvement of the nature conservation methods and the cultural and educational programs in the planning of this highly interesting nature reserve.

    [es] Se ha estudiado la gestión tradicional de una dehesa boyal localizada en un área montañosa del centro de España, en el municipio madrileño de Puebla de la Sierra, y sus efectos sobres las caracter

  2. The impact of atmospheric deposition and climate on forest growth in Europe using two empirical modelling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbertin, M.; Solberg, S.; Laubhann, D.; Sterba, H.; Reinds, G. J.; de Vries, W.

    2009-04-01

    Most recent studies show increasing forest growth in central Europe, rather than a decline as was expected due to negative effects of air pollution. While nitrogen deposition, increasing temperature and change in forest management are discussed as possible causes, quantification of the various environmental factors has rarely been undertaken. In our study, we used data from several hundreds of intensive monitoring plots from the ICP Forests network in Europe, ranging from northern Finland to Spain and southern Italy. Five-year growth data for the period 1994-1999 were available from roughly 650 plots to examine the influence of environmental factors on forest growth. Evaluations focused on the influence of nitrogen, sulphur and acid deposition, temperature, precipitation and drought. Concerning the latter meteorological variables we used the deviation from the long-term (30 years) mean. The study included the main tree species common beech (Fagus sylvatica), sessile or pedunculate oak (Quercus petraea and Q. robur), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norway spruce (Picea abies). Two very different approaches were used. In the first approach an individual tree-based regression model was applied (Laubhahn et al., 2009), while in the second approach a stand-based model was applied (Solberg et al., 2009). The individual tree-based model had measured basal area increment of each individual tree as a growth response variable and tree size (diameter at breast height), tree competition (basal area of larger trees and stand density index), site factors (e.g. soil C/N ratio, temperature), and environmental factors (e.g. temperature change compared to long-term average, nitrogen and sulphur deposition) as influencing parameters. In the stand-growth model, stem volume increment was used as the growth response variable, after filtering out the expected growth. Expected growth was modelled as a function of site productivity, stand age and a stand density index. Relative volume

  3. Assessing the determinism of the seasonal variations of trunk CO2 efflux by combining field-isotopic composition monitoring and process-based modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngao, J.; Berveiller, D.; Eglin, T.; Bazot, S.; Pontailler, J.; Damesin, C.

    2008-12-01

    Trunk CO2 efflux is a major component of total CO2 forest ecosystem efflux but its determinism is still poorly understood. This CO2 flux could originate from different carbon sources (respiration of newly assimilates or reserves; xylem sap flow dissolved CO2). These potential CO2 sources of the ecosystem vary at a diurnal and seasonal time scale. They follow distinct metabolic pathways within the tree and could potentially differ in terms of stable C isotopes composition (δ13C). During this last decade, new techniques such as tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) has enabled to track both the δ13C and rate of CO2 fluxes at a high temporal frequency compared to conventional isotope ratio mass spectroscopy and chamber-based techniques. In this context, our objective is to examine the diurnal and day-to-day variations of δ13C trunk CO2 efflux and to test if they are driven by climate, xylem sap flow and photosynthetic activity. A TDLAS (TGA100A, Campbell Sci., UT) was installed in early July 2008 in a mature oak (Quercus petraea, L.) stand of the Barbeau forest (France, Carboeurope site). It has been connected to three opened trunk chambers placed at breast height. Before each chamber measurement, which occurred every six minutes, the analyzer was calibrated with four calibration gas bottles with known CO2 concentration (in air) and δ13C values. Concurrently to trunk CO2 efflux rate and δ13C, xylem sap flow rate, air and trunk temperatures, and vapor pressure deficit above canopy were recorded. Data for the summer and fall seasons will be presented and discussed. Preliminary results showed that in summer both trunk CO2 efflux rate and CO2 followed the time evolution but at a different level among trees. The mean hourly averages of CO2 of trunk CO2 efflux values ranged from -29.6‰ to - 23.2‰, and hourly means of CO2 efflux were positively and linearly linked to trunk temperature. The diurnal variations of δ13C of CO2 efflux are less obvious that

  4. Projected changes in the future distribution and production of sessile oak forests near the xeric limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, Krisztina; Berki, Imre; Veperdi, Gábor

    2017-04-01

    As a result of regional climate change, most European countries are experiencing an increase in mean annual temperature and CO2 concentration and a decrease in mean annual precipitation. In low-elevation areas in Southeast Europe, where precipitation is a limiting factor, the projected climate change threatens the health, production, and potential distribution of forest ecosystems. The intensive summer droughts and commonly occurring extreme weather events create negative influences that cause health declines, changes in yield potential, and tree mortality. Due to the observed damages, attention has been focused on these problems. The impacts of climatic extremes cause difficulties in forest management; these difficulties occur more frequently in Hungary, which is a region that is the most sensitive to climatic extremes. Regional climate model simulations project that the frequency of extremely high temperatures and long-term dry periods will increase; both of these factors have negative effects on future tree species distribution and production. Thus, the aim of our study is to utilize the sessile oak (Quercus petraea) as a climate indicator tree species to investigate potential future distribution and estimate changes in growth trends. For future spatial distribution, we used the Fuzzy membership distribution model in a new Decision Support System (DSS) which was developed for the Hungarian forestry and agricultural sectors. Through study techniques we can employ DSS, which contains various environmental layers (topography, vegetation, past and projected future climate, soils, and hydrology), to create probability distribution maps. The results, based on 12 regional climate model simulations (www.ensembles-eu.org), show that the area of sessile oak forests is shrinking continuously and will continue to do so to the end of the 21st century. For future production estimations, we analysed intensive long-term growth monitoring network plots that were established in

  5. Species-specific fine root biomass distribution alters competition in mixed forests under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyer, Christopher; Gutsch, Martin; Lasch, Petra; Suckow, Felicitas; Sterck, Frank; Mohren, Frits

    2010-05-01

    The importance of mixed forests in European silviculture has increased due to forest conversion policies and multifunctional forest management. Concurrently, evidences for substantial impacts of climate change on forest ecosystems accumulate. Projected drier and warmer conditions alter the water relations of tree species, their growth and ultimately their inter-specific competition in mixed stands. Process-based models are scientific tools to study the impact of climate change on and to deepen the understanding of the functioning of these systems based on ecological mechanisms. They allow for long-term, stand-level studies of forest dynamics which could only be addressed with great difficulty in an experimental or empirical setup. We used the process-based forest model 4C to simulate inter-specific competition in mixed stands of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Common beech (Fagus sylvatica) as well as Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Sessile / Pedunculate oak (Quercus petraea and Quercus robur) under a) historical climate for model verification and b) under climate change scenario realizations of the climate model STAR 2.0 in Brandenburg, Germany. Some of the climate change scenario realizations feature a substantially drier and warmer summer climate which decreases the climatic water balance during the growing season. We assumed species-specific fine root biomass distributions which feature broadleaved fine roots in deeper soil layers and coniferous fine roots in upper soil layers according to several root excavation studies from mixed stands. The stands themselves were constructed from yield tables of the contributing species. The model verification provided good results for the basal area predictions under the historical climate. Under climate change, the number of days when the tree water demand exceeded the soil water supply was higher for the coniferous species than for broadleaved species. Furthermore, after 45 simulation years the basal area

  6. Towards a common methodology to simulate tree mortality based on ring-width data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailleret, Maxime; Bigler, Christof; Bugmann, Harald; Davi, Hendrik; Minunno, Francesco; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    Individual mortality is a key process of population and community dynamics, especially for long-lived species such as trees. As the rates of vegetation background mortality and of massive diebacks accelerated during the last decades and would continue in the future due to rising temperature and increasing drought, there is a growing demand of early warning signals that announce that the likelihood of death is very high. If physiological indicators have a high potential to predict tree mortality, their development requires an intensive tree monitoring which cannot be currently done on a representative sample of a population and on several species. An easier approach is to use radial growth data such as tree ring-widths measurements. During the last decades, an increasing number of studies aimed to derive these growth-mortality functions. However, as they followed different approaches concerning the choice of the sampling strategy (number of dead and living trees), of the type of growth explanatory variables (growth level, growth trend variables…), and of the length of the time-window (number of rings before death) used to calculate them, it makes difficult to compare results among studies and a subsequent biological interpretation. We detailed a new methodology for assessing reliable tree-ring based growth-mortality relationships using binomial logistic regression models. As examples we used published tree-ring datasets from Abies alba growing in 13 different sites, and from Nothofagus dombeyi and Quercus petraea located in one single site. Our first approach, based on constant samplings, aims to (1) assess the dependency of growth-mortality relationships on the statistical sampling scheme used; (2) determine the best length of the time-window used to calculate each growth variable; and (3) reveal the presence of intra-specific shifts in growth-mortality relationships. We also followed a Bayesian approach to build the best multi-variable logistic model considering

  7. Spore density and root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in preserved or disturbed Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. O. Ktze. ecosystems Densidade de esporos e colonização radicular por fungos microrrízicos arbusculares em ecossistemas de Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. O. Ktze. preservados e impactados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Moreira

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. O. Ktze., a native forest tree from Brazil, is under extinction risk. This tree depends on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for growth and development, especially in tropical low-P soils but, despite being a conifer, Araucaria does not form ectomycorrhiza, but only the arbuscular endomycorrhiza. This study aimed at surveying data on the spore density and root colonization (CR by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF in Araucaria angustifolia forest ecosystems, in order to discriminate natural, implemented, and anthropic action-impacted ecosystems, by means of Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA. Three ecosystems representative of the Campos do Jordão (SP, Brazil region were selected: 1. a native forest (FN; 2. a replanted Araucaria forest (R; and 3. a replanted Araucaria forest, submitted to accidental fire (RF. Rhizosphere soil and roots were sampled in May and October, 2002, for root colonization, AMF identification, and spores counts. Root percent colonization rates at first collection date were relatively low and did not differ amongst ecosystems. At the second period, FN presented higher colonization than the other two areas, with much higher figures than during the first period, for all areas. Spore density was lower in FN than in the other areas. A total of 26 AMF species were identified. The percent root colonization and spore numbers were inversely related to each other in all ecosystems. CDA indicated that there is spatial distinction among the three ecosystems in regard to the evaluated parameters.A Araucaria angustifolia (Bert. O. Ktze. é uma espécie florestal nativa do Brasil e encontra-se ameaçada de extinção. É altamente dependente de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares para seu desenvolvimento, principalmente em solos com baixos teores de fósforo. Embora sendo uma conífera, esta árvore não forma ectomicorriza, mas sim a endomicorriza arbuscular. O presente estudo teve como objetivo levantar dados

  8. Can ectomycorrhizal symbiosis and belowground plant traits be used as ecological tools to mitigate erosion on degraded slopes in the ultramafic soils of New Caledonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demenois, Julien; Carriconde, Fabian; Rey, Freddy; Stokes, Alexia

    2015-04-01

    New Caledonia is an archipelago in the South West Pacific located just above the Tropic of Capricorn. The main island is bisected by a continuous mountain chain whose highest peaks reach more than 1 600 m. With mean annual rainfall above 2 000 mm in the South of the main island, frequent downpours and steep slopes, its soils are prone to water erosion. Deforestation, fires and mining activity are the main drivers of water erosion. Stakes are high to mitigate the phenomenon: extraction of nickel from ultramafic substrates (one third of the whole territory) is the main economic activity; New Caledonia is considered as a biodiversity hotspot. Restoration ecology is seen as a key approach for tackling such environmental challenges. Soil microorganisms could play significant roles in biological processes such as plant nutrition and plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses. Microorganisms could increase soil aggregate stability and thus mitigate soil erodibility. Plant roots increase soil cohesion through exudation and decomposition processes. To date, few studies have collected data on the soil aggregate stability of steep slopes affected by erosion and, to our knowledge, interactions between ectomycorrhizas (ECM), roots and erodibility of ultramafic soils have never been considered. The objective of our study is to assess the influence of ECM symbiosis and plant root traits on the erodibility of ultramafic soils of New Caledonia and answer the following questions: 1/ What is the influence of plant root traits of vegetal communities and ECM fungal diversity on soil erodibility? 2/ What are the belowground plant traits of some mycorrhized endemic species used in ecological restoration? 3/ What is the influence of plant root traits and ECM fungal inoculation on soil erodibility? At the scale of plant communities, five types of vegetation have been chosen in the South of the main island: degraded ligno-herbaceous shrubland, ligno-herbaceous shrubland, degraded humid

  9. Characteristics of soil microbial biomass and community composition in three types of plantations in southern subtropical area of China%南亚热带3种人工林土壤微生物生物量和微生物群落结构特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卫霞; 史作民; 罗达; 刘世荣; 卢立华

    2013-01-01

    positively correlated with soil organic carbon,total nitrogen,and total phosphorus,suggesting that the soil organic carbon,total nitrogen,and total phosphorus contents were the most important nutrient factors affecting the numbers and types of the soil microorganisms.In addition,the ectomycorrhizae fungal PLFA (18:1ω9c) and AMF PLFA were significantly correlated with the soil C/N ratio.

  10. Effects of mycorrhizal fungus inoculation on the root of Cupressus duclouxiana and Catalpa bungei seedlings under drought stress%干旱胁迫下接种菌根真菌对滇柏和楸树幼苗根系的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王如岩; 于水强; 张金池; 周垂帆; 陈莉莎

    2012-01-01

    在正常水分(25%~30%)、中度干旱(15%~20%)、重度干旱(5%~10%)3种水分条件下,设对照(A)、接种内生菌根真菌(B)、接种外生菌根真菌(C)、混合接种(D)4个处理,利用盆栽实验研究了菌根真菌对滇柏、楸树地下生物量和根系N、P含量以及根系形态的影响.结果表明:接种菌根真菌后,根系生物量都有所增加,但滇柏以外生菌和混合菌接种的效果更显著,而楸树以内生菌的效果最为显著.除重度干旱以外,滇柏接种处理的氮和磷含量都要高于对照处理,楸树B和D处理的氮磷含量要高于对照.其中滇柏根系的平均直径、总长度以及表面积都有所增加,接种效果表现为D>C>B>A.接种内生菌根对楸树影响明显,根系形态和对照组相比呈显著性差异,外生菌根无明显作用.重度干旱条件下,接种处理对两种树种各指标的影响都较小.可见,接种菌根真菌能够提高滇柏、楸树的抗旱性.%The potted seedlings of Cupressus duclouxiana and Catalpa bungei were used to examine their response under different moisture content conditions, including normal moisture (25 % -30 % ) , moderate drought (15 % -20 % ) and severe drought (5 % -10 %). The inoculated groups were the control group (A) , VAM group (B) , ectomyeor-rhizal(C) and mixture group (D, VAM + Ectomycorrhiza). After 150 days of treatment, the root biomass, root morphology and contents of nitrogen and phosphorus were measured. The results showed that after the seedlings were inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi, root biomass increased. The root biomass of Cupressus duclouxiana seedlings increased significantly under C and D treatments, however, B and D treatment significantly increased the root biomass of Catalpa bungei. Except severe drought, N and P contents in roots of Cupressus duclouxiana with mycorrhizal fungus inoculated were higher than those of control, whereas only with B and D treatment, the N and P contents

  11. Mycorrhizae respond to plant diversity in monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest succession choronsequence%季风常绿阔叶林演替系列菌根资源及其与群落多样性的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑克举; 唐旭利; 张静; 韩天丰

    2013-01-01

    Plant species diversity, community structure, productivity and edaphic factors varied significantly with forest succession, these variations may influence the diversity of mycorrhizae. To understand how forest structure and function impact on mycorrhizae at ecosystem level, three subtropical forests were chosen along a forest succession series in South China to investigate mycorrhizae, ectomycorrhizae ( ECM ), arbuscular mycorrhizae ( AM ), and mycorrhizal fungal spores in the top soil ( 0-20 cm depth ). Potential influences of forest structure on mycorrhizae were analyzed based on field census together with plant diversity and soil nutrients. The results showed that nearly 70% of fine roots less than 2 mm diameter in the top soil of each forest were colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, but dominate mycorrhizae types varied significantly in the three successional forests. AM accounted for 78% of total mycor-rhizae in the pine forest at early successional stage, ECM contributed to 75% of mycorrhizae in the mixed forest at middle succes-sional stage, and AM and ECM contributed equivalently to total mycorrhizae in the monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest at late succession stage. Mycorrhizal fungal spore density was highest in the pine forest (2 925 spores per 20 g dry soil), which was 2.5 and 2 times of those in the mixed forest and monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest, respectively. We found that the difference of mycor-rhizae composition was associated with plant diversity, community structure and soil nutrient condition in successional forests. Spe-cies-rich and individual high density of grass plants and poor soil nutrient level in the pine forest may result in relatively high propor-tion of AM in the pine forest. Mycorrhizae were dominated by ECM resulting from the dominance of ECM plant in the mixed forest. Abundant plant species and complex community structure in the monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest contributed AM and ECM to equal distribution in the forest