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Sample records for quench tank in-leakage

  1. Quench tank in-leakage diagnosis at St. Lucie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J.E.; Au-Yang, M.K.; Beckner, D.A.; Vickery, A.N.

    1996-12-01

    In February 1995, leakage into the quench tank of the St. Lucie Nuclear Station Unit 1 was becoming an operational concern. This internal leak resulted in measurable increases in both the temperature and level of the quench tank water, and was so severe that, if the trend continued, plant shut down would be necessary. Preliminary diagnosis based on in-plant instrumentation indicated that any one of 11 valves might be leaking into the quench tank. This paper describes the joint effort by two teams of engineers--one from Florida Power & Light, the other from Framatome Technologies--to identify the sources of the leak, using the latest technology developed for valve diagnosis.

  2. Quench tank in-leakage diagnosis at St. Lucie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.E.; Au-Yang, M.K.; Beckner, D.A.; Vickery, A.N.

    1996-01-01

    In February 1995, leakage into the quench tank of the St. Lucie Nuclear Station Unit 1 was becoming an operational concern. This internal leak resulted in measurable increases in both the temperature and level of the quench tank water, and was so severe that, if the trend continued, plant shut down would be necessary. Preliminary diagnosis based on in-plant instrumentation indicated that any one of 11 valves might be leaking into the quench tank. This paper describes the joint effort by two teams of engineers--one from Florida Power ampersand Light, the other from Framatome Technologies--to identify the sources of the leak, using the latest technology developed for valve diagnosis

  3. Functions and requirements for single-shell tank leakage mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for the leakage mitigation mission applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. A Mission Analysis has been completed, this document reflects the next step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The functions and requirements in this document apply to mitigative actions to be taken regarding below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage mitigation is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities

  4. Mission analysis report for single-shell tank leakage mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    This document provides an analysis of the leakage mitigation mission applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall missions of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineers principles are being applied to this effort. Mission analysis supports early decision making by clearly defining program objectives. This documents identifies the initial conditions and acceptable final conditions, defines the programmatic and physical interfaces and constraints, estimates the resources to carry out the mission, and establishes measures of success. The results of the mission analysis provide a consistent basis for subsequent systems engineering work

  5. Functions and requirements for Hanford single-shell tank leakage detection and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruse, J.M.; Ohl, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document provides the initial functions and requirements for leakage detection and monitoring applicable to past and potential future leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level waste tanks. This mission is a part of the overall mission of the Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Waste Remediation System division to remediate the tank waste in a safe and acceptable manner. Systems engineering principles are being applied to this effort. This document reflects the an initial step in the systems engineering approach to decompose the mission into primary functions and requirements. The document is considered approximately 30% complete relative to the effort required to produce a final version that can be used to support demonstration and/or procurement of technologies. The functions and requirements in this document apply to detection and monitoring of below ground leaks from SST containment boundaries and the resulting soil contamination. Leakage detection and monitoring is invoked in the TWRS Program in three fourth level functions: (1) Store Waste, (2) Retrieve Waste, and (3) Disposition Excess Facilities (as identified in DOE/RL-92-60 Rev. 1, Tank Waste Remediation System Functions and Requirements)

  6. Determination of the rf leakage field in the vacuum tank of the TRIUMF cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohback; Dohan, D.; Dutto, G.; Enegren, T.A.; Fong, K.; Pacak, V.

    1983-01-01

    In the TRIUMF cyclotron the dees are partially defined by the two halves of the quasi-circular vacuum chamber, which completely contains the 1 MW resonating cavity. A stray electric field or ''RF leakage'' exists inside the dees and has occasionally caused problems to probes or other tank equipment. In order to understand the nature of this field a precise 1:10 scale metal model of the entire tank and resonator system has been built and is being investigated. Various resonances have been identified: the push-pull mode at 226 MHz and the push-push mode at 233 MHz; cross modes along the dee gap resonate at 243 MHz and 253 MHz. In the quasicircular tank region outside of the main resonating cavity the Tm 310 and Tm 410 modes are mainly responsible for the configuration of the leakage field since they are closer to the operating frequency. The measurements are in reasonable agreement with the results of numerical relaxation calculation and with measurements in the cyclotron tank

  7. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F.; Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J.; Cruse, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report

  8. An alarm instrument for monitoring leakage of oil storage tanks and the location of their leak position using radioisotope tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qingqian; Sun Xiaolei; Hu Xusheng

    1990-01-01

    Usually it is difficult to find out gasoline leakage at the bottom of a storage tank from the very beginning. In order to solve this problem, a leak-monitoring technique and an instrument based on the detection of nuclear radiation have been successfully developed. The instrument possesses high sensitivity, short reaction time, excellent stability and rellability. When very small leaks at the bottom of a tank appear, the instrument will show a leak signal and give an alarm. In the meantime, however, the tank can be still used until the preparations for repairing are completed. Then its leak position can be accurately located by using radioisotope tracers

  9. History of waste tank 16, 1959 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Jones, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1977-07-01

    Tank 16 was placed in service as a receiver of fresh high heat waste (HW) on May 9, 1959, and was filled to capacity in May 1960. Approximately half the tank contents were transferred to tanks 14 and 15 during September and October 1960 because of leakage into the annulus. Use of tank 16 was resumed in October 1967 when authorization (TA 2-603) was obtained to receive LW, and the tank was filled to capacity by June 1968. Subsequently, supernate was removed from the tank, and a blend of fresh LW and evaporator bottoms was added. In March 1972, the supernate was transferred to tank 13 because leakage had resumed. The sludge was left in the tank bottom and the use of tank 16 for any additional waste storage was discontinued. In September 1960 liquid waste overflowed the annulus pan. Leakage essentially stopped after the tank liquid level was lowered below the middle horizontal weld. After exhaustive study, tank cracking and resultant leakage was concluded to have been caused by stress corrosion due to the action of NaOH or NaNO 3 on areas of high local stress in the steel plate such as welds. Samples of sludge, supernate, tank vapors, and leaked material in the annulus were analyzed, and tank temperature and radiation profiles were taken. Two disk samples were cut from the primary tank wall for metallurgical examination. Test coupons of various metals were exposed to tank 16 waste to aid new tank design and to study stress corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement. In addition, samples of SRP bedrock were placed in tank 16 to study reactions between bedrock and HW. 18 figures, 2 tables

  10. Optimization of the quenching method for metabolomics analysis of Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-ming; Li, Ai-li; Sun, Mao-cheng; Feng, Zhen; Meng, Xiang-chen; Wang, Ying

    2014-04-01

    This study proposed a quenching protocol for metabolite analysis of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Microbial cells were quenched with 60% methanol/water, 80% methanol/glycerol, or 80% methanol/water. The effect of the quenching process was assessed by the optical density (OD)-based method, flow cytometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were employed for metabolite identification. The results indicated that quenching with 80% methanol/water solution led to less damage to the L. bulgaricus cells, characterized by the lower relative fraction of prodium iodide (PI)-labeled cells and the higher OD recovery ratio. Through GC-MS analysis, higher levels of intracellular metabolites (including focal glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, and AMP) and a lower leakage rate were detected in the sample quenched with 80% methanol/water compared with the others. In conclusion, we suggested a higher concentration of cold methanol quenching for L. bulgaricus metabolomics due to its decreasing metabolite leakage.

  11. Optimization of the quenching method for metabolomics analysis of Lactobacillus bulgaricus *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-ming; Li, Ai-li; Sun, Mao-cheng; Feng, Zhen; Meng, Xiang-chen; Wang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    This study proposed a quenching protocol for metabolite analysis of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. Microbial cells were quenched with 60% methanol/water, 80% methanol/glycerol, or 80% methanol/water. The effect of the quenching process was assessed by the optical density (OD)-based method, flow cytometry, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were employed for metabolite identification. The results indicated that quenching with 80% methanol/water solution led to less damage to the L. bulgaricus cells, characterized by the lower relative fraction of prodium iodide (PI)-labeled cells and the higher OD recovery ratio. Through GC-MS analysis, higher levels of intracellular metabolites (including focal glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, and AMP) and a lower leakage rate were detected in the sample quenched with 80% methanol/water compared with the others. In conclusion, we suggested a higher concentration of cold methanol quenching for L. bulgaricus metabolomics due to its decreasing metabolite leakage. PMID:24711354

  12. Stabilization of In-Tank Residual Wastes and External-Tank Soil Contamination for the Hanford Tank Closure Program: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; Dwyer, B.P.; Ho, C.; Krumhansl, J.L.; McKeen, G.; Molecke, M.A.; Westrich, H.R.; Zhang, P.

    1998-11-01

    Technical support for the Hanford Tank Closure Program focused on evaluation of concepts for immobilization of residual contaminants in the Hanford AX tanks and underlying soils, and identification of cost-effective approaches to improve long-term performance of AX tank farm cIosure systems. Project objectives are to develop materials or engineered systems that would significantly reduce the radionuclide transport to the groundwater from AX tanks containing residual waste. We pursued several studies that, if implemented, would help achieve these goals. They include: (1) tank fill design to reduce water inilltration and potential interaction with residual waste; (2) development of in-tank getter materials that would specifically sorb or sequester radionuclides; (3) evaluation of grout emplacement under and around the tanks to prevent waste leakage during waste retrieval or to minimize water infiltration beneath the tanks; (4) development of getters that will chemically fix specific radionuclides in soils under tanks; and (5) geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil-grout interactions. These studies differ in scope from the reducing grout tank fill employed at the Savannah River Site in that our strategy improves upon tank fill design by providing redundancy in the barriers to radionuclide migration and by modification the hydrogeochemistry external to the tanks.

  13. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external tank soil contamination for the Hanford tank closure program: application to the AX tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SONNICHSEN, J.C.

    1998-10-12

    Mixed high-level waste is currently stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site. The plan is to retrieve the waste, process the water, and dispose of the waste in a manner that will provide less long-term health risk. The AX Tank Farm has been identified for purposes of demonstration. Not all the waste can be retrieved from the tanks and some waste has leaked from these tanks into the underlying soil. Retrieval of this waste could result in additional leakage. During FY1998, the Sandia National Laboratory was under contract to evaluate concepts for immobilizing the residual waste remaining in tanks and mitigating the migration of contaminants that exist in the soil column. Specifically, the scope of this evaluation included: development of a layered tank fill design for reducing water infiltration; development of in-tank getter technology; mitigation of soil contamination through grouting; sequestering of specific radionuclides in soil; and geochemical and hydrologic modeling of waste-water-soil interactions. A copy of the final report prepared by Sandia National Laboratory is attached.

  14. Air clearing pressure oscillation produced in a quenching tank by a prototype unit cell sparger of the APR1400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seok; Song, Chul-Hwa; Park, Choon-Kyong; Kim, Hwan-Yeol; Baek, Won-Pil

    2008-01-01

    KAERI has performed a series of experiments to investigate the performance of a prototype sparger for the APR1400 in view of a dynamic load oscillation with a variation of the test conditions such as a discharged air mass, a submergence of the sparger, the valve opening time, and the pool temperature during an air clearing phase. The air mass and pool temperature are in the range of 0.8-1.5 kg and 20-90 o C, respectively. The valve opening time can be adjusted within the range of 0.6-1.8 s. The maximum positive pressure amplitude, which is observed at the bottom of the quenching tank, is increased with the maximum header pressure of the sparger. The valve opening time has a considerable effect on the maximum amplitude. As the opening time decreases, the maximum amplitude at the tank wall is increased. Air mass and pool temperature, however, have a weak effect on the maximum amplitude. Oscillation frequency is decreased with an increase of the air mass in the range of 2.5-4.5 Hz

  15. Operational tank leak detection and minimization during retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    This report evaluates the activities associated with the retrieval of wastes from the single-shell tanks proposed under the initial Single-Shell Tank Retrieval System. This report focuses on minimizing leakage during retrieval by using effective leak detection and mitigating actions. After reviewing the historical data available on single-shell leakage, and evaluating current leak detection technology, this report concludes that the only currently available leak detection method which can function within the most probable leakage range is the mass balance system. If utilized after each sluicing campaign, this method should allow detection at a leakage value well below the leakage value where significant health effects occur which is calculated for each tank. Furthermore, this report concludes that the planned sequence or sluicing activities will serve to further minimize the probability and volume of leaks by keeping liquid away from areas with the greatest potential for leaking. Finally, this report identifies a series of operational responses which when used in conjunction with the recommended sluicing sequence and leak detection methods will minimize worker exposure and environmental safety health risks

  16. Coolant leakage detecting device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Katsunori; Ishihara, Yoshinao.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention judges an amount of leakage of primary coolants of a PWR power plant at high speed. Namely, a mass of coolants contained in a pressurizer, a volume controlling tank and loop regions is obtained based on a preset relational formula and signals of each of process amount, summed up to determine the total mass of coolants for every period of time. The amount of leakage for every period of time is calculated by a formula of Karman's filter based on the total mass of the primary coolants for every predetermined period of time, and displays it on CRT. The Karman's filter is formed on every formula for several kinds of states formed based on the preset amount of the leakage, to calculate forecasting values for every mass of coolants. An adaptable probability for every preset leakage amount is determined based on the difference between the forecast value and the observed value and the scattering thereof. The adaptable probability is compared with a predetermined threshold value, which is displayed on the CRT. This device enables earlier detection of leakage and identification of minute leakage amount as compared with the prior device. (I.S.)

  17. Trade study of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies to support Hanford single-shell waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System to safely manage and dispose of low-level, high-level, and transuranic wastes currently stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Eastern Washington. This report supports the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone No. M-45-08-T01 and addresses additional issues regarding single-shell tank leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies and provide an indication of the scope of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation activities necessary to support the Tank Waste Remedial System Initial Single-shell Tank Retrieval System project

  18. Method of detecting leakage in nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koba, Akitoshi; Goto, Seiichiro.

    1974-01-01

    Object: To permit accurate and prompt detection of leakage of a radioactive substance. Structure: The rate of change of such factors as radiation dose, temperature and pressure in the containment vessel, and each detected rate of change is compared with a reference value. The running cycle of the condensed drain exhausting pump in a drain collecting tank within a predetermined period is detected, and it is also compared with a reference value. These comparisons determine the absence or presence of leakage. (Kamimura, M.)

  19. Tank 244A tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System currently receives waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System in support of SST stabilization efforts or from other on-site facilities which generate or store waste. Waste is also transferred between individual DSTs. The mixing or commingling of potentially incompatible waste types at the Hanford Site must be addressed prior to any waste transfers into the DSTs. The primary goal of the Waste Compatibility Program is to prevent the formation of an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) as a result of improper waste management. Tank 244A is a Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) which serves as any overflow tank for the East Area Farms. Waste material is able to flow freely between the underground storage tanks and tank 244A. Therefore, it is necessary to test the waste in tank 244A for compatibility purposes. Two issues related to the overall problem of waste compatibility must be evaluated: Assurance of continued operability during waste transfer and waste concentration and Assurance that safety problems are not created as a result of commingling wastes under interim storage. The results of the grab sampling activity prescribed by this Tank Characterization Plan shall help determine the potential for four kinds of safety problems: criticality, flammable gas accumulation, energetics, and corrosion and leakage

  20. Two-dimensional thermal analysis of liquid hydrogen tank insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babac, Gulru; Sisman, Altug [Istanbul Technical University, Energy Institute, Ayazaga campus, 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey); Cimen, Tolga [Jaguar and Landrover, Banbury Road, Gaydon, Warwick CV35 0RR (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) storage has the advantage of high volumetric energy density, while boil-off losses constitute a major disadvantage. To minimize the losses, complicated insulation techniques are necessary. In general, Multi Layer Insulation (MLI) and a Vapor-Cooled Shield (VCS) are used together in LH{sub 2} tanks. In the design of an LH{sub 2} tank with VCS, the main goal is to find the optimum location for the VCS in order to minimize heat leakage. In this study, a 2D thermal model is developed by considering the temperature dependencies of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of hydrogen gas. The developed model is used to analyze the effects of model considerations on heat leakage predictions. Furthermore, heat leakage in insulation of LH{sub 2} tanks with single and double VCS is analyzed for an automobile application, and the optimum locations of the VCS for minimization of heat leakage are determined for both cases. (author)

  1. Quantitative quenching evaluation and direct intracellular metabolite analysis in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, Sabine; Rapp, Sina; Schmitz, Katja; Noack, Stephan; Kornfeld, Georg; Hardiman, Timo

    2013-07-01

    Sustained progress in metabolic engineering methodologies has stimulated new efforts toward optimizing fungal production strains such as through metabolite analysis of Penicillium chrysogenum industrial-scale processes. Accurate intracellular metabolite quantification requires sampling procedures that rapidly stop metabolism (quenching) and avoid metabolite loss via the cell membrane (leakage). When sampling protocols are validated, the quenching efficiency is generally not quantitatively assessed. For fungal metabolomics, quantitative biomass separation using centrifugation is a further challenge. In this study, P. chrysogenum intracellular metabolites were quantified directly from biomass extracts using automated sampling and fast filtration. A master/slave bioreactor concept was applied to provide industrial production conditions. Metabolic activity during sampling was monitored by 13C tracing. Enzyme activities were efficiently stopped and metabolite leakage was absent. This work provides a reliable method for P. chrysogenum metabolomics and will be an essential base for metabolic engineering of industrial processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Underground storage tank 431-D1U1, Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancieri, S.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information about the decommissioning of Tank 431-D1U1. This tank was installed in 1965 for diesel fuel storage. This tank will remain in active usage until closure procedures begin. Soils and ground water around the tank will be sampled to check for leakage. Appendices include; proof of proper training for workers, health and safety briefing record, task hazard analysis summary, and emergency plans.

  3. Safety analysis report for the gunite and associated tanks project remediation of the South Tank Farm, facility 3507, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1998-02-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks, which were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid Low-Level Waste System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The last of the tanks was taken out of service in 1986, but the tanks have been shown by structural analysis to continue to be structurally sound. An attempt was made in 1983 to empty the tanks; however, removal of all the sludge from the tanks was not possible with the equipment and schedule available. Since removal of the liquid waste in 1983, liquid continues to accumulate within the tanks. The in-leakage is believed to be the result of groundwater dripping into the tanks around penetrations in the domes. The tanks are currently being maintained under a Surveillance and Maintenance Program that includes activities such as level monitoring, vegetation control, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filter leakage requirement testing/replacement, sign erection/repair, pump-out of excessive liquids, and instrument calibration/maintenance. These activities are addressed in ORNL/ER-275

  4. Large Propellant Tank Cryo-Cooler (LPTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In rocket test and launch facilities, cryogenic propellants stored in tanks boils off due to heat leakage, with the following impacts:Ø   Waste, propellants boil off...

  5. On The Possible Leakage of ET-RR1 Liquid Waste Tank: Hydrological and Migration Modes Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mahmoud

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The first Egyptian (ET-RR1 research reactor has been in operation since 1961 at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA Inshas site. Therefore, at present, it faces a serious problem due to aging equipment, especially those directly in contact with the environment such as the underground settling tanks of nuclear and radioactive waste. The possible leakage of radionuclides from these aging tanks and their migration to the aquifer was studied using instantaneous release.This study was done based on the geological and hydrological characteristics of the site, which were obtained from the hydrogeological data of 25 wells previously drilled at the site of the reactor[1]. These data were used to calculate the trend of water levels, hydraulic gradient, and formulation of water table maps from 1993–2002. This information was utilized to determine water velocity in the unsaturated zone.Radionuclides released from the settling tank to the aquifer were screened according to the radionuclides that have high migration ability and high activity. The amount of fission and activation products of the burned fuels that contaminated the water content of the reactor pool were considered as 10% of the original spent fuel. The radionuclides considered in this case were H-3, Sr-90, Zr-93, Tc-99, Cd-113, Cs-135, Cs-137, Sm-151, Pu-238, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Am-241.The instantaneous release was analyzed by theoretical calculations, taking into consideration the migration mechanism of the various radionuclides through the soil space between the tank bottom and the aquifer. The migration mechanism through the unsaturated zone was considered depending on soil type, thickness of the unsaturated zone, water velocity, and other factors that are specific for each radionuclide, namely retardation factor, which is the function of the specific distribution coefficient of each radionuclide. This was considered collectively as delay time. Meanwhile, the mechanism of

  6. Comparison of quenching and extraction methodologies for metabolome analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faijes Magda

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable quenching and metabolite extraction method has been developed for Lactobacillus plantarum. The energy charge value was used as a critical indicator for fixation of metabolism. Results Four different aqueous quenching solutions, all containing 60% of methanol, were compared for their efficiency. Only the solutions containing either 70 mM HEPES or 0.85% (w/v ammonium carbonate (pH 5.5 caused less than 10% cell leakage and the energy charge of the quenched cells was high, indicating rapid inactivation of the metabolism. The efficiency of extraction of intracellular metabolites from cell cultures depends on the extraction methods, and is expected to vary between micro-organisms. For L. plantarum, we have compared five different extraction methodologies based on (i cold methanol, (ii perchloric acid, (iii boiling ethanol, (iv chloroform/methanol (1:1 and (v chloroform/water (1:1. Quantification of representative intracellular metabolites showed that the best extraction efficiencies were achieved with cold methanol, boiling ethanol and perchloric acid. Conclusion The ammonium carbonate solution was selected as the most suitable quenching buffer for metabolomics studies in L. plantarum because (i leakage is minimal, (ii the energy charge indicates good fixation of metabolism, and (iii all components are easily removed during freeze-drying. A modified procedure based on cold methanol extraction combined good extractability with mild extraction conditions and high enzymatic inactivation. These features make the combination of these quenching and extraction protocols very suitable for metabolomics studies with L. plantarum.

  7. Polymers for subterranean containment barriers for underground storage tanks (USTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.H.; Colombo, P.; Clinton, J.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) set up the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration Program (USTID) to demonstrate technologies for the retrieval and treatment of tank waste, and closure of underground storage tanks (USTs). There are more than 250 underground storage tanks throughout the DOE complex. These tanks contain a wide variety of wastes including high level, low level, transuranic, mixed and hazardous wastes. Many of the tanks have performed beyond the designed lifetime resulting in leakage and contamination of the local geologic media and groundwater. To mitigate this problem it has been proposed that an interim subterranean containment barrier be placed around the tanks. This would minimize or prevent future contamination of soil and groundwater in the event that further tank leakages occur before or during remediation. Use of interim subterranean barriers can also provide sufficient time to evaluate and select appropriate remediation alternatives. The DOE Hanford site was chosen as the demonstration site for containment barrier technologies. A panel of experts for the USTID was convened in February, 1992, to identify technologies for placement of subterranean barriers. The selection was based on the ability of candidate grouts to withstand high radiation doses, high temperatures and aggressive tank waste leachates. The group identified and ranked nine grouting technologies that have potential to place vertical barriers and five for horizontal barriers around the tank. The panel also endorsed placement technologies that require minimal excavation of soil surrounding the tanks

  8. Feasibility of Autonomous Monitoring of CO2 Leakage in Aquifers: Results From Controlled Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R.; Leger, E.; Dafflon, B.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic sequestration of CO2 is one of the primary proposed approaches for reducing total atmospheric CO2 concentrations. MVAA (Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment) of CO2 sequestration is an essential part of the geologic CO2 sequestration cycle. MVAA activities need to meet multiple operational, regulatory and environmental objectives, including ensuring the protection of underground sources of drinking water. Anticipated negative consequences of CO2 leakage into groundwater, besides possible brine contamination and release of gaseous CO2, include a significant increase of dissolved CO2 into shallow groundwater systems, which will decrease groundwater pH and can potentially mobilize naturally occurring trace metals and ions that are commonly absorbed to or contained in sediments. Autonomous electrical geophysical monitoring in aquifers has the potential of allowing for rapid and automated detection of CO2 leakage. However, while the feasibility of such monitoring has been demonstrated by a number of different field experiments, automated interpretation of complex electrical resistivity data requires the development of quantitative relationships between complex electrical resistivity signatures and dissolved CO2 in the aquifer resulting from leakage Under a DOE SBIR funded effort we performed multiple tank scale experiments in which we investigated complex electrical resistivity signatures associated with dissolved CO2 plumes in saturated sediments. We also investigated the feasibility of distinguishing CO2 leakage signatures from signatures associated with other processes such as salt water movement, temperature variations and other variations in chemical or physical conditions. In addition to these experiments we also numerically modeled the tank experiments. These experiments showed that (a) we can distinguish CO2 leakage signatures from other signatures, (b) CO2 leakage signatures have a consistent characteristic, (c) laboratory experiments

  9. X-33 LH2 Tank Failure Investigation Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermeyer, Melinda

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the composite sandwich-honeycomb structure of the liquid hydrogen tank of the X-33 reusable launch vehicle, and describes why the the first pressure test to determine the tank's structural integrity failed. The presentation includes images of the tank before and after the failed test, including photomicrographs. It then reaches conclusions on the nature of the microcracks which caused the liquid hydrogen leakage.

  10. Double-Shell Tank Visual Inspection Changes Resulting from the Tank 241-AY-102 Primary Tank Leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardot, Crystal L.; Washenfelder, Dennis J.; Johnson, Jeremy M.; Engeman, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Program, remote visual inspections are utilized to perform qualitative in-service inspections of the DSTs in order to provide a general overview of the condition of the tanks. During routine visual inspections of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) in August 2012, anomalies were identified on the annulus floor which resulted in further evaluations. In October 2012, Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC determined that the primary tank of AY-102 was leaking. Following identification of the tank AY-102 probable leak cause, evaluations considered the adequacy of the existing annulus inspection frequency with respect to the circumstances of the tank AY-102 1eak and the advancing age of the DST structures. The evaluations concluded that the interval between annulus inspections should be shortened for all DSTs, and each annulus inspection should cover > 95 percent of annulus floor area, and the portion of the primary tank (i.e., dome, sidewall, lower knuckle, and insulating refractory) that is visible from the annulus inspection risers. In March 2013, enhanced visual inspections were performed for the six oldest tanks: 241-AY-101, 241-AZ-101,241-AZ-102, 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103, and no evidence of leakage from the primary tank were observed. Prior to October 2012, the approach for conducting visual examinations of DSTs was to perform a video examination of each tank's interior and annulus regions approximately every five years (not to exceed seven years between inspections). Also, the annulus inspection only covered about 42 percent of the annulus floor

  11. History of waste tank 13, 1956 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1978-06-01

    Tank 13 was placed in service as a receiver of LW from the Building 221-H Purex process in December 1956. Five years later, the supernate was decanted to evaporator feed tank 21. It has since served as a transfer tank for HW supernate being sent to tank 21 and has received sludge removed from other tanks four times. The tank annulus has been inspected with an optical periscope and a lead-shielded camera. No indication of tank leakage had been seen through December 1974. However, subsequent to this report (on April 14, 1977), an arrested leak was discovered, making tank 13 the last of the four type II tanks to leak. Analytical samples of supernate and sludge have been taken. Tank 13 has had no cooling coil failures. Primary tank wall thicknesses, sludge level determinations, and temperature profiles have been obtained. Tank 13 has been included in various tests. Equipment modifications and various equipment repairs were made. 11 figures, 2 tables

  12. History of waste tank 9 , 1955--1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tharin, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Tank 9 was placed in service as a receiver for Purex HLW on July 19, 1955. Filling was essentially completed in December 1955, and this original complement of waste remained in the tank until December 1965, when most of the liquid was decanted to allow refilling. In July 1966, the remaining liquid and approximately 15 inches of sludge were removed using 3000 to 3500 psi water introduced through nozzles to mobilize the sludge. The tank was then used as a receiver and cooler for aged HLW solution concentrated by the tank farm evaporator; the resulting crystallized salt, covered with saturated solution, is now stored in this tank. Inspections have been made of the tank interior and annulus by direct observation and with a 40-ft optical periscope. Analytical samples have been taken of the sludge, supernate, vapor, and leaked material in the annulus. Top-to-bottom profiles of radiation and temperature have been obtained in the annulus and tank, respectively, and measurements have been made of roof deflection caused by salt adhering to roof-supported cooling coils. Leaked waste was discovered in the annulus pan in October 1957. During 1958-59, the annulus pan was flushed nine times with water in 2000-gallon batches, jetting the waste and flush water into the primary tank. However, waste leakage into the annulus continued. The maximum liquid depth reached in the annulus was about 12 inches. This was jetted out in 1961., but some leakage continued theeeafter as indicated by roddings. The roddings showed no standing liquid by August 1964, but some liquid may have been present undera salt crust. In March 1972, salt depth in the annulus was measured to be 8 to 10 in., and the bottom 3 in. was quite wet. The salt remains although most of the liquid has been removed

  13. 46 CFR 35.05-15 - Tank vessel security-TB/ALL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... scuppers, if any, unobstructed; meets any loadline or freeboard requirements; and neither leaks cargo into the water, voids, or cofferdams nor leaks water into the tanks, voids, or cofferdams; (ii) Ensuring... checks are made of every tank barge in the tow for leakage of cargo into the water, voids, or cofferdams...

  14. DEGRADATION EVALUATION OF HEAVY WATER DRUMS AND TANKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickalonis, J.; Vormelker, P.

    2009-07-31

    Heavy water with varying chemistries is currently being stored in over 6700 drums in L- and K-areas and in seven tanks in L-, K-, and C-areas. A detailed evaluation of the potential degradation of the drums and tanks, specific to their design and service conditions, has been performed to support the demonstration of their integrity throughout the desired storage period. The 55-gallon drums are of several designs with Type 304 stainless steel as the material of construction. The tanks have capacities ranging from 8000 to 45600 gallons and are made of Type 304 stainless steel. The drums and tanks were designed and fabricated to national regulations, codes and standards per procurement specifications for the Savannah River Site. The drums have had approximately 25 leakage failures over their 50+ years of use with the last drum failure occurring in 2003. The tanks have experienced no leaks to date. The failures in the drums have occurred principally near the bottom weld, which attaches the bottom to the drum sidewall. Failures have occurred by pitting, crevice and stress corrosion cracking and are attributable, in part, to the presence of chloride ions in the heavy water. Probable degradation mechanisms for the continued storage of heavy water were evaluated that could lead to future failures in the drum or tanks. This evaluation will be used to support establishment of an inspection plan which will include susceptible locations, methods, and frequencies for the drums and tanks to avoid future leakage failures.

  15. High-level waste leakage from the 241-T-106 tank at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routson, R.C.; Price, W.H.; Brown, D.J.; Fecht, K.R.

    1979-02-01

    The history, status, fate, and impact of the 4.34 x 10 5 -liter (115,000-gal) radioactive waste tank leak from the 241-T-106 tank have been studied since 1973. As of May 1978, the maximum detected depth of the 1-microcurie per liter (μCi/l) concentration of 106 Ru penetration was 33 meters (108 ft) below the ground surface or 29 meters (95 ft) above the regional water table. This maximum depth of penetration was detected in two of the dry wells in the 241-T tank farm. In no other well has radioactivity greater than 1.0-μCi/l been found deeper than 29 meters (95 ft). This is approximately 43% of the distance from the bottom of the tank to the water table. The maximum horizontal movement of the 1-μCi/l 106 Ru concentration front from the tank was approximately 23 meters (75 ft) at a depth of 25 meters (82 ft). This distance is approximately equal to the diameter of the tank. The rate of frontal movement of radioactivity was qualitatively estimated. A large portion of the movement occurred in 1973, prior to the publication of an initial tank leak status report. From 1973 to 1974, detectable lateral movement occurred in at least some sediment layers. From 1974 to 1978, movement could not generally be detected. However, migration in wells near the leak perimeter was detected in 1978, and the probable cause defined. Calculations on vadose zone moisture and wetting frontal movement were found to be essentially in qualitative agreement in their assessed lack of movement of any waste above concentration guidelines to the Hanford ground water. Thus, during the hazardous lifetime of the fission products, there will likely be no amount of radioactivity enter the Hanford ground water. Therefore, there appears to be no impact of the leak on the Columbia River

  16. Quenching technology: a selected overview of the current state-of-the-art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauralice de Campos Franceschini Canale

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Many papers have been published on a wide range of aspects of the fundamental physics and chemistry of quenching such as: additive technology, surface rewetting, hardness distribution prediction, role of heat transfer and residual stresses, etc.1,2. However, relatively little information has been published on the application of these insightful research results for the solution of long standing quench tank production problems. This paper will address three areas where technical advancements have been, or may be, made. These include discussion of: 1 the application fundamental fluid dynamics to characterize quenching uniformity due to agitation; 2 the use of "waves" to provide uniform agitation during the quenching process; and 3 the use of pressure as a variable to mediate heat transfer throughout the quenching process.

  17. 49 CFR 179.300-16 - Tests of tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... air pressure test of at least 100 psig under conditions favorable to detection of any leakage. No... postweld heat treatment, tanks shall be subjected to hydrostatic expansion test in a water jacket, or by...

  18. The detection of leakages in open reservoirs by the radioisotope sorption method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owczarczyk, A.; Wierzchnicki, R.; Urbanski, T.; Chmielewski, A.G.; Szpilowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    Location of leakages in large hydro-engineering plants and industrial water reservoirs is of great importance from view-point of both safety and economy of their exploitation. Large variety of water reservoirs encountered in hydro-engineering and industry calls for adaptation of investigation methods to their specific features. In the paper a number of methodological variants of known radiotracer technique developed at the INCT is presented. They are intended to detect and locate leakages in hydro-engineering reservoirs and dams as well as large open industrial tanks. The radioisotopes Au-198 and In-133 m being used for that purpose show excellent sorption characteristic on typical construction materials users to build such objects. (author). 8 refs, 8 figs

  19. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    This document reflects the evaluations and analyses performed in response to Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A - open-quotes Complete Evaluation of Subsurface Barrier Feasibilityclose quotes (September 1994). In addition, this feasibility study was revised reflecting ongoing work supporting a pending decision by the DOE Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding further development of subsurface barrier options for SSTs and whether to proceed with demonstration plans at the Hanford Site (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07B). Analyses of 14 integrated SST tank farm remediation alternatives were conducted in response to the three stated objectives of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A. The alternatives include eight with subsurface barriers and six without. Technologies used in the alternatives include three types of tank waste retrieval, seven types of subsurface barriers, a method of stabilizing the void space of emptied tanks, two types of in situ soil flushing, one type of surface barrier, and a clean-closure method. A no-action alternative and a surface-barrier-only alternative were included as nonviable alternatives for comparison. All other alternatives were designed to result in closure of SST tank farms as landfills or in clean-closure. Revision 1 incorporates additional analyses of worker safety, large leak scenarios, and sensitivity to the leach rates of risk controlling constituents. The additional analyses were conducted to support TPA Milestone M-45-07B

  20. Assessment of vadose zone radionuclide contamination around Single Shell Tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kos, S.E.

    1995-12-01

    Five drywells surrounding single shell tank 241-C-103 were logged with the high-purity germanium logging system to investigate possible leakage of radioactive contamination from the tank. The investigation included integration of the drywell survey results with several other data sources. There is no conclusive evidence showing indications that the 241-C-103 tank has leaked

  1. Study of Vapour Cloud Explosion Impact from Pressure Changes in the Liquefied Petroleum Gas Sphere Tank Storage Leakage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Z. A.; Suhaimi Yeong, A. F. Mohd; Alias, A. B.; Ahmad, M. A.; AbdulBari Ali, S.

    2018-05-01

    This research was carried out to determine the risk impact of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage facilities, especially in the event of LPG tank explosion. In order to prevent the LPG tank explosion from occurring, it is important to decide the most suitable operating condition for the LPG tank itself, as the explosion of LPG tank could affect and cause extensive damage to the surrounding. The explosion of LPG tank usually occurs due to the rise of pressure in the tank. Thus, in this research, a method called Planas-Cuchi was applied to determine the Peak Side-On Overpressure (Po) of the LPG tank during the occurrence of explosion. Thermodynamic properties of saturated propane, (C3H8) have been chosen as a reference and basis of calculation to determine the parameters such as Explosion Energy (E), Equivalent Mass of TNT (WTNT), and Scaled Overpressure (PS ). A cylindrical LPG tank in Feyzin Refinery, France was selected as a case study in this research and at the end of this research, the most suitable operating pressure of the LPG tank was determined.

  2. Brine reuse in ion-exchange softening: salt discharge, hardness leakage, and capacity tradeoffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodman, Hunter R; Dvorak, Bruce I

    2012-06-01

    Ion-exchange water softening results in the discharge of excess sodium chloride to the aquatic environment during the regeneration cycle. In order to reduce sodium chloride use and subsequent discharge from ion-exchange processes, either brine reclaim operations can be implemented or salt application during regeneration can be reduced. Both result in tradeoffs related to loss of bed volumes treated per cycle and increased hardness leakage. An experimentally validated model was used to compare concurrent water softening operations at various salt application quantities with and without the direct reuse of waste brine for treated tap water of typical midwestern water quality. Both approaches were able to reduce salt use and subsequent discharge. Reducing salt use and discharge by lowering the salt application rate during regeneration consequently increased hardness leakage and decreased treatment capacity. Single or two tank brine recycling systems are capable of reducing salt use and discharge without increasing hardness leakage, although treatment capacity is reduced.

  3. Aboveground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    With the 1988 promulgation of the comprehensive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for underground storage of petroleum and hazardous substances, many existing underground storage tank (UST) owners have been considering making the move to aboveground storage. While on the surface, this may appear to be the cure-all to avoiding the underground leakage dilemma, there are many other new and different issues to consider with aboveground storage. The greatest misconception is that by storing materials above ground, there is no risk of subsurface environmental problems. it should be noted that with the aboveground storage tank (AGST) systems, there is still considerable risk of environmental contamination, either by the failure of onground tank bottoms or the spillage of product onto the ground surface where it subsequently finds its way to the ground water. In addition, there are added safety concerns that must be addressed. So what are the other specific areas of concern besides environmental to be addressed when making the decision between underground and aboveground tanks? The primary issues that will be addressed in this paper are: Safety, Product Losses, Cost Comparison of USTs vs AGSTs, Space Availability/Accessibility, Precipitation Handling, Aesthetics and Security, Pending and Existing Regulations

  4. Technical safety requirments for the South Tank Farm Remediation Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1998-02-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks that were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLLW) System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Although the last of the tanks was taken out of service in 1986, they have been shown by structural analysis to continue to be structurally sound. An attempt was made in 1983 to empty the tanks; however, removal of all the sludge from the tanks was not possible with the equipment and schedule available. Since removal of the liquid waste in 1983, liquid continues to accumulate within the tanks. The in-leakage is believed to be the result of groundwater dripping into the tanks around penetrations in the domes. The tanks are currently being maintained under a Surveillance and Maintenance Program, which includes activities such as level monitoring, vegetation control, High Efficiency Particulate Air filter leakage requirement testing/replacement, sign erection/repair, pump-out of excessive liquids, and instrument calibration/maintenance

  5. History of waste tank 1, 1954 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.; Stevens, W.E.

    1978-10-01

    Tank 1 was placed in service as a receiver of high heat waste (HW) in October 1954. The supernate was removed from the tank in October 1961 and the tank began receiving low heat waste (LW) in January 1962. The LW supernate was decanted in October 1962 and prior to beginning a second HW filling in April 1963. The supernate from this HW filling was decanted twice in 1969. Sludge removal operations were conducted in May and August 1969 in order to use tank 1 for salt storage. The first evaporator concentrate receipt was in September 1969 and tank 1 has only been used as a salt storage tank since. Leakage from the tank into the annulus was discovered in February 1969. Deposits less than 1/4 inch deep of leaked waste were found on the pan floor. However, no leak sites have been found. Inspections of the tank interior and annulus were made by direct observation and by using a 40-ft optical periscope. Samples of sludge, supernate, tank vapors, and leaked material into the annulus were analyzed and tank temperature profiles were taken. Deflection measurements were made of the primary tank bottom knuckle plate while filling the tank with salt. Two vertical cooling coils have failed. Several equipment modifications and various equipment repairs were made. 18 figures, 2 tables

  6. Tank wall thinning -- Process and programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, S.D.; McBrine, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    In-service thinning of tank walls has occurred in the power industry and can pose a significant risk to plant safety and dependability. Appropriate respect for the energy stored in a high-pressure drain tank warrants a careful consideration of this possibility and appropriate action in order to assure the adequate safety margins against leakage or rupture. Although it has not proven to be a widespread problem, several cases of wall thinning and at least one recent tank rupture has highlighted this issue in recent years, particularly in nuclear power plants. However, the problem is not new or unique to the nuclear power industry. Severe wall thinning in deaerator tanks has been frequently identified at fossil-fueled power plants. There are many mechanisms which can contribute to tank wall thinning. Considerations for a specific tank are dictated by the system operating conditions, tank geometry, and construction material. Thinning mechanisms which have been identified include: Erosion/Corrosion Impingement Erosion Cavitation Erosion General Corrosion Galvanic Corrosion Microbial-induced Corrosion of course there are many other possible types of material degradation, many of which are characterized by pitting and cracking. This paper specifically addresses wall thinning induced by Erosion/Corrosion (also called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion) and Impingement Erosion of tanks in a power plant steam cycle. Many of the considerations presented are applicable to other types of vessels, such as moisture separators and heat exchangers

  7. History of waste tank 14, 1957 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, T.L.; Tharin, D.W.; Jones, D.W.; Lohr, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    Tank 14 was placed in service as a receiver of fresh high heat waste (HW) in September 1957. Annulus leakage was discovered in April 1959 and continued until annulus ventilation was increased in January 1965. Practically all of the approximately 40 leak sites that have been identified on the tank wall are located at or below the bottom horizontal weld. Tank supernate was removed from the tank in preparation for a sludge removal operation which was performed in December 1968. The tank was then filled to its present level with blended supernate from tanks 10 and 13. In December 1972, supernate was inadvertently siphoned into the annulus through a dewatering jet, filling the annulus pan to a level of 33 in. The waste was promptly returned to the tank. Inspections of the tank interior and annulus were performed by direct observation, with a 40-ft optical periscope, and with photography and closed circuit television. Radioactive waste was first found in the annulus during visual inspection in May 1959. Samples of sludge, supernate, tank vapors, and leaked material in the annulus were analyzed, and numerous tank temperature profiles were taken. Soil and tank wall temperatures were measured in a study of tank nil ductility transition temperature. Six cooling coils failed, five of which occurred within 7 months after sludge removal. Several modifications to equipment and various equipment repairs were made. 14 figures, 3 tables

  8. Forest Carbon Leakage Quantification Methods and Their Suitability for Assessing Leakage in REDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Henders

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses quantification methods for carbon leakage from forestry activities for their suitability in leakage accounting in a future Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD mechanism. To that end, we first conducted a literature review to identify specific pre-requisites for leakage assessment in REDD. We then analyzed a total of 34 quantification methods for leakage emissions from the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM, the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS, the Climate Action Reserve (CAR, the CarbonFix Standard (CFS, and from scientific literature sources. We screened these methods for the leakage aspects they address in terms of leakage type, tools used for quantification and the geographical scale covered. Results show that leakage methods can be grouped into nine main methodological approaches, six of which could fulfill the recommended REDD leakage requirements if approaches for primary and secondary leakage are combined. The majority of methods assessed, address either primary or secondary leakage; the former mostly on a local or regional and the latter on national scale. The VCS is found to be the only carbon accounting standard at present to fulfill all leakage quantification requisites in REDD. However, a lack of accounting methods was identified for international leakage, which was addressed by only two methods, both from scientific literature.

  9. Scatter and leakage contributions to the out-of-field absorbed dose distribution in water phantom around the medical LINAC radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordy, J.M.; Bessiere, I.; Ostrowsky, A.; Poumarede, B.; Sorel, S.; Vermesse, D.

    2013-01-01

    This work is carried out within the framework of EURADOS Working Group 9 (WG9) whose general objective is 'to assess non-target organ doses in radiotherapy and the related risks of second cancers, with the emphasis on dosimetry'. The objective of the present work is to provide reference values (i) to evaluate the current methods of deriving three-dimensional dose distributions in and around the target volume using passive dosimeters, (ii) to derive the leakage dose from the head of the medical linear accelerator (LINAC) and the doses due to scattered radiation from the collimator edges and the body (phantom) itself. Radiation qualities of 6, 12 and 20 MV are used with standard calibration conditions described in IAEA TRS 398 and nonstandard conditions at a reference facility at the Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (CEA LIST/LNE LNHB). An ionisation chamber is used to measure profile and depth dose in especially design water phantom built to enable investigation of doses up to 60 cm from the beam axis. A first set of experiments is carried out with the beam passing through the tank. From this first experiment, penumbra and out-of-field dose profiles including water and collimator scatter and leakage are found over three orders of magnitude. Two further sets of experiments using the same experimental arrangement with the beam outside the tank, to avoid water scatter, are designed to measure collimator scatter and leakage by closing the jaws of the collimator. It is shown that the ratios between water scatter, collimator scatter and leakage depend on the photon energy. Depending on the energy, typical leakage and collimator scatter represents 10-40% and 30-50% of the total out-of-field doses respectively. Water scatter decreases with energy while leakage increases with energy, and collimator scatter varies only slowly with energy. (authors)

  10. Radioactivity leakage accidents in the feed water heater and the general drainage of the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station of Japan Atomic Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Station, JAPC on the shell on extracted-steam side in B system of No. 4 feed water heater, drain water leakage occurred twice in January, 1981. Then, 61 pCi/g cobalt-60 and 10 pCi/g manganese-54 were detected in soil at the outlet of general drainage on April 17, 1981. The cause was found to be the overflow of radioactive liquid waste in the filter sludge storage tank on March 8, the same year. On-the-spot inspection was subsequently made by the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy on both leakage accidents. The results of inspections are described as follows: the course of leakage accident, and also the measures taken to JAPC in connection with the two leakage accidents. (J.P.N.)

  11. Investigation of cooling coil corrosion in storage tanks for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    The high frequency of cooling coil leaks observed in high-heat waste storage tanks soon after sludge removal operations is attributed to pitting, according to laboratory corrosion studies. Experiments show that the most likely series of events leading to coil leakage is (1) excessive dilution of basic nitrite in the supernate, (2) initiation of attack in crevices due to oxygen depletion cells, and (3) acceleration of the attack by sulfate dissolved from the sludge. When sludge was slurried with water, the interstitial liquid was diluted. Nitrite, the anodic inhibitor that prevented attack on coils and tanks in normal operation when its concentration was 0.5 to 3.0M, could accelerate attack when diluted to 10 -4 to 10 -3 M. Attack was presumably initiated at oxygen depletion cells. The presence of sulfate, leached from the sludge, produced a conductive solution that could produce high current densities at the corroding steel surface. The proposed series of events leading to coil leakage agrees with the observations previously made on one leaking coil removed from Tank 2F after sludge removal in 1967. Examination revealed pitting that had originated on the outside of the coils. This pitting was attributed to oxygen depletion cells in coil crevices. To prevent recurrence of pitting attack on cooling coils during future sludge removal operations, the sludge should be slurried (1) with waste diluted less than one hundredfold with water, or (2) with a 500-ppm nitrite-H 2 O solution at pH 12. Either method should preclude pitting damage to the coils

  12. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachel Landry

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related sub-tasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these sub-tasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these sub-tasks were derived from the original intent

  13. Quark contributions to baryon magnetic moments in full, quenched, and partially quenched QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinweber, Derek B.

    2004-01-01

    The chiral nonanalytic behavior of quark-flavor contributions to the magnetic moments of octet baryons is determined in full, quenched and partially quenched QCD, using an intuitive and efficient diagrammatic formulation of quenched and partially quenched chiral perturbation theory. The technique provides a separation of quark-sector magnetic-moment contributions into direct sea-quark loop, valence-quark, indirect sea-quark loop and quenched valence contributions, the latter being the conventional view of the quenched approximation. Both meson and baryon mass violations of SU(3)-flavor symmetry are accounted for. Following a comprehensive examination of the individual quark-sector contributions to octet baryon magnetic moments, numerous opportunities to observe and test the underlying structure of baryons and the nature of chiral nonanalytic behavior in QCD and its quenched variants are discussed. In particular, the valence u-quark contribution to the proton magnetic moment provides the optimal opportunity to directly view nonanalytic behavior associated with the meson cloud of full QCD and the quenched meson cloud of quenched QCD. The u quark in Σ + provides the best opportunity to display the artifacts of the quenched approximation

  14. Safety considerations on LPG storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paff, R.

    1993-01-01

    The safety of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) storage tanks, in refineries, petrochemicals plants, or distribution storage, is an important concern. Some serious accidents in recent years, have highlighted the need for a good safety policy for such equipment. Accidents in LPG storage are mainly due to losses of containment of the LPG. Formation of a cloud can lead to a ''Unconfined Vapor Cloud Explosion'' (UVCE). Liquid leakage can lead to pool fires in the retention area. In some circumstances the heat input of the tank, combined with the loss of mechanical resistance of the steel under high temperature, can lead to a BLEVE ''Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosion''. It is obvious that such equipment needs a proper design, maintenance and operating policy. The details to be considered are set out. (4 figures). (Author)

  15. Analytical support for the preparation of bundle test QUENCH-10 on air ingress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchley, J.; Haste, T.; Homann, C.; Hering, W.

    2005-07-01

    Bundle test QUENCH-10 is dedicated to study air ingress with subsequent water quench during a supposed accident in a spent fuel storage tank. It was proposed by AEKI, Budapest, Hungary and was performed on 21 July 2004 in the QUENCH facility at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Preparation of the test is based on common analytical work at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, Switzerland, mainly with the severe accident codes SCDAP/RELAP5 and MELCOR, to derive the protocol for the essential test phases, namely pre-oxidation, air ingress and quench phase. For issues that could not be tackled by this computational work, suggestions for the test conduct were made and applied during the test. Improvements of the experimental set-up and the test conduct were suggested and largely applied. In SCDAP/RELAP5, an error was found: for thick oxide scales, the output value of the oxide scale is sensibly underestimated. For the aims of the test preparation, its consequences could be taken into account. Together with the related computational and other analytical support by the engaged institutions the test is co-financed as test QUENCH-L1 by the European Community under the Euratom Fifth Framework Programme on Nuclear Fission Safety 1998 - 2002 (LACOMERA Project, contract No. FIR1-CT2002-40158). (orig.)

  16. Characterizing Water Quenching Systems with a Quench Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, B. Lynn; Li, Zhichao; Freborg, Andrew M.

    2014-12-01

    Quench probes have been used effectively to characterize the quality of quenchants for many years. For this purpose, a variety of commercial probes, as well as the necessary data acquisition system for determining the time-temperature data for a set of standardized test conditions, are available for purchase. The type of information obtained from such probes provides a good basis for comparing media, characterizing general cooling capabilities, and checking media condition over time. However, these data do not adequately characterize the actual production quenching process in terms of heat transfer behavior in many cases, especially when high temperature gradients are present. Faced with the need to characterize water quenching practices, including conventional and intensive practices, a quench probe was developed. This paper describes that probe, the data collection system, the data gathered for both intensive quenching and conventional water quenching, and the heat transfer coefficients determined for these processes. Process sensitivities are investigated and highlight some intricacies of quenching.

  17. Quench origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    1990-03-01

    Quenches can be divided into two categories; conductor-limited and energy-deposited quenches. A conductor-limited quench occurs when the current in the magnet exceeds the capacity of the superconductor; it is characterized by a strong correlation with temperature. An energy-deposited quench occurs when a disturbance releases enough energy to trigger a quench; the main disturbances during magnet energization are frictional movements of the conductor due to increasing Lorentz forces. The current level of the conductor-limited quenches defines the limit of the magnet performance, and can only be surpassed by lowering the operating temperature; the occurrence of a constant current at quench during the magnetic testing is called a plateau. Usually it takes a few energy-deposited quenches of increasing currents to reach the plateau; these first few steps are called the magnet's training. The goal in designing a magnet is to be able to energize it and to reliably operate it at the design current without training. This can be achieved by optimizing the magnet's operating margin, that is, by designing and building the magnet in such a way that the sizes of the mechanical disturbances needed to trigger a quench are much larger than the achievable mechanical tolerances. (N.K.) 112 refs

  18. Discrimination Voltage and Overdrive Bias Dependent Performance Evaluation of Passively Quenched SiC Single-Photon-Counting Avalanche Photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fei; Yang Sen; Zhou Dong; Lu Hai; Zhang Rong; Zheng You-Dou

    2015-01-01

    In many critical civil and emerging military applications, low-level UV detection, sometimes at single photon level, is highly desired. In this work, a mesa-type 4H-SiC UV avalanche photodiode (APD) is designed and fabricated, which exhibits low leakage current and high avalanche gain. When studied by using a passive quenching circuit, the APD exhibits self-quenching characteristics due to its high differential resistance in the avalanche region. The single photon detection efficiency and dark count rate of the APD are evaluated as functions of discrimination voltage and over-drive voltage. The optimized operation conditions of the single photon counting APD are discussed. (paper)

  19. Light Duty Utility Arm System applications for tank waste remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, B.A.

    1994-10-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System is being developed by the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Technology Development (OTD, EM-50) to obtain information about the conditions and contents of the DOE's underground storage tanks. Many of these tanks are deteriorating and contain hazardous, radioactive waste generated over the past 50 years as a result of defense materials production at a member of DOE sites. Stabilization and remediation of these waste tanks is a high priority for the DOE's environmental restoration program. The LDUA System will provide the capability to obtain vital data needed to develop safe and cost-effective tank remediation plans, to respond to ongoing questions about tank integrity and leakage, and to quickly investigate tank events that raise safety concerns. In-tank demonstrations of the LDUA System are planned for three DOE sites in 1996 and 1997: Hanford, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This paper provides a general description of the system design and discusses a number of planned applications of this technology to support the DOE's environmental restoration program, as well as potential applications in other areas. Supporting papers by other authors provide additional in-depth technical information on specific areas of the system design

  20. Quantum quenches with integrable pre-quench dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Delfino, Gesualdo

    2014-01-01

    We consider the unitary time evolution of a one-dimensional quantum system which is in a stationary state for negative times and then undergoes a sudden change (quench) of a parameter of its Hamiltonian at t=0. For systems possessing a continuum limit described by a massive quantum field theory we investigate in general perturbative quenches for the case in which the theory is integrable before the quench.

  1. Quantum quenches with integrable pre-quench dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, Gesualdo

    2014-01-01

    We consider the unitary time evolution of a one-dimensional quantum system which is in a stationary state for negative times and then undergoes a sudden change (quench) of a parameter of its Hamiltonian at t = 0. For systems possessing a continuum limit described by a massive quantum field theory we investigate in general perturbative quenches for the case in which the theory is integrable before the quench. (fast track communication)

  2. Inner volume leakage during integrated leakage rate testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    During an integrated leak rate test (ILRT), the containment structure is maintained at test pressure with most penetrations isolated. Since penetrations typically employ dual isolation, the possibility exists for the inner isolation to leak while the outer holds. In this case, the ILRT instrumentation system would indicate containment out-leakage when, in fact, only the inner volume between closures is being pressurized. The problem is compounded because this false leakage is not readily observable outside of containment by standard leak inspection techniques. The inner volume leakage eventually subsides after the affected volumes reach test pressure. Depending on the magnitude of leakage and the size of the volumes, equalization could occur prior to the end of the pretest stabilization period, or significant false leakages may persist throughout the entire test. Two simple analyses were performed to quantify the effects of inside volume leakages. First, a lower bound for the equalization time was found. A second analysis was performed to find an approximate upper bound for the stabilization time. The results of both analyses are shown

  3. Reactivity effect of a heavy water tank as reflector in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Fuga, Rinaldo

    2013-01-01

    This experiment comprises a set of experiments performed in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor and described in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, specifically the experiment aim to evaluate the reactivity due to the heavy water tank placed at reflector region of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. An aluminum tank was designed to be filled with heavy water and positioned at the west face of the IPEN/MB-01, additionally the experiment was also designed to allow variable heavy water height inside of this tank providing different neutron leakage rate in the west face of the IPEN/MB-01, consequently providing a series of interesting combinations. The measured quantities in the experiment are reactivities and critical control bank positions for several combinations of the control banks and an excess of reactivity of the heavy water tank. The experiment will be simulated using a Monte Carlo code MCNP in order to compare the different critical control bank position. (author)

  4. On Probability Leakage

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, William M.

    2012-01-01

    The probability leakage of model M with respect to evidence E is defined. Probability leakage is a kind of model error. It occurs when M implies that events $y$, which are impossible given E, have positive probability. Leakage does not imply model falsification. Models with probability leakage cannot be calibrated empirically. Regression models, which are ubiquitous in statistical practice, often evince probability leakage.

  5. Technical safety requirements for the South Tank Farm remediation project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platfoot, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    The South Tank Farm (STF) is a series of six, 170,000-gal underground, domed storage tanks that were placed into service in 1943. The tanks were constructed of a concrete mixture known as gunite. They were used as a portion of the Liquid LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW) System for the collection, neutralization, storage, and transfer of the aqueous portion of the radioactive and/or hazardous chemical wastes produced as part of normal facility operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Although the last of the tanks was taken out of service in 1986, they have been shown by structural analysis to continue to be structurally sound. An attempt was made in 1983 to empty the tanks; however, removal of all the sludge from the tanks was not possible with the equipment and schedule available. Since removal of the liquid waste in 1983, liquid continues to accumulate within the tanks. The in-leakage is believed to be the result of groundwater dripping into the tanks around penetrations in the domes. The tanks are currently being maintained under a Surveillance and Maintenance Program, which includes activities such as level monitoring, vegetation control, High Efficiency Particulate Air filter leakage requirement testing/replacement, sign erection/repair, pump-out of excess liquids, and instrument calibration/maintenance. A technique known as confined sluicing, which uses a high-pressure, low-volume water jet integrated with a jet pump, will be used to remove the sludge. The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) are those operational requirements that specify the operating limits and surveillance requirements, the basis thereof, safety boundaries, and the management of administrative controls necessary to ensure the safe operation of the STF remediation project. Effective implementation of TSRs will limit to acceptable levels the risks to the public and workers from uncontrolled releases of radioactive or other hazardous material

  6. Simulation of quenches in SSC magnets with passive quench protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koepke, K.

    1985-06-01

    The relative ease of protecting an SSC magnet following a quench and the implications of quench protection on magnet reliability and operation are necessary inputs in a rational magnet selection process. As it appears likely that the magnet selection will be made prior to full scale prototype testing, an alternative means is required to ascertain the surviveability of contending magnet types. This paper attempts to provide a basis for magnet selection by calculating the peak expected quench temperatures in the 3 T Design C magnet and the 6 T Design D magnet as a function of magnet length. A passive, ''cold diode'' protection system has been assumed. The relative merits of passive versus active protection systems have been discussed in a previous report. It is therefore assumed that - given the experience gained from the Tevatron system - that an active quench protection system can be employed to protect the magnets in the eventuality of unreliable cold diode function

  7. QUENCH: A software package for the determination of quenching curves in Liquid Scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassette, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    In Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC), the scintillating source is part of the measurement system and its detection efficiency varies with the scintillator used, the vial and the volume and the chemistry of the sample. The detection efficiency is generally determined using a quenching curve, describing, for a specific radionuclide, the relationship between a quenching index given by the counter and the detection efficiency. A quenched set of LS standard sources are prepared by adding a quenching agent and the quenching index and detection efficiency are determined for each source. Then a simple formula is fitted to the experimental points to define the quenching curve function. The paper describes a software package specifically devoted to the determination of quenching curves with uncertainties. The experimental measurements are described by their quenching index and detection efficiency with uncertainties on both quantities. Random Gaussian fluctuations of these experimental measurements are sampled and a polynomial or logarithmic function is fitted on each fluctuation by χ"2 minimization. This Monte Carlo procedure is repeated many times and eventually the arithmetic mean and the experimental standard deviation of each parameter are calculated, together with the covariances between these parameters. Using these parameters, the detection efficiency, corresponding to an arbitrary quenching index within the measured range, can be calculated. The associated uncertainty is calculated with the law of propagation of variances, including the covariance terms. - Highlights: • The program “QUENCH” is devoted to the interpolation of quenching curves in LSC. • Functions are fitted to experimental data with uncertainties in both quenching and efficiency. • The parameters of the fitting function and the associated covariance matrix are evaluated. • The detection efficiency and uncertainty corresponding to a given quenching index is calculated.

  8. Quench detection and behaviour in case of quench in the ITER magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coatanea-Gouachet, M.

    2012-02-01

    The quench of one of the ITER magnet system is an irreversible transition from superconducting to normal resistive state, of a conductor. This normal zone propagates along the cable in conduit conductor dissipating a large power. The detection has to be fast enough to dump out the magnetic energy and avoid irreversible damage of the systems. The primary quench detection in ITER is based on voltage detection, which is the most rapid detection. The very magnetically disturbed environment during the plasma scenario makes the voltage detection particularly difficult, inducing large inductive components in the coils and voltage compensations have to be designed to discriminate the resistive voltage associated with the quench. A conceptual design of the quench detection based on voltage measurements is proposed for the three majors magnet systems of ITER. For this, a clear methodology was developed. It includes the classical hot spot criterion, the quench propagation study using the commercial code Gandalf and the careful estimation of the inductive disturbances by developing the TrapsAV code. Specific solutions have been proposed for the compensation in the three ITER magnet systems and for the quench detection parameters, which are the voltage threshold (in the range of 0.1 V - 0.55 V) and the holding time (in the range of 1-1.4 s). The selected values, in particular the holding time, are sufficiently high to ensure the reliability of the system and avoid fast safety discharges not induced by a quench, which is a classical problem. (author)

  9. Porous debris behavior modeling of QUENCH-02, QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-09 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselev, A.E.; Kobelev, G.V.; Strizhov, V.F.; Vasiliev, A.D.

    2006-01-01

    The heat-up, melting, relocation, hydrogen generation phenomena, relevant for high-temperature stages both in a reactor case and small-scale integral tests like QUENCH, are governed in particular by heat and mass transfer in porous debris and molten pools which are formed in the core region. Porous debris formation and behavior in QUENCH experiments (QUENCH-02, QUENCH-03, QUENCH-09) plays a considerable role and its adequate modeling is important for thermal analysis. In particular, the analysis of QUENCH experiments shows that the major hydrogen release takes place in debris and melt regions formed in the upper part of the fuel assembly. The porous debris model was implemented in the Russian best estimate numerical code RATEG/SVECHA/HEFEST developed for modelling thermal hydraulics and severe accident phenomena in a reactor. The original approach for debris evolution is developed in the model from classical principles using a set of parameters including debris porosity; average particle diameter; temperatures and mass fractions of solid, liquid and gas phases; specific interface areas between different phases; effective thermal conductivity of each phase, including radiative heat conductivity; mass and energy fluxes through the interfaces. The debris model is based on the system of continuity, momentum and energy conservation equations, which consider the dynamics of volume-averaged velocities and temperatures of fluid, solid and gaseous phases of porous debris. The model is used for calculation of QUENCH experiments. The results obtained by the model are compared to experimental data concerning different aspects of thermal behavior: thermal hydraulics of porous debris, radiative heat transfer in a porous medium, the generalized melting and refreezing behavior of materials, hydrogen production. (author)

  10. An overview of the DOE high-level waste storage tank structural integrity assessment guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Bush, S.; Kassir, M.; Mather, B.; Shewmon, P.; Streicher, M.; Thompson, B.; van Rooyen, D.; Weeks, J.

    1995-01-01

    The basic elements of a structural integrity program for high-level waste storage tanks include identifying significant aging degradation mechanisms, developing programs to monitor and control these degradation processes, and developing management options and procedures to minimize impact on the environment should tank leakage develop. A Waste Tank Structural Integrity Panel (TSIP) was established by Brookhaven National Laboratory at the request of the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management to review these elements and prepare a set of guidelines that could be used by DOE and its contractors to manage the structural integrity of these tanks. These guidelines emphasize the identification of significant degradation mechanisms for both the steel and concrete components of the tanks, the recommended monitoring and inspection programs, and the indicated management options

  11. Land-use Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  12. Quench origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper, I shall discuss the quench origins. I shall first establish a method of classification and introduce the notions of conductor-limited and energy-deposited quenches. Next the paper will be devoted to the study of conductor-limited quenches, and I shall introduce the notions of plateau and of fraction of short sample. Also the paper will be devoted to the study of energy-deposited quenches, and I shall introduce the notions of training and of minimum energy deposit; I shall then review the possible causes of energy release. Lastly, I shall introduce the notion of operating margin, and I shall indicate how to optimize the operating margin in order to limit the risk of premature quenching. 112 refs., 14 figs

  13. Passive quench arrest by a chimney induced deluge at every quench front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydoriak, S.G.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes a magnet in which a growing quench stops itself spontaneously within a fraction of one winding turn because vapor in quench-heated channels generates a progressively increasing downflow of liquid in advance of each of the quench fronts. The downflow eventually becomes a deluge as the quench grows. The design of the multiple arrested quench magnet is discussed. It is shown how to construct a magnet so that if an arrested quench arises when it is at its highest operating current, peak nucleate boiling will exist in all quenching channels

  14. Underground or aboveground storage tanks - A critical decision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    With the 1988 promulgation of the comprehensive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for underground storage of petroleum and hazardous substances, many existing underground storage tank (UST) owners have been considering making the move to aboveground storage. While on the surface, this may appear to be the cure-all to avoiding the underground leakage dilemma, there are many other new and different issues to consider with aboveground storage. The greatest misconception is that by storing materials above ground, there is no risk of subsurface environmental problems. It should be noted that with the aboveground storage tank (AGST) systems, there is still considerable risk of environmental contamination, either by the failure of onground tank bottoms or the spillage of product onto the ground surface where it subsequently finds its way to the ground water. In addition, there are added safety concerns that must be addressed. The greatest interest in AGSTs comes from managers with small volumes of used oil, fresh oil, solvents, chemicals, or heating oil. Dealing with small capacity tanks is not so different than large bulk storage - and, in fact, it lends itself to more options, such as portable storage, tank within tank configurations and inside installations. So what are the other specific areas of concern besides environmental to be addressed when making the decision between underground and aboveground tanks? The primary issues that will be addressed in this presentation are: (1) safety; (2) product losses; (3) cost comparison of USTs vs AGSTs; (4) space availability/accessibility; (5) precipitation handling; (6) aesthetics and security; (7) pending and existing regulations

  15. Damage detection in hazardous waste storage tank bottoms using ultrasonic guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Adam C.; Fisher, Jay L.; Bartlett, Jonathan D.; Earnest, Douglas R.

    2018-04-01

    Detecting damage in storage tanks is performed commercially using a variety of techniques. The most commonly used inspection technologies are magnetic flux leakage (MFL), conventional ultrasonic testing (UT), and leak testing. MFL and UT typically involve manual or robotic scanning of a sensor along the metal surfaces to detect cracks or corrosion wall loss. For inspection of the tank bottom, however, the storage tank is commonly emptied to allow interior access for the inspection system. While there are costs associated with emptying a storage tank for inspection that can be justified in some scenarios, there are situations where emptying the tank is impractical. Robotic, submersible systems have been developed for inspecting these tanks, but there are some storage tanks whose contents are so hazardous that even the use of these systems is untenable. Thus, there is a need to develop an inspection strategy that does not require emptying the tank or insertion of the sensor system into the tank. This paper presents a guided wave system for inspecting the bottom of double-shelled storage tanks (DSTs), with the sensor located on the exterior side-wall of the vessel. The sensor used is an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) that generates and receives shear-horizontal guided plate waves using magnetostriction principles. The system operates by scanning the sensor around the circumference of the storage tank and sending guided waves into the tank bottom at regular intervals. The data from multiple locations are combined using the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) to create a color-mapped image of the vessel thickness changes. The target application of the system described is inspection of DSTs located at the Hanford site, which are million-gallon vessels used to store nuclear waste. Other vessels whose exterior walls are accessible would also be candidates for inspection using the described approach. Experimental results are shown from tests on multiple

  16. Cryogenic storage tank with built-in pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwick, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A cryogenic storage tank with a built-in pump for pumping cryogen directly from the primary storage container consistent with low boil-off losses of cryogen has an outer vessel, an inner vessel and an evacuated insulation space therebetween. A pump mounting tube assembly extends into the interior of the inner vessel and includes an inner pump mounting tube and an outer pump mounting tube joined at their lower rims to define an insulating jacket between the two tubes. The inner pump mounting tube is affixed at its upper end to the outer vessel while the outer pump mounting tube is affixed at its upper end to the inner vessel. The inner pump mounting tube defines a relatively long heat path into the cryogenic container and is itself insulated from the liquid cryogen by a pocket of trapped gas formed within the inner pump mounting tube by heated cryogen. A pump may be introduced through the inner pump mounting tube and is also insulated against contact with liquid cryogen by the trapped gas such that only the lowermost end of the pump is immersed in cryogen thereby minimizing heat leakage into the tank

  17. Quench limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapinski, M.

    2012-01-01

    With thirteen beam induced quenches and numerous Machine Development tests, the current knowledge of LHC magnets quench limits still contains a lot of unknowns. Various approaches to determine the quench limits are reviewed and results of the tests are presented. Attempt to reconstruct a coherent picture emerging from these results is taken. The available methods of computation of the quench levels are presented together with dedicated particle shower simulations which are necessary to understand the tests. The future experiments, needed to reach better understanding of quench limits as well as limits for the machine operation are investigated. The possible strategies to set BLM (Beam Loss Monitor) thresholds are discussed. (author)

  18. Modeling valve leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, S.R.; Rohrscheib, R.

    1994-01-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code requires individual valve leakage testing for Category A valves. Although the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) has recognized that it is more appropriate to test containment isolation valves in groups, as allowed by 10 CFR 50, Appendix J, a utility seeking relief from these Code requirements must provide technical justification for the relief and establish a conservative alternate acceptance criteria. In order to provide technical justification for group testing of containment isolation valves, Illinois Power developed a calculation (model) for determining the size of a leakage pathway in a valve disc or seat for a given leakage rate. The model was verified experimentally by machining leakage pathways of known size and then measuring the leakage and comparing this value to the calculated value. For the range of values typical of leakage rate testing, the correlation between the experimental values and calculated values was quote good. Based upon these results, Illinois Power established a conservative acceptance criteria for all valves in the inservice testing (IST) program and was granted relief by the USNRC from the individual leakage testing requirements of the ASME Code. This paper presents the results of Illinois Power's work in the area of valve leakage rate testing

  19. Quenches in large superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Green, M.A.; Lecomte, P.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Vuillemin, V.

    1977-08-01

    The development of large high current density superconducting magnets requires an understanding of the quench process by which the magnet goes normal. A theory which describes the quench process in large superconducting magnets is presented and compared with experimental measurements. The use of a quench theory to improve the design of large high current density superconducting magnets is discussed

  20. Predicting Envelope Leakage in Attached Dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faakye, O. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Arena, L. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Griffiths, D. [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The most common method for measuring air leakage is to use a single blower door to pressurize and/or depressurize the test unit. In detached housing, the test unit is the entire home and the single blower door measures air leakage to the outside. In attached housing, this 'single unit', 'total', or 'solo' test method measures both the air leakage between adjacent units through common surfaces as well air leakage to the outside. Measuring and minimizing this total leakage is recommended to avoid indoor air quality issues between units, reduce energy losses to the outside, reduce pressure differentials between units, and control stack effect. However, two significant limitations of the total leakage measurement in attached housing are: for retrofit work, if total leakage is assumed to be all to the outside, the energy benefits of air sealing can be significantly over predicted; for new construction, the total leakage values may result in failing to meet an energy-based house tightness program criterion. The scope of this research is to investigate an approach for developing a viable simplified algorithm that can be used by contractors to assess energy efficiency program qualification and/or compliance based upon solo test results.

  1. QUENCH: A software package for the determination of quenching curves in Liquid Scintillation counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassette, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    In Liquid Scintillation Counting (LSC), the scintillating source is part of the measurement system and its detection efficiency varies with the scintillator used, the vial and the volume and the chemistry of the sample. The detection efficiency is generally determined using a quenching curve, describing, for a specific radionuclide, the relationship between a quenching index given by the counter and the detection efficiency. A quenched set of LS standard sources are prepared by adding a quenching agent and the quenching index and detection efficiency are determined for each source. Then a simple formula is fitted to the experimental points to define the quenching curve function. The paper describes a software package specifically devoted to the determination of quenching curves with uncertainties. The experimental measurements are described by their quenching index and detection efficiency with uncertainties on both quantities. Random Gaussian fluctuations of these experimental measurements are sampled and a polynomial or logarithmic function is fitted on each fluctuation by χ(2) minimization. This Monte Carlo procedure is repeated many times and eventually the arithmetic mean and the experimental standard deviation of each parameter are calculated, together with the covariances between these parameters. Using these parameters, the detection efficiency, corresponding to an arbitrary quenching index within the measured range, can be calculated. The associated uncertainty is calculated with the law of propagation of variances, including the covariance terms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Role of Quench-back in the Passive Quench Protection of Long Solenoids with Coil Sub-division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Guo, XingLong; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes how a passive quench protection system can be applied to long superconducting solenoid magnets. When a solenoid coil is long compared to its thickness, the magnet quench process will be dominated by the time needed for uench propagation along the magnet length. Quench-back will permit a long magnet to quench more rapidly in a passive way. Quenchback from a conductive (low resistivity) mandrel is essential for spreading the quench along the length of a magnet. The andrel must be inductively coupled to the magnet circuit that is being quenched. Current induced in the mandrel by di/dt in the magnet produces heat in the mandrel, which in turn causes the superconducting coil wound on the mandrel to quench. Sub-divisions often employed to reduce the voltages to ground within the coil. This paper explores when it is possible for quench-back to be employed for passive quench protection. The role of sub-division of the coil is discussed for long magnets.

  3. Quench propagation and quench detection in the TF system of JT-60SA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, Benoit; Duchateau, Jean-Luc; Meuris, Chantal; Ciazynski, Daniel; Nicollet, Sylvie; Zani, Louis; Polli, Gian-Mario

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The JT-60SA primary quench detection system will be based on voltage measurements. • The early quench propagation was studied in the JT-60SA TF conductor. • The impact of the conductor jacket on the hot spot criterion was quantified. • The detection parameters were investigated for different quench initiations. -- Abstract: In the framework of the JT-60SA project, France and Italy will provide to JAEA 18 Toroidal Field (TF) coils including NbTi cable-in-conduit conductors. During the tokamak operation, these coils could experience a quench, an incidental event corresponding to the irreversible transition from superconducting state to normal resistive state. Starting from a localized disturbance, the normal zone propagates along the conductor and dissipates a large energy due to Joule heating, which can cause irreversible damages. The detection has to be fast enough (a few seconds) to trigger the current discharge, so as to dump the stored magnetic energy into an external resistor. The JT-60SA primary quench detection system will be based on voltage measurements, which are the most rapid technology. The features of the detection system must be adjusted so as to detect the most probable quenches, while avoiding inopportune fast safety discharges. This requires a reliable simulation of the early quench propagation, performed in this study with the Gandalf code. The conductor temperature reached during the current discharge must be kept under a maximal value, according to the hot spot criterion. In the present study, a hot spot criterion temperature of 150 K was taken into account and the role of each conductor component (strands, helium and conduit) was analyzed. The detection parameters were then investigated for different hypotheses regarding the quench initiation

  4. Temperature Profiles During Quenches in LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets Protected by Quench Heaters

    OpenAIRE

    Maroussov, V; Sanfilippo, S; Siemko, A

    1999-01-01

    The efficiency of the magnet protection by quench heaters was studied using a novel method which derives the temperature profile in a superconducting magnet during a quench from measured voltage signals. In several Large Hadron Collider single aperture dipole models, temperature profiles and temperature gradients in the magnet coil have been evaluated in the case of protection by different sets of quench heaters and different powering and protection parameters. The influence of the insulation...

  5. Remediation and recycling of oil-contaminated soil beneath a large above-ground storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, G.

    1994-01-01

    While retrofitting a large 30-year-old, above-ground petroleum storage tank, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) discovered that soil beneath the fixed-roof, single-bottom tank was contaminated with 40,000 gallons of number-sign 6 fuel oil. The steel tank was left in place during the excavation and remediation of the contaminated soil to retain the operating permit. The resulting 2,000 tons of contaminated aggregate was recycled to make asphalt concrete for paving the tank basin and the remaining 5,600 tons of oily soil was thermally treated on site for use as engineered fill at another location. This successful operation provided an economical cleanup solution for a common leakage problem of single-lined tanks and eliminated the long-term liability of Class 1 landfill disposal. As a pro-active environmental effort, this paper shares SCE's site assessment procedure, reveals the engineering method developed to stabilize the tank, discusses the soil treatment technologies used, describes the problems encountered and lessons learned during the cleanup, discloses the costs of the operation, and offers guidelines and recommendations for similar tank remediation. This paper does not describe the work or costs for removing or replacing the tank bottom

  6. Quenches after LS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verweij, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I will give an overview of the different types of quenches that occur in the LHC, followed by an estimate of the number of quenches that we can expect after LS1. Beam-induced quenches and false triggering of the QPS will be the main cause of those quenches that cause a beam dump. Possibly in total up to 10-20 per year. After consolidation of the 13 kA joints, the approach for the BLM settings can be less conservative than in 2010-2012 in order to maximize beam time. This will cause some quenches but, anyhow, a beam.induced quench is not more risky than a quench provoked by false triggering. It is not easy to predict the number of BLM triggered beam dumps, needed to avoid magnet quenches, because it is not sure how to scale beam losses and UFO's from 3.5 TeV to 6.5 TeV, and it is not sure if the thresholds at 3.5 TeV are correct. Quench events will be much more massive (ex: RB quench at 6 kA → 2 MJ, RB quench at 11 kA → 6-20 MJ), and as a result cryo recuperation much longer. There will also be more ramp induced quenches after a FPA in other circuits due to higher ramp rates and smaller temperature margins (mutual coupling)

  7. Quench observation using quench antennas on RHIC IR quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ganetis, G.; Muratore, J.; Wanderer, P.

    1995-01-01

    Quench observation using quench antennas is now being performed routinely on RHIC dipole and quadrupole magnets. Recently, a quench antenna was used on a RHIC IR magnet which is heavily instrumented with voltage taps. It was confirmed that the signals detected in the antenna coils do not contradict the voltage tap signals. The antenna also detects a sign of mechanical disturbance which could be related to a training quench. This paper summarizes signals detected in the antenna and discusses possible causes of these signals

  8. Quench observation using quench antennas on RHIC IR quadrupole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogitsu, T.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ganetis, G.; Muratore, J.; Wanderer, P.

    1996-01-01

    Quench observation using quench antennas is now being performed routinely on RHIC dipole and quadrupole magnets. Recently, a quench antenna was used on a RHIC IR magnet which is heavily instrumented with voltage taps. It was confirmed that the signals detected in the antenna coils do not contradict the voltage tap signals. The antenna also detects a sign of mechanical disturbance which could be related to a training quench. This paper summarizes signals detected in the antenna and discusses possible causes of these signals

  9. Concentration quenching in Nd-doped glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokowski, S.E.; Cook, L.; Mueller, H.; Weber, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Fluorescence from trivalent Nd in solids is unfortunately quenched by interactions between Nd ions. Thus, laser materials with high Nd concentrations have reduced efficiencies because of this self-quenching, also known as concentration quenching. Nd self-quenching in different crystals and glasses varies considerably. We are therefore investigating this effect in a large number of materials in an effort to: (1) find those materials with long Nd fluorescent lifetimes at high Nd concentrations; and (2) elucidate the basic mechanisms of quenching and how the material structure controls its magnitude. We have concentrated on Nd-doped glasses because they provide a rich variety of structures, albeit complicated by Nd site inhomogeneities, and are easily and quickly made

  10. Risk based inspection for atmospheric storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agus; Haryadi, Gunawan Dwi; Ismail, Rifky; Kim, Seon Jin

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is an attack that occurs on a metallic material as a result of environment's reaction.Thus, it causes atmospheric storage tank's leakage, material loss, environmental pollution, equipment failure and affects the age of process equipment then finally financial damage. Corrosion risk measurement becomesa vital part of Asset Management at the plant for operating any aging asset.This paper provides six case studies dealing with high speed diesel atmospheric storage tank parts at a power plant. A summary of the basic principles and procedures of corrosion risk analysis and RBI applicable to the Process Industries were discussed prior to the study. Semi quantitative method based onAPI 58I Base-Resource Document was employed. The risk associated with corrosion on the equipment in terms of its likelihood and its consequences were discussed. The corrosion risk analysis outcome used to formulate Risk Based Inspection (RBI) method that should be a part of the atmospheric storage tank operation at the plant. RBI gives more concern to inspection resources which are mostly on `High Risk' and `Medium Risk' criteria and less on `Low Risk' shell. Risk categories of the evaluated equipment were illustrated through case study analysis outcome.

  11. Spectral analysis of colour-quenched and chemically quenched C-14 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P. E.; Grau, A.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper pairs of pulse height distribution curves, of C-14 samples, colour-quenched and chemically quenched was obtained. The possibility to choose a counting window in order to obtain the counting efficiency curves, for both type of quenching was studied. (Author) 7 refs

  12. Rapid Quench in an Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Matson, Douglas M.

    2016-01-01

    The Electrostatic Levitation (ESL) Laboratory at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The ESL laboratory's main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy, as a quench medium. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to eight quench vessels can be loaded into a wheel inside the chamber that is indexed with control software. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and a silicon-cobalt alloy. This new rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  13. Spectral analysis of colour-quenched and chemically quenched C 14 samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Malonda, A.; Scott Guillearrd, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Pairs of pulse height distribution curves, of C-14 samples, colour quenched and chemically quenched were obtained. The possibility to choose a counting window in order to obtain the counting efficiency curves, for both type of quenching was studied. (author). 7 figs., 7 refs

  14. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper......, theoretical comparisons between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems are presented....

  15. Quench/reflood modeling in MELCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauntt, R.O.

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe the reactor accident simulation model MELCOR. It comprises hydrodynamic investigations on reactor core quenching, hydrogen generation in the reactor core vessel, quench front advances. Preliminary comparisons to data are reasonable but need further validation. (uke)

  16. 2003 Initial Assessments of Closure for the C Tank Farm Field Investigation Report (FIR):Numerical Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; White, Mark D.

    2003-01-01

    In support of CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.'s (CHG) preparation of a Field Investigative Report (FIR) for the closure of the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank (SST) Waste Management Area (WMA) tank farms, a set of numerical simulations of flow and solute transport was executed to predict the performance of surface barriers for reducing long-term risks from potential groundwater contamination at the C Farm WMA. This report documents the simulation of 14 cases (and two verification cases) involving two-dimensional cross sections through the C Farm WMA tanks C-103 - C-112. Utilizing a unit release scenario at Tank C-112, four different types of leaks were simulated. These simulations assessed the impact of leakage during retrieval, past leaks, and tank residual wastes and tank ancillary equipment following closure activities. . Two transported solutes were considered: uranium-238 (U-238) and technetium-99 (Tc-99). To evaluate the impact of sorption to the subsurface materials, six different retardation coefficients were simulated for U-238. Overall, simulations results for the C Farm WMA showed that only a small fraction of the U-238 with retardation factors greater than 0.6 migrated from the vadose zone in all of the cases. For the conservative solute, Tc-99, results showed that the simulations investigating leakages during retrieval demonstrated the highest WMA peak concentrations and the earliest arrival times due to the high infiltration rate before the use of surface barriers and the addition of water into the system. Simulations investigating past leaks showed similar peaks and arrival times as the retrieval leak cases. Several different release rates were used to investigate contaminant transport from residual tank wastes. All showed similar peak concentrations and arrival times, except for the lowest initial release rate, which was 1,000 times slower than the highest release rate. Past leaks were also investigated with different release rate models, including

  17. Classical vs. evolved quenching parameters and procedures in scintillation measurements: The importance of ionization quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagan, H.; Tarancon, A.; Rauret, G.; Garcia, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    The quenching parameters used to model detection efficiency variations in scintillation measurements have not evolved since the decade of 1970s. Meanwhile, computer capabilities have increased enormously and ionization quenching has appeared in practical measurements using plastic scintillation. This study compares the results obtained in activity quantification by plastic scintillation of 14 C samples that contain colour and ionization quenchers, using classical (SIS, SCR-limited, SCR-non-limited, SIS(ext), SQP(E)) and evolved (MWA-SCR and WDW) parameters and following three calibration approaches: single step, which does not take into account the quenching mechanism; two steps, which takes into account the quenching phenomena; and multivariate calibration. Two-step calibration (ionization followed by colour) yielded the lowest relative errors, which means that each quenching phenomenon must be specifically modelled. In addition, the sample activity was quantified more accurately when the evolved parameters were used. Multivariate calibration-PLS also yielded better results than those obtained using classical parameters, which confirms that the quenching phenomena must be taken into account. The detection limits for each calibration method and each parameter were close to those obtained theoretically using the Currie approach

  18. Model for Electromagnetic Information Leakage

    OpenAIRE

    Mao Jian; Li Yongmei; Zhang Jiemin; Liu Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic leakage will happen in working information equipments; it could lead to information leakage. In order to discover the nature of information in electromagnetic leakage, this paper combined electromagnetic theory with information theory as an innovative research method. It outlines a systematic model of electromagnetic information leakage, which theoretically describes the process of information leakage, intercept and reproduction based on electromagnetic radiation, and ana...

  19. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each person...

  20. Feasible voltage-tap based quench detection in a Ag/Bi-2212 coil enabled by fast 3D normal zone propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Tengming; Ye, Liyang; Li, Pei

    2016-01-01

    For this study, small insert solenoids have been built using a commercial Ag/Bi-2212 multifilamentary round wire, insulated with a new thin TiO 2 – polymer coating insulation (thickness in ~20 μm versus ~100 μm for a commonly used mullite braided sleeve insulation), and characterized in background magnetic field up to 14 T at 4.2 K to explore the high-field performance and quench detection of Bi-2212 magnets. The coil has no visible leakage and no electrical shorts after reaction, and it carries 280 A/mm -2 in a background field 14 T and generates an additional 1.7 T. A notable result is that, despite normal zones propagate slowly along the conductor, the hot spot temperature upon detection increases only from 40 K to 60 K when the resistive quench detection voltage threshold increases from 0.1 V to 1 V for all operating current density investigated, showing that quench detection using voltage taps is feasible for this coil. This is in a strong contrast to a coil we previously built to the same specifications but from wires insulated with the mullite braided sleeve insulation, for which the hot spot temperature upon detection increases from ~80 K to ~140 K while increasing from the detection voltage threshold from 0.1 V to 1 V, and thus for which quench detection using voltage taps presents significant risks, consistent with the common belief that the effectiveness of quench detection using voltage taps for superconducting magnets built using high temperature superconductors is seriously compromised by their slow normal zone propagation. This striking difference is ascribed to the fast transverse quench propagation enabled by thin insulation and improved thermal coupling between conductor turns. Finally, this work demonstrates that quench detection for high-temperature superconducting magnets highly depends on the design and construction of the coils such as insulation materials used and this dependence should be factored into the overall magnet design

  1. Project W-340 tank 241-C-106 manipulator system closeout summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, L.B.

    1995-02-01

    This document summarizes the work that was ongoing when Project W-340 was put on hold. Project W-340: Tank 241-C-106 Manipulator Retrieval System, was a candidate FY98 Major System Acquisition. The project was to develop, procure and deploy a Long Reach Manipulator (LRM) waste retrieval system to provide an alternate method to completing the in-tank demonstration of Single Shell Tank waste retrieval technology. The need for enhanced capabilities derives from (1) the inability of the baseline technology to retrieve certain hard waste forms; (2) uncertainty in the quantity of leakage which will be allowed. Numerous studies over the years have identified an arm architecture as a promising retrieval technology to overcome these concerns. The W340 project was intended to further develop and demonstrate this alternative, as part of selecting the best approach for all tanks. Prior to completing the effort, it was determined that an LRM system was too architecture specific and was envisioned to be too expensive for a one time demonstration of retrieval technology. At the time the work was stopped, an effort was underway to broaden the project scope to allow alternatives to an arm-based system

  2. FNR demonstration experiments Part I: Beam port leakage currents and spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehe, D.K.; King, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the NR-LEU experimental program has been to measure the changes in numerous reactor characteristics when the conventional HEU core is replaced by a complete LEU fueled core or by a single LEU element in the normal HEU core. We have observed comparisons in a) thermal flux intensity, spatial distribution and cadmium ratios, both in the core and in the light and heavy water reflectors, b) fast flux intensity and spectral shape at a special element within the core, c) the thermal leakage flux intensity at the exit positions of several beam ports and its spectral shape at one beam port, d) shim and control rod worths, e) temperature coefficient of reactivity, and f) xenon poison worth. The NR is a 2 MW light water pool reactor, reflected on three faces by light water and on one face by D 2 O, composed of MTR plate fuel elements. Figure shows a plan view of the core grid, D 2 O reflector tank, and beam ports. The conventional HEU fuel element contains eighteen MTR Al plates 30 in x 24 in x 0.06 in. The center 0.02 in of each plate is 93% U-235 enriched UAl x . A normal equilibrium HEU core loading is outlined. Each new HEU element contains ∼ 140 grams of U-235. The LEU low enrichment fuel retains the same plate and element geometry but the fuel is contained in a central 0.03 in thick UA l x matrix with 19.5% U-235 enrichment. Each new LEU element contains ov 167.3 grams U-235. In-core neutron fluxes were routinely mapped by a rhodium SPND and by many wire and foil activations. The same data, but in more restricted positions, were obtained through the light water reflector (south) and D 2 O reflector tank (north). Beam port leakage currents were measured during all power cycles, by transmission fission chambers at the exits of ports GI, and J, by a B3 detector at A-port, and by a prompt detector at the F-port exit. Thermal neutron spectra for both HEU and LEU cores were measured at I port using a single crystal silicon diffractometer. These measurements

  3. Engineering study of 50 miscellaneous inactive underground radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Site, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    This engineering study addresses 50 inactive underground radioactive waste tanks. The tanks were formerly used for the following functions associated with plutonium and uranium separations and waste management activities in the 200 East and 200 West Areas of the Hanford Site: settling solids prior to disposal of supernatant in cribs and a reverse well; neutralizing acidic process wastes prior to crib disposal; receipt and processing of single-shell tank (SST) waste for uranium recovery operations; catch tanks to collect water that intruded into diversion boxes and transfer pipeline encasements and any leakage that occurred during waste transfer operations; and waste handling and process experimentation. Most of these tanks have not been in use for many years. Several projects have, been planned and implemented since the 1970's and through 1985 to remove waste and interim isolate or interim stabilize many of the tanks. Some tanks have been filled with grout within the past several years. Responsibility for final closure and/or remediation of these tanks is currently assigned to several programs including Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS), Environmental Restoration and Remedial Action (ERRA), and Decommissioning and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure (D ampersand RCP). Some are under facility landlord responsibility for maintenance and surveillance (i.e. Plutonium Uranium Extraction [PUREX]). However, most of the tanks are not currently included in any active monitoring or surveillance program

  4. Developing a scarifier to retrieve radioactive waste from Hanford single-shell tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Steele, D.E.

    1993-08-01

    Radioactive waste is stored in 149 3,785 m 3 (million gal) single-shell tanks on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in eastern Washington. To minimize leakage as the tanks age, the free liquid has been pumped out, leaving concentrated solidified salt cake and sludge deposits. Now methods to dislodge and remove this waste are being developed so that the waste can be retrieved and processed for permanent storage. This paper presents research and development on ultrahigh-pressure water-jet technology to fracture and dislodge the wastes in these tanks. A water-based prototype scarifier with an integral conveyance system is being developed, and its performance demonstrated in a coupled analytical and experimental investigation. This paper describes experimental objectives and approach and results of the single jet experiments. Previous testing indicates that the method can be readily applied to salt cake waste forms; retrieval and conveyance of sludge and viscous fluid waste forms may present additional challenges

  5. Doubler system quench detection threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuepke, K.; Kuchnir, M.; Martin, P.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental study leading to the determination of the sensitivity needed for protecting the Fermilab Doubler from damage during quenches is presented. The quench voltage thresholds involved were obtained from measurements made on Doubler cable of resistance x temperature and voltage x time during quenches under several currents and from data collected during operation of the Doubler Quench Protection System as implemented in the B-12 string of 20 magnets. At 4kA, a quench voltage threshold in excess of 5.OV will limit the peak Doubler cable temperature to 452K for quenches originating in the magnet coils whereas a threshold of 0.5V is required for quenches originating outside of coils

  6. Quenches in the superconducting magnet CELLO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1979-01-01

    The superconducting magnet CELLO was tested with currents up to 3200 A at Saclay and has been installed at DESY in Hamburg where it will be used for particle physics experiments requiring colliding beams of electrons and positrons. The testing of this unique, large, one-layer solenoid provides an excellent opportunity to evaluate the theory of quench propagation under adiabatic conditions, that is, in a coil in which the conductors are not in direct contact with helium. In an early test of this coil, quenches that occurred, gives the details of the damaged conductor, and includes an analysis of the quenches. Observed axial quench velocities are compared to the calculated values based on both measurements and calculations of the thermal conductivity of the fabricated coil

  7. Control of the integrity of the fuel elements and the 30 years old reactor tank at the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hien, P.D.; Binh, N.T.; Ngo, N.T.; Nang, N.T.; Phuong, T.T.; Khang, N.P.; Bac, V.T.

    1992-01-01

    The aluminum tank of the Dalat nuclear research reactor is three decades old. Recent underwater optical inspection has revealed a number of corrosion spots, causing a certain concern about its longevity. Concerning the fuel assemblies of the Russian type VVR-M2 a regular radioactivity monitoring of air and reactor coolant water has not observed so far any anomaly related to the leakage of fission products. However, with more than 11,000 operating hours at nominal power since 1984 some fuel assemblies are now approaching the last stage of their lifetime and early detection of fuel failure must be paid due attention. Appropriate measures have been taken to maintain as good as possible the parameters of the primary coolant water during reactor shut-down periods, especially in the stagnant zones of the pool. Routine low-level measurements of fission products allow the early detection of anomaly leakage of the whole core as minor as 0.03 mCi/h of Xe-135 released into the pool water. Accurate account of the pool water loss and replenishment ensures the detection of invisible water leakage through the aluminum tank as low as 10 liters/week. Results of corrosion products monitoring show a slight increasing trend of corrosion rate of the whole primary coolant system. However from these data it is hard to conclude about the development status of the corrosion observed optically in the reactor tank.(Authors)(4 Fig. 4 Tables)

  8. Control of the integrity of the fuel elements and the 30-years old reactor tank at the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Zuy Hien; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Nguyen Trong Ngo; Nguyen Thi Nang; Tran Thu Phuong; Ngo Phu Khang; Vuong Thu Bac.

    1992-01-01

    The aluminum tank of the Dalat nuclear research reactor is three decades old. Recent underwater optical inspection has revealed a number of corrosion spots, causing a certain concern about its longevity. Concerning the fuel assemblies of the Russian type VVR-M2 a regular radioactivity monitoring of air and reactor coolant water has not observed so far any anomaly related to the leakage of fissio products. However, with more than 11,000 operating hours at nominal power since 1984 some fuel assemblies are now approaching the last stage of their lifetime and early detection of fuel failure must be paid due attention. Appropriate measures have been taken to maintain as good as possible the parameters of the primary coolant water during reactor shut-down periods, especially in the stagnant zones of the pool. Routine low-level measurements of fission products allow the early detection of anomal leakage of the whole core as minor as 0.03 mCi/h of Xe-135 released into the pool water. Accurate account of the pool water loss and replenishment ensures the detection of invisible water leakage through the aluminum tank as low as 10 liters/week. Results of corrosion products monitoring show a slight increasing trend of corrosion rate of the whole primary coolant system. However from these data it is hard to conclude about the development status of the corrosion observed optically in the reactor tank. (author). 4 refs, 4 tabs, 4 figs

  9. ATR confinement leakage determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, P.; Buescher, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    The air leakage rate from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) confinement is an important parameter in estimating hypothesized accidental releases of radiation to the environment. The leakage rate must be determined periodically to assure that the confinement has not degraded with time and such determination is one of the technical safety requirements of ATR operation. This paper reviews the methods of confinement leakage determination and presents an analysis of leakage determination under windy conditions, which can complicate the interpretation of the determined leakage rates. The paper also presents results of analyses of building air exchange under windy conditions. High wind can enhance air exchange and this could increase the release rates of radioisotopes following an accident

  10. Universal leakage elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, Mark S.; Lidar, Daniel A.; Wu, L.-A.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    'Leakage' errors are particularly serious errors which couple states within a code subspace to states outside of that subspace, thus destroying the error protection benefit afforded by an encoded state. We generalize an earlier method for producing leakage elimination decoupling operations and examine the effects of the leakage eliminating operations on decoherence-free or noiseless subsystems which encode one logical, or protected qubit into three or four qubits. We find that by eliminating a large class of leakage errors, under some circumstances, we can create the conditions for a decoherence-free evolution. In other cases we identify a combined decoherence-free and quantum error correcting code which could eliminate errors in solid-state qubits with anisotropic exchange interaction Hamiltonians and enable universal quantum computing with only these interactions

  11. Quench propagation in the SSC dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.; Snitchler, G.

    1990-09-01

    The effects of quench propagation are modeled in 40mm and 50mm diameter collider dipole magnet designs. A comparative study of the cold diode (passive) and quench heater (active) protection schemes will be presented. The SSCQ modeling program accurately simulates the axial quench velocity and uses phenomenological time delays for turn-to-turn transverse propagation. The axial quench velocity is field dependent and consequently, each conductor's quench profile is tracked separately. No symmetry constraints are employed and the distribution of the temperatures along the conductor differs from the adiabatic approximation. A single magnet has a wide margin of self protection which suggests that passive protection schemes must be considered. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  12. effects of various effects of various quenching media on quenching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    ABSTRACT. Evaluation of palm kernel oil, cotton seed oil and olive oil as quenching media of 0.509Wt%C medium carbon steel ... Quenching is an essential element in developing the .... machine, heat treatment furnace, Avery Denison Izod.

  13. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND CONTAMINATION ON MPCMS ELECTRODES IN 241-AY-101 AND 241-AN-107 TANK WASTE SIMULANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CATO DM; DAHL MM; PHILO GL; EDGEMON GL; BELL DR.JLS; MOORE CG

    2010-03-26

    This report documents the results of tests designed to characterize the relationship between temperature and the measured potential of electrodes installed on multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems in waste tanks. This report also documents the results of tests designed to demonstrate the impact of liquid in-leakage into electrode bodies as well as the contamination of primary reference electrodes by diffusion through the electrode tip.

  14. EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND CONTAMINATION ON MPCMS ELECTRODES IN 241-AY-101 AND 241-AN-107 TANK WASTE SIMULANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cato, D.M.; Dahl, M.M.; Philo, G.L.; Edgemon, G.L.; Bell, J.L.S.; Moore, C.G.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents the results of tests designed to characterize the relationship between temperature and the measured potential of electrodes installed on multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems in waste tanks. This report also documents the results of tests designed to demonstrate the impact of liquid in-leakage into electrode bodies as well as the contamination of primary reference electrodes by diffusion through the electrode tip.

  15. Dynamic Study of Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger Addition on Double Bed Configuration Ammonia Reactor System within Varied Quenching Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhi Tri Partono

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is one of the most important industrial commodity due to its wide function. Ammonia synthesis reaction is an exotermic reaction. Therefore, Feed-Effluent Heat Exchanger (FEHE is added to increase thermal efficiency. However, FEHE could lead the process to experience hysteresis phenomenon due to interaction between equipments as one steady state T feed could result several T outlet. Hysteresis phenomenon may result asset losses like explosion, leakage, and loosing material integrity. Double bed reactor configuration allows us to use several operating parameters as variation to overcome hysteresis. In this review, quenching ratio was chosen to be that varied parameter. This study aims to determine how quenching ratio affects hysteresis zone by utilizing Aspen Hysys® V8.8 as simulation tool. Simulation showed that quenching ratio would narrow hysteresis zone yet increased extinction temperature that lower the conversion. Conversion profile showed that 0.2 quenching ratio got the highest conversion for system with bed volume ratio 2:1 while total volume was 30 m3. However, the feed temperature was fallen at hysteresis zone. Dynamic simulation showed that highest conversion feed temperature (10%ΔTf above extinct temperature was still able to preserve stability with descending temperature approach. Hysteresis itself started to occur at 1.7%ΔTf above extinct temperature

  16. Wave form of current quench during disruptions in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugihara, Masayoshi; Gribov, Yuri; Shimada, Michiya; Lukash, Victor; Kawano, Yasunori; Yoshino, Ryuji; Miki, Nobuharu; Ohmori, Junji; Khayrutdinov, Rustam

    2003-01-01

    The time dependence of the current decay during the current quench phase of disruptions, which can significantly influence the electro-magnetic force on the in-vessel components due to the induced eddy currents, is investigated using data obtained in JT-60U experiments in order to derive a relevant physics guideline for the predictive simulations of disruptions in ITER. It is shown that an exponential decay can fit the time dependence of current quench for discharges with large quench rate (fast current quench). On the other hand, for discharges with smaller quench rate (slow current quench), a linear decay can fit the time dependence of current quench better than exponential. (author)

  17. Theoretical study of solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    . Originality/value - Many different Solar Combisystem designs have been commercialized over the years. In the IEA-SHC Task 26, twenty one solar combisystems have been described and analyzed. Maybe the mantle tank approach also for solar combisystems can be used with advantage? This might be possible...... if the solar heating system is based on a so called bikini tank. Therefore the new developed solar combisystems based on bikini tanks is compared to the tank-in-tank solar combisystems to elucidate which one is suitable for three different houses with low energy heating demand, medium and high heating demand.......Purpose - Low flow bikini solar combisystems and high flow tank-in-tank solar combisystems have been studied theoretically. The aim of the paper is to study which of these two solar combisystem designs is suitable for different houses. The thermal performance of solar combisystems based on the two...

  18. Excessive leakage measurement using pressure decay method in containment building local leakage rate test at nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Kyu; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Wang Bae [KHNP, Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    There are two methods for conducting the containment local leakage rate test (LLRT) in nuclear power plants: the make-up flow rate method and the pressure decay method. The make-up flow rate method is applied first in most power plants. In this method, the leakage rate is measured by checking the flow rate of the make-up flow. However, when it is difficult to maintain the test pressure because of excessive leakage, the pressure decay method can be used as a complementary method, as the leakage rates at pressures lower than normal can be measured using this method. We studied the method of measuring over leakage using the pressure decay method for conducting the LLRT for the containment building at a nuclear power plant. We performed experiments under conditions similar to those during an LLRT conducted on-site. We measured the characteristics of the leakage rate under varies pressure decay conditions, and calculated the compensation ratio based on these data.

  19. Minimum Quench Energy and Early Quench Development in NbTi Superconducting Strands

    CERN Document Server

    Breschi, M; Boselli, M; Bottura, Luca; Devred, Arnaud; Ribani, P L; Trillaud, F

    2007-01-01

    The stability of superconducting wires is a crucial task in the design of safe and reliable superconducting magnets. These magnets are prone to premature quenches due to local releases of energy. In order to simulate these energy disturbances, various heater technologies have been developed, such as coated tips, graphite pastes, and inductive coils. The experiments studied in the present work have been performed using a single-mode diode laser with an optical fiber to illuminate the superconducting strand surface. Minimum quench energies and voltage traces at different magnetic flux densities and transport currents have been measured on an LHC-type, Cu/NbTi wire bathed in pool boiling helium I. This paper deals with the numerical analysis of the experimental data. In particular, a coupled electromagnetic and thermal model has been developed to study quench development and propagation, focusing on the influence of heat exchange with liquid helium.

  20. Quenching experiments on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirtlich, I.A.; Schultz, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart

    1980-01-01

    High-purity niobium wire specimens have been quenched in superfluid helium from near the melting point in order to obtain information on vacancies in this material. The quenched-in resistivity Δsub(pQ) for a quench from 2600 K was very small (approximately 0.3 x 10 -12 Ω m) and near the limit of detection. It is assumed that large quenching losses are responsible for the small quenched-in resistance. From the experimental cooling curve estimates have been made for the formation and migration enthalpies (Hsub(1V)sup(F), Hsub(1V)sup(M)), where Hsub(1V)sup(M)+Hsub(1V)sup(F)=Qsub(1V)sup(SD)=3.62 ev. For Ssub(1V)sup(F), the formation entropy, two different values were assumed. (author)

  1. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  2. Practical Leakage-Resilient Symmetric Cryptography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faust, Sebastian; Pietrzak, Krzysztof; Schipper, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Leakage resilient cryptography attempts to incorporate side-channel leakage into the black-box security model and designs cryptographic schemes that are provably secure within it. Informally, a scheme is leakage-resilient if it remains secure even if an adversary learns a bounded amount of arbitr......Leakage resilient cryptography attempts to incorporate side-channel leakage into the black-box security model and designs cryptographic schemes that are provably secure within it. Informally, a scheme is leakage-resilient if it remains secure even if an adversary learns a bounded amount...

  3. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford tank initiative: Applications to the AX Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balsley, S.D.; Krumhansl, J.L.; Borns, D.J.; McKeen, R.G.

    1998-07-01

    A combined engineering and geochemistry approach is recommended for the stabilization of waste in decommissioned tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm, Hanford, WA. A two-part strategy of desiccation and gettering is proposed for treatment of the in-tank residual wastes. Dry portland cement and/or fly ash are suggested as an effective and low-cost desiccant for wicking excess moisture from the upper waste layer. Getters work by either ion exchange or phase precipitation to reduce radionuclide concentrations in solution. The authors recommend the use of specific natural and man-made compounds, appropriately proportioned to the unique inventory of each tank. A filler design consisting of multilayered cementitous grout with interlayered sealant horizons should serve to maintain tank integrity and minimize fluid transport to the residual waste form. External tank soil contamination is best mitigated by placement of grouted skirts under and around each tank, together with installation of a cone-shaped permeable reactive barrier beneath the entire tank farm. Actinide release rates are calculated from four tank closure scenarios ranging from no action to a comprehensive stabilization treatment plan (desiccant/getters/grouting/RCRA cap). Although preliminary, these calculations indicate significant reductions in the potential for actinide transport as compared to the no-treatment option

  4. LHC magnet quench protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-07-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called 'cold diode' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements - so called 'cold diodes'. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a 'natural' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages.

  5. LHC magnet quench protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coull, L.; Hagedorn, D.; Remondino, V.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.

    1994-01-01

    The quench protection system for the superconducting magnets of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The system is based on the so called ''cold diode'' concept. In a group of series connected magnets if one magnet quenches then the magnetic energy of all the magnets will be dissipated in the quenched magnet so destroying it. This is avoided by by-passing the quenched magnet and then rapidly de-exciting the unquenched magnets. For the LHC machine it is foreseen to use silicon diodes situated inside the cryostat as by-pass elements--so called ''cold diodes''. The diodes are exposed to some 50 kGray of radiation during a 10 year operation life-time. The high energy density of the LHC magnets (500 kJ/m) coupled with the relatively slow propagation speed of a ''natural'' quench (10 to 20 m/s) can lead to excessive heating of the zone where the quench started and to high internal voltages. It is therefore necessary to detect quickly the incipient quench and fire strip heaters which spread the quench out more quickly over a large volume of the magnet. After a quench the magnet chain must be de-excited rapidly to avoid spreading the quench to other magnets and over-heating the by-pass diode. This is done by switching high-power energy-dump resistors in series with the magnets. The LHC main ring magnet will be divided into 16 electrically separated units which has important advantages

  6. Variation of Quench Propagation Velocities in YBCO Cables

    CERN Document Server

    Härö, E.; Stenvall, A.; 10.1007/s10948-015-2976-y

    2015-01-01

    changes during the quench. Due to the large temperature margin between the operation and the current sharing temperatures, the normal zone does not propagate with the temperature front. This means that the temperature will rise in a considerably larger volume when compared to the quenched volume. Thus, the evolution of the temperature distribution below current sharing temperature Tcs after the quench onset affects the normal zone propagation velocity in HTS more than in LTS coils. This can be seen as an acceleration of the quench propagation velocities while the quench evolves when margin to Tcs is high. In this paper we scrutinize quench propagation in a stack of YBCO cables with an in-house finite element method software which solves the heat diffusion equation. We compute the longitudinal and transverse normal zone propagation velocities at various distances from the hot spot to demonstrate the distance-variation...

  7. A dichotomy in satellite quenching around L* galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John I.; Wheeler, Coral; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Cooper, Michael C.; Tollerud, Erik J.

    2014-01-01

    We examine the star formation properties of bright (˜0.1 L*) satellites around isolated ˜L* hosts in the local Universe using spectroscopically confirmed systems in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. Our selection method is carefully designed with the aid of N-body simulations to avoid groups and clusters. We find that satellites are significantly more likely to be quenched than a stellar mass-matched sample of isolated galaxies. Remarkably, this quenching occurs only for satellites of hosts that are themselves quenched: while star formation is unaffected in the satellites of star-forming hosts, satellites around quiescent hosts are more than twice as likely to be quenched than stellar-mass-matched field samples. One implication of this is that whatever shuts down star formation in isolated, passive L* galaxies also play at least an indirect role in quenching star formation in their bright satellites. The previously reported tendency for `galactic conformity' in colour/morphology may be a by-product of this host-specific quenching dichotomy. The Sérsic indices of quenched satellites are statistically identical to those of field galaxies with the same specific star formation rates, suggesting that environmental and secular quenching give rise to the same morphological structure. By studying the distribution of pairwise velocities between the hosts and satellites, we find dynamical evidence that passive host galaxies reside in dark matter haloes that are ˜45 per cent more massive than those of star-forming host galaxies of the same stellar mass. We emphasize that even around passive hosts, the mere fact that galaxies become satellites does not typically result in star formation quenching: we find that only ˜30 per cent of ˜0.1L* galaxies that fall in from the field are quenched around passive hosts, compared with ˜0 per cent around star-forming hosts.

  8. Heater induced quenches in SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] model dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1986-10-01

    A 1-m long SSC dipole constructed at the Lawrence Berkeley laboratory was subjected to a series of heater induced quenches to determine: axial quench propagation velocities, transverse quench propagation, and conductor temperature rise. Quenches were produced by 3 heaters at different locations in the magnet and at several currents. The results of these studies are described and are compared to previously published theoretical studies of quenches on the SSC dipoles. These results are shown to be in agreement with the calculations of the program ''QUENCH'', which includes an increase of the quench velocity during the first few milliseconds of the quench

  9. Identification of single-shell tank in-tank hardware obstructions to retrieval at Hanford Site Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, R.A.

    1994-10-01

    Two retrieval technologies, one of which uses robot-deployed end effectors, will be demonstrated on the first single-shell tank (SST) waste to be retrieved at the Hanford Site. A significant impediment to the success of this technology in completing the Hanford retrieval mission is the presence of unique tank contents called in-tank hardware (ITH). In-tank hardware includes installed and discarded equipment and various other materials introduced into the tank. This paper identifies those items of ITH that will most influence retrieval operations in the arm-based demonstration project and in follow-on tank operations within the SST farms

  10. Quantum Quenches in a Spinor Condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamacraft, Austen

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the ordering of a spin-1 condensate when quenched from its paramagnetic phase to its ferromagnetic phase by reducing the magnetic field. We first elucidate the nature of the equilibrium quantum phase transition. Quenching rapidly through this transition reveals XY ordering either at a specific wave vector, or the ''light-cone'' correlations familiar from relativistic theories, depending on the end point of the quench. For a quench proceeding at a finite rate the ordering scale is governed by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. The creation of vortices through growth of the magnetization fluctuations is also discussed. The long-time dynamics again depends on the end point, conserving the order parameter in a zero field, but not at a finite field, with differing exponents for the coarsening of magnetic order. The results are discussed in the light of a recent experiment by Sadler et al

  11. Radioactivity leakage monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Takuichiro; Noguchi, Noboru.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain a device for detecting the leakage ratio of a primary coolant by utilizing the variation in the radioactivity concentration in a reactor container when the coolant is leaked. Constitution: A measurement signal is produced from a radioactivity measuring instrument, and is continuously input to a malfunction discriminator. The discriminator inputs a measurement signal to a concentration variation discriminator when the malfunction is recognized and simultaneously inputs a measurement starting time from the inputting time to a concentration measuring instrument. On the other hand, reactor water radioactivity concentration data obtained by sampling the primary coolant is input to a concentration variation computing device. A comparator obtains the ratio of the measurement signal from the measuring instrument and the computed data signal from the computing device at the same time and hence the leakage rate, indicates the average leakage rate by averaging the leakage rate signals and also indicates the total leakage amount. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Architecture of a software quench management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerzy M. Nogiec et al.

    2001-01-01

    Testing superconducting accelerator magnets is inherently coupled with the proper handling of quenches; i.e., protecting the magnet and characterizing the quench process. Therefore, software implementations must include elements of both data acquisition and real-time controls. The architecture of the quench management software developed at Fermilab's Magnet Test Facility is described. This system consists of quench detection, quench protection, and quench characterization components that execute concurrently in a distributed system. Collaboration between the elements of quench detection, quench characterization and current control are discussed, together with a schema of distributed saving of various quench-related data. Solutions to synchronization and reliability in such a distributed quench system are also presented

  13. Bar quenching in gas-rich galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoperskov, S.; Haywood, M.; Di Matteo, P.; Lehnert, M. D.; Combes, F.

    2018-01-01

    Galaxy surveys have suggested that rapid and sustained decrease in the star-formation rate (SFR), "quenching", in massive disk galaxies is frequently related to the presence of a bar. Optical and near-IR observations reveal that nearly 60% of disk galaxies in the local universe are barred, thus it is important to understand the relationship between bars and star formation in disk galaxies. Recent observational results imply that the Milky Way quenched about 9-10 Gyr ago, at the transition between the cessation of the growth of the kinematically hot, old, metal-poor thick disk and the kinematically colder, younger, and more metal-rich thin disk. Although perhaps coincidental, the quenching episode could also be related to the formation of the bar. Indeed the transfer of energy from the large-scale shear induced by the bar to increasing turbulent energy could stabilize the gaseous disk against wide-spread star formation and quench the galaxy. To explore the relation between bar formation and star formation in gas rich galaxies quantitatively, we simulated gas-rich disk isolated galaxies. Our simulations include prescriptions for star formation, stellar feedback, and for regulating the multi-phase interstellar medium. We find that the action of stellar bar efficiently quenches star formation, reducing the star-formation rate by a factor of ten in less than 1 Gyr. Analytical and self-consistent galaxy simulations with bars suggest that the action of the stellar bar increases the gas random motions within the co-rotation radius of the bar. Indeed, we detect an increase in the gas velocity dispersion up to 20-35 km s-1 at the end of the bar formation phase. The star-formation efficiency decreases rapidly, and in all of our models, the bar quenches the star formation in the galaxy. The star-formation efficiency is much lower in simulated barred compared to unbarred galaxies and more rapid bar formation implies more rapid quenching.

  14. Quench simulation in the thin superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tominaka, T.; Takasaki, M.; Wake, M.; Yamada, R.

    1983-07-01

    The propagation velocities of a normal zone were calculated for a 1 mdiameter x 1 m superconducting solenoid and for a 3 mdiameter x 5 m thin solenoid based on a simple model using the one-dimensional thermal equation. The quench back effect can be observed in certain conditions. The quench of the large thin solenoid was also simulated by using the computer program 'QUENCH'. (author)

  15. Detection device for pipeway water leakage in building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Jun.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly detect pipeway leakage at predetermined areas over a wide range in a building. Constitution: If flooding should occur in a power plant building and left as it is, emergency core cooling system, as well as auxiliary equipments and electrical equipments of the system are flooded to make the safety shutdown of the plant impossible. The present invention copes with such a risk. That is, an inlet flow meter and as exit flow meter are disposed to the inlet and the exit of pipeways disposed in a predetermined region in the building and a flow rate difference detector between them is disposed. In this way, pipeway leakage is detected by detecting the flow rate difference between the inlet flow rate and the exit flow rate of the pipeway in the predetermined region. According to the present invention, if a pipeway in a predetermined region is raptured to cause water leakage, the pipeway leakage can rapidly be detected depending on the flow rate difference between the inlet flow rate and the exit flow rate. Further, the water leakage over the entire the predetermined region can be detected rapidly as compared with the conventional case of detecting the leakage at a restricted portion where the leakage detector is disposed. (Kamimura, M.)

  16. Experimental methods for quenching structures in lunar-analog silicate melts - Variations as a function of quench media and composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyar, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    Compositions analogous to lunar green, orange, and brown glasses were synthesized under consistent conditions, then quenched into a variety of different media when the samples were removed from the furnace. Iron valence and coordination are a direct function of quench media used, spanning the range from brine/ice (most effective quench), water, butyl phthalate, silicone oil, liquid nitrogen, highly reducing CO-CO2 gas, to air (least efficient quench). In the green and brown glasses, Fe(3+) in four-fold and six-fold coordination is observed in the slowest-quenched samples Fe(2+) coordination varies directly with quench efficiency. Less pronounced changes were observed in the Ti-rich orange glass. Therefore the remote-sensed spectrum of a glass-bearing regolith on the moon may be influenced by the process by which the glass cooled, and extreme caution must be used when comparing spectra of synthetic glass analogs with real lunar glasses

  17. Effects of quenching and partial quenching on QCD penguin matrix elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golterman, Maarten; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2002-01-01

    We point out that chiral transformation properties of penguin operators change in the transition from unquenched to (partially) quenched QCD. The way in which this affects the lattice determination of weak matrix elements can be understood in the framework of (partially) quenched chiral perturbation

  18. Radiation induced leakage current and stress induced leakage current in ultra-thin gate oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceschia, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Cester, A.; Scarpa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Low-field leakage current has been measured in thin oxides after exposure to ionizing radiation. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) can be described as an inelastic tunneling process mediated by neutral traps in the oxide, with an energy loss of about 1 eV. The neutral trap distribution is influenced by the oxide field applied during irradiation, thus indicating that the precursors of the neutral defects are charged, likely being defects associated to trapped holes. The maximum leakage current is found under zero-field condition during irradiation, and it rapidly decreases as the field is enhanced, due to a displacement of the defect distribution across the oxide towards the cathodic interface. The RILC kinetics are linear with the cumulative dose, in contrast with the power law found on electrically stressed devices

  19. Radiation leakage in nuclear ship 'MUTSU'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshio; Miyasaka, Shun-ichi; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi.

    1975-01-01

    Associated with the radiation leakage in MUTSU occurred in September 1974, this report reviews the shielding design for MUTSU, radiation measurement and inspection activities by a survey group, and 2 dimensional analysis on the behavior of fast neutrons to shielding based on Ssub(N) codes. In the first part, the purpose and the structure of the primary and the secondary shields of MUTSU are briefly illustrated. In the second part, the progress of the series of affairs is explained, starting from zero power criticality experiment, through discovery of radiation leakage in output-increasing test, sending of a survey group for various measurement and inspection, and finally to the conclusion drawn by the survey group. In the third part, various numerical analyses performed to investigate into the leakage are illustrated with their results. The transport codes used were ANISN, TWOTRAN, SPAN, and PALLAS-2DCY. As a result of those inspection and calculation, it was found that the radiation leakage was due to fast neutrons coming through the gap between the reactor vessel and the primary shield. (Aoki, K.)

  20. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-01-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity

  1. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ishida, Naoki [Daihatsu Motor Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  2. Testing and correction of underground tanks at LLNL: Workplan and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.K.; Schwartz, W.W.; Castro, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This report defines a workplan and time schedule for leak tightness testing of underground tank systems and for corrective measures for systems shown by testing to leak. The systems addressed by this report failed a leak tightness test or the test results were inconclusive. The workplan prescribes testing all systems to yield conclusive results. Systems shown to leak will be repaired, retested, and either left in service or be closed. Materials effected by leakage will be cleaned up or removed. 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, F.; Schmidt, R.

    2000-08-01

    The design of the protection system for the superconducting elements in an accelerator such as the large Hadron collider (LHC), now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. A numerical program (SPQR - simulation program for quench research) has been developed to evaluate temperature and voltage distributions during a quench as a function of space and time. The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite difference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions. The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable, forced quenching with heaters, impact of eddy currents induced by a magnetic field change, and heat transfer through an insulation layer into helium, an adjacent conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequate dimensioning and protection of the highly stabilised superconducting cables for connecting magnets (busbars), optimising the quench heater strip layout for the main magnets, and studying quench back by induced eddy currents in the superconductor. After the introduction of the theoretical approach, some applications of the simulation model for the LHC dipole and corrector magnets are presented and the outcome of the studies is compared with experimental data.

  4. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  5. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  6. Magnet Quench 101

    OpenAIRE

    Bottura, L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives a broad summary of the physical phenomena associated with the quench of a superconducting magnet. This paper gives a broad summary of the physical phenomena associated with the quench of a superconducting magnet.

  7. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2000-01-01

    The design of he protection system for he superconducting elements in an accel- erator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC),now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the hermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic pro- cesses during a quench.A numerical program (SPQR -Simulation Program for Quench Research)has been developed o evaluate temperature and voltage dis ri- butions during a quench as a func ion of space and ime.The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite di fference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions.The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable,forced quenching with heaters,impact of eddy curren s induced by a magnetic field change,and heat trans- fer hrough an insulation layer in o helium,an adjacen conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequ...

  8. Deciphering jet quenching with JEWEL

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    In heavy ion collisions jets arising from the fragmentation of hard quarks and gluons experience strong modifications due to final state re-scattering. This so-called jet quenching is related to the emergence of collectivity and equilibration in QCD. I will give an introduction to jet quenching and its modeling in JEWEL, a Monte Carlo implementation of a dynamical model for jet quenching. I will then discuss examples highlighting how JEWEL can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms relevant for jet quenching.  

  9. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft 3 of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms

  10. Tank 241-BY-108 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQOs identity information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for tank BY-108 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given. Single-shell tank BY-108 is classified as a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank. The tank was declared an assumed leaker and removed from service in 1972; interim stabilized was completed in February 1985. Although not officially an Organic Watch List tank, restrictions have been placed on intrusive operations by Standing Order number-sign 94-16 (dated 09/08/94) since the tank is suspected to contain or to have contained a floating organic layer

  11. Data leakage quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavilis, S.; Petkovic, M.; Zannone, N.; Atluri, V.; Pernul, G.

    2014-01-01

    The detection and handling of data leakages is becoming a critical issue for organizations. To this end, data leakage solutions are usually employed by organizations to monitor network traffic and the use of portable storage devices. These solutions often produce a large number of alerts, whose

  12. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX SOLIDS WITH LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.

    2011-11-11

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). In the summer of 2011, Tank 50H contained two standard slurry pumps and two quad volute slurry pumps. Current requirements for mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste moved both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that were failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to mix solids with liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange Process (SCIX), SRNL computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, Tank 50H operating experience, and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters of pumps needed to mix the solid particles with the liquid in Tank 50H. The analysis determined pump requirements to suspend the solids with no 'dead zones', but did not determine the pump requirements to produce a homogeneous suspension. In addition, the analysis determined the pump requirements to prevent the accumulation of a large amount of solid particles under the telescoping transfer pump. The conclusions from this analysis follow: (1) The analysis shows that three Quad Volute pumps should be able to suspend the solid particles expected ({approx}0.6 g/L insoluble solids, {approx}5 micron) in Tank 50H. (2) Three standard slurry pumps may not be able to suspend the solid particles in Tank 50H; (3) The ability of two Quad Volute pumps to fully suspend all of the solid particles in Tank 50H is marginal; and (4) One standard slurry pump should be able to

  13. Fluorescence quenching of fluorescein by Merocyanine 540 in liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toprak, Mahmut; Meryem Aydin, Burcu; Arik, Mustafa; Onganer, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching of fluorescein (FL) by merociyanine 540 (MC540) was examined in L-egg lecithin phosphatidycholine (PC) liposomes using spectroscopic methods. The type of quenching mechanism (dynamic or static) was evaluated using the Stern-Volmer plots. Findings were also supported by the temperature studies and florescence decay measurements. The Stern-Volmer equation was utilized to calculate bimolecular quenching constants (K q ). Furthermore, the bimolecular quenching constant of the quencher in the liposomes (K SV ), partition coefficient (K p ), binding constant (K), and corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG were calculated. The quenching property was also used in determining quantitatively (K p ) the partition coefficient of Merociyanini 540 in PC liposome.The obtained data indicated that static quenching occurred in the system and the K SV values decreased with increasing lipid concentration. In addition, thermodynamic analysis suggested that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding were the main acting forces between fluorescein and merociyanine 540 molecules in the medium. - Highlights: → Fluorescence quenching of FL by MC540 in liposome system was analyzed. → Fluorescence quenching mechanism of FL by MC540 was consistent with the static model. → Binding FL to MC540 was spontaneous and carried out by hydrogen bond and van der Waals forces.

  14. TANK WASTE RETRIEVAL LESSONS LEARNED AT THE HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DODD, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60% of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring the waste to the DST system since 1997 as part of the interim stabilization program. Retrieval of SST saltcake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. This paper presents lessons learned from retrieval of tank waste at the Hanford Site and discusses how this information is used to optimize retrieval system efficiency, improve overall cost effectiveness of retrieval operations, and ensure that HFFACO requirements are met

  15. Effect of geometrical imperfection on buckling failure of ITER VVPSS tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Saroj Kumar; Gupta, Girish Kumar; Pandey, Manish Kumar; Bhattacharya, Avik; Jogi, Gaurav; Bhardwaj, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The 'Vacuum Vessel Pressure Suppression System' (VVPSS) is Part of ITER machine, which is designed to protect the ITER Vacuum Vessel and its connected systems, from an over-pressure situation. It is comprised of a partially evacuated tank of stainless steel approximately 46 meters long and 6 meters in diameter and thickness 30mm. It is to hold approximately 675 tonnes of water at room temperature to condense the steam resulting from the adverse water leakage into the Vacuum Vessel chamber. For any vacuum vessel, geometrical imperfection has significant effect on buckling failure and structural integrity. Major geometrical imperfection in VVPSS tank depends on form tolerances. To study the effect of geometrical imperfection on buckling failure of VVPSS tank, finite element analysis (FEA) has been performed in line with ASME section VIII division 2 part 5, 'design by analysis method'. Linear buckling analysis has been performed to get the buckled shape and displacement. Geometrical imperfection due to form tolerance is incorporated in FEA model of VVPSS tank by scaling the resulted buckled shape by a factor '60'. This buckled shape model is used as input geometry for plastic collapse and buckling failure assessment. Plastic collapse and buckling failure of VVPSS tank has been assessed by using the elastic-plastic analysis method. This analysis has been performed for different values of form tolerance. The results of analysis show that displacement and load proportionality factor (LPF) vary inversely with form tolerance. For higher values of form tolerance LPF reduces significantly with high values of displacement. (author)

  16. Quench dynamics in SRF cavities: can we locate the quench origin with 2nd sound?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximenko, Yulia; Segatskov, Dmitri A.

    2011-01-01

    A newly developed method of locating quenches in SRF cavities by detecting second-sound waves has been gaining popularity in SRF laboratories. The technique is based on measurements of time delays between the quench as determined by the RF system and arrival of the second-sound wave to the multiple detectors placed around the cavity in superfluid helium. Unlike multi-channel temperature mapping, this approach requires only a few sensors and simple readout electronics; it can be used with SRF cavities of almost arbitrary shape. One of its drawbacks is that being an indirect method it requires one to solve an inverse problem to find the location of a quench. We tried to solve this inverse problem by using a parametric forward model. By analyzing the data we found that the approximation where the second-sound emitter is a near-singular source does not describe the physical system well enough. A time-dependent analysis of the quench process can help us to put forward a more adequate model. We present here our current algorithm to solve the inverse problem and discuss the experimental results.

  17. Galaxies in the act of quenching star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quai, Salvatore; Pozzetti, Lucia; Citro, Annalisa; Moresco, Michele; Cimatti, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Detecting galaxies when their star-formation is being quenched is crucial to understand the mechanisms driving their evolution. We identify for the first time a sample of quenching galaxies selected just after the interruption of their star formation by exploiting the [O III] λ5007/Hα ratio and searching for galaxies with undetected [O III]. Using a sample of ˜174000 star-forming galaxies extracted from the SDSS-DR8 at 0.04 ≤ z growth of the quiescent population at these redshifts. Their main properties (i.e. star-formation rate, colours and metallicities) are comparable to those of the star-forming population, coherently with the hypothesis of recent quenching, but preferably reside in higher-density environments.Most candidates have morphologies similar to star-forming galaxies, suggesting that no morphological transformation has occurred yet. From a survival analysis we find a low fraction of candidates (˜ 0.58% of the star-forming population), leading to a short quenching timescale of tQ ˜ 50 Myr and an e-folding time for the quenching history of τQ ˜ 90 Myr, and their upper limits of tQ < 0.76 Gyr and τQ <1.5 Gyr, assuming as quenching galaxies 50% of objects without [O III] (˜7.5%).Our results are compatible with a 'rapid' quenching scenario of satellites galaxies due to the final phase of strangulation or ram-pressure stripping. This approach represents a robust alternative to methods used so far to select quenched galaxies (e.g. colours, specific star-formation rate, or post-starburst spectra).

  18. Stabilization of in-tank residual wastes and external-tank soil contamination for the tank focus area, Hanford Tank Initiative: Applications to the AX tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    This report investigates five technical areas for stabilization of decommissioned waste tanks and contaminated soils at the Hanford Site AX Farm. The investigations are part of a preliminary evacuation of end-state options for closure of the AX Tanks. The five technical areas investigated are: (1) emplacement of cementations grouts and/or other materials; (2) injection of chemicals into contaminated soils surrounding tanks (soil mixing); (3) emplacement of grout barriers under and around the tanks; (4) the explicit recognition that natural attenuation processes do occur; and (5) combined geochemical and hydrological modeling. Research topics are identified in support of key areas of technical uncertainty, in each of the five areas. Detailed cost-benefit analyses of the technologies are not provided. This investigation was conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, during FY 1997 by tank Focus Area (EM-50) funding

  19. Radiologic assessment of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Chang Jin; Kim, Ji Hyung; Kim, Jang Sung; Kim, Sun Yong; Suh, Jung Ho

    1999-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of imaging modalities in the detection of spinal CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Fifteen patients who complained of postural headache without any preceding cause showed typical brain MR findings of intracranial hypotension, including radiologically confirmed CSF leakage. All fifteen underwent brain MRI and radionuclide cisternography. CT myelography was performed in eight patients and spinal MRI in six. Medical records, imaging findings and the incidence of spinal CSF leakage during each modality were retrospectively reviewed. CSF leakage was most common at the cervicothoracic junction, where in seven of 15 cases it was seen on radionuclide cisternography as increased focal paraspinal activity. Leakage was noted at the mid-tho-racic level in three patients, at the upper thoracic level in two, and at the cervical and lumbar levels in the remaining two. In two patients multiple CSF leaks were noted, and in all, early radioactive accumulation in the bladder was visualized. CT myelography revealed extrathecal and paraspinal contrast leakage in three of eight patients, and among those who underwent spinal MRI, dural enhancement was observed at the site of CSF leakage in all six, abnormal CSF signal in the neural foramen in one, and epidural CSF collection in one. Radionuclide cisternography is a useful method for the detection of CSF leakage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. CT myelography and spinal MRI help determine the precise location of leakage

  20. Discharge quenching circuit for counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasik, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    A circuit for quenching discharges in gas-discharge detectors with working voltage of 3-5 kV based on transistors operating in the avalanche mode is described. The quenching circuit consists of a coordinating emitter follower, amplifier-shaper for avalanche key cascade control which changes potential on the counter electrodes and a shaper of discharge quenching duration. The emitter follower is assembled according to a widely used flowsheet with two transistors. The circuit permits to obtain a rectangular quenching pulse with front of 100 ns and an amplitude of up to 3.2 kV at duration of 500 μm-8 ms. Application of the quenching circuit described permits to obtain countering characteristics with the slope less than or equal to 0.02%/V and plateau extent greater than or equal to 300 V [ru

  1. Subsea Hydraulic Leakage Detection and Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Stavenes, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The motivation for this thesis is reduction of hydraulic emissions, minimizing of process emergency shutdowns, exploitation of intervention capacity, and reduction of costs. Today, monitoring of hydraulic leakages is scarce and the main way to detect leakage is the constant need for filling of hydraulic fluid to the Hydraulic Power Unit (HPU). Leakage detection and diagnosis has potential, which would be adressed in this thesis. A strategy towards leakage detection and diagnosis is given....

  2. Radiation-induced off-state leakage current in commercial power MOSFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, Paul Emerson; Shaneyfelt, Marty Ray; Draper, Bruce Leroy; Felix, James Andrew; Schwank, James Ralph; Dalton, Scott Matthew

    2005-01-01

    The total dose hardness of several commercial power MOSFET technologies is examined. After exposure to 20 krad(SiO 2 ) most of the n- and p-channel devices examined in this work show substantial (2 to 6 orders of magnitude) increases in off-state leakage current. For the n-channel devices, the increase in radiation-induced leakage current follows standard behavior for moderately thick gate oxides, i.e., the increase in leakage current is dominated by large negative threshold voltage shifts, which cause the transistor to be partially on even when no bias is applied to the gate electrode. N-channel devices biased during irradiation show a significantly larger leakage current increase than grounded devices. The increase in leakage current for the p-channel devices, however, was unexpected. For the p-channel devices, it is shown using electrical characterization and simulation that the radiation-induced leakage current increase is related to an increase in the reverse bias leakage characteristics of the gated diode which is formed by the drain epitaxial layer and the body. This mechanism does not significantly contribute to radiation-induced leakage current in typical p-channel MOS transistors. The p-channel leakage current increase is nearly identical for both biased and grounded irradiations and therefore has serious implications for long duration missions since even devices which are usually powered off could show significant degradation and potentially fail.

  3. TANK FARM RETRIEVAL LESSONS LEARNED AT THE HANFORD SITE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DODD RA

    2008-01-01

    One of the environmental remediation challenges facing the nation is the retrieval and permanent disposal of approximately 90 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State and stores roughly 60 percent of this waste. An estimated 53 million gallons of high-level, transuranic, and low-level radioactive waste is stored underground in 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 newer double-shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site. These SSTs range in size from 55,000 gallons to 1,000,000 gallon capacity. Approximately 30 million gallons of this waste is stored in SSTs. The SSTs were constructed between 1943 and 1964 and all have exceeded the nominal 20-year design life. Sixty-seven SSTs are known or suspected to have leaked an estimated 1,000,000 gallons of waste to the surrounding soil. The risk of additional SST leakage has been greatly reduced by removing more than 3 million gallons of interstitial liquids and supernatant and transferring this waste to the DST system. Retrieval of SST saltcake and sludge waste is underway to further reduce risks and stage feed materials for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment Plant. Regulatory requirements for SST waste retrieval and tank farm closure are established in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO), better known as the TriParty Agreement, or TPA. The HFFACO was signed by the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology), and U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and requires retrieval of as much waste as technically possible, with waste residues not to exceed 360 fe in 530,000 gallon or larger tanks; 30 fe in 55,000 gallon or smaller tanks; or the limit of waste retrieval technology, whichever is less. If residual waste volume requirements cannot be achieved, then HFFACO Appendix H provisions can be invoked to request Ecology and EPA approval of an

  4. Quenching behaviour of hot zircaloy tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinchole, A.S.; Kulkarni, P.P.; Nayak, A.K.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    The quenching process plays a very important role in case of safety of nuclear reactors. During large break Loss of Coolant Accident in a nuclear reactor, the cooling water from the system is lost. Under this condition, cold water is injected from emergency core cooling system. Quenching behaviour of such heated rod bundle is really complex. It is well known that nanofluids have better heat removal capability and high heat transfer coefficient owing to enhanced thermal properties. Alumina nano-particles result in better cooling abilities compared with the traditionally used quenching media. In this paper, the authors have carried out experiments on quenching behaviour of hot zircaloy tube with demineralized water and nanofluids. It was observed that, the tube got quenched within few seconds even with the presence of decay heat and shows slightly reduced quenching time compared with DM water. (author)

  5. Artificial-Crack-Behavior Test Evaluation of the Water-Leakage Repair Materials Used for the Repair of Water-Leakage Cracks in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Yeon Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There are no existing standard test methods at home and abroad that can verify the performance of water leakage repair materials, and it is thus very difficult to perform quality control checks in the field of water leakage repair. This study determined that the key factors that have the greatest impact on the water leakage repair materials are the micro-behaviors of cracks, and proposed an artificial-crack-behavior test method for the performance verification of the repair materials. The performance of the 15 kinds of repair materials that are currently being used in the field of water leakage repair was evaluated by applying the proposed test method. The main aim of such a test method is to determine if there is water leakage by injecting water leakage repair materials into a crack behavior test specimen with an artificial 5-mm crack width, applying a 2.5 mm vertical behavior load at 100 cycles, and applying 0.3 N/mm2 constant water pressure. The test results showed that of the 15 kinds of repair materials, only two effectively sealed the crack and thus stopped the water leakage. The findings of this study confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed artificial-crack-behavior test method and suggest that it can be used as a performance verification method for checking the responsiveness of the repair materials being used in the field of water leakage repair to the repetitive water leakage behaviors that occur in concrete structures. The study findings further suggest that the use of the proposed test method makes it possible to quantify the water leakage repair quality control in the field.

  6. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO's identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given

  7. Pancreatic anastomosis leakage management following pancreaticoduodenectomy how could be manage the anastomosis leakage after pancreaticoduodenectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abbas Tabatabei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pancreatic anastomosis leakage and fistula formation following pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple′s procedure is a common complication. Delay in timely diagnosis and proper management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. To report our experience with management of pancreatic fistula following Whipple′s procedure. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, medical records of 90 patients who underwent Whipple′s procedure from 2009 to 2013 at our medical center were reviewed for documents about pancreatic anastomosis leakage and fistula formation. Results: There were 15 patients who developed pancreatico-jejunal anastomosis leakage. In 6 patients (3 males and 3 females the leakage was mild (conservative therapy was administered, but in 9 patients (6 males and 3 females, there was severe leakage. For the latter group, surgical intervention was done (2 cases underwent re-anastomosis and for 7 cases pancreatico-jejunal stump ligation was done along with drainage of the location. Conclusion: In severe pancreatic anastomotic leakage, it is better to intervene surgically as soon as possible by debridement of the distal part of the pancreas and ligation of the stump with nonabsorbable suture. Furthermore, debridement of the jejunum should be done, and the stump should be ligated thoroughly along with drainage.

  8. Quench Simulation Studies: Program documentation of SPQR

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2001-01-01

    Quench experiments are being performed on prototypes of the superconducting magnets and busbars to determine the adequate design and protection. Many tests can only be understood correctly with the help of quench simulations that model the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. In some cases simulations are the only method to scale the experimental results of prototype measurements to match the situation of quenching superconducting elements in the LHC. This note introduces the theoretical quench model and the use of the simulation program SPQR (Simulation Program for Quench Research), which has been developed to compute the quench process in superconducting magnets and busbars. The model approximates the heat balance equation with the finite difference method including the temperature dependence of the material parameters. SPQR allows the simulation of longitudinal quench propagation along a superconducting cable, the transverse propagation between adjacent conductors, heat transfer i...

  9. Leakage monitoring device and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Izumi; Matsui, Yuji; Fujimori, Haruo.

    1995-01-01

    In a water leakage monitor for a steam generator, output signals from an acoustic sensor disposed in the vicinity of a region to be monitored is subjected to phasing calculation (beam forming calculation) to determine the distribution of a sound source intensity distribution. A peak is retrieved based on the distribution of the sound source intensity distribution. A correction coefficient depending on the position of the peak is multiplied to the sound source intensity. The presence or absence of leakage is determined based on the degree of the sound source intensity after the completion of correction. Namely, a relative value of sound source intensity for each of the portions in the region to be monitored is determined, and the point of the greatest sound source intensity is assumed as a leaking point, to determine the position of the leakage. An absolute value of the sound source intensity at the leaking point is determined by such a constitution that a correction coefficient depending on the position is multiplied to the intensity of the position of the peak in the distribution of the sound intensity. A threshold value for the determination of the presence or absence of the leakage can be set if a relation between an amount of the leakage previously determined experimentally and the intensity of the sound source. Then, a countermeasure can easily be taken after the detection of the leakage and a restoring operation can be carried out rapidly after the occurrence of leakage while avoiding unnecessary shutdown. (N.H.)

  10. Quench propagation across the copper wedges in SSC dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Robins, K.E.; Sampson, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of copper wedges on quench propagation in SSC windings has been studied. The results indicate that the turn-to-turn quench transit time for conductors separated by an insulated copper wedge can be predicted with reasonable accuracy from the bulk quench properties and the mean wedge thickness

  11. Smooth and fast versus instantaneous quenches in quantum field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumit R.; Galante, Damián A.; Myers, Robert C.

    2015-08-01

    We examine in detail the relationship between smooth fast quantum quenches, characterized by a time scale δ t, and instantaneous quenches, within the framework of exactly solvable mass quenches in free scalar field theory. Our earlier studies [1, 2] highlighted that the two protocols remain distinct in the limit δ t → 0 because of the relation of the quench rate to the UV cut-off, i.e., 1 /δ t ≪ Λ always holds in the fast smooth quenches while 1 /δ t ˜ Λ for instantaneous quenches. Here we study UV finite quantities like correlators at finite spatial distances and the excess energy produced above the final ground state energy. We show that at late times and large distances (compared to the quench time scale) the smooth quench correlator approaches that for the instantaneous quench. At early times, we find that for small spatial separation and small δ t, the correlator scales universally with δ t, exactly as in the scaling of renormalized one point functions found in earlier work. At larger separation, the dependence on δ t drops out. The excess energy density is finite (for finite mδ t) and scales in a universal fashion for all d. However, the scaling behaviour produces a divergent result in the limit mδ t → 0 for d ≥ 4, just as in an instantaneous quench, where it is UV divergent for d ≥ 4. We argue that similar results hold for arbitrary interacting theories: the excess energy density produced is expected to diverge for scaling dimensions Δ > d/2.

  12. Tank 241-AW-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    The first section gives a summary of the available information for Tank AW-101. Included in the discussion are the process history and recent sampling events for the tank, as well as general information about the tank such as its age and the risers to be used for sampling. Tank 241-AW-101 is one of the 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. To resolve the Flammable Gas safety issue, characterization of the tanks, including intrusive tank sampling, must be performed. Prior to sampling, however, the potential for the following scenarios must be evaluated: the potential for ignition of flammable gases such as hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-nitrous oxide; and the potential for secondary ignition of organic-nitrate/nitrate mixtures in crust layer initiated by the burning of flammable gases or by a mechanical in-tank energy source. The characterization effort applicable to this Tank Characterization Plan is focused on the resolution of the crust burn flammable gas safety issue of Tank AW-101. To evaluate the potential for a crust burn of the waste material, calorimetry tests will be performed on the waste. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) will be used to determine whether an exothermic reaction exists

  13. Colorectal Anastomotic Leakage: New perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Daams (Freek)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis provides new perspectives on colorectal anastomotic leakages. In both experimental and clinical studies, aspects of prevention, early identification, treatment and consequences of anastomotic leakage are discussed.

  14. Temperature profile evolution in quenching high-Tc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Irreversible normal zones leading to quench is an important aspect of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) in all practical applications. As a consequence of quench, transport current gets diverted to the matrix stabilizer material of the high-Tc composite and causes Joule heating till the original conditions are ...

  15. Radiofrequency radiation leakage from microwave ovens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahham, A.; Sharabati, A.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents data on the amount of radiation leakage from 117 microwave ovens in domestic and restaurant use in the West Bank, Palestine. The study of leakage is based on the measurements of radiation emissions from the oven in real-life conditions by using a frequency selective field strength measuring system. The power density from individual ovens was measured at a distance of 1 m and at the height of centre of door screen. The tested ovens were of different types, models with operating powers between 1000 and 1600 W and ages ranging from 1 month to >20 y, including 16 ovens with unknown ages. The amount of radiation leakage at a distance of 1 m was found to vary from 0.43 to 16.4 μW cm -1 with an average value equalling 3.64 μW cm -2 . Leakages from all tested microwave ovens except for seven ovens (∼6 % of the total) were below 10 μW cm -2 . The highest radiation leakage from any tested oven was ∼16.4 μW cm -2 , and found in two cases only. In no case did the leakage exceed the limit of 1 μWcm -1 recommended by the ICNIRP for 2.45-GHz radiofrequency. This study confirms a linear correlation between the amount of leakage and both oven age and operating power, with a stronger dependence of leakage on age. (authors)

  16. The role of quench rate in colloidal gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royall, C Patrick; Malins, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between colloidal particles have hitherto usually been fixed by the suspension composition. Recent experimental developments now enable the control of interactions in situ. Here we use Brownian dynamics simulations to investigate the effect of controlling interactions upon gelation, by "quenching" the system from an equilibrium fluid to a gel. We find that, contrary to the normal case of an instantaneous quench, where the local structure of the gel is highly disordered, controlled quenching results in a gel with a much higher degree of local order. Under sufficiently slow quenching, local crystallisation is found, which is strongly enhanced when a monodisperse system is used. The higher the degree of local order, the smaller the mean squared displacement, indicating an enhancement of gel stability.

  17. Issues behind Competitiveness and Carbon Leakage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    This report explores the vulnerability of heavy industry to carbon leakage and competitiveness loss. It reviews the existing literature on competitiveness and carbon leakage under uneven climate policies. It also suggests a statistical method to track carbon leakage, and applies this methodology to Phase I of the EU emissions trading scheme, for various industrial activities: iron and steel, cement, aluminium and refineries. Finally, it reviews measures to mitigate carbon leakage, as discussed in Australia, Canada, Europe, New Zealand and the US.

  18. The Quench Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caux, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-01

    We give a pedagogical introduction to the methodology of the Quench Action, which is an effective representation for the calculation of time-dependent expectation values of physical operators following a generic out-of-equilibrium state preparation protocol (for example a quantum quench). The representation, originally introduced in Caux and Essler (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 257203), is founded on a mixture of exact data for overlaps together with variational reasonings. It is argued to be quite generally valid and thermodynamically exact for arbitrary times after the quench (from short times all the way up to the steady state), and applicable to a wide class of physically relevant observables. Here, we introduce the method and its language, give an overview of some recent results, suggest a roadmap and offer some perspectives on possible future research directions.

  19. Quench start localization in full-length SSC R ampersand D dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devred, A.; Chapman, M.; Cortella, J.; Desportes, A.; Kaugerts, J.; Kirk, T.; Mirk, K.; Schermer, R.; Tompkins, J.C.; Turner, J.; Bleadon, M.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Peoples, J.; Strait, J.; Tool, G.; Caspi, S.; Gilbert, W.; Meuser, R.; Peters, C.; Rechen, J.; Royet, J.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.; Zbasnik, J.

    1989-04-01

    Full-length SSC R ampersand D dipole magnets instrumented with four voltage taps on each turn of the inner quarter coils have been tested. These voltage taps enable accurate location of the point at which the quenches start and detailed studies of quench development in the coil. Attention here is focused on localizing the quench source. After recalling the basic mechanism of a quench (why it occurs and how it propagates), the method of quench origin analysis is described: the quench propagation velocity on the turn where the quench occurs is calculated, and the quench location is then verified by reiterating the analysis on the adjacent turns. Last, the velocity value, which appears to be higher than previously measured, is discussed

  20. Prediction of leakage in the fixed mechanical seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asheichik Anatoly A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The questions of influence of the shape of contact surfaces on leakages through rubber seals in fixed connection of subassemblies are considered in the article. It is known from practice of operation of seals of various designs that the shape of contact surfaces and consequently also the shape of diagram of stresses in a contact zone considerably influences on value of leaks Linking leakage magnitude and distribution of contact stresses enables, firstly, more precisely calculate the amount of leakage for existing seals, and, secondly, to optimize the shape of the seals in their design in each case. As the result of experimental studies on the introduction of the rubber gasket ring fixed indenters different profiles found that by optimizing the shape of the indenter magnitude of leakage can be reduced by 10 times.

  1. Acoustic control of sodium leakage in valve gates of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trykov, E.L.; Kovtun, S.N.; Anan'ev, A.A.; Yugov, S.I.

    2014-01-01

    Short description of sodium bench and acoustic investigation results on leakage monitoring of valves DN10 and DN40 are given. It is shown that acoustic method can be used successfully to control the leakages of sodium valves. Leakages on both type of valves increase the acoustic signal dispersion by 2-3 orders. For each type of valve acoustic system of leakage determination allows to conduct the preliminary graduation of signal dispersion on the sodium discharge rate. It make possible not only to record the leakage presence but also to determine the sodium discharge rate through the valve during the leakage [ru

  2. In-Tank Peroxide Oxidation Process for the Decomposition of Tetraphenylborate in Tank 48H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DANIEL, LAMBERT

    2005-01-01

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. The TPB was added during an in-tank precipitation process to removed soluble cesium, but excessive benzene generation curtailed this treatment method. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to routine Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains approximately 240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with approximately 19,000 kg (42,000 lb) of potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). Out of Tank processing of the Tank 48H has some distinct advantages as aggressive processing conditions (e.g., high temperature, low pH) are required for fast destruction of the tetraphenylborate. Also, a new facility can be designed with the optimum materials of construction and other design features to allow the safe processing of the Tank 48H waste. However, it is very expensive to build a new facility. As a result, an in-tank process primarily using existing equipment and facilities is desirable. Development of an in-tank process would be economically attractive. Based on success with Fentons Chemistry (i.e., hydrogen peroxide with an iron or copper catalyst to produce hydroxyl radicals, strong oxidation agents), testing was initiated to develop a higher pH oxidation process that could be completed in-tank

  3. Quenching and recovery experiments on molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirtlich, I.A.; Schultz, H.; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Stuttgart

    1980-01-01

    Quenching experiments in superfluid helium have been performed on high-purity wire specimens obtained from a Mo single crystal with a residual resistance ratio of 40 000. Quenching from various temperatures near the melting point to 1.5 K resulted in quenched-in resistivities which are interpreted in terms of quenched-in vacancies. The following parameters were derived: Hsub(1V)sup(F) = 3.2 eV (formation enthalpy of monovacancies) and Ssub(1V)sup(F) = 1.5 k (formation entropy). The recovery of the quenched-in resistivity showed a recovery stage at 520 K, which is compatible with a migration enthalpy of Hsub(1V)sup(M) = 1.35 eV. The results are compared with recently published positron annihilation data. (author)

  4. Understanding and managing leakage in forest-based greenhouse-gas-mitigation projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Reimund; Niles, John O; Olander, Jacob

    2002-08-15

    A major concern about land use, land-use change and forestry (LULUCF) projects under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is the potential for leakage. Leakage refers to a net increase of greenhouse-gas emissions in an area outside the project resulting from the CDM activity. This paper provides an overview of leakage, its definitions and its causes. It describes ways that LULUCF projects may suffer from leakage and attempts to assess the magnitude of leakage risks for different LULUCF project types. It also summarizes some of the approaches, both in terms of policies and project development, to address LULUCF leakage.

  5. Leakage localization with an acoustic array that covers a wide area for pipeline leakage monitoring in a closed space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choon Su [Center for Safety Measurements, Division of Metrology for Quality of Life, Korea Research institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jong Hoon [Hyundai Heavy Industry Co.,Ltd., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin Ho [Korea Atomiv Energy Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    It is of great importance to localize leakages in complex pipelines for assuring their safety. A sensor array that can detect where leakages occur enables us to monitor a wide area with a relatively low cost. Beam forming is a fast and efficient algorithm to estimate where sources are, but it is generally made use of in free field condition. In practice, however, many pipelines are placed in a closed space for the purpose of safety and maintenance. This leads us to take reflected waves into account to the beam forming for interior leakage localization. Beam power distribution of reflected waves in a closed space is formulated, and spatial average is introduced to suppress the effect of reflected waves. Computer simulations and experiments ensure how the proposed method is effective to localize leakage in a closed space for structural health monitoring.

  6. Smooth and fast versus instantaneous quenches in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Sumit R.; Galante, Damián A.; Myers, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    We examine in detail the relationship between smooth fast quantum quenches, characterized by a time scale δt, and instantaneous quenches, within the framework of exactly solvable mass quenches in free scalar field theory. Our earlier studies http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.171601 and http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)167 highlighted that the two protocols remain distinct in the limit δt→0 because of the relation of the quench rate to the UV cut-off, i.e., 1/δt≪Λ always holds in the fast smooth quenches while 1/δt∼Λ for instantaneous quenches. Here we study UV finite quantities like correlators at finite spatial distances and the excess energy produced above the final ground state energy. We show that at late times and large distances (compared to the quench time scale) the smooth quench correlator approaches that for the instantaneous quench. At early times, we find that for small spatial separation and small δt, the correlator scales universally with δt, exactly as in the scaling of renormalized one point functions found in earlier work. At larger separation, the dependence on δt drops out. The excess energy density is finite (for finite mδt) and scales in a universal fashion for all d. However, the scaling behaviour produces a divergent result in the limit mδt→0 for d≥4, just as in an instantaneous quench, where it is UV divergent for d≥4. We argue that similar results hold for arbitrary interacting theories: the excess energy density produced is expected to diverge for scaling dimensions Δ>d/2.

  7. Reactivity of Primary Soil Minerals and Secondary Precipitates Beneath Leaking Hanford Waste Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Kathryn L.; Sturchio, Neil C.

    2003-01-01

    This project, renewal of a previous EMSP project of the same title, is in its first year of funding at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The purpose is to continue investigating rates and mechanisms of reactions between primary sediment minerals found in the Hanford subsurface and leaked waste tank solutions. The goals are to understand processes that result in (1) changes in porosity and permeability of the sediment and resultant changes in flow paths of the contaminant plumes, (2) formation of secondary precipitates that can take up contaminants in their structures, and (3) release of mineral components that can drive redox reactions affecting dissolved contaminant mobility. A post-doctoral scientist, Dr. Sherry Samson, has been hired and two masters of science students are beginning to conduct experimental research. One research project that is underway is focused on measurement of the dissolution rates of plagioclase feldspar in high pH, high nitrate, high Al-bearing solutions characteristic of the BX tank farms. The first set of experiments is being conduced at room temperature. Subsequent experiments will examine the role of temperature because tank solutions in many cases were near boiling when leakage is thought to have occurred and temperature gradients have been observed beneath the SX and BX tank farms. The dissolution experiments are being conducted in stirred-flow kinetic reactors using powdered labradorite feldspar from Pueblo Park, New Mexico

  8. Environmental Quenching of Low-Mass Field Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, Sean P.; Cooper, Michael C.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Wheeler, Coral

    2018-04-01

    In the local Universe, there is a strong division in the star-forming properties of low-mass galaxies, with star formation largely ubiquitous amongst the field population while satellite systems are predominantly quenched. This dichotomy implies that environmental processes play the dominant role in suppressing star formation within this low-mass regime (M⋆ ˜ 105.5 - 8 M⊙). As shown by observations of the Local Volume, however, there is a non-negligible population of passive systems in the field, which challenges our understanding of quenching at low masses. By applying the satellite quenching models of Fillingham et al. (2015) to subhalo populations in the Exploring the Local Volume In Simulations (ELVIS) suite, we investigate the role of environmental processes in quenching star formation within the nearby field. Using model parameters that reproduce the satellite quenched fraction in the Local Group, we predict a quenched fraction - due solely to environmental effects - of ˜0.52 ± 0.26 within 1 systems observed at these distances are quenched via environmental mechanisms. Beyond 2 Rvir, however, dwarf galaxy quenching becomes difficult to explain through an interaction with either the Milky Way or M31, such that more isolated, field dwarfs may be self-quenched as a result of star-formation feedback.

  9. Tank 241-C-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify the sampling analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. A Tank Characterization Plant (TCP) will be developed for each double shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. There are four Watch list tank classifications (ferrocyanide, organic salts, hydrogen/flammable gas, and high heat load). These classifications cover the six safety issues related to public and worker health that have been associated with the Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These safety issues are as follows: ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, criticality, high heat, and vapor safety issues. Tank C-103 is one of the twenty tanks currently on the Organic Salts Watch List. This TCP will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in accordance with the appropriate DQO documents. In addition, the current contents and status of the tank are projected from historical information. The relevant safety issues that are of concern for tanks on the Organic Salts Watch List are: the potential for an exothermic reaction occurring from the flammable mixture of organic materials and nitrate/nitrite salts that could result in a release of radioactive material and the possibility that other safety issues may exist for the tank

  10. Think tanks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blach-Ørsten, Mark; Kristensen, Nete Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    outside the media. The study shows that the two largest and oldest think tanks in Denmark, the liberal think tank CEPOS and the social democratic think tank ECLM, are very active and observable in the media; that the media’s distribution of attention to these think tanks, to some extent, confirms a re......-politicization of Danish newspapers; but also that the news media as an arena of influence is only one part of the equation, since some of the corporatist political networks are still intact and working outside the media...... half of the 2010s, because in this national setting think tanks are still a relatively new phenomenon. Based on theories of mediatization and de-corporatization, we present 1) an analysis of the visibility of selected Danish think tanks in the media and 2) an analysis of their political networks...

  11. Failure analysis of leakage current in plastic encapsulated packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, S.J.; Cheang, F.T.

    1989-12-01

    Plastic encapsulated packages exhibit high leakage current after a few hundred hours steam pressure pot test. The present study investigates two possible sources of leakage current, the mold compound and the lead frame tape used for taping the lead frame fingers. The results of the study indicate that the leakage current is independent of the frame and is not caused by the mold compound. The data further indicates that it is the ionic contents and acrylic-based adhesive layer of the lead frame tapes which cause the leakage current. To eliminate the leakage current, lead frame tape with low ionic contents and non acrylic-based adhesive should be used. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs, 3 graphs

  12. Device for preventing leakage of coolant in nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yukio; Sekiguchi, Mamoru; Yoshida, Hideo.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To prevent leakage of coolant from between lower tie plate and channel box without causing deformation of the channel box and also without the possibility of disturbing the installation and removal of the box by the provision of a thin plate provided with leakage holes for the lower tie plate. Structure: Static water pressure within the lower tie plate is adapted to act upon the bear side of a flat plate for leakage prevention through leakage holes formed in the tie plate, thus urging the flat plate against the channel box inner surface. Meanwhile, static water pressure having been led through the leakage holes in the flat plate is adapted to press the flat plate in the vertical direction, thus urging the flat plate against the channel box inner surface and thereby preventing leakage of the coolant through a gap between the channel box and lower tie plate. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keim, E. [Siemens/KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack.

  14. Determination of leakage areas in nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keim, E.

    1997-01-01

    For the design and operation of nuclear power plants the Leak-Before-Break (LBB) behavior of a piping component has to be shown. This means that the length of a crack resulting in a leak is smaller than the critical crack length and that the leak is safely detectable by a suitable monitoring system. The LBB-concept of Siemens/KWU is based on computer codes for the evaluation of critical crack lengths, crack openings, leakage areas and leakage rates, developed by Siemens/KWU. In the experience with the leak rate program is described while this paper deals with the computation of crack openings and leakage areas of longitudinal and circumferential cracks by means of fracture mechanics. The leakage areas are determined by the integration of the crack openings along the crack front, considering plasticity and geometrical effects. They are evaluated with respect to minimum values for the design of leak detection systems, and maximum values for controlling jet and reaction forces. By means of fracture mechanics LBB for subcritical cracks has to be shown and the calculation of leakage areas is the basis for quantitatively determining the discharge rate of leaking subcritical through-wall cracks. The analytical approach and its validation will be presented for two examples of complex structures. The first one is a pipe branch containing a circumferential crack and the second one is a pipe bend with a longitudinal crack

  15. MSFC Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Rapid Quench System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Craven, Paul D.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) Laboratory is a unique facility for investigators studying high-temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified, all without the interference of a container or data-gathering instrument. The ESL main chamber has been upgraded with the addition of a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals. Up to 8 quench vessels can be loaded into the quench wheel, which is indexed with LabVIEW control software. This allows up to 8 samples to be rapidly quenched before having to open the chamber. The system has been tested successfully on several zirconium samples. Future work will be done with other materials using different quench mediums. Microstructural analysis will also be done on successfully quench samples.

  16. Characteristics of current quenches during disruptions in the J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, Z Y; Fang, D; Jin, W; Huang, Y H; Wang, Z J; Yang, Z J; Chen, Z P; Ding, Y H; Zhang, M; Zhuang, G

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of tokamak current quenches are an important issue for the determination of electro-magnetic forces that act on the in-vessel components and vacuum vessel during major disruptions. The characteristics of current quenches in spontaneous disruptions in the J-TEXT tokamak have been investigated. It is shown that the waveforms for the fastest current quenches are more accurately fitted by linear current decays than exponential, although neither is a good fit in many slower cases. The minimum current quench time is about 2.4 ms for the J-TEXT tokamak. The maximum instantaneous current quench rate is more than seven times the average current quench rate in J-TEXT. (paper)

  17. Observations of environmental quenching in groups in the 11 Gyr since z = 2.5: Different quenching for central and satellite galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal, Tomer; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Daniel; Dekel, Avishai; Oesch, Pascal; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Marchesini, Danilo; Patel, Shannon G.; Quadri, Ryan F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David A.; Whitaker, Katherine E.

    2014-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0 < z < 2.5. We utilize a large sample of nearly 6000 groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z ∼ 0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M * /M ☉ = 6.5 × 10 10 ) to nearby massive ellipticals (M * /M ☉ = 1.5 × 10 11 ). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M * /M ☉ = 6.5 × 10 9 ). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates for our central galaxies, we find that star formation shuts off in centrals when typical halo masses reach between 10 12 and 10 13 M ☉ , consistent with predictions from the halo quenching model. In contrast, satellite galaxies in the same groups most likely undergo quenching by environmental processes, whose onset is delayed with respect to their central galaxy. Although star formation is suppressed in all galaxies over time, the processes that govern quenching are different for centrals and satellites. While mass plays an important role in determining the star formation activity of central galaxies, quenching in satellite galaxies is dominated by the environment in which they reside.

  18. Observations of environmental quenching in groups in the 11 Gyr since z = 2.5: Different quenching for central and satellite galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tal, Tomer; Illingworth, Garth D.; Magee, Daniel [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Oesch, Pascal; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Leja, Joel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica J. [Yale University Astronomy Department, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Brammer, Gabriel B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Patel, Shannon G.; Quadri, Ryan F. [Carnegie Observatories, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Skelton, Rosalind E. [South African Astronomical Observatory, Observatory Road, Cape Town (South Africa); Wake, David A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Whitaker, Katherine E., E-mail: tal@ucolick.org [Astrophysics Science Division, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We present direct observational evidence for star formation quenching in galaxy groups in the redshift range 0 < z < 2.5. We utilize a large sample of nearly 6000 groups, selected by fixed cumulative number density from three photometric catalogs, to follow the evolving quiescent fractions of central and satellite galaxies over roughly 11 Gyr. At z ∼ 0, central galaxies in our sample range in stellar mass from Milky Way/M31 analogs (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 6.5 × 10{sup 10}) to nearby massive ellipticals (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 1.5 × 10{sup 11}). Satellite galaxies in the same groups reach masses as low as twice that of the Large Magellanic Cloud (M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 6.5 × 10{sup 9}). Using statistical background subtraction, we measure the average rest-frame colors of galaxies in our groups and calculate the evolving quiescent fractions of centrals and satellites over seven redshift bins. Our analysis shows clear evidence for star formation quenching in group halos, with a different quenching onset for centrals and their satellite galaxies. Using halo mass estimates for our central galaxies, we find that star formation shuts off in centrals when typical halo masses reach between 10{sup 12} and 10{sup 13} M{sub ☉}, consistent with predictions from the halo quenching model. In contrast, satellite galaxies in the same groups most likely undergo quenching by environmental processes, whose onset is delayed with respect to their central galaxy. Although star formation is suppressed in all galaxies over time, the processes that govern quenching are different for centrals and satellites. While mass plays an important role in determining the star formation activity of central galaxies, quenching in satellite galaxies is dominated by the environment in which they reside.

  19. The mass dependence of satellite quenching in Milky Way-like haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John I.; Wheeler, Coral; Cooper, Michael C.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Tollerud, Erik

    2015-02-01

    Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we examine the quenching of satellite galaxies around isolated Milky Way-like hosts in the local Universe. We find that the efficiency of satellite quenching around isolated galaxies is low and roughly constant over two orders of magnitude in satellite stellar mass (M⋆ = 108.5-1010.5 M⊙), with only ˜20 per cent of systems quenched as a result of environmental processes. While largely independent of satellite stellar mass, satellite quenching does exhibit clear dependence on the properties of the host. We show that satellites of passive hosts are substantially more likely to be quenched than those of star-forming hosts, and we present evidence that more massive haloes quench their satellites more efficiently. These results extend trends seen previously in more massive host haloes and for higher satellite masses. Taken together, it appears that galaxies with stellar masses larger than about 108 M⊙ are uniformly resistant to environmental quenching, with the relative harshness of the host environment likely serving as the primary driver of satellite quenching. At lower stellar masses (<108 M⊙), however, observations of the Local Group suggest that the vast majority of satellite galaxies are quenched, potentially pointing towards a characteristic satellite mass scale below which quenching efficiency increases dramatically.

  20. The concept of leakage in threat assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloy, J Reid; O'Toole, Mary Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Leakage in the context of threat assessment is the communication to a third party of an intent to do harm to a target. Third parties are usually other people, but the means of communication vary, and include letters, diaries, journals, blogs, videos on the internet, emails, voice mails, and other social media forms of transmission. Leakage is a type of warning behavior that typically infers a preoccupation with the target, and may signal the research, planning, and implementation of an attack. Nomothetic data suggest that leakage occurs in a majority of cases of attacks on and assassinations of public figures, adult mass murders, adolescent mass murders, and school or campus shootings: very low-frequency, but catastrophic acts of intended and targeted violence. Idiographic or case data illustrate the various permutations of leakage. We discuss the operational importance of the concept, place it in the context of other warning behaviors, emphasize the need for further research, and outline risk management strategies for the mitigation of such acts of violence in both law enforcement and clinical mental health settings. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Lung protein leakage in feline septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schützer, K M; Larsson, A; Risberg, B; Falk, A

    1993-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore lung microvascular leakage of protein and water in a feline model of septic shock, using a double isotope technique with external gamma camera detection and gravimetric lung water measurements. The experiments were performed on artificially ventilated cats. One group of cats (n = 8) was given an infusion of live Escherichia coli bacteria, and another group (n = 5) served as a control group receiving saline. Plasma transferrin was radiolabeled in vivo with indium-113m-chloride, and erythrocytes were labeled with technetium-99m. The distribution of these isotopes in the lungs was continuously measured with a gamma camera. A normalized slope index (NSI) was calculated, indicative of the transferrin accumulation corrected for changes in local blood volume that reflect protein leakage. In the septic group there was a protein leakage after bacterial infusion, with a NSI of 39 x 10(-4) +/- 5 x 10(-4) min-1 (mean +/- SEM), and the PaO2 diminished from 21 +/- 1 to 9.5 +/- 1 kPa. In control cats a slight protein leakage with a NSI of 9 +/- 10(-4) +/- 2 x 10(-4) min-1 was detected, probably caused by the operative procedure, but PaO2 did not change. Wet-to-dry-weight ratios of postmortem lungs were not significantly different between the groups. It was concluded that an intravenous infusion of live E. coli bacteria induces a lung capillary protein leakage without increased lung water and a concomitantly disturbed gas exchange.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Application of Best Estimate Approach for Modelling of QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Kaliatka

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 experiments are modelled using ASTEC and RELAP/SCDAPSIM codes. For the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, SUSA3.5 and SUNSET tools were used. The article demonstrates that applying the best estimate approach, it is possible to develop basic QUENCH input deck and to develop the two sets of input parameters, covering maximal and minimal ranges of uncertainties. These allow simulating different (but with the same nature tests, receiving calculation results with the evaluated range of uncertainties.

  3. Processing of the quench detection signals in W7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birus, Dietrich; Schneider, Matthias; Rummel, Thomas; Fricke, Marko; Petry, Klaus; Ebersoldt, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) project uses superconductive coils for generation of the magnetic field to keep the plasma. One of the important safety systems is the protection against quench events. The quench detection system of W7-X protects the superconducting coils, the superconducting bus bar sections and the high temperature superconductor of the current leads against the damage because of a quench and against the high stress by a fast discharge of the magnet system. Therefore, the present design of the quench detection system (QDS) uses a two-stage safety concept for discharging the magnetic system. This paper describes the present design of the system assembly from the quench detection unit (QDU) for the detection of the quench to the quench detection interface (QDI) to implement the two-stage safety concept.

  4. Effect of Heat Treatment Process on Mechanical Properties and Microstructure of a 9% Ni Steel for Large LNG Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. M.; Li, H.; Yang, F.; Chi, Q.; Ji, L. K.; Feng, Y. R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, two different heat treatment processes of a 9% Ni steel for large liquefied natural gas storage tanks were performed in an industrial heating furnace. The former was a special heat treatment process consisting of quenching and intercritical quenching and tempering (Q-IQ-T). The latter was a heat treatment process only consisting of quenching and tempering. Mechanical properties were measured by tensile testing and charpy impact testing, and the microstructure was analyzed by optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction. The results showed that outstanding mechanical properties were obtained from the Q-IQ-T process in comparison with the Q-T process, and a cryogenic toughness with charpy impact energy value of 201 J was achieved at 77 K. Microstructure analysis revealed that samples of the Q-IQ-T process had about 9.8% of austenite in needle-like martensite, while samples of the Q-T process only had about 0.9% of austenite retained in tempered martensite.

  5. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters

  6. The mass dependence of dwarf satellite galaxy quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slater, Colin T.; Bell, Eric F.

    2014-01-01

    We combine observations of the Local Group with data from the NASA-Sloan Atlas to show the variation in the quenched fraction of satellite galaxies from low-mass dwarf spheroidals and dwarf irregulars to more massive dwarfs similar to the Magellanic Clouds. While almost all of the low-mass (M * ≲ 10 7 M ☉ ) dwarfs are quenched, at higher masses the quenched fraction decreases to approximately 40%-50%. This change in the quenched fraction is large and suggests a sudden change in the effectiveness of quenching that correlates with satellite mass. We combine this observation with models of satellite infall and ram pressure stripping to show that the low-mass satellites must quench within 1-2 Gyr of pericenter passage to maintain a high quenched fraction, but that many more massive dwarfs must continue to form stars today even though they likely fell into their host >5 Gyr ago. We also characterize how the susceptibility of dwarfs to ram pressure must vary as a function of mass if it is to account for the change in quenched fractions. Though neither model predicts the quenching effectiveness a priori, this modeling illustrates the physical requirements that the observed quenched fractions place on possible quenching mechanisms.

  7. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SAMPLING OF TANK 19 IN F TANK FARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, S.; Shine, G.

    2009-12-14

    Representative sampling is required for characterization of the residual material in Tank 19 prior to operational closure. Tank 19 is a Type IV underground waste storage tank located in the F-Tank Farm. It is a cylindrical-shaped, carbon steel tank with a diameter of 85 feet, a height of 34.25 feet, and a working capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Tank 19 was placed in service in 1961 and initially received a small amount of low heat waste from Tank 17. It then served as an evaporator concentrate (saltcake) receiver from February 1962 to September 1976. Tank 19 also received the spent zeolite ion exchange media from a cesium removal column that once operated in the Northeast riser of the tank to remove cesium from the evaporator overheads. Recent mechanical cleaning of the tank removed all mounds of material. Anticipating a low level of solids in the residual waste, Huff and Thaxton [2009] developed a plan to sample the waste during the final clean-up process while it would still be resident in sufficient quantities to support analytical determinations in four quadrants of the tank. Execution of the plan produced fewer solids than expected to support analytical determinations in all four quadrants. Huff and Thaxton [2009] then restructured the plan to characterize the residual separately in the North and the South regions: two 'hemispheres.' This document provides sampling recommendations to complete the characterization of the residual material on the tank bottom following the guidance in Huff and Thaxton [2009] to split the tank floor into a North and a South hemisphere. The number of samples is determined from a modification of the formula previously published in Edwards [2001] and the sample characterization data for previous sampling of Tank 19 described by Oji [2009]. The uncertainty is quantified by an upper 95% confidence limit (UCL95%) on each analyte's mean concentration in Tank 19. The procedure computes the uncertainty in analyte

  8. ASSESSMENT OF THE ABILITY OF STANDARD SLURRY PUMPS TO MIX MISCIBLE AND IMMISCIBLE LIQUIDS IN TANK 50H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.

    2011-06-15

    Tank 50H is the feed tank for the Saltstone Production Facility (SPF). At present, Tank 50H contains two standard slurry pumps and two Quad Volute slurry pumps. Current requirements and mixing operation is to run three pumps for one hour prior to initiating a feed transfer to SPF. Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste would like to move one or both of the Quad Volute pumps from Tank 50H to Tank 51H to replace pumps in Tank 51H that are failing. In addition, one of the standard pumps in Tank 50H exhibits high seal leakage and vibration. SRS Liquid Waste requested Savannah River National (SRNL) to conduct a study to evaluate the feasibility of mixing the contents of Tank 50H with one to three standard slurry pumps. To determine the pump requirements to blend miscible and immiscible liquids in Tank 50H, the author reviewed the pilot-scale blending work performed for the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP) and the technical literature, and applied the results to Tank 50H to determine the number, size, and operating parameters needed to blend the tank contents. The conclusions from this analysis are: (1) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will be able to blend miscible liquids (i.e., salt solution) in Tank 50H within 4.4 hours. (2) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 3.1 hours. (3) Three rotating standard slurry pumps will be able to blend miscible liquids in Tank 50H within 2.5 hours. (4) A single rotating standard slurry pump (with a 13.6 ft{sup 2}/s U{sub 0}D) will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets that are less than or equal to 15 micron in diameter. If the droplets are less than 15 micron, they will be dispersed within 4.4 hours. Isopar L{reg_sign} provides a lower bound on the maximum size of droplets that will be dispersed by the slurry pumps in Tank 50H. (5) Two rotating standard slurry pumps will disperse Isopar L{reg_sign} droplets less than 15 micron

  9. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    in their national contexts. Questions regarding patterns and differences in think tank organisations and functions across countries have largely been left unanswered. This paper advances a definition and research design that uses different expert roles to categorise think tanks. A sample of 34 think tanks from...

  10. Self-quenching streamer discharge in a wire chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, G.D.; Kruglov, V.V.; Khazins, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    A summary is given of the investigation of a new mode of operation of a wire chamber involving a self-quenching streamer discharge. The history of the question is briefly discussed. The main characteristics of the self-quenching mode and the influence of the composition and pressure of the gas mixture and the geometrical parameters of the chamber on the characteristics are described. The mechanism of a self-quenching streamer discharge is analyzed. Detectors working in this mode are described, and the prospects for its future use are discussed

  11. Calculation of Leakage Inductance for High Frequency Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Ziwei; Jun, Zhang; Hurley, William Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Frequency dependent leakage inductance is often observed. High frequency eddy current effects cause a reduction in leakage inductance. The proximity effect between adjacent layers is responsible for the reduction of leakage inductance. This paper gives a detailed analysis of high frequency leakag...

  12. Investigation of thermal quenching and abnormal thermal quenching in mixed valence Eu co-doped LaAlO{sub 3} phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingjing [Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Zhao, Yang [China academy of civil aviation science and technology, Beijing 100028 (China); Mao, Zhiyong, E-mail: mzhy1984@163.com [Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Wang, Dajian [Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China); Bie, Lijian, E-mail: ljbie@tjut.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory for Photoelectric Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin 300384 (China)

    2017-06-15

    Temperature dependent luminescence of mixed valence Eu co-doped LaAlO{sub 3} phosphors are deeply investigated in this work. Different temperature properties of Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+} luminescence are observed as the phosphor excited by different incident light. Eu{sup 3+} luminescence shows normal thermal quenching when excited at 320 nm and abnormal thermal quenching as the excitation light changed into 365 nm, while Eu{sup 2+} luminescence exhibits a normal thermal quenching independent on the incident excitation lights. The origin of these novel normal/abnormal thermal quenching phenomena are analyzed and discussed by the excitation-emission processes in terms of the configuration coordinate model. The presented important experimental and analysis results give insights into the temperature properties of phosphors.

  13. Study on quench effects in liquid scintillation counting during tritium measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivana Jakonic; Jovana Nikolov; Natasa Todorovic; Miroslav Veskovic; Branislava Tenjovic

    2014-01-01

    Quench effects can cause a serious reduction in counting efficiency for a given sample/cocktail mixture in liquid scintillation counting (LSC) experiments. This paper presents a simple experiment performed in order to test the influence of quenching on the LSC efficiency of 3 H. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of several quench agents with different quench strengths (nitromethane, nitric acid, acetone, dimethyl-sulfoxide) added in different amounts to tritiated water in order to obtain standard sets for quench calibration curves. The OptiPhase HiSafe 2 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 scintillation cocktails were used in this study in order to compare their quench resistance. Measurements were performed using a low-level LS counter (Wallac, Quantulus 1220). (author)

  14. Enhanced ground bounce noise reduction in a low-leakage CMOS multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Bipin Kumar; Akashe, Shyam; Sharma, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, various parameters are used to reduce leakage power, leakage current and noise margin of circuits to enhance their performance. A multiplier is proposed with low-leakage current and low ground bounce noise for the microprocessor, digital signal processors (DSP) and graphics engines. The ground bounce noise problem appears when a conventional power-gating circuit transits from sleep-to-active mode. This paper discusses a reduction in leakage current in the stacking power-gating technique by three modes - sleep, active and sleep-to-active. The simulation results are performed on a 4 × 4 carry-save multiplier for leakage current, active power, leakage power and ground bounce noise, and comparison made for different nanoscales. Ground bounce noise is limited to 90%. The leakage current of the circuit is decimated up to 80% and the active power is reduced to 31%. We performed simulations using cadence virtuoso 180 and 45 nm at room temperature at various supply voltages.

  15. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  16. Single-shell tank closure work plan. Revision A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    In January 1994, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Conset Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was amended to reflect a revised strategy for remediation of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks. These amendments include milestones for closure of the single-shell tank (SST) operable units, to be initiated by March 2012 and completed by September 2024. This SST-CWP has been prepared to address the principal topical areas identified in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-06 (i.e., regulatory pathway, operable unit characterization, waste retrieval, technology development, and a strategy for achieving closure). Chapter 2.0 of this SST-CWP provides a brief description of the environmental setting, SST System, the origin and characteristics of SST waste, and ancillary equipment that will be remediated as part of SST operable unit closure. Appendix 2A provides a description of the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, including information on the unsaturated sediments (vadose zone) beneath the 200 Areas Plateau. Chapter 3.0 provides a discussion of the laws and regulations applicable to closure of the SST farm operable units. Chapter 4.0 provides a summary description of the ongoing characterization activities that best align with the proposed regulatory pathway for closure. Chapter 5.0 describes aspects of the SST waste retrieval program, including retrieval strategy, technology, and sequence, potential tank leakage during retrieval, and considerations of deployment of subsurface barriers. Chapter 6.0 outlines a proposed strategy for closure. Chapter 7.0 provides a summary of the programs underway or planned to develop technologies to support closure. Ca. 325 refs.

  17. Single-shell tank closure work plan. Revision A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    In January 1994, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Conset Order (Tri-Party Agreement) was amended to reflect a revised strategy for remediation of radioactive waste in underground storage tanks. These amendments include milestones for closure of the single-shell tank (SST) operable units, to be initiated by March 2012 and completed by September 2024. This SST-CWP has been prepared to address the principal topical areas identified in Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-06 (i.e., regulatory pathway, operable unit characterization, waste retrieval, technology development, and a strategy for achieving closure). Chapter 2.0 of this SST-CWP provides a brief description of the environmental setting, SST System, the origin and characteristics of SST waste, and ancillary equipment that will be remediated as part of SST operable unit closure. Appendix 2A provides a description of the hydrogeology of the Hanford Site, including information on the unsaturated sediments (vadose zone) beneath the 200 Areas Plateau. Chapter 3.0 provides a discussion of the laws and regulations applicable to closure of the SST farm operable units. Chapter 4.0 provides a summary description of the ongoing characterization activities that best align with the proposed regulatory pathway for closure. Chapter 5.0 describes aspects of the SST waste retrieval program, including retrieval strategy, technology, and sequence, potential tank leakage during retrieval, and considerations of deployment of subsurface barriers. Chapter 6.0 outlines a proposed strategy for closure. Chapter 7.0 provides a summary of the programs underway or planned to develop technologies to support closure. Ca. 325 refs

  18. Quench simulation of SMES consisting of some superconducting coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, S.; Oga, Y.; Igarashi, H.

    2011-01-01

    A chain of quenches may be caused by a quench of one element coil when SMES is consists of many element coils. To avoid the chain of quenches, the energy stored in element coil has to be quickly discharged. The cause of the chain of the quenches is the short time constant of the decreasing current of the quenched coil. In recent years, many HTS superconducting magnetic energy storage (HTS-SMES) systems are investigated and designed. They usually consist of some superconducting element coils due to storing excessively high energy. If one of them was quenched, the storage energy of the superconducting element coil quenched has to be immediately dispersed to protect the HTS-SMES system. As the result, the current of the other element coils, which do not reach to quench, increases since the magnetic coupling between the quenched element coil and the others are excessively strong. The increase of the current may cause the quench of the other element coils. If the energy dispersion of the element coil quenched was failed, the other superconducting element coil would be quenched in series. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the behavior of the HTS-SMES after quenching one or more element coils. To protect a chain of quenches, it is also important to investigate the time constant of the coils. We have developed a simulation code to investigate the behavior of the HTS-SMES. By the quench simulation, it is indicated that a chain of quenches is caused by a quench of one element coil.

  19. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  20. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable

  1. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank B-111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Toth, J.J.; Ryan, F.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Simpson, D.B.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-B-111 (hereafter referred to as B-111) is a 2,006,300 liter (530,000 gallon) single-shell waste tank located in the 200 East B tank farm at Hanford. Two cores were taken from this tank in 1991 and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle's 325-A Laboratory in 1993. Characterization of the waste in this tank is being done to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank B-111 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks B-110 and B-112. During its process history, B-111 received mostly second-decontamination-cycle waste and fission products waste via the cascade from Tank B-110. This tank was retired from service in 1976, and in 1978 the tank was assumed to have leaked 30,300 liters (8,000 gallons). The tank was interim stabilized and interim isolated in 1985. The tank presently contains approximately 893,400 liters (236,000 gallons) of sludge-like waste and approximately 3,800 liters (1,000 gallons) of supernate. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1991. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (> 0.5 wt%) measured in the waste are water, sodium, nitrate, phosphate, nitrite, bismuth, iron, sulfate and silicon, ordered from largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. Since Tanks B-110 and B-111 have similar process histories, their sampling results were compared. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303). This assessment was conducted by comparing tank analyses against dangerous waste characteristics 'D' waste codes; and against state waste codes

  2. Tank 241-AZ-102 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process ... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) sampling activities. Tank AZ-102 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The current contents of Tank AZ-102, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,600 kL (950 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-102 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 360 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,240 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.9 meters

  3. A study of point defects in quenched stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheloufi, Khelifa.

    1977-07-01

    Thin foils of stainless steels (18%Cr, 14%Ni) containing boron (50x10 -6 ) and stabilised with titanium have been quenched at different rates in order to observe secondary defects by transmission electron microscopy. A rapid quenching in gallium has not given any secondary defects either before or after annealing. But samples quenched from temperatures greater than 800 0 C-900 0 C exhibit a dislocation density approximately 10 9 cm/cm 3 . A vacancy concentration less than 10 -6 has been observed by positron annihilation technique. After a moderate quenching, any secondary defects has been observed. It is thus clear that boron does not favour the secondary defects formation as does phosphorus [fr

  4. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Results of experimental and numerical investigations of thermal stratification and natural convection in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank during standby periods are presented. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by heat loss are investigated...... on the natural buoyancy resulting in downward flow along the tank side walls due to heat loss of the tank and the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow and the corresponding upward flow in the central parts of the tank. Water temperatures at different levels of the tank...... by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and by thermal measurements. A tank with uniform temperatures and thermal stratification is studied. The distribution of the heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is measured by tests and used as input to the CFD model. The investigations focus...

  5. Density of kinks just after a quench in an underdamped system

    OpenAIRE

    Dziarmaga, Jacek

    1998-01-01

    A quench in an underdamped one dimensional $\\phi^4$ model is studied by analytical methods. The density of kinks just after the transition is proportional to the square root of the rate of the quench for slow quenches. If the quench is shorter that the relaxation time, then the density scales like the third root of the rate.

  6. In-pile behavior of controlled beta-quenched fuel channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeckel, Andreas; Pflaum, Wolfgang; Cremer, Ingo [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Zbib, Ali A. [AREVA NP Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Dimensional stability during in-reactor service is the major requirement that is put on fuel channels to provide good moderation and power distribution, and to guarantee unrestricted movement of the control blades during operation. High corrosion resistance and low hydrogen pick-up are required as well. The latter are usually not considered to be life limiting, but may contribute to channel deformation since increased oxide layers due to shadow corrosion on the control blade sides of a channel result in differential oxide thickness and differential volume expansion due to hydride formation. This would be in addition to the well known effects of irradiation induced channel deformation, especially channel growth and bow. In order to meet the trend toward increased fuel assembly discharge burnup levels and the industry wide need for improved dimensional stability of fuel channels, AREVA NP has developed the Controlled Beta-Quenching of fuel channels. The process combines the positive effect of randomization of the crystallographic texture by beta-quenching with the optimization of the microstructure for good corrosion resistance by providing intermetallic phase particles in the optimum size range. The Controlled Beta-Quenching is a continuous heat treatment operation. Its key features are the two-step induction heating to uniformly reach the target temperature, the tight control of the quench rate by cooling the fuel channel from the outer surface using a controlled argon mass flow for quenching, and the protection of the inner surface from oxidation by providing an argon atmosphere. Due to the utilization of argon, the surfaces of the channels remain metal bright after beta-quenching. All in all, the Controlled Beta-Quenching provides an overall 'clean' and environment friendly operation without the need of additional surface conditioning. The first set of beta-quenched fuel channels, exhibiting these optimized material properties, were inserted in the core

  7. Quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setser, D.W.

    2001-01-01

    The two-body, thermal quenching reactions of electronically excited atoms are reviewed using excited states of Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms as examples. State-specific interstate relaxation and excitation-transfer reactions with atomic colliders are discussed first. These results then are used to discuss quenching reactions of excited-state atoms with diatomic and polyatomic molecules, the latter have large cross sections, and the reactions can proceed by excitation transfer and by reactive quenching. Excited states of molecules are not considered; however, a table of quenching rate constants is given for six excited-state molecules in an appendix

  8. Estimation of leakage power and delay in CMOS circuits using parametric variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Verma

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of deep-submicron technologies, leakage power dissipation is a major concern for scaling down portable devices that have burst-mode type integrated circuits. In this paper leakage reduction technique HTLCT (High Threshold Leakage Control Transistor is discussed. Using high threshold transistors at the place of low threshold leakage control transistors, result in more leakage power reduction as compared to LCT (leakage control transistor technique but at the scarifies of area and delay. Further, analysis of effect of parametric variation on leakage current and propagation delay in CMOS circuits is performed. It is found that the leakage power dissipation increases with increasing temperature, supply voltage and aspect ratio. However, opposite pattern is noticed for the propagation delay. Leakage power dissipation for LCT NAND gate increases up to 14.32%, 6.43% and 36.21% and delay decreases by 22.5%, 42% and 9% for variation of temperature, supply voltage and aspect ratio. Maximum peak of equivalent output noise is obtained as 127.531 nV/Sqrt(Hz at 400 mHz.

  9. Spray-on foam insulations for launch vehicle cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Coffman, B. E.; Meneghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2012-04-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex array of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of 200-260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the different

  10. Spray-On Foam Insulations for Launch Vehicle Cryogenic Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, J. E.; Cofman, B. E.; Menghelli, B. J.; Heckle, K. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spray-on foam insulation (SOFI) has been developed for use on the cryogenic tanks of space launch vehicles beginning in the 1960s with the Apollo program. The use of SOFI was further developed for the Space Shuttle program. The External Tank (ET) of the Space Shuttle, consisting of a forward liquid oxygen tank in line with an aft liquid hydrogen tank, requires thermal insulation over its outer surface to prevent ice formation and avoid in-flight damage to the ceramic tile thermal protection system on the adjacent Orbiter. The insulation also provides system control and stability with throughout the lengthy process of cooldown, loading, and replenishing the tank. There are two main types of SOFI used on the ET: acreage (with the rind) and closeout (machined surface). The thermal performance of the seemingly simple SOFI system is a complex of many variables starting with the large temperature difference of from 200 to 260 K through the typical 25-mm thickness. Environmental factors include air temperature and humidity, wind speed, solar exposure, and aging or weathering history. Additional factors include manufacturing details, launch processing operations, and number of cryogenic thermal cycles. The study of the cryogenic thermal performance of SOFI under large temperature differentials is the subject of this article. The amount of moisture taken into the foam during the cold soak phase, termed Cryogenic Moisture Uptake, must also be considered. The heat leakage rates through these foams were measured under representative conditions using laboratory standard liquid nitrogen boiloff apparatus. Test articles included baseline, aged, and weathered specimens. Testing was performed over the entire pressure range from high vacuum to ambient pressure. Values for apparent thermal conductivity and heat flux were calculated and compared with prior data. As the prior data of record was obtained for small temperature differentials on non-weathered foams, analysis of the

  11. Coolant leakage detection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To surely detect the coolant leakage at a time when the leakage amount is still low in the intra-reactor inlet pipeway of FBR type reactor. Constitution: Outside of the intra-reactor inlet piping for introducing coolants at low temperature into a reactor core, an outer closure pipe is furnished. The upper end of the outer closure pipe opens above the liquid level of the coolants in the reactor, and a thermocouple is inserted to the opening of the upper end. In such a structure, if the coolants in the in-reactor piping should leak to the outer closure pipe, coolants over-flows from the opening thereof, at which the thermocouple detects the temperature of the coolants at a low temperature, thereby enabling to detect the leakage of the coolants at a time when it is still low. (Kamimura, M.)

  12. Carbon leakage from a Nordic perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naess-Schmidt, S.; Hansen, Martin Bo; Sand Kirk, J. [Copenhagen Economics, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-02-15

    Carbon pricing is generally considered a highly effective tool in reducing carbon emissions. Putting a price on carbon provides incentives for users and producers of fossil fuels to reduce consumption and develop low carbon products and processes. However, pursuing an ambitious climate policy can lead to carbon leakage, which refers to a situation where unilateral or regional climate change policy drives the relocation of industry investments and installations, and associated emissions, to third countries. This report by Copenhagen Economics has been commissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers to give an overview of the industries at risk of carbon leakage in the Nordic countries, and estimate the expected extent of carbon leakage from unilateral climate policies in the Nordic countries. The report also assesses available policy options that may reduce the risk of carbon leakage, such as exemptions from energy tax and exemptions from quota obligations under green certificate schemes. The key drivers of carbon leakage are identified, which include energy intensity, product differentiation, transportation costs and capital intensity. The analysis suggests that industries such as paper and pulp, iron and steel, aluminium, cement, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and fertilizers are most at risk of carbon leakage in the Nordic manufacturing sector. (Author)

  13. In-tank photo analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorvick, C.A.; Baird, D.B.; Heasler, P.G.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents an analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) of photographs showing the interior of a single shell tank (SST) at the Hanford site. This report shows that in-tank photos can be used to create a plan-view map of the waste surface inside a tank, and that measuring the elevation of the waste surface from the photos is possible, but not accurate enough to be useful at this time. In-tank photos were acquired for Tanks BX111 and T111. The BX111 photos were used to create the waste surface map and to measure the waste surface elevation. T111 photos were used to measure the waste surface elevation. Uncertainty analyses of the mapping and surface elevation are included to show the accuracy of the calculations for both methods

  14. Analysis of ONKALO water leakage mapping results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahokas, H.; Nummela, J; Turku, J. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2014-04-15

    As part of the programme for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, an analysis has been compiled of water leakage mapping performed in ONKALO. Leakage mapping is part of the Olkiluoto Monitoring Programme (OMO) and the field work has been carried out by Posiva Oy. The main objective of the study is to analyse differences detected between mapping campaigns carried out typically twice a year in 2005-2012. Differences were estimated to be caused by the differences in groundwater conditions caused by seasonal effects or by differences between the years. The effect of technical changes like shotcreting, postgrouting, ventilation etc. on the results was also studied. The development of the visualisation of mapping results was also an objective of this work. Leakage mapping results have been reported yearly in the monitoring reports of Hydrology with some brief comments on the detected differences. In this study, the development of the total area and the number of different leakages as well as the correlation of changes with shotcreting and grouting operations were studied. In addition, traces of fractures on tunnel surfaces, and the location of rock bolts and drain pipes were illustrated together with leakage mapping. In water leakage mapping, the tunnel surfaces are visually mapped to five categories: dry, damp, wet, dripping and flowing. Major changes were detected in the total area of damp leakages. It is likely that the increase has been caused by the condensation of warm ventilation air on the tunnel surfaces and the corresponding decrease by the evaporation of moisture into the dry ventilation air. Shotcreting deep in ONKALO may also have decreased the total area of damp leakages. Changes in the total area and number of wet leakages correlate at least near the surface with differences in yearly precipitation. It is possible that strong rains have also caused a temporary increase in wet leakages. Dripping and wet leakages have been observed on average more

  15. Analysis of ONKALO water leakage mapping results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahokas, H.; Nummela, J; Turku, J.

    2014-04-01

    As part of the programme for the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, an analysis has been compiled of water leakage mapping performed in ONKALO. Leakage mapping is part of the Olkiluoto Monitoring Programme (OMO) and the field work has been carried out by Posiva Oy. The main objective of the study is to analyse differences detected between mapping campaigns carried out typically twice a year in 2005-2012. Differences were estimated to be caused by the differences in groundwater conditions caused by seasonal effects or by differences between the years. The effect of technical changes like shotcreting, postgrouting, ventilation etc. on the results was also studied. The development of the visualisation of mapping results was also an objective of this work. Leakage mapping results have been reported yearly in the monitoring reports of Hydrology with some brief comments on the detected differences. In this study, the development of the total area and the number of different leakages as well as the correlation of changes with shotcreting and grouting operations were studied. In addition, traces of fractures on tunnel surfaces, and the location of rock bolts and drain pipes were illustrated together with leakage mapping. In water leakage mapping, the tunnel surfaces are visually mapped to five categories: dry, damp, wet, dripping and flowing. Major changes were detected in the total area of damp leakages. It is likely that the increase has been caused by the condensation of warm ventilation air on the tunnel surfaces and the corresponding decrease by the evaporation of moisture into the dry ventilation air. Shotcreting deep in ONKALO may also have decreased the total area of damp leakages. Changes in the total area and number of wet leakages correlate at least near the surface with differences in yearly precipitation. It is possible that strong rains have also caused a temporary increase in wet leakages. Dripping and wet leakages have been observed on average more

  16. Leakage evaluation in the PCV (Primary Containment Vessel) using chemical and radiochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuji; Nagasawa, Katsumi

    1998-01-01

    Keeping the reliability of nuclear power plant operation, the primary coolant leakage in the PCV is strictly restricted by the Technical Specifications. It is very important to detect an indication of leakage and estimate the source of leakage to provide countermeasures. Usually the indication of leakage will be detected by increase of drain flow in the PCV sump. There are some possibilities of leakage sources in the PCV, such as reactor water, main steam, condensate, feedwater and closed cooling water. The leakage source contain different chemical and radiochemical species. This means that the leakage source can be presumed and detected by using chemical information from the PCV atmosphere and sump water. To detect the leakage indication and the source quickly and exactly, the PCV Leakage Detection Expert System has been developed. This paper describes how to evaluate the leakage indication and source in the PCV by using chemical and radiochemical data. (author)

  17. Experimental evaluation of clinical colon anastomotic leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal anastomotic leakage remains a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. Patient and procedure related risk factors for anastomotic leakage have been identified. However, the responsible pathophysiological mechanisms are still unknown. Among these, ischemia and insufficient surgical technique have been suggested to play a central role. Animal models are valuable means to evaluate pathophysiological mechanisms and may be used to test preventive measures aiming at reducing the risk of anastomotic leakage, such as external anastomotic coating. The aim of this thesis was to: Clarify the best suited animal to model clinical anastomotic leakage in humans; Create animal models mimicking anastomotic leakage in humans induced by insufficient surgical technique and tissue ischemia; Determine the best suited coating materials to prevent anastomotic leakage. This study is a systematic review using the databases MEDLINE and Rex. MEDLINE was searched up to October 2010 to identify studies on experimental animal models of clinical colon anastomotic leakage. From the Rex database, textbooks on surgical aspects as well as gastrointestinal physiology and anatomy of experimental animals were identified. The results indicated that the mouse and the pig are the best suited animals to evaluate clinical anastomotic leakage. However, the pig model is less validated and more costly to use compared with the mouse. Most frequently, rats are used as models. However, extreme interventions are needed to create clinical leakage in these animals. The knowledge from this study formed the basis for selecting the animal species most suited for the models in the next studies. STUDY 2: In this experimental study, technically insufficient colonic anastomoses were performed in 110 C57BL/6 mice. The number of sutures in the intervention group was reduced to produce a suitable leakage rate. Moreover, the analgesia and suture material were changed in order to optimize the

  18. Quenched chiral logarithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1992-04-01

    I develop a diagrammatic method for calculating chiral logarithms in the quenched approximation. While not rigorous, the method is based on physically reasonable assumptions, which can be tested by numerical simulations. The main results are that, at leading order in the chiral expansion, (a) there are no chiral logarithms in quenched f π m u = m d ; (b) the chiral logarithms in B K and related kaon B-parameters are, for m d = m s the same in the quenched approximation as in the full theory (c) for m π and the condensate, there are extra chiral logarithms due to loops containing the η', which lead to a peculiar non-analytic dependence of these quantities on the bare quark mass. Following the work of Gasser and Leutwyler, I discuss how there is a predictable finite volume dependence associated with each chiral logarithm. I compare the resulting predictions with numerical results: for most quantities the expected volume dependence is smaller than the errors. but for B V and B A there is an observed dependence which is consistent with the predictions

  19. Simulation of the Quench-06 experiment with Scdapsim; Simulacion del experimento Quench-06 con Scdapsim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel M, E. del; Nunez C, A.; Amador G, R. [CNSNS, Dr. Barragan No. 779, 03020 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. e-mail: edangelm@cnsns.gob.mx

    2003-07-01

    The present work describes the pattern of the called Quench installation developed and used by the National Commission of Nuclear Security and Safeguards (CNSNS) for their participation in the International Standard Problem 45 (ISP), organized by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The exercise consisted on the simulation of the denominated experiment Quench-06 carried out in the experimental installation Quench located in the Forschungszentrum laboratory in Karlsruhe, Germany. The experiment Quench-06 consisted on simulating the sudden and late injection of water in a fuel assemble for a pressurized reactor (PWR). The CNSNS uses the version bd of the SCDAPSIM code developed by the company Innovative Software Systems (ISS) to simulate this experiment. The obtained results showed that the code is able to predict the experiment partially when overestimating the hydrogen production and of the partial fused of some fuel pellets, but predicting correctly the damage in the shroud. (Author)

  20. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, J.

    1996-01-01

    This characterization report summarizes the available information on the historical uses, current status, and sampling and analysis results of waste stored in double-shell underground storage tank 241- AN-102. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1996). Tank 241-AN-102 is one of seven double-shell tanks located in the AN Tank Farm in the Hanford Site 200 East Area. The tank was hydrotested in 1981, and when the water was removed, a 6-inch heel was left. Tank 241-AN-102 began receiving waste from tank 241-SY-102 beginning in 1982. The tank was nearly emptied in the third quarter of 1983, leaving only 125 kL (33 kgal) of waste. Between the fourth quarter of 1983 and the first quarter of 1984, tank 241-AN-102 received waste from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-SY-102, 241-AW-105, and 241- AN-101. The tank was nearly emptied in the second quarter of 1984, leaving a heel of 129 kL (34 kgal). During the second and third quarters of 1984, the tank was filled with concentrated complexant waste from tank 241-AW-101. Since that time, only minor amounts of Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant miscellaneous waste and water have been received; there have been no waste transfer to or from the tank since 1992. Therefore, the waste currently in the tank is considered to be concentrated complexant waste. Tank 241-AN-102 is sound and is not included on any of the Watch Lists

  1. Uncertainty Analysis of In leakage Test for Pressurized Control Room Envelop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. B. [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In leakage tests for control room envelops(CRE) of newly constructed nuclear power plants are required to prove the control room habitability. Results of the in leakage tests should be analyzed using an uncertainty analysis. Test uncertainty can be an issue if the test results for pressurized CREs show low in leakage. To have a better knowledge of the test uncertainty, a statistical model for the uncertainty analysis is described here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test is presented. A statistical method for analyzing the uncertainty of the in leakage test is presented here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test was performed. By using the statistical method we can evaluate the test result with certain level of significance. This method can be more helpful when the difference of the two mean values of the test result is small.

  2. Uncertainty Analysis of In leakage Test for Pressurized Control Room Envelop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    In leakage tests for control room envelops(CRE) of newly constructed nuclear power plants are required to prove the control room habitability. Results of the in leakage tests should be analyzed using an uncertainty analysis. Test uncertainty can be an issue if the test results for pressurized CREs show low in leakage. To have a better knowledge of the test uncertainty, a statistical model for the uncertainty analysis is described here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test is presented. A statistical method for analyzing the uncertainty of the in leakage test is presented here and a representative uncertainty analysis of a sample in leakage test was performed. By using the statistical method we can evaluate the test result with certain level of significance. This method can be more helpful when the difference of the two mean values of the test result is small

  3. The quench detector on magnetic modulator for the UNK quench protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, I.M.; Enbaev, A.V.; Erokhin, A.N.; Gridasov, V.I.; Priyma, M.V.; Sychev, V.A.; Vasiliev, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    When designing and constructing superconducting high energy accelerators, the development of the Quench Detection System (QDS) for superconducting (SC) magnets becomes an important and critical problem. At present there is experience in developing such systems for the Tevatron (FNAL, USA) and HERA (Hamburg, Germany). The machines for more than 3 TeV-the UNK (Russia) and SSC (USA), which are presently under construction, have very large circumferences, 21 and 87 km, respectively. The QDS's, similar to those of the Tevatron, require a larger part of the active components of the electronic equipment be placed in the machine tunnel close to the magnets, and protected from irradiation or additional surface buildings will have to be constructed. In either case the cost of such a QDS increases. In addition the former ones reliability decreases and maintenance becomes more difficult. For such machines, a QDS in which the quench signal, in each superconducting magnet (SCM) or groups of SCM'S, is extracted with the help of a bridge circuit (BC) appears to be more suitable. The half coils of SCM's are connected as two arms of the bridge and the resistors placed in the vacuum vessels of the magnet cryostats are connected to the other two. The off-balance signal of each BC is enhanced with the help of magnetic amplifiers. This note describes the experimental prototype of a bridge-type Quench Detector (QD) based on a magnetic amplifier Magnetic Modulator (MM) type, allowing one not only to detect a quench in a SCM, but also making feasible a wider system capability, namely: to record the signals from all SC elements during a quench for further analysis of its causes; to check the presence of short circuits of the ring electromagnet bus relative to the cryostats and to localize their position

  4. Assessment of Petroleum Leakage in Groundwater of the Abadan Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Shadizadeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of petroleum leakage at oil refineries is vital for environmental study of water and soil pollution. Abadan Refinery is located between the Arvandrud and Bahmanshir rivers in the highly populated area of Abadan city. These rivers supply domestic, industrial, and agricultural water toAbadancity. During the war betweenIranandIraq, enormous volumes of oil and petroleum products leaked from storage tanks and pipelines at Abadan Refinery into the surrounding environment. The resulting pollution is a serious threat and a growing environmental concern for the region. In this work, twenty boreholes were dug to investigate petroleum leaks into the surrounding area both during and after the war. The thickness of petroleum floating on underground waters at the refinery was measured by sampling underground water over a period of one year along with measuring the piezometric heads of groundwater monitoring wells. Also, groundwater movement pattern at Abadan Refinery was determined by measuring the water table in each well over the same period. The results of sampling indicate that oil leaks were observed in just two wells; namely, wells No.3 and No.11. The results also show that the greatest portion of the oil spill in underground layers at Abadan Refinery was absorbed into clay soil.

  5. Studies of quench propagation in a superconducting window frame magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Carroll, A.; Danby, G.; DeVito, B.; Jackson, J.; Leonhardt, M.; Prodell, A.; Stoehr, R.

    1981-01-01

    During the testing of a meter long, superconducting window frame magnet, information from many spontaneously generated quenches have been recorded by an on-line computer system. Nearly every layer in an eleven layer dipole had a voltage tap and for some layers this subdivided into two halves. This allowed us to study development of the quenches in some detail. Knowledge of the resistances throughout the magnet also allowed the temperature distributions in the superconducting windings to be determined. A qualitative picture of the quench was developed and quantitative values of quench propagation velocities were compared to heat transfer calculations

  6. Storage Tanks - Selection Of Type, Design Code And Tank Sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatla, M.N; El Hady, M.

    2004-01-01

    The present work gives an insight into the proper selection of type, design code and sizing of storage tanks used in the Petroleum and Process industries. In this work, storage tanks are classified based on their design conditions. Suitable design codes and their limitations are discussed for each tank type. The option of storage under high pressure and ambient temperature, in spherical and cigar tanks, is compared to the option of storage under low temperature and slight pressure (close to ambient) in low temperature and cryogenic tanks. The discussion is extended to the types of low temperature and cryogenic tanks and recommendations are given to select their types. A study of pressurized tanks designed according to ASME code, conducted in the present work, reveals that tanks designed according to ASME Section VIII DIV 2 provides cost savings over tanks designed according to ASME Section VIII DlV 1. The present work is extended to discuss the parameters that affect sizing of flat bottom cylindrical tanks. The analysis shows the effect of height-to-diameter ratio on tank instability and foundation loads

  7. Ultrafast quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins: Interresidue and intrahelical electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Weihong; Li Tanping; Zhang Luyuan; Yang Yi; Kao Yating; Wang Lijuan [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Zhong Dongping [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Program of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)], E-mail: dongping@mps.ohio-state.edu

    2008-06-23

    Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence in proteins has been critical to the understanding of protein dynamics and enzyme reactions using tryptophan as a molecular optical probe. We report here our systematic examinations of potential quenching residues with more than 40 proteins. With site-directed mutation, we placed tryptophan to desired positions or altered its neighboring residues to screen quenching groups among 20 amino acid residues and of peptide backbones. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the ultrafast quenching dynamics within 100 ps and identified two ultrafast quenching groups, the carbonyl- and sulfur-containing residues. The former is glutamine and glutamate residues and the later is disulfide bond and cysteine residue. The quenching by the peptide-bond carbonyl group as well as other potential residues mostly occurs in longer than 100 ps. These ultrafast quenching dynamics occur at van der Waals distances through intraprotein electron transfer with high directionality. Following optimal molecular orbital overlap, electron jumps from the benzene ring of the indole moiety in a vertical orientation to the LUMO of acceptor quenching residues. Molecular dynamics simulations were invoked to elucidate various correlations of quenching dynamics with separation distances, relative orientations, local fluctuations and reaction heterogeneity. These unique ultrafast quenching pairs, as recently found to extensively occur in high-resolution protein structures, may have significant biological implications.

  8. Roxby Downs water leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The Environment, Resource and development Committee has been asked by Parliament to examine 'a massive leakage of water at Roxby Downs' and to make recommendations 'as to further action'. It has also been specifically asked to comment on 'the desirability of the Department of Mines and Energy having prime responsibility for environmental matters in relation to mining operations'. This report begins with a description of the Olympic Dam operations near Roxby Downs and with a brief overview of the regulations controlling those operations. The site of the leakage the Olympic Dam tailings retention system is then described in greater detail. Part 3 describes how the system was originally designed, modified and approved. It ends with a series of findings about the adequacy of the original design (including the monitoring systems built into it) and of the approvals process. Recommendations are then made about how future approvals should be handled. Part 4 of the report outlines how the tailings retention system was built and operated and how the massive leakage from it was detected and reported. Findings about the adequacy of the management of the system and about the initial reactions to the leakage are then made, together with recommendations designed to improve future management of the system. 25 refs., 15 figs

  9. Revisiting the Role of Xanthophylls in Nonphotochemical Quenching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oort, Bart; Roy, Laura M; Xu, Pengqi; Lu, Yinghong; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph; Croce, Roberta

    2018-01-01

    Photoprotective nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of absorbed solar energy is vital for survival of photosynthetic organisms, and NPQ modifications significantly improve plant productivity. However, the exact NPQ quenching mechanism is obscured by discrepancies between reported mechanisms, involving

  10. Single photon detection with self-quenching multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinyu (Inventor); Cunningham, Thomas J. (Inventor); Pain, Bedabrata (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A photoelectronic device and an avalanche self-quenching process for a photoelectronic device are described. The photoelectronic device comprises a nanoscale semiconductor multiplication region and a nanoscale doped semiconductor quenching structure including a depletion region and an undepletion region. The photoelectronic device can act as a single photon detector or a single carrier multiplier. The avalanche self-quenching process allows electrical field reduction in the multiplication region by movement of the multiplication carriers, thus quenching the avalanche.

  11. Thermal stratification in a hot water tank established by heat loss from the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents numerical investigations of thermal stratification in a vertical cylindrical hot water tank established by standby heat loss from the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are calculated by means of validated...... computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The measured heat loss coefficient for the different parts of the tank is used as input to the CFD model. Parametric studies are carried out using the validated models to investigate the influence on thermal stratification of the tank by the downward flow...... the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The results show that 20–55% of the side heat loss drops to layers below in the part of the tank without the presence of thermal stratification. A heat loss removal factor is introduced...

  12. SURFACE DENSITY EFFECTS IN QUENCHING: CAUSE OR EFFECT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-12-10

    There are very strong observed correlations between the specific star formation rates (sSFRs) of galaxies and their mean surface mass densities, Σ, as well as other aspects of their internal structure. These strong correlations have often been taken to argue that the internal structure of a galaxy must play a major physical role, directly or indirectly, in the control of star formation. In this paper we show by means of a very simple toy model that these correlations can arise naturally without any such physical role once the observed evolution of the size–mass relation for star-forming galaxies is taken into account. In particular, the model reproduces the sharp threshold in Σ between galaxies that are star-forming and those that are quenched and the evolution of this threshold with redshift. Similarly, it produces iso-quenched-fraction contours in the f {sub Q}( m , R {sub e}) plane that are almost exactly parallel to lines of constant Σ for centrals and shallower for satellites. It does so without any dependence on quenching on size or Σ and without invoking any differences between centrals and satellites, beyond the different mass dependences of their quenching laws. The toy model also reproduces several other observations, including the sSFR gradients within galaxies and the appearance of inside-out build-up of passive galaxies. Finally, it is shown that curvature in the main-sequence sSFR–mass relation can produce curvature in the apparent B / T ratios with mass. Our analysis therefore suggests that many of the strong correlations that are observed between galaxy structure and sSFR may well be a consequence of things unrelated to quenching and should not be taken as evidence of the physical processes that drive quenching.

  13. Performance and risk assessment of subsurface barriers for single-shell tank waste retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Cruse, J.M.; Hampsten, K.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Treat, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    Subsurface barriers are among various alternatives under evaluation to mitigate the threat of leakage from the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell high-level radioactive waste tanks. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) division of Westinghouse Hanford Company is conducting this evaluation of subsurface barriers and other alternatives, focusing on risk and cost as performance measures. A number of alternative retrieval/closure approaches were evaluated in terms of risks (carcinogenic and toxicological) to a postulated maximally exposed individual. In addition, worker and accident risks were evaluated and factors developed for each alternative on a relative basis. The work performed to date indicates the use of subsurface barriers may potentially reduce public risk by limiting contamination of groundwater below the Hanford Site; however, the cost in terms of actual funding and in elevated worker risk is significant. The analyses also assume certain performance levels for technologies that have not been demonstrated in field conditions similar to Hanford Site tank farms. The evaluations summarized herein are being used to support a decision by representatives of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding potential further development of subsurface barrier technology.

  14. Performance and risk assessment of subsurface barriers for single-shell tank waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazinet, G.D.; Cruse, J.M.; Hampsten, K.L.; Treat, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    Subsurface barriers are among various alternatives under evaluation to mitigate the threat of leakage from the Hanford Site's 149 single-shell high-level radioactive waste tanks. The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) division of Westinghouse Hanford Company is conducting this evaluation of subsurface barriers and other alternatives, focusing on risk and cost as performance measures. A number of alternative retrieval/closure approaches were evaluated in terms of risks (carcinogenic and toxicological) to a postulated maximally exposed individual. In addition, worker and accident risks were evaluated and factors developed for each alternative on a relative basis. The work performed to date indicates the use of subsurface barriers may potentially reduce public risk by limiting contamination of groundwater below the Hanford Site; however, the cost in terms of actual funding and in elevated worker risk is significant. The analyses also assume certain performance levels for technologies that have not been demonstrated in field conditions similar to Hanford Site tank farms. The evaluations summarized herein are being used to support a decision by representatives of the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding potential further development of subsurface barrier technology

  15. Computational quench model applicable to the SMES/CICC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Cesar A.; Chang, Chih-Lien; Partain, Kenneth D.

    1994-07-01

    A computational quench model accounting for the hydraulic peculiarities of the 200 kA SMES cable-in-conduit conductor has been developed. The model is presented and used to simulate the quench on the SMES-ETM. Conclusions are drawn concerning quench detection and protection. A plan for quench model validation is presented.

  16. Quench propagation in coated conductors for fault current limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, F.; Perez, S.; Therasse, M.; Dutoit, B.; Sirois, F.; Decroux, M.; Antognazza, L.

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the quench phenomenon is crucial in the future design and operation of high temperature superconductors based fault current limiters. The key parameter that quantifies the quenching process in superconductors is the normal zone propagation (NZP) velocity, which is defined as the speed at which the normal zone expands into the superconducting volume. In the present paper, we used numerical models developed in our group recently to investigate the quench propagation in coated conductors. With our models, we have shown that the NZP in these tapes depends strongly on the substrate properties.

  17. Signal attenuation due to cavity leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, M.H.; Modera, M.P.

    1988-01-01

    The propagation of sound waves in fluids requires information about three properties of the system: capacitance (compressibility), resistance (friction), and inductance (inertia). Acoustical design techniques to date have tended to ignore the frictional effects associated with airflow across the envelope of the acoustic cavity (e.g., resistive vents). Since such leakage through the cavity envelope is best expressed with a power law dependence on the pressure, standard Fourier techniques that rely on linearity cannot be used. In this article, the theory relevant to nonlinear leakage is developed and equations presented. Potential applications of the theory to techniques for quantifying the leakage of buildings are presented. Experimental results from pressure decays in a full-scale test structure are presented and the leakage so measured is compared with independent measurements to demonstrate the technique

  18. Final Technical Report: Intensive Quenching Technology for Heat Treating and Forging Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronov, Michael A.

    2005-12-21

    equipment: High-velocity single part quenching IQ unit developed and built previously under EMTEC CT-65 project. The unit is equipped with a neutral salt bath furnace and a high-temperature, electric-fired, atmosphere, box furnace. New 1,900 gallon IQ system with a 24'' x 24'' atmosphere pit furnace and a load transfer mechanism. Shaker hearth furnace equipped with an IQ water tank and with a chiller to maintain the required water temperature. Potential Savings for USA Heat Treating Industry IQ Process Benefit/Annual Benefit for USA Heat Treating Industry Full elimination or 30% reduction of the carburization cycle Savings of 1,800 billion Btu of energy Cost reduction by $600,000,000 Reduction of CO2 emissions by 148,000 ton Part weight reduction by 5% Savings in material cost of $70,000,000 Savings of 300 billion Btu of energy

  19. Tank characterization report for double-shell Tank 241-AP-107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, D.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this tank characterization report is to describe and characterize the waste in Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-107 based on information gathered from various sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the waste in Tank 241-AP-107, and arranges it in a useful format for making management and technical decisions concerning this particular waste tank. In addition, conclusion and recommendations based on safety and further characterization needs are given. Specific objectives reached by the sampling and characterization of the waste in Tank 241-AP-107 are: Contribute toward the fulfillment of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05 concerning the characterization of Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks; Complete safety screening of the contents of Tank 241-AP-107 to meet the characterization requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-5; and Provide tank waste characterization to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Program Elements in accordance with the TWRS Tank Waste Analysis Plan

  20. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roared tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne's in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements

  1. Sloshing impact in roofed tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uras, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    A large number of high-level waste (HLW) storage tanks exists in various tank farms. Seismic activities at those locations may cause significant sloshing in HLW tanks. These tanks are covered to avoid any spilling during large amplitude earthquakes. However, large amplitude sloshing may result in impact on the cover or the roof of the tank. Hence, a better understanding of the impact phenomenon is necessary to assess the safety of the tanks currently in existence, and to establish design guidelines for future designs. A pressure based formulation is derived to model sloshing impact in roofed tanks. It is incorporated into Argonne's in-house finite element code FLUSTR-ANL. A numerical test case with a harmonic input excitation is studied. The simulation results indicate that linear behavior is preserved beyond the first impact, and some mesh distortion is observed following a stronger second impact. During the impact, the displacement of the contacting surface nodes remains constant, and the velocities are reduced to zero. An identification of impacting nodes is possible from the dynamic pressures induced in surface elements

  2. How to attribute market leakage to CDM projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vöhringer, F.; Kuosmanen, T.K.; Dellink, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Economic studies suggest that market leakage rates of greenhouse gas abatement can reach the two-digit percentage range. Although the Marrakesh Accords require Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects to account for leakage, most projects neglect market leakage. Insufficient leakage accounting is

  3. Development of High Heat Input Welding High Strength Steel Plate for Oil Storage Tank in Xinyu Steel Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hemin; Dong, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Xiong

    This essay introduces the developed high-heat input welding quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel 12MnNiVR for oil storage tank by Xinyu Steel, which passed the review by the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Standards Technical Committee in 2009. The review comments that compared to the domestic and foreign similar steel standard, the key technical index of enterprise standard were in advanced level. After the heat input of 100kJ/cm electro-gas welding, welded points were still with excellent low temperature toughness at -20°C. The steel plate may be constructed for oil storage tank, which has been permitted by thickness range from 10 to 40mm, and design temperature among -20°C-100°C. It studied microstructure genetic effects mechanical properties of the steel. Many production practices indicated that the mechanical properties of products and the steel by stress relief heat treatment of steel were excellent, with pretreatment of hot metal, converter refining, external refining, protective casting, TMCP and heat treatment process measurements. The stability of performance and matured technology of Xinyu Steel support the products could completely service the demand of steel constructed for 10-15 million cubic meters large oil storage tank.

  4. Theory and modelling of quench in cable-in-conduit superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajii, A.

    1994-04-01

    A new simple, self consistent theoretical model is presented that describes the phenomena of quench propagation in Cable-In-Conduit superconducting magnets. The model (Quencher) circumvents many of the difficulties associated with obtaining numerical solutions in more general existing models. Specifically, a factor of 30-50 is gained in CPU time over the general, explicit time dependent codes used to study typical quench events. The corresponding numerical implementation of the new model is described and the numerical results are shown to agree very well with those of the more general models, as well as with experimental data. Further, well justified approximations lead to the MacQuench model that is shown to be very accurate and considerably more efficient than the Quencher model. The MacQuench code is suitable for performing quench studies on a personal computer, requiring only several minutes of CPU time. In order to perform parametric studies on new conductor designs it is required to utilize a model such as MacQuench because of the high computational efficiency of this model. Finally, a set of analytic solutions for the problem of quench propagation in Cable-In-Conduit Conductors is presented. These analytic solutions represent the first such results that remain valid for the long time scales of interest during a quench process. The assumptions and the resulting simplifications that lead to the analytic solutions are discussed, and the regimes of validity of the various approximations are specified. The predictions of the analytic results are shown to be in very good agreement with numerical as well as experimental results. Important analytic scaling relations are verified by such comparisons, and the consequences of some of these scalings on currently designed superconducting magnets are discussed

  5. Toward Understanding Tip Leakage Flows in Small Compressor Cores Including Stator Leakage Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdanier, Reid A.; Key, Nicole L.

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this work was to provide additional data to supplement the work reported in NASA/CR-2015-218868 (Berdanier and Key, 2015b). The aim of that project was to characterize the fundamental flow physics and the overall performance effects due to increased rotor tip clearance heights in axial compressors. Data have been collected in the three-stage axial research compressor at Purdue University with a specific focus on analyzing the multistage effects resulting from the tip leakage flow. Three separate rotor tip clearances were studied with nominal tip clearance gaps of 1.5 percent, 3.0 percent, and 4.0 percent based on a constant annulus height. Overall compressor performance was previously investigated at four corrected speedlines (100 percent, 90 percent, 80 percent, and 68 percent) for each of the three tip clearance configurations. This study extends the previously published results to include detailed steady and time-resolved pressure data at two loading conditions, nominal loading (NL) and high loading (HL), on the 100 percent corrected speedline for the intermediate clearance level (3.0 percent). Steady detailed radial traverses of total pressure at the exit of each stator row are supported by flow visualization techniques to identify regions of flow recirculation and separation. Furthermore, detailed radial traverses of time-resolved total pressures at the exit of each rotor row have been measured with a fast-response pressure probe. These data were combined with existing three-component velocity measurements to identify a novel technique for calculating blockage in a multistage compressor. Time-resolved static pressure measurements have been collected over the rotor tips for all rotors with each of the three tip clearance configurations for up to five loading conditions along the 100 percent corrected speedline using fast-response piezoresistive pressure sensors. These time-resolved static pressure measurements reveal new knowledge about the

  6. Quantum quench in an atomic one-dimensional Ising chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, F; Mark, M J; Kirilov, E; Lauber, K; Weinmann, P; Daley, A J; Nägerl, H-C

    2013-08-02

    We study nonequilibrium dynamics for an ensemble of tilted one-dimensional atomic Bose-Hubbard chains after a sudden quench to the vicinity of the transition point of the Ising paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic quantum phase transition. The quench results in coherent oscillations for the orientation of effective Ising spins, detected via oscillations in the number of doubly occupied lattice sites. We characterize the quench by varying the system parameters. We report significant modification of the tunneling rate induced by interactions and show clear evidence for collective effects in the oscillatory response.

  7. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    José Santander, María; Nunez, Alvaro S.; Roldán-Molina, A.; Troncoso, Roberto E.

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation

  8. Dynamical quenching of tunneling in molecular magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    José Santander, María, E-mail: maria.jose.noemi@gmail.com [Recursos Educativos Quántica, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago (Chile); Nunez, Alvaro S., E-mail: alnunez@dfi.uchile.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 487-3, Santiago (Chile); Roldán-Molina, A. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Avenida Universidad 330, Curauma, Valparaíso (Chile); Troncoso, Roberto E., E-mail: r.troncoso.c@gmail.com [Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Avda. Ecuador 3493, Santiago 9170124 (Chile); Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-12-15

    It is shown that a single molecular magnet placed in a rapidly oscillating magnetic field displays the phenomenon of quenching of tunneling processes. The results open a way to manipulate the quantum states of molecular magnets by means of radiation in the terahertz range. Our analysis separates the time evolution into slow and fast components thereby obtaining an effective theory for the slow dynamics. This effective theory presents quenching of the tunnel effect, in particular, stands out its difference with the so-called coherent destruction of tunneling. We support our prediction with numerical evidence based on an exact solution of Schrödinger's equation. - Highlights: • Single molecular magnets under rapidly oscillating magnetic fields is studied. • It is shown that this system displays the quenching of tunneling processes. • Our findings provide a control of quantum molecular magnets via terahertz radiation.

  9. Radioactivity Monitoring System for TRIGA 2000 Reactor Water Tank with On-Line Gamma Spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasetyo Basuki; Sudjatmi KA

    2009-01-01

    One of the requirements in radiological safety in the operating condition of research reactor are the absence of radionuclide from fission product released to reactor cooling water and environment. Early detection of fission product that released from fuel element can be done by monitoring radioactivity level on primary cooling water.Reactor cooling water can be used as an important indicator in detecting radioactivity level of material fission product, when the leakage occurs. Therefore, it needs to build a monitoring system for measuring radioactivity level of cooling water directly and simple. The idea of this system is counting radioactivity water flow from reactor tank to the marinelli cube that attached to the HPGe detector on gamma spectrometer. Cooling water from tank aimed on plastic pipe to the marinelli cube. Water flows in gravitational driven to the marinelli cube, with volume flow rate 5.1 liters/minute in the inlet and 2.2 liters/minute in output. (author)

  10. Critical properties of Sudden Quench Dynamics in the anisotropic XY Model

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Hongli; Liu, Zhao; Fan, Heng; Chen, Shu

    2010-01-01

    We study the zero temperature quantum dynamical critical behavior of the anisotropic XY chain under a sudden quench in a transverse field. We demonstrate theoretically that both quench magnetic susceptibility and two-particle quench correlation can be used to describe the dynamical quantum phase transition (QPT) properties. Either the quench magnetic susceptibility or the derivative of correlation functions as a function of initial magnetic field $a$ exhibits a divergence at the critical poin...

  11. Effect of quenching rate on precipitation kinetics in AA2219 DC cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elgallad, E.M., E-mail: eelgalla@uqac.ca; Zhang, Z.; Chen, X.-G.

    2017-06-01

    Slow quenching of direct chill (DC) cast aluminum ingot plates used in large mold applications is often used to decrease quench-induced residual stresses, which can deteriorate the machining performance of these plates. Slow quenching may negatively affect the mechanical properties of the cast plates when using highly quench-sensitive aluminum alloys because of its negative effect on the precipitation hardening behavior of such alloys. The effect of the quenching rate on precipitation kinetics in AA2219 DC cast alloy was systematically studied under water and air quenching conditions using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) technique. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was also used to characterize the precipitate microstructure. The results showed that the precipitation kinetics of the θ′ phase in the air-quenched condition was mostly slower than that in the water-quenched one. Air quenching continuously increased the precipitation kinetics of the θ phase compared to water quenching. These results revealed the contributions of the inadequate precipitation of the strengthening θ′ phase and the increased precipitation of the equilibrium θ phase to the deterioration of the mechanical properties of air-quenched AA2219 DC cast plates. The preexisting GP zones and quenched-in dislocations affected the kinetics of the θ′ phase, whereas the preceding precipitation of the θ′ phase affected the kinetics of the θ phase by controlling its precipitation mechanism.

  12. [Detection of marginal leakage of Class V restorations in vitro by micro-CT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lin-juan; Zhao, Xin-yi; Li, Shi-bao

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the reliability and superiority of micro-CT in marginal leakage assessment of Class V restorations. Class V preparations with gingival margins in dentin and occlusal in enamel were made in sixteen extracted non-carious human molars and restored with dental bonding agents and composite resin. All teeth were then immersed in 50% ammonia-silver nitrate solution for 12 hours, followed by developing solution for 8 hours. Each restoration was scanned by a micro-CT and silver leakage was measured and three-dimensional image of the silver leakage alone cavity wall were reconstructed. Afterward, all restorations were sectioned and examined for leakage depth using a microscope. The silver leakage depth of each restoration obtained by micro-CT and microscope were compared for equivalency. The silver leakage depths in gingival wall obtained with micro-CT (0.78 mm) and microscope (0.74 mm) showed no significant difference (P > 0.05), while the judgment of leakage depths in occlusal wall in micro-CT image (0.40 mm) was affected by adjacent enamel structure, giving less leakage depths compared to microscope (0.72 mm)(P leakages showed channels on their way to spreading. Micro-CT can detect precisely the silver leakage in the dentin wall of a restoration and display its three-dimensional shape fully. Enamel structure affects the detection of the silver leakage next to it.

  13. Submersion Quenching of Undercooled Liquid Metals in an Electrostatic Levitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory has a long history of providing materials research and thermophysical property data. The laboratory has recently added a new capability, a rapid quench system. This system allows samples to be dropped into a quench vessel that can be filled with a low melting point material, such as a gallium or indium alloy. Thereby allowing rapid quenching of undercooled liquid metals and alloys. This is the first submersion quench system inside an electrostatic levitator. The system has been tested successfully with samples of zirconium, iron-cobalt alloys, titanium-zirconium-nickel alloys, and silicon-cobalt alloys. This rapid quench system will allow materials science studies of undercooled materials and new materials development, including studies of metastable phases and transient microstructures. In this presentation, the system is described and some initial results are presented.

  14. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy's high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provide an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements; assessed each requirement; and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of normalized ASME SA 516, Grade 70, carbon steel

  15. Entanglement growth after a global quench in free scalar field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotler, Jordan S. [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Hertzberg, Mark P. [Institute of Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Mezei, Márk [Princeton Center for Theoretical Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Mueller, Mark T. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-11-28

    We compute the entanglement and Rényi entropy growth after a global quench in various dimensions in free scalar field theory. We study two types of quenches: a boundary state quench and a global mass quench. Both of these quenches are investigated for a strip geometry in 1, 2, and 3 spatial dimensions, and for a spherical geometry in 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. We compare the numerical results for massless free scalars in these geometries with the predictions of the analytical quasiparticle model based on EPR pairs, and find excellent agreement in the limit of large region sizes. At subleading order in the region size, we observe an anomalous logarithmic growth of entanglement coming from the zero mode of the scalar.

  16. Short-term effects of CO2 leakage on the soil bacterial community in a simulated gas leakage scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Wangyuan; Zhang, Shaoliang; Zhu, Qianlin; Feng, Qiyan; Chen, Fu

    2017-01-01

    The technology of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage (CCS) has provided a new option for mitigating global anthropogenic emissions with unique advantages. However, the potential risk of gas leakage from CO 2 sequestration and utilization processes has attracted considerable attention. Moreover, leakage might threaten soil ecosystems and thus cannot be ignored. In this study, a simulation experiment of leakage from CO 2 geological storage was designed to investigate the short-term effects of different CO 2 leakage concentration (from 400 g m -2 day -1 to 2,000 g m -2 day -1 ) on soil bacterial communities. A shunt device and adjustable flow meter were used to control the amount of CO 2 injected into the soil. Comparisons were made between soil physicochemical properties, soil enzyme activities, and microbial community diversity before and after injecting different CO 2 concentrations. Increasing CO 2 concentration decreased the soil pH, and the largest variation ranged from 8.15 to 7.29 ( p soil CO 2 concentration increased. The dominant phylum in the soil samples was Proteobacteria , whose proportion rose rapidly from 28.85% to 67.93%. In addition, the proportion of Acidobacteria decreased from 19.64% to 9.29% ( p soil ecosystems.

  17. Studies on halogen quenching through the Stern-Volmer plot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takiue, Makoto; Ishikawa, Hiroaki.

    1978-01-01

    The quenching effect for halogenated benzenes, methanes and ethanes have been investigated. The halogen quenching was accurately measured using the internal conversion electrons emitted from 113 Sn-sup(113m)In. From the quenching constants determined by the Stern-Volmer plots with respect to various halogen quenchers, the following results have been obtained. (1) The quenching constants increase with the number of halogen substituents, so as linearly in halogenated benzenes and exponentially in halogenated methanes and ethanes. Even the isomers of halogenides have different quenching constants. (2) There is a linearity between logarithm of the quenching constant and a polarographic half-wave reduction potential. (3) Electron excitation provides larger quenching constants than UV excitation for halogenated methanes. Based on these results, the mechanism of halogen quenching have been discussed in connection with the exciplex formation. (auth.)

  18. Modelling of heterogenous neutron leakages in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohleber, X.

    1997-01-01

    The TIBERE Model is a neutron leakage method based on B 1 heterogeneous transport equation resolution. In this work, we have studied the influence of the reflection mode at the boundary of the assembly. In particular the White boundary condition has been implemented in the APOLLO2 neutron transport code. We have compared the two TIBERE kinds of boundary conditions (specular and white) with the classical B 1 homogeneous leakage method in the modelling of some reactors. We have remarked the better capability of the TIBERE Model to compute voided assemblies. The white boundary condition is also able to compute a completely voided assembly and, besides, wins a factor 10 in CPU time in comparison with the specular boundary condition. These two heterogenous leakage formalisms have been tested on a partially voided experiment and have shown that the TIBERE Model can compute this kind of situation with a greater precision than the classical B 1 homogeneous leakage method, and with a shorter computational time. (author)

  19. Pickering unit 1 containment leakage characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaib, G.D.

    1994-01-01

    Results of the design pressure test carried out on Pickering Reactor Building number 1 during late 1992 showed that the leakage rate of the building was close to the safety analysis value of 2.7% contained mass per hour at the design pressure of 41.4 kPa(g) and was significantly higher than that reported after the previous test conducted in the spring of 1987. This unexpected finding initiated the longest and the most comprehensive containment leakage investigation ever undertaken by Ontario Hydro. A thorough investigation of leakage behaviour by repeated testing, inspections, leak search and analysis was launched. The extensive leak search effort included items such as: leak source detection by soap solution application, use of ultrasonic detectors, fogging and tracer gas techniques, systematic systems isolation, thermal imaging of the exterior, and quantification of leak sites by flowmeter and bagging. Using a specially designed volumetric technique, the root cause of the problem was finally confirmed as being due to 'pressure dependent laminar leakage' through the hairline cracks in the dome concrete. Structural analysis indicated that the thermal gradients and pressure loading combined to cause the cracking early in the structure's operating history and that overall structural integrity has not been compromised. Leakage rate analysis using a new fluid mechanics model augmented by the effect of thermal strains indicated that the leakage could be significantly less under certain transient temperature gradient conditions. Several options for repairing the dome were considered by a multidisciplinary team and it was finally decided to apply a specially engineered multilayer elastomeric coating to the exterior concrete surface. When the unit was re-tested in October 1993, a dramatic ten-fold improvement in leakage rate (down to 0.25%/h at design pressure) was observed. This is lower than even the commissioning results and comparable to the performance of newer units

  20. Tank 241-U-203: Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1995-01-01

    The revised Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order states that a tank characterization plan will be developed for each double-shell tank and single-shell tank using the data quality objective process. The plans are intended to allow users and regulators to ensure their needs will be met and resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-U-203 sampling activities

  1. Quenching behaviour for a singular predator–prey model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducrot, Arnaud; Guo, Jong-Shenq

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the quenching behaviour for a system of two reaction–diffusion equations arising in the modelling of the spatio-temporal interaction of prey and predator populations in fragile environment. We first provide some sufficient conditions on the initial data to have finite time quenching. Then we classify the initial data to distinguish type I quenching and type II quenching, by introducing a delicate energy functional along with the help of some a priori estimates. Finally, we present some results on the quenching set. It can be a singleton, the whole domain, or a compact subset of the domain

  2. Contrast media for radiological examination in gastrointestinal tract leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.Z. Ginai (Abida)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this investigation has been to find a safe and suitable contrast medium for radiological evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract in cases where leakage outside the GIT can be suspected. Leakage outside the gastro-intestinal tract lumen can occur in many ways eg.,

  3. Alopecia associated with unexpected leakage from electron cone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, B.C.; Pennington, E.C.; Hussey, D.H.; Jani, S.K.

    1989-06-01

    Excessive irradiation due to unexpected leakage was found on a patient receiving electron beam therapy. The cause of this leakage was analyzed and the amount of leakage was measured for different electron beam energies. The highest leakage occurred with a 6 x 6 cm cone using a 12 MeV electron beam. The leakage dose measured along the side of the cone could be as great as 40%. Until the cones are modified or redesigned, it is advised that all patient setups be carefully reviewed to assure that no significant patient areas are in the side scatter region.

  4. Tank 241-B-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-B-103 (B-103) sampling activities. Tank B-103 was placed on the Organic Watch List in January 1991 due to review of TRAC data that predicts a TOC content of 3.3 dry weight percent. The tank was classified as an assumed leaker of approximately 30,280 liters (8,000 gallons) in 1978 and declared inactive. Tank B-103 is passively ventilated with interim stabilization and intrusion prevention measures completed in 1985

  5. Tank design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that aboveground tanks can be designed with innovative changes to complement the environment. Tanks can be constructed to eliminate the vapor and odor emanating from their contents. Aboveground tanks are sometimes considered eyesores, and in some areas the landscaping has to be improved before they are tolerated. A more universal concern, however, is the vapor or odor that emanates from the tanks as a result of the materials being sorted. The assertive posture some segments of the public now take may eventually force legislatures to classify certain vapors as hazardous pollutants or simply health risks. In any case, responsibility will be leveled at the corporation and subsequent remedy could increase cost beyond preventive measures. The new approach to design and construction of aboveground tanks will forestall any panic which might be induced or perceived by environmentalists. Recently, actions by local authorities and complaining residents were sufficient to cause a corporation to curtail odorous emissions through a change in tank design. The tank design change eliminated the odor from fuel oil vapor thus removing the threat to the environment that the residents perceived. The design includes reinforcement to the tank structure and the addition of an adsorption section. This section allows the tanks to function without any limitation and their contents do not foul the environment. The vapor and odor control was completed successfully on 6,000,000 gallon capacity tanks

  6. Tank 241-TX-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-TX-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-TX-105 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  7. Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issuesclose quotes. Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolutionclose quotes

  8. Tank 241-BY-111 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-111 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-111 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  9. Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues (Osborne and Huckaby 1994). Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution (Osborne et al., 1994)

  10. Tank 241-TX-118 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-TX-118 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-TX-118 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  11. Tank 241-BY-112 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-112 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-112 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  12. Tank 241-C-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-C-104 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-C-104 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  13. Tank 241-BY-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-103 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-103 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  14. Tank 241-U-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-05-31

    Tank 241-U-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in {open_quotes}Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.{close_quotes} Tank 241-U-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with {open_quotes}Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.{close_quotes}

  15. Leakage Resilient Secure Two-Party Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Hazay, Carmit; Patra, Arpita

    2012-01-01

    we initiate the study of {\\em secure two-party computation in the presence of leakage}, where on top of corrupting one of the parties the adversary obtains leakage from the content of the secret memory of the honest party. Our study involves the following contributions: \\BE \\item {\\em Security...... and returns its result. Almost independently of secure computation, the area of {\\em leakage resilient cryptography} has recently been evolving intensively, studying the question of designing cryptographic primitives that remain secure even when some information about the secret key is leaked. In this paper...

  16. Underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental contamination from leaking underground storage tanks poses a significant threat to human health and the environment. An estimated five to six million underground storage tanks containing hazardous substances or petroleum products are in use in the US. Originally placed underground as a fire prevention measure, these tanks have substantially reduced the damages from stored flammable liquids. However, an estimated 400,000 underground tanks are thought to be leaking now, and many more will begin to leak in the near future. Products released from these leaking tanks can threaten groundwater supplies, damage sewer lines and buried cables, poison crops, and lead to fires and explosions. As required by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), the EPA has been developing a comprehensive regulatory program for underground storage tanks. The EPA proposed three sets of regulations pertaining to underground tanks. The first addressed technical requirements for petroleum and hazardous substance tanks, including new tank performance standards, release detection, release reporting and investigation, corrective action, and tank closure. The second proposed regulation addresses financial responsibility requirements for underground petroleum tanks. The third addressed standards for approval of state tank programs

  17. Simulation of leakage through mechanical sealing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomorov, V. P.; Gorlenko, O. A.; Izmerov, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    The procedure of mathematical modeling of leakage through the mechanical seal taking into account waviness and roughness is considered. The percolation process is represented as the sum of leakages through a gap between wavy surfaces and percolation through gaps formed by fractal roughness, i.e. the total leakage is determined by the slot model and filtration leakage. Dependences of leaks on the contact pressure of corrugated and rough surfaces of the mechanical seal elements are presented.

  18. Suspending Zeolite Particles In Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The current practice for removing waste from the tanks is adding water, agitating the tanks with long shaft vertical centrifugal pumps, and pumping the sludge/salt solution from the tank to downstream treatment processes. This practice has left sludge heels (tilde 30,000 gallons) in the bottom of the tanks. SRS is evaluating shrouded axial impeller mixers for removing the sludge heels in the waste tanks. The authors conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using the shrouded axial impeller mixers. The tests were performed with zeolite in scaled tanks which have diameters of 1.5, 6.0, and 18.75 feet. The mixer speeds required to suspend zeolite particles were measured at each scale. The data were analyzed with various scaling methods to compare their ability to describe the suspension of insoluble solids with the mixers and to apply the data to a full-scale waste tank. The impact of changes in particle properties and operating parameters was also evaluated. The conclusions of the work are: Scaling of the suspension of fast settling zeolite particles was best described by the constant power per unit volume method. Increasing the zeolite particle concentration increased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Decreasing the zeolite particle size from 0.7 mm 0.3 mm decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Increasing the number of mixers in the tank decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. A velocity of 1.6 ft/sec two inches above the tank bottom is needed to suspend zeolite particles

  19. Particle and radiation leakage importance: definition, analysis, and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacuci, D.G.; Wagschal, J.J.; Yaari, A.

    1982-01-01

    The concept of leakage importance function has been introduced and analyzed for physical systems governed by the Boltzmann transport equation. This leakage importance function represents a measure of the relative importance of source particles located at every point in phase space in contributing to the leakage and provides insight regarding the specific physical process that leads to leakage. The equation satisfied by the leakage importance function has been derived by using adjoint operators. It has been shown that procedures that are customarily used to derive an equation obeyed by an importance function suitable for an integral parameter such as a detector response or an eigenvalue lead to difficulties when directly applied to derive an equation obeyed by the leakage importance function. This is because, although leakage is also an integral parameter (i.e., a functional of the forward flux density), leakage is expressed in terms of a surface integral rather than in terms of volume integrals such as those appearing in expressions of detector responses or eigenvalues. Therefore, a procedure that departs from the customary course has been devised to derive the equation satisfied by the leakage importance function

  20. 27 CFR 24.229 - Tank car and tank truck requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.229 Tank car and tank truck requirements. Railroad tank cars and tank trucks used to transport spirits for use in wine production will be constructed...

  1. Leakage potential through mechanical penetrations in a severe accident environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, L.N.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the findings of an ongoing program, Integrity of Containment Penetrations Under Severe Accident Loads. The program is concerned with the leakage modes as well as the magnitude of leakage through mechanical penetrations in a containment building subject to a severe accident. Seal and gasket tests are used to evaluate the effect of radiation aging, thermal aging, seal geometry, and seal squeeze on seals and gaskets subjected to a hypothesized severe accident. The effects on leakage of the structural response of equipment hatches, personnel airlocks, and drywell heads subjected to severe accident pressures are studied by experiments and analyses. The data gathered during this program will be used to develop methodologies for predicting leakage

  2. CRITICAL ASSUMPTIONS IN THE F-TANK FARM CLOSURE OPERATIONAL DOCUMENTATION REGARDING WASTE TANK INTERNAL CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hommel, S.; Fountain, D.

    2012-03-28

    The intent of this document is to provide clarification of critical assumptions regarding the internal configurations of liquid waste tanks at operational closure, with respect to F-Tank Farm (FTF) closure documentation. For the purposes of this document, FTF closure documentation includes: (1) Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the FTF PA) (SRS-REG-2007-00002), (2) Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (DOE/SRS-WD-2012-001), (3) Tier 1 Closure Plan for the F-Area Waste Tank Systems at the Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2010-00147), (4) F-Tank Farm Tanks 18 and 19 DOE Manual 435.1-1 Tier 2 Closure Plan Savannah River Site (SRR-CWDA-2011-00015), (5) Industrial Wastewater Closure Module for the Liquid Waste Tanks 18 and 19 (SRRCWDA-2010-00003), and (6) Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis for the Performance Assessment for the F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (hereafter referred to as the Tank 18/Tank 19 Special Analysis) (SRR-CWDA-2010-00124). Note that the first three FTF closure documents listed apply to the entire FTF, whereas the last three FTF closure documents listed are specific to Tanks 18 and 19. These two waste tanks are expected to be the first two tanks to be grouted and operationally closed under the current suite of FTF closure documents and many of the assumptions and approaches that apply to these two tanks are also applicable to the other FTF waste tanks and operational closure processes.

  3. The Inductive Coupling of the Magnets in MICE and its Effect on Quench Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Witte, Holger

    2005-01-01

    The inductive coupling between various MICE magnet circuits is described. The consequences of this coupling on magnet charging and quenching are discussed. Magnet quench protection is achieved through the use of quench-back. Calculations of the quenching of a magnet due to quench-back resulting from circulating currents induced in the magnet mandrel due to quenching of an adjacent magnet are discussed. This report describes how the MICE magnet channel will react when magnets in that channel are quenched

  4. Tank 241-C-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for the Tank 241-C-107 (C-107) sampling activities. Currently tank C-107 is categorized as a sound, low-heat load tank with partial isolation completed in December 1982. The tank is awaiting stabilization. Tank C-107 is expected to contain three primary layers of waste. The bottom layer should contain a mixture of the following wastes: ion exchange, concentrated phosphate waste from N-Reactor, Hanford Lab Operations, strontium semi-works, Battelle Northwest, 1C, TBP waste, cladding waste, and the hot semi-works. The middle layer should contain strontium recovery supernate. The upper layer should consist of non-complexed waste

  5. Quench in a conduction-cooled Nb3Sn SMES magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpela, Aki; Lehtonen, Jorma; Mikkonen, Risto; Perälä, Raine

    2003-11-01

    Due to the rapid development of cryocoolers, conduction-cooled Nb3Sn devices are nowadays enabled. A 0.2 MJ conduction-cooled Nb3Sn SMES system has been designed and constructed. The nominal current of the coil was 275 A at 10 K. The quench tests have been performed and in this paper the experimental data are compared to the computational one. Due to a slow normal zone propagation, Nb3Sn magnets are not necessarily self-protective. In conduction-cooled coils, a thermal interface provides a protection method known as a quench back. The temperature rise in the coil during a quench was measured with a sensor located on the inner radius of the coil. The current decay was also monitored. The measured temperature increased for approximately 15 s after the current had already decayed. This temperature rise is due to the heat conduction from the hot spot. Thus, the measured temperature does not represent the hot-spot temperature. A computational quench model which takes into account quench back and heat conduction after the current decay was developed in order to understand the measured temperatures. According to the results, a quench back due to the eddy current induced heating of the thermal interface of an LTS coil was an adequate protection method.

  6. Tank characterization report for single-shell Tank 241-B-110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, L.C.; De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Rutherford, J.H.; Stephens, R.H.; Heasler, P.G.; Brown, T.M.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    Single-shell Tank 241-B-110 is an underground storage tank containing radioactive waste. The tank was sampled at various times between August and November of 1989 and later in April of 1990. The analytical data gathered from these sampling efforts were used to generate this Tank Characterization Report. Tank 241-B-110, located in the 200 East Area B Tank Farm, was constructed in 1943 and 1944, and went into service in 1945 by receiving second cycle decontamination waste from the B and T Plants. During the service life of the tank, other wastes were added including B Plant flush waste, B Plant fission product waste, B Plant ion exchange waste, PUREX Plant coating waste, and waste from Tank 241-B-105. The tank currently contains 246,000 gallons of non-complexed waste, existing primarily as sludge. Approximately 22,000 gallons of drainable interstitial liquid and 1,000 gallons of supernate remain. The solid phase of the waste is heterogeneous, for the top layer and subsequent layers have significantly different chemical compositions and are visually distinct. A complete analysis of the top layer has not been done, and auger sampling of the top layer is recommended to fully characterize the waste in Tank 241-B-110. The tank is not classified as a Watch List tank; however, it is a Confirmed Leaker, having lost nearly 10,000 gallons of waste. The waste in Tank 241-B-110 is primarily precipitated salts, some of which are composed of radioactive isotopes. The most prevalent analytes include water, bismuth, iron, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, silicon, sodium, and sulfate. The major radionuclide constituents are 137 Cs and 90 Sr

  7. Asymmetries in the spectral density of an interaction-quenched Luttinger liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzona, A.; Gambetta, F. M.; Carrega, M.; Cavaliere, F.; Sassetti, M.

    2018-03-01

    The spectral density of an interaction-quenched one-dimensional system is investigated. Both direct and inverse quench protocols are considered and it is found that the former leads to stronger effects on the spectral density with respect to the latter. Such asymmetry is directly reflected on transport properties of the system, namely the charge and energy current flowing to the system from a tunnel coupled biased probe. In particular, the injection of particles from the probe to the right-moving channel of the system is considered. The resulting fractionalization phenomena are strongly affected by the quench protocol and display asymmetries in the case of direct and inverse quench. Transport properties therefore emerge as natural probes for the observation of this quench-induced behavior.

  8. Thermal quenching of the yellow luminescence in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Albarakati, N. M.; Monavarian, M.; Avrutin, V.; Morkoç, H.

    2018-04-01

    We observed varying thermal quenching behavior of the yellow luminescence band near 2.2 eV in different GaN samples. In spite of the different behavior, the yellow band in all the samples is caused by the same defect—the YL1 center. In conductive n-type GaN, the YL1 band quenches with exponential law, and the Arrhenius plot reveals an ionization energy of ˜0.9 eV for the YL1 center. In semi-insulating GaN, an abrupt and tunable quenching of the YL1 band is observed, where the apparent activation energy in the Arrhenius plot is not related to the ionization energy of the defect. In this case, the ionization energy can be found by analyzing the shift of the characteristic temperature of PL quenching with excitation intensity. We conclude that only one defect, namely, the YL1 center, is responsible for the yellow band in undoped and doped GaN samples grown by different techniques.

  9. 40 CFR 1065.675 - CLD quench verification calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false CLD quench verification calculations... POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.675 CLD quench verification calculations. Perform CLD quench-check calculations as follows: (a) Perform a CLD analyzer quench...

  10. Tank drive : ZCL takes its composite tank technology worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byfield, M.

    2010-06-15

    Edmonton-based ZCL Composites Inc. is North America's largest manufacturer and supplier of fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP) underground storage tanks. The company has aggressively pursued new markets in the oil sands, shale gas gas, and other upstream petroleum industries. The manufacturer also targets water and sewage applications, and provides customized corrosion solutions for a variety of industries. The company developed its double-walled FRP tanks in response to Canadian Environmental Protection Act rules requiring cathodic protection for steel tanks, leak detection, and secondary containment. ZCL supplies approximately 90 per cent of the new tanks installed by gasoline retailers in Canada. Future growth is expected to be strong, as many old tanks will soon need to be replaced. The company has also developed a method of transforming underground single wall tanks into secondarily contained systems without digging them out. The company has also recently signed licence agreements with tank manufacturers in China. 3 figs.

  11. Artificial-Crack-Behavior Test Evaluation of the Water-Leakage Repair Materials Used for the Repair of Water-Leakage Cracks in Concrete Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Soo-Yeon Kim; Sang-Keun Oh; Byoungil Kim

    2016-01-01

    There are no existing standard test methods at home and abroad that can verify the performance of water leakage repair materials, and it is thus very difficult to perform quality control checks in the field of water leakage repair. This study determined that the key factors that have the greatest impact on the water leakage repair materials are the micro-behaviors of cracks, and proposed an artificial-crack-behavior test method for the performance verification of the repair materials. The per...

  12. Singlet oxygen quenching by oxygen in tetraphenyl-porphyrin solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedic, Roman; Korinek, Miloslav; Molnar, Alexander; Svoboda, Antonin; Hala, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved measurement of singlet oxygen infrared phosphorescence is a powerful tool for determination of quantum yields and kinetics of its photosensitization. This technique was employed to investigate in detail the previously observed effect of singlet oxygen quenching by oxygen. The question whether the singlet oxygen is quenched by oxygen in ground or in excited state was addressed by study of two complementary dependencies of singlet oxygen lifetimes: on dissolved oxygen concentration and on excitation intensity. Oxygen concentration dependence study of meso-tetra(4-sulphonato)phenylporphyrin (TPPS 4 ) phosphorescence kinetics showed linearity of the dependence of TPPS 4 triplet state rate-constant. Corresponding bimolecular quenching constant of (1.5±0.1)x10 9 l/mol s was obtained. On the other hand, rate constants of singlet oxygen depopulation exhibit nonlinear dependence on oxygen concentration. Comparison of zero oxygen concentration-extrapolated value of singlet oxygen lifetime of (6.5±0.4) μs to (3.7±0.1) μs observed under air-saturated conditions indicates importance of the effect of quenching of singlet oxygen by oxygen. Upward-sloping dependencies of singlet oxygen depopulation rate-constant on excitation intensity evidence that singlet oxygen is predominantly quenched by oxygen in excited singlet state

  13. Acceptance/operational test procedure 101-AW tank camera purge system and 101-AW video camera system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castleberry, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-AW Tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and the 101-AW Video Camera System. The safety interlock which shuts down all the electronics inside the 101-AW vapor space, during loss of purge pressure, will be in place and tested to ensure reliable performance. This procedure is separated into four sections. Section 6.1 is performed in the 306 building prior to delivery to the 200 East Tank Farms and involves leak checking all fittings on the 101-AW Purge Panel for leakage using a Snoop solution and resolving the leakage. Section 7.1 verifies that PR-1, the regulator which maintains a positive pressure within the volume (cameras and pneumatic lines), is properly set. In addition the green light (PRESSURIZED) (located on the Purge Control Panel) is verified to turn on above 10 in. w.g. and after the time delay (TDR) has timed out. Section 7.2 verifies that the purge cycle functions properly, the red light (PURGE ON) comes on, and that the correct flowrate is obtained to meet the requirements of the National Fire Protection Association. Section 7.3 verifies that the pan and tilt, camera, associated controls and components operate correctly. This section also verifies that the safety interlock system operates correctly during loss of purge pressure. During the loss of purge operation the illumination of the amber light (PURGE FAILED) will be verified

  14. SDSS-IV MaNGA: faint quenched galaxies - I. Sample selection and evidence for environmental quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Masters, Karen L.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Law, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freischlad, Gordon; Gaulme, Patrick; Grabowski, Katie; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Wake, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Using kinematic maps from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, we reveal that the majority of low-mass quenched galaxies exhibit coherent rotation in their stellar kinematics. Our sample includes all 39 quenched low-mass galaxies observed in the first year of MaNGA. The galaxies are selected with Mr > -19.1, stellar masses 109 M⊙ 1.9. They lie on the size-magnitude and σ-luminosity relations for previously studied dwarf galaxies. Just six (15 ± 5.7 per cent) are found to have rotation speeds ve, rot 5 × 1010 M⊙), supporting the hypothesis that galaxy-galaxy or galaxy-group interactions quench star formation in low-mass galaxies. The local bright galaxy density for our sample is ρproj = 8.2 ± 2.0 Mpc-2, compared to ρproj = 2.1 ± 0.4 Mpc-2 for a star-forming comparison sample, confirming that the quenched low-mass galaxies are preferentially found in higher density environments.

  15. Strain-based quench detection for a solenoid superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingzhe; Guan Mingzhi; Ma Lizhen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a non-electric quench detection method based on the strain gauge measurement of a superconducting solenoid magnet at cryogenic temperature under an intense magnetic field. Unlike the traditional voltage measurement of quench detection, the strain-based detection method utilizes low-temperature strain gauges, which evidently reduce electromagnetic noise and breakdown, to measure the magneto/thermo-mechanical behavior of the superconducting magnet during excitation. The magnet excitation, quench tests and trainings were performed on a prototype 5 T superconducting solenoid magnet. The transient strains and their abrupt changes were compared with the current, magnetic field and temperature signals collected during excitation and quench tests to indicate that the strain gauge measurements can detect the quench feature of the superconducting magnet. The proposed method is expected to be able to detect the quench of a superconducting coil independently or utilized together with other electrical methods. In addition, the axial quench propagation velocity of the solenoid is evaluated by the quench time lags among different localized strains. The propagation velocity is enhanced after repeated quench trainings. (paper)

  16. Detection of leaks in underground storage tanks using electrical resistance methods: 1996 results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.

    1996-10-01

    This document provides a summary of a field experiment performed under a 15m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation, Washington. The purpose of this test was to image a contaminant plume as it develops in soil under a tank already contaminated by previous leakage and to determine whether contaminant plumes can be detected without the benefit of background data. Measurements of electrical resistance were made before and during a salt water release. These measurements were made in soil which contained the remnants of salt water plumes released during previous tests in 1994 and in 1995. About 11,150 liters of saline solution were released along a portion of the tank's edge in 1996. Changes in electrical resistivity due to release of salt water conducted in 1996 were determined in two ways: (1) changes relative to the 1996 pre-spill data, and (2) changes relative to data collected near the middle of the 1996 spill after the release flow rate was increased. In both cases, the observed resistivity changes show clearly defined anomalies caused by the salt water release. These results indicate that when a plume develops over an existing plume and in a geologic environment similar to the test site environment, the resulting resistivity changes are easily detectable. Three dimensional tomographs of the resistivity of the soil under the tank show that the salt water release caused a region of low soil resistivity which can be observed directly without the benefit of comparing the tomograph to tomographs or data collected before the spill started. This means that it may be possible to infer the presence of pre-existing plumes if there is other data showing that the regions of low resistivity are correlated with the presence of contaminated soil. However, this approach does not appear reliable in defining the total extent of the plume due to the confounding effect that natural heterogeneity has on our ability to define the margins of the anomaly

  17. Why the CDM can reduce carbon leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallbekken, S.

    2006-04-01

    Carbon leakage is an important concern because it can reduce the environmental effectiveness of the Kyoto Protocol. The Clean Development Mechanism, one of the flexibility mechanisms allowed under the protocol, has the potential to reduce carbon leakage significantly because it reduces the relative competitive disadvantage to Annex B countries of restricting greenhouse gas emissions. The economic intuition behind this mechanism is explored in a theoretical analysis. It is then analyzed numerically using a CGE model. The results indicate that, assuming appropriate accounting for leakage and under realistic assumptions on CDM activity, the CDM has the potential to reduce the magnitude of carbon leakage by around three fifths

  18. Thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in quartz samples of various origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subedi, B.; Oniya, E.; Polymeris, G.S.; Afouxenidis, D.; Tsirliganis, N.C.; Kitis, G.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of thermal quenching stands among the most important properties in the thermoluminescence (TL) of quartz on which many applications of TL are based. Since the quartz samples used in various applications are all of different origin it is useful to investigate whether the values of the thermal quenching parameters, i.e. the activation energy for thermal quenching W and a parameter C which describes the ratio of non-radiative to radiative luminescence transitions, evaluated mainly in specific quartz samples can be extrapolated to quartz samples of unknown origin as well as to quartz samples which are annealed at high temperatures. In the present work the TL glow curve of a series of un-annealed and annealed natural and synthetic quartz samples were studied as a function of the heating rate between 0.25 K/s and 16 K/s. Using an indirect fitting method it was found that the thermal quenching parameters W and C in most of the quartz samples are very similar to the values accepted in the literature. Furthermore, in some cases the thermal quenching parameters W and C are not the same for all TL glow-peaks in the same glow-curve. Finally, the strong external treatment of annealing the quartz samples at very high temperature can also influence at least one of the thermal quenching parameters.

  19. Stabilization of in-tank residuals and external-tank soil contamination: FY 1997 interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    This interim report evaluates various ways to stabilize decommissioned waste tanks and contaminated soils at the AX Tank Farm as part of a preliminary evaluation of end-state options for the Hanford tanks. Five technical areas were considered: (1) emplacement of smart grouts and/or other materials, (2) injection of chemical-getters into contaminated soils surrounding tanks (soil mixing), (3) emplacement of grout barriers under and around the tanks, (4) the use of engineered barriers over the tanks, and (5) the explicit recognition that natural attenuation processes do occur. Research topics are identified in support of key areas of technical uncertainty, in each of the five technical areas. Detailed cost/benefit analyses of the recommended technologies are not provided in this evaluation, performed by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

  20. Effects of cavity on leakage loss in straight-through labyrinth seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W; Nielsen, T K; Billdal, J T

    2010-01-01

    Labyrinth seals are widely used in rotating fluid machinery, due to its low-cost, simplicity and reliability. A straight-through labyrinth seal consists of a clearance between the stator and rotor, and sometimes cavities which are included on the stator or the rotator side. In this type of seals, making cavities are an effective way to convert turbulence kinetic energy into thermal energy by forming turbulence vortices, thereby reducing pressure difference and leakage flow. In this paper, the effect of cavities on leakage loss in straight-through labyrinth seals are studied by changing cavity dimensions such as depth and length, cavity number and cavity location. The influences of unilateral cavities and bilateral cavities on the leakage loss in straight-through labyrinth seals are also compared. The fluid flow characteristics through straight-through labyrinth seals were obtained by using viscous flow analysis along with a standard k-ωturbulence model. The cavity dimensions and cavity numbers have significant effects on the leakage as well as on the flow pattern in the seal. The bilateral cavity has better leakage performance than the unilateral cavity when cavity dimensions are identical. However, the cavity location shows no significant influences on the leakage flow.

  1. Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagadu, C.P.K.; Akaho, E.H.K.; Danso, K.A.; Stegowski, Z.; Furman, L.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. - Highlights: ► I-131 radioactive tracer is suitable for tracing the aqueous phase in gold ore slurry. ► Online data collection is more convenient method for tracer monitoring in industrial process systems. ► The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant zones is suitable to describe the flow behavior of leaching tanks. ► The radiotracer RTD technique could be used to validate design data after process intensification in gold leaching tanks.

  2. Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagadu, C.P.K., E-mail: dagadukofi@yahoo.co.uk [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Akaho, E.H.K.; Danso, K.A. [Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Stegowski, Z.; Furman, L. [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH-UST, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2012-01-15

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I-131 radioactive tracer is suitable for tracing the aqueous phase in gold ore slurry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Online data collection is more convenient method for tracer monitoring in industrial process systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant zones is suitable to describe the flow behavior of leaching tanks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radiotracer RTD technique could be used to validate design data after process intensification in gold leaching tanks.

  3. Radiolytic gas generation in Salt Cake Quality Assurance Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes are stored in large, steel tanks in the Savannah River Site's Tank Farms. The liquid levels in these tanks are monitored to detect leakage of waste out of tanks or leakage of liquids into the tanks. Recent unexplained level fluctuations in high-level waste (HLW) tanks have caused High Level Waste Engineering (HLWE) to develop a program to better understand tank level behavioral Interim Waste Technology (IWT) has been requested by HLWE to obtain data which will lead to a better understanding of the radiolytic generation of gases in salt cake. A task plan has been written in response to this request. This document details the controls necessary to ensure the quality of the results of the activities described in the task plan

  4. 9 CFR 316.14 - Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. 316.14 Section 316.14 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY... CONTAINERS § 316.14 Marking tank cars and tank trucks used in transportation of edible products. Each tank...

  5. High-field quench behavior and dependence of hot spot temperature on quench detection voltage threshold in a Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Tengming; Ye, Liyang; Turrioni, Daniele; Li, Pei

    2015-01-01

    Small insert solenoids have been built using a multifilamentary Ag/Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O x round wire insulated with a mullite sleeve (∼100 μm in thickness) and characterized in background fields to explore the quench behaviors and limits of Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O x superconducting magnets, with an emphasis on assessing the impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection. Using heaters of various lengths to initiate a small normal zone, a coil was quenched safely more than 70 times without degradation, with the maximum coil temperature reaching 280 K. Coils withstood a resistive voltage of tens of mV for seconds without quenching, showing the high stability of these coils and suggesting that the quench detection voltage should be greater than 50 mV in order not to falsely trigger protection. The hot spot temperature for the resistive voltage of the normal zone to reach 100 mV increased from ∼40–∼80 K while increasing the operating wire current density J o from 89 A mm −2 to 354 A mm −2 , whereas for the voltage to reach 1 V, it increased from ∼60–∼140 K. This shows the increasing negative impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection with increasing J o and the need to limit the quench detection voltage to <1 V. These measurements, coupled with an analytical quench model, were used to assess the impact of the maximum allowable detection voltage and temperature upon quench detection on the quench protection, assuming a limit of the hot spot temperature to <300 K. (paper)

  6. 49 CFR 179.102 - Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.102 Section 179.102 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.102 Special commodity requirements for pressure tank car tanks. (a) In addition to...

  7. Evaluation of Technologies for Retrieval of Waste from Leaking Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Lewis, Benjamin E.; Randolph, John D.; Killough, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Environmental and Waste Management Tanks Focus Area selected as a strategic initiative the need to identify and develop technologies for remediation of tanks that are known or are suspected to leak. This investigation identified and evaluated technical options for single-shell tank waste retrieval applicable to retrieve waste from potentially leaking tanks. Technologies that minimize leakage use minimal water, and dry retrieval technologies were evaluated. Safety, cost, authorization basis, and schedule risks were identified for each technology to provide River Protection Program with information to evaluate technical and programmatic risk. A workshop was held to identify technology needs and solutions. These approaches grouped into five categories: those related to waste dislodging, waste conveyance, both waste dislodging and conveyance, the deployment platform, and technologies related to leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation. Based on the ranking, six technologies were selected as potential candidates for further evaluation. These items were prioritized into four technologies to recommend for further evaluation (1) Air assisted TORE(R). The TORE(R) produces a processing vortex core with the ability to convey solids at pre-determined slurry concentrations over great distances. The dry TORE(R) concept uses air to develop the vortex to fluidize dry solids. The TORE(R)the solids in a slurry transport line. (2) Sonication for waste dislodging utilizes ultrasonic energy to fracture and dislodge hard waste types such as salt cake and sludge. (3) Novel long-reach manipulators concept is to investigate novel cost effective approaches for long-reach manipulator technology. (4) Next generation crawler technology envisions a non-umbilical dislodger, possibly radio controlled and powered remotely to provide a deployment platform not affected by path, or the need to retrace steps

  8. Radiotracer investigation in gold leaching tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagadu, C P K; Akaho, E H K; Danso, K A; Stegowski, Z; Furman, L

    2012-01-01

    Measurement and analysis of residence time distribution (RTD) is a classical method to investigate performance of chemical reactors. In the present investigation, the radioactive tracer technique was used to measure the RTD of aqueous phase in a series of gold leaching tanks at the Damang gold processing plant in Ghana. The objective of the investigation was to measure the effective volume of each tank and validate the design data after recent process intensification or revamping of the plant. I-131 was used as a radioactive tracer and was instantaneously injected into the feed stream of the first tank and monitored at the outlet of different tanks. Both sampling and online measurement methods were used to monitor the tracer concentration. The results of measurements indicated that both the methods provided identical RTD curves. The mean residence time (MRT) and effective volume of each tank was estimated. The tanks-in-series model with exchange between active and stagnant volume was used and found suitable to describe the flow structure of aqueous phase in the tanks. The estimated effective volume of the tanks and high degree of mixing in tanks could validate the design data and confirmed the expectation of the plant engineer after intensification of the process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quenching of p-Cyanophenylalanine Fluorescence by Various Anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Roesch, Rachel M; Gai, Feng

    2013-03-20

    To expand the spectroscopic utility of the non-natural amino acid p -cyanophenylalanine (Phe CN ), we examine the quenching efficiencies of a series of commonly encountered anions toward its fluorescence. We find that iodide exhibits an unusually large Stern-Volmer quenching constant, making it a convenient choice in Phe CN fluorescence quenching studies. Indeed, using the villin headpiece subdomain as a testbed we demonstrate that iodide quenching of Phe CN fluorescence offers a convenient means to reveal protein conformational heterogeneity. Furthermore, we show that the amino group of Phe CN strongly quenches its fluorescence, suggesting that Phe CN could be used as a local pH sensor.

  10. Transanal stent in anterior resection does not prevent anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Bulut, O; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS AND METH....... On this basis it was decided to discontinue the study prematurely for ethical reasons. CONCLUSION: Decompression of the anastomosis with a transanal stent does not reduce the risk of anastomotic leakage after anterior resection.......OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS...... AND METHODS: Randomized open trial of 194 patients operated in 11 hospitals during September 2000 to September 2003 with anterior resection for a mobile rectal tumour, 115 men and 79 women, median age 68 years (range 37-90 years). The surgeon decided upon the use of a protective ileostomy, and after...

  11. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces vascular leakage via autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Ru Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular leakage is an important feature of acute inflammatory shock, which currently has no effective treatment. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that can induce vascular leakage and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of shock. However, the mechanism of MIF-induced vascular leakage is still unclear. In this study, using recombinant MIF (rMIF, we demonstrated that MIF induced disorganization and degradation of junction proteins and increased the permeability of human endothelial cells in vitro. Western blotting analysis showed that rMIF treatment induced LC3 conversion and p62 degradation. Inhibition of autophagy with a PI3K inhibitor (3-MA, a ROS scavenger (NAC or autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion inhibitors (bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine rescued rMIF-induced vascular leakage, suggesting that autophagy mediates MIF-induced vascular leakage. The potential involvement of other signaling pathways was also studied using different inhibitors, and the results suggested that MIF-induced vascular leakage may occur through the ERK pathway. In conclusion, we showed that MIF triggered autophagic degradation of endothelial cells, resulting in vascular leakage. Inhibition of MIF-induced autophagy may provide therapeutic targets against vascular leakage in inflammatory shock.

  12. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-T-104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCenso, A.T.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    In August 1992, Single-Shell Tank 241-T-104 was sampled to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code (Ecology, 1991). This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also addresses expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background tank information. The purpose of this report is to describe and characterize the waste in Single-Shall Tank 241-T-104 (hereafter, Tank 241-T-104) based on information given from various sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the waste in Tank 241-T-104, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a useful format for making management and technical decisions concerning this waste tank. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are given based on safety issues and further characterization needs

  13. Competitiveness and carbon leakages in industry under asymmetric climate policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demailly, D.

    2008-02-01

    This research aims at studying how to predict competitiveness loss for an industry submitted to an asymmetric carbon constraint, and carbon leakages, whether high losses and important leakages might be feared, and which policies can be used to mitigate these losses and escapes. The author analyses and comments the content of four articles dealing with: the impact on competitiveness, revenue distribution and economic efficiency of a change in the allocation rules for EU greenhouse gas allowances; the relationship between allocation of CO 2 allowances and competitiveness in the case of the European iron and steel industry; CO 2 abatement, competitiveness and leakage in the European cement industry under EU ETS; and leakage from climate policies and border tax adjustment (lessons from a geographic model of the cement industry). Then, the author combines several approaches to study the cement and steel industries

  14. Xanthophyll cycle-dependent quenching of photosystem II chlorophyll a fluorescence: Formation of a quenching complex with a short fluorescence lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, A.M.; Hazlett, T.L.; Govindjee [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-03-14

    Excess light triggers protective nonradiative dissipation of excitation energy in photosystem II through the formation of a trans-thylakoid pH gradient that in turn stimulates formation of zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin. These xanthophylls when combined with protonation of antenna pigment-protein complexes may increase nonradiative dissipation and, thus, quench chlorophyll a fluorescence. Here we measured, in parallel, the chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetime and intensity to understand the mechanism of this process. Increasing the xanthophyll concentration in the presence of a pH gradient (quenched conditions) decreases the fractional intensity of a fluorescence lifetime component centered at {approx}2 ns and increases a component at {approx}0.4 ns. Uncoupling the pH gradient (unquenched conditions) eliminates the 0.4-ns component. Changes in the xanthophyll concentration do not significantly affect the fluorescence lifetimes in either the quenched or unquenched sample conditions. However, there are differences in fluorescence lifetimes between the quenched and unquenched states that are due to pH-related, but nonxanthophyll-related, processes. Quenching of the maximal fluorescence intensity correlates with both the xanthophyll concentration and the fractional intensity of the 0.4-ns component. The unchanged fluorescence lifetimes and the proportional quenching of the maximal and dark-level fluorescence intensities indicate that the xanthophyllact on antenna, not reaction center processes. Further, the fluorescence quenching is interpreted as the combined effect of the pH gradient and xanthophyll concentration, resulting in the formation of a quenching complex with a short ({approx}0.4 ns) fluorescence lifetime. 33 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Amorphous intergranular films in silicon nitride ceramics quenched from high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinibulk, M.K.; Kleebe, H.; Schneider, G.A.; Ruehle, M.

    1993-01-01

    High-temperature microstructure of an MgO-hot-pressed Si 3 N 4 and a Yb 2 O 3 + Al 2 O 3 -sintered/annealed Si 3 N 4 were obtained by quenching thin specimens from temperatures between 1,350 and 1,550 C. Quenching materials from 1,350 C produced no observable exchanges in the secondary phases at triple-grain junctions or along grain boundaries. Although quenching from temperatures of ∼1,450 C also showed no significant changes in the general microstructure or morphology of the Si 3 N 4 grains, the amorphous intergranular film thickness increased substantially from an initial ∼1 nm in the slowly cooled material to 1.5--9 nm in the quenched materials. The variability of film thickness in a given material suggests a nonequilibrium state. Specimens quenched from 1,550 C revealed once again thin (1-nm) intergranular films at all high-angle grain boundaries, indicating an equilibrium condition. The changes observed in intergranular-film thickness by high-resolution electron microscopy can be related to the eutectic temperature of the system and to diffusional and viscous processes occurring in the amorphous intergranular film during the high-temperature anneal prior to quenching

  16. Quenching of the He/sub μ/ +(2s) atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Quenching of the metastable 2s state of the He/sub μ/ + atom in helium gas is discussed. The first part of the discussion, which is devoted entirely to processes occurring after the He/sub μ/ + has become bound to one or more ordinary helium atoms, is based partly on Cohen's calculations of rates of vibrational quenching and partly on estimates obtained in the present paper of rates of Burbidge--de Borde quenching and Ruderman quenching. It is concluded that Burbidge--de Borde quenching or Ruderman quenching, or both, are likely to be more effective than Cohen quenching if the vibrational level of the bound system is low. A recent experiment by von Arb et al. is then analyzed in the light of this conclusion. The analysis is based on the reported absence, or near absence, of Auger electrons accompanying 2s quenching. While it is agreed that the Cohen mechanism occurring in the molecular ion HeHe/sub μ/ + remains the most likely explanation of the experiment, it is concluded that the quenching occurs in comparatively high levels. It is then argued that this conclusion is in accord with some theoretical investigations of three-body association reactions and also with some elementary considerations regarding the relaxation of highly excited diatomic molecules, and it is further concluded that the quenching is most likely to occur in states with very low rotational quantum number and vibrational quantum number 8≤v≤14

  17. Determination of Unidentified Leakage Using a Kalman Smoother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Soek Bo; Heo, Gyunyoung; Ra, Insik; Han, Jeonghyun; Lee, Seon Woo

    2008-01-01

    Since the safety significance of leaks from the RCS can widely vary depending on the source of the leak as well as the leak rate, the detection of the leakage is an important issue. The leakage is classified into 1) identified leakage which is defined as leakage into closed systems such as pump seal or valve packing leaks that can be captured, and 2) unidentified leakage which is all other leakage. The unidentified leakage is typically determined by the RCS inventory balance method which is based on NUREG-1107. Since the accuracy of leak rate calculation is dependent of the plant operating condition, the change in the RCS temperature, inventory, and the transient operating condition should be avoided during the measurement period. Nevertheless, the operation of the makeup of the borated water into the RCS and the diversion of the inventory to the outside of the RCS boundary makes it difficult to maintain the plant stable over an hour. Due to the large fluctuation of the calculated leak rate, it is sometimes hard to know the trend of the leakage as well as the instantaneous leak rate. Any fluctuation of operating conditions can results in unreliable leak rate. This study proposes a new way of determining the unidentified leak rate using a Kalman filter and smoother technique. The proposed algorithm enhances the accuracy of the leak rate calculation not only for the steady state operations but also for transients in a well timed manner

  18. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLorenzo, D.S.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-105 is a radioactive waste tank most recently sampled in March of 1993. Sampling and characterization of the waste in Tank 241-AP-105 contributes toward the fulfillment of Milestone M-44-05 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology, EPA, and DOE, 1993). Characterization is also needed tot evaluate the waste's fitness for safe processing through an evaporator as part of an overall waste volume reduction program. Tank 241-AP-105, located in the 200 East Area AP Tank Farm, was constructed and went into service in 1986 as a dilute waste receiver tank; Tank 241AP-1 05 was considered as a candidate tank for the Grout Treatment Facility. With the cancellation of the Grout Program, the final disposal of the waste in will be as high- and low-level glass fractions. The tank has an operational capacity of 1,140,000 gallons, and currently contains 821,000 gallons of double-shell slurry feed. The waste is heterogeneous, although distinct layers do not exist. Waste has been removed periodically for processing and concentration through the 242-A Evaporator. The tank is not classified as a Watch List tank and is considered to be sound. There are no Unreviewed Safety Questions associated with Tank 241-AP-105 at this time. The waste in Tank 241-AP-105 exists as an aqueous solution of metallic salts and radionuclides, with limited amounts of organic complexants. The most prevalent soluble analytes include aluminum, potassium, sodium, hydroxide, carbonate, nitrate, and nitrite. The calculated pH is greater than the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act established limit of 12.5 for corrosivity. In addition, cadmium, chromium, and lead concentrations were found at levels greater than their regulatory thresholds. The major radionuclide constituent is 137 Cs, while the few organic complexants present include glycolate and oxalate. Approximately 60% of the waste by weight is water

  19. 27 CFR 24.230 - Examination of tank car or tank truck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.230 Examination of tank car or tank truck. Upon arrival of a tank car or tank truck at the bonded wine premises, the proprietor shall... calibration chart is available at the bonded wine premises, the spirits may be gauged by volume in the tank...

  20. Potential for criticality in Hanford tanks resulting from retrieval of tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyatt, G.A.; Sterne, R.J.; Mattigod, S.V.

    1996-09-01

    This report assesses the potential during retrieval operations for segregation and concentration of fissile material to result in a criticality. The sluicing retrieval of C-106 sludge to AY-102 and the operation of mixer pumps in SY-102 are examined in some detail. These two tanks (C-106, SY-102) were selected because of the near term plans for retrieval of these tanks and their high plutonium inventories relative to other tanks. Although all underground storage tanks are subcritical by a wide margin if assumed to be uniform in composition, the possibility retrieval operations could preferentially segregate the plutonium and locally concentrate it sufficiently to result in criticality was a concern. This report examines the potential for this segregation to occur

  1. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-B-104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document summarizes information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-B-104. Sampling and analyses meet safety screening and historical data quality objectives. This report supports the requirements of Tri-party Agreement Milestone M-44-09. his characterization report summoned the available information on the historical uses and the current status of single-shell tank 241-B-104, and presents the analytical results of the June 1995 sampling and analysis effort. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-44-09 (Ecology et al. 1994). Tank 241-B-104 is a single-shell underground waste storage tank located in the 200 East Area B Tank Farm on the Hanford Site. It is the first tank in a three-tank cascade series. The tank went into service in August 1946 with a transfer of second-cycle decontamination waste generated from the bismuth phosphate process. The tank continued to receive this waste type until the third quarter of 1950, when it began receiving first-cycle decontamination waste also produced during the bismuth phosphate process. Following this, the tank received evaporator bottoms sludge from the 242-B Evaporator and waste generated from the flushing of transfer lines. A description and the status of tank 241-B-104 are sum in Table ES-1 and Figure ES-1. The tank has an operating capacity of 2,010 kL (530 kgal), and presently contains 1,400 kL (371 kgal) of waste. The total amount is composed of 4 kL (1 kgal) of supernatant, 260 kL (69 kgal) of saltcake, and 1,140 kL (301 kgal) of sludge (Hanlon 1995). Current surveillance data and observations appear to support these results

  2. Tank 241-C-101 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank C-101 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks of fugitive emissions to tank farm workers. Gas and vapor samples from the Tank C-101 headspace were collected on July 7, 1994 using the in situ sampling (ISS) method, and again on September 1, 1994 using the more robust vapor sampling system (VSS). Gas and vapor concentrations in Tank C-101 are influenced by its connections to other tanks and its ventilation pathways. At issue is whether the organic vapors in Tank C-101 are from the waste in that tank, or from Tanks C-102 or C-103. Tank C-103 is on the Organic Watch List; the other two are not. Air from the Tank C-101 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9-m long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 8, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 34.0 C, and all heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 39 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks provided by the laboratories

  3. Air Leakage Rates in Typical Air Barrier Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hun, Diana E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Childs, Phillip W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Estimates for 2010 indicate that infiltration in residential buildings was responsible for 2.85 quads of energy (DOE 2014), which is about 3% of the total energy consumed in the US. One of the mechanisms being implemented to reduce this energy penalty is the use of air barriers as part of the building envelope. These technologies decrease airflow through major leakage sites such as oriented strand board (OSB) joints, and gaps around penetrations (e.g., windows, doors, pipes, electrical outlets) as indicated by Hun et al. (2014). However, most air barrier materials do not properly address leakage spots such as wall-to-roof joints and wall-to-foundation joints because these are difficult to seal, and because air barrier manufacturers usually do not provide adequate instructions for these locations. The present study focuses on characterizing typical air leakage sites in wall assemblies with air barrier materials.

  4. Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system operational test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of operational testing of the 241-C-106 In-Tank Video Camera Imaging System. This imaging system was installed as a component of Project W-320 to monitor sluicing and waste retrieval activities in Tank 241-C-106

  5. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AP-102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LAMBERT, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    In April 1993, Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-102 was sampled to determine waste feed characteristics for the Hanford Grout Disposal Program. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics, expected bulk inventory, and concentration data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and information on the history of the tank. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding tank operational safety issues

  6. 241-AY-101 Tank Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.

    2013-08-26

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tank 241-AY-101. The construction history of tank 241-AY-101 has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In tank 241-AY-101, the second double-shell tank constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction reoccurred. The overall extent of similary and affect on tank 241-AY-101 integrity is described herein.

  7. Some possible causes and probability of leakages in LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, P.R.

    1984-01-01

    Relevant operational experience with steam generators for process and conventional plant and thermal and fast reactors is reviewed. Possible causes of water/steam leakages into sodium/gas are identified and data is given on the conditions necessary for failure, leakage probability and type of leakage path. (author)

  8. International Market Leakage from China’s Forestry Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Hu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon leakage can be a problem when seeking to reduce carbon emissions through forest policy. International market leakage is mainly caused by supply and demand imbalances in the timber market. This paper selects China, which is implementing forestry policy changes, as the research object. We begin by offering a brief analysis of China’s forestry policy changes, such as the logging quota and Six Key Forestry Programs to determine whether those policies affect timber supply. Second, through the use of three shock variables, carbon leakage is simulated under different scenarios by the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP model. The results reveal that the magnitude of leakage caused by implementing China’s forestry policies is between 79.7% and 88.8% with carbon leakage mainly displaced to Russia, Southeast Asia, and the EU. Two effective scenarios for reducing market leakage are presented: forest tenure reform and fast growing forest projects to improve domestic timber production, and raising tariffs on timber imports to reduce imports.

  9. Automation of unit for leakage test

    OpenAIRE

    LYCHKOVSKAYA V.S.; TSYGANKOV A.S.; GRINBERG G.M.; STANOVOVA O.A.

    2015-01-01

    Federal state educational standard requirements for training of university students have been considered. Leakage test procedures for components of aerospace vehicles have been described. Automation procedures of existing laboratory leakage test units have been outlined.

  10. Flow in sodium loop surge tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Martoch, J.

    1977-01-01

    The alternate liquid flow, the condition of vortex formation, gas entrainment in the discharge and the liquid level characteristics are studied using the models of the vertical and horizontal surge tanks of a sodium circuit with pump and heat exchangers. The conditions for vortex formation are more favourable in the vertical cylindrical tank than in the horizontal tank. The size of the vortex produced in the tank is affected by the initial speed circulation, due as a rule to an unsuitable inlet design. The proposed design considers an inlet below the sodium level using capped perforated pipes. Vortex formation, gas transport to the discharge pipe and turbulences of the liquid in the tank may be prevented by dividing the tank to the discharge and the inlet areas using perforated partitions, and by inserting the discharge cylinder above the discharge pipe outflow. The liquid level in the tank may be calmed by screens or by perforated plates. The adaptation of the surge tank of the sodium circuit will probably eliminate vortex formation and the entrainment of cover gas into the discharge piping and the sodium circuit under nominal conditions. (J.B.)

  11. A new method of quench monitoring in liquid scintillation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horrocks, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    The quench level of different liquid scintillation counting samples is measured by comparing the responses (pulse heights) produced by the same energy electrons in each sample. The electrons utilized in the measurements are those of the maximum energy (Esub(max)) which are produced by the single Compton scattering process for the same energy gamma-rays in each sample. The Esub(max) response produced in any sample is related to the Esub(max) response produced in an unquenched, sealed standard. The difference in response on a logarithm response scale is defined as the ''H Number''. The H number is related to the counting efficiency of the desired radionuclide by measurement of a set of standards of known amounts of the radionuclide and different amounts of quench (standard quench curve). The concept of the H number has been shown to be theoretically valid. Based upon this proof, the features of the H number concept as embodied in the Beckman LS-8000 Series Liquid Scintillation Systems have been demonstrated. It has been shown that one H number is unique; it provides a method of instrument calibration and wide dynamic quench range measurements. Further, it has been demonstrated that the H number concept provides a universal quench parameter. Counting efficiency vs. H number plots are repeatable within the statistical limits of +-1% counting efficiency. By the use of the H number concept a very accurate method of automatic quench compensation (A.Q.C.) is possible. (T.G.)

  12. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In...

  13. Factors related to ostomy leakage in the community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Catherine R

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe demographic and clinical variables related to ostomy pouch leakage from those discharged from a major medical center during a 2-year period. A convenience sample of 198 persons with an ostomy was obtained using the ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) codes for colostomy, ileostomy, and ileal conduit for patients who were discharged from the medical center within the time frame of July 2009 to July 2011. One hundred seven participants (55%) returned a completed survey. Respondents included 57 men (53%) and 50 women (47%). The mean age was 60 years with age range from 23 to 91 years. Fecal ostomies made up the majority of the stomas representing 71 patients (66%). A descriptive, cross-sectional research design was used to describe clinical variables related to ostomy pouch leakage for those discharged from a major academic medical center over a 2-year period of time. Participants were mailed an introductory letter from the principal investigator, a self-administered questionnaire, and a prepaid return envelope. Ninety-three patients (87%) reported leakage; however, 48 patients (45%) stated that they did not leak often. A logistic regression was estimated to determine which variables were significant predictors of the dependent variable of leaking status (no/seldom leaking vs more frequent leaking). Two variables were individually significant predictors, sex (P = .021) and 2-piece pouch (P = .015). Women were 4 times more likely to be in the more frequent leaking group than were men. Those who were wearing 2-piece pouches were 78% less likely to be in the more frequent leaking group. Participants with ileostomies or urostomies were more likely to be in the more frequent leaking group and those with peristomal skin irritation were more likely to be in the more frequent leaking group. Findings from this study reveal that women were more likely to experience leakage than men and that wearing a 2-piece

  14. Automated detection of leakage in fluorescein angiography images with application to malarial retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yitian; MacCormick, Ian J C; Parry, David G; Leach, Sophie; Beare, Nicholas A V; Harding, Simon P; Zheng, Yalin

    2015-06-01

    The detection and assessment of leakage in retinal fluorescein angiogram images is important for the management of a wide range of retinal diseases. We have developed a framework that can automatically detect three types of leakage (large focal, punctate focal, and vessel segment leakage) and validated it on images from patients with malarial retinopathy. This framework comprises three steps: vessel segmentation, saliency feature generation and leakage detection. We tested the effectiveness of this framework by applying it to images from 20 patients with large focal leak, 10 patients with punctate focal leak, and 5,846 vessel segments from 10 patients with vessel leakage. The sensitivity in detecting large focal, punctate focal and vessel segment leakage are 95%, 82% and 81%, respectively, when compared to manual annotation by expert human observers. Our framework has the potential to become a powerful new tool for studying malarial retinopathy, and other conditions involving retinal leakage.

  15. Transanal stent in anterior resection does not prevent anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Bulut, O; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A defunctioning transanal stent may theoretically reduce the leakage rate after anterior rectal resection. We present a randomized open study with the aim of comparing the leakage rate after anterior resection with a loop ileostomy, a transanal stent, both or neither. PATIENTS...... completion of the operation the patients were randomized in two groups with and without a transanal stent. RESULTS: A clinically significant leakage was diagnosed in 25 patients (13%). No significant difference was found 17 of 98 patients with a stent and 8 of 96 without (P = 0.09), or in 9 of 44 ileostomy...... patients with a stent and in 3 of 45 without (P = 0.07). Several leaks over a short time led to an interim analysis after inclusion of 194 of 448 planned patients. The analysis showed no significant protective effect of the stent, and more leakages in the stent group, although not statistically significant...

  16. Reanastomosis with Stapler in Duodenojejunal Junction Anastomosis Leakage: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Seker

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available After anastomosis leakages, treatment of patient gets more difficult and mortality rates increase. At lower level gastrointestinal anastomosis leakages, because of always there is an ostomy alternative, digestion problems are seen lesser. But at upper level gastrointestinal system anastomosis leakages, when it is taken account of nutrient condition of patient, requirement of making anastomos increases. So moratlity rates increase. At this article we aimed to present a different technique that we administered on management of a patient who had duodenojejunal junction anastomosis leakage.

  17. System and method for quench protection of a superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianrui; Sivasubramaniam, Kiruba Haran; Bray, James William; Ryan, David Thomas

    2008-03-11

    A system and method for protecting a superconductor from a quench condition. A quench protection system is provided to protect the superconductor from damage due to a quench condition. The quench protection system comprises a voltage detector operable to detect voltage across the superconductor. The system also comprises a frequency filter coupled to the voltage detector. The frequency filter is operable to couple voltage signals to a control circuit that are representative of a rise in superconductor voltage caused by a quench condition and to block voltage signals that are not. The system is operable to detect whether a quench condition exists in the superconductor based on the voltage signal received via the frequency filter and to initiate a protective action in response.

  18. Cherenkov radiation effects on counting efficiency in extremely quenched liquid scintillation samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau Carles, A.; Grau Malonda, A.; Rodriguez Barquero, L.

    1993-01-01

    The CIEMAT/NIST tracer method has successfully standardized nuclides with diverse quench values and decay schemes in liquid scintillation counting. However, the counting efficiency is computed inaccurately for extremely quenched samples. This article shows that when samples are extremely quenched, the counting efficiency in high-energy beta-ray nuclides depends principally on the Cherenkov effect. A new technique is described for quench determination, which makes the measurement of counting efficiency possible when scintillation counting approaches zero. A new efficiency computation model for pure beta-ray nuclides is also described. The results of the model are tested experimentally for 89 Sr, 90 Y, 36 Cl and 204 Tl nuclides with independence of the quench level. (orig.)

  19. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs

  20. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs

  1. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for A Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the A Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  2. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for S tank farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Walsh, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200 West Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to all the SSTs in the S Tank Farm of the southwest quadrant of the 200 West Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs.

  3. Supporting document for the historical tank content estimate for B Tank Farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Johnson, E.D.

    1994-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the Hanford Site 200-East Area underground single-shell tanks (SSTs). A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy (DOE) and Department of Defense (DOD) contractors. The historical data will supplement information gathered from in-tank core sampling activities that are currently underway. A tank history review that is accompanied by current characterization data creates a complete and reliable inventory estimate. Additionally, historical review of the tanks may reveal anomalies or unusual contents that are critical to characterization and post characterization activities. Complete and accurate tank waste characterizations are critical first steps for DOE and Westinghouse Hanford Company safety programs, waste pretreatment, and waste retrieval activities. The scope of this document is limited to the SSTs in the B Tank Farm of the northeast quadrant of the 200 East Area. Nine appendices compile data on: tank level histories; temperature graphs; surface level graphs; drywell graphs; riser configuration and tank cross section; sampling data; tank photographs; unknown tank transfers; and tank layering comparison. 113 refs

  4. Two-level quenching of photoluminescence in hexagonal boron nitride micropowder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henaish, A. M. A. [Ural Federal University, NANOTECH Center, Mira Street, 19, Yekaterinburg, Russia, 620002 (Russian Federation); Tanta University, Physics Department, Tanta, Egypt, 31527 (Egypt); Vokhmintsev, A. S.; Weinstein, I. A., E-mail: i.a.weinstein@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, NANOTECH Center, Mira Street, 19, Yekaterinburg, Russia, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-29

    The processes of photoluminescence thermal quenching in the range RT – 800 K of h-BN micropowder in the 3.56 eV band were studied. It was found that two non-radiative channels of excitations relaxation with activation energies of 0.27 and 0.81 eV control the quenching for emission observed. It was assumed that emptying the shallow traps based on O{sub N}-centers characterized external quenching in RT – 530 K range and non-radiative mechanism of donor-acceptor recombination began to dominate at T > 530 K.

  5. Quantum quench in one dimension: coherent inhomogeneity amplification and "supersolitons".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Matthew S; Yuzbashyan, Emil A; Altshuler, Boris L

    2010-09-24

    We study a quantum quench in a 1D system possessing Luttinger liquid (LL) and Mott insulating ground states before and after the quench, respectively. We show that the quench induces power law amplification in time of any particle density inhomogeneity in the initial LL ground state. The scaling exponent is set by the fractionalization of the LL quasiparticle number relative to the insulator. As an illustration, we consider the traveling density waves launched from an initial localized density bump. While these waves exhibit a particular rigid shape, their amplitudes grow without bound.

  6. Two-level quenching of photoluminescence in hexagonal boron nitride micropowder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henaish, A. M. A.; Vokhmintsev, A. S.; Weinstein, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    The processes of photoluminescence thermal quenching in the range RT – 800 K of h-BN micropowder in the 3.56 eV band were studied. It was found that two non-radiative channels of excitations relaxation with activation energies of 0.27 and 0.81 eV control the quenching for emission observed. It was assumed that emptying the shallow traps based on O N -centers characterized external quenching in RT – 530 K range and non-radiative mechanism of donor-acceptor recombination began to dominate at T > 530 K.

  7. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  8. 241-AW Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Gunter, Jason R.; Reeploeg, Gretchen E.

    2013-11-19

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for the 241-AW tank farm. The construction history of the 241-AW tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AW tank farm, the fourth double-shell tank farm constructed, similar issues as those with tank 241-AY-102 construction occured. The overall extent of similary and affect on 241-AW tank farm integrity is described herein.

  9. ITER Side Correction Coil Quench model and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicollet, S.; Bessette, D.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J. L.; Gauthier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2016-12-01

    Previous thermohydraulic studies performed for the ITER TF, CS and PF magnet systems have brought some important information on the detection and consequences of a quench as a function of the initial conditions (deposited energy, heated length). Even if the temperature margin of the Correction Coils is high, their behavior during a quench should also be studied since a quench is likely to be triggered by potential anomalies in joints, ground fault on the instrumentation wires, etc. A model has been developed with the SuperMagnet Code (Bagnasco et al., 2010) for a Side Correction Coil (SCC2) with four pancakes cooled in parallel, each of them represented by a Thea module (with the proper Cable In Conduit Conductor characteristics). All the other coils of the PF cooling loop are hydraulically connected in parallel (top/bottom correction coils and six Poloidal Field Coils) are modeled by Flower modules with equivalent hydraulics properties. The model and the analysis results are presented for five quench initiation cases with/without fast discharge: two quenches initiated by a heat input to the innermost turn of one pancake (case 1 and case 2) and two other quenches initiated at the innermost turns of four pancakes (case 3 and case 4). In the 5th case, the quench is initiated at the middle turn of one pancake. The impact on the cooling circuit, e.g. the exceedance of the opening pressure of the quench relief valves, is detailed in case of an undetected quench (i.e. no discharge of the magnet). Particular attention is also paid to a possible secondary quench detection system based on measured thermohydraulic signals (pressure, temperature and/or helium mass flow rate). The maximum cable temperature achieved in case of a fast current discharge (primary detection by voltage) is compared to the design hot spot criterion of 150 K, which includes the contribution of helium and jacket.

  10. Tank Characterization Report for Single-Shell Tank 241-C-104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank

  11. Optimization of a quench detection system for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borlein, M.

    2004-12-01

    Subject of this report is the detection of a quench in a superconducting magnet. For the safe operation of superconducting magnets one of the most important issues is the quench detection system which controls the superconducting state of the magnet and triggers a safety discharge if necessary. If it comes to a breakdown of the superconductivity (quench), the magnet has to be discharged very quickly to avoid any damage or danger for the magnet or its environment. First an introducing overview is given. Next different methods of quench detection will be presented, partially on the basis of existing quench detection systems and the applicability of these methods in different states of the magnet operation will be shown. The different quench detection methods are compared and evaluated partially by using test experiments described in the appendix. As an application example this report contains a proposal for the quench detection system for the Wendelstein 7-X facility, actually built by the Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching [de

  12. Physical pictures of symmetry breaking in quenched QED4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogut, J.B.; Argonne National Lab., IL

    1989-01-01

    We discuss 'collapse of the wavefunction' as the phenomenon underlying chiral symmetry breaking in quenched QED4. The 1/r singularity in the 'collapsed' qanti q wavefunction causes 'catalyzed symmetry breaking' which is the field theoretic analog of 'monopole induced proton decay'. The evasion of mean field exponents by the quenched theory's chiral phase transition is emphasized. (orig.)

  13. Nonequilibrium forces following quenches in active and thermal matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Christian M.; Solon, Alexandre; Kardar, Mehran; Krüger, Matthias

    2018-03-01

    Nonequilibrium systems with conserved quantities like density or momentum are known to exhibit long-ranged correlations. This, in turn, leads to long-ranged fluctuation-induced (Casimir) forces, predicted to arise in a variety of nonequilibrium settings. Here, we study such forces, which arise transiently between parallel plates or compact inclusions in a gas of particles, following a change ("quench") in temperature or activity of the medium. Analytical calculations, as well as numerical simulations of passive or active Brownian particles, indicate two distinct forces: (i) The immediate effect of the quench is adsorption or desorption of particles of the medium to the immersed objects, which in turn initiates a front of relaxing (mean) density. This leads to time-dependent density-induced forces. (ii) A long-term effect of the quench is that density fluctuations are modified, manifested as transient (long-ranged) (pair-)correlations that relax diffusively to their (short-ranged) steady-state limit. As a result, transient fluctuation-induced forces emerge. We discuss the properties of fluctuation-induced and density-induced forces as regards universality, relaxation as a function of time, and scaling with distance between objects. Their distinct signatures allow us to distinguish the two types of forces in simulation data. Our simulations also show that a quench of the effective temperature of an active medium gives rise to qualitatively similar effects to a temperature quench in a passive medium. Based on this insight, we propose several scenarios for the experimental observation of the forces described here.

  14. Quench propagation in the superconducting 6 kA flexible busbars of the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzog, R.; Calvi, M.; Sonnemann, F.; Pelegrin-Carcelen, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    Flexible superconducting cables with currents up to 6 kA will be used to power magnets individually in the insertion regions of the LHC. In case of a quench, the currents in these circuits will decay very fast (with time constants of about 200 ms) such that relatively small copper cross sections are sufficient for these busbars. Quench propagation experiments on a prototype cable and corresponding simulations led to a detailed understanding of the quench behavior of these busbars and to recommendations for the design and application of the cable. Simulations of the quench process in a multi-strand conductor led to a detailed understanding of the way current crosses from superconducting to pure copper strands and how this affects the quench propagation velocity. At nominal current (6 kA), the quench propagation velocities are high (10 m/s) and the hot spot temperature increases rapidly. In this situation, timely quench detection and energy extraction (current reduction) are vital to prevent damage of circuit components

  15. Quench Propagation in the Superconducting 6 kA Flexible Busbars of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Calvi, M; Pelegrin-Carcelen, J M; Sonnemann, F

    2002-01-01

    Flexible superconducting cables with currents up to 6 kA will be used to power magnets individually in the insertion regions of the LHC. In case of a quench, the currents in these circuits will decay very fast (with time constants of about 200 ms) such that relatively small copper cross sections are sufficient for these busbars. Quench propagation experiments on a prototype cable and corresponding simulations led to a detailed understanding of the quench behavior of these busbars and to recommendations for the design and application of the cable. Simulations of the quench process in a multi-strand conductor led to a detailed understanding of the way current crosses from superconducting to pure copper strands and how this affects the quench propagation velocity. At nominal current (6 kA), the quench propagation velocities are high (10 m/s) and the hot spot temperature increases rapidly. In this situation, timely quench detection and energy extraction (current reduction) are vital to prevent damage of circuit c...

  16. Quench propagation in the superconducting 6 kA flexible busbars of the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, R.; Calvi, M.; Sonnemann, F.; Pelegrin-Carcelen, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Flexible superconducting cables with currents up to 6 kA will be used to power magnets individually in the insertion regions of the LHC. In case of a quench, the currents in these circuits will decay very fast (with time constants of about 200 ms) such that relatively small copper cross sections are sufficient for these busbars. Quench propagation experiments on a prototype cable and corresponding simulations led to a detailed understanding of the quench behavior of these busbars and to recommendations for the design and application of the cable. Simulations of the quench process in a multi-strand conductor led to a detailed understanding of the way current crosses from superconducting to pure copper strands and how this affects the quench propagation velocity. At nominal current (6 kA), the quench propagation velocities are high (10 m/s) and the hot spot temperature increases rapidly. In this situation, timely quench detection and energy extraction (current reduction) are vital to prevent damage of circuit components.

  17. Quench behavior of a superconducting accelerator magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInturff, A.D.; Sampson, W.B.; Garber, M.; Dahl, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented on the minimum energy required to cause quenches to propagate in an accelerator dipole magnet. The amount of stored energy dissipated into the magnet was measured as a function of dipole excitation current. This in turn determines the maximum coil temperature reached in a given magnet. Quench velocities in the longitudinal direction of the conductor were as high as 11m/sec. The azimuthal velocities or turn to turn velocities were found to be a function of the number of fiberglass layers of insulation that the quench had to cross and were on the order of a few tens of centimeters/sec. The field shape of a given magnet was found to be unchanged for more than 100 quenches. The coil to coil connection and inter-coil splice resistances were found to be less than a namo-ohm and therefore of litle consequence in the cryogenic load considerations. No definitive answers were found on how to decrease the rate of training (130 Gauss/Quench average) required from 4.OT to 5.1T

  18. Channel follower leakage restrictor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, H.E.; Smith, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    An improved means is provided to control coolant leakage between the flow channel and the lower tie plate of a nuclear fuel assembly. The means includes an opening in the lower tie plate and a movable element adjacent thereto. The coolant pressure within the tie plate biases the movable means toward the inner surface of the surrounding flow channel to compensate for any movement of the flow channel away from the lower tie plate to thereby control the leakage of coolant flow from the fuel assemblies to the spaces among the fuel assemblies of the core. 9 figures

  19. Numerical calculation of transient field effects in quenching superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerg, Juljan Nikolai

    2010-01-01

    The maximum obtainable magnetic induction of accelerator magnets, relying on normal conducting cables and iron poles, is limited to around 2 T because of ohmic losses and iron saturation. Using superconducting cables, and employing permeable materials merely to reduce the fringe field, this limit can be exceeded and fields of more than 10 T can be obtained. A quench denotes the sudden transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state. The drastic increase in electrical resistivity causes ohmic heating. The dissipated heat yields a temperature rise in the coil and causes the quench to propagate. The resulting high voltages and excessive temperatures can result in an irreversible damage of the magnet - to the extend of a cable melt-down. The quench behavior of a magnet depends on numerous factors, e.g. the magnet design, the applied magnet protection measures, the external electrical network, electrical and thermal material properties, and induced eddy current losses. The analysis and optimization of the quench behavior is an integral part of the construction of any superconducting magnet. The dissertation is divided in three complementary parts, i.e. the thesis, the detailed treatment and the appendix. In the thesis the quench process in superconducting accelerator magnets is studied. At first, we give an overview over features of accelerator magnets and physical phenomena occurring during a quench. For all relevant effects numerical models are introduced and adapted. The different models are weakly coupled in the quench algorithm and solved by means of an adaptive time-stepping method. This allows to resolve the variation of material properties as well as time constants. The quench model is validated by means of measurement data from magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. In a second step, we show results of protection studies for future accelerator magnets. The thesis ends with a summary of the results and a critical outlook on aspects which could

  20. Numerical calculation of transient field effects in quenching superconducting magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerg, Juljan Nikolai

    2010-07-01

    The maximum obtainable magnetic induction of accelerator magnets, relying on normal conducting cables and iron poles, is limited to around 2 T because of ohmic losses and iron saturation. Using superconducting cables, and employing permeable materials merely to reduce the fringe field, this limit can be exceeded and fields of more than 10 T can be obtained. A quench denotes the sudden transition from the superconducting to the normal conducting state. The drastic increase in electrical resistivity causes ohmic heating. The dissipated heat yields a temperature rise in the coil and causes the quench to propagate. The resulting high voltages and excessive temperatures can result in an irreversible damage of the magnet - to the extend of a cable melt-down. The quench behavior of a magnet depends on numerous factors, e.g. the magnet design, the applied magnet protection measures, the external electrical network, electrical and thermal material properties, and induced eddy current losses. The analysis and optimization of the quench behavior is an integral part of the construction of any superconducting magnet. The dissertation is divided in three complementary parts, i.e. the thesis, the detailed treatment and the appendix. In the thesis the quench process in superconducting accelerator magnets is studied. At first, we give an overview over features of accelerator magnets and physical phenomena occurring during a quench. For all relevant effects numerical models are introduced and adapted. The different models are weakly coupled in the quench algorithm and solved by means of an adaptive time-stepping method. This allows to resolve the variation of material properties as well as time constants. The quench model is validated by means of measurement data from magnets of the Large Hadron Collider. In a second step, we show results of protection studies for future accelerator magnets. The thesis ends with a summary of the results and a critical outlook on aspects which could

  1. Heterogeneous neutron-leakage model for PWR pin-by-pin calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yunzhao; Zhang, Bin; Wu, Hongchun; Shen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •The derivation of the formula of the leakage model is introduced. This paper evaluates homogeneous and heterogeneous leakage models used in PWR pin-by-pin calculation. •The implements of homogeneous and heterogeneous leakage models used in pin-cell homogenization of the lattice calculation are studied. A consistent method of cooperation between the heterogeneous leakage model and the pin-cell homogenization theory is proposed. •Considering the computational cost, a new buckling search scheme is proposed to reach the convergence faster. The computational cost of the newly proposed neutron balance scheme is much less than the power-method scheme and the linear-interpolation scheme. -- Abstract: When assembly calculation is performed with the reflective boundary condition, a leakage model is usually required in the lattice code. The previous studies show that the homogeneous leakage model works effectively for the assembly homogenization. However, it becomes different and unsettled for the pin-cell homogenization. Thus, this paper evaluates homogeneous and heterogeneous leakage models used in pin-by-pin calculation. The implements of homogeneous and heterogeneous leakage models used in pin-cell homogenization of the lattice calculation are studied. A consistent method of cooperation between the heterogeneous leakage model and the pin-cell homogenization theory is proposed. Considering the computational cost, a new buckling search scheme is proposed to reach the convergence faster. For practical reactor-core applications, the diffusion coefficients determined by the transport cross-section or by the leakage model are compared with each other to determine which one is more accurate for the Pressurized Water Reactor pin-by-pin calculation. Numerical results have demonstrated that the heterogeneous leakage model together with the diffusion coefficient determined by the heterogeneous leakage model would have the higher accuracy. The new buckling search

  2. Calculating Quench Propagation with ANSYS(regsign)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.; Hinkins, R.; Lietzke, A.F.; Prestemon, S.

    2002-01-01

    A commercial Finite-Element-Analysis program, ANSYS(reg s ign), is widely used in structural and thermal analysis. With the program's ability to include non-linear material properties and import complex CAD files, one can generate coil geometries and simulate quench propagation in superconducting magnets. A 'proof-of-principle' finite element model was developed assuming a resistivity that increases linearly from zero to its normal value at a temperature consistent with the assumed B magnetic field. More sophisticated models could easily include finer-grained coil, cable, structural, and circuit details. A quench is provoked by raising the temperature of an arbitrary superconducting element above its T c . The time response to this perturbation is calculated using small time-steps to allow convergence between steps. Snapshots of the temperature and voltage distributions allow examination of longitudinal and turn-to-turn quench propagation, quench-front annihilation, and cryo-stability. Modeling details are discussed, and a computed voltage history was compared with measurements from a recent magnet test.

  3. Tank characterization report for double-shell Tank 241-AW-105

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCenso, A.T.; Amato, L.C.; Franklin, J.D.; Lambie, R.W.; Stephens, R.H.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    In May 1990, double-shell Tank 241-AW-105 was sampled to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also addresses expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background tank information. This report summarizes the available information regarding the waste in Tank 241-AW-105, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a useful format for making management and technical decisions concerning this waste tank. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are given based on safety issues and further characterization needs

  4. Quenching effects in photon production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, M.

    1989-01-01

    Contraints on the photon production calculated by kinetic approaches are studied by means of sum-rules a finite temperature for simple quantum system. For the square-well potential the exact production rate is compared with its semi-classical limit in order to introduce the principle problem. For the scattering of hard spheres the photon production cross section is derived exactly by partial wave expansion. This serves to study the more realistic example of a gas of hard spheres. The corresponding kinetic photon production rates are found to violate the sum-rules, due to a singular behaviour at small gamma energies. Thus the hypothesis of incoherent free scattering is not valid in that range because of destructive interferences which quench the production rates significantly. For the application to nuclear collisions at intermediate energies these quenching effects are found to be important for gamma energies even up to a few hundred MeV. (orig.)

  5. Leakage-Resilient Circuits without Computational Assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziembowski, Stefan; Faust, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Physical cryptographic devices inadvertently leak information through numerous side-channels. Such leakage is exploited by so-called side-channel attacks, which often allow for a complete security breache. A recent trend in cryptography is to propose formal models to incorporate leakage...... on computational assumptions, our results are purely information-theoretic. In particular, we do not make use of public key encryption, which was required in all previous works...... into the model and to construct schemes that are provably secure within them. We design a general compiler that transforms any cryptographic scheme, e.g., a block-cipher, into a functionally equivalent scheme which is resilient to any continual leakage provided that the following three requirements are satisfied...

  6. Reliability analysis for the quench detection in the LHC machine

    CERN Document Server

    Denz, R; Vergara-Fernández, A

    2002-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will incorporate a large amount of superconducting elements that require protection in case of a quench. Key elements in the quench protection system are the electronic quench detectors. Their reliability will have an important impact on the down time as well as on the operational cost of the collider. The expected rates of both false and missed quenches have been computed for several redundant detection schemes. The developed model takes account of the maintainability of the system to optimise the frequency of foreseen checks, and evaluate their influence on the performance of different detection topologies. Seen the uncertainty of the failure rate of the components combined with the LHC tunnel environment, the study has been completed with a sensitivity analysis of the results. The chosen detection scheme and the maintainability strategy for each detector family are given.

  7. The Politics of Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    consequences in the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark and at the EU-level. A Continental think tank tradition in which the state plays a pivotal role and an Anglo-American tradition which facilitates interaction in public policy on market-like terms have shaped the development of think tanks. On the basis......In the 21st century, think tanks have become more than a buzzword in European public discourse. They now play important roles in the policy-making process by providing applied research, building networks and advocating policies. The book studies the development of think tanks and contemporary...... of a typology of think tanks, quantitative data and interviews with think tank practitioners, the interplay between state and market dynamics and the development of different types of think tanks is analysed. Although think tanks develop along different institutional trajectories, it is concluded that the Anglo...

  8. Quench Tests of LHC Magnets with Beam: Studies on Beam Loss development and determination of Quench levels

    CERN Document Server

    Priebe, A; Sapinski, M

    The application of superconducting materials in the field of high energy accelerator physics not only opens the doors to the generation of the magnetic fields unattainable to normal conductors but also demands facing new challenges. A transition fromthe superconducting state, which is characterized by a resistance-free flow of the electric current, to the normal conducting state is called quenching. This process might be extremely dangerous and even lead to destruction of amagnet superconducting coil if no protecting actions are taken. Therefore, the knowledge of a magnet quench level, i.e. amount of energy which causes the transition to the resistive state, is crucial for the safety and operational efficiency of the accelerator. Regarding that, specific thresholds are incorporated to dedicated quench prevention systems in order to suppress the origin of detected energy perturbation, for example beam losses, or mitigate the consequences of the quenching process by dissipating the energy stored in the magnetic...

  9. Quenching and recovery experiments on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasch, K.D.; Siegel, R.W.; Schultz, H.

    1976-01-01

    A short summary is given of new results concerning transmission electron microscopy and resistivity measurements on quenched tungsten. These results give evidence for the first time that the quenching and annealing of high purity tungsten leads to vacancy--defect clustering resulting in small voids observable in the electron microscope. 21 references

  10. Sustainable management of leakage from wastewater pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, D; Burn, S; Tjandraatmadja, G; Moglia, M; Davis, P; Wolf, L; Held, I; Vollertsen, J; Williams, W; Hafskjold, L

    2005-01-01

    Wastewater pipeline leakage is an emerging concern in Europe, especially with regards to the potential effect of leaking effluent on groundwater contamination and the effects infiltration has on the management of sewer reticulation systems. This paper describes efforts by Australia, in association with several European partners, towards the development of decision support tools to prioritize proactive rehabilitation of wastewater pipe networks to account for leakage. In the fundamental models for the decision support system, leakage is viewed as a function of pipeline system deterioration. The models rely on soil type identification across the service area to determine the aggressiveness of the pipe environment and for division of the area into zones based on pipe properties and operational conditions. By understanding the interaction between pipe materials, operating conditions, and the pipe environment in the mechanisms leading to pipe deterioration, the models allow the prediction of leakage rates in different zones across a network. The decision support system utilizes these models to predict the condition of pipes in individual zones, and to optimize the utilization of rehabilitation resources by targeting the areas with the highest leakage rates.

  11. (Talk) Investigating The Star Formation Quenching Across Cosmic Time - A Methodology To Select Galaxies Just After The Quenching Of Star Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citro, Annalisa; Pozzetti, Lucia; Quai, Salvatore; Moresco, Michele; Vallini, Livia; Cimatti, Andrea

    2017-06-01

    We propose a method aimed at identifing galaxies in the short evolutionary phase in which they quench their star-formation (SF). We rely on high- to low-ionization emission line ratios, which rapidly disappear after the SF halt due to the softening of the UV ionizing radiation. In particular, we focus on [O III] 5007/Halpha and [Ne III] 3869/[O II] 3727, simulating their time evolution by means of the CLOUDY photoionization code. We find that these two emission line ratios are able to trace the quenching on very short time-scales (i.e. 10-80 Myr), depending on if a sharp or a smoother SF quenching is assumed. We adopt the [N II] 6584/[O II] 3727 ratio as metallicity diagnostic to mitigate the metallicity degeneracy which affects our method. Using a Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxy sample, we identify 11 examples of extreme quenching candidates within the [O III] 5007/Halpha vs. [N II] 6584/[O II] 3727 plane, characterized by faint [Ne III] 3869, blue dust-corrected spectra and blue (u-r) colours, as expected if the quenching occurred in the recent past. Our results also suggest that the observed fractions of quenching candidates can be used to constrain the quenching mechanism at work and its time-scales.

  12. Thermalization in 2D critical quench and UV/IR mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Gautam; Paranjape, Shruti; Sorokhaibam, Nilakash

    2018-01-01

    We consider quantum quenches in models of free scalars and fermions with a generic time-dependent mass m( t) that goes from m 0 to zero. We prove that, as anticipated in MSS [1], the post-quench dynamics can be described in terms of a state of the generalized Calabrese-Cardy form | ψ〉 = exp[- κ 2 H - ∑ n >2 ∞ κ n W n ]|Bd〉. The W n ( n = 2, 3, . . ., W 2 = H) here represent the conserved W ∞ charges and |Bd〉 represents a conformal boundary state. Our result holds irrespective of whether the pre-quench state is a ground state or a squeezed state, and is proved without recourse to perturbation expansion in the κ n 's as in MSS. We compute exact time-dependent correlators for some specific quench protocols m( t). The correlators explicitly show thermalization to a generalized Gibbs ensemble (GGE), with inverse temperature β = 4 κ 2, and chemical potentials μ n = 4 κ n . In case the pre-quench state is a ground state, it is possible to retrieve the exact quench protocol m( t) from the final GGE, by an application of inverse scattering techniques. Another notable result, which we interpret as a UV/IR mixing, is that the long distance and long time (IR) behaviour of some correlators depends crucially on all κ n 's, although they are highly irrelevant couplings in the usual RG parlance. This indicates subtleties in RG arguments when applied to non-equilibrium dynamics.

  13. Leakage detection in underground gas mains with radioaktive argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, J.

    1975-01-01

    In the field of gas supply, radionuclide techniques are suitable for the routine monitoring of transport mains by means of highly active tracer clouds and a measuring scraper as well as for exact leakage detection in local gas distribution systems. Very good results are obtained in the case of mains lying lower than 1.5 m if the length and alignment of the pipe section allow a towing probe to be pulled through. This was investigated systematically on a model stretch under practical conditions. The attempts to detect leakages were made with the aid of the radioactive isotope 41 Ar. Under conditions close to practice concerning pipe bedding, branching, pre-pressure, and leakage diameter, a leak with leakage rates as small as approx. 1 l/min could be measured with the aid of a towing probe with a precision of +-0.5 m. This accuracy is another advantage of this method. Branching and fittings with a big dead volume do not interfere with the evaluation. The investment for this method can be compared to other physical/technical investigations on mains, e.g. weld seam tests. (orig./LN) [de

  14. Signal-based Gas Leakage Detection for Fluid Power Accumulators in Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liniger, Jesper; Sepehri, Nariman; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a signal-based fault detection method for identifying gas leakage in hydraulic accumulators used in wind turbines. The method uses Multiresolution Signal Decomposition (MSD) based on wavelets for feature extraction from a~single fluid pressure...... measurement located close to the accumulator. Gas leakage is shown to create increased variations in this pressure signal. The Root Mean Square (RMS) of the detail coefficient Level 9 from the MSD is found as the most sensitive and robust fault indicator of gas leakage. The method is verified...... on an experimental setup allowing for the replication of the conditions for accumulators in wind turbines. Robustness is tested in a multi-fault environment where gas and external fluid leakage occurs simultaneously. In total, 24 experiments are performed, which show that the method is sensitive to gas leakage...

  15. Method to detect steam generator tube leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Kiyomi

    1994-01-01

    It is important for plant operation to detect minor leakages from the steam generator tube at an early stage, thus, leakage detection has been performed using a condenser air ejector gas monitor and a steam generator blow down monitor, etc. In this study highly-sensitive main steam line monitors have been developed in order to identify leakages in the steam generator more quickly and accurately. The performance of the monitors was verified and the demonstration test at the actual plant was conducted for their intended application to the plants. (author)

  16. Ship cabin leakage alarm based on ARM SCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Liyan

    2018-03-01

    If there is a leakage in the cabin of a sailing ship, it is a major accident that threatens the personnel and property of the ship. If we can’t take timely measures, there will be a devastating disaster. In order to judge the leakage of the cabin, it is necessary to set up a leakage alarm system, so as to achieve the purpose of detecting and alarming the leakage of the cabin, and avoid the occurrence of accidents. This paper discusses the design of ship cabin leakage alarm system based on ARM SCM. In order to ensure the stability and precision of the product, the hardware design of the alarm system is carried out, such as circuit design, software design, the programming of SCM, the software programming of upper computer, etc. It is hoped that it can be of reference value to interested readers.

  17. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-S-104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCenso, A.T.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    In July and August 1992, Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 was sampled as part of the overall characterization effort directed by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Sampling was also performed to determine proper handling of the waste, to address corrosivity and compatibility issues, and to comply with requirements of the Washington Administrative Code. This Tank Characterization Report presents an overview of that tank sampling and analysis effort, and contains observations regarding waste characteristics. It also presents expected concentration and bulk inventory data for the waste contents based on this latest sampling data and background historical and surveillance tank information. Finally, this report makes recommendations and conclusions regarding operational safety. The purpose of this report is to describe the characteristics the waste in Single-Shell Tank 241-S-104 (hereafter, Tank 241-S-104) based on information obtained from a variety of sources. This report summarizes the available information regarding the chemical and physical properties of the waste in Tank 241-S-104, and using the historical information to place the analytical data in context, arranges this information in a format useful for making management and technical decisions concerning waste tank safety and disposal issues. In addition, conclusions and recommendations are presented based on safety issues and further characterization needs

  18. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.M.; Jensen, L.

    1993-04-01

    This report investigates the nature of the waste in tank U-110 using historical and current information. When characterizing tank waste, several important properties are considered. First, the physical characteristics of the waste are presented, including waste appearance, density, and size of waste particles. The existence of any exotherms in the tank that may present a safety concern is investigated. Finally, the radiological and chemical composition of the tank are presented

  19. The quench detection system of Wendelstein 7-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birus, Dietrich; Schneider, Matthias; Rummel, Thomas; Fricke, Marko

    2011-01-01

    The Quench Detection System of Wendelstein W7-X has been developed, pretested and manufactured during the last four years. This safety subsystem of the superconducting magnet power supply will guarantee the safe operating of the whole magnet system. The main targets of the Quench Detection System are the complete data acquisition of all the voltages along the superconducting components, i.e. non planar and planar coils, and bus bars, the evaluation of this data and the control of the magnet system safety discharges. The Quench Detection System is generating control commands for the magnet power supply control system and the electrical status of the superconducting components of W7-X. The Quench Detection System consists of nearly 580 Quench Detection Units (QDU) located in 10 QD-subsystems, 8 racks in each, one host system and two special interfaces for evaluation of the quench control commands and the failure signals. The operating software suite of the QD System allows the configuration, the operation and the maintenance of the whole system.

  20. Novel water-air circulation quenching process for AISI 4140 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liyun; Zheng, Dawei; Zhao, Lixin; Wang, Lihui; Zhang, Kai

    2013-11-01

    AISI 4140 steel is usually used after quenching and tempering. During the heat treatment process in industry production, there are some problems, such as quenching cracks, related to water-cooling and low hardness due to oil quenching. A water-air circulation quenching process can solve the problems of quenching cracks with water and the high cost quenching with oil, which is flammable, unsafe and not enough to obtain the required hardness. The control of the water-cooling and air-cooling time is a key factor in the process. This paper focuses on the quenching temperature, water-air cycle time and cycle index to prevent cracking for AISI 4140 steel. The optimum heat treatment parameters to achieve a good match of the strength and toughness of AISI 4140 steel were obtained by repeated adjustment of the water-air circulation quenching process parameters. The tensile strength, Charpy impact energy at -10 °C and hardness of the heat treated AISI 4140 steel after quenching and tempering were approximately 1098 MPa, 67.5 J and 316 HB, respectively.

  1. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  2. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented

  3. The Effect of Internal Leakages on Thermal Performance in NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Gyun Young; Kim, Doo Won; Jang, Seok Bo

    2007-01-01

    Since the Balance Of Plant (BOP, limited to a turbine cycle in this study) does not contain radioactive material, regulatory authorities did not need to have concerns on it. As the interests on safety and performance is getting more serious and extensive, controlling the level of safety and performance of a BOP have just begun or is about to begin. The performance standards or ageing management programs of the major equipment in a BOP is being developed. The regulatory requirements for tests and/or maintenance are being actively built up. There is also a probabilistic approach quantifying performance of a BOP. The study on quantifying the rate of unanticipated shutdowns caused by careless maintenance and/or tests conducted in a BOP is going on. In this study, the modeling of the entire BOP and the methodologies of thermal performance analysis should be one of the must-have items as well. This study was achieved to ensure fundamental skills related to 1) the detailed steady-state modeling of a BOP and 2) thermal performance analysis under various conditions. Particularly, the paper will focus on the effect of internal leakages inside the valves and FeedWater Heaters (FWHs). The internal leakage is regarded as the flow movement through the isolated path but remaining inside the system boundary of a BOP. For instance, the leakage from one side of a valve seat to the other side, or the leakage through the cracked tubes or tube-sheets in a heat exchanger correspond to internal leakages. We made a BOP model of OPR1000 and investigated thermal performance under the internal leakage in Turbine Bypass Condenser Dump Valves (TBCDV) and FWHs

  4. ERROR REDUCTION IN DUCT LEAKAGE TESTING THROUGH DATA CROSS-CHECKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ANDREWS, J.W.

    1998-12-31

    One way to reduce uncertainty in scientific measurement is to devise a protocol in which more quantities are measured than are absolutely required, so that the result is over constrained. This report develops a method for so combining data from two different tests for air leakage in residential duct systems. An algorithm, which depends on the uncertainty estimates for the measured quantities, optimizes the use of the excess data. In many cases it can significantly reduce the error bar on at least one of the two measured duct leakage rates (supply or return), and it provides a rational method of reconciling any conflicting results from the two leakage tests.

  5. Characterization of plasma current quench at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccardo, V; Barabaschi, P; Sugihara, M

    2005-01-01

    Eddy currents generated during the fastest disruption current decays represent the most severe design condition for medium and small size in-vessel components of most tokamaks. Best-fit linear and instantaneous plasma current quench rates have been extracted for a set of recent JET disruptions. Contrary to expectations, the current quench rate spectrum of high and low thermal energy disruptions is not substantially different. For most of the disruptions with the highest instantaneous current quench rate an exponential fit of the early phase of the current decay provides a more accurate estimate of the maximum current decay velocity. However, this fit is only suitable to model the fastest events, for which the current quench is dominated by radiation losses rather than the plasma motion

  6. Distributed public key schemes secure against continual leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akavia, Adi; Goldwasser, Shafi; Hazay, Carmit

    2012-01-01

    -secure against continual memory leakage. Our DPKE scheme also implies a secure storage system on leaky devices, where a value s can be secretely stored on devices that continually leak information about their internal state to an external attacker. The devices go through a periodic refresh protocol......In this work we study distributed public key schemes secure against continual memory leakage. The secret key will be shared among two computing devices communicating over a public channel, and the decryption operation will be computed by a simple 2-party protocol between the devices. Similarly...... against continual memory leakage, under the Bilinear Decisional Diffie-Hellman and $2$-linear assumptions. Our schemes have the following properties: 1. Our DPKE and DIBE schemes tolerate leakage at all times, including during refresh. During refresh the tolerated leakage is a (1/2-o (1),1)-fraction...

  7. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and... liquid tank car tanks. ...

  8. Fuel rod quenching with oxidation and precursory cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidi, A.; Elias, E.; Olek, S.

    1999-01-01

    During a loss-of-coolant-accident in LWR fuel rods may be temporarily exposed thus reaching high temperature levels. The injection of cold water into the core, while providing the necessary cooling to prevent melting may also generate steam inducing exothermal oxidation of the cladding. A number of high temperature quenching experiments [I] have demonstrated that during the early phase of the quenching process, the rate of hydrogen generation increased markedly and the surface temperatures rose rapidly. These effects are believed to result from thermal stresses breaking up the oxide layer on the zircalloy cladding, thus exposing the inner surface to oxidizing atmosphere. Steam reacts exothermally with the metallic components of the newly formed surface causing temporarily local temperature escalation. The main objective of this study is to develop and assess a one-dimensional time-dependent rewetting model to address the problem of quenching of hot surfaces undergoing exothermic oxidation reactions. Addressing a time-dependent problem is an important aspect of the work since it is believed that the progression of a quench-front along a hot oxidizing surface is an unsteady process. Several studies dealing with time-dependent rewetting problems have been published, e.g. [2]-[5], but none considers oxidation reactions downstream of the quench-front. The main difficulty in solving time-dependent rewetting problems stems from the fact that either the quench-front velocity or the quench-front positions constitute a time-dependent eigenvalue of the problem. The model is applied to describe the interrelated processes of cooling and exothermic steam-metal reactions at the vapor zirconium-cladding interface during quenching of degraded fuel rods. A constant heat transfer coefficient is assumed upstream of the quenching front whereas the combined effect of oxidation and post dry-out cooling is described by prescribing a heat flux distribution of general form downstream. The

  9. 49 CFR 179.100 - General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.100 Section 179.100 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.100 General specifications applicable to pressure tank car tanks. ...

  10. Quorum Quenching Revisited—From Signal Decays to Signalling Confusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In a polymicrobial community, while some bacteria are communicating with neighboring cells (quorum sensing, others are interrupting the communication (quorum quenching, thus creating a constant arms race between intercellular communication. In the past decade, numerous quorum quenching enzymes have been found and initially thought to inactivate the signalling molecules. Though this is widely accepted, the actual roles of these quorum quenching enzymes are now being uncovered. Recent evidence extends the role of quorum quenching to detoxification or metabolism of signalling molecules as food and energy source; this includes “signalling confusion”, a term coined in this paper to refer to the phenomenon of non-destructive modification of signalling molecules. While quorum quenching has been explored as a novel anti-infective therapy targeting, quorum sensing evidence begins to show the development of resistance against quorum quenching.

  11. The location of the quench origin in a superconducting accelerator magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Robins, K.E.; Sampson, W.B.

    1987-01-01

    A method of calculating the initial rate of rise of the resistive voltage in a quenching superconducting magnet is described. Comparison of such calculations with data from spontaneously occurring quenches gives the location of the quench origin since the normal state resistance of the conductor is determined by its position in the windings due to the magnetoresistance of the copper matrix. The characteristics of the voltage buildup is used to separate quenches occurring in low field regions, such as the magnet ends, from those starting in the two-dimensional straight section of the coil. The magnitude of V dot is a measure of performance and can be used to determine if the magnet is reaching the maximum current permitted by the conductor parameters

  12. Quantum quenches in a holographic Kondo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Flory, Mario; Newrzella, Max-Niklas; Strydom, Migael; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2017-04-01

    We study non-equilibrium dynamics and quantum quenches in a recent gauge/gravity duality model for a strongly coupled system interacting with a magnetic impurity with SU( N ) spin. At large N , it is convenient to write the impurity spin as a bilinear in Abrikosov fermions. The model describes an RG flow triggered by the marginally relevant Kondo operator. There is a phase transition at a critical temperature, below which an operator condenses which involves both an electron and an Abrikosov fermion field. This corresponds to a holographic superconductor in AdS2 and models the impurity screening. We quench the Kondo coupling either by a Gaussian pulse or by a hyperbolic tangent, the latter taking the system from the condensed to the uncondensed phase or vice-versa. We study the time dependence of the condensate induced by this quench. The timescale for equilibration is generically given by the leading quasinormal mode of the dual gravity model. This mode also governs the formation of the screening cloud, which is obtained as the decrease of impurity degrees of freedom with time. In the condensed phase, the leading quasinormal mode is imaginary and the relaxation of the condensate is over-damped. For quenches whose final state is close to the critical point of the large N phase transition, we study the critical slowing down and obtain the combination of critical exponents zν = 1. When the final state is exactly at the phase transition, we find that the exponential ringing of the quasinormal modes is replaced by a power-law behaviour of the form ˜ t - a sin( b log t). This indicates the emergence of a discrete scale invariance.

  13. Tank 241-C-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-C-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-C-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  14. Tank 241-BY-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-107 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-107 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  15. Tank 241-BY-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in ''Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues'' (Osborne and Huckaby 1994). Tank 241-BY-108 was vapor sampled in accordance with ''Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution (Osborne et al., 1994)

  16. Tank 241-BY-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank 241-BY-106 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. The drivers and objectives of waste tank headspace sampling and analysis are discussed in open-quotes Program Plan for the Resolution of Tank Vapor Issues.close quotes Tank 241-BY-106 was vapor sampled in accordance with open-quotes Data Quality Objectives for Generic In-Tank Health and Safety Issue Resolution.close quotes

  17. Suppression and control of leakage field in electromagnetic helical microwiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohigashi, N. [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Tsunawaki, Y. [Osaka Sangyo Univ. (Japan); Imasaki, K. [Institute for Laser Technology, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Shortening the period of electromagnetic wiggler introduces both the radical increase of the leakage field and the decrease of the field in the gap region. The leakage field is severer problem in planar electromagnetic wiggler than in helical wiggler. Hence, in order to develop a short period electromagnetic wiggler, we have adopted {open_quotes}three poles per period{close_quotes} type electromagnetic helical microwiggler. In this work, we inserted the permanent magnet (PM) blocks with specific magnetized directions in the space between magnetic poles, for suppressing the leakage field flowing out from a pole face to the neighboring pole face. These PM-blocks must have higher intrinsic coersive force than saturation field of pole material. The gap field due to each pole is adjustable by controlling the leakage fields, that is, controlling the position of each iron screw set in each retainer fixing the PM-blocks. At present time, a test wiggler with period 7.8mm, periodical number 10 and gap length 4.6mm has been manufactured. Because the ratio of PM-block aperture to gap length is important parameter to suppress the leakage field, the parameter has been surveyed experimentally for PM-blocks with several dimensions of aperture. The field strength of 3-5kG (K=0.2-0.4) would be expected in the wiggler.

  18. Heating the quenched Eguchi-Kawai model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinkhamer, F.R. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Sterrewacht)

    1983-05-30

    We consider the Eguchi-Kawaii reduction, in the momentum-quenched prescription, of the SU(N) lattice gauge theory for N -> infinite and address the problem of how finite temperature might be incorporated. This is of interest in order to establish quark deconfinement at high temperatures. We also show that different quenching procedures may be inequivalent.

  19. Risk factors, treatment and impact on outcomes of bile leakage after hemihepatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Si-Ming; Li, Hong; Li, Gen-Cong; Yu, Dan-Song; Ying, Dong-Jian; Zhang, Bin; Lu, Cai-De; Zhou, Xin-Hua

    2017-07-01

    Risk factors for bile leakage after hemihepatectomy are unknown. A prospectively maintained database review identified patients undergoing hemihepatectomy between 1 January 2009 and 30 September 2014. Patients were divided into B/C and non-B/C bile leakage groups. Risk factors for bile leakage were predicted and assessments of their impact on patients were made. Bile leakage occurred in 91 of the 297 patients (30.6%); 64 cases were classified as grade B bile leakage (21.5%) and three cases as grade C bile leakage (1.0%). Multivariate analysis confirmed that elevated preoperative alanine transaminase (ALT), positive bile culture during surgery, hilar bile duct plasty, bilioenteric anastomosis and laparoscopic surgery were risk factors for B/C grade bile leakage (P bile leakage (P bile leakage (P bile leakage group were higher than those in the non-B/C bile leakage group (P bile leakage group also required prolonged hospitalization (P 0.05). Patient with elevated preoperative ALT, positive bile cultures during surgery, hilar bile duct plasty, bilioenteric anastomosis and laparoscopic surgery are more likely to complicate bile leakage. We should use biliary drainage such as preoperative PTBD, ENBD or intraoperative Kehr's T-tube drainage to reduce and treat bile leakage in patients with high risk of bile leakage. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Development of a hot water tank simulation program with improved prediction of thermal stratification in the tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Furbo, Simon; Yue, Hongqiang

    2015-01-01

    A simulation program SpiralSol was developed in previous investigations to calculate thermal performance of a solar domestic hot water (SDHW) system with a hot water tank with a built-in heat exchanger spiral [1]. The simulation program is improved in the paper in term of prediction of thermal...... stratification in the tank. The transient fluid flow and heat transfer in the hot water tank during cooling caused by standby heat loss are investigated by validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Detailed CFD investigations are carried out to determine the influence of thickness and material...... property of the tank wall on thermal stratification in the tank. It is elucidated how thermal stratification in the tank is influenced by the natural convection and how the heat loss from the tank sides will be distributed at different levels of the tank at different thermal conditions. The existing...

  1. Exciplex formation accompanied with excitation quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Stanislav G; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2010-04-08

    The competence of the reversible exciplex formation and parallel quenching of excitation (by electron or energy transfer) was considered using a non-Markovian pi-forms approach, identical to integral encounter theory (IET). General equations accounting for the reversible quenching and exciplex formation are derived in the contact approximation. Their general solution was obtained and adopted to the most common case when the ground state particles are in great excess. Particular cases of only photoionization or just exciplex formation separately studied earlier by means of IET are reproduced. In the case of the irreversible excitation quenching, the theory allows specifying the yields of the fluorescence and exciplex luminescence, as well as the long time kinetics of excitation and exciplex decays, in the absence of quenching. The theory distinguishes between the alternative regimes of (a) fast equilibration between excitations and exciplexes followed by their decay with a common average rate and (b) the fastest and deep excitation decay followed by the weaker and slower delayed fluorescence, backed by exciplex dissociation.

  2. Jet Quenching in the Compact Muon Solenoid at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    David Lopez Mateos

    In this thesis we perform analyses on simulated data that allow us to demonstrate thesensitivity of the CMS experiment to certain jet quenching observables. In particular,two theoretical scenarios which mimic RHIC data at low pT and which show eitherno quenching or BDMPS-based quenching at high pT are formulated. The differencebetween these two scenarios is analyzed for RAA , RCP at different centralities andjet-specific observables such as jet energy spectra, fragmentation functions and jetprofiles. We show how these analyses indicate that the large acceptance of the CMSdetector, combined with the high granularity in the energy resolution of the calorimeter will be essential tools in studying the phenomenon of jet quenching. Finally, wepropose extensions to this work in preparation to analyzing the data from P b-P b runsat the LHC.Disclaimer: The work on this thesis does not model the CMS detector geometrywith the accuracy required for official analyses, which are fully representative of theCMS detector ...

  3. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

    1996-04-23

    A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

  4. FPGA-based quench detection system for super-FRS super-ferric dipole prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tongjun; Wu Wei; Yao Qinggao; Yuan Ping; He Yuan; Han Shaofei; Ma Lizhen

    2011-01-01

    The quench detection system for Super-FRS super-ferric dipole prototype magnet of FAIR has been designed and built. The balance bridge was used to detect quench signal. In order to avoid blind zone of quench detection, two independent bridges were used. NI PXI-7830R FPGA was used to implement filter to quench signal and algorithm of quench decision and to produce quench trigger signal. Pre-sample technique was used in quench data acquisition. The data before and after quench could be recorded for analysis later. The test result indicated that the quench of the dipole's superconducting coil could be reliably detected by the quench detection module. (authors)

  5. Validation of Quench Simulation and Simulation of the TWIN Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Pots, Rosalinde Hendrika

    2015-01-01

    For the Future Circular Collider at CERN a multi-purpose detector is proposed. The 6T TWIN Solenoid, a very large magnet system with a stored energy of 53 GJ, is being designed. It is important to protect the magnet against quenches in the system. Therefore several existing quench protection systems are evaluated and simulations have be performed on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid. The simulations on quenches in the TWIN Solenoid have been performed with promising results; the hotspot temperatures do not exceed 120 K and layer to layer voltages stay below 500 V. Adding quench heaters to the system might improve the quench protection system further.

  6. Report on the water leakage from instrumentation pipe in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    On December 10, 2002, the leakage was found at the pressure instrumentation pipe attached to the exit pipe of No.1 charging pump of the purification system of a primary cooling system at JMTR in the Oarai Research establishment, JAERI. The Investigation Committee for Water Leakage from Instrumentation Pipe in JMTR was established and organized by specialists from inside and outside JAERI on December 16 and its meeting was held in public 3 times by 6th January, 2003. They found out the cause and countermeasures of cracks, and also investigated enhancement of safety management. As the result, it was considered that the leakage started around the 6th of December 2002 and the cause of the cracks was due to fatigue by vibration of the charging pump during operation. The committee discovered following incorrect actions in the safety management. First, operation of JMTR was continued without keeping careful watch in spite of occurrence of leakage detector alarm. Second, every time when the alarm range for the reasons other than the leakage, appropriate investigation and countermeasure were not taken. Third, the manager in charge didn't have a fair understanding of the situation and didn't give an appropriate direction. This is the report on the cause and countermeasures of cracks and enhancement of safety management. (author)

  7. Calculation of transformers leakage reactance using electromagnetic energy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiz, J.; Mohseni, H.; Sabet Marzooghi, S.; Naderian Jahromi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Determination of transformer leakage reactance using magnetic cores has long been an area of interest to engineers involved in the design of power and distribution transformers. This is required for predicting the performance of transformers before actual assembly of the transformers. In this paper a closed form solution technique applicable to the leakage reactance calculations for transformers is presented. An emphasis is on the development of a simple method to calculate the leakage reactance of the distribution transformers and smaller transformers. Energy technique procedure for computing the leakage reactances in distribution transformers is presented. This method is very efficient compared with the use of flux element and image technique and is also remarkably accurate. Examples of calculated leakage inductances and the short circuit impedance are given for illustration. For validation, the results are compared with the results obtained using test. This paper presents a novel technique for calculation of the leakage inductance in different parts of the transformer using the electromagnetic stored energy

  8. 49 CFR 179.103 - Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car... SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-105, 109, 112, 114 and 120) § 179.103 Special requirements for class 114A * * * tank car tanks. (a) In addition to the applicable...

  9. Apparatus for detecting leakage of liquid sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Yoshiaki

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting the leakage of liquid sodium includes a cable-like sensor adapted to be secured to a wall of piping or other equipment having sodium on the opposite side of the wall, and the sensor includes a core wire electrically connected to the wall through a leak current detector and a power source. An accidental leakage of the liquid sodium causes the corrosion of a metallic layer and an insulative layer of the sensor by products resulted from a reaction of sodium with water or oxygen in the atmospheric air so as to decrease the resistance between the core wire and the wall. Thus, the leakage is detected as an increase in the leaking electrical current. The apparatus is especially adapted for use in detecting the leakage of liquid sodium from sodium-conveying pipes or equipment in a fast breeder reactor.

  10. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective sheathing of the pipe; this paper aims at testing the feasibility of detecting leakages with temporary introduced fiber optic cable inside the pipe. The detection and localization were tested in a laboratory experiment. The intrusion of water from leakages into the pipe, producing a local temperature drop, served as indicator for leakages. Measurements were taken under varying measurement conditions, including the number of leakages as well as the positioning of the fiber optic cable. Experiments showed that leakages could be detected accurately with the proposed methodology, when measuring resolution, temperature gradient and measurement time were properly selected. Despite the successful application of DTS for leakage detection in this lab environment, challenges in real system applications may arise from temperature gradients within the pipe system over longer distances and the placement of the cable into the real pipe system.

  11. Method for detecting resin leakage in LWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    Resin leakage from condensate polishing units can result in steam generator corrosion. This report describes the development of a resin leakage detection method based in analyzing the organic breakdown products released from resin on heating. The breakdown products are analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. Some of the organic products formed have been identified. A design for a resin monitoring unit, suitable for incorporation into the IONTRAC system, is presented. Theoretically, detection of ppB levels of resin by processing about one liter of water, is possible

  12. Quench antenna for superconducting particle accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogitsu, T.; Devred, A.; Kim, K.

    1993-10-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and test of an assembly of stationary pickup coils which can be used to localize quench origins. After describing the pickup coils configuration, we develop a simple model of current redistribution which allows interpretation of the measured voltages and determination of the turn of the magnet coil in which the quench started. The technique is illustrated by analyzing the data from a quench of a 5-cm-aperture, 15-m-long SSC dipole magnet prototype

  13. Forced convective post CHF heat transfer and quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses mechanisms in the post-CHF region which provide understanding and qualitative prediction capability for several current forced convective heat transfer problems. In the area of nuclear reactor safety, the mechanisms are important in the prediction of fuel rod quenches for the reflood phase, blowdown phase, and possibly some operational transients with dryout. Results using the mechanisms to investigate forced convective quenching are presented. Data reduction of quenching experiments is discussed, and the way in which the quenching transient may affect the results of different types of quenching experiments is investigated. This investigation provides an explanation of how minimum wall superheats greater than the homogeneous nucleation temperature result, as well as how these may appear to be either hydrodynamically or thermodynamically controlled. Finally, the results of a parametric study of the effects of the mechanisms upon the LOFT L2-3 hotpin calculation are presented

  14. Variation of Optical Quenching of Photoconductivity with Resistivity in Unintentional Doped GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi-Feng, Hou; Xiao-Liang, Wang; Hong-Ling, Xiao; Cui-Mei, Wang; Cui-Bai, Yang; Jin-Min, Li

    2010-01-01

    The optical quenching of photoconductivity under dual illumination in GaN samples with different resistivity is investigated to reveal the variation of deep levels. The samples are grown by metal organic chemical vapour deposition without intentional doping. Quenching bands centered at 1.35eV, 1.55eV, 1.98eV, and 2.60eV are observed. It is found that the 1.98eV quenching band is dominated in all the samples and the 2.60eV band is observed only in the high-resistivity samples. The possible defect levels responsible for the quenching bands and the origin of different quenching behaviour at 2.60eV are discussed. It is suggested that the defect level responsible for quenching at 2.60eV plays an important role for the enhancement of resistivity

  15. Defect production in simulated cascades: Cascade quenching and short-term annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    Defect production in displacement cascades in copper has been modeled using the MARLOWE code to generate cascades and the stochastic annealing code ALSOME to simulate cascade quenching and short-term annealing of isolated cascades. Quenching is accomplished by using exaggerated values for defect mobilities and for critical reaction distances in ALSOME for a very short time. The quenched cascades are then short-term annealed with normal parameter values. The quenching parameter values were empirically determined by comparison with results of resistivity measurements. Throughout the collisional, quenching and short-term annealing phases of cascade development, the high energy cascades continue to behave as a collection of independent lower energy lobes. For recoils above about 30 keV the total number of defects and the numbers of free defects scale with the damage energy. As the energy decreases from 30 keV, defect production varies with the changing nature of the cascade configuration, resulting in more defects per unit damage energy. The simulated annealing of a low fluence of interacting cascades revealed an interstitial shielding effect on depleted zones during Stage I recovery. (orig.)

  16. Numerical Study of Quench Protection for Fast-Ramping Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwerg, N; Mess, K-N; Russenschuck, S

    2009-01-01

    The quench module of the ROXIE field computation program has been presented at previous conferences. In this paper we discuss recently implemented features that allow quench simulation of fast-ramping superconducting magnets. As the reliability of quench detection during the ramps depends on the signal to noise ratio, we simulate the influence of detection thresholds and the propagation of undetected quenches during the ramps. We also study the effect of an increased copper content and the feasibility of a self-protected magnet surviving a powering cycle with an undetected quench and without quench heater firing or energy-extraction system.

  17. Heating the quenched Eguchi-Kawai model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkhamer, F.R.

    1983-01-01

    We consider the Eguchi-Kawaii reduction, in the momentum-quenched prescription, of the SU(N) lattice gauge theory for N -> infinite and address the problem of how finite temperature might be incorporated. This is of interest in order to establish quark deconfinement at high temperatures. We also show that different quenching procedures may be inequivalent. (orig.)

  18. Insulation Resistance and Leakage Currents in Low-Voltage Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of insulation resistance (IR) in multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) is considered a screening technique that ensures the dielectric is defect-free. This work analyzes the effectiveness of this technique for revealing cracks in ceramic capacitors. It is shown that absorption currents prevail over the intrinsic leakage currents during standard IR measurements at room temperature. Absorption currents, and consequently IR, have a weak temperature dependence, increase linearly with voltage (before saturation), and are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects. In contrary, intrinsic leakage currents increase super-linearly with voltage and exponentially with temperature (activation energy is in the range from 0.6 eV to 1.1 eV). Leakage currents associated with the presence of cracks have a weaker dependence on temperature and voltage compared to the intrinsic leakage currents. For this reason, intrinsic leakage currents prevail at high temperatures and voltages, thus masking the presence of defects.

  19. Investigation of an overheated PWR-type fuel rod simulator bundle cooled down by steam. Pt. 1: experimental and calculational results of the QUENCH-04 test. Pt. 2: application of the SVECHA/QUENCH code to the analysis of the QUENCH-01 and QUENCH-04 bundle tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepold, L.; Hofmann, P.; Homann, C.

    2002-04-01

    The QUENCH experiments are to investigate the hydrogen source term that results from the water injection into an uncovered core of a light-water reactor (LWR). The test bundle is made of 21 fuel rod simulators with a length of approximately 2.5 m. 20 fuel rod simulators are heated over a length of 1024 mm, the one unheated fuel rod simulator is located in the center of the test bundle. Heating is carried out electrically using 6-mm-diameter tungsten heating elements installed in the center of the rods and surrounded by annular ZrO 2 pellets. The rod cladding is identical to that used in LWRs: Zircaloy-4, 10.75 mm outside diameter, 0.725 mm wall thickness. The test bundle is instrumented with thermocouples attached to the cladding and the shroud at 17 different elevations with an axial distance between the thermocouples of 100 mm. During the entire test up to the cooldown phase, superheated steam together with the argon as carrier gas enters the test bundle at the bottom end and leaves the test section at the top together with the hydrogen that is produced in the zirconium-steam reaction. The hydrogen is analyzed by three different instruments: two mass spectrometers and a ''Caldos 7 G'' hydrogen measuring device (based on the principle of heat conductivity). Part I of this report describes the results of test QUENCH-04 performed in the QUENCH test facility at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe on June 30, 1999. The objective of the experiment QUENCH-04 was to investigate the reaction of the non-preoxidized rod cladding on cooldown by steam rather than quenching by water. Part II of the present report deals with the results of the SVECHA/QUENCH (S/Q) code application to the FZK QUENCH bundle tests. The adaptation of the S/Q code to such kind of calculations is described. The numerical procedure of the recalculation of the temperature test data, and the preparation for the S/Q code input is presented. In particular, the results of the QUENCH-01 and QUENCH-04 test

  20. HOUDINI: RECONFIGURABEL IN-TANK ROBOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Thompson; Adam Slifko

    1997-02-12

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup systems called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobile waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  1. HOUDINI: RECONFIGURABEL IN-TANK ROBOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce Thompson; Adam Slifko

    1997-01-01

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup systems called Houdini(trademark). Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini(trademark) represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini(trademark) is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini(trademark) utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobile waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini(trademark) system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini(trademark) system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks

  2. Tank 241-A-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-A-104. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in addition to reporting the current contents and status of the tank as projected from historical information

  3. Effect of condenser water in-leakage on steam generator water chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, P.V.

    1978-01-01

    Corrosive environments may be generated within steam genrators from condenser cooling water in-leakage. Theoretical as well as experimental evaluation of the aggressiveness of such environments is being carried out for the condenser-cooling waters used at CANDU-PHW nuclear power stations. Calculations have shown that highly concentrated chloride solutions - acidic in the case of sea-water in-leakage, and alkaline in the rest of the cases considered - would be produced within the steam generator. Experiments in a model boiler showed that sea-water in-leakage caused rapid corrosion of carbon steel components when only AVT (all volatile treatment) was used for water chemistry control. Use of a non-volatile reagent, as in the congruent phosphate treatment, avoided the rapid corrosion of carbon steel. On the basis of our studies, congruent phosphate treatment during sea water in-leakage appears desirable. (author)

  4. Leakage-resilient cryptography from minimal assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hazay, Carmit; López-Alt, Adriana; Wee, Hoeteck

    2013-01-01

    We present new constructions of leakage-resilient cryptosystems, which remain provably secure even if the attacker learns some arbitrary partial information about their internal secret key. For any polynomial ℓ, we can instantiate these schemes so as to tolerate up to ℓ bits of leakage. While the...

  5. Partially quenched gauge theories and an application to staggered fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, C.W.; Golterman, M.F.L.

    1994-01-01

    We extend our Lagrangian technique for chiral perturbation theory for quenched QCD to include theories in which only some of the quarks are quenched. We discuss the relationship between the partially quenched theory and a theory in which only the unquenched quarks are present. We also investigate the peculiar infrared divergences associated with the η' in the quenched approximation, and find the conditions under which such divergences can appear in a partially quenched theory. We then apply our results to staggered fermion QCD in which the square root of the fermion determinant is taken, using the observation that this should correspond to a theory with four quarks, two of which are quenched

  6. Supporting document for the Southeast Quadrant historical tank content estimate report for SY-tank farm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Consort, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Southeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground double-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East and West Areas. This report summarizes historical information such as waste history, temperature profiles, psychrometric data, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance are included. Components of the data management effort, such as Waste Status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layer Model, Supernatant Mixing Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates which generate these tank content estimates, are also given in this report

  7. Utilization of the MPI Process for in-tank solidification of heel material in large-diameter cylindrical tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauschinger, J.L.; Lewis, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    A major problem faced by the US Department of Energy is remediation of sludge and supernatant waste in underground storage tanks. Exhumation of the waste is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation cannot completely remove all of the contaminated materials from the tanks. For large-diameter tanks, amounts of highly contaminated ``heel'' material approaching 20,000 gal can remain. Often sludge containing zeolite particles leaves ``sand bars'' of locally contaminated material across the floor of the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment (stabilization and immobilization) of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and mixed uniformly with sludge. Ground Environmental Services has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity jet delivery system termed, Multi-Point-Injection (MPI). This robust jet delivery system has been field-deployed to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in cylindrical (FY 1998) and long, horizontal tanks (FY 1999). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process successfully formed a 32-ton uniform monolith of grout and waste surrogates in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within a 40-in.-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies similar to Gunite and Associated Tank (GAAT) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily intermixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing.

  8. 241-AZ Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-30

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102. The construction history of the 241-AZ tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-AZ tank farm, the second DST farm constructed, both refractory quality and tank and liner fabrication were improved.

  9. Evaluation of isolation valve leakage in alternate charging piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauch, P.L.; Roarty, D.H.; Brice-Nash, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The chemical and volume control system (CVCS) alternate charging flow path at an operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant was determined to be susceptible to adverse stresses from isolation valve leakage. Isolation valve leakage had resulted in pipe cracks at several nuclear units worldwide, as described in United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Bulletin 88-08 and its supplements. To provide for continuing assurance that cracks would not initiate over the plant life, the operators considered performing fatigue evaluation to demonstrate structural integrity of the system. This evaluation included heat transfer, stress and fatigue analysis, using methods described in Electric Power Research Institute Report ''Thermal Stratification, Cycling, and Striping (TASCS),'' March 1994. The evaluation concluded that the fatigue usage would be less than 1.0 under worst case isolation valve leakage conditions, and therefore a significant investment in permanent temperature monitoring was avoided

  10. Leakage Account for Radial Face Contact Seal in Aircraft Engine Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, A. S.; Sergeeva, T. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article is dedicated to the development of a methodology for the radial face contact seal design taking into consideration the supporting elements deformations in different aircraft engine operating modes. Radial face contact seals are popular in the aircraft engines bearing support. However, there are no published leakage calculation methodologies of these seals. Radial face contact seal leakage is determined by the gap clearance in the carbon seal ring split. In turn, the size gap clearance depends on the deformation of the seal assembly parts and from the engine operation. The article shows the leakage detection sequence in the intershaft radial face contact seal of the compressor support for take-off and cruising modes. Evaluated calculated leakage values (2.4 g/s at takeoff and 0.75 g/s at cruising) go with experience in designing seals.

  11. Defect production in nonlinear quench across a quantum critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Diptiman; Sengupta, K; Mondal, Shreyoshi

    2008-07-04

    We show that the defect density n, for a slow nonlinear power-law quench with a rate tau(-1) and an exponent alpha>0, which takes the system through a critical point characterized by correlation length and dynamical critical exponents nu and z, scales as n approximately tau(-alphanud/(alphaznu+1)) [n approximately (alphag((alpha-1)/alpha)/tau)(nud/(znu+1))] if the quench takes the system across the critical point at time t=0 [t=t(0) not = 0], where g is a nonuniversal constant and d is the system dimension. These scaling laws constitute the first theoretical results for defect production in nonlinear quenches across quantum critical points and reproduce their well-known counterpart for a linear quench (alpha=1) as a special case. We supplement our results with numerical studies of well-known models and suggest experiments to test our theory.

  12. Tank 241-BY-108 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank BY-108 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-108 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-108 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on october 27, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 25.7 C. Air from the Tank BY-108 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9 m-long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 1, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The 40 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks that accompanied the samples

  13. Tank 241-BY-105 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank BY-105 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-105 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-105 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on July 7, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 26 C. Air from the Tank BY-105 headspace was withdrawn via a heated sampling probe mounted in riser 10A, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 65 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, and Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology through a contract with Sandia National Laboratories. The 46 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 10 trip blanks provided by the laboratories

  14. Tank 241-BY-110 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Tank BY-110 headspace gas and vapor samples were collected and analyzed to help determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank. Tank BY-110 is on the Ferrocyanide Watch List. Samples were collected from Tank BY-110 using the vapor sampling system (VSS) on November 11, 1994 by WHC Sampling and Mobile Laboratories. The tank headspace temperature was determined to be 27 C. Air from the Tank BY-110 headspace was withdrawn via a 7.9 m-long heated sampling probe mounted in riser 12B, and transferred via heated tubing to the VSS sampling manifold. All heated zones of the VSS were maintained at approximately 50 C. Sampling media were prepared and analyzed by WHC, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and Pacific Northwest Laboratories. The 40 tank air samples and 2 ambient air control samples collected are listed in Table X-1 by analytical laboratory. Table X-1 also lists the 14 trip blanks and 2 field blanks that accompanied the samples

  15. Quenching of liquid scintillator fluorescence by chloroalkanes and chloroalkenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hariharan, Chithra; Mishra, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    The fluorescence quenching of 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) by a series of chloroalkanes and chloroalkenes including carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, dichloroethane, tetrachloroethane, dichloroethylene, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene was studied in toluene as solvent at room temperature. CCl 4 was found to be the most efficient quencher in the series. The quenching was found to be appreciable and a positive deviation from linearity was observed in the Stern-Volmer (SV) plots for all the quenchers in the concentration range studied. From the studies of effect of temperature, solvent viscosity and excitation wavelength dependence for the PPO-CCl 4 system, it was inferred that non-linearity is due to the presence of a minor static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching. The static (K S ) and the dynamic (K D ) quenching constants were calculated from the modified SV equation using quadratic least square fits. Fluorescence quenching experiments with CCl 4 were done for four other scintillators (POPOP, α-NPO, BBO and PBBO). The mechanism of quenching was established to be via charge-transfer, with the direction of transfer being from the scintillators to the chloroalkanes and chloroalkenes

  16. Tank 241-U-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-U-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  17. ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure

  18. Tank Characterization report for single-shell tank 241-SX-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WILMARTH, S.R.

    1999-01-01

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report. This report and its appendices serve as the tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-SX-103. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-SX-103 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, and Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15c, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for fiscal year 1999'' (Adams et al. 1998)

  19. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SASAKI, L.M.

    1999-02-24

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report. This report and its appendices serve as the tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-103. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-U-103 waste and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15b, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with Waste Information Requirements Documents developed for 1998.''

  20. A retrospective analysis of endoscopic treatment outcomes in patients with postoperative bile leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Suleyman; Olmez, Sehmus; Avcioglu, Ufuk; Tenlik, Ilyas; Saritas, Bunyamin; Ozdil, Kamil; Altiparmak, Emin; Ozaslan, Ersan

    2016-01-01

    Bile leakage, while rare, can be a complication seen after cholecystectomy. It may also occur after hepatic or biliary surgical procedures. Etiology may be underlying pathology or surgical complication. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) can play major role in diagnosis and treatment of bile leakage. Present study was a retrospective analysis of outcomes of ERCP procedure in patients with bile leakage. Patients who underwent ERCP for bile leakage after surgery between 2008 and 2012 were included in the study. Etiology, clinical and radiological characteristics, and endoscopic treatment outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Total of 31 patients (10 male, 21 female) were included in the study. ERCP was performed for bile leakage after cholecystectomy in 20 patients, after hydatid cyst operation in 10 patients, and after hepatic resection in 1 patient. Clinical signs and symptoms of bile leakage included abdominal pain, bile drainage from percutaneous drain, peritonitis, jaundice, and bilioma. Twelve (60%) patients were treated with endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) and nasobiliary drainage (NBD) catheter, 7 patients (35%) were treated with ES and biliary stent (BS), and 1 patient (5%) was treated with ES alone. Treatment efficiency was 100% in bile leakage cases after cholecystectomy. Ten (32%) cases of hydatid cyst surgery had subsequent cystobiliary fistula. Of these patients, 7 were treated with ES and NBD, 2 were treated with ES and BS, and 1 patient (8%) with ES alone. Treatment was successful in 90% of these cases. ERCP is an effective method to diagnose and treat bile leakage. Endoscopic treatment of postoperative bile leakage should be individualized based on etiological and other factors, such as accompanying fistula.

  1. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT... tank car tanks. Editorial Note: At 66 FR 45186, Aug. 28, 2001, an amendment published amending a table...

  2. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500 Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. ...

  3. Multiple leakage localization and leak size estimation in water networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbasi, N.; Habibi, H.; Hurkens, C.A.J.; Klabbers, M.D.; Tijsseling, A.S.; Eijndhoven, van S.J.L.

    2012-01-01

    Water distribution networks experience considerable losses due to leakage, often at multiple locations simultaneously. Leakage detection and localization based on sensor placement and online pressure monitoring could be fast and economical. Using the difference between estimated and measured

  4. High-Field Quench Behavior and Protection of $Bi_2 Sr_2 Ca Cu_2 O_x$ Coils: Minimum and Maximum Quench Detection Voltages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Tengming [Fermilab; Ye, Liyang [NCSU, Raleigh; Turrioni, Daniele [Fermilab; Li, Pei [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    Small insert coils have been built using a multifilamentary Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox round wire, and characterized in background fields to explore the quench behaviors and limits of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox superconducting magnets, with an emphasis on assessing the impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection. Using heaters of various lengths to initiate a small normal zone, a coil was quenched safely more than 70 times without degradation, with the maximum coil temperature reaching 280 K. Coils withstood a resistive voltage of tens of mV for seconds without quenching, showing the high stability of these coils and suggesting that the quench detection voltage shall be greater than 50 mV to not to falsely trigger protection. The hot spot temperature for the resistive voltage of the normal zone to reach 100 mV increases from ~40 K to ~80 K with increasing the operating wire current density Jo from 89 A/mm2 to 354 A/mm2 whereas for the voltage to reach 1 V, it increases from ~60 K to ~140 K, showing the increasing negative impact of slow normal zone propagation on quench detection with increasing Jo and the need to limit the quench detection voltage to < 1 V. These measurements, coupled with an analytical quench model, were used to access the impact of the maximum allowable voltage and temperature upon quench detection on the quench protection, assuming to limit the hot spot temperature to <300 K.

  5. Superconducting synchrotron power supply and quench protection scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiening, R.; Flora, R.; Lauckner, R.; Tool, G.

    1978-01-01

    The power supply and quench protection scheme for the proposed Fermilab 6 km circumference superconducting synchrotron is described. Specifically, the following points are discussed: (1) the 46 MW thyristor power supply; (2) the 3 x 10 8 J emergency energy dump; (3) the distributed microprocessing system for the detection of quenches; (4) the thyristor network for shunting current around quenched magnets; and (5) the heaters internal to the magnets which cause rapid propagation of quenches. Test results on prototype systems are given

  6. Microvascular dysfunction with increased vascular leakage response in mice systemically exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chieh; Huang, Shin-Yin; Lu, Chi-Yu; Hsu, Ya-Hung; Wang, Dean-Chuan

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms underlying cardiovascular disease induced by arsenic exposure are not completely understood. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether arsenic-fed mice have an increased vascular leakage response to vasoactive agents and whether enhanced type-2 protein phosphatase (PP2A) activity is involved in mustard oil-induced leakage. ICR mice were fed water or sodium arsenite (20 mg/kg) for 4 or 8 weeks. The leakage response to vasoactive agents was quantified using the Evans blue (EB) technique or vascular labeling with carbon particles. Increased EB leakage and high density of carbon-labeled microvessels were detected in arsenic-fed mice treated with mustard oil. Histamine induced significantly higher vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice than in water-fed mice. Pretreatment with the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid or the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) blocker RP67580 significantly reduced mustard oil-induced vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice. The protein levels of PP2Ac and NK1R were similar in both groups. PP2A activity was significantly higher in the arsenic-fed mice compared with the control group. These findings indicate that microvessels generally respond to vasoactive agents, and that the increased PP2A activity is involved in mustard oil-induced vascular leakage in arsenic-fed mice. Arsenic may initiate endothelial dysfunction, resulting in vascular leakage in response to vasoactive agents.

  7. Modelling of QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 Experiments Using RELAP/SCDAPSIM and ASTEC Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Kaliatka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To prevent total meltdown of the uncovered and overheated core, the reflooding with water is a necessary accident management measure. Because these actions lead to the generation of hydrogen, which can cause further problems, the related phenomena are investigated performing experiments and computer simulations. In this paper, for the experiments of loss of coolant accidents, performed in Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, QUENCH-03 and QUENCH-06 are modelled using RELAP5/SCDAPSIM and ASTEC codes. The performed benchmark allowed analysing different modelling features. The recommendations for the model development are presented.

  8. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-U-110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.M.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-U-110 (U-110) is a Hanford Site waste tank that was;most recently sampled in November and December 1989. Analysis of the samples obtained from tank U-110 was conducted to support the characterization of the contents of this tank and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-10-00 (Ecology, et al. 1992). Because of incomplete recovery of the waste during sampling, there may be bias in the results of this characterization report

  9. Pulse sequences for suppressing leakage in single-qubit gate operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Joydip; Coppersmith, S. N.; Friesen, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Many realizations of solid-state qubits involve couplings to leakage states lying outside the computational subspace, posing a threat to high-fidelity quantum gate operations. Mitigating leakage errors is especially challenging when the coupling strength is unknown, e.g., when it is caused by noise. Here we show that simple pulse sequences can be used to strongly suppress leakage errors for a qubit embedded in a three-level system. As an example, we apply our scheme to the recently proposed charge quadrupole (CQ) qubit for quantum dots. These results provide a solution to a key challenge for fault-tolerant quantum computing with solid-state elements.

  10. A review on leakage rate tests for containment isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Goo; Kim, Hho Jung

    1992-01-01

    Wide experiences in operating containment isolation systems have been accumulated in Korea since 1978. Hence, it becomes necessary to review the operating data in order to confirm the integrity of containments with about 50 reactor-years of experience and to establish the future direction to the containment test program. The objectives of present work are to collect, consolidate and assess the leakage rate data, and then to find out dominant leakage paths and factors affecting integrated leakage rate test. General trends of overall leakage show that more careful surveillance during pre-operational test can reduce the containment leakage. Dominant leakage paths are found to be through air locks and large-sized valves, such as butterfly valves of purge lines, so that weighted surveillance and inspection on these dominant leakage paths can considerably reduce the containment leakage. The atmosphere stabilization are found to be the most important to obtain the reliable result. In order to get well stabilized atmosphere, temperature and flow rate of compressed air should be kept constant and it is preferable not to operate fan cooler during pressurizing the containment for test

  11. Effects of quenching and partial quenching on penguin matrix elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golterman, Maarten; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2001-01-01

    In the calculation of non-leptonic weak decay rates, a "mismatch" arises when the QCD evolution of the relevant weak hamiltonian down to hadronic scales is performed in unquenched QCD, but the hadronic matrix elements are then computed in (partially) quenched lattice QCD. This mismatch arises

  12. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  13. Numerical simulation of the laminar hydrogen flame in the presence of a quenching mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudriakov, S.; Studer, E.; Bin, C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies of J.H. Song et al., and S.Y. Yang et al. have been concentrated on mitigation measures against hydrogen risk. The authors have proposed installation of quenching meshes between compartments or around the essential equipment in order to contain hydrogen flames. Preliminary tests were conducted which demonstrated the possibility of flame extinction using metallic meshes of specific size. Considerable amount of numerical and theoretical work on flame quenching phenomenon has been performed in the second half of the last century and several techniques and models have been proposed to predict the quenching phenomenon of the laminar flame system. Most of these models appreciated the importance of heat loss to the surroundings as a primary cause of extinguishment, in particular, the heat transfer by conduction to the containing wall. The supporting simulations predict flame-quenching structure either between parallel plates (quenching distance) or inside a tube of a certain diameter (quenching diameter). In the present study the flame quenching is investigated assuming the laminar hydrogen flame propagating towards a quenching mesh using two-dimensional configuration and the earlier developed models. It is shown that due to a heat loss to a metallic grid the flame can be quenched numerically. (authors)

  14. Tank Characterization Report for Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-AN-107

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ADAMS, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    This report interprets information about the tank answering a series of six questions covering areas such as information drivers, tank history, tank comparisons, disposal implications, data quality and quantity, and unique aspects of the tank

  15. Influence of temperature to quenching on liquid scintillation measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, T

    2003-01-01

    The amount of quench is measured with liquid scintillation spectrometer changing the temperature of the sample. The range of the changed temperature is between 0 deg C and 35 deg C. The measurement is carried out for three kinds of unquenched standard, two quenched standards and fifteen kinds of scintillation cocktail and the mixed sample. It is confirmed that the amount of quench increases for all samples as the temperature rises. The influence of the changed amount of quench to the quench correction is examined. (author)

  16. Leakage Detection and Estimation Algorithm for Loss Reduction in Water Piping Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem B. Adedeji

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Water loss through leaking pipes constitutes a major challenge to the operational service of water utilities. In recent years, increasing concern about the financial loss and environmental pollution caused by leaking pipes has been driving the development of efficient algorithms for detecting leakage in water piping networks. Water distribution networks (WDNs are disperse in nature with numerous number of nodes and branches. Consequently, identifying the segment(s of the network and the exact leaking pipelines connected to this segment(s where higher background leakage outflow occurs is a challenging task. Background leakage concerns the outflow from small cracks or deteriorated joints. In addition, because they are diffuse flow, they are not characterised by quick pressure drop and are not detectable by measuring instruments. Consequently, they go unreported for a long period of time posing a threat to water loss volume. Most of the existing research focuses on the detection and localisation of burst type leakages which are characterised by a sudden pressure drop. In this work, an algorithm for detecting and estimating background leakage in water distribution networks is presented. The algorithm integrates a leakage model into a classical WDN hydraulic model for solving the network leakage flows. The applicability of the developed algorithm is demonstrated on two different water networks. The results of the tested networks are discussed and the solutions obtained show the benefits of the proposed algorithm. A noteworthy evidence is that the algorithm permits the detection of critical segments or pipes of the network experiencing higher leakage outflow and indicates the probable pipes of the network where pressure control can be performed. However, the possible position of pressure control elements along such critical pipes will be addressed in future work.

  17. 241-SY Tank Farm Construction Extent of Condition Review for Tank Integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Travis J.; Boomer, Kayle D.; Gunter, Jason R.; Venetz, Theodore J.

    2013-07-25

    This report provides the results of an extent of condition construction history review for tanks 241-SY-101, 241-SY-102, and 241-SY-103. The construction history of the 241-SY tank farm has been reviewed to identify issues similar to those experienced during tank 241-AY-102 construction. Those issues and others impacting integrity are discussed based on information found in available construction records, using tank 241-AY-102 as the comparison benchmark. In the 241-SY tank farm, the third DST farm constructed, refractory quality and stress relief were improved, while similar tank and liner fabrication issues remained.

  18. Fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peehs, M.; Stehle, H.; Weidinger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The stationary fuel storage tank is immersed below the water level in the spent fuel storage pool. In it there is placed a fuel assembly within a cage. Moreover, the storage tank has got a water filling and a gas buffer. The water in the storage tank is connected with the pool water by means of a filter, a surge tank and a water purification facility, temperature and pressure monitoring being performed. In the buffer compartment there are arranged catalysts a glow plugs for recombination of radiolysis products into water. The supply of water into the storage tank is performed through the gas buffer compartment. (DG) [de

  19. Tank 241-TY-101 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-TY-101. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  20. Tank 241-C-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-107. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  1. Tank 241-C-102 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-C-102. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedures that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  2. Tank 241-B-103 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-B-103. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  3. Tank 241-BX-104 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-BX-104. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  4. Tank 241-SX-106 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-SX-106. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  5. Tank 241-T-107 vapor sampling and analysis tank characterization report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huckaby, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the details of the Hanford waste tank characterization study for tank 241-T-107. The drivers and objectives of the headspace vapor sampling and analysis were in accordance with procedure that were presented in other reports. The vapor and headspace gas samples were collected and analyzed to determine the potential risks to tank farm workers due to fugitive emissions from the tank

  6. Impact of leakage delay on bifurcation in high-order fractional BAM neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengdai; Cao, Jinde

    2018-02-01

    The effects of leakage delay on the dynamics of neural networks with integer-order have lately been received considerable attention. It has been confirmed that fractional neural networks more appropriately uncover the dynamical properties of neural networks, but the results of fractional neural networks with leakage delay are relatively few. This paper primarily concentrates on the issue of bifurcation for high-order fractional bidirectional associative memory(BAM) neural networks involving leakage delay. The first attempt is made to tackle the stability and bifurcation of high-order fractional BAM neural networks with time delay in leakage terms in this paper. The conditions for the appearance of bifurcation for the proposed systems with leakage delay are firstly established by adopting time delay as a bifurcation parameter. Then, the bifurcation criteria of such system without leakage delay are successfully acquired. Comparative analysis wondrously detects that the stability performance of the proposed high-order fractional neural networks is critically weakened by leakage delay, they cannot be overlooked. Numerical examples are ultimately exhibited to attest the efficiency of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantum quenches in a holographic Kondo model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmenger, Johanna [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805, Munich (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg,Am Hubland, 97074 Würzburg (Germany); Flory, Mario [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805, Munich (Germany); Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University,Łojasiewicza 11, 30-348 Kraków (Poland); Newrzella, Max-Niklas; Strydom, Migael [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, 80805, Munich (Germany); Wu, Jackson M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Alabama,Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2017-04-10

    We study non-equilibrium dynamics and quantum quenches in a recent gauge/ gravity duality model for a strongly coupled system interacting with a magnetic impurity with SU(N) spin. At large N, it is convenient to write the impurity spin as a bilinear in Abrikosov fermions. The model describes an RG flow triggered by the marginally relevant Kondo operator. There is a phase transition at a critical temperature, below which an operator condenses which involves both an electron and an Abrikosov fermion field. This corresponds to a holographic superconductor in AdS{sub 2} and models the impurity screening. We quench the Kondo coupling either by a Gaussian pulse or by a hyperbolic tangent, the latter taking the system from the condensed to the uncondensed phase or vice-versa. We study the time dependence of the condensate induced by this quench. The timescale for equilibration is generically given by the leading quasinormal mode of the dual gravity model. This mode also governs the formation of the screening cloud, which is obtained as the decrease of impurity degrees of freedom with time. In the condensed phase, the leading quasinormal mode is imaginary and the relaxation of the condensate is over-damped. For quenches whose final state is close to the critical point of the large N phase transition, we study the critical slowing down and obtain the combination of critical exponents zν=1. When the final state is exactly at the phase transition, we find that the exponential ringing of the quasinormal modes is replaced by a power-law behaviour of the form ∼t{sup −a}sin (blog t). This indicates the emergence of a discrete scale invariance.

  8. Detecting the leakage source of a reservoir using isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Peng; Yang, Jing; Wang, Yongdong; Mugwanezal, Vincent de Paul; Chen, Li; Aldahan, Ala

    2018-07-01

    A good monitoring method is vital for understanding the sources of a water reservoir leakage and planning for effective restoring. Here we present a combination of several tracers ( 222 Rn, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, anions and temperature) for identification of water leakage sources in the Pushihe pumped storage power station which is in the Liaoning province, China. The results show an average 222 Rn activity of 6843 Bq/m 3 in the leakage water, 3034 Bq/m 3 in the reservoir water, and 41,759 Bq/m 3 in the groundwater. Considering that 222 Rn activity in surface water is typically less than 5000 Bq/m 3 , the low level average 222 Rn activity in the leakage water suggests the reservoir water as the main source of water. Results of the oxygen and hydrogen isotopes show comparable ranges and values in the reservoir and the leakage water samples. However, important contribution of the groundwater (up to 36%) was present in some samples from the bottom and upper parts of the underground powerhouse, while the leakage water from some other parts indicate the reservoir water as the dominant source. The isotopic finding suggests that the reservoir water is the main source of the leakage water which is confirmed by the analysis of anions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride) in the water samples. The combination of these tracer methods for studying dam water leakage improves the accuracy of identifying the source of leaks and provide a scientific reference for engineering solutions to ensure the dam safety. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The LHC quench protection system

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The new quench protection system (QPS) has the crucial roles of providing an early warning for any part of the superconducting coils and busbars that develop high resistance, as well as triggering the switch-off of the machine. Over 2000 new detectors will be installed around the LHC to make sure every busbar segment between magnets is monitored and protected. One of the major consolidation activities for the LHC is the addition of two new detectors to the quench protection system. A magnet quench occurs when part of the superconducting cable becomes normally-conducting. When the protection system detects an increased resistance the huge amount of energy stored in the magnet chains is safely extracted and ‘dumped’ into specially designed resistors. In the case of the main dipole chain, the stored energy in a single LHC sector is roughly the same as the kinetic energy of a passenger jet at cruising speed. The first new detector is designed to monitor the superconducting...

  10. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-11-15

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

  11. Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakestraw, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks

  12. Control dynamics of interaction quenched ultracold bosons in periodically driven lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Schmelcher, Peter; Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2016-05-01

    The out-of-equilibrium dynamics of ultracold bosons following an interaction quench upon a periodically driven optical lattice is investigated. It is shown that an interaction quench triggers the inter-well tunneling dynamics, while for the intra-well dynamics breathing and cradle-like processes can be generated. In particular, the occurrence of a resonance between the cradle and tunneling modes is revealed. On the other hand, the employed periodic driving enforces the bosons in the mirror wells to oscillate out-of-phase and to exhibit a dipole mode, while in the central well the cloud experiences a breathing mode. The dynamical behaviour of the system is investigated with respect to the driving frequency revealing a resonant behaviour of the intra-well dynamics. To drive the system in a highly non-equilibrium state an interaction quench upon the driving is performed giving rise to admixtures of excitations in the outer wells, an enhanced breathing in the center and an amplification of the tunneling dynamics. As a result of the quench the system experiences multiple resonances between the inter- and intra-well dynamics at different quench amplitudes. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  13. Cement Leakage in Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation for Osteoporotic Vertebral Compression Fractures: Analysis of Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weixing; Jin, Daxiang; Ma, Hui; Ding, Jinyong; Xu, Jixi; Zhang, Shuncong; Liang, De

    2016-05-01

    The risk factors for cement leakage were retrospectively reviewed in 192 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral augmentation (PVA). To discuss the factors related to the cement leakage in PVA procedure for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. PVA is widely applied for the treatment of osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Cement leakage is a major complication of this procedure. The risk factors for cement leakage were controversial. A retrospective review of 192 patients who underwent PVA was conducted. The following data were recorded: age, sex, bone density, number of fractured vertebrae before surgery, number of treated vertebrae, severity of the treated vertebrae, operative approach, volume of injected bone cement, preoperative vertebral compression ratio, preoperative local kyphosis angle, intraosseous clefts, preoperative vertebral cortical bone defect, and ratio and type of cement leakage. To study the correlation between each factor and cement leakage ratio, bivariate regression analysis was employed to perform univariate analysis, whereas multivariate linear regression analysis was employed to perform multivariate analysis. The study included 192 patients (282 treated vertebrae), and cement leakage occurred in 100 vertebrae (35.46%). The vertebrae with preoperative cortical bone defects generally exhibited higher cement leakage ratio, and the leakage is typically type C. Vertebrae with intact cortical bones before the procedure tend to experience type S leakage. Univariate analysis showed that patient age, bone density, number of fractured vertebrae before surgery, and vertebral cortical bone were associated with cement leakage ratio (Pcement leakage are bone density and vertebral cortical bone defect, with standardized partial regression coefficients of -0.085 and 0.144, respectively. High bone density and vertebral cortical bone defect are independent risk factors associated with bone cement leakage.

  14. Quench protection and safety of the ATLAS central solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Makida, Y; Haruyama, T; ten Kate, H H J; Kawai, M; Kobayashi, T; Kondo, T; Kondo, Y; Mizumaki, S; Olesen, G; Sbrissa, E; Yamamoto, A; Yamaoka, H

    2002-01-01

    Fabrication of the ATLAS central solenoid was completed and the performance test has been carried out. The solenoid was successfully charged up to 8.4 kA, which is 10% higher than the normal operational current of 7.6 kA. Two methods for quench protection, pure aluminum strips accelerating quench propagation and quench protection heaters distributing normal zones, are applied in order to safely dissipate the stored energy. In this paper, quench characteristics and protection methods of the ATLAS central solenoid are described. (14 refs).

  15. Defect production in simulated cascades: cascade quenching and short-term annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1982-01-01

    Defect production in high energy displacement cascades has been modeled using the computer code MARLOWE to generate the cascades and the stochastic computer code ALSOME to simulate the cascade quenching and short-term annealing of isolated cascades. The quenching is accomplished by using ALSOME with exaggerated values for defect mobilities and critical reaction distanes for recombination and clustering, which are in effect until the number of defect pairs is equal to the value determined from resistivity experiments at 4K. Then normal mobilities and reaction distances are used during short-term annealing to a point representative of Stage III recovery. Effects of cascade interactions at low fluences are also being investigated. The quenching parameter values were empirically determined for 30 keV cascades. The results agree well with experimental information throughout the range from 1 keV to 100 keV. Even after quenching and short-term annealing the high energy cascades behave as a collection of lower energy subcascades and lobes. Cascades generated in a crystal having thermal displacements were found to be in better agreement with experiments after quenching and annealing than those generated in a non-thermal crystal

  16. AgInCd control rod failure in the QUENCH-13 bundle test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepold, L.; Lind, T.; Csordas, A. Pinter; Stegmaier, U.; Steinbrueck, M.; Stuckert, J.

    2009-01-01

    The QUENCH off-pile experiments performed at the Karlsruhe Research Center are to investigate the high-temperature behavior of Light Water Reactor (LWR) core materials under transient conditions and in particular the hydrogen source term resulting from the water injection into an uncovered LWR core. The typical LWR-type QUENCH test bundle, which is electrically heated, consists of 21 fuel rod simulators with a total length of approximately 2.5 m. The Zircaloy-4 rod claddings and the grid spacers are identical to those used in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) whereas the fuel is represented by ZrO 2 pellets. In the QUENCH-13 experiment the single unheated fuel rod simulator in the center of the test bundle was replaced by a PWR-type control rod. The QUENCH-13 experiment consisting of pre-oxidation, transient, and quench water injection at the bottom of the test section investigated the effect of an AgInCd/stainless steel/Zircaloy-4 control rod assembly on early-phase bundle degradation and on reflood behavior. Furthermore, in the frame of the EU 6th Framework Network of Excellence SARNET, release and transport of aerosols of a failed absorber rod were to be studied in QUENCH-13, which was accomplished with help of aerosol measurements performed by PSI-Switzerland and AEKI-Hungary. Control rod failure was initiated by eutectic interaction of steel cladding and Zircaloy-4 guide tube and was indicated at about 1415 K by axial peak absorber and bundle temperature responses and additionally by the on-line aerosol monitoring system. Significant releases of aerosols and melt relocation from the control rod were observed at an axial peak bundle temperature of 1650 K. At a maximum bundle temperature of 1820 K reflood from the bottom was initiated with cold water at a flooding rate of 52 g/s. There was no noticeable temperature escalation during quenching. This corresponds to the small amount of about 1 g in hydrogen production during the quench phase (compared to 42 g of H 2

  17. [Bile leakage after liver resection: A retrospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menclová, K; Bělina, F; Pudil, J; Langer, D; Ryska, M

    2015-12-01

    Many previous reports have focused on bile leakage after liver resection. Despite the improvements in surgical techniques and perioperative care the incidence of this complication rather keeps increasing. A number of predictive factors have been analyzed. There is still no consensus regarding their influence on the formation of bile leakage. The objective of our analysis was to evaluate the incidence of bile leakage, its impact on mortality and duration of hospitalization at our department. At the same time, we conducted an analysis of known predictive factors. The authors present a retrospective review of the set of 146 patients who underwent liver resection at the Department of Surgery of the 2nd Faculty of Medicine of the Charles University and Central Military Hospital Prague, performed between 20102013. We used the current ISGLS (International Study Group of Liver Surgery) classification to evaluate the bile leakage. The severity of this complication was determined according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system. Statistical significance of the predictive factors was determined using Fishers exact test and Students t-test. The incidence of bile leakage was 21%. According to ISGLS classification the A, B, and C rates were 6.5%, 61.2%, and 32.3%, respectively. The severity of bile leakage according to the Clavien-Dindo classification system - I-II, IIIa, IIIb, IV and V rates were 19.3%, 42%, 9.7%, 9.7%, and 19.3%, respectively. We determined the following predictive factors as statistically significant: surgery for malignancy (pBile leakage significantly prolonged hospitalization time (pbile leakage the perioperative mortality was 23 times higher (pBile leakage is one of the most serious complications of liver surgery. Most of the risk factors are not easily controllable and there is no clear consensus on their influence. Intraoperative leak tests could probably reduce the incidence of bile leakage. In the future, further studies will be required to improve

  18. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BY-112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-BY-112. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-10. (This tank has been designated a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank.)

  19. Short initial length quench on CICC of ITER TF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicollet, S.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J.-L.; Lacroix, B. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bessette, D.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Coatanea-Gouachet, M. [ELC Engineering, 350 chemin du Verladet, F-13290 Les Milles (France); Gauthier, F. [Soditech Ingenierie, 4 bis allée des Gabians, ZI La Frayère, 06150 Cannes (France)

    2014-01-29

    Previous quench studies performed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field (TF) Coils have led to identify two extreme families of quench: first 'severe' quenches over long initial lengths in high magnetic field, and second smooth quenches over short initial lengths in low field region. Detailed analyses and results on smooth quench propagation and detectability on one TF Cable In Conduit Conductor (CICC) with a lower propagation velocity are presented here. The influence of the initial quench energy is shown and results of computations with either a Fast Discharge (FD) of the magnet or without (failure of the voltage quench detection system) are reported. The influence of the central spiral of the conductor on the propagation velocity is also detailed. In the cases of a regularly triggered FD, the hot spot temperature criterion of 150 K (with helium and jacket) is fulfilled for an initial quench length of 1 m, whereas this criterion is exceed (Tmax ≈ 200 K) for an extremely short length of 5 cm. These analyses were carried out using both the Supermagnet(trade mark, serif) and Venecia codes and the comparisons of the results are also discussed.

  20. Short initial length quench on CICC of ITER TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicollet, S.; Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J.-L.; Lacroix, B.; Bessette, D.; Rodriguez-Mateos, F.; Coatanea-Gouachet, M.; Gauthier, F.

    2014-01-01

    Previous quench studies performed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field (TF) Coils have led to identify two extreme families of quench: first 'severe' quenches over long initial lengths in high magnetic field, and second smooth quenches over short initial lengths in low field region. Detailed analyses and results on smooth quench propagation and detectability on one TF Cable In Conduit Conductor (CICC) with a lower propagation velocity are presented here. The influence of the initial quench energy is shown and results of computations with either a Fast Discharge (FD) of the magnet or without (failure of the voltage quench detection system) are reported. The influence of the central spiral of the conductor on the propagation velocity is also detailed. In the cases of a regularly triggered FD, the hot spot temperature criterion of 150 K (with helium and jacket) is fulfilled for an initial quench length of 1 m, whereas this criterion is exceed (Tmax ≈ 200 K) for an extremely short length of 5 cm. These analyses were carried out using both the Supermagnet(trade mark, serif) and Venecia codes and the comparisons of the results are also discussed