WorldWideScience

Sample records for quasar target selection

  1. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Quasar Target Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Adam D; Prakash, Abhishek; Pâris, Isabelle; Yeche, Christophe; Dawson, Kyle S; Bovy, Jo; Lang, Dustin; Schlegel, David J; Newman, Jeffrey A; Petitjean, Patrick; Kneib, Jean Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Percival, Will J; Ross, Ashley J; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Armengaud, Eric; Brownstein, Joel; Burtin, Etienne; Cai, Zheng; Comparat, Johan; Kasliwal, Mansi; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; McBride, Cameron K; McGreer, Ian D; Miller, Adam A; Nugent, Peter; Ofek, Eran; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Schneider, Donald P; Sesar, Branimir; Streblyanska, Alina; Surace, Jason

    2015-01-01

    As part of the SDSS-IV the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will perform measurements of the cosmological distance scale via application of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) method to samples of quasars and galaxies. Quasar surveys are particularly useful in the BAO context as they can trace extremely large volumes back to moderately high redshift. eBOSS will adopt two approaches to target quasars over a 7500 sq. deg. area. First, z > 2.1 quasars will be targeted to improve BAO measurements in the Lyman-Alpha Forest. Second, a homogeneously selected "CORE" sample of quasars at 0.9 2.1 quasars. A supplemental selection based on variability of quasars in multi-epoch imaging from the Palomar Transient Factory should recover an additional ~3-4 per sq. deg. z > 2.1 quasars to g 500,000 new spectroscopically confirmed quasars and > 500,000 uniformly selected spectroscopically confirmed 0.9 < z < 2.2 quasars. At the conclusion of SDSS-IV, the SDSS will have provided unique spectra...

  2. Think Outside the Color-Box: Probabilistic Target Selection and the SDSS-XDQSO Quasar Targeting Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Bovy, Jo; Hogg, David W; Myers, Adam D; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Schlegel, David J; Ross, Nicholas P; Sheldon, Erin S; McGreer, Ian D; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael A; Weaver, Benjamin A

    2010-01-01

    We present the SDSS-XDQSO quasar targeting catalog for efficient flux-based quasar target selection down to the faint limit of the SDSS catalog, even at medium redshifts (2.5 3.5) quasar probabilities for all 160,904,060 point-sources with dereddened i-band magnitude between 17.75 and 22.45 mag in the 14,555 deg^2 of imaging from SDSS Data Release 8. The catalog can be used to define a uniformly selected and efficient low- or medium-redshift quasar survey, such as that needed for the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey project. We show that the XDQSO technique performs as well as the current best photometric quasar selection technique at low redshift, and out-performs all other flux-based methods for selecting the medium-redshift quasars of our primary interest.

  3. A survey of luminous high-redshift quasars with SDSS and WISE. I. target selection and optical spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yang, Jinyi; Yi, Weimin; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Wang, Shu; Cai, Zheng; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift quasars are important tracers of structure and evolution in the early universe. However, they are very rare and difficult to find when using color selection because of contamination from late-type dwarfs. High-redshift quasar surveys based on only optical colors suffer from incompleteness and low identification efficiency, especially at $z\\gtrsim4.5$. We have developed a new method to select $4.7\\lesssim z \\lesssim 5.4$ quasars with both high efficiency and completeness by combining optical and mid-IR Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) photometric data, and are conducting a luminous $z\\sim5$ quasar survey in the whole Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We have spectroscopically observed 99 out of 110 candidates with $z$-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5 and 64 (64.6\\%) of them are quasars with redshifts of $4.4\\lesssim z \\lesssim 5.5$ and absolute magnitudes of $-29\\lesssim M_{1450} \\lesssim -26.4$. In addition, we also observed 14 fainter candidates selected with the same crite...

  4. Halo Occupation Distribution of Infrared Selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Kaustav

    2016-01-01

    We perform a Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of quasars that are observed in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) telescope with counter-parts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release (DR)-8 quasar catalog at a median redshift of $z\\sim 1.04 (\\pm 0.58)$. Using a four parameter HOD model we derive the host mass scales of WISE selected quasars. Our results show that the median halo masses of central and satellite quasars lie in the range $M_{\\mathrm{cen}} = (5 \\pm 1.0) \\times 10^{12} M_{\\odot}$ and $M_{\\mathrm{sat}} = 8 (^{+7.8} _{-4.8}) \\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}$, respectively. The derived satellite fraction is $f_{\\mathrm{sat}}= 5.5 (^{+35} _{-5.0})\\times 10^{-3}$. Previously Richardson et al.\\ used the SDSS DR7 quasar clustering data to obtain the halo mass distributions of $z\\sim 1.4$ quasars. Our results on the HOD of central quasars are in excellent agreement with Richardson et al.\\ but the host mass scale of satellite ...

  5. Quasar Selection Based on Photometric Variability

    CERN Document Server

    MacLeod, C L; Ivezic, Z; Kochanek, C S; Gibson, R; Meisner, A; Kozlowski, S; Sesar, B; Becker, A C; de Vries, W

    2010-01-01

    We develop a method for separating quasars from other variable point sources using SDSS Stripe 82 light curve data for ~10,000 variable objects. To statistically describe quasar variability, we use a damped random walk model parametrized by a damping time scale, tau, and an asymptotic amplitude (structure function), SF_inf. With the aid of an SDSS spectroscopically confirmed quasar sample, we demonstrate that variability selection in typical extragalactic fields with low stellar density can deliver complete samples with reasonable purity (or efficiency, E). Compared to a selection method based solely on the slope of the structure function, the inclusion of the tau information boosts E from 60% to 75% while maintaining a highly complete sample (98%) even in the absence of color information. For a completeness of C=90%, E is boosted from 80% to 85%. Conversely, C improves from 90% to 97% while maintaining E=80% when imposing a lower limit on tau. With the aid of color selection, the purity can be further booste...

  6. Black Hole Mass Estimates of Radio Selected Quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Oshlack, Alicia; Webster, Rachel; Whiting, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    The black hole (BH) mass in the centre of AGN has been estimated for a sample of radio-selected flat-spectrum quasars to investigate the relationship between BH mass and radio properties of quasars. We have used the virial assumption with measurements of the H$\\beta$ FWHM and luminosity to estimate the central BH mass. In contrast to previous studies we find no correlation between BH mass and radio power in these AGN. We find a range in BH mass similar to that seen in radio-quiet quasars from...

  7. Eight-Dimensional Mid-Infrared/Optical Bayesian Quasar Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gordon T; Lacy, Mark; Myers, Adam D; Nichol, Robert C; Zakamska, Nadia L; Brunner, Robert J; Brandt, W N; Gray, Alexander G; Parejko, John K; Ptak, Andrew; Schneider, Donald P; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J; Szalay, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    We explore the multidimensional, multiwavelength selection of quasars from mid-IR (MIR) plus optical data, specifically from Spitzer-IRAC and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We apply modern statistical techniques to combined Spitzer MIR and SDSS optical data, allowing up to 8-D color selection of quasars. Using a Bayesian selection method, we catalog 5546 quasar candidates to an 8.0um depth of 56uJy over an area of ~24 sq. deg; ~70% of these candidates are not identified by applying the same Bayesian algorithm to 4-color SDSS optical data alone. Our selection recovers 97.7% of known type 1 quasars in this area and greatly improves the effectiveness of identifying 3.5quasars. Even using only the two shortest wavelength IRAC bandpasses (3.6 and 4.5um), it is possible to use our Bayesian techniques to select quasars with 97% completeness and as little as 10% contamination. This sample has a photometric redshift accuracy of 93.6% (DeltaZ +/- 0.3), remaining roughly constant when the two reddest MI...

  8. The extended High A(V) Quasar Survey: Searching for dusty absorbers toward mid-infrared selected quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krogager, J -K; Heintz, K E; Geier, S; Ledoux, C; Møller, P; Noterdaeme, P; Venemans, B P; Vestergaard, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a new spectroscopic survey for dusty intervening absorption systems, particularly damped Ly$\\alpha$ absorbers (DLAs), towards reddened quasars. The candidate quasars are selected from mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer combined with optical and near-infrared photometry. Out of 1073 candidates, we secure low-resolution spectra for 108 using the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma, Spain. Based on the spectra, we are able to classify 100 of the 108 targets as quasars. A large fraction (50 %) is observed to have broad absorption lines (BALs). Moreover, we find 6 quasars with strange breaks in their spectra, which are not consistent with regular dust reddening. Using template fitting we infer the amount of reddening along each line of sight ranging from A(V)$\\approx$0.1 mag to 1.2 mag (assuming an SMC extinction curve). In four cases, the reddening is consistent with dust exhibiting the 2175{\\AA} feature caused by an intervening absorber, and for two of...

  9. The Composite Spectrum of BOSS Quasars Selected for Studies of the Lyα Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David W.; Jensen, Trey W.; Suzuki, Nao; Bautista, Julian E.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Vivek, M.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Herbst, H.; Jiang, Linhua; Moran, Sarah E.; Myers, Adam D.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-06-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) has collected more than 150,000 2.1 ≤ z ≤ 3.5 quasar spectra since 2009. Using this unprecedented sample, we create a composite spectrum in the rest-frame of 102,150 quasar spectra from 800-3300 Å at a signal-to-noise ratio close to 1000 per pixel (Δv of 69 km s-1). Included in this analysis is a correction to account for flux calibration residuals in the BOSS spectrophotometry. We determine the spectral index as a function of redshift of the full sample, warp the composite spectrum to match the median spectral index, and compare the resulting spectrum to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry used in target selection. The quasar composite matches the color of the quasar population to 0.02 mag in g - r, 0.03 mag in r - i, and 0.01 mag in i - z over the redshift range 2.2 < z < 2.6. The composite spectrum deviates from the imaging photometry by 0.05 mag around z = 2.7, likely due to differences in target selection as the quasar colors become similar to the stellar locus at this redshift. Finally, we characterize the line features in the high signal-to-noise composite and identify nine faint lines not found in the previous composite spectrum from SDSS.

  10. The Einstein database of IPC x-ray observations of optically selected and radio-selected quasars, 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Worrall, D. M.; Avni, Yoram; Oey, M. S.; Flanagan, Joan

    1994-01-01

    We present the first volume of the Einstein quasar database. The database includes estimates of the X-ray count rates, fluxes, and luminosities for 514 quasars and Seyfert 1 galaxies observed with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) aboard the Einstein Observatory. All were previously known optically selected or radio-selected objects, and most were the targets of the X-ray observations. The X-ray properties of the Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) have been derived by reanalyzing the IPC data in a systematic manner to provide a uniform database for general use by the astronomical community. We use the database to extend earlier quasar luminosity studies which were made using only a subset of the currently available data. The database can be accessed on internet via the SAO Einstein on-line system ('Einline') and is available in ASCII format on magnetic tape and DOS diskette.

  11. The Composite Spectrum of BOSS Quasars Selected for Studies of the Lyman-alpha Forest

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, David W; Suzuki, Nao; Bautista, Julian E; Dawson, Kyle S; Vivek, M; Brownstein, Joel R; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Herbst, H; Jiang, Linhua; Moran, Sarah E; Myers, Adam D; Olmstead, Matthew D; Schneider, Donald P

    2016-01-01

    The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) has collected more than 150,000 $2.1 \\leq z \\leq 3.5$ quasar spectra since 2009. Using this unprecedented sample, we create a composite spectrum in the rest-frame of 102,150 quasar spectra from 800 \\AA\\ to 3300 \\AA\\ at a signal-to-noise ratio close to 1000 per pixel ($\\Delta v$ of 69 km~s$^{-1}$). Included in this analysis is a correction to account for flux calibration residuals in the BOSS spectrophotometry. We determine the spectral index as a function of redshift of the full sample, warp the composite spectrum to match the median spectral index, and compare the resulting spectrum to SDSS photometry used in target selection. The quasar composite matches the color of the quasar population to within 0.02 magnitudes in $g-r$, 0.03 magnitudes in $r-i$, and 0.01 magnitudes in $i-z$ over the redshift range $2.2target select...

  12. Mid-infrared spectra of optically selected type 2 quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Strauss, Michael A; Krolik, Julian H

    2008-01-01

    Type 2 quasars are luminous Active Galactic Nuclei whose central engines are seen through large amounts of gas and dust. We present Spitzer spectra of twelve type 2 quasars selected on the basis of their optical emission line properties. Within this sample, we find a surprising diversity of spectra, from those that are featureless to those showing strong PAH emission, deep silicate absorption at 10 micron, hydrocarbon absorption, high-ionization emission lines and H_2 rotational emission lines. About half of the objects in the sample are likely Compton-thick, including the two with the deepest Si absorption. The median star-formation luminosity of the objects in our sample measured from the strength of the PAH features is 5x10^11 L_sun, much higher than for field galaxies or for any other AGN sample, but similar to other samples of type 2 quasars. This suggests an evolutionary link between obscured quasars and peak star formation activity in the host galaxy. Despite the high level of star formation, the bolom...

  13. Discovery of 16 New z ∼ 5.5 Quasars: Filling in the Redshift Gap of Quasar Color Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyi; Fan, Xiaohui; Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Bian, Fuyan; Yang, Qian; McGreer, Ian D.; Yi, Weimin; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Yue, Minghao; Wang, Shu; Li, Zefeng; Ding, Jiani; Dye, Simon; Lawrence, Andy

    2017-04-01

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey of luminous z ∼ 5.5 quasars. Quasars at z ∼ 5.5, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and the early super-massive black hole growth. However, it has been very challenging to select quasars at redshifts 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distributions. We develop a new selection technique for z ∼ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near-IR, and mid-IR photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT InfraRed Deep Sky Surveys—Large Area Survey (ULAS), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS), and Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer. From our pilot observations in the SDSS-ULAS/VHS area, we have discovered 15 new quasars at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 and 6 new lower redshift quasars, with SDSS z band magnitude brighter than 20.5. Including other two z ∼ 5.5 quasars already published in our previous work, we now construct a uniform quasar sample at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7, with 17 quasars in a ∼4800 square degree survey area. For further application in a larger survey area, we apply our selection pipeline to do a test selection by using the new wide field J-band photometric data from a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS). We successfully discover the first UHS selected z ∼ 5.5 quasar.

  14. Quasar lenses and galactic streams: outlier selection and Gaia multiplet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Adriano

    2017-10-01

    I describe two novel techniques originally devised to select strongly lensed quasar candidates in wide-field surveys. The first relies on outlier selection in optical and mid-infrared magnitude space; the second combines mid-infrared colour selection with Gaia spatial resolution, to identify multiplets of objects with quasar-like colours. Both methods have already been applied successfully to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, ATLAS and Dark Energy Survey footprints: besides recovering known lenses from previous searches, they have led to new discoveries, including quadruply lensed quasars, which are rare within the rare-object class of quasar lenses. As a serendipitous by-product, at least four candidate Galactic streams in the South have been identified among foreground contaminants. There is considerable scope for tailoring the WISE-Gaia multiplet search to stellar-like objects, instead of quasar-like, and to automatically detect Galactic streams.

  15. On the selection effect of radio quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Yu; Zhou, Hongyan; Wu, Jian

    2010-01-01

    We identified a large sample of radio quasars, including those with complex radio morphology, from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Faint Images of Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST). Using this sample, we inspect previous radio quasar samples for selection effects resulting from complex radio morphologies and adopting positional coincidence between radio and optical sources alone. We find that 13.0% and 8.1% radio quasars do not show a radio core within 1.2 and 2 arcsecs of their optical position, and thus are missed in such samples. Radio flux is under-estimated by a factor of more than 2 for an additional 8.7% radio quasars. These missing radio extended quasars are more radio loud with a typical radio-to-optical flux ratio namely radio loudness RL >100, and radio power P >10^{25} W/Hz. They account for more than one third of all quasars with RL>100. The color of radio extended quasars tends to be bluer than the radio compact quasars. This suggests that radio extended quasars are more radio powerful ...

  16. A unifying evolutionary framework for infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasar host haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Myers, A. D.; Geach, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Recent measurements of the dark matter halo masses of infrared-selected obscured quasars are in tension - some indicate that obscured quasars have a higher halo mass compared to their unobscured counterparts, while others find no difference. The former result is inconsistent with the simplest models of quasar unification which rely solely on the viewing angle, while the latter may support such models. Here, using empirical relationships between dark matter halo and supermassive black hole (BH) masses, we provide a simple evolutionary picture which naturally explains these findings and is motivated by more sophisticated merger-driven quasar-fuelling models. The model tracks the growth rate of haloes, with the BH growing in spurts of quasar activity in order to `catch up' with the Mbh-Mstellar-Mhalo relationship. The first part of the quasar phase is obscured and is followed by an unobscured phase. Depending on the luminosity limit of the sample, driven by observational selection effects, a difference in halo masses may or may not be significant. For high-luminosity samples, the difference can be large (a few to 10 times higher masses in obscured quasars), while for lower luminosity samples, the halo mass difference is very small, much smaller than current observational constraints. Such a simple model provides a qualitative explanation for the higher mass haloes of obscured quasars, as well as a rough quantitative agreement with seemingly disparate results.

  17. New quasars behind the Magellanic Clouds. Spectroscopic confirmation of near-infrared selected candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Valentin D; Bekki, Kenji; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim; Gibson, Brad K; Kamath, Devika; van Loon, Jacco Th; Piatti, Andres E; For, Bi-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Quasi--stellar objects (quasars) located behind nearby galaxies provide an excellent absolute reference system for astrometric studies, but they are difficult to identify because of fore- and background contamination. Deep wide--field, high angular resolution surveys spanning the entire area of nearby galaxies are needed to obtain a complete census of such quasars. We embarked on a program to expand the quasar reference system behind the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds, the Magellanic Bridge, and the Magellanic Stream, connecting the Clouds with the Milky Way. Hundreds of quasar candidates were selected based on their near--infrared colors and variability properties from the ongoing public ESO VISTA Magellanic Clouds survey. A subset of 49 objects was followed up with optical spectroscopy. We confirmed the quasar nature of 37 objects (34 new identifications), four are low redshift objects, three are probably stars, and the remaining three lack prominent spectral features for a secure classification; bon...

  18. Probabilistic Selection of High-redshift Quasars with Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Masafusa

    High-redshift quasars are an important probe of the distant Universe. They enable observational studies of the early growth of supermassive blackholes, cosmic reionization, chemical enrichment of host galaxies, and so on. Through pioneering optical and near-infrared wide-area surveys such as the SDSS and the VIKING Survey, about one hundred quasars have been found at z > 6 (e.g., Fan et al. (2006b), Venemans et al. (2013)). However, its current small sample size and the fact that most of them are the most luminous (M 1450 6 quasars, especially low-luminous or z > 7 quasars, is highly desired for further understanding of the early universe. We are now starting a new ground-breaking survey of high-redshift (z > 6) quasars using the exquisite imaging data provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) Survey. Thanks to its extremely wide coverage and its high sensitivity thorough five optical bands (1,400 deg2 to the depth of r ~ 26 in HSC-Wide layer), it is one of the most powerful contemporary surveys that makes it possible for us to increase the number of z > 6 quasars by almost an order of magnitude, i.e., 300 at z ~ 6 and 50 at z ~ 7, based on the current estimate of the QLF at z > 6 by Willott et al. (2010b). One of the biggest challenges in z > 6 quasar candidate selection is contamination of Galactic brown dwarfs, which have the same point-like appearance as and similarly red colors to the quasars. To overcome this issue and maximize the selection efficiency, we apply a double-layered approach to the HSC survey products, namely combination of two probabilistic selections: SED-fitting and Bayesian selection. In particular, we have developed a template SED fitting method optimized to high-redshift quasars selection. Its application with 27 photometric bands to the COSMOS quasars at 3 6 quasar selection, and it is expected that the first HSC quasar discovery will be in the near future.

  19. Efficient Photometric Selection of Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: II. ~1,000,000 Quasars from Data Release Six

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gordon T; Gray, Alexander G; Riegel, Ryan N; Nichol, Robert C; Brunner, Robert J; Szalay, Alexander S; Schneider, Donald P; Anderson, Scott F

    2008-01-01

    We present a catalog of 1,172,157 quasar candidates selected from the photometric imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The objects are all point sources to a limiting magnitude of i=21.3 from 8417 sq. deg. of imaging from SDSS Data Release 6 (DR6). This sample extends our previous catalog by using the latest SDSS public release data and probing both UV-excess and high-redshift quasars. While the addition of high-redshift candidates reduces the overall efficiency (quasars:quasar candidates) of the catalog to ~80%, it is expected to contain no fewer than 850,000 bona fide quasars -- ~8 times the number of our previous sample, and ~10 times the size of the largest spectroscopic quasar catalog. Cross-matching between our photometric catalog and spectroscopic quasar catalogs from both the SDSS and 2dF Surveys, yields 88,879 spectroscopically confirmed quasars. For judicious selection of the most robust UV-excess sources (~500,000 objects in all), the efficiency is nearly 97% -- more than sufficient...

  20. Probabilistic Selection of High-redshfit Quasars with Subaru / Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Masafusa

    2015-08-01

    High-redshift quasrs are an important probe of the distant Universe. They enable observational studies of the early growth of supermassive blackholes, cosmic reionization, chemical enrichment of host galaxies, and so on. We are now starting a new ground-breaking survey of high-redsfhit quasars (z>6) using the exquisite imaging data provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) Survey. With the extremely wide-area coverage and high sensitivity thorugh five optical bands (1,400 deg2 to the depth of r~26 in Wide layer), it is one of the most powerful contemporary surveys that makes it possible for the HSC-AGN collaboration to increase the number of z>6 quasars by almost an order of magnitude, i.e., 300 at z~6 and 50 at z~7 based on the current estimate of the QLF at z>6 (Willott et al. 2010).One of the biggest challenges in the candidate selection is the significant contamination of Galactic brown dwarfs, which have the same point-like appearance as and similarly red colors to z>6 quasars. To overcome this issue, we have developed template SED fitting method optimized to high-redshift quasars selection for constructing the largest z>6 quasar sample with the HSC survey. Since 500 deg2 of the footprints of the HSC survey overlaps with the VISTA/VIKING survey, it is expected that z>6 quasars, with characteristic large Lyman break and flat red-continuum in its SED, can be separated out from contaminating sources by applying SED fitting with multi-wavelength photometric data. In practice, its application with 27 photometric bands to the COSMOS quasars at 36 quasar search with the first-year data products of the HSC survey, which results in extracting several promising candidates including one possible highest-redshift quasar at zphoto=7.3.

  1. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova fields

    CERN Document Server

    Tie, S S; Mudd, D; Ostrovski, F; Reed, S L; Lidman, C; Kochanek, C; Davis, T M; Sharp, R; Uddin, S; King, A; Wester, W; Tucker, B E; Tucker, D L; Buckley-Geer, E; Carollo, D; Childress, M; Glazebrook, K; Hinton, S R; Lewis, G; Macaulay, E; O'Neill, C R; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Annis, J; Benoit-L'evy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Garcia-Bellido, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Menanteau, F; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of quasar selection using the DES supernova fields. We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. We only considered objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the WISE mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g-i and i-W1) and a mixture of VHS and DES colors (g-i and i-K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we used XDQSOz, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band chi2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection band...

  2. The characteristic halo masses of half-a-million WISE-selected quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Hickox, R. C.; Eftekharzadeh, S.; Myers, A. D.

    2017-08-01

    Recent work has found evidence for a difference in the bias and dark matter halo masses of WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer)-selected obscured and unobscured quasars, implying a distinction between these populations beyond random line-of-sight effects. However, the significance of this difference in the most up-to-date measurements is relatively weak, at ˜2σ for individual measurements, but bolstered by agreement from different techniques, including angular clustering and cross-correlations with cosmic microwave background lensing maps. Here, we expand the footprint of previous work, aiming to improve the precision of both methods. In this larger area, we correct for position-dependent selection effects, in particular fluctuations of the WISE-selected quasar density as a function of Galactic latitude. We also measure the cross-correlation of the obscured and unobscured samples and confirm that they are well matched in redshift, both centred at z = 1. Combined with very similar detection fractions and magnitude distributions in the long-wavelength WISE bands, this redshift match strongly supports the fact that infrared selection identifies obscured and unobscured quasars of similar bolometric luminosity. Finally, we perform cross-correlations with confirmed spectroscopic quasars, again confirming the results from other methods - obscured quasars reside in haloes a factor of 3 times more massive than unobscured quasars. This difference is significant at the ˜5σ level when the measurements are combined, providing strong support for the idea that obscuration in at least some quasars is tied to the larger environment, and may have an evolutionary component.

  3. A unifying evolutionary framework for infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasar host haloes

    CERN Document Server

    DiPompeo, Michael; Myers, Adam; Geach, James

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the dark matter halo masses of infrared-selected obscured quasars are in tension --- some indicate that obscured quasars have higher halo mass compared to their unobscured counterparts, while others find no difference. The former result is inconsistent with the simplest models of quasar unification that rely solely on viewing angle, while the latter may support such models. Here, using empirical relationships between dark matter halo and supermassive black hole masses, we provide a simple evolutionary picture that naturally explains these findings and is motivated by more sophisticated merger-driven quasar fueling models. The model tracks the growth rate of haloes, with the black hole growing in spurts of quasar activity in order to "catch-up" with the $M_{\\textrm{BH}}$ - $M_{\\textrm{star}}$ - $M_{\\textrm{halo}}$ relationship. The first part of the quasar phase is obscured and is followed by an unobscured phase. Depending on the luminosity limit of the sample, driven by observational se...

  4. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Supernova Fields of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tie, S. S.; Martini, P.; Mudd, D.; Ostrovski, F.; Reed, S. L.; Lidman, C.; Kochanek, C.; Davis, T. M.; Sharp, R.; Uddin, S.; King, A.; Wester, W.; Tucker, B. E.; Tucker, D. L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carollo, D.; Childress, M.; Glazebrook, K.; Hinton, S. R.; Lewis, G.; Macaulay, E.; O’Neill, C. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.

    2017-02-14

    We present a study of quasar selection using the DES supernova fields. We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. We only considered objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the WISE mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g-i and i-W1) and a mixture of VHS and DES colors (g-i and i-K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we used XDQSOz, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band chi2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection bands and pass our data quality and photometric error cuts. We conduct our analyses at two magnitude limits, i<19.8 mag and i<22 mag. For sources with W1 and W2 detections, the W1-W2 color or XDQSOz method combined with variability gives the highest completenesses of >85% for both i-band magnitude limits and efficiencies of >80% to the bright limit and >60% to the faint limit; however, the giW1 and giW1+variability methods give the highest quasar surface densities. The XDQSOz method and combinations of W1W2/giW1/XDQSOz with variability are among the better selection methods when both high completeness and high efficiency are desired. We also present the OzDES Quasar Catalog of 1,263 spectroscopically-confirmed quasars taken by the OzDES survey. The catalog includes quasars with redshifts up to z~4 and brighter than i=22 mag, although the catalog is not complete up this magnitude limit.

  5. A Study of Quasar Selection in the Supernova Fields of the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, S. S.; Martini, P.; Mudd, D.; Ostrovski, F.; Reed, S. L.; Lidman, C.; Kochanek, C.; Davis, T. M.; Sharp, R.; Uddin, S.; King, A.; Wester, W.; Tucker, B. E.; Tucker, D. L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Carollo, D.; Childress, M.; Glazebrook, K.; Hinton, S. R.; Lewis, G.; Macaulay, E.; O'Neill, C. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Menanteau, F.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We present a study of quasar selection using the supernova fields of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We used a quasar catalog from an overlapping portion of the SDSS Stripe 82 region to quantify the completeness and efficiency of selection methods involving color, probabilistic modeling, variability, and combinations of color/probabilistic modeling with variability. In all cases, we considered only objects that appear as point sources in the DES images. We examine color selection methods based on the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mid-IR W1-W2 color, a mixture of WISE and DES colors (g ‑ i and i-W1), and a mixture of Vista Hemisphere Survey and DES colors (g ‑ i and i ‑ K). For probabilistic quasar selection, we used XDQSO, an algorithm that employs an empirical multi-wavelength flux model of quasars to assign quasar probabilities. Our variability selection uses the multi-band χ 2-probability that sources are constant in the DES Year 1 griz-band light curves. The completeness and efficiency are calculated relative to an underlying sample of point sources that are detected in the required selection bands and pass our data quality and photometric error cuts. We conduct our analyses at two magnitude limits, i 85% for both i-band magnitude limits and efficiencies of >80% to the bright limit and >60% to the faint limit; however, the giW1 and giW1+variability methods give the highest quasar surface densities. The XDQSOz method and combinations of W1W2/giW1/XDQSOz with variability are among the better selection methods when both high completeness and high efficiency are desired. We also present the OzDES Quasar Catalog of 1263 spectroscopically confirmed quasars from three years of OzDES observation in the 30 deg2 of the DES supernova fields. The catalog includes quasars with redshifts up to z ∼ 4 and brighter than i = 22 mag, although the catalog is not complete up to this magnitude limit.

  6. LAMOST Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the Chinese LAMOST spectroscopic quasar survey is to discover 0.4 million new quasars from 1 million quasar candidates brighter than the magnitude limit i=20.5 in the next 5 years. This will hopefully provide the largest quasar sample for the further studies of AGN physics and cosmology. The improved quasar selection criteria based on the UKIDSS near-IR and SDSS optical colors are presented, and their advantages in uncovering the missing quasars in the quasar 'redshift desert' are demonstrated. In addition, some recent discoveries of new quasars during the LAMOST commissioning phase are presented.

  7. Mid-Infrared Selected Quasars I: Virial Black Hole Mass and Eddington Ratios

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, Y Sophia; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Fazio, Giovanni G; Huang, Jia-Sheng; Wilkes, Belinda J; Willmer, Christopher N A; Omont, Alain; Papovich, Casey

    2014-01-01

    We provide a catalog of 391 mid-infrared-selected (MIR, 24$\\mu$m) broad-emission-line (BEL, type 1) quasars in the 22 deg$^2$ SWIRE Lockman Hole field. This quasar sample is selected in the MIR from Spitzer MIPS with $S_{\\rm 24} > 400\\mu$Jy, jointly with an optical magnitude limit of r (AB) $ 19.1$. We then investigate the continuum luminosity and line profiles of these MIR quasars, and estimate their virial black hole masses and the Eddington ratios. The SMBH mass shows evidence of downsizing, though the Eddington ratios remain constant at $1 < z < 4$. Compared to point sources in the same redshift range, extended sources at $z < 1$ show systematically lower Eddington ratios. The catalog and spectra are publicly available online.

  8. Selection constraints on high-redshift quasar searches in the VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, J. R.; Sutherland, W. J.; Venemans, B. P.; Reylé, C.; Robin, A. C.; Bonfield, D. G.; Bruce, V. A.; Jarvis, M. J.

    2012-02-01

    The European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) is a 4-m class survey telescope for wide-field near-infrared imaging. VISTA is currently running a suite of six public surveys, which will shortly deliver their first Europe wide public data releases to ESO. The VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy survey (VIKING) forms a natural intermediate between current wide shallow and deeper more concentrated surveys, by targeting two patches totalling 1500 deg2 in the Northern and Southern hemispheres with measured 5σ limiting depths of Z≃ 22.4, Y≃ 21.4, J≃ 20.9, H≃ 19.9 and Ks≃ 19.3 (Vega). This architecture forms an ideal working parameter space for the discovery of a significant sample of 6.5 ≤ z ≤ 7.5 quasars. In the first data release, priority has been placed on small areas encompassing a number of fields well sampled at many wavelengths, thereby optimizing science gains and synergy whilst ensuring a timely release of the first products. For rare object searches, e.g. high-z quasars, this policy is not ideal since photometric selection strategies generally evolve considerably with the acquisition of data. Without a reasonably representative data set sampling many directions on the sky, it is not clear how a rare object search can be conducted in a highly complete and efficient manner. In this paper, we alleviate this problem by supplementing initial data with a realistic model of the spatial, luminosity and colour distributions of sources known to heavily contaminate photometric quasar selection spaces, namely dwarf stars of spectral types M, L and T. We use this model along with a subset of available data to investigate contamination of quasar selection space by cool stars and galaxies and lay down a set of benchmark selection constraints that limit contamination to reasonable levels whilst maintaining high completeness as a function of both magnitude and redshift. We review recent follow-up imaging of

  9. Dusty Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczyk, Coleman M; Gallagher, S C; Leighly, Karen M; Hewett, Paul C; Ross, Nicholas P; Hall, P B

    2014-01-01

    We explore the extinction/reddening of ~35,000 uniformly-selected quasars with 00.1 and 0.1% (1.3%) with E(B-V)>0.2. Simulations show both populations of quasars are intrinsically bluer than the mean composite, with a mean spectral index (${\\alpha}_{\\lambda}$) of -1.79 (-1.83). The emission and absorption-line properties of both samples reveal that quasars with intrinsically red continua have narrower Balmer lines and stronger ionizing spectral lines, the latter indicating a harder continuum in the extreme-UV and the former indicating either smaller BH mass or more face-on orientation.

  10. Regional reliability of quantitative signal targeting with alternating radiofrequency (STAR) labeling of arterial regions (QUASAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatewaki, Yasuko; Higano, Shuichi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Murata, Takaki; Mugikura, Shunji; Ito, Daisuke; Takase, Kei; Takahashi, Shoki

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative signal targeting with alternating radiofrequency labeling of arterial regions (QUASAR) is a recent spin labeling technique that could improve the reliability of brain perfusion measurements. Although it is considered reliable for measuring gray matter as a whole, it has never been evaluated regionally. Here we assessed this regional reliability. Using a 3-Tesla Philips Achieva whole-body system, we scanned four times 10 healthy volunteers, in two sessions 2 weeks apart, to obtain QUASAR images. We computed perfusion images and ran a voxel-based analysis within all brain structures. We also calculated mean regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) within regions of interest configured for each arterial territory distribution. The mean CBF over whole gray matter was 37.74 with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of .70. In white matter, it was 13.94 with an ICC of .30. Voxel-wise ICC and coefficient-of-variation maps showed relatively lower reliability in watershed areas and white matter especially in deeper white matter. The absolute mean rCBF values were consistent with the ones reported from PET, as was the relatively low variability in different feeding arteries. Thus, QUASAR reliability for regional perfusion is high within gray matter, but uncertain within white matter. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neuroimaging published by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  11. Strong Variability of Overlapping Iron Broad Absorption Lines in five Radio-selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Shi, Xiheng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Wenjuan; Li, Zhenzhen; Wang, Shufen

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a variability study of broad absorption lines (BALs) in a uniformly radio-selected sample of 28 BAL quasars using the archival data from the first bright quasar survey (FBQS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), as well as those obtained by ourselves, covering time scales $\\sim 1-10$ years in the quasar's rest-frame. The variable absorption troughs are detected in 12 BAL quasars. Among them, five cases showed strong spectral variations and are all belong to a special subclass of overlapping iron low ionization BALs (OFeLoBALs). The absorbers of \\ion{Fe}{2} are estimated to be formed by a relative dense (\\mbox{$n\\rm _{e} > 10^6~cm^{-3}$}) gas at a distance from the subparsec scale to the dozens of parsec-scale from the continuum source. They differ from those of invariable non-overlapping FeLoBALs (non-OFeLoBALs), which are the low-density gas and locate at the distance of hundreds to thousands parsecs. OFeLoBALs and non-OFeLoBALs, i.e., FeLoBALs with/without strong BAL variations...

  12. A multi-wavelength survey of AGN in the XMM-LSS field: I. Quasar selection via the KX technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nakos, Th; Andreon, S; Surdej, J; Riaud, P; Hatziminaoglou, E; Garcet, O; Alloin, D; Baes, M; Galaz, G; Pierre, M; Quintana, H; Page, M J; Tedds, J A; Ceballos, M T; Corral, A; Ebrero, J; Krumpe, M; Mateos, S

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: We present a sample of candidate quasars selected using the KX-technique. The data cover 0.68 deg^2 of the X-ray Multi-Mirror (XMM) Large-Scale Structure (LSS) survey area where overlapping multi-wavelength imaging data permits an investigation of the physical nature of selected sources. METHODS: The KX method identifies quasars on the basis of their optical (R and z') to near-infrared (Ks) photometry and point-like morphology. We combine these data with optical (u*,g'r',i',z') and mid-infrared (3.6-24 micron) wavebands to reconstruct the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of candidate quasars. RESULTS: Of 93 sources selected as candidate quasars by the KX method, 25 are classified as quasars by the subsequent SED analysis. Spectroscopic observations are available for 12/25 of these sources and confirm the quasar hypothesis in each case. Even more, 90% of the SED-classified quasars show X-ray emission, a property not shared by any of the false candidates in the KX-selected sample. Applying a photometr...

  13. SDSS quasars in the WISE preliminary data release and quasar candidate selection with the optical/infrared colors

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zhang, Yanxia; Peng, Nanbo

    2012-01-01

    We present a catalog of 37842 quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 7, which have counterparts within 6$"$ in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) Preliminary Data Release. The overall WISE detection rate of the SDSS quasars is 86.7%, and it decreases to less than 50.0% when the quasar magnitude is fainter than $i=20.5$. We derive the median color-redshift relations based on this SDSS-WISE quasar sample and apply them to estimate the photometric redshifts of the SDSS-WISE quasars. We find that by adding the WISE W1 and W2-band data to the SDSS photometry we can increase the photometric redshift reliability, defined as the percentage of sources with the photometric and spectroscopic redshift difference less than 0.2, from 70.3% to 77.2%. We also obtain the samples of WISE detected normal and late-type stars with SDSS spectroscopy, and present a criterion in the $z-W1$ vs. $g-z$ color-color diagram, $z-W1>0.66(g-z)+2.01$, to separate quasars from stars. With this criterion we can...

  14. A novel variability-based method for quasar selection: evidence for a rest frame ~54 day characteristic timescale

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Matthew J; Drake, Andrew J; Mahabal, Ashish A; Chang, Melissa; Stern, Daniel; Donalek, Ciro; Glikman, Eilat

    2014-01-01

    We compare quasar selection techniques based on their optical variability using data from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS). We introduce a new technique based on Slepian wavelet variance (SWV) that shows comparable or better performance to structure functions and damped random walk models but with fewer assumptions. Combining these methods with WISE mid-IR colors produces a highly efficient quasar selection technique which we have validated spectroscopically. The SWV technique also identifies characteristic timescales in a time series and we find a characteristic rest frame timescale of ~54 days, confirmed in the light curves of ~18000 quasars from CRTS, SDSS and MACHO data, and anticorrelated with absolute magnitude. This indicates a transition between a damped random walk and $P(f) \\propto f^{-1/3}$ behaviours and is the first strong indication that a damped random walk model may be too simplistic to describe optical quasar variability.

  15. Emission-Line Properties and Selection Effects for z > 4 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, A.; Shields, J. C.; Hamann, F.

    2000-12-01

    A growing number of QSOs are now known to exist at redshifts beyond 4, and these sources provide important opportunities for better understanding of the astrophysics of galaxy formation and evolution. To date there are ~ 130 known QSOs with z > 4, but only limited efforts have been made to survey systematically the emission-line properties of these objects and/or the selection effects related with the techniques by which they were discovered. In this poster we will present results of a program of high signal-to-noise spectroscopy for 44 QSOs using the MMT and Keck observatories. The majority of these sources were originally identified via color selection techiques. The quasar spectra cover wavelengths between 1100 Å and 1700 Å in the rest frame, for sources spanning a luminosity range of ~ 2 orders of magnitude. An examination of the luminosity dependence of the emission features reveals evidence for a weak Baldwin effect. Spectrum composites for the whole data set and for subsets are obtained and analysed in order to investigate the spectral dependence on selection effects. The results show a tendency for stronger C IV emission lines for color-selected quasars, than for grism-selected objects.

  16. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    We present mass functions of distant actively accreting supermassive black holes residing in luminous quasars discovered in the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Fall Equatorial Stripe of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The quasars cover a wide range of redshifts (0...

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationships of selective antagonists of glucagon receptor using QuaSAR descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj Kumar, Palanivelu; Karthikeyan, Chandrabose; Hari Narayana Moorthy, Narayana Subbiah; Trivedi, Piyush

    2006-11-01

    In the present paper, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) approach was applied to understand the affinity and selectivity of a novel series of triaryl imidazole derivatives towards glucagon receptor. Statistically significant and highly predictive QSARs were derived for glucagon receptor inhibition by triaryl imidazoles using QuaSAR descriptors of molecular operating environment (MOE) employing computer-assisted multiple regression procedure. The generated QSAR models revealed that factors related to hydrophobicity, molecular shape and geometry predominantly influences glucagon receptor binding affinity of the triaryl imidazoles indicating the relevance of shape specific steric interactions between the molecule and the receptor. Further, QSAR models formulated for selective inhibition of glucagon receptor over p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase of the compounds in the series highlights that the same structural features, which influence the glucagon receptor affinity, also contribute to their selective inhibition.

  18. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of Luminous, Heavily Obscured, WISE-Selected Quasars at z ~ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, D.; Lansbury, G. B.; Assef, Roberto J.

    2014-01-01

    L(sun). The corresponding intrinsic, unobscured hard X-ray luminosities are L(2-10)~4e45 erg/s for typical quasar templates. These are amongst the most luminous AGN known, though the optical spectra rarely show evidence of a broad-line region and the selection criteria imply heavy obscuration even...... faintly detected by XMM-Newton. A third source was observed only with XMM-Newton, yielding a faint detection. The X-ray data require gas column densities N(H)>1e24 /cm2, implying the sources are extremely obscured, consistent with Compton-thick, luminous quasars. The discovery of a significant population...... of heavily obscured, extremely luminous AGN does not conform to the standard paradigm of a receding torus, in which more luminous quasars are less likely to be obscured. If a larger sample conforms with this finding, then this suggests an additional source of obscuration for these extreme sources....

  19. Data Mining for Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Gravitationally lensed (GL) quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine learning techniques and demonstrate that a two step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step we use catalog-level information ($griz$+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to preselect targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (Gradient-Boosted Trees), to form a final set of cand...

  20. X-Ray Observations of Optically Selected, Radio-quiet Quasars. I. The ASCA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, I. M.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Netzer, H.; Laor, A.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Nandra, K.; Takahashi, T.

    2000-03-01

    We present the result of 27 ASCA observations of 26 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) from the Palomar-Green (PG) survey. The sample is not statistically complete, but it is reasonably representative of RQQs in the PG survey. For many of the sources, the ASCA data are presented here for the first time. All the RQQs were detected except for two objects, both of which contain broad absorption lines in the optical band. We find the variability characteristics of the sources to be consistent with Seyfert 1 galaxies. A power law offers an acceptable description of the time-averaged spectra in the 2-10 keV (quasar frame) band for all but one data set. The best-fitting values of the photon index vary from object to object over the range 1.5~=2 and dispersion σ(Γ2-10)~=0.25. The distribution of Γ2-10 is therefore similar to that observed in other RQ active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and seems to be unrelated to X-ray luminosity. No single model adequately describes the full 0.6-10 keV (observed frame) continuum of all the RQQs. Approximately 50% of the sources can be adequately described by a single power law or by a power law with only very subtle deviations. All but one of the remaining data sets were found to have convex spectra (flattening as one moves to higher energies). The exception is PG 1411+442, in which a substantial column density (NH,z~2x1023 cm-2) obscures ~98% of the continuum. We find only five (maybe six) of 14 objects with z<~0.25 to have ``soft excesses'' at energies <~1 keV, but we find no universal shape for these spectral components. The spectrum of PG 1244+026 contains a rather narrow emission feature centered at an energy ~1 keV (quasar frame). The detection rate of absorption due to ionized material in these RQQs is lower than that seen in Seyfert 1 galaxies. In part, this may be due to selection effects. However, when detected, the absorbers in the RQQs exhibit a similar range of column density and ionization parameter as Seyfert 1 galaxies. We find

  1. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Jiang Linhua [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 92420 (United States); Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); DeGraf, Colin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Ge Jian [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Streblyanska, Alina, E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  2. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  3. Selection constraints on high redshift quasar searches in the VISTA kilo-degree infrared galaxy survey

    CERN Document Server

    Findlay, J R; Venemans, B P; Reyle, C; Robin, A C; Bonfield, D G; Bruce, V A; Jarvis, M J

    2011-01-01

    The European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) is a 4-m class survey telescope for wide-field near-infrared imaging. VISTA is currently running a suite of six public surveys, which will shortly deliver their first Europe wide public data releases to ESO. The VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy Survey (VIKING) forms a natural intermediate between current wide shallow, and deeper more concentrated surveys, by targeting two patches totalling 1500 sq.deg in the northern and southern hemispheres with measured 5-sigma limiting depths of Z ~ 22.4, Y ~ 21.4, J ~ 20.9, H ~ 19.9 and Ks ~19.3 (Vega). This architecture forms an ideal working parameter space for the discovery of a significant sample of 6.5 <= z <= 7.5 quasars. In the first data release priority has been placed on small areas encompassing a number of fields well sampled at many wavelengths, thereby optimising science gains and synergy whilst ensuring a timely release of the first products. For rare...

  4. A large sample of Kohonen-selected SDSS quasars with weak emission lines: selection effects and statistical properties

    CERN Document Server

    Meusinger, H

    2014-01-01

    We performed a search for WLQs in the spectroscopic data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 based on Kohonen self-organising maps for nearly 10^5 quasar spectra. The final sample consists of 365 quasars and includes in particular a subsample of 46 WLQs with equivalent widths W(MgII) 1500 A. The variability in the optical and UV is relatively low, even taking the variability-luminosity anti-correlation into account. The percentage of radio detected quasars and of core-dominant radio sources is significantly higher than for the control sample, whereas the mean radio-loudness is lower. The properties of our WLQ sample can be consistently understood assuming that it consists of a mix of quasars at the beginning of a stage of increased accretion activity and of beamed radio-quiet quasars. (Abstract modified to match the arXiv format)

  5. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    We present mass functions of distant actively accreting supermassive black holes residing in luminous quasars discovered in the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Fall Equatorial Stripe of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The quasars cover a wide range of redshifts (0...... functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison......, and discussion of these mass functions will be made with other existing black hole mass functions, notably that based on the SDSS DR3 quasar catalog. We present the relationships used to estimate the black hole mass based on the MgII emission line; the relations are calibrated to the Hbeta and CIV relations...

  6. ALMA DETECTED OVERDENSITY OF SUB-MILLIMETER SOURCES AROUND WISE/NVSS-SELECTED z ∼ 2 DUSTY QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Andrea; Sajina, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Lonsdale, Carol; Lacy, Mark [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    We study the environments of 49 WISE/NVSS-selected dusty, hyper-luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars using the Atacama Large Millimeter/Sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) 345 GHz images. We find that 17 of the 49 WISE/NVSS sources show additional sub-millimeter galaxies within the ALMA primary beam, probing scales within ∼150 kpc. We find a total of 23 additional sub-millimeter sources, four of which are in the field of a single WISE/NVSS source. The measured 870 μm source counts are ∼10× what is expected for unbiased regions, suggesting such hyper-luminous dusty quasars are excellent at probing high-density peaks.

  7. The Infrared Medium-Deep Survey. V. A New Selection Strategy for Quasars at z > 5 based on Medium-Band Observation with SQUEAN

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, Yiseul; Pak, Soojong; Hyun, Minhee; Kim, Sanghyuk; Kim, Yongjung; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple color selection techniques have been successful in identifying quasars from wide-field broad-band imaging survey data. Among the quasars that have been discovered so far, however, there is a redshift gap at $5 \\lesssim {\\rm z} \\lesssim 5.7$ due to the limitations of filter sets in previous studies. In this work, we present a new selection technique of high redshift quasars using a sequence of medium-band filters: nine filters with central wavelengths from 625 to 1025 nm and bandwidths of 50 nm. Photometry with these medium-bands traces the spectral energy distribution (SED) of a source, similar to spectroscopy with resolution R $\\sim$ 15. By conducting medium-band observations of high redshift quasars at 4.7 $\\leq$ z $\\leq$ 6.0 and brown dwarfs (the main contaminants in high redshift quasar selection) using the SED camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse (SQUEAN) on the 2.1-m telescope at the McDonald Observatory, we show that these medium-band filters are superior to multi-color broad-band color sectio...

  8. High-Redshift Quasars Found in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Commissioning Data III A Color Selected Sample at i^*<20 in the Fall Equatorial Stripe

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, X; Richards, G T; Newman, J A; Becker, R H; Schneider, D P; Gunn, J E; Davis, M; White, R L; Lupton, R H

    2000-01-01

    This is the third paper in a series aimed at finding high-redshift quasars from five-color (u'g'r'i'z') imaging data taken along the Celestial Equator by the SDSS during its commissioning phase. In this paper, we first present the observations of 14 bright high-redshift quasars (3.66quasars in the same region of the sky. Combined with the quasars presented in previous papers, we define a color-selected flux-limited sample of 39 quasars at 3.6 < z < 5.0 and i^*<20, covering a total effective area of 182 deg^2. From this sample, we estimate the average spectral power law slope in the rest-frame ultraviolet for quasars at z~4 to be -0.79 with a standard deviation of 0.34, and the average rest-frame equivalent width of the Ly alpha+N V emission line to be 69 A with a standard deviation of 18 A. The selection completeness of this multicolor sample is determined from the mo...

  9. Eight New Luminous z > 6 Quasars Selected via SED Model Fitting of VISTA, WISE and Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.L.; et al.

    2017-01-17

    We present the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation with the ESO NTT and Gemini South telescopes of eight new 6.0 < z < 6.5 quasars with z$_{AB}$ < 21.0. These quasars were photometrically selected without any star-galaxy morphological criteria from 1533 deg$^{2}$ using SED model fitting to photometric data from the Dark Energy Survey (g, r, i, z, Y), the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (J, H, K) and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (W1, W2). The photometric data was fitted with a grid of quasar model SEDs with redshift dependent Lyman-{\\alpha} forest absorption and a range of intrinsic reddening as well as a series of low mass cool star models. Candidates were ranked using on a SED-model based $\\chi^{2}$-statistic, which is extendable to other future imaging surveys (e.g. LSST, Euclid). Our spectral confirmation success rate is 100% without the need for follow-up photometric observations as used in other studies of this type. Combined with automatic removal of the main types of non-astrophysical contaminants the method allows large data sets to be processed without human intervention and without being over run by spurious false candidates. We also present a robust parametric redshift estimating technique that gives comparable accuracy to MgII and CO based redshift estimators. We find two z $\\sim$ 6.2 quasars with HII near zone sizes < 3 proper Mpc which could indicate that these quasars may be young with ages < 10$^6$ - 10$^7$ years or lie in over dense regions of the IGM. The z = 6.5 quasar VDESJ0224-4711 has J$_{AB}$ = 19.75 is the second most luminous quasar known with z > 6.5.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: Twelfth data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Myers, Adam D.; Aubourg, Éric; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Armengaud, Éric; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Hamann, Fred; Strauss, Michael A.; Albareti, Franco D.; Bovy, Jo; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Niel Brandt, W.; Brusa, Marcella; Buchner, Johannes; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Dwelly, Tom; Fan, Xiaohui; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hall, Patrick B.; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMahon, Richard G.; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pieri, Matthew M.; Prada, Francisco; Salvato, Mara; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H.; Zhu, Liu

    2017-01-01

    We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi [z = 2] half maximum (FWHM) larger than 500 km s-1 or, if not, have interesting/complex absorption features. The catalog also includes previously known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 297 301 quasars (272 026 are new discoveries since the beginning of SDSS-III) detected over 9376 deg2 with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with z > 2.15 (184 101, of which 167 742 are new discoveries) is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z > 2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (C iv, C iii], Mg ii). The catalog identifies 29 580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and Palomar Transient Factory multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra, covering the wavelength region 3600-10 500 Å at a spectral resolution in the range 1300 < R < 2500, can be retrieved from the SDSS Catalog Archive Server. We also provide a supplemental list of an additional 4841 quasars that have been identified serendipitously outside of

  11. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: ninth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Arnau, Eduard; Bautista, Julian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Busca, Nicolas; Capellupo, Daniel; Carithers, William; Croft, Rupert A C; Dawson, Kyle; Delubac, Timothée; Ebelke, Garrett; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Engelke, Philip; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nur Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Gibson, Robert R; Hall, Patrick B; Hamann, Fred; Hennawi, Joseph F; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jiang, Linhua; Kimball, Amy E; Kirkby, David; Kirkpatrick, Jessica A; Lee, Khee-Gan; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Lundgren, Britt; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew M; Richards, Gordon T; Rollinde, Emmanuel; Sheldon, Erin S; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anze; Shelden, Alaina; Shen, Yue; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Suzuki, Nao; Tinker, Jeremy; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present the Data Release 9 Quasar (DR9Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the survey, are spectrocopically confirmed as quasars via visual inspection, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15$ (61,931) is ~2.8 times larger than the number of z>2.15 quasars previously known. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 7,533 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object the catalog presents five-band (u,g,r,i,z) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys.

  12. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog: twelfth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Aubourg, Éric; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Armengaud, Éric; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Yèche, Christophe; Hamann, Fred; Strauss, Michael A; Albareti, Franco D; Bovy, Jo; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brandt, W Niel; Brusa, Marcella; Buchner, Johannes; Comparat, Johan; Croft, Rupert A C; Dwelly, Tom; Fan, Xiaohui; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Georgakakis, Antonis; Hall, Patrick B; Jian, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; McMahon, Richard G; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pieri, Matthew M; Prada, Francisco; Salvato, Mara; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weinberg, David H; Zhu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    We present the Data Release 12 Quasar catalog (DR12Q) from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the SDSS-III. This catalog includes all SDSS-III/BOSS objects that were spectroscopically targeted as quasar candidates during the full survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra, have luminosities Mi[z=2]2.15 is about an order of magnitude greater than the number of z>2.15 quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII], MgII). The catalog identifies 29,580 broad absorption line quasars and lists their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-based photometry together with some information on the optical morphology and the selection criteria. When available, the catalog also provides information on the optical variability of quasars using SDSS and PTF multi-epoch photometry. The catalog also contains X-ray, ultraviolet, near-infrared, and radio emission properti...

  13. A novel variability-based method for quasar selection: evidence for a rest-frame ˜54 d characteristic time-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Chang, Melissa; Stern, Daniel; Donalek, Ciro; Glikman, Eilat

    2014-03-01

    We compare quasar-selection techniques based on their optical variability using data from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS). We introduce a new technique based on Slepian wavelet variance (SWV) that shows comparable or better performance to structure functions and damped random walk models but with fewer assumptions. Combining these methods with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-IR colours produces a highly efficient quasar-selection technique which we have validated spectroscopically. The SWV technique also identifies characteristic time-scales in a time series, and we find a characteristic rest-frame time-scale of ˜54 d, confirmed in the light curves of ˜18 000 quasars from CRTS, SDSS and MACHO data, and anticorrelated with absolute magnitude. This indicates a transition between a damped random walk and P(f) ∝ f-1/3 behaviours and is the first strong indication that a damped random walk model may be too simplistic to describe optical quasar variability.

  14. Towards a comprehensive picture of powerful quasars, their host galaxies and quasar winds at z ~ 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin; Obied, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Luminous type-2 quasars in which the glow from the central black hole is obscured by dust are ideal targets for studying their host galaxies and the quasars' effect on galaxy evolution. Such feedback appears ubiquitous in luminous obscured quasars where high velocity ionized nebulae have been found. We present rest-frame yellow-band (~5000 Angstroms) observations using the Hubble Space Telescope for a sample of 20 luminous quasar host galaxies at 0.2 < z < 0.6 selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. For the first time, we combine host galaxy observations with geometric measurements of quasar illumination using blue-band HST observations and [OIII] integral field unit observations probing the quasar winds. The HST images reveal bright merger signatures in about half the galaxies; a significantly higher fraction than in comparison inactive ellipticals. We show that the host galaxies are primarily bulge-dominated, with masses close to M*, but belong to < 30% of elliptical galaxies that are highly st...

  15. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of 13 gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Anupreeta; Oguri, Masamune; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A.; Santiago, Basilio X.; Mosquera, Ana M.; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Rusu, Cristian E.; Brownstein, Joel R.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Quimby, Robert M.; Schneider, Donald P.; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G.

    2016-02-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ( ≲ 2 arcsec) confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs ≈ 4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  16. The SDSS-III BOSS quasar lens survey: discovery of thirteen gravitationally lensed quasars

    CERN Document Server

    More, Anupreeta; Kayo, Issha; Zinn, Joel; Strauss, Michael A; Santiago, Basilio X; Mosquera, Ana M; Inada, Naohisa; Kochanek, Christopher S; Rusu, Cristian E; Brownstein, Joel R; da Costa, Luiz N; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Maia, Marcio A G; Quimby, Robert M; Schneider, Donald P; Streblyanska, Alina; York, Donald G

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of 13 confirmed two-image quasar lenses from a systematic search for gravitationally lensed quasars in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We adopted a methodology similar to that used in the SDSS Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). In addition to the confirmed lenses, we report 11 quasar pairs with small angular separations ($\\lesssim$2") confirmed from our spectroscopy, which are either projected pairs, physical binaries, or possibly quasar lens systems whose lens galaxies have not yet been detected. The newly discovered quasar lens system, SDSS J1452+4224 at zs$\\approx$4.8 is one of the highest redshift multiply imaged quasars found to date. Furthermore, we have over 50 good lens candidates yet to be followed up. Owing to the heterogeneous selection of BOSS quasars, the lens sample presented here does not have a well-defined selection function.

  17. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of Luminous, Heavily Obscured, WISE-Selected Quasars at z ~ 2

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, D; Assef, R J; Brandt, W N; Alexander, D M; Ballantyne, D R; Balokovic, M; Benford, D; Blain, A; Boggs, S E; Bridge, C; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Del Moro, A; Eisenhardt, P R M; Gandhi, P; Griffith, R; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Jarrett, T H; Koss, M; Lake, S; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Tsai, C -W; Walton, D J; Wright, E L; Wu, J; Yan, L; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We report on a NuSTAR and XMM-Newton program that has observed a sample of three extremely luminous, heavily obscured WISE-selected AGN at z~2 in a broad X-ray band (0.1 - 79 keV). The parent sample, selected to be faint or undetected in the WISE 3.4um (W1) and 4.6um (W2) bands but bright at 12um (W3) and 22um (W4), are extremely rare, with only ~1000 so-called W1W2-dropouts across the extragalactic sky. Optical spectroscopy reveals typical redshifts of z~2 for this population, implying rest-frame mid-IR luminosities of L(6um)~6e46 erg/s and bolometric luminosities that can exceed L(bol)~1e14 L(sun). The corresponding intrinsic, unobscured hard X-ray luminosities are L(2-10)~4e45 erg/s for typical quasar templates. These are amongst the most luminous AGN known, though the optical spectra rarely show evidence of a broad-line region and the selection criteria imply heavy obscuration even at rest-frame 1.5um. We designed our X-ray observations to obtain robust detections for gas column densities N(H)1e24 /cm2, i...

  18. Data mining for gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Adriano; Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.

    2015-04-01

    Gravitationally lensed quasars are brighter than their unlensed counterparts and produce images with distinctive morphological signatures. Past searches and target-selection algorithms, in particular the Sloan Quasar Lens Search (SQLS), have relied on basic morphological criteria, which were applied to samples of bright, spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The SQLS techniques are not sufficient for searching into new surveys (e.g. DES, PS1, LSST), because spectroscopic information is not readily available and the large data volume requires higher purity in target/candidate selection. We carry out a systematic exploration of machine-learning techniques and demonstrate that a two-step strategy can be highly effective. In the first step, we use catalogue-level information (griz+WISE magnitudes, second moments) to pre-select targets, using artificial neural networks. The accepted targets are then inspected with pixel-by-pixel pattern recognition algorithms (gradient-boosted trees), to form a final set of candidates. The results from this procedure can be used to further refine the simpler SQLS algorithms, with a twofold (or threefold) gain in purity and the same (or 80 per cent) completeness at target-selection stage, or a purity of 70 per cent and a completeness of 60 per cent after the candidate-selection step. Simpler photometric searches in griz+WISE based on colour cuts would provide samples with 7 per cent purity or less. Our technique is extremely fast, as a list of candidates can be obtained from a Stage III experiment (e.g. DES catalogue/data base) in a few CPU hours. The techniques are easily extendable to Stage IV experiments like LSST with the addition of time domain information.

  19. A NEOWISE Survey of Quasars in the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaohui

    Luminous quasars at high redshift provide direct probes of the evolution of supermassive black holes (BHs) and intergalactic medium (IGM) at early cosmic time. More than 100 quasars have now been discovered at z>6, with the highest redshift at z=7.1. Detections of such objects indicate the existence of billion solar mass BHs merely a few hundred Myrs after the first star formation in the universe, challenging the theory of BH growth and BH-galaxy coevolution at early epoch. Absorption spectra of the highest redshift quasars reveal complete Gunn-Peterson absorption from an increasing neutral IGM, marking the end of the reionization epoch at z>6. Combined with observations of CMB polarization and high-redshift Ly alpha galaxies, current data strongly suggest a peak of reionization activity and emergence of the earliest galaxies and AGNs at 77, and a handful at z>6.5. In this ADAP program, we will carry out the first comprehensive survey of z>=7 quasars, using a WISE-based selection algorithm, deep mid-IR photometry from coadded NEOWISE data and deep optical and near-IR photometry from new wide-field imaging surveys. We will select and follow-up quasar candidates over >20,000 deg^2 of high galactic latitude sky, aiming at finding 10-15 quasars at z>=7 in the next three years. There are two main technical components of our program. (1) WISE-based quasar selection. We have developed a highly successful selection method by combining WISE and optical/near-IR photometry to search for luminous quasars at z = 4.5-6.5, resulted in the discovery of the first known supermassive black holes with 10 billion solar mass BHs in the early universe. We will expand and optimize the algorithm for the redshift range of 6.5 measure the density of luminous quasars and their BH masses at z>=7, and place constraint on the existence of z>8 quasars. These measurements will test whether super-Eddington accretion or direct formation of intermediate-mass BHs are needed for early BH growth

  20. A very bright i=16.44 quasar in the `redshift desert' discovered by LAMOST

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Jia, Zhendong; Zuo, Wenwen; Zhao, Yongheng; Luo, Ali; Bai, Zhongrui; Chen, Jianjun; Zhang, Haotong; Yan, Hongliang; Ren, Juanjuan; Sun, Shiwei; Wu, Hong; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yeping; Lu, Qishuai; Wang, You; Ni, Jijun; Wang, Hai; Kong, Xu; Shen, Shiyin

    2010-01-01

    The redshift range from 2.2 to 3, is known as the 'redshift desert' of quasars because quasars with redshift in this range have similar optical colors as normal stars and are thus difficult to be found in optical sky surveys. A quasar candidate, SDSS J085543.40-001517.7, which was selected by a recently proposed criterion involving near-IR $Y-K$ and optical $g-z$ colors, was identified spectroscopically as a new quasar with redshift of 2.427 by the LAMOST commissioning observation in December 2009 and confirmed by the observation made with the NAOC/Xinglong 2.16m telescope in March 2010. This quasar was not targeted in the SDSS spectroscopic survey because it locates in the stellar locus of the optical color-color diagrams, while it is clearly separated from stars in the $Y-K$ vs. $g-z$ diagram. Comparing with other SDSS quasars we found this new quasar with $i$ magnitude of 16.44 is apparently the brightest one in the redshift range from 2.3 to 2.7. From the spectral properties we derived its central black h...

  1. Selective targeting of epigenetic reader domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greschik, Holger; Schüle, Roland; Günther, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Epigenetic regulators including writers, erasers, and readers of chromatin marks have been implicated in numerous diseases and are therefore subject of intense academic and pharmaceutical research. While several small-molecule inhibitors targeting writers or erasers are either approved drugs or are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, the targeting of epigenetic readers has lagged behind. Proof-of-principle that epigenetic readers are also relevant drug targets was provided by landmark discoveries of selective inhibitors targeting the BET family of acetyl-lysine readers. More recently, high affinity chemical probes for non-BET acetyl- and methyl-lysine reader domains have also been developed. Areas covered: This article covers recent advances with the identification and validation of inhibitors and chemical probes targeting epigenetic reader domains. Issues related to epigenetic reader druggability, quality requirements for chemical probes, interpretation of cellular action, unexpected cross-talk, and future challenges are also discussed. Expert opinion: Chemical probes provide a powerful means to unravel biological functions of epigenetic readers and evaluate their potential as drug targets. To yield meaningful results, potency, selectivity, and cellular target engagement of chemical probes need to be stringently validated. Future chemical probes will probably need to fulfil additional criteria such as strict target specificity or the targeting of readers within protein complexes.

  2. Microsatellites as targets of natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2013-02-01

    The ability to survey polymorphism on a genomic scale has enabled genome-wide scans for the targets of natural selection. Theory that connects patterns of genetic variation to evidence of natural selection most often assumes a diallelic locus and no recurrent mutation. Although these assumptions are suitable to selection that targets single nucleotide variants, fundamentally different types of mutation generate abundant polymorphism in genomes. Moreover, recent empirical results suggest that mutationally complex, multiallelic loci including microsatellites and copy number variants are sometimes targeted by natural selection. Given their abundance, the lack of inference methods tailored to the mutational peculiarities of these types of loci represents a notable gap in our ability to interrogate genomes for signatures of natural selection. Previous theoretical investigations of mutation-selection balance at multiallelic loci include assumptions that limit their application to inference from empirical data. Focusing on microsatellites, we assess the dynamics and population-level consequences of selection targeting mutationally complex variants. We develop general models of a multiallelic fitness surface, a realistic model of microsatellite mutation, and an efficient simulation algorithm. Using these tools, we explore mutation-selection-drift equilibrium at microsatellites and investigate the mutational history and selective regime of the microsatellite that causes Friedreich's ataxia. We characterize microsatellite selective events by their duration and cost, note similarities to sweeps from standing point variation, and conclude that it is premature to label microsatellites as ubiquitous agents of efficient adaptive change. Together, our models and simulation algorithm provide a powerful framework for statistical inference, which can be used to test the neutrality of microsatellites and other multiallelic variants.

  3. Evidence for Quasar Activity Triggered by Galaxy Mergers in HST Observations of Dust-reddened Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Becker, Robert H.

    2008-02-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope ACS images of 13 dust-reddened type 1 quasars selected from the FIRST/2MASS Red Quasar Survey. These quasars have high intrinsic luminosities after correction for dust obscuration (-23.5 >= MB >= - 26.2 from K-magnitude). The images show strong evidence of recent or ongoing interaction in 11 of the 13 cases, even before the quasar nucleus is subtracted. None of the host galaxies are well fit by a simple elliptical profile. The fraction of quasars showing interaction is significantly higher than the 30% seen in samples of host galaxies of normal, unobscured quasars. There is a weak correlation between the amount of dust reddening and the magnitude of interaction in the host galaxy, measured using the Gini coefficient and the concentration index. Although few host galaxy studies of normal quasars are matched to ours in intrinsic quasar luminosity, no evidence has been found for a strong dependence of merger activity on host luminosity in samples of the host galaxies of normal quasars. We thus believe that the high merger fraction in our sample is related to their obscured nature, with a significant amount of reddening occurring in the host galaxy. The red quasar phenomenon seems to have an evolutionary explanation, with the young quasar spending the early part of its lifetime enshrouded in an interacting galaxy. This might be further indication of a link between AGNs and starburst galaxies.

  4. Discovery of Radio-loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars Using Ultraviolet Excess and Deep Radio Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Brotherton, M S; Smith, R J; Boyle, B J; Shanks, T; Croom, S M; Miller, L; Becker, R H; Breugel, Wil van; Miller, Lance; Becker, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    We report the discovery of five broad-absorption-line (BAL) QSOs in a complete sample of 111 ultraviolet excess (UVX) QSO candidates also detected in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey. All five BAL QSOs, which include two high-ionization BAL QSOs and three low-ionization BAL QSOs, are formally radio-loud. Of QSOs with z > 0.4, 3+/-2% show low-ionization BALs, and of QSOs with z > 1.5, all radio-loud, 9+/-5% show BALs; these frequencies are consistent with those of optical surveys. While the first reported radio-loud BAL QSO, FIRST J155633.8+351758, is likely to be heavily dust reddened and thus less radio-loud than indicated by its observed radio-to-optical luminosity, these QSOs are UVX selected and probably free of significant dust along the line of sight. We point out unusual features in two of the BAL QSOs and discuss the significance finding these heretofore rare objects.

  5. GBT Detection of Polarization-dependent HI Absorption and HI Outflows in Local ULIRGs and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Stacy H; Baker, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L$_{8-1000 \\mu m} > 10^{12}$ L$_\\odot$) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km s$^{-1}$ in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the...

  6. Flamingos 2 Spectroscopy of Obscured and Unobscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Susan; Lacy, Mark; Urrutia, Tanya; Petric, Andreea

    2013-08-01

    We will use Flamingos-2 to obtain spectra of luminous AGN and quasars selected in the mid-infrared. Mid-infrared selection is much less biased with respect to obscuration than optical and X-ray techniques, and hence allows for finding obscured (Type-2) quasars as well as Type-1 quasars. Our survey so far has been very successful and has provided an unique opportunity to construct luminosity functions for both Type-1 and Type-2 quasars selected in the same way and covering similar redshifts and luminosities. We have quantifed the change in the obscured fraction with luminosity and redshift for the first time, and find interesting indications that at high redshift the obscured fraction rises, consistent with models for the joint formation of the galaxy and black hole populations. Our samples are, however, still quite incomplete at low fluxes (and therefore lower luminosities at a given redshift), particularly in the southern hemisphere. Near-infrared spectroscopy, such as that we have previously obtained with NIRI at Gemini N, offers us the best possibility of bringing these southern samples to a reasonable completeness level, and will greatly increase the number of high z quasars in our sample. This will allow us to better judge our tantalizing initial results on the redshift evolution of the obscured fraction. In addition, these southern targets can be followed up with ALMA and GEMS/GSAOI to study the morphologies and star-formation properties of the hosts, allowing further exploration of the relationship between the formation of massive bulges and supermassive blackholes in the early universe.

  7. GBT Detection of Polarization-Dependent HI Absorption and HI Outflows in Local ULIRGs and Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L(sub 8 - 1000 micron) > 10(exp 12) solar L) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km/s in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the FIR-strong and FIR-weak quasars, respectively). We attribute this result to absorption of polarized continuum emission from these sources by foreground HI clouds. About 60% of the quasars displaying polarized spectra are radio-loud, far higher than the approx 10% observed in the general AGN population. This discrepancy suggests that radio jets play an important role in shaping the environments in these galaxies. These systems may represent a transition phase in the evolution of gas-rich mergers into "mature" radio galaxies.

  8. MaNGA: Target selection and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, David

    2016-01-01

    The 6-year SDSS-IV MaNGA survey will measure spatially resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies using the Sloan 2.5m telescope and the BOSS spectrographs with a new fiber arrangement consisting of 17 individually deployable IFUs. We present the simultaneous design of the target selection and IFU size distribution to optimally meet our targeting requirements. The requirements for the main samples were to use simple cuts in redshift and magnitude to produce an approximately flat number density of targets as a function of stellar mass, ranging from 1x109 to 1x1011 M⊙, and radial coverage to either 1.5 (Primary sample) or 2.5 (Secondary sample) effective radii, while maximizing S/N and spatial resolution. In addition we constructed a "Color-Enhanced" sample where we required 25% of the targets to have an approximately flat number density in the color and mass plane. We show how these requirements are met using simple absolute magnitude (and color) dependent redshift cuts applied to an extended version of the NASA Sloan Atlas (NSA), how this determines the distribution of IFU sizes and the resulting properties of the MaNGA sample.

  9. The hidden quasar nucleus of a WISE-selected, hyperluminous, dust-obscured galaxy at z ~ 2.3

    CERN Document Server

    Piconcelli, E; Bianchi, S; Zappacosta, L; Fritz, J; Lanzuisi, G; Miniutti, G; Bongiorno, A; Feruglio, C; Fiore, F; Maiolino, R

    2014-01-01

    We present the first X-ray spectrum of a Hot dust-obscured galaxy (DOG), namely W1835+4355 at z ~ 2.3. Hot DOGs represent a very rare population of hyperluminous (>= 10^47 erg/s), dust-enshrouded objects at z > 2 recently discovered in the WISE All Sky Survey. The 40 ks XMM-Newton spectrum reveals a continuum as flat (Gamma ~ 0.8) as typically seen in heavily obscured AGN. This, along with the presence of strong Fe Kalpha emission, clearly suggests a reflection-dominated spectrum due to Compton-thick absorption. In this scenario, the observed luminosity of L(2-10 keV) ~ 2 x 10^44 erg/s is a fraction (~ 5 x 10^45 erg/s by using several proxies. The Herschel data allow us to constrain the SED up to the sub-mm band, providing a reliable estimate of the quasar contribution (~ 75%) to the IR luminosity as well as the amount of star formation (~ 2100 Msun/yr). Our results thus provide additional pieces of evidence that associate Hot DOGs with an exceptionally dusty phase during which luminous quasars and massive ga...

  10. THE LARGE SKY AREA MULTI-OBJECT FIBER SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE QUASAR SURVEY: QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM THE FIRST DATA RELEASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Y. L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Dong, Xiaoyi [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zuo, Wenwen; Shen, S.-Y. [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Y.-X.; Yuan, H.-L.; Song, Y.-H.; Yang, M.; Wu, H.; Shi, J.-R.; He, B.-L.; Lei, Y.-J.; Li, Y.-B. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences 100012, Beijing (China); Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo, E-mail: aiyl@pku.edu.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes the pilot survey and the first year of the regular survey. There are 3921 quasars reliably identified, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with a highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg ii, and C iv regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photometric data with model fitting, as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, with flags indicating the selection methods, and broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are also available. Of the 3921 quasars, 28% are independently selected with optical–infrared colors, indicating that the method is quite promising for the completeness of the quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the ongoing quasar survey will provide valuable data for studies of quasars.

  11. Extremely red quasars in BOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Fred; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T.; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W. Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual `wingless' line profiles, large N V/Lyα, N V/C IV, Si IV/C IV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [O III] λ5007. Here we present a new catalogue of C IV and N V emission-line data for 216 188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR colour, secondarily on REW(C IV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a `core' sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 ≥ 4.6 (AB) and REW(C IV) ≥ 100 Å at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity ˜ 47.1, sky density 0.010 deg-2, surprisingly flat/blue UV spectra given their red UV-to-mid-IR colours, and common outflow signatures including BALs or BAL-like features and large C IV emission-line blueshifts. Their SEDs and line properties are inconsistent with normal quasars behind a dust reddening screen. We argue that the core ERQs are a unique obscured quasar population with extreme physical conditions related to powerful outflows across the line-forming regions. Patchy obscuration by small dusty clouds could produce the observed UV extinctions without substantial UV reddening.

  12. On the Evidence for Cosmic Variation of the Fine Structure Constant (II): A Semi-Parametric Bayesian Model Selection Analysis of the Quasar Dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Ewan

    2013-01-01

    In the second paper of this series we extend our Bayesian reanalysis of the evidence for a cosmic variation of the fine structure constant to the semi-parametric modelling regime. By adopting a mixture of Dirichlet processes prior for the unexplained errors in each instrumental subgroup of the benchmark quasar dataset we go some way towards freeing our model selection procedure from the apparent subjectivity of a fixed distributional form. Despite the infinite-dimensional domain of the error hierarchy so constructed we are able to demonstrate a recursive scheme for marginal likelihood estimation with prior-sensitivity analysis directly analogous to that presented in Paper I, thereby allowing the robustness of our posterior Bayes factors to hyper-parameter choice and model specification to be readily verified. In the course of this work we elucidate various similarities between unexplained error problems in the seemingly disparate fields of astronomy and clinical meta-analysis, and we highlight a number of sop...

  13. Catalog of candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 selected among X-Ray sources from the 3XMM-DR4 survey of the XMM-Newton observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorunzhev, G. A.; Burenin, R. A.; Meshcheryakov, A. V.; Sazonov, S. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    We have compiled a catalog of 903 candidates for type 1 quasars at redshifts 3 20° in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) fields with a total area of about 300 deg2. Photometric SDSS data as well infrared 2MASS and WISE data were used to select the objects. We selected the point sources from the photometric SDSS catalog with a magnitude error δ mz' library that we compiled for these purposes using the EAZY software. Based on these data, we have rejected the objects whose spectral energy distributions are better described by the templates of stars at z = 0 and obtained a sample of quasars with photometric redshift estimates 2.75 3 in the investigated fields is shown to be about 80%. The normalized median absolute deviation (Δ z = | z spec - z phot|) is σ Δ z /(1+ z spec) = 0.07, while the outlier fraction is η = 9% when Δ z/(1 + z cпek.) > 0.2. The number of objects per unit area in our sample exceeds the number of quasars in the spectroscopic SDSS sample at the same redshifts approximately by a factor of 1.5. The subsequent spectroscopic testing of the redshifts of our selected candidates for quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 will allow the purity of this sample to be estimated more accurately.

  14. The Final SDSS High-Redshift Quasar Sample of 52 Quasars at z>5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A; Banados, Eduardo; Becker, Robert H; Bian, Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Shen, Yue; Wang, Feige; Wang, Ran; Wang, Shu; White, Richard L; Wu, Jin; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We present the discovery of nine quasars at $z\\sim6$ identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of $z\\sim6$ quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at $5.7quasars with $z_{\\rm AB}\\le20$ mag selected from 11,240 deg$^2$ of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with $20\\le z_{\\rm AB}\\le20.5$ selected from 4223 deg$^2$ of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to $z_{\\rm AB}\\approx22$ mag from the 277 deg$^2$ in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of $-29.0\\le M_{1450}\\le-24.5$. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at $z\\sim6$. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ($M_{1450}\\ge-23$ mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope $\\beta$ of the QLF is well constrained to be $\\beta=-2.8\\pm0.2$. Due to the...

  15. In Search of Quasar Host Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jason; Eracleous, M.; Gronwall, C.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Sturm, E.; Ciardullo, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Accretion-powered and star formation activity have been shown to coincide, motivating us to search for the star-forming regions in the host galaxies of quasars and to determine the star-formation rates. In this work we use calibrated narrow band emission line (H-beta and Pa-alpha) WFPC2 and NICMOS images as maps for total star formation rate. The main challenge in imaging quasar host galaxies is the separation of the quasar light from the galaxy light, especially in the case of z approximately 0.1 quasars in WFPC2 images where the PSF radius closely matches the expected host scale radius. To this this end we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light, which we have validated through extensive simulations using artificial quasar+galaxy images. The other significant challenge in mapping and measuring star forming regions is correcting for extinction, which we address using extinction maps created from the Pa-alpha/H-beta ratio. To determine the source of excitation, we utilize H-beta along with [OIII]5007 and [OII]3727 images in diagnostic line ratio (BPT) diagrams. We detect extended line emission in our targets on scales of order 1-2 kpc. A preliminary analysis suggests star formation rates of order 10 solar masses per year.

  16. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Teng, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Koss, M. [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Puccetti, S. [ASDC—ASI, Via del Politecnico, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Saez, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  17. HER2 overexpression and amplification as a potential therapeutic target in colorectal cancer: analysis of 3256 patients enrolled in the QUASAR, FOCUS and PICCOLO colorectal cancer trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Susan D; Southward, Katie; Chambers, Philip; Cross, Debra; Barrett, Jennifer; Hemmings, Gemma; Taylor, Morag; Wood, Henry; Hutchins, Gordon; Foster, Joseph M; Oumie, Assa; Spink, Karen G; Brown, Sarah R; Jones, Marc; Kerr, David; Handley, Kelly; Gray, Richard; Seymour, Matthew; Quirke, Philip

    2016-03-01

    HER2 overexpression/amplification is linked to trastuzumab response in breast/gastric cancers. One suggested anti-EGFR resistance mechanism in colorectal cancer (CRC) is aberrant MEK-AKT pathway activation through HER2 up-regulation. We assessed HER2-amplification/overexpression in stage II-III and IV CRC patients, assessing relationships to KRAS/BRAF and outcome. Pathological material was obtained from 1914 patients in the QUASAR stage II-III trial and 1342 patients in stage IV trials (FOCUS and PICCOLO). Tissue microarrays were created for HER2 immunohistochemistry. HER2-amplification was assessed using FISH and copy number variation. KRAS/BRAF mutation status was assessed by pyrosequencing. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) data were obtained for FOCUS/PICCOLO and recurrence and mortality for QUASAR; 29/1342 (2.2%) stage IV and 25/1914 (1.3%) stage II-III tumours showed HER2 protein overexpression. Of the HER2-overexpressing cases, 27/28 (96.4%) stage IV tumours and 20/24 (83.3%) stage II-III tumours demonstrated HER2 amplification by FISH; 41/47 (87.2%) also showed copy number gains. HER2-overexpression was associated with KRAS/BRAF wild-type (WT) status at all stages: in 5.2% WT versus 1.0% mutated tumours (p < 0.0001) in stage IV and 2.1% versus 0.2% in stage II-III tumours (p = 0.01), respectively. HER2 was not associated with OS or PFS. At stage II-III, there was no significant correlation between HER2 overexpression and 5FU/FA response. A higher proportion of HER2-overexpressing cases experienced recurrence, but the difference was not significant. HER2-amplification/overexpression is identifiable by immunohistochemistry, occurring infrequently in stage II-III CRC, rising in stage IV and further in KRAS/BRAF WT tumours. The value of HER2-targeted therapy in patients with HER2-amplified CRC must be tested in a clinical trial. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society

  18. Sensitive Radio Survey of Obscured Quasar Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandroff, Rachael M; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars over a range of redshifts to understand the role of radio activity in accretion using the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 6.0GHz and 1.4GHz. Our z~2.5 sample consists of optically-selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of $\

  19. Extremely Red Quasars in BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Fred; Ross, Nicholas; Paris, Isabelle; Alexandroff, Rachael M; Villforth, Carolin; Richards, Gordon T; Herbst, Hanna; Brandt, W Niel; Cook, Ben; Denney, Kelly D; Greene, Jenny E; Schneider, Donald P; Strauss, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Red quasars are candidate young objects in an early transition stage of massive galaxy evolution. Our team recently discovered a population of extremely red quasars (ERQs) in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) that has a suite of peculiar emission-line properties including large rest equivalent widths (REWs), unusual "wingless" line profiles, large NV/Lya, NV/CIV, SiIV/CIV and other flux ratios, and very broad and blueshifted [OIII] 5007. Here we present a new catalog of CIV and NV emission-line data for 216,188 BOSS quasars to characterize the ERQ line properties further. We show that they depend sharply on UV-to-mid-IR color, secondarily on REW(CIV), and not at all on luminosity or the Baldwin Effect. We identify a "core" sample of 97 ERQs with nearly uniform peculiar properties selected via i-W3 > 4.6 (AB) and REW(CIV) > 100 A at redshifts 2.0-3.4. A broader search finds 235 more red quasars with similar unusual characteristics. The core ERQs have median luminosity log L (ergs/s) ~ 47.1, sk...

  20. Peculiar Broad Absorption Line Quasars found in DPOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Brunner, R J; Djorgovski, S G; Gal, R R; Mahabal, A A; Lopes, P A A; De Carvalho, R R; Odewahn, S C; Castro, S; Thompson, D; Chaffee, F; Darling, J; Desai, V; Brunner, Robert J.; Hall, Patrick B.

    2003-01-01

    With the recent release of large (i.e., > hundred million objects), well-calibrated photometric surveys, such as DPOSS, 2MASS, and SDSS, spectroscopic identification of important targets is no longer a simple issue. In order to enhance the returns from a spectroscopic survey, candidate sources are often preferentially selected to be of interest, such as brown dwarfs or high redshift quasars. This approach, while useful for targeted projects, risks missing new or unusual species. We have, as a result, taken the alternative path of spectroscopically identifying interesting sources with the sole criterion being that they are in low density areas of the g - r and r - i color-space defined by the DPOSS survey. In this paper, we present three peculiar broad absorption line quasars that were discovered during this spectroscopic survey, demonstrating the efficacy of this approach. PSS J0052+2405 is an Iron LoBAL quasar at a redshift z = 2.4512 with very broad absorption from many species. PSS J0141+3334 is a reddened...

  1. An astrophysics data program investigation of a synoptic study of quasar continua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the program is presented. The major product of the program, an atlas of quasar energy distributions, is presented in the appendices along with papers written as a result of this research. The topics covered in the papers include: (1) accurate galactic N(sub h) values toward quasars and active galactic nuclei (AGN); (2) weak bump quasars; (3) millimeter measurements of hard x ray selected active galaxies- implications for the nature of the continuous spectrum; (3) persistence and change in the soft x ray spectrum of the quasar PG1211+143; (4) the soft x ray excess in einstein quasar spectra; and (5) EXOSAT x ray spectra of quasars.

  2. Exploring target-selectivity patterns of molecular scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-05-13

    We investigate the question of whether target-selective molecular scaffolds can be identified on the basis of currently available compound activity data. Starting from a pool of 17745 public domain compounds with activity annotations for 433 human targets, we ultimately identify, through a selectivity classification and database-mining approach, 42 molecular scaffolds represented by multiple compounds that are highly selective for a particular target over one or more others. In many other cases, individual compounds representing unique scaffolds are target-selective. Hence, currently available public domain compound selectivity data are sparse. However, we also identify selectivity patterns that evolve around specific targets and are formed by multiple target-selective scaffolds. These scaffolds should provide interesting starting points for further chemical exploration.

  3. New Discoveries Fill the Quasar Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Quasars active and luminous galactic centers can be difficult to find at some high redshifts due to their camouflaging color. A team of scientists has now come up with a way to detect these distant monsters in spite of their disguise.Quasar CamouflageThe color track of quasars between 5 z 6 in the commonly used i z and r i bands. Each dot on the red line marks a 0.1 difference in redshift. The contours show the colors of M dwarfs, from early type to late type. Quasars at a redshift of 5.3 z 5.7 are clearly contaminated by M dwarfs, making them difficult to identify. [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]One of the key ways we can study the early universe is by building a large sample of high-redshift quasars. In particular, we believe that reionization of the universe is just completing around z 6. Quasars near this redshift are crucial tools for probing the post-reionization epoch and exploring the evolution of the intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and early supermassive black hole growth.But quasars at this redshift are difficult to detect! The problem is contamination: quasars at this distance are the same color in commonly used optical bands as cool M-dwarf stars. As a result, surveys searching for quasars have often just cut out that entire section of the color space in order to avoid this contamination.This means that theres a huge gap in our sample of quasars around z 5.5: of the more than 300,000 quasars known, only 30 have been found in the redshift range of 5.3 z 5.7.The addition of new colorcolor selection criteria using infrared bands (bottom two plots) allows the authors to differentiate quasars (blue) from M dwarfs (grey), which isnt possible when only the traditional optical colorcolor selection criteria are used (top plot). [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]A New ApproachIn a recent publication led by Jinyi Yang (Peking University, China and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona), a team of scientists has demonstrated a new technique for finding

  4. A Multiwavelength Study of Binary Quasars and Their Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul J.; Myers, Adam D.; Barkhouse, Wayne A.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Trichas, Markos; Richards, Gordon T.; Ruiz, Ángel; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2011-12-01

    We present Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy for 14 quasars in spatially resolved pairs targeted as part of a complete sample of binary quasars with small transverse separations drawn from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSSDR6) photometry. We measure the X-ray properties of all 14 QSOs, and study the distribution of X-ray and optical-to-X-ray power-law indices in these binary quasars. We find no significant difference when compared with large control samples of isolated quasars, true even for SDSS J1254+0846, discussed in detail in a companion paper, which clearly inhabits an ongoing, pre-coalescence galaxy merger showing obvious tidal tails. We present infrared photometry from our observations with SAO Wide-field InfraRed Camera at the MMT, and from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Preliminary Data Release, and fit simple spectral energy distributions to all 14 QSOs. We find preliminary evidence that substantial contributions from star formation are required, but possibly no more so than for isolated X-ray-detected QSOs. Sensitive searches of the X-ray images for extended emission and the optical images for optical galaxy excess show that these binary QSOs—expected to occur in strong peaks of the dark matter distribution—are not preferentially found in rich cluster environments. While larger binary QSO samples with richer far-IR and submillimeter multiwavelength data might better reveal signatures of merging and triggering, optical color selection of QSO pairs may be biased against such signatures. X-ray and/or variability selection of QSO pairs, while challenging, should be attempted. We present in an Appendix a primer on X-ray flux and luminosity calculations.

  5. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare the ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the machine learning methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30% of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and fi...

  6. Double Lobed Radio Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W H; Becker, R H; White, R L

    2005-11-10

    We have combined a sample of 44 984 quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 3, with the FIRST radio survey. Using a novel technique where the optical quasar position is matched to the complete radio environment within 450'', we are able to characterize the radio morphological make-up of what is essentially an optically selected quasar sample, regardless of whether the quasar (nucleus) itself has been detected in the radio. About 10% of the quasar population have radio cores brighter than 0.75 mJy at 1.4 GHz, and 1.7% have double lobed FR2-like radio morphologies. About 75% of the FR2 sources have a radio core (> 0.75mJy). A significant fraction ({approx}40%) of the FR2 quasars are bent by more than 10 degrees, indicating either interactions of the radio plasma with the ICM or IGM. We found no evidence for correlations with redshift among our FR2 quasars: radio lobe flux densities and radio source diameters of the quasars have similar distributions at low (mean 0.77) and high (mean 2.09) redshifts. Using a smaller high reliability FR2 sample of 422 quasars and two comparison samples of radio-quiet and non-FR2 radio-loud quasars, matched in their redshift distributions, we constructed composite optical spectra from the SDSS spectroscopic data. Based on these spectra we can conclude that the FR2 quasars have stronger high-ionization emission lines compared to both the radio quiet and non-FR2 radio loud sources. This is consistent with the notion that the emission lines are brightened by ongoing shock ionization of ambient gas in the quasar host as the radio source expands.

  7. Changing Look Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul J.; MacLeod, Chelsea; Anderson, Scott F.; Eracleous, Michael; Ruan, John J.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Accretion onto black holes (BH) illuminates fascinating physics from the stellar mass BHs in Galactic X-ray binaries (XRBs) to the supermassive black holes (SMBH) in Seyferts and quasars. Alas, BH accretion regions are too compact to be spatially resolved. Temporal changes in XRB spectral states have gone a long way to unravel the accretion physics in XRBs, and suggest powerful theoretical and observational analogies to quasars. However, simple mass scaling to SMBHs suggests impractically long timescales (millenia) for accretion state transitions in quasars. However, large spectral state changes in quasars have now been detected that both inform and invigorate debates about accretion theory and the nature of historical quasar classes (e.g., Type 1 vs Type 2). In the last couple of years, a dozen luminous "changing-look quasars" (CLQs) were discovered to exhibit strong, persistent changes in luminosity, accompanied by the dramatic emergence or disappearance of broad emission-line (BEL) components. The availability of repeat spectroscopy for large samples of quasars provided by Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its ongoing Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) now extend this rare and remarkable phenomenon to regimes of luminosity and redshift that overlap the huge cosmological samples of quasars in the SDSS. We review the current understanding of these events, and upcoming possibilities for their detection, characterization and modeling.

  8. Survey For Very High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, S.; MacAlpine, G.

    1997-12-01

    I will present the results from the deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars. The survey involved direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.0 < z < 5.4 were selected based on the detection of the Lyman alpha line and the strong drop in the spectrum blueward of this. Because of this response, quasars are clearly located away from the stellar locus on g - r vs. r - i diagrams. Quasar candidates in this redshift range have large values of g - r and small values of r - i. To confirm the candidates as quasars, the multi-fiber spectroscope Hydra, located on the WIYN telescope, was used. To date, spectral confirmation has been completed for ten degrees out of the approximately fifteen square degress of survey area. Several quasars were discovered, and I will present their spectra and information on the viability of this technique.

  9. A CONSTRAINT ON QUASAR CLUSTERING AT z = 5 FROM A BINARY QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D., E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ∼135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5; the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r{sub 0}){sup −2}, this discovery implies a correlation length of r{sub 0} ≳ 20h{sup −1} Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift.

  10. Gravitational lensing of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Eigenbrod, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The universe, in all its richness, diversity and complexity, is populated by a myriad of intriguing celestial objects. Among the most exotic of them are gravitationally lensed quasars. A quasar is an extremely bright nucleus of a galaxy, and when such an object is gravitationally lensed, multiple images of the quasar are produced – this phenomenon of cosmic mirage can provide invaluable insights on burning questions, such as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. After presenting the basics of modern cosmology, the book describes active galactic nuclei, the theory of gravitational lensing, and presents a particular numerical technique to improve the resolution of astronomical data. The book then enters the heart of the subject with the description of important applications of gravitational lensing of quasars, such as the measurement of the famous Hubble constant, the determination of the dark matter distribution in galaxies, and the observation of the mysterious inner parts of quasars with much higher r...

  11. Ground moving target processing for tracking selected targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Howard; Majumder, Uttam; Owirka, Gregory; Finn, Lucas

    2016-05-01

    BAE Systems has developed a baseline real-time selected vehicle (SV) radar tracking capability that successfully tracked multiple civilian vehicles in real-world traffic conditions within challenging semi-urban clutter. This real-time tracking capability was demonstrated in laboratory setting. Recent enhancements to the baseline capability include multiple detection modes, improvements to the system-level design, and a wide-area tracking mode. The multiple detection modes support two tracking regimes; wide-area and localized selected vehicle tracking. These two tracking regimes have distinct challenges that may be suited to different trackers. Incorporation of a wide-area tracking mode provides both situational awareness and the potential for enhancing SV track initiation. Improvements to the system-level design simplify the integration of multiple detection modes and more realistic SV track initiation capabilities. Improvements are designed to contribute to a comprehensive tracking capability that exploits a continuous stare paradigm. In this paper, focus will be on the challenges, design considerations, and integration of selected vehicle tracking.

  12. A large sample of binary quasars: Does quasar bias tracks from Mpc scale to kpc scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D.; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Graham, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    We present the most precise estimate to date of the bias of quasars on very small scales, based on a measurement of the clustering of 47 spectroscopically confirmed binary quasars with proper transverse separations of ~25 h^{-1} kpc. The quasars in our sample, which is an order-of-magnitude larger than previous samples, are targeted using a Kernel Density Estimation technique (KDE) applied to Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging over most of the SDSS area. Our sample is "complete," in that all possible pairs of binary quasars across our area of interest have been spectroscopically confirmed from a combination of previous surveys and our own long-slit observational campaign. We determine the projected correlation function of quasars (\\bar W_p) in four bins of proper transverse scale over the range 17.0 \\lesssim R_{prop} \\lesssim 36.2 h^{-1} kpc. Due to our large sample size, our measured projected correlation function in each of these four bins of scale is more than twice as precise as any previous measurement made over our {\\em full} range of scales. We also measure the bias of our quasar sample in four slices of redshift across the range 0.43 \\le z \\le 2.26 and compare our results to similar measurements of how quasar bias evolves on Mpc-scales. This measurement addresses the question of whether it is reasonable to assume that quasar bias evolves with redshift in a similar fashion on both Mpc and kpc scales. Our results can meaningfully constrain the one-halo term of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD) of quasars and how it evolves with redshift. This work was partially supported by NSF grant 1515404.

  13. The UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS): DR1

    CERN Document Server

    Monroe, TalaWanda R; Tejos, N; Worseck, G; Hennawi, Joseph F; Schmidt, Tobias; Tumlinson, Jason; Shen, Yue

    2016-01-01

    We present the first data release (DR1) from our UV-bright Quasar Survey (UVQS) for new $z \\sim 1$ active galactic nuclei (AGN) across the sky. Using simple GALEX UV and WISE near-IR color selection criteria, we generated a list of 1450 primary candidates with $FUV 0.5$. Including a small set of observed secondary candidates, we report the discovery of 217 AGN with $FUV < 18$ mag that had no previously reported spectroscopic redshift. These are excellent potential targets for UV spectroscopy before the end of the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} mission. The main data products are publicly released through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes.

  14. Selectively targeting estrogen receptors for cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens regulate growth and development through the action of two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), ER alpha and ER beta, which mediate proliferation and differentiation of cells. For decades, ER alpha mediated estrogen signaling has been therapeutically targeted to treat breast cancer, most nota

  15. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  16. The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope Quasar Survey: Quasar Properties from First Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Ai, Y L; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Zuo, Wenwen; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Y -X; Yuan, H -L; Song, Y -H; Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo; Yang, M; Wu, H; Shen, S -Y; Shi, J -R; He, B -L; Lei, Y -J; Li, Y -B; Luo, A -L; Zhao, Y -H; Zhang, Hao-Tong

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in Large Sky Area Multi- Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes pilot survey and the first year regular survey. There are 3921 quasars identified with reliability, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the H{\\alpha}, H{\\beta}, Mg II, and C IV regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photo- metric data with model fitting as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, and flags indicating the selec- tion methods, broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are available online. 28% of the 3921 quasars are selected with optical- infrared colours independently, indicating that the method is quite promising in completeness of quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the on-g...

  17. Fifty Years of Quasars From Early Observations and Ideas to Future Research

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of the discovery of quasars in 1963 presents an interesting opportunity to ask questions about the current state of quasar research. Formatted as a series of interviews with noted researchers in the field, each of them asked to address a specific set of questions covering topics selected by the editors, this book deals with the historical development of quasar research and discusses how advances in instrumentation and computational capabilities have benefitted quasar astronomy and have changed our basic understanding of quasars. In the last part of the book the interviews address the current topic of the role of quasars in galaxy evolution. They summarise open issues in understanding active galactic nuclei and quasars and present an outlook regarding what future observational facilities both on the ground and in space might reveal. Its interview format, the fascinating topic of quasars and black holes, and the lively recollections and at times controversial views of the contributors make ...

  18. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE Snapshot Survey of 3CR Quasars: The Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Matthew D.; Miley, George K.; Sparks, William B.; Baum, Stefi A.; Biretta, John; Golombek, Daniel; de Koff, Sigrid; Macchetto, Ferdinando D.; McCarthy, Patrick J.

    1999-08-01

    We present images taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera (WFPC-2) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of 43 quasars selected from the 3CR radio catalog. The redshift range of the targets is large--0.3Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. Sensitive radio survey of obscured quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael M.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; van Velzen, Sjoert; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2016-12-01

    We study the radio properties of moderately obscured quasars in samples at both low (z ˜ 0.5) and high (z ˜ 2.5) redshift to understand the role of radio activity in accretion, using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 6.0 GHz and 1.4 GHz. Our z ˜ 2.5 sample consists of optically selected obscured quasar candidates, all of which are radio-quiet, with typical radio luminosities of νLν[1.4 GHz] ≲ 1040 erg s-1. Only a single source is individually detected in our deep (rms˜10 μJy) exposures. This population would not be identified by radio-based selection methods used for distinguishing dusty star-forming galaxies and obscured active nuclei. In our pilot A-array study of z ˜ 0.5 radio-quiet quasars, we spatially resolve four of five objects on scales ˜5 kpc and find they have steep spectral indices with an average value of α = -0.75. Therefore, radio emission in these sources could be due to jet-driven or radiatively driven bubbles interacting with interstellar material on the scale of the host galaxy. Finally, we also study the additional population of ˜200 faint ( ˜ 40 μJy-40 mJy) field radio sources observed over ˜120 arcmin2 of our data. 60 per cent of these detections (excluding our original targets) are matched in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and/or Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and are, in roughly equal shares, active galactic nuclei (AGN) at a broad range of redshifts, passive galaxies with no other signs of nuclear activity and infrared-bright but optically faint sources. Spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed star-forming galaxies constitute only a small minority of the matches. Such sensitive radio surveys allow us to address important questions of AGN evolution and evaluate the AGN contribution to the radio-quiet sky.

  20. Selecting asteroids for a targeted spectroscopic survey

    CERN Document Server

    Oszkiewicz, D A; Tomov, T; Birlan, M; Geier, S; Penttilä, A; Polińska, M

    2014-01-01

    Asteroid spectroscopy reflects surface mineralogy. There are few thousand asteroids whose surfaces have been observed spectrally. Determining the surface properties of those objects is important for many practical and scientific applications, such as for example developing impact deflection strategies or studying history and evolution of the Solar System and planet formation. The aim of this study is to develop a pre-selection method that can be utilized in searching for asteroids of any taxonomic complex. The method could then be utilized im multiple applications such as searching for the missing V-types or looking for primitive asteroids. We used the Bayes Naive Classifier combined with observations obtained in the course of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer surveys as well as a database of asteroid phase curves for asteroids with known taxonomic type. Using the new classification method we have selected a number of possible V-type candidates. Some of the candidates we...

  1. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow-up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare seven different ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the ML methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30 per cent of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow-up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.

  2. Minor Contribution of Quasars to Ionizing Photon Budget at z ∼ 6: Update on Quasar Luminosity Function at the Faint End with Subaru/Suprime-Cam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Willott, Chris J.; Hibon, Pascale; Im, Myungshin; Furusawa, Hisanori; Harikane, Yuichi; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Ishikawa, Shogo; Kikuta, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Nagao, Tohru; Niino, Yuu; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Toshikawa, Jun; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2017-10-01

    We constrain the quasar contribution to the cosmic reionization based on our deep optical survey of z ∼ 6 quasars down to z R = 24.15 using Subaru/Suprime-Cam in three UKIDSS-DXS fields covering 6.5 deg2. In Kashikawa et al. (2015), we select 17 quasar candidates and report our initial discovery of two low-luminosity quasars ({M}1450∼ -23) from seven targets, one of which might be a Lyα-emitting galaxy. From an additional optical spectroscopy, none of the four candidates out of the remaining 10 turn out to be genuine quasars. Moreover, the deeper optical photometry provided by the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program (HSC-SSP) shows that, unlike the two already-known quasars, the i ‑ z and z ‑ y colors of the last six candidates are consistent with M- or L-type brown dwarfs. Therefore, the quasar luminosity function (QLF) measurement in the previous paper is confirmed. Compiling the QLF measurements from the literature over a wide magnitude range, including an extremely faint AGN candidate from Parsa et al. (2017), to fit them with a double power law, we find that the best-fit faint-end slope is α =-{2.04}-0.18+0.33 (-{1.98}-0.21+0.48) and characteristic magnitude is {M}1450* =-{25.8}-1.9+1.1 (-{25.7}-1.8+1.0) in the case of two (one) quasar detection. Our result suggests that, if the QLF is integrated down to {M}1450=-18, quasars produce ∼1%–12% of the ionizing photons required to fully ionize the universe at z ∼ 6 with a 2σ confidence level, assuming that the escape fraction is {f}{esc}=1 and the intergalactic medium clumpy factor is C = 3. Even when the systematic uncertainties are taken into account, our result supports the scenario that quasars are the minor contributors of the reionization.

  3. Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dines, James P; Otárola-Castillo, Erik; Ralph, Peter; Alas, Jesse; Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Male genitalia evolve rapidly, probably as a result of sexual selection. Whether this pattern extends to the internal infrastructure that influences genital movements remains unknown. Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) offer a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis: since evolving from land-dwelling ancestors, they lost external hind limbs and evolved a highly reduced pelvis that seems to serve no other function except to anchor muscles that maneuver the penis. Here, we create a novel morphometric pipeline to analyze the size and shape evolution of pelvic bones from 130 individuals (29 species) in the context of inferred mating system. We present two main findings: (1) males from species with relatively intense sexual selection (inferred by relative testes size) tend to evolve larger penises and pelvic bones compared to their body length, and (2) pelvic bone shape has diverged more in species pairs that have diverged in inferred mating system. Neither pattern was observed in the anterior-most pair of vertebral ribs, which served as a negative control. This study provides evidence that sexual selection can affect internal anatomy that controls male genitalia. These important functions may explain why cetacean pelvic bones have not been lost through evolutionary time.

  4. Quasar Classification Using Color and Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Christina M; Myers, Adam D; Strauss, Michael A; Schmidt, Kasper B; Ivezić, Željko; Ross, Nicholas P; MacLeod, Chelsea L; Riegel, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    We conduct a pilot investigation to determine the optimal combination of color and variability information to identify quasars in current and future multi-epoch optical surveys. We use a Bayesian quasar selection algorithm (Richards et al. 2004) to identify 35,820 type 1 quasar candidates in a 239 square degree field of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, using a combination of optical photometry and variability. Color analysis is performed on 5-band single- and multi-epoch SDSS optical photometry to a depth of r ~22.4. From these data, variability parameters are calculated by fitting the structure function of each object in each band with a power law model using 10 to >100 observations over timescales from ~1 day to ~8 years. Selection was based on a training sample of 13,221 spectroscopically-confirmed type-1 quasars, largely from the SDSS. Using variability alone, colors alone, and combining variability and colors we achieve 91%, 93%, and 97% quasar completeness and 98%, 98%, and 97% efficiency ...

  5. Quasars: A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedman, Daniel

    1988-01-01

    Reports on some of the discoveries over the last quarter century regarding quasars including spectra and energy sources, formation and evolution, and cosmological probes. Describes some of the fundamental mysteries that remain. (CW)

  6. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalog: tenth data release

    CERN Document Server

    Pâris, Isabelle; Aubourg, Éric; Ross, Nicholas P; Myers, Adam D; Streblyanska, Alina; Bailey, Stephen; Hall, Patrick B; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Borde, Arnaud; Brinkmann, Jon; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N; Brewington, Howard; Brownstein, Joel R; Cook, Benjamin A; Ebelke, Garrett; Fan, Xiaohui; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Ho, Shirley; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marchante, Moses; McGreer, Ian D; McMahon, Richard G; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Muna, Demitri; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Oravetz, Daniel; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Perez-Fournon, Ismaël; Pieri, Matthew; Riffel, Rogério; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Simmons, Audrey; Viel, Matteo; Weaver, Benjamin A; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe; York, Donald G

    2013-01-01

    We present the Data Release 10 Quasar (DR10Q) catalog from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. The catalog includes all BOSS objects that were targeted as quasar candidates during the first 2.5 years of the survey and that are confirmed as quasars via visual inspection of the spectra. The catalog also includes known quasars (mostly from SDSS-I and II) that were reobserved by BOSS. The catalog contains 166,583 quasars (74,454 are new discoveries since SDSS-DR9) detected over 6,373 deg$^{2}$ with robust identification and redshift measured by a combination of principal component eigenspectra. The number of quasars with $z>2.15$ (117,668) is $\\sim$5 times greater than the number of $z>2.15$ quasars known prior to BOSS. Redshifts and FWHMs are provided for the strongest emission lines (CIV, CIII, MgII). The catalog identifies 16,461 broad absorption line quasars and gives their characteristics. For each object, the catalog presents five-band (u, g, r, i, z) CCD-...

  7. Target-based drug discovery for human African trypanosomiasis: selection of molecular target and chemical matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ian H

    2014-01-01

    Target-based approaches for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) and related parasites can be a valuable route for drug discovery for these diseases. However, care needs to be taken in selection of both the actual drug target and the chemical matter that is developed. In this article, potential criteria to aid target selection are described. Then the physiochemical properties of typical oral drugs are discussed and compared to those of known anti-parasitics.

  8. The Multi-Wavelength Quasar Survey Ⅲ.Quasars in Field 836

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Bai; Yang Chen; Xiang-Tao He; Jiang-Hua Wu; Qing-Kang Li; Richard F.Green; Wolfgang Voges

    2007-01-01

    This is the third Paper in a series connected with our Multiwavelength Quasar Survey.The survey is aimed to provide a quasar sample more complete than any previous survey by using a combined selection technique to reduce selection effects.we present the observational results for the X-ray candidates in field f836.We found 15 X-ray AGNs in this field of which eight are new discoveries.The X-ray data and optical spectra of these AGNs are given.We give the X-ray candidate selection criteria.which proved to be highly efficient in isolating X-ray AGNs.

  9. Luminous, High-z, Type-2 Quasars are Still Missing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Rivera, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    A simple unified model suggests that there should be roughly equal numbers of type-1 (unobscured) and type 2 (obscured) quasars. However, we argue that the expected population of luminous, high-z, type-2 quasars are still missing. While large numbers of type-2 AGNs have now been identified (both via spectroscopy and through color-based arguments in the optical, IR, and X-ray), the vast majority of these are low-luminosity objects at zmodel" predict similar numbers of type-1 and type-2 quasars, this conspicuous lack of luminous type-2 quasars at high-redshift constitutes a major unsolved problem. To uncover these missing type-2 quasars, we explore a candidate selection algorithm that utilizes the sky area of AllWISE, the depth/resolution of large-area Spitzer-IRAC surveys, and optical data from the SDSS.

  10. Target selection biases from recent experience transfer across effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, Jeff; Song, Joo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Target selection is often biased by an observer's recent experiences. However, not much is known about whether these selection biases influence behavior across different effectors. For example, does looking at a red object make it easier to subsequently reach towards another red object? In the current study, we asked observers to find the uniquely colored target object on each trial. Randomly intermixed pre-trial cues indicated the mode of action: either an eye movement or a visually guided reach movement to the target. In Experiment 1, we found that priming of popout, reflected in faster responses following repetition of the target color on consecutive trials, occurred regardless of whether the effector was repeated from the previous trial or not. In Experiment 2, we examined whether an inhibitory selection bias away from a feature could transfer across effectors. While priming of popout reflects both enhancement of the repeated target features and suppression of the repeated distractor features, the distractor previewing effect isolates a purely inhibitory component of target selection in which a previewed color is presented in a homogenous display and subsequently inhibited. Much like priming of popout, intertrial suppression biases in the distractor previewing effect transferred across effectors. Together, these results suggest that biases for target selection driven by recent trial history transfer across effectors. This indicates that representations in memory that bias attention towards or away from specific features are largely independent from their associated actions.

  11. Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyrin-Biroulet, L; Sandborn, W; Sands, B E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The Selecting Therapeutic Targets in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (STRIDE) program was initiated by the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IOIBD). It examined potential treatment targets for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to be used for a "treat...

  12. Towards replacing closed with open target selection strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, M.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly, microbial production processes are being improved by targeted approaches. In directed strain improvement, the selection of the relevant targets is the limiting step in metabolic engineering. Currently, the identification of leads is still a random process relying largely on expert know

  13. Quasar absorption lines and the intergalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Jannuzi, B T

    1996-01-01

    The importance of HST for the study of quasar absorption lines and of the nature of the intergalactic medium is illustrated by reviewing selected results from past HST observations. Topics reviewed include the study of Ly-alpha absorbers at low redshift and the search for a diffuse IGM at high redshifts.

  14. Obscuration of Quasars by Dust and the Reddening Mechanism in Parkes-Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Masci, F J

    1998-01-01

    A majority of quasar surveys have been based on criteria which assume strong blue continua or a UV-excess. Any amount of dust along the line-of-sight is expected to drastically extinguish the optical/UV flux leading to a selection bias. Radio surveys however should suffer no bias against extinction by dust. Recently, a large complete sample of radio-selected quasars has become available (the `Parkes sample'). A majority of these sources exhibit optical--to--near-infrared continua that are exceedingly `red', very unlike those of quasars selected optically. The purpose of this thesis, broadly speaking, is to explore the problem of incompleteness in optical quasar surveys due to obscuration by dust, and to interpret the relatively `red' continua observed in the Parkes quasar sample. The first part of this thesis explores the observational consequences of an intervening (foreground) cosmological dust component, such as that located in galaxies and clusters. The second part examines the continuum properties of Par...

  15. Quasar Absorption Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  16. The Discovery of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2013-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of quasars was discussed as early as 1960, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be an unrealistically high radio and optical luminosity. Following the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, and the subsequent identification with an apparent stellar object, Maarten Schmidt recognized that the relatively simple hydrogen line Balmer series spectrum implied a redshift of 0.16 Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as being by far the most distant and the most luminous objects in the Universe. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first catalogued in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely iden...

  17. Astrometric Redshifts for Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kaczmarczik, Michael C; Mehta, Sajjan S; Schlegel, David J

    2009-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes differential chromatic refraction (DCR), whereby objects imaged at different optical/UV wavelengths are observed at slightly different positions in the plane of the detector. Strong spectral features induce changes in the effective wavelengths of broad-band filters that are capable of producing significant positional offsets with respect to standard DCR corrections. We examine such offsets for broad-emission-line (type 1) quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spanning 0quasar spectrum with the SDSS bandpasses as a function of redshift and airmass. This astrometric information can be used to break degeneracies in photometric redshifts of quasars (or other emission-line sources) and, for extreme cases, may be suitable for determining "astrometric redshifts". On the SDSS's southern equatorial stripe, where it is pos...

  18. Lensed Quasar Hosts

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, C Y; Rix, H W; Keeton, C R; Falco, E E; Kochanek, C S; Lehár, J; McLeod, B A; Peng, Chien Y.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Keeton, Charles R.; Falco, Emilio E.; Kochanek, Chris S.; Lehar, Joseph; Leod, Brian A. Mc

    2006-01-01

    Gravitational lensing assists in the detection of quasar hosts by amplifying and distorting the host light away from the unresolved quasar core images. We present the results of HST observations of 30 quasar hosts at redshifts 1 1.7 is a factor of 3--6 higher than the local value. But, depending on the stellar content the ratio may decline at z>4 (if E/S0-like), flatten off to 6--10 times the local value (if Sbc-like), or continue to rise (if Im-like). We infer that galaxy bulge masses must have grown by a factor of 3--6 over the redshift range 3>z>1, and then changed little since z~1. This suggests that the peak epoch of galaxy formation for massive galaxies is above z~1. We also estimate the duty cycle of luminous AGNs at z>1 to be ~1%, or 10^7 yrs, with sizable scatter.

  19. Target selection and transfer trajectories design for exploring asteroid mission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Technique of target selection and profiles of transfer trajectory for Chinese asteroid exploring mission are studied systemically.A complete set of approaches to selecting mission targets and designing the transfer trajectory is proposed.First,when selecting a target for mission,some factors regarded as the scientific motivations are discussed.Then,when analyzing the accessibility of targets,instead of the classical strategy,the multiple gravity-assist strategy is provided.The suitable and possible targets,taking into account scientific value and technically feasible,are obtained via selection and estimation.When designing the transfer trajectory for exploring asteroid mission,an approach to selecting gravity-assist celestial body is proposed.Finally,according to the mission constraints,the trajectory profile with 2-years △V-EGA for exploring asteroid is presented.Through analyzing the trajectory profile,unexpected result that the trajectory would pass by two main-belts asteroids is found.So,the original proposal is extended to the multiple flybys mission.It adds the scientific return for asteroid mission.

  20. A Survey for Very High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemley, Shelley R.

    1995-12-01

    I have been conducting a deep, three color survey for very high redshift quasars and will present information on how my candidates, which are awaiting spectroscopic confirmation, have been selected. The survey involves direct imaging through Gunn gri filters using a 2048 x 2048 STIS ccd chip and Cerro Tololo's Curtis Scmidt Telescope. Quasar candidates in the range 4.2 5 candidates have large r - i values and g - r values near zero. Before beginning the survey, test observations using this selection method were made of two known quasars with redshifts of 4.5 and 4.7. The quasars were successfully relocated by the technique and several candidates, which will also be observed for spectroscopic confirmation, were selected from those two fields. To date, 13 square degrees have been surveyed.

  1. Measuring Quasar Variability with Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Morganson, E; Chambers, K C; Green, P J; Kaiser, N; Magnier, E A; Marshall, P J; Morgan, J S; Price, P A; Rix, H -W; Chlafly, E F S; Tonry, J L; Walter, F

    2014-01-01

    We measure quasar variability using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 Survey (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and establish a method of selecting quasars via their variability in 10,000 square degree surveys. We use 100,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars that have been well measured in both PS1 and SDSS and take advantage of the decadal time scales that separate SDSS measurements and PS1 measurements. A power law model fits the data well over the entire time range tested, 0.01 to 10 years. Variability in the current PS1-SDSS dataset can efficiently distinguish between quasars and non-varying objects. It improves the purity of a griz quasar color cut from 4.1% to 48% while maintaining 67% completeness. Variability will be very effective at finding quasars in datasets with no u band and in redshift ranges where exclusively photometric selection is not efficient. We show that quasars' rest-frame ensemble variability, measured as a root mean squared in del...

  2. Distributions of Quasar Hosts on the Galaxy Main Sequence Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-03-01

    The relation between star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, i.e., the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z ≤ 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the SFRs through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios, or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals, and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/mergers to ellipticals. However, combined with results at higher redshift, they suggest that quasars can be widely triggered in normal galaxies as long as they contain abundant gas and have ongoing star formation.

  3. Bayesian High-Redshift Quasar Classification from Optical and Mid-IR Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, Gordon T; Peters, Christina M; Krawczyk, Coleman M; Chase, Greg; Ross, Nicholas P; Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua; Lacy, Mark; McGreer, Ian D; Trump, Jonathan R; Riegel, Ryan N

    2015-01-01

    We identify 885,503 type 1 quasar candidates to i3.5 than the traditional mid-IR selection "wedges" and to 2.23. This catalog paves the way for luminosity-dependent clustering investigations of large numbers of faint, high-redshift quasars and for further machine learning quasar selection using Spitzer and WISE data combined with other large-area optical imaging surveys.

  4. Target Selection for the LBTI Exozodi Key Science Program

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberger, Alycia J; Kennedy, Grant M; Roberge, Aki; Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M; Millan-Gabet, Rafael; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P; Danchi, William C; Haniff, Chris; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Skemer, Andrew J; Stapelfeldt, Karl R; Wyatt, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ~300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels ...

  5. Protecting Ligands Enhance Selective Targeting of Multivalent Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Angioletti-Uberti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles functionalized with multiple ligands can be programmed to bind biological targets, e.g. cells, depending on the receptors they express, providing a general platform for the development of different technologies, from selective drug-delivery to biosensing. In order to be highly selective ligands should exclusively bind to specific targeted receptors, since formation of bonds with other, untargeted ones would lead to non-specific binding and potentially harmful behaviour. This poses a particular problem for multivalent nanoparticles, because even very weak bonds can collectively lead to strong binding. A statistical mechanical model is presented here to describe the extent to which bond strength and nanoparticle valency can induce non-selective adsorption. The same model is used to describe a possible solution: functionalization of the nanoparticles with "protective" receptors. The latter compete with cell receptors for the targeting ligands, and can be optimized to strongly reduce the effect of u...

  6. How do optically-similar quasars look elsewhere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Zhaohui; Ma, Bin; Brotherton, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    As too many spectroscopic and physical parameters complicates the study of quasars, reducing the number of parameters can help to isolate many problems in general. Using spectral principal component analysis, we selected from SDSS a pilot sample of quasars with virtually identical spectral features in H-beta region. We found that they also show very similar spectral features outside the H-beta region in the optical band. We also explore their properties in other available wavelength bands and plan to study the accretion, ionization, and possibly geometry of quasars using this controlled sample.

  7. A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis

    2005-12-01

    We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

  8. Feature Extraction and Selection Strategies for Automated Target Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, W. Nicholas; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Several feature extraction and selection methods for an existing automatic target recognition (ATR) system using JPLs Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and Optimal Trade-Off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter were tested using MATLAB. The ATR system is composed of three stages: a cursory region of-interest (ROI) search using the GOC and OT-MACH filter, a feature extraction and selection stage, and a final classification stage. Feature extraction and selection concerns transforming potential target data into more useful forms as well as selecting important subsets of that data which may aide in detection and classification. The strategies tested were built around two popular extraction methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Performance was measured based on the classification accuracy and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) output of a support vector machine(SVM) and a neural net (NN) classifier.

  9. Feature Extraction and Selection Strategies for Automated Target Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, W. Nicholas; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Several feature extraction and selection methods for an existing automatic target recognition (ATR) system using JPLs Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) and Optimal Trade-Off Maximum Average Correlation Height (OT-MACH) filter were tested using MATLAB. The ATR system is composed of three stages: a cursory region of-interest (ROI) search using the GOC and OT-MACH filter, a feature extraction and selection stage, and a final classification stage. Feature extraction and selection concerns transforming potential target data into more useful forms as well as selecting important subsets of that data which may aide in detection and classification. The strategies tested were built around two popular extraction methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Performance was measured based on the classification accuracy and free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) output of a support vector machine(SVM) and a neural net (NN) classifier.

  10. Target selection and determination of function in structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James D; Todd, Annabel E; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A; Thornton, Janet M

    2003-01-01

    The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question.

  11. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  12. Quasar Astrophysics with the Space Interferometry Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen; Wehrle, Ann; Meier, David; Jones, Dayton; Piner, Glenn

    2007-01-01

    Optical astrometry of quasars and active galaxies can provide key information on the spatial distribution and variability of emission in compact nuclei. The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM PlanetQuest) will have the sensitivity to measure a significant number of quasar positions at the microarcsecond level. SIM will be very sensitive to astrometric shifts for objects as faint as V = 19. A variety of AGN phenomena are expected to be visible to SIM on these scales, including time and spectral dependence in position offsets between accretion disk and jet emission. These represent unique data on the spatial distribution and time dependence of quasar emission. It will also probe the use of quasar nuclei as fundamental astrometric references. Comparisons between the time-dependent optical photocenter position and VLBI radio images will provide further insight into the jet emission mechanism. Observations will be tailored to each specific target and science question. SIM will be able to distinguish spatially between jet and accretion disk emission; and it can observe the cores of galaxies potentially harboring binary supermassive black holes resulting from mergers.

  13. Quasars : The Observational Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Shields, Greg; Gaskell, Martin; Boroson, Todd; Laor, Ari; Hawkins, Michael; Pronik, Vladimir; Sergeev, Sergey; Dultzin, Deborah; Grupe, Dirk; Richards, Gordon; Morganti, Raffaella; Volvach, Aleksander; Zamfir, Sebastian; Falcke, Heino; Körding, Elmar; Elvis, Martin; Turner, Tracey Jane; Kembhavi, Ajit; Foschini, Luigi; Neshpor, Yuri; Franceschini, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The empirical basis of quasar astronomy can be overawing especially in the twenty-first century. A first source of intricacy involves the nomenclature that has evolved to label the multifold phenomenological manifestations now united under the umbrella of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). A further com

  14. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  15. A Quasar Turns On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has discovered a quasar the brightly-shining, active nucleus of a galaxy abruptly turning on in what appears to be the fastest such transition ever seen in such an object.A Rapid TransitionQuasars are expected to show variations in brightness on timescales of hours to millions of years, but its not often that we get to study their major variability in real time! So far, weve discovered only a dozen changing-look quasars active galactic nuclei that exhibit major changes in their spectral class and brightness between observations. Roughly half of these were quasars that turned on and half were quasars that turned off, generally on timescales of maybe 5 or 10 years.The dramatic change in spectrum of iPTF 16bco between the archival SDSS data from 2004 (bottom) and the follow-up spectroscopy from Keck 2+DEIMOS in 2016 (top). [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]In June 2016, however, a team of scientists led by Suvi Gezari (University of Maryland) discovered iPTF 16bco, a nuclear transient that wasnt there the last time Palomar checked in 2012. A search through archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX data in addition to some follow-up X-ray imaging and spectroscopic observations told the team what they needed to know: iPTF 16bco is a quasar that only just turned on within the 500 days preceding the iPTF observations.This source, in fact, is a 100-million-solar-mass black hole located at the center of a galaxy at a redshift of z= 0.237. In just over a year, the source changed classification from a galaxy with weak narrow-line emission to a quasar with characteristic strong, broad emission lines and a ten-fold increase in continuum brightness! What caused this sudden transition?Instabilities at Fault?iPTF 16bco and the other known changing-look quasars with disappearing (red circles) and appearing (blue circles) broad-line emission. [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]Gezari and collaborators used the large number of recent

  16. Adaptive Robust Waveform Selection for Unknown Target Detection in Clutter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-Lu Wang; Hong-Qiang Wang; Yu-Liang Qin; Yong-Qiang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    @@@A basic assumption of most recently proposed waveform design algorithms is that the target impulse response is a known deterministic function or a stochastic process with a known power spectral density (PSD). However, it is well-known that a target impulse response is neither easily nor accurately obtained; besides it changes sharply with attitude angles. Both of the aforementioned cases complicate the waveform design process. In this paper, an adaptive robust waveform selection method for unknown target detection in clutter is proposed. The target impulse response is considered to be unknown but belongs to a known uncertainty set. An adaptive waveform library is devised by using a signal-to-clutter-plus-noise ratio (SCNR)- based optimal waveform design method. By applying the minimax robust waveform selection method, the optimal robust waveform is selected to ensure the lowest performance bound of the unknown target detection in clutter. Results show that the adaptive waveform library outperforms the predefined linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform library on the SCNR bound.

  17. Neural Networks for Target Selection in Direct Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Potharst (Rob); U. Kaymak (Uzay); W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPartly due to a growing interest in direct marketing, it has become an important application field for data mining. Many techniques have been applied to select the targets in commercial applications, such as statistical regression, regression trees, neural computing, fuzzy clustering

  18. Pattern-Based Target Selection Applied to Fund Raising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); R. Potharst (Rob); U. Kaymak (Uzay)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThis paper proposes a new algorithm for target selection. This algorithm collects all frequent patterns (equivalent to frequent item sets) in a training set. These patterns are stored e?ciently using a compact data structure called a trie. For each pattern the relative frequency of the t

  19. Neural Networks for Target Selection in Direct Marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Potharst (Rob); U. Kaymak (Uzay); W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractPartly due to a growing interest in direct marketing, it has become an important application field for data mining. Many techniques have been applied to select the targets in commercial applications, such as statistical regression, regression trees, neural computing, fuzzy clustering an

  20. Classification and Target Group Selection Based Upon Frequent Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H.L.M. Pijls (Wim); R. Potharst (Rob)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this technical report , two new algorithms based upon frequent patterns are proposed. One algorithm is a classification method. The other one is an algorithm for target group selection. In both algorithms, first of all, the collection of frequent patterns in the training set is constr

  1. From local active galactic nuclei to early quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, A.; Giallongo, E.; Vagnetti, F.

    1985-09-15

    To close the gap between the local luminosity function of the optically selected active galactic nuclei and the population properties of distant (z< or approx. =2) quasars, we propose a model of differential luminosity evolution which is astrophysically based and contains a minimal number of free parameters. We discuss the advantages of the model and its predictions, and indicate how to extend it for z > 2 to cover the beginning of the quasar era.

  2. Selective target processing: perceptual load or distractor salience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltiti, Stacy; Wallace, Denise; Fox, Elaine

    2005-07-01

    Perceptual load theory (Lavie, 1995) states that participants cannot engage in focused attention when shown displays containing a low perceptual load, because attentional resources are not exhausted, whereas in high-load displays attention is always focused, because attentional resources are exhausted. An alternative "salience" hypothesis holds that the salience of distractors and not perceptual load per se determines selective attention. Three experiments were conducted to investigate the influence that target and distractor onsets and offsets have on selective processing in a standard interference task. Perceptual load theory predicts that, regardless of target or distractor presentation (onset or offset), interference from ignored distractors should occur in low-load displays only. In contrast, the salience hypothesis predicts that interference should occur when the distractor appears as an onset and would occur for distractor offsets only when the target was also an offset. Interference may even occur in highload displays if the distractor is more salient. The results supported the salience hypothesis.

  3. REVERBERATION MAPPING WITH INTERMEDIATE-BAND PHOTOMETRY: DETECTION OF BROAD-LINE Hα TIME LAGS FOR QUASARS AT 0.2 < z < 0.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Linhua [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shen, Yue [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Morganson, Eric [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Windhorst, Rogier A., E-mail: jiangKIAA@pku.edu.cn [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    We present a reverberation mapping (RM) experiment that combines broad- and intermediate-band photometry; it is the first such attempt targeting 13 quasars at 0.2 < z < 0.9. The quasars were selected to have strong Hα or Hβ emission lines that are located in one of three intermediate bands (with FWHM around 200 Å) centered at 8045, 8505, and 9171 Å. The imaging observations were carried out in the intermediate bands and the broad i and z bands using the prime-focus imager 90Prime on the 2.3 m Bok telescope. Because of the large (∼1 deg{sup 2}) field of view (FOV) of 90Prime, we included the 13 quasars within only five telescope pointings or fields. The five fields were repeatedly observed over 20–30 epochs that were unevenly distributed over a duration of 5–6 months. The combination of the broad- and intermediate-band photometry allows us to derive accurate light curves for both optical continuum emission (from the accretion disk) and line emission (from the broad-line region, or BLR). We detect Hα time lags between the continuum and line emission in six quasars. These quasars are at relatively low redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.4. The measured lags are consistent with the current BLR size–luminosity relation for Hβ at z < 0.3. While this experiment appears successful in detecting lags of the bright Hα line, further investigation is required to see if it can also be applied to the fainter Hβ line for quasars at higher redshifts. Finally we demonstrate that, by using a small telescope with a large FOV, intermediate-band photometric RM can be efficiently executed for a large sample of quasars at z > 0.2.

  4. Target Selection for the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; De Lee, Nathan; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Mack, Claude E., III; Dhital, Saurav; Hebb, Leslie; Ge, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We present the target selection process for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. MARVELS is a medium-resolution (R ∼ 11,000) multi-fiber spectrograph capable of obtaining radial velocities for 60 objects at a time in order to find brown dwarfs and giant planets. The survey was configured to target dwarf stars with effective temperatures approximately between 4500 and 6250 K. For the first 2 years MARVELS relied on low-resolution spectroscopic pre-observations to estimate the effective temperature and log (g) for candidate stars and then selected suitable dwarf stars from this pool. Ultimately, the pre-observation spectra proved ineffective at filtering out giant stars; many giants were incorrectly classified as dwarfs, resulting in a giant contamination rate of ∼30% for the first phase of the MARVELS survey. Thereafter, the survey instead applied a reduced proper motion cut to eliminate giants and used the Infrared Flux Method to estimate effective temperatures, using only extant photmetric and proper-motion catalog information. The target selection method introduced here may be useful for other surveys that need to rely on extant catalog data for selection of specific stellar populations.

  5. Signatures of DNA target selectivity by ETS transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Gregory M K; Kim, Hye Mi

    2017-05-27

    The ETS family of transcription factors is a functionally heterogeneous group of gene regulators that share a structurally conserved, eponymous DNA-binding domain. DNA target specificity derives from combinatorial interactions with other proteins as well as intrinsic heterogeneity among ETS domains. Emerging evidence suggests molecular hydration as a fundamental feature that defines the intrinsic heterogeneity in DNA target selection and susceptibility to epigenetic DNA modification. This perspective invokes novel hypotheses in the regulation of ETS proteins in physiologic osmotic stress, their pioneering potential in heterochromatin, and the effects of passive and pharmacologic DNA demethylation on ETS regulation.

  6. Exploratory Study of the X-Ray Properties of Quasars With Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Misawa, Toru; Chartas, George; Charlton, Jane C

    2008-01-01

    We have used archival Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of quasars hosting intrinsic narrow UV absorption lines (intrinsic NALs) to carry out an exploratory survey of their X-ray properties. Our sample consists of three intrinsic-NAL quasars and one "mini-BAL" quasar, plus four quasars without intrinsic absorption lines for comparison. These were drawn in a systematic manner from an optical/UV-selected sample. The X-ray properties of intrinsic-NAL quasars are indistinguishable from those of "normal" quasars. We do not find any excess absorption in quasars with intrinsic NALs, with upper limits of a few times 10^22 cm^-2. We compare the X-ray and UV properties of our sample quasars by plotting the equivalent width and blueshift velocity of the intrinsic NALs and the X-ray spectral index against the "optical-to-X-ray" slope, alpha-ox. When BAL quasars and other AGNs with intrinsic NALs are included, the plots suggest that intrinsic-NAL quasars form an extension of the BAL sequences and tend to bridge the gap ...

  7. An extinction curve template for intrinsically reddened quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zafar, Tayyaba; Watson, Darach; Fynbo, Johan P U; Krogager, Jens-Kristian; Zafar, Nosheen; Saturni, Francesci G; Geier5, Stefan; Venemans, Bram P

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the near-infrared to UV data of 16 quasars with redshifts ranging from 0.71 $<$ $z$ $<$ 2.13 to investigate dust extinction properties. The sample presented in this work is obtained from the High $A_V$ Quasar (HAQ) survey. The quasar candidates were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS), and follow-up spectroscopy was carried out at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the New Technology Telescope (NTT). To study dust extinction curves intrinsic to the quasars, from the HAQ survey we selected 16 cases where the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) law could not provide a good solution to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We derived the extinction curves using Fitzpatrick & Massa 1986 (FM) law by comparing the observed SEDs to the combined quasar template from Vanden Berk et al. 2001 and Glikman et al. 2006. The derived extinction, $A_V$, ranges from 0.2-1.0 mag. All the individual extinction curves of our quasars are steeper ($...

  8. Host Galaxies of Young Dust-Reddened Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, T.; Lacy, M.; Becker, R.; Glikman, E.

    2009-10-01

    We present results on a multiwavelength campaign to identify the nature of dust-reddened Type 1 quasars. These quasars were selected by matching FIRST, 2MASS and very red optical counterparts with r'-K > 5. We find a very high fraction of Low Ionization Broad Absorption Line Quasars (LoBALs) among AGN selected with this method, perhaps a sign of quasar feedback. From X-ray observations and Balmer decrement measurements, the obscuring dust is most likely located in a cold absorber such as the host galaxy, rather than from a torus near the AGN. Hubble ACS imaging of a sub-sample of these sources showed a very high fraction of interacting and merging systems. The quasars appear to be very young in which dust from the merging galaxies is still settling in. Spitzer IRS and MIPS data show star formation signatures and deep Silicate absorption features in these objects, but overall the quasar is the dominant source in the Mid-infrared.

  9. Targets of balancing selection in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrés, Aida M; Hubisz, Melissa J; Indap, Amit

    2009-01-01

    to maintaining phenotypic variation in natural populations. Nevertheless, its prevalence and specific targets in the human genome remain largely unknown. We have analyzed the patterns of diversity and divergence of 13,400 genes in two human populations using an unbiased single-nucleotide polymorphism data set......, a genome-wide approach, and a method that incorporates demography in neutrality tests. We identified an unbiased catalog of genes with signatures of long-term balancing selection, which includes immunity genes as well as genes encoding keratins and membrane channels; the catalog also shows enrichment...... in functional categories involved in cellular structure. Patterns are mostly concordant in the two populations, with a small fraction of genes showing population-specific signatures of selection. Power considerations indicate that our findings represent a subset of all targets in the genome, suggesting...

  10. Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-ray Weakness

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, B; Alexander, D M; Stern, D; Teng, S H; Arévalo, P; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Farrah, D; Gandhi, P; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Koss, M; Ogle, P; Puccetti, S; Saez, C; Scott, A E; Walton, D J; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z=0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  11. Peptide-functionalized nanoparticles for selective targeting of pancreatic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valetti, Sabrina; Maione, Federica; Mura, Simona; Stella, Barbara; Desmaële, Didier; Noiray, Magali; Vergnaud, Juliette; Vauthier, Christine; Cattel, Luigi; Giraudo, Enrico; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-10-28

    Chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer is hampered by the tumor's physio-pathological complexity. Here we show a targeted nanomedicine using a new ligand, the CKAAKN peptide, which had been identified by phage display, as an efficient homing device within the pancreatic pathological microenvironment. Taking advantage of the squalenoylation platform, the CKAAKN peptide was conjugated to squalene (SQCKAAKN) and then co-nanoprecipitated with the squalenoyl prodrug of gemcitabine (SQdFdC) giving near monodisperse nanoparticles (NPs) for safe intravenous injection. By interacting with a novel target pathway, the Wnt-2, the CKAAKN functionalization enabled nanoparticles: (i) to specifically interact with both tumor cells and angiogenic vessels and (ii) to simultaneously promote pericyte coverage, thus leading to the normalization of the vasculature likely improving the tumor accessibility for therapy. All together, this approach represents a unique targeted nanoparticle design with remarkable selectivity towards pancreatic cancer and multiple mechanisms of action.

  12. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE LBTI EXOZODI KEY SCIENCE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberger, Alycia J. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Bryden, Geoff; Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Kennedy, Grant M.; Wyatt, Mark C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Roberge, Aki; Danchi, William C.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Defrère, Denis; Hinz, Philip M.; Rieke, George; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Skemer, Andrew J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Lane, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Millan-Gabet, Rafael [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Haniff, Chris, E-mail: weinberger@dtm.ciw.edu [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer will survey nearby stars for faint emission arising from ∼300 K dust (exozodiacal dust), and aims to determine the exozodiacal dust luminosity function. HOSTS results will enable planning for future space telescopes aimed at direct spectroscopy of habitable zone terrestrial planets, as well as greater understanding of the evolution of exozodiacal disks and planetary systems. We lay out here the considerations that lead to the final HOSTS target list. Our target selection strategy maximizes the ability of the survey to constrain the exozodi luminosity function by selecting a combination of stars selected for suitability as targets of future missions and as sensitive exozodi probes. With a survey of approximately 50 stars, we show that HOSTS can enable an understanding of the statistical distribution of warm dust around various types of stars and is robust to the effects of varying levels of survey sensitivity induced by weather conditions.

  13. Selection and trajectory design to mission secondary targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victorino Sarli, Bruno; Kawakatsu, Yasuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Recently, with new trajectory design techniques and use of low-thrust propulsion systems, missions have become more efficient and cheaper with respect to propellant. As a way to increase the mission's value and scientific return, secondary targets close to the main trajectory are often added with a small change in the transfer trajectory. As a result of their large number, importance and facility to perform a flyby, asteroids are commonly used as such targets. This work uses the Primer Vector theory to define the direction and magnitude of the thrust for a minimum fuel consumption problem. The design of a low-thrust trajectory with a midcourse asteroid flyby is not only challenging for the low-thrust problem solution, but also with respect to the selection of a target and its flyby point. Currently more than 700,000 minor bodies have been identified, which generates a very large number of possible flyby points. This work uses a combination of reachability, reference orbit, and linear theory to select appropriate candidates, drastically reducing the simulation time, to be later included in the main trajectory and optimized. Two test cases are presented using the aforementioned selection process and optimization to add and design a secondary flyby to a mission with the primary objective of 3200 Phaethon flyby and 25143 Itokawa rendezvous.

  14. Color-Redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Bing Wu; Wei Zhang; Xu Zhou

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the χ2 minimization technique, we describe a general method for estimating the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compared them with their spectroscopic redshifts. The difference is less than 0.1 for 47% of the quasars and less than 0.2for 68%. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars,galaxies and quasars both on the SDSS system and on the BATC system, we expect that we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficaciously with the latter than with the former, provided the BATC survey can detect objects with magnitudes fainter than 21.

  15. Color-redshift Relations and Photometric Redshift Estimations of Quasars in Large Sky Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, X B; Zhou, X; Wu, Xue-Bing; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Xu

    2004-01-01

    With a recently constructed composite quasar spectrum and the \\chi^2 minimization technique, we demonstrated a general method to estimate the photometric redshifts of a large sample of quasars by deriving the theoretical color-redshift relations and comparing the theoretical colors with the observed ones. We estimated the photometric redshifts from the 5-band SDSS photometric data of 18678 quasars in the first major data release of SDSS and compare them with the spectroscopic redshifts. The redshift difference is smaller than 0.1 for 47% of quasars and 0.2 for 68 % of them. Based on the calculation of the theoretical color-color diagrams of stars, galaxies and quasars in both the SDSS and BATC photometric systems, we expected that with the BATC system of 15 intermediate filters we would be able to select candidates of high redshift quasars more efficiently than in the SDSS, provided the BATC survey could detect objects with magnitude fainter than 21.

  16. A Deep Multicolor Survey; 3, Additional Spectroscopy and Implications for the Number Counts of Faint Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kennefick, D; Hall, P B; Green, R F; Kennefick, Julia D.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Hall, Patrick B.; Green, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    We have made spectroscopic identifications of 39 additional quasar candidates from the Deep Multicolor Survey (DMS) of Hall et al. (1996, ApJ, 462, 614, astro-ph/9512052). We have identified 9 new quasars with 0.3 3 were found among the observed candidates selected due to their red (B-R) and (V-R) colors. As a result, there are now 55 confirmed quasars in the survey: 42 with 0.3 3 over predictions based on models by Warren, Hewett, & Osmer is less than previously suggested. We also demonstrate the success of our quasar color modeling which is important in assessing the completeness of our survey.

  17. Dust Obscured Quasars: A Missing Link in Quasar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikman, Eilat; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A.; Lacy, M.

    2007-12-01

    A host of observational evidence over several decades of research has suggested a formation and evolutionary link between the growth of supermassive black holes, quasar activity and the build-up of the stellar populations in their host galaxies. Such evolutionary scenarios have been invoked to explain the presence of buried AGN seen in ultraluminous infrared galaxies, a high fraction of which also show evidence of merging and interaction. However, the morphologies of luminous, blue quasars show no signs of interaction. Their hosts are mostly undistrubed elliptical galaxies. These seemingly conflicting observations suggest a missing link in the evolutionary path where the dust that completely buried the ULIRG is being cleared, eventually to reveal an unobscured, luminous quasar. This missing link may be a population of highly reddened, but not completely obscured quasars. We have constructed asample of dust obscured quasars using FIRST and 2MASS. We find that for K CRATES flat-spectrum radio catalog.

  18. Highly selective luminescent nanostructures for mitochondrial imaging and targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanizza, E.; Iacobazzi, R. M.; Laquintana, V.; Valente, G.; Caliandro, G.; Striccoli, M.; Agostiano, A.; Cutrignelli, A.; Lopedota, A.; Curri, M. L.; Franco, M.; Depalo, N.; Denora, N.

    2016-02-01

    Here a luminescent hybrid nanostructure based on functionalized quantum dots (QDs) is used as a fluorescent imaging agent able to target selectively mitochondria thanks to the molecular recognition of the translocator protein (TSPO). The selective targeting of such an 18 kDa protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and overexpressed in several pathological states including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers may provide valuable information for the early diagnosis and therapy of human disorders. In particular, the rational design of amino functionalized luminescent silica coated QD nanoparticles (QD@SiO2 NPs) provides a versatile nanoplatform to anchor a potent and selective TSPO ligand, characterized by a 2-phenyl-imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine acetamide structure along with a derivatizable carboxylic end group, useful to conjugate the TSPO ligand and achieve TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs by means of a covalent amide bond. The colloidal stability and optical properties of the proposed nanomaterials are comprehensively investigated and their potential as mitochondrial imaging agents is fully assessed. Sub-cellular fractionation, together with confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy and co-localization analysis of targeted TSPO-QD@SiO2 NPs in C6 glioma cells overexpressing the TSPO, proves the great potential of these multifunctional nanosystems as in vitro selective mitochondrial imaging agents.Here a luminescent hybrid nanostructure based on functionalized quantum dots (QDs) is used as a fluorescent imaging agent able to target selectively mitochondria thanks to the molecular recognition of the translocator protein (TSPO). The selective targeting of such an 18 kDa protein mainly located in the outer mitochondrial membrane and overexpressed in several pathological states including neurodegenerative diseases and cancers may provide valuable information for the early diagnosis and therapy of human disorders. In particular, the rational design of amino

  19. Target inhibition networks: predicting selective combinations of druggable targets to block cancer survival pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    Full Text Available A recent trend in drug development is to identify drug combinations or multi-target agents that effectively modify multiple nodes of disease-associated networks. Such polypharmacological effects may reduce the risk of emerging drug resistance by means of attacking the disease networks through synergistic and synthetic lethal interactions. However, due to the exponentially increasing number of potential drug and target combinations, systematic approaches are needed for prioritizing the most potent multi-target alternatives on a global network level. We took a functional systems pharmacology approach toward the identification of selective target combinations for specific cancer cells by combining large-scale screening data on drug treatment efficacies and drug-target binding affinities. Our model-based prediction approach, named TIMMA, takes advantage of the polypharmacological effects of drugs and infers combinatorial drug efficacies through system-level target inhibition networks. Case studies in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer and BxPC-3 pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated how the target inhibition modeling allows systematic exploration of functional interactions between drugs and their targets to maximally inhibit multiple survival pathways in a given cancer type. The TIMMA prediction results were experimentally validated by means of systematic siRNA-mediated silencing of the selected targets and their pairwise combinations, showing increased ability to identify not only such druggable kinase targets that are essential for cancer survival either individually or in combination, but also synergistic interactions indicative of non-additive drug efficacies. These system-level analyses were enabled by a novel model construction method utilizing maximization and minimization rules, as well as a model selection algorithm based on sequential forward floating search. Compared with an existing computational solution, TIMMA showed both enhanced

  20. A convergent mean shift algorithm to select targets for LAMOST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Wei Li; Gang Zhao

    2009-01-01

    This paper firstly finds that the Mean Shift Algorithm used by the Observation Control System (OCS) Research Group of the University of Science and Technology of China in Survey Strategy System 2.10 (SSS2.10) to select targets for the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) is not convergent in theory. By carefully studying the mathematical formulation of the Mean Shift Algorithm, we find that it tries to find a point where some objective function achieves its maximum value; the Mean Shift Vector can be regarded as the ascension direction for the objective function. If we regard the objective function as the numerical description for the imaging quality of all targets covered by the focal panel, then the Mean Shift Algorithm can find the place where the imaging quality is the best. So, the problem of selecting targets is equal to the problem of finding the place where the imaging quality is the best. In addition, we also give some effective heuristics to improve computational speed and propose an effective method to assign point sources to the respective fibers. As a result, our program runs fast, and it costs only several seconds to generate an observation.

  1. Quasars in the Cosmic Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Dultzin, Deborah; Richards, Gordon; Knapen, Johan; Shlosman, Isaac; Morganti, Raffaella; Falomo, Renato; Hawkins, Mike; Cavaliere, Alfonso; McLure, Ross; Shields, Greg; Netzer, Hagai; Proga, Daniel; Franceschini, Alberto; Fan, Xiaoui; Elvis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We now consider the environment of quasars in the widest possible sense, from the circumnuclear regions to very large scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs. The circumgalactic environment of nearby quasars has been widely studied since the late 1960s in an attempt to test its influence on the triggering

  2. Outshining the quasars at reionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, D.; Reeves, J.N.; Hjorth, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January......Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January...

  3. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  4. Selective Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Targeted Granzyme B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Jabulowsky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential utility of immunotoxins for cancer therapy has convincingly been demonstrated in clinical studies. Nevertheless, the high immunogenicity of their bacterial toxin domain represents a critical limitation, and has prompted the evaluation of cell-death inducing proteins of human origin as a basis for less immunogenic immunotoxin-like molecules. In this review, we focus on the current status and future prospects of targeted fusion proteins for cancer therapy that employ granzyme B (GrB from cytotoxic lymphocytes as a cytotoxic moiety. Naturally, this serine protease plays a critical role in the immune defense by inducing apoptotic target cell death upon cleavage of intracellular substrates. Advances in understanding of the structure and function of GrB enabled the generation of chimeric fusion proteins that carry a heterologous cell binding domain for recognition of tumor-associated cell surface antigens. These hybrid molecules display high selectivity for cancer cells, with cell killing activities similar to that of corresponding recombinant toxins. Recent findings have helped to understand and circumvent intrinsic cell binding of GrB and susceptibility of the enzyme to inhibition by serpins. This now allows the rational design of optimized GrB derivatives that avoid sequestration by binding to non-target tissues, limit off-target effects, and overcome resistance mechanisms in tumor cells.

  5. Selective follicular targeting by modification of the particle sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Alexa; Richter, Heike; Knorr, Fanny; Schäfer, Ulrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Dähne, Lars; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2011-02-28

    Hair follicles represent interesting target sites for topically applied substances such as topical vaccinations or agents used in the field of regenerative medicine. In recent years, it could be shown that particles penetrate very effectively into the hair follicles. In the present study, the influence of particle size on the follicular penetration depths was examined. The penetration depths of two different types of particles sized 122 to 1000 nm were determined in vitro on porcine skin. The results revealed that the particles of medium size (643 and 646 nm, respectively) penetrated deeper into the porcine hair follicles than smaller or larger particles. It was concluded that by varying the particle size, different sites within the porcine hair follicle can be targeted selectively. For the human terminal hair follicle, the situation can be expected to be similar due to a similar size ratio of the hair follicles.

  6. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs): New z > 6 Quasar Survey with Subaru/HSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; SHELLQs Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at high redshift are an important and unique probe of the distant Universe, for understanding the origin and progress of cosmic reionization, the early growth of supermassive black holes, and the evolution of quasar host galaxies and their dark matter halos, among other topics. We are currently carrying out a new spectroscopic survey, called SHELLQs (Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars), to search for low-luminosity quasars at z > 6. By exploiting the exquisite imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we aim to probe quasar luminosities down to M1450 ~ -22 mag, i.e., below the classical threshold between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. Candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm. A large spectroscopic observing program is underway, using Subaru/FOCAS, GTC/OSIRIS, and Gemini/GMOS; in particular, SHELLQs has been approved as a Subaru intensive program to use 20 nights in the coming four semesters. As of August 2016, we have discovered ~40 quasars and bright galaxies at z ~ 6 and beyond, from the first 100 deg2 of the HSC survey (Matsuoka et al. 2016, ApJ, 828, 26). Surprisingly, we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of high-z galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~ 24 mag. Multi-wavelength follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  7. Observing broad-absorption line quasars with Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.P.; Schnopper, H.W.; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    1998-01-01

    Broad-absorption line quasars are found to have extremely weak soft X-ray emission when compared with other optically selected quasars. In the only example of PHL 5200 for which a detailed X-ray spectrum has been obtained with ASCA, strong absorption in the source appears to be responsible...

  8. Narrow CIV lambda 1549A Absorption Lines in Moderate-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    A large, high-quality spectral data base of well-selected, moderate-redshift radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars is used to characterize the incidence of narrow associated CIV lambda 1549 absorption, and how this may depend on some quasar properties, including radio-type. Preliminary results...

  9. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Heyden, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  10. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  11. Quasars Probing Quasars VI. Excess HI Absorption Within One Proper Mpc of z~2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J Xavier; Lee, Khee-Gan; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Bovy, Jo; Djorgovski, S G; Ellison, Sara L; Lau, Marie Wingyee; Martin, Crystal L; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H R; Simcoe, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the HI Lya absorption transverse to luminous, z~2 quasars at proper separations of 30kpc 17.3) at separations R<200kpc, which decreases to ~20% at R~1Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function xi_QA(r) = (r/r_0)^gamma with a large correlation length r_0 = 12.5+2.7-1.4 Mpc/h (comoving) and gamma = 1.68+0.14-0.30. The HI absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos Mhalo~10^12.5 Msun at z~2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased towards producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence th...

  12. Recombinant protein expression by targeting pre-selected chromosomal loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krömer Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells is mostly achieved by stable integration of transgenes into the chromosomal DNA of established cell lines. The chromosomal surroundings have strong influences on the expression of transgenes. The exploitation of defined loci by targeting expression constructs with different regulatory elements is an approach to design high level expression systems. Further, this allows to evaluate the impact of chromosomal surroundings on distinct vector constructs. Results We explored antibody expression upon targeting diverse expression constructs into previously tagged loci in CHO-K1 and HEK293 cells that exhibit high reporter gene expression. These loci were selected by random transfer of reporter cassettes and subsequent screening. Both, retroviral infection and plasmid transfection with eGFP or antibody expression cassettes were employed for tagging. The tagged cell clones were screened for expression and single copy integration. Cell clones producing > 20 pg/cell in 24 hours could be identified. Selected integration sites that had been flanked with heterologous recombinase target sites (FRTs were targeted by Flp recombinase mediated cassette exchange (RMCE. The results give proof of principle for consistent protein expression upon RMCE. Upon targeting antibody expression cassettes 90-100% of all resulting cell clones showed correct integration. Antibody production was found to be highly consistent within the individual cell clones as expected from their isogenic nature. However, the nature and orientation of expression control elements revealed to be critical. The impact of different promoters was examined with the tag-and-targeting approach. For each of the chosen promoters high expression sites were identified. However, each site supported the chosen promoters to a different extent, indicating that the strength of a particular promoter is dominantly defined by its chromosomal context

  13. Selective Targeting to Glioma with Nucleic Acid Aptamers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Aptekar

    Full Text Available Malignant glioma is characterised by a rapid growth rate and high capacity for invasive infiltration to surrounding brain tissue; hence, diagnosis and treatment is difficult and patient survival is poor. Aptamers contribute a promising and unique technology for the in vitro imaging of live cells and tissues, with a potentially bright future in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics for malignant glioma. The binding selectivity, uptake capacity and binding target of two DNA aptamers, SA43 and SA44, were investigated in glioma cells and patient tissues. The binding assay showed that SA43 and SA44 bound with strong affinity (Kd, 21.56 ± 4.60 nM and Kd, 21.11 ± 3.30 nM respectively to the target U87MG cells. Quantitative analysis by flow cytometry showed that the aptamers were able to actively internalise in U87MG and 1321N1 glioma cells compared to the non-cancerous and non-glioma cell types. Confocal microscopy confirmed staining in the cytoplasm, and co-localisation studies with endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and lysosomal markers suggested internalisation and compartmentalisation within the endomembrane system. Both aptamers selectively bound to Ku 70 and Ku 80 DNA repair proteins as determined by aptoprecipitation (AP followed by mass spectrometry analysis and confirmation by Western blot. In addition, aptohistochemical (AHC staining on paraffin embedded, formalin fixed patient tissues revealed that the binding selectivity was significantly higher for SA43 aptamer in glioma tissues (grade I, II, III and IV compared to the non-cancerous tissues, whereas SA44 did not show selectivity towards glioma tissues. The results indicate that SA43 aptamer can differentiate between glioma and non-cancerous cells and tissues and therefore, shows promise for histological diagnosis of glioma.

  14. Near-infrared spectra and intrinsic luminosities of candidate type II quasars at 2 < z < 3.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Alexandroff, Rachael; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lang, Dustin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Hamann, Frederick [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Brandt, W. Niel; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); York, Donald [University of Chicago Astronomy and Astrophysics Department and Enrico Fermi Institute, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We present JHK near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy of 25 candidate Type II quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using Triplespec on the Apache Point Observatory 3.5 m telescope, the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette at the Magellan/Baade 6.5 m telescope, and the Gemini Near-Infrared Spectrograph on Gemini. At redshifts of 2 < z < 3.4, our NIR spectra probe the rest-frame optical region of these targets, which were initially selected to have strong lines of C IV and Ly α, with FWHM < 2000 km s{sup –1} from the SDSS pipeline. We use the [O III] λ5007 line shape as a model for the narrow-line region emission and find that Hα consistently requires a broad component with FWHMs ranging from 1000 to 7500 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the C IV lines also require broad bases, but with considerably narrower widths of 1000-4500 km s{sup –1}. Estimating the extinction using the Balmer decrement and also the relationship in lower-z quasars between rest equivalent width and luminosity in the [O III] line, we find typical A{sub V} values of 0-2 mag, which naturally explains the attenuated C IV lines relative to Hα. We propose that our targets are moderately obscured quasars. We also describe one unusual object with three distinct velocity peaks in its [O III] spectrum.

  15. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: instrument specification and target selection

    CERN Document Server

    Bryant, J J; Robotham, A S G; Croom, S M; Driver, S P; Drinkwater, M J; Lorente, N P F; Cortese, L; Scott, N; Colless, M; Schaefer, A; Taylor, E N; Konstantopoulos, I S; Allen, J T; Baldry, I; Barnes, L; Bauer, A E; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bloom, J V; Brooks, A M; Brough, S; Cecil, G; Couch, W; Croton, D; Davies, R; Ellis, S; Fogarty, L M R; Foster, C; Glazebrook, K; Goodwin, M; Green, A; Gunawardhana, M L; Hampton, E; Ho, I -T; Hopkins, A M; Kewley, L; Lawrence, J S; Leon-Saval, S G; Leslie, S; Lewis, G; Liske, J; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Mahajan, S; Medling, A M; Metcalfe, N; Meyer, M; Mould, J; Obreschkow, D; O'Toole, S; Pracy, M; Richards, S N; Shanks, T; Sharp, R; Sweet, S M; Thomas, A D; Tonini, C; Walcher, C J

    2014-01-01

    The SAMI Galaxy Survey will observe 3400 galaxies with the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral-field spectrograph (SAMI) on the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) in a 3-year survey which began in 2013. We present the throughput of the SAMI system, the science basis and specifications for the target selection, the survey observation plan and the combined properties of the selected galaxies. The survey includes four volume limited galaxy samples based on cuts in a proxy for stellar mass, along with low-stellar mass dwarf galaxies all selected from the Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey. The GAMA regions were selected because of the vast array of ancillary data available, including ultraviolet through to radio bands. These fields are on the celestial equator at 9, 12, and 14.5 hours, and cover a total of 144 square degrees (in GAMA-I). Higher density environments are also included with the addition of eight clusters. The clusters have spectroscopy from 2dFGRS and SDSS and photometry in regions covered by the Slo...

  16. Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) I: First Phase Observations and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Induk; Kim, Minjin; Kang, Eugene; Shim, Hyunjin; Richards, Gordon T; Edge, Alastair C; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2008-01-01

    We present results from the first phase of the Seoul National University Bright Quasar Survey in Optical (SNUQSO) as well as its basic observational setup. Previous and current large-area surveys have been successful in identifying many quasars, but they could have missed bright quasars due to their survey design. In order to help complete the census of bright quasars, we have performed spectroscopic observations of new bright quasar candidates selected from various methods based on optical colors, near-infrared colors, radio, and X-ray data. In 2005/2006, we observed 55 bright quasar candidates using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) on the 1.8 m telescope at the Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory in Korea. We identify 14 quasars/Seyferts from our observation, including an optically bright quasar with i=14.98 mag at z=0.092 (SDSS J003236.59-091026.2). Non-quasar/Seyfert objects are found to be mostly stars, among which there are five M-type stars and one cataclysmic variable. Our result ...

  17. Target Selection for the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Paegert, Martin; De Lee, Nathan; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Mack, Claude E; Dhital, Saurav; Hebb, Leslie; Ge, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present the target selection process for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. MARVELS is a medium-resolution ($R \\sim 11000$) multi-fiber spectrograph capable of obtaining radial velocities for 60 objects at a time in order to find brown dwarfs and giant planets. The survey was configured to target dwarf stars with effective temperatures approximately between $4500$ and $6250 \\, \\mbox{K}$. For the first 2 years MARVELS relied on low-resolution spectroscopic pre-observations to estimate the effective temperature and $\\log(g)$ for candidate stars and then selected suitable dwarf stars from this pool. Ultimately, the pre-observation spectra proved ineffective at filtering out giant stars; many giants were incorrectly classified as dwarfs, resulting in a giant contamination rate of $\\sim$30\\% for the first phase of the MARVELS survey. Thereafter, the survey instead applied a reduced proper motion cut to eliminate ...

  18. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  19. The Road to Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kellermann, K I

    2014-01-01

    Although the extragalactic nature of 3C 48 and other quasi stellar radio sources was discussed as early as 1960 by John Bolton and others, it was rejected largely because of preconceived ideas about what appeared to be unrealistically high radio and optical luminosities. Not until the 1962 occultations of the strong radio source 3C 273 at Parkes, which led Maarten Schmidt to identify 3C 273 with an apparent stellar object at a redshift of 0.16, was the true nature understood. Successive radio and optical measurements quickly led to the identification of other quasars with increasingly large redshifts and the general, although for some decades not universal, acceptance of quasars as the very luminous nuclei of galaxies. Curiously, 3C 273, which is one of the strongest extragalactic sources in the sky, was first cataloged in 1959 and the magnitude 13 optical counterpart was observed at least as early as 1887. Since 1960, much fainter optical counterparts were being routinely identified using accurate radio inte...

  20. The Pan-STARRS1 distant z>5.6 quasar survey: more than 100 quasars within the first Gyr of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Bañados, E; Decarli, R; Farina, E P; Mazzucchelli, C; Walter, F; Fan, X; Stern, D; Schlafly, E; Chambers, K C; Rix, H-W; Jiang, L; McGreer, I; Simcoe, R; Wang, F; Yang, J; Morganson, E; De Rosa, G; Greiner, J; Baloković, M; Burgett, W S; Cooper, T; Draper, P W; Flewelling, H; Hodapp, K W; Jun, H D; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Miller, D; Schindler, J -T; Tonry, J L; Wainscoat, R J; Waters, C; Yang, Q

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars at z>5.6 can be studied in detail with the current generation of telescopes and provide us with unique information on the first gigayear of the universe. Thus far these studies have been statistically limited by the number of quasars known at these redshifts. Such quasars are rare and therefore wide-field surveys are required to identify them and multiwavelength data are needed to separate them efficiently from their main contaminants, the far more numerous cool dwarfs. In this paper, we update and extend the selection for z~6 quasars presented in Banados et al. (2014) using the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) survey. We present the PS1 distant quasar sample, which currently consists of 124 quasars in the redshift range 5.65.6 presented in this work almost double the quasars previously known at these redshifts, marking a transition phase from studies of individual sources to statistical studies of the high-redshift quasar population, which was impossible with earlier, smaller samples.

  1. Dusty Quasars at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Weedman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A population of quasars at z ~ 2 is determined based on dust luminosities vLv(7.8 um) that includes unobscured, partially obscured, and obscured quasars. Quasars are classified by the ratio vLv(0.25 um)/vLv(7.8 um) = UV/IR, assumed to measure obscuration of UV luminosity by the dust which produces IR luminosity. Quasar counts at rest frame 7.8 um are determined for quasars in the Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey using 24 um sources with optical redshifts from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey (AGES) or infrared redshifts from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph. Spectral energy distributions are extended to far infrared wavelengths using observations from the Herschel Space Observatory Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE), and new SPIRE photometry is presented for 77 high redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that unobscured and obscured quasars have similar space densities at rest frame 7.8 um, but the ratio Lv(100 um)/Lv(7.8 um) is about three times high...

  2. Systematic Assessment of Molecular Selectivity at the Level of Targets, Bioactive Compounds, and Structural Analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-06-20

    Through systematic mining of compound activity data, the target selectivity of bioactive compounds was systematically explored. The analysis was facilitated by applying, extending, and combining the concepts of target cliffs, selectivity cliffs, and matched molecular pairs. Selectivity relationships were explored at different levels including targets, individual bioactive compounds, and pairs of structural analogues. A variety of targets were identified for which active compounds were consistently nonselective or, by contrast, exclusively selective, making it possible to prioritize, or de-prioritize, targets for compound development. Furthermore, many chemical modifications were detected that altered compound selectivity in a well-defined manner including small structural changes that converted nonselective into target-selective compounds or inverted the target selectivity of active compounds. A large knowledge base of selectivity relationships across pharmaceutical targets and chemical modifications that alter selectivity was generated; this has been made freely available to the scientific community as a part of this investigation.

  3. NuSTAR Reveals Extreme Absorption in z <0.5 Type 2 Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic column density (N-H) distribution of quasars is poorly known. At the high obscuration end of the quasar population and for redshifts z ...-ray observatory NuSTAR, along with archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data, we study the broad-band X-ray spectra of nine optically selected (from the SDSS), candidate Compton-thick (N-H > 1.5 x 10(24) cm(-2)) type 2 quasars (CTQSO2s); five new NuSTAR observations are reported herein, and four have been previously......STAR-detected type 2 quasars are representative of other Compton-thick candidates, we make a correction to the N-H distribution for optically selected type 2 quasars as measured by Chandra and XMM-Newton for 39 objects. With this approach, we predict a Compton-thick fraction of f(CT) = 36(-12)(+14)%, although higher...

  4. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-04

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators.

  5. CD133, Selectively Targeting the Root of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg U. Schmohl

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC are capable of promoting tumor initiation and self-renewal, two important hallmarks of carcinoma formation. This population comprises a small percentage of the tumor mass and is highly resistant to chemotherapy, causing the most difficult problem in the field of cancer research, drug refractory relapse. Many CSC markers have been reported. One of the most promising and perhaps least ubiquitous is CD133, a membrane-bound pentaspan glycoprotein that is frequently expressed on CSC. There is evidence that directly targeting CD133 with biological drugs might be the most effective way to eliminate CSC. We have investigated two entirely unrelated, but highly effective approaches for selectively targeting CD133. The first involves using a special anti-CD133 single chain variable fragment (scFv to deliver a catalytic toxin. The second utilizes this same scFv to deliver components of the immune system. In this review, we discuss the development and current status of these CD133 associated biological agents. Together, they show exceptional promise by specific and efficient CSC elimination.

  6. The LEGUE disk target selection for the LAMOST pilot survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Li; Yu, Jincheng; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yueyang; Shen, Shiyin; Zhang, Haotong; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Yuqing; Christlieb, Norbert; Han, Zhanwen; Lee, Hsu-Tai; Liu, Xiaowei; Pan, Kaike; Shi, Jianrong; Wang, Hongchi; Zhu, Zi

    2012-01-01

    We describe the target selection algorithm for the low latitude disk portion of the LAMOST Pilot Survey, which aims to test systems in preparation for the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. We use the PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010) astrometric catalog, which provides positions, proper motions, B/R/I magnitudes (mostly) from USNO-B (Monet et al. 2003) and J/H/Ks from The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, see Skrutskie et al. 2006) as well. We chose 8 plates along the Galactic plane, in the region $0^\\circ<\\alpha<67^\\circ$ and $42^\\circ<\\delta<59^\\circ$, that cover 22 known open clusters with a range of ages. Adjacent plates may have small overlapping. Each plate covers an area $2.5^\\circ$ in radius,with central star (for Shark-Hartmann guider) brighter than $\\sim8^{\\rm th}$ magnitude. For each plate, we create an input catalog in the magnitude range $11.3selected to satisfy the requirements of the fiber positioning system and have a uniform dis...

  7. Probing Advantages of Different Selectivity Strategies for Targeted Quantitative Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriman, M.; Hunter, C.; Mollah, Sahana

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There has been an exponential increase in the number of ‘potential’ protein biomarkers discovered; thus requiring the need for better quantification strategies to confirm or refute their ultimate utility. Also required is increased throughput which means reduced sample preparation and/or accelerated chromatography which increases the chance of interferences that could confound robust quantification. The purpose of this study is to explore a range of new MS analysis methodologies that enable higher selectivity quantification. The different techniques rely on different properties of the molecule for specificity so their utility will depend to a large degree on the target molecules. But an exploration to determine some general guidelines will be helpful when choosing the best strategy. In this study, we compare the quantification of tryptic peptides in complex biological matrices using various strategies including combinations of sample preparation and mass spectrometric methodologies on different mass spectrometric platforms. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: The intact or digested BNP was spiked into the crashed plasma to create calibration curves. An AB SCIEX QTRAP® 5500 system equipped with Turbo V™ source was used. Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions and MRM3 experiments for intact and digested BNP were developed and used to measure the calibration curves. For the differential mobility separations, a QTRAP 5500 system equipped with SelexION™ Technology was used. RESULTS: Three quantitative methodologies were used with the QTRAP® 5500 System: MRM provides selectivity based on the fragmentation of the peptide and monitoring of a specific product ion. When matrix interference is a problem with MRM, further selectivity can be performed using MRM3, which provides a second level of selectivity based on monitoring a secondary product ion. Alternatively, the differential mobility separation (DMS) system which provides selectivity based on the

  8. Deciphering the code for retroviral integration target site selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Andrea Santoni

    Full Text Available Upon cell invasion, retroviruses generate a DNA copy of their RNA genome and integrate retroviral cDNA within host chromosomal DNA. Integration occurs throughout the host cell genome, but target site selection is not random. Each subgroup of retrovirus is distinguished from the others by attraction to particular features on chromosomes. Despite extensive efforts to identify host factors that interact with retrovirion components or chromosome features predictive of integration, little is known about how integration sites are selected. We attempted to identify markers predictive of retroviral integration by exploiting Precision-Recall methods for extracting information from highly skewed datasets to derive robust and discriminating measures of association. ChIPSeq datasets for more than 60 factors were compared with 14 retroviral integration datasets. When compared with MLV, PERV or XMRV integration sites, strong association was observed with STAT1, acetylation of H3 and H4 at several positions, and methylation of H2AZ, H3K4, and K9. By combining peaks from ChIPSeq datasets, a supermarker was identified that localized within 2 kB of 75% of MLV proviruses and detected differences in integration preferences among different cell types. The supermarker predicted the likelihood of integration within specific chromosomal regions in a cell-type specific manner, yielding probabilities for integration into proto-oncogene LMO2 identical to experimentally determined values. The supermarker thus identifies chromosomal features highly favored for retroviral integration, provides clues to the mechanism by which retrovirus integration sites are selected, and offers a tool for predicting cell-type specific proto-oncogene activation by retroviruses.

  9. Red quasars not so dusty

    CERN Document Server

    Benn, C R; Carballo, R; González-Serrano, J I; Sánchez, S F

    1997-01-01

    Webster et al (1995) claimed that up to 80% of QSOs may be obscured by dust. They inferred the presence of this dust from the remarkably broad range of B-K optical-infrared colours of a sample of flat-spectrum PKS radio QSOs. If such dust is typical of QSOs, it will have rendered invisible most of those which would otherwise been have detected by optical surveys. We used the William Herschel Telescope on La Palma to obtain K infrared images of 54 B3 radio quasars selected at low frequency (mainly steep-spectrum), and we find that although several have very red optical-infrared colours, most of these can be attributed to an excess of light in K rather than a dust-induced deficit in B. We present evidence that some of the infrared excess comes from the light of stars in the host galaxy (some, as previously suggested, comes from synchrotron radiation associated with flat-spectrum radio sources). The B-K colours of the B3 QSOs provide no evidence for a large reddened population. Either the Webster et al QSOs are ...

  10. HST/COS OBSERVATIONS OF THIRTEEN NEW He II QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syphers, David [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zheng Wei [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Meiksin, Avery [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); York, Donald G., E-mail: David.Syphers@colorado.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The full reionization of intergalactic helium was a major event in the history of the intergalactic medium (IGM), and UV observations of the He II Gunn-Peterson trough allow us to characterize the end of this process at z {approx} 3. Due to intervening hydrogen absorption, quasars allowing such study are rare, with only 33 known in the literature, and most of those are very recent discoveries. We expand on our previous discovery work, and present 13 new He II quasars with redshifts 2.82 < z < 3.77, here selected with {approx}80% efficiency, and including several that are much brighter than the vast majority of those previously known. This is the largest sample of uniformly observed He II quasars covering such a broad redshift range, and they show evidence of IGM opacity increasing with redshift, as expected for the helium reionization epoch. No evidence of He II Ly{alpha} quasar emission is seen in individual or averaged spectra, posing a problem for standard models of the broad-line region. The current rapid advance in the study of He II quasars has been greatly facilitated by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, and we discuss the instrumental and other subtleties that must be taken into account in IGM He II observations.

  11. Thermal Emission from Warm Dust in the Most Distant Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, R; Wagg, J; Bertoldi, F; Walter, F; Menten, K M; Omont, A; Cox, P; Strauss, M A; Fan, X; Jiang, L; Schneider, D P

    2008-01-01

    We report new continuum observations of fourteen z~6 quasars at 250 GHz and fourteen quasars at 1.4 GHz. We summarize all recent millimeter and radio observations of the sample of the thirty-three quasars known with 5.7110^{12}L_{\\odot}), while the average L_{FIR}/L_{bol} ratio of the non-detections is consistent with that of the optically-selected PG quasars. The MAMBO detections also tend to have weaker Ly\\alpha emission than the non-detected sources. We discuss possible FIR dust heating sources, and critically assess the possibility of active star formation in the host galaxies of the z~6 quasars. The average star formation rate of the MAMBO non-detections is likely to be less than a few hundred M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, but in the strong detections, the host galaxy star formation is probably at a rate of \\gtrsim10^{3} M_{\\odot} yr^{-1}, which dominates the FIR dust heating.

  12. Occurrence and Global Properties of Narrow CIV lambda 1549 Absorption Lines in Moderate-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    A statistical study is presented of (a) the frequency of narrow CIV lambda 1549 absorption lines in 1.5 ~50%) of narrow CIV absorbers is detected for the radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars, and a constant ~25% of all the quasars, irrespective of radio type display associated CIV absorbers stronger...... than a rest equivalent width of 0.5A. Both radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars with narrow absorption lines have systematically redder continua, especially strongly absorbed objects. There is evidence of inclination dependent dust reddening and absorption for the radio quasars. An additional key result...... is that the most strongly absorbed radio quasars have the largest radio source extent. This result is in stark contrast to a recent study of the low-frequency selected Molonglo survey in which a connection between the strength of the narrow absorbers and the (young) age of the radio source has been proposed...

  13. FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES OF TYPE 1 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanish, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Capak, P.; Desai, V.; Armus, L.; Brinkworth, C.; Brooke, T.; Colbert, J.; Fadda, D.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Paladini, R. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 220-6, 1200 E California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Huynh, M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, M468, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Lacy, M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Murphy, E. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Scarlata, C. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Shenoy, S., E-mail: hanish@ipac.caltech.edu [Space Science Division, NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    We use the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products and the Spitzer Archival Far-InfraRed Extragalactic Survey to study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By combining the Spitzer and SDSS data with the Two Micron All Sky Survey, we are able to construct a statistically robust rest-frame 0.1-100 {mu}m type 1 quasar template. We find that the quasar population is well-described by a single power-law SED at wavelengths less than 20 {mu}m, in good agreement with previous work. However, at longer wavelengths, we find a significant excess in infrared luminosity above an extrapolated power-law, along with significant object-to-object dispersion in the SED. The mean excess reaches a maximum of 0.8 dex at rest-frame wavelengths near 100 {mu}m.

  14. Far-Infrared Properties of Type 1 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hanish, D J; Capak, P; Desai, V; Armus, L; Brinkworth, C; Brooke, T; Colbert, J; Fadda, D; Frayer, D; Huynh, M; Lacy, M; Murphy, E; Noriega-Crespo, A; Paladini, R; Scarlata, C; Shenoy, S

    2013-01-01

    We use the Spitzer Space Telescope Enhanced Imaging Products (SEIP) and the Spitzer Archival Far-InfraRed Extragalactic Survey (SAFIRES) to study the spectral energy distributions of spectroscopically confirmed type 1 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). By combining the Spitzer and SDSS data with the 2-Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) we are able to construct a statistically robust rest-frame 0.1-100 micron type 1 quasar template. We find the quasar population is well-described by a single power-law SED at wavelengths less than 20 microns, in good agreement with previous work. However, at longer wavelengths we find a significant excess in infrared luminosity above an extrapolated power-law, along with signifiant object-to-object dispersion in the SED. The mean excess reaches a maximum of 0.8 dex at rest-frame wavelengths near 100 microns.

  15. Probing the faint end of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 4 in the COSMOS field

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, H; Matsuoka, K; Taniguchi, Y; Shioya, Y; Trump, J R; Capak, P; Comastri, A; Enoki, M; Ideue, Y; Kakazu, Y; Koekemoer, A M; Morokuma, T; Murayama, T; Saito, T; Salvato, M; Schinnerer, E; Scoville, N Z; Silverman, J D

    2010-01-01

    We searched for quasars that are ~ 3 mag fainter than the SDSS quasars in the redshift range 3.7 < z < 4.7 in the COSMOS field to constrain the faint end of the quasar luminosity function. Using optical photometric data, we selected 31 quasar candidates with 22 < i' < 24 at z ~ 4. We obtained optical spectra for most of these candidates using FOCAS on the Subaru telescope, and identified 8 low-luminosity quasars at z ~ 4. In order to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) based on our spectroscopic follow-up campaign, we estimated the photometric completeness of our quasar survey through detailed Monte Carlo simulations. Our QLF at z ~ 4 has a much shallower faint-end slope beta = -1.67^{+0.11}_{-0.17} than that obtained by other recent surveys in the same redshift. Our result is consistent with the scenario of downsizing evolution of active galactic nuclei inferred by recent optical and X-ray quasar surveys at lower redshifts.

  16. Comparison of Approaches to Photometric Redshift Estimation of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yang; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Tian, Hai-Jun

    We probe many kinds of approaches used for photometric redshift estimation of quasars, including KNN (K-nearest neighbor algorithm), Lasso (Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator), PLS (Partial Least Square regression), ridge regression, SGD (Stochastic Gradient Descent) and Extra-Trees.

  17. Human hair follicle: reservoir function and selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Peytavi, U; Vogt, A

    2011-10-01

    Penetration of topically applied compounds may occur via the stratum corneum, skin appendages and hair follicles. The follicular infundibulum increases the surface area, disrupts the epidermal barrier towards the lower parts of the follicle, and serves as a reservoir. Topical delivery of active compounds to specific targets within the skin, especially to distinct hair follicle compartments or cell populations, may help to treat local inflammatory reactions selectively, with reduced systemic side-effects. Various in vitro and in vivo methods exist for studying the hair follicle structure and follicular penetration pathways. These include cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping, confocal microscopy and cyanoacrylate scalp follicle biopsy. The complex anatomical structure as well as the cyclical activity of the hair follicle must be taken into consideration when designing delivery systems. In addition, delivery into and retention inside the infundibular reservoir are controlled by, for example, molecule or particle size, their polarity and the type of preparation. Preferred penetration depth and storage time must also be considered. Particles with release mechanisms should be preferred; however, the release of drugs from nanoparticles still requires further investigations.

  18. Disclosing the Radio Loudness Distribution Dichotomy in Quasars: An Unbiased Monte Carlo Approach Applied to the SDSS-FIRST Quasar Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Balokovic, Mislav; Ivezic, Zeljko; Zamorani, Gianni; Schinnerer, Eva; Kelly, Brandon C

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modelling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8,300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with 12+/-1 % of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for it...

  19. Insights into the molecular basis of a bispecific antibody's target selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mazor, Yariv; Hansen, Anna; Yang, Chunning; Partha S Chowdhury; Wang, Jihong; Stephens, Geoffrey; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies constitute a valuable class of therapeutics owing to their ability to bind 2 distinct targets. Dual targeting is thought to enhance biological efficacy, limit escape mechanisms, and increase target selectivity via a strong avidity effect mediated by concurrent binding to both antigens on the surface of the same cell. However, factors that regulate the extent of target selectivity are not well understood. We show that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to promote effi...

  20. Feature to space conversion during target selection in the dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex of monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masato; Mikami, Akichika

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the neuronal mechanism of the process of selection of a target from an array of stimuli, we analysed neuronal activity of the lateral prefrontal cortex during the response period of a serial probe reproduction task. During the response period of this task, monkeys were trained to select a memorized target object from an array of three objects and make a saccadic eye movement toward it. Of 611 neurons, 74 neurons showed visual response and 56 neurons showed presaccadic activity during the response period. Among visual neurons, 27 showed array- and target-selectivity. All of these array- and target-selective visual responses were recorded from the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). Among 56 neurons with presaccadic activity, nine showed target-selective activity, 17 showed target- and direction-selective activity, and 23 showed direction-selective activity. The target-selective, and the target- and direction-selective activities were recorded from the VLPFC, and the direction-selective activities were recorded from VLPFC and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The starting time of the activity was earlier for the target-selective, and target- and direction-selective activities in VLPFC, intermediate for the direction-selective activities in VLPFC, and later for the direction-selective activities in DLPFC. These results suggest that VLPFC plays a role in the process of selection of a target object from an array of stimuli, VLPFC and DLPFC play a role in determining the location of the target in space, and DLPFC plays a role in selecting a direction and making a decision to generate a saccadic eye movement.

  1. Dust reddened quasars in first and UKIDSS: Beyond the tip of the iceberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Urrutia, Tanya [Leibniz Institut fr Astrophysik, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Lacy, Mark [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, Ashish; Graham, Matthew [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Urry, Meg [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Croom, Scott [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ge, Jian, E-mail: eglikman@middlebury.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a pilot survey to find dust-reddened quasars by matching the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) radio catalog to the UKIDSS near-infrared survey and using optical data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select objects with very red colors. The deep K-band limit provided by UKIDSS allows for finding more heavily reddened quasars at higher redshifts as compared with previous work using FIRST and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). We selected 87 candidates with K ≤ 17.0 from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS) First Data Release (DR1), which covers 190 deg{sup 2}. These candidates reach up to ∼1.5 mag below the 2MASS limit and obey the color criteria developed to identify dust-reddened quasars. We have obtained 61 spectroscopic observations in the optical and/or near-infrared, as well as classifications in the literature, and have identified 14 reddened quasars with E(B – V) > 0.1, including 3 at z > 2. We study the infrared properties of the sample using photometry from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer and find that infrared colors improve the efficiency of red quasar selection, removing many contaminants in an infrared-to-optical color-selected sample alone. The highest-redshift quasars (z ≳ 2) are only moderately reddened, with E(B – V) ∼ 0.2-0.3. We find that the surface density of red quasars rises sharply with faintness, comprising up to 17% of blue quasars at the same apparent K-band flux limit. We estimate that to reach more heavily reddened quasars (i.e., E(B – V) ≳ 0.5) at z > 2 and a depth of K = 17, we would need to survey at least ∼2.5 times more area.

  2. Quasar Structure from Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher W.

    2007-12-01

    I investigate microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars and discuss the use of its signal to probe quasar structure on small angular scales. I describe our lensed quasar optical monitoring program and RETROCAM, the optical camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I use the microlensing variability observed in 11 gravitationally lensed quasars to show that the accretion disk size at 2500Å is related to the black hole mass by log(R2500/cm) = (15.70±0.16) + (0.64±0.18)log(MBH/109M⊙). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R ∝ MBH2/3), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(η) = -1.54±0.36 + log(L/LE) where η=L/(Mdotc2). With one exception, these sizes are larger by a factor of 4 than the size needed to produce the observed 0.8µm quasar flux by thermal radiation from a thin disk with the same T ∝ R-3/4 temperature profile. More sophisticated disk models are clearly required, particularly as our continuing observations improve the precision of the measurements and yield estimates of the scaling with wavelength and accretion rate. This research made extensive use of a Beowulf computer cluster obtained through the Cluster Ohio program of the Ohio Supercomputer Center. Support for program HST-GO-9744 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS-5-26666.

  3. Locating star-forming regions in quasar host galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J. E.; Eracleous, M.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Gronwall, C.; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R.; Sturm, Eckhard

    2014-02-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II]λ3727, Hβ, [O III]λ5007 and Paα images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically around the nucleus, powered primarily by star formation. We determine star-formation rates of the order of a few tens of M⊙ yr-1. The host galaxies of our target quasars have stellar masses of the order of 1011 M⊙ and specific star-formation rates on a par with those of M82 and luminous infrared galaxies. As such they fall at the upper envelope or just above the star-formation mass sequence in the specific star formation versus stellar mass diagram. We see a clear trend of increasing star-formation rate with quasar luminosity, reinforcing the link between the growth of the stellar mass of the host and the black hole mass found by other authors.

  4. Effects of Mode of Target Task Selection on Learning about Plants in a Mobile Learning Environment: Effortful Manual Selection versus Effortless QR-Code Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Liu, Tzu-Chien; Paas, Fred

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the effects of effortless selection of target plants using quick respond (QR) code technology to effortful manual search and selection of target plants on learning about plants in a mobile device supported learning environment. In addition, it was investigated whether the effectiveness of the 2 selection methods was…

  5. Target product selection - where can Molecular Pharming make the difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Mathew J; Teh, Audrey Y H; Twyman, Richard M; Ma, Julian K-C

    2013-01-01

    Four major developments have taken place in the world of Molecular Pharming recently. In the USA, the DARPA initiative challenged plant biotechnology companies to develop strategies for the large-scale manufacture of influenza vaccines, resulting in a successful Phase I clinical trial; in Europe the Pharma-Planta academic consortium gained regulatory approval for a plant-derived monoclonal antibody and completed a first-in-human phase I clinical trial; the Dutch pharmaceutical company Synthon acquired the assets of Biolex Therapeutics, an established Molecular Pharming company with several clinical candidates produced in their proprietary LEX system based on aquatic plants; and finally, the Israeli biotechnology company Protalix Biotherapeutics won FDA approval for the commercial release of a recombinant form of the enzyme glucocerebrosidase produced in carrot cells, the first plant biotechnology-derived biopharmaceutical in the world approved for the market. Commercial momentum is gathering pace with additional candidates now undergoing or awaiting approval for phase III clinical trials. Filling the product pipeline is vital to establish commercial sustainability, and the selection of appropriate target products for Molecular Pharming will be a critical factor. An interesting feature of the four stories outlined above is that they span the use of very different platform technologies addressing different types of molecules which aim to satisfy distinct market demands. In each case, Molecular Pharming was an economically and technically suitable approach, but this decisionmaking process is not necessarily straightforward. Although the various technologies available to Molecular Pharming are broad ranging and flexible, competing technologies are better established, so there needs to be a compelling reason to move into plants. It is most unlikely that plant biotechnology will be the answer for the whole biologics field. In this article, we discuss the current plant

  6. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  7. Selected problems of targeting active labour market policies in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Maria Maksim; Dominik Sliwicki

    2012-01-01

    Well targeted active labour market policies create better prospects for achieving higher net employment effects. This article attempts to analyse targeting of active labour market policies in the context of regulations contained in the Act of Employment Promotion and Labour Market Institutions, and current evaluation findings. The paper analyses basic active labour market policies, that have been in place in Poland in 2009. To assess program targeting logistic regression was applied.

  8. A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2005-01-01

    We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two...... have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could...... be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do...

  9. The SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Quasar Luminosity Function from Data Release Nine

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Nicholas P; White, Martin; Richards, Gordon T; Myers, Adam D; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Strauss, Michael A; Anderson, Scott F; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W N; Yeche, Christophe; Swanson, Molly E C; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bovy, Jo; Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, J; DeGraf, Colin; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Ebelke, Garrett; Fan, Xiaohui; Ge, Jian; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Maraston, Claudia; Muna, Demitri; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Paris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Schawinski, Kevin; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Silverman, John D; Simmons, Audrey; Snedden, Stephanie; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Weinberg, David H; York, Donald

    2012-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the optical Quasar Luminosity Function (QLF), using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III: Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-III: BOSS). From the SDSS-III Data Release Nine (DR9), we select a uniform sample of 22,301 i<=21.8 quasars over an area of 2236 sq. deg with confirmed spectroscopic redshifts between 2.2quasar studies. We derive the completeness of the survey through simulated quasar photometry, and check this completeness estimate using a sample of quasars selected by their photometric variability within the BOSS footprint. We investigate the level of systematics associated with our quasar sample using the simulations, in the process generating color-redshift relations and a new quasar k-correction. We probe the faint end of the QLF to M_i(z=2.2) = -24.5 and see a clear break in the QLF at all redshifts up to z=3.5. We find that a log-linear relation (in log[Phi*] - M*) ...

  10. A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.;

    2005-01-01

    be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do......We present the discovery of seven quasars at z>5.7, selected from ~2000 deg^2 of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two...... have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z=5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-sigma limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly alpha+NV line is 5 A. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could...

  11. Complete Ionisation of the Neutral Gas in High Redshift Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, S J

    2012-01-01

    Cool neutral gas provides the raw material for all star formation in the Universe, and yet, from a survey of the hosts of high redshift radio galaxies and quasars, we find a complete dearth of atomic (HI 21-cm) and molecular (OH, CO, HCO+ & HCN) absorption at redshifts z > 3. Upon a thorough analysis of the optical photometry, we find that all of our targets have ionising ultra-violet continuum luminosities of logL > 23 W/Hz. We therefore attribute this deficit to the traditional optical selection of targets biasing surveys towards the most ultra-violet luminous objects, where the intense radiation excites the neutral gas to the point where it cannot engage in star formation. However, this hypothesis does not explain why there is a critical luminosity, rather than a continuum where the detections gradually become fewer and fewer as the harshness of the radiation increases. We show that by placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas there is always a finite ultra-violet luminosity above which all of the gas is...

  12. High redshift quasars monitoring campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Ismael; Lira, Paulina; Martinez, Jorge; Netzer, Hagai; Kaspi, Shai

    2014-07-01

    We present an update of the monitoring campaign we have undertaken to probe the most massive black holes in powerful quasars at high redshift through the reverberation mapping technique. Once this campaign has finished, we will be able to directly measure broad line region (BLR) sizes of quasars at z ~ 2-3, improving dramatically the BLR size-luminosity relation, and therefore, black hole mass estimates based on this relationship. So far, we have identified a dozen highly variable sources suitable for future cross-correlation analysis and reverberation measurements.

  13. Development of Antibacterials Targeting the MEP Pathway of Select Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    chemical class of antimicrobial drugs targeting MEP synthase. Additionally, our screening has highlighted a rationally designed bisubstrate inhibitor of...identify top compounds. • Mode of inhibition studies to determine the mechanism of action for the top hit compounds. • Identification of a...chemical class of antimicrobial drugs targeting MEP synthase. Additionally, our screening has highlighted a rationally designed bisubstrate inhibitor of

  14. NuSTAR observations of heavily obscured quasars at z ~ 0.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ≈ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured, Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength...... broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at >8 keV with a no-source probability of...

  15. Discovery of six high-redshift quasars with the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope and the Multiple Mirror Telescope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Bing Wu; Wen-Wen Zuo; Qian Yang; Wei-Min Yi; Chen-Wei Yang; Wen-Juan Liu; Peng Jiang; Xin-Wen Shu; Hong-Yan Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Quasars with redshifts greater than 4 are rare,and can be used to probe the structure and evolution of the early universe.Here we report the discovery of six new quasars with i-band magnitudes brighter than 19.5 and redshifts between 2.4 and 4.6 from spectroscopy with the Yunnan Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (YFOSC) at the Lijiang 2.4m telescope in February,2012.These quasars are in the list of z > 3.6 quasar candidates selected by using our proposed J - K/i - Y criterion and the photometric redshift estimations from the SDSS optical and UKIDSS near-IR photometric data.Nine candidates were observed by YFOSC,and five among six new quasars were identified as z > 3.6 quasars.One of the other three objects was identified as a star and the other two were unidentified due to the lower signal-to-noise ratio of their spectra.This is the first time that z > 4 quasars have been discovered using a telescope in China.Thanks to the Chinese Telescope Access Program (TAP),the redshift of 4.6 for one of these quasars was confirmed by the Multiple Mirror Telescope (MMT) Red Channel spectroscopy.The continuum and emission line properties of these six quasars,as well as their central black hole masses and Eddington ratios,were obtained.

  16. Low redshift quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82. Host galaxy colors and close environment

    CERN Document Server

    Bettoni, D; Kotilainen, J K; Karhunen, K; Uslenghi, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a photometrical and morphological multicolor study of the properties of low redshift (z<0.3) quasar hosts based on a large and homogeneous dataset of quasars derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (DR7). We used quasars that were imaged in the SDSS Stripe82 that is up to 2 mag deeper than standard Sloan images. This sample is part of a larger dataset of ~400 quasars at z<0.5 for which both the host galaxies and their galaxy environments were studied (Falomo et al. 2014,Karhunen et al. 2014). For 52 quasars we undertake a study of the color of the host galaxies and of their close environments in u,g,r,i and z bands. We are able to resolve almost all the quasars in the sample in the filters g,r,i and z and also in $u$ for about 50% of the targets. We found that the mean colors of the QSO host galaxy (g-i=0.82+-0.26; r-i=0.26+-0.16 and u-g=1.32+-0.25) are very similar to the values of a sample of inactive galaxies matched in terms of redshift and galaxy luminosity with the quasar sample. Ther...

  17. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers....... This demonstrates that the cell model can be a useful tool for the design of effective lysosome-targeting drugs with minimal off-target interactions....

  18. A study of the 15 micron quasars in the ELAIS N1 and N2 fields

    CERN Document Server

    Afonso-Luis, A; González-Solares, E A; Hatziminaoglou, E; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Hernan-Caballero, A; Serjeant,; Rowan-Robinson, M; Lari, C; Vaccari, M; Oliver, S

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses properties of the European Large Area ISO Survey 15 micron quasars and tries to establish a robust method of quasar selection for future use within the Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE) framework. The importance of good quality ground-based optical data is stressed, both for the candidates selection and for the photometric redshifts estimates. Colour-colour plots and template fitting are used for these purposes. The properties of the 15 micron quasars sample are studied, including variability and black hole masses and compared to the properties of other quasars that lie within the same fields but have no mid-infrared counterparts. The two subsamples do not present substantial differences and are believed to come from the same parent population.

  19. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z 330 times weaker than...... expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL...... quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three...

  20. Systematic analysis of public domain compound potency data identifies selective molecular scaffolds across druggable target families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ye; Wassermann, Anne Mai; Lounkine, Eugen; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2010-01-28

    Molecular scaffolds that yield target family-selective compounds are of high interest in pharmaceutical research. There continues to be considerable debate in the field as to whether chemotypes with a priori selectivity for given target families and/or targets exist and how they might be identified. What do currently available data tell us? We present a systematic and comprehensive selectivity-centric analysis of public domain target-ligand interactions. More than 200 molecular scaffolds are identified in currently available active compounds that are selective for established target families. A subset of these scaffolds is found to produce compounds with high selectivity for individual targets among closely related ones. These scaffolds are currently underrepresented in approved drugs.

  1. Comparing different indicators of quasar orientation

    CERN Document Server

    Van Gorkom, Kyle J; Rauch, Andreas P; Gobeille, Doug B

    2015-01-01

    Radio core dominance, the rest-frame ratio of core to lobe luminosity, has been widely used as a measure of Doppler boosting of a quasar's radio jets and hence of the inclination of the central engine's spin axis to the line of sight. However, the use of the radio lobe luminosity in the denominator (essentially to try and factor out the intrinsic power of the central engine) has been criticized and other proxies for the intrinsic engine power have been proposed. These include the optical continuum luminosity, and the luminosity of the narrow-line region. Each is plausible, but so far none has been shown to be clearly better than the others. In this paper we evaluate four different measures of core dominance using a new sample of 126 radio loud quasars, carefully selected to be as free as possible of orientation bias, together with high quality VLA images and optical spectra from the SDSS. We find that normalizing the radio core luminosity by the optical continuum luminosity yields a demonstrably superior orie...

  2. Discovery of a very Lyman-α-luminous quasar at z = 6.62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptelova, Ekaterina; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Yu, Po-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Ping; Guo, Jhen-Kuei

    2017-02-02

    Distant luminous quasars provide important information on the growth of the first supermassive black holes, their host galaxies and the epoch of reionization. The identification of quasars is usually performed through detection of their Lyman-α line redshifted to 0.9 microns at z > 6.5. Here, we report the discovery of a very Lyman-α luminous quasar, PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 at redshift z = 6.618, selected based on its red colour and multi-epoch detection of the Lyman-α emission in a single near-infrared band. The Lyman-α line luminosity of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 is unusually high and estimated to be 0.8 × 10(12) Solar luminosities (about 3% of the total quasar luminosity). The Lyman-α emission of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 shows fast variability on timescales of days in the quasar rest frame, which has never been detected in any of the known high-redshift quasars. The high luminosity of the Lyman-α line, its narrow width and fast variability resemble properties of local Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies which suggests that the quasar is likely at the active phase of the black hole growth accreting close or even beyond the Eddington limit.

  3. Far-infrared emission in luminous quasars accompanied by nuclear outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Natasha; Jarvis, M. J.; Banerji, M.; Hewett, P. C.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Maddox, S. J.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2017-09-01

    Combining large-area optical quasar surveys with the new far-infrared (FIR) Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1, we search for an observational signature associated with the minority of quasars possessing bright FIR luminosities. We find that FIR-bright quasars show broad C IV emission-line blueshifts in excess of that expected from the optical luminosity alone, indicating particularly powerful nuclear outflows. The quasars show no signs of having redder optical colours than the general ensemble of optically selected quasars, ruling out differences in line-of-sight dust within the host galaxies. We postulate that these objects may be caught in a special evolutionary phase, with unobscured, high black hole accretion rates and correspondingly strong nuclear outflows. The high FIR emission found in these objects is then either a result of star formation related to the outflow, or is due to dust within the host galaxy illuminated by the quasar. We are thus directly witnessing coincident small-scale nuclear processes and galaxy-wide activity, commonly invoked in galaxy simulations that rely on feedback from quasars to influence galaxy evolution.

  4. Discovery of a very Lyman-α-luminous quasar at z = 6.62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koptelova, Ekaterina; Hwang, Chorng-Yuan; Yu, Po-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Ping; Guo, Jhen-Kuei

    2017-01-01

    Distant luminous quasars provide important information on the growth of the first supermassive black holes, their host galaxies and the epoch of reionization. The identification of quasars is usually performed through detection of their Lyman-α line redshifted to 0.9 microns at z > 6.5. Here, we report the discovery of a very Lyman-α luminous quasar, PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 at redshift z = 6.618, selected based on its red colour and multi-epoch detection of the Lyman-α emission in a single near-infrared band. The Lyman-α line luminosity of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 is unusually high and estimated to be 0.8 × 1012 Solar luminosities (about 3% of the total quasar luminosity). The Lyman-α emission of PSO J006.1240 + 39.2219 shows fast variability on timescales of days in the quasar rest frame, which has never been detected in any of the known high-redshift quasars. The high luminosity of the Lyman-α line, its narrow width and fast variability resemble properties of local Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies which suggests that the quasar is likely at the active phase of the black hole growth accreting close or even beyond the Eddington limit. PMID:28150701

  5. THE HIGH A{sub V} Quasar Survey: Reddened Quasi-Stellar Objects selected from optical/near-infrared photometry. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vestergaard, M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Geier, S. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Venemans, B. P. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ledoux, C. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Møller, P. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschildstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Noterdaeme, P. [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Kangas, T.; Pursimo, T.; Smirnova, O. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Apartado 474, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain); Saturni, F. G. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, 21500 Piikkiö (Finland)

    2015-03-15

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are reddened by dust either in their host galaxies or in intervening absorber galaxies are to a large degree missed by optical color selection criteria like the ones used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To overcome this bias against red QSOs, we employ a combined optical and near-infrared (near-IR) color selection. In this paper, we present a spectroscopic follow-up campaign of a sample of red candidate QSOs which were selected from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic data and SDSS/UKIDSS photometry are supplemented by mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In our sample of 159 candidates, 154 (97%) are confirmed to be QSOs. We use a statistical algorithm to identify sightlines with plausible intervening absorption systems and identify nine such cases assuming dust in the absorber similar to Large Magellanic Cloud sightlines. We find absorption systems toward 30 QSOs, 2 of which are consistent with the best-fit absorber redshift from the statistical modeling. Furthermore, we observe a broad range in SED properties of the QSOs as probed by the rest-frame 2 μm flux. We find QSOs with a strong excess as well as QSOs with a large deficit at rest-frame 2 μm relative to a QSO template. Potential solutions to these discrepancies are discussed. Overall, our study demonstrates the high efficiency of the optical/near-IR selection of red QSOs.

  6. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection

    OpenAIRE

    Pespeni, Melissa H.; Garfield, David A.; Manier, Mollie K; Palumbi, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species...

  7. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  8. Parasite neuropeptide biology: Seeding rational drug target selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Paul; Atkinson, Louise; Marks, Nikki J.; Mousley, Angela; Dalzell, Johnathan J.; Sluder, Ann; Hammerland, Lance; Maule, Aaron G.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale for identifying drug targets within helminth neuromuscular signalling systems is based on the premise that adequate nerve and muscle function is essential for many of the key behavioural determinants of helminth parasitism, including sensory perception/host location, invasion, locomotion/orientation, attachment, feeding and reproduction. This premise is validated by the tendency of current anthelmintics to act on classical neurotransmitter-gated ion channels present on helminth nerve and/or muscle, yielding therapeutic endpoints associated with paralysis and/or death. Supplementary to classical neurotransmitters, helminth nervous systems are peptide-rich and encompass associated biosynthetic and signal transduction components – putative drug targets that remain to be exploited by anthelmintic chemotherapy. At this time, no neuropeptide system-targeting lead compounds have been reported, and given that our basic knowledge of neuropeptide biology in parasitic helminths remains inadequate, the short-term prospects for such drugs remain poor. Here, we review current knowledge of neuropeptide signalling in Nematoda and Platyhelminthes, and highlight a suite of 19 protein families that yield deleterious phenotypes in helminth reverse genetics screens. We suggest that orthologues of some of these peptidergic signalling components represent appealing therapeutic targets in parasitic helminths. PMID:24533265

  9. Enhanced tumor-targeting selectivity by modulating bispecific antibody binding affinity and format valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Yang, Chunning; Hansen, Anna; Filderman, Jessica; Mulgrew, Kathy; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies are considered attractive bio-therapeutic agents owing to their ability to target two distinct disease mediators. Cross-arm avidity targeting of antigen double-positive cancer cells over single-positive normal tissue is believed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, restrict major escape mechanisms and increase tumor-targeting selectivity, leading to reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. However, the interplay of factors regulating target selectivity is not well understood and often overlooked when developing clinically relevant bispecific therapeutics. We show in vivo that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to endow selective tumor-targeting, and report the pivotal roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and format valence. Specifically, a series of monovalent and bivalent bispecific IgGs composed of the anti-HER2 trastuzumab moiety paired with affinity-modulated VH and VL regions of the anti-EGFR GA201 mAb were tested for selective targeting and eradication of double-positive human NCI-H358 non-small cell lung cancer target tumors over single-positive, non-target NCI-H358-HER2 CRISPR knock out tumors in nude mice bearing dual-flank tumor xenografts. Affinity-reduced monovalent bispecific variants, but not their bivalent bispecific counterparts, mediated a greater degree of tumor targeting selectivity, while the overall efficacy against the targeted tumor was not substantially affected. PMID:28067257

  10. A survey of luminous high-redshift quasars with SDSS and WISE II. the bright end of the quasar luminosity function at z ~ 5

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D; Bian, Fuyan; Yi, Weimin; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli; Dong, Xiaoyi; Zuo, Wenwen; Green, Richard; Jiang, Linhua; Wang, Shu; Wang, Ran; Yue, Minghao

    2016-01-01

    This is the second paper in a series on a new luminous z ~ 5 quasar survey using optical and near-infrared colors. Here we present a new determination of the bright end of the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z ~ 5. Combined our 45 new quasars with previously known quasars that satisfy our selections, we construct the largest uniform luminous z ~ 5 quasar sample to date, with 99 quasars in the range 4.7 <= z < 5.4 and -29 < M1450 <= -26.8, within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. We use a modified 1/Va method including flux limit correction to derive a binned QLF, and we model the parametric QLF using maximum likelihood estimation. With the faint-end slope of the QLF fixed as alpha = -2.03 from previous deeper samples, the best fit of our QLF gives a flatter bright end slope beta = -3.58+/-0.24 and a fainter break magnitude M*1450 = -26.98+/-0.23 than previous studies at similar redshift. Combined with previous work at lower and higher redshifts, our result is consistent with a lum...

  11. Statistical Analysis of Quasar Light Curves from Pan-STARRS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Betsy; Liu, Tingting; Gezari, Suvi

    2017-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of variable quasars in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS). PS1 MDS obtained multi-epoch images of 10 fields, each 8 square degrees in size, over 4 years, starting in May 2010. The MDS fields were observed in 5 filters (gp1, rp1, ip1, zp1, and yp1) during their season of visibility, with a typical cadence per filter of 3 days. We extracted the light curves of 670 color-selected quasars in the PS1 MDS using Point Spread Function photometry from the Image Processing Pipeline data products. From the quasar sample, we selected 104 quasars whose variability was at least 2 standard deviations higher than the non-variable reference star sample. We performed a statistical analysis of the light curves of the selected quasars in the g,r,i and z bands using a maximum likelihood method to find the best-fit Damped Random Walk parameters (sigma and tau - also incorporating the Zoghbi et al. 2013 method for uneven sampling). The resulting distributions for sigma and tau were similar to those found in previous studies of quasars.

  12. The ELG target selection with the BOSS survey

    CERN Document Server

    Escoffier, S; Ealet, A; Kneib, J -P; Zoubian, J; Lamareille, F

    2013-01-01

    The Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the power spectrum of galaxies can be used as a standard ruler to probe the accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this paper, we study several galaxy selection schemes aiming at building an emission-line galaxy (ELG) sample in the redshift range $0.6 < z < 1.7$, that would be suitable for future BAO studies using the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectrograph on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. We explore two different color selections using both the SDSS and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) photometry in the $u, g, r, i$ bands and evaluate their performance for selecting bright ELG. This study confirms the feasibility of massive ELG surveys using the BOSS spectrographs on the SDSS telescope for a BAO detection at redshift $z\\sim1$, in particular for the proposed eBOSS experiment.

  13. A Quasar-Galaxy Mixing Diagram: Quasar Spectral Energy Distribution Shapes in the Optical to Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Heng; Kelly, Brandon C; Civano, Francesca; Bongiorno, Angela; Zamorani, Gianni; Celotti, Annalisa; Ho, Luis C; Merloni, Andrea; Jahnke, Knud; Comastri, Andrea; Trump, Jonathan R; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Salvato, Mara; Brusa, Marcella; Impey, Chris D; Koekemoer, Anton M; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Vignali, Cristian; Silverman, John D; Urry, C Megan; Schawinski, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    We define the quasar-galaxy mixing diagram by the slopes of the spectral energy distribution (SED) of quasars from $1\\mu m$ to 3000 \\AA\\ and from $1\\mu m$ to 3 $\\mu m$ in the rest frame. The mixing diagram can easily distinguish among quasar-dominated, galaxy-dominated and reddening-dominated SED shapes. By studying the position of the 413 XMM selected Type 1 AGN in the wide-field "Cosmic Evolution Survey" (COSMOS) in the mixing diagram, we find that a combination of the Elvis et al. (1994, hereafter E94) quasar SED with various contributions from galaxy emission and some dust reddening is remarkably effective in describing the SED shape near $1\\mu m$ for large ranges of redshift, luminosity, black hole mass and Eddington ratio of type 1 AGN. In particular, the location in the mixing diagram of the highest luminosity AGN is very close (within 1$\\sigma$) to that expected on the basis of the E94 SED. The mixing diagram can also be used to estimate the host galaxy fraction and reddening in the SED. We also show ...

  14. The safety of ONRAB® in select non-target wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Tricia L; Vandalen, Kaci K; Duncan, Colleen; Vercauteren, Kurt

    2013-08-20

    ONRAB(®) is a recombinant human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5) with the rabies glycoprotein gene incorporated into its genome. ONRAB(®) has been used in Canada as an oral rabies vaccine in target wildlife species such as: red fox (Vulpes vulpes), raccoon (Procyon lotor), and striped skunk (Mepthis mephitis). We evaluated the safety of ONRAB(®) in non-target wildlife species likely to contact the vaccine baits during oral rabies vaccine campaigns in the United States. We investigated the effects of oral inoculation of high titer ONRAB(®), approximately ten times the dose given to target species, in wood rats (Neotoma spp.), eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana), eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo silvestri), and fox squirrels (Sciurus niger). We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on fecal swabs, oral swabs, and tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, small intestine, large intestine, and when appropriate nasal turbinates, to detect ONRAB(®) DNA from inoculated animals. By seven days post-inoculation, turkeys, opossums, and cottontails had all stopped shedding ONRAB(®) DNA. One wood rat and one fox squirrel still had detectable levels of ONRAB(®) DNA in fecal swabs 14 days post-inoculation. Real-time PCR analysis of the tissues revealed some ONRAB(®) DNA persisting in certain tissues; however, there were no significant gross or histologic lesions associated with ONRAB(®) in any of the species studied. Our results suggest that many non-target species are not likely to be impacted by the distribution of ONRAB(®) as part of oral rabies vaccination programs in the United States.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptide-PNA Conjugates Selectively Targeting Bacterial Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    change, (Good, 2000). In the case of MRSA, RNA polymerase σ⁷⁷ (encoded by gene rpoD) is a conserved prokaryotic factor essential for transcription...silencing technology to bacteria is the inefficient entry of PNAs into the targeted cell due to restrictions imposed by the bacterial membrane . Peptide...AMP and (RW)3, a linear hexameric peptide, both designed in our lab, interact with wall polymers and cause penetration of the cell membrane at sub

  16. Quasar structure from microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher Warren

    2008-02-01

    I analyze microlensing in gravitationally lensed quasars to yield measurements of the structure of their continuum emission regions. I first describe our lensed quasar monitoring program and RETROCAM, the auxiliary port camera I built for the 2.4m Hiltner telescope to monitor lensed quasars. I describe the application of our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to SDSS 0924+0219, a system with a highly anomalous optical flux ratio. For an inclination angle i, I find an optical scale radius log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] . I extrapolate the best-fitting light curves into the future to find a roughly 45% probability that the anomalous image (D) will brighten by at least an order of magnitude during the next decade. I expand our method to make simultaneous estimates of the time delays and structure of HE1104-1805 and QJ0158-4325, two doubly-imaged quasars with microlensing and intrinsic variability on comparable time scales. For HE1104- 1805 I find a time delay of D t AB = t A - t B = [Special characters omitted.] days and estimate a scale radius of log[( r s /cm)[Special characters omitted.] ] = [Special characters omitted.] at 0.2mm in the rest frame. I am unable to measure a time delay for QJ0158-4325, but the scale radius is log[( r s /cm) [Special characters omitted.] ] = 14.9 ±1 0.3 at 0.3mm in the rest frame. I then apply our Monte Carlo microlensing analysis technique to the optical light curves of 11 lensed quasar systems to show that quasar accretion disk sizes at 2500Å are related to black hole mass ( M BH ) by log( R 2500 /cm) = (15.7 ± 0.16) + (0.64± 0.18) log( M BH /10 9 [Special characters omitted.] ). This scaling is consistent with the expectation from thin disk theory (R 0( [Special characters omitted.] ), but it implies that black holes radiate with relatively low efficiency, log(e) = -1.54 ± 0.36 + log( L/L E ) where e=3D L / ( M c 2 ). These sizes are also larger, by a factor of ~ 3, than

  17. Quasar Absorption Lines and SDSS Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Emileigh Suzanne; Scott, Jennifer E.; Oldak, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the sightlines of 45 low redshift quasars (0.06 COS that lie within the footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use both the SDSS DR12 galaxy photometric data, including photometric redshifts, and the measured properties of the absorbers along with the known absorption characteristics of the intergalactic medium and the circumgalactic medium of galaxies to assign the most probable galaxy matches for each absorber in the sample, using estimated galaxy luminosities and virial radii as a discriminator. We show that the scheme can recover known galaxy-absorber matches found from spectroscopic data and thus provides a method for identifying likely pairs in photometric data sets as well as targets for spectroscopic follow up.

  18. Target selection by natural and redesigned PUF proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Douglas F; Koh, Yvonne Y; VanVeller, Brett; Raines, Ronald T; Wickens, Marvin

    2015-12-29

    Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) proteins bind RNA with sequence specificity and modularity, and have become exemplary scaffolds in the reengineering of new RNA specificities. Here, we report the in vivo RNA binding sites of wild-type (WT) and reengineered forms of the PUF protein Saccharomyces cerevisiae Puf2p across the transcriptome. Puf2p defines an ancient protein family present throughout fungi, with divergent and distinctive PUF RNA binding domains, RNA-recognition motifs (RRMs), and prion regions. We identify sites in RNA bound to Puf2p in vivo by using two forms of UV cross-linking followed by immunopurification. The protein specifically binds more than 1,000 mRNAs, which contain multiple iterations of UAAU-binding elements. Regions outside the PUF domain, including the RRM, enhance discrimination among targets. Compensatory mutants reveal that one Puf2p molecule binds one UAAU sequence, and align the protein with the RNA site. Based on this architecture, we redesign Puf2p to bind UAAG and identify the targets of this reengineered PUF in vivo. The mutant protein finds its target site in 1,800 RNAs and yields a novel RNA network with a dramatic redistribution of binding elements. The mutant protein exhibits even greater RNA specificity than wild type. The redesigned protein decreases the abundance of RNAs in its redesigned network. These results suggest that reengineering using the PUF scaffold redirects and can even enhance specificity in vivo.

  19. Selection of DNA-encoded small molecule libraries against unmodified and non-immobilized protein targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peng; Chen, Zitian; Li, Yizhou; Sun, Dawei; Gao, Yuan; Huang, Yanyi; Li, Xiaoyu

    2014-09-15

    The selection of DNA-encoded libraries against biological targets has become an important discovery method in chemical biology and drug discovery, but the requirement of modified and immobilized targets remains a significant disadvantage. With a terminal protection strategy and ligand-induced photo-crosslinking, we show that iterated selections of DNA-encoded libraries can be realized with unmodified and non-immobilized protein targets.

  20. Modeling charity donations: target selection, response time and gift size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J-J. Jonker (Jedid-Jah); R. Paap (Richard); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractCharitable organizations often consider direct mailings to raise donations. Obviously, it is important for a charity to make a profitable selection from available mailing lists, which can be its own list or a list obtained elsewhere. For this purpose, a charitable organization usually ha

  1. Dissecting patterns of preparatory activity in the frontal eye fields during pursuit target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramanujan T; Joshua, Mati

    2017-07-19

    We investigated the composition of preparatory activity of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons in monkeys performing a pursuit target selection task. In response to the orthogonal motion of a large and a small reward target, monkeys initiated pursuit biased towards the direction of large reward target motion. FEF neurons exhibited robust preparatory activity preceding movement initiation in this task. Preparatory activity consisted of two components, ramping activity that was constant across target selection conditions and a flat offset in firing rates that signaled the target selection condition. Ramping activity accounted for 50% of the variance in the preparatory activity and was linked most strongly, on a trial-by-trial basis, to pursuit eye movement latency rather than to its direction or gain. The offset in firing rates that discriminated target selection conditions accounted for 25% of the variance in the preparatory activity, and was commensurate with a winner-take-all representation signaling the direction of large reward target motion rather than a representation that matched the parameters of the upcoming movement. These offer new insights into the role the frontal eye fields play in target selection and pursuit control. They show that preparatory activity in the FEF signals more strongly when to move rather than where or how to move, and suggest that structures outside the FEF augment its contributions to the target selection process. Copyright © 2017, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  2. Decoding quasars: gravitationally redshifted spectral lines !

    CERN Document Server

    Kantharia, Nimisha G

    2016-01-01

    Further investigation of data on quasars, especially in the ultraviolet band, yields an amazingly coherent narrative which we present in this paper. Quasars are characterised by strong continuum emission and redshifted emission and absorption lines which includes the famous Lyman $\\alpha$ forest. We present irrefutable evidence in support of (1) the entire line spectrum arising in matter located inside the quasar system, (2) the range of redshifts shown by the lines being due to the variable contribution of the gravitational redshift in the observed line velocity, (3) existence of rotating black holes and of matter inside its ergosphere, (4) quasars located within cosmological redshifts $\\sim 3$, (5) $\\gamma$ ray bursts being explosive events in a quasar. These results are significant and a game-changer when we realise that the absorbing gas has been postulated to exist along the line-of-sight to the quasar and observations have accordingly been interpreted. In light of these definitive results which uniquely...

  3. The most-luminous heavily-obscured quasars have a high merger fraction: morphological study of WISE-selected hot dust-obscured galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Lulu; Fang, Guanwen; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Dandan; Jiang, Xiaoming; Wu, Qiaoqian; Yang, Jun; Li, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that WISE-selected hyperluminous, hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are powered by highly dust-obscured, possibly Compton-thick AGNs. High obscuration provides us a good chance to study the host morphology of the most luminous AGNs directly. We analyze the host morphology of 18 Hot DOGs at $z\\sim3$ using Hubble Space Telescope/WFC3 imaging. We find that Hot DOGs have a high merger fraction ($62\\pm 14 \\%$). By fitting the surface brightness profiles, we find that the distribution of S\\'ersic indices in our Hot DOG sample peaks around 2, which suggests that most of Hot DOGs have transforming morphologies. We also derive the AGN bolometric luminosity ($\\sim10^{14}L_\\odot$) of our Hot DOG sample by using IR SEDs decomposition. The derived merger fraction and AGN bolometric luminosity relation is well consistent with the variability-based model prediction (Hickox et al. 2014). Both the high merger fraction in IR-luminous AGN sample and relatively low merger fraction in UV/optical-se...

  4. In vivo Target Residence Time and Kinetic Selectivity: The Association Rate Constant as Determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2016-10-01

    It is generally accepted that, in conjunction with pharmacokinetics, the first-order rate constant of target dissociation is a major determinant of the time course and duration of in vivo target occupancy. Here we show that the second-order rate constant of target association can be equally important. On the basis of the commonly used mathematical models for drug-target binding, it is shown that a high target association rate constant can increase the (local) concentration of the drug, which decreases the rate of decline of target occupancy. The increased drug concentration can also lead to increased off-target binding and decreased selectivity. Therefore, the kinetics of both target association and dissociation need to be taken into account in the selection of drug candidates with optimal pharmacodynamic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Leveraging big data to transform target selection and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  6. Observational constraints on the structure and evolution of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brandon C.

    2008-01-01

    I use X-ray and optical data to investigate the structure of quasars, and its dependence on luminosity, redshift, black hole mass, and Eddington ratio. In order to facilitate my work, I develop new statistical methods of accounting for measurement error, non-detections, and survey selection functions. The main results of this thesis follow. (1) The statistical uncertainty in the broad line mass estimates can lead to significant artificial broadening of the observed distribution of black hole mass. (2) The z = 0.2 broad line quasar black hole mass function falls off approximately as a power law with slope ~ 2 for M BH [Special characters omitted.] 10 8 [Special characters omitted.] . (3) Radio-quiet quasars become more X-ray quiet as their optical/UV luminosity, black hole mass, or Eddington ratio increase, and more X-ray loud at higher redshift. These correlations imply that quasars emit a larger fraction of their bolometric luminosity through the accretion disk component, as compared to the corona component, as black hole mass and Eddington ratio increase. (4) The X- ray spectral slopes of radio-quiet quasars display a non-monotonic trend with Eddington ratio, where the X-ray continuum softens with increasing Eddington ratio until L/L Edd ~ 0.3, and then begins to harden. This observed non- monotonic trend may be caused by a change in the structure of the disk/corona system at L/L Edd ~ 0.3, possibly due to increased radiation pressure. (5) The characteristic time scales of quasar optical flux variations increase with increasing M BH , and are consistent with disk orbital or thermal time scales. In addition the amplitude of short time scale variability decreases with increasing M BH . I interpret quasar optical light curves as being driven by thermal fluctuations, which in turn are driven by some other underlying stochastic process with characteristic time scale long compared to the disk thermal time scale. The stochastic model I use is able to explain both short

  7. New z > 6 Quasars Discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, X.; Strauss, M. A.; Schneider, D. P.; Becker, R. H.; White, R. L.; Narayanan, V. K.; Richards, G. T.; Pentericci, L.; Grebel, E.; SDSS Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    We present the new results from a survey of i-dropout objects selected from the multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Three new objects, at z=6.4, 6.2 and 6.05, were discovered, bringing the total number of known quasars at z>5.7 to seven. We present new measurements on the evolution of the quasar number density and quasar emission line strengths based on this quasar sample, and discuss the Gunn-Peterson effect along different lines of sight and its implications on the history of cosmic reionization based on observations taken with the Apache Point 3.5-m, Keck, and Hobby-Eberly and Calar Alto 3.5m Telescopes.

  8. Epigenetic Editing : targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined D

  9. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, M.L.; Verschure, P.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined D

  10. Generic Prioritization Framework For Target Selection And Instrument Usage For Reconnaissance Mission Autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Fink, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    A generic prioritization framework is introduced for addressing the problem of automated prioritization of target selection and instrument usage, applicable to Earth and Space reconnaissance missions. The framework is based on the assumptions that clustering of preliminary data for identified targets within an operational area has occurred and that the clustering quality can be expressed as an objective function. Target prioritization then means to rank targets accordi...

  11. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-12

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors.

  12. Follicular targeting--a promising tool in selective dermatotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Annika; Mandt, Nathalie; Lademann, Juergen; Schaefer, Hans; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2005-12-01

    The penetration of topically applied compounds varies considerably in the different regions of the human body. The presence of hair follicles significantly contributes to this effect by an increase in surface area and a disruption of the epidermal barrier towards the lower parts of the hair follicle. The human hair follicle, hereby, serves not only as a reservoir, but also as a major entry point for topically applied compounds. Topical delivery of active compounds to specific targets within the skin may help reduce side-effects caused by unspecific reactions, and may help develop new strategies in the prevention and treatment of skin diseases. Various drug carrier and drug delivery systems are currently being investigated. The aim of these investigational efforts is to direct topically applied compounds to the different types of hair follicles and, ideally, to specific compartments and cell populations within the hair follicles. Follicular targeting offers opportunities for new developments, not only in hair therapy and in the treatment of hair follicle associated diseases but also in gene therapy and immunotherapy.

  13. DES J0454$-$4448: Discovery of the First Luminous z $\\ge$ 6 Quasar from the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Reed, S L; Banerji, M; Becker, G D; Gonzalez-Solares, E; Martini, P; Ostrovski, F; Rauch, M; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Levy, A; Bertin, E; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D; Rosell, A Carnero; da Costa, L N; ĎAndrea, C; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Doel, P; Cunha, C E; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Neto, A Fausti; Finley, D A; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gruen, D; Honscheid, K; James, D; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Marshall, J; Merritt, K; Miquel, R; Mohr, J; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A; Romer, K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Schubnell, M; Sevilla, I; Smith, C; Soares-Santos, M; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Walker, A; Wechsler, R H

    2015-01-01

    We present the first results of a survey for high redshift, z $\\ge$ 6, quasars using izY multi-colour photometric observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Here we report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of the $\\rm z_{AB}, Y_{AB}$ = 20.2, 20.2 (M$_{1450}$ = $-$26.5) quasar DES J0454$-$4448 with an emission line redshift of z = 6.10$\\pm$0.03 and a HI near zone size of 4.6 $\\pm$ 1.7 Mpc.The quasar was selected as an i-band drop out with i$-$z = 2.46 and z$_{AB} $ 50-100 new quasars with z $>$ 6 including 3-10 with z $>$ 7 dramatically increasing the numbers of quasars currently known that are suitable for detailed studies including determination of the neutral HI fraction of the intergalactic medium (IGM) during the epoch of Hydrogen reionization.

  14. High Redshift Quasars and Star Formation History

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Dietrich, Matthias; Hamann, Fred

    2001-01-01

    Quasars are among the most luminous objects in the universe, and they can be studied in detail up to the highest known redshift. Assuming that the gas associated with quasars is closely related to the interstellar medium of the host galaxy, quasars can be used as tracer of the star formation history in the early universe. We have observed a small sample of quasars at redshifts 3= 10, corresponding to an age of the universe of less than 5*10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7).

  15. A Catalog of Broad Absorption Line Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Trump, J R; Brinkman, J; Fan, X; Hall, P B; Kleinman, S J; Knapp, G R; Nitta, A; Reichard, T A; Richards, G T; Schneider, D P; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Anderson, Scott F.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Nitta, Atsuko; Reichard, Timothy A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Trump, Jonathan R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a total of 4784 unique broad absorption line quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release. An automated algorithm was used to match a continuum to each quasar and to identify regions of flux at least 10% below the continuum over a velocity range of at least 1000 km/s in the CIV and MgII absorption regions. The model continuum was selected as the best-fit match from a set of template quasar spectra binned in luminosity, emission line width, and redshift, with the power-law spectral index and amount of dust reddening as additional free parameters. We characterize our sample through the traditional ``balnicity'' index and a revised absorption index, as well as through parameters such as the width, outflow velocity, fractional depth and number of troughs. From a sample of 16883 quasars at 1.7 \\le z \\le 4.38, we identify 4386 (26.0%) quasars with broad CIV absorption, of which 1756 (10.4%) satisfy traditional selection criteria. From a sample of 34973 quasars at 0.5 \\le z \\le 2.15, we id...

  16. Distributions of quasar hosts on the galaxy main-sequence plane

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Rieke, George H; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-01-01

    The relation between star formation rates and stellar masses, i.e. the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically-selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected 2MASS quasars at z <= 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the star formation rates through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/m...

  17. TYPE 1 AND TYPE 2 QUASARS IN THE MID-INFRARED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Ridgway

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 or \\obscured" AGN have long been identi ed at low AGN luminosities (e.g. Seyfert 2s or through their radio luminosities (e.g. radio galaxies. But radio-quiet quasars (RQQs are many times more common than radio-loud quasars, and it's therefore unsurprising that recent searches have revealed that radio-quiet quasar 2s also form a signi cant population. Finding the numbers, properties, and redshift distribution of quasar 2s will be very important to resolving questions about the formation and co-evolution of black holes and galaxies. We have selected a sample of Type 2 and Type 1 quasars matched in their mid-infrared luminosity from the Spitzer First Look Survey by selecting on their mid-infrared dust emission properties (as measured by Spitzer IRAC photometry. This emission provides a distinctive signature of AGN activity but should not be a cted by orientation or torus opening angle. We have obtained mid-infrared IRS spectroscopy of these samples to study star formation activity in the host galaxies and the dust environments of the AGN, using measurements of the PAH features, the shape of the mid-infrared SED, and the equivalent width of the silicate features at 10 microns. We nd that the quasar 2s have more diverse mid-IR spectral properties, and that obscuration of the AGN is linked to star formation activity in the host.

  18. Targeting of phage particles towards endothelial cells by antibodies selected through a multi-parameter selection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrup, Ole A.; Lykkemark, Simon; Kristensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is sustained angiogenesis. Here, normal endothelial cells are activated, and their formation of new blood vessels leads to continued tumour growth. An improved patient condition is often observed when angiogenesis is prevented or normalized through targeting of these genomically stable endothelial cells. However, intracellular targets constitute a challenge in therapy, as the agents modulating these targets have to be delivered and internalized specifically to the endothelial cells. Selection of antibodies binding specifically to certain cell types is well established. It is nonetheless a challenge to ensure that the binding of antibodies to the target cell will mediate internalization. Previously selection of such antibodies has been performed targeting cancer cell lines; most often using either monovalent display or polyvalent display. In this article, we describe selections that isolate internalizing antibodies by sequential combining monovalent and polyvalent display using two types of helper phages, one which increases display valence and one which reduces background. One of the selected antibodies was found to mediate internalization into human endothelial cells, although our results confirms that the single stranded nature of the DNA packaged into phage particles may limit applications aimed at targeting nucleic acids in mammalian cells. PMID:28186116

  19. A Comparison of BBN, ADTree and MLP in separating Quasars from Large Survey Catalogues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xia Zhang; Yong-Heng Zhao

    2007-01-01

    We compare the performance of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN), Multilayer Perception (MLP) networks and Alternating Decision Trees (ADtree) on separating quasars from stars with the database from the 2MASS and FIRST survey catalogs. Having a training sample of sources of known object types, the classifiers are trained to separate quasars from stars. By the statistical properties of the sample, the features important for classification are selected. We compare the classification results with and without feature selection.Experiments show that the results with feature selection are better than those without feature selection. From the high accuracy found, it is concluded that these automated methods are robust and effective for classifying point sources. They may all be applied to large survey projects (e.g. selecting input catalogs) and for other astronomical issues, such as the parameter measurement of stars and the redshift estimation of galaxies and quasars.

  20. BBN, ADTree and MLP Comparison in Separating Quasars from Large Survey Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Y

    2006-01-01

    We compare the performance of Bayesian Belief Networks (BBN), Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) networks and Alternating Decision Trees (ADtree) on separating quasars from stars with the database from the 2MASS and FIRST survey catalogs. Having a training sample of sources of known object types, the classifiers are trained to separate quasars from stars. By the statistical properties of the sample, the features important for classification are selected. We compare the classification results with and without feature selection. Experiments show that the results with feature selection are better than those without feature selection. From the high accuracy, it is concluded that these automated methods are robust and effective to classify point sources, moreover they all may be applied for large survey projects (e.g. selecting input catalogs) and for other astronomical issues, such as the parameter measurement of stars and the redshift estimation of galaxies and quasars.

  1. Functional Regression for Quasar Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ciollaro, Mattia; Freeman, Peter; Genovese, Christopher; Lei, Jing; O'Connell, Ross; Wasserman, Larry

    2014-01-01

    The Lyman-alpha forest is a portion of the observed light spectrum of distant galactic nuclei which allows us to probe remote regions of the Universe that are otherwise inaccessible. The observed Lyman-alpha forest of a quasar light spectrum can be modeled as a noisy realization of a smooth curve that is affected by a `damping effect' which occurs whenever the light emitted by the quasar travels through regions of the Universe with higher matter concentration. To decode the information conveyed by the Lyman-alpha forest about the matter distribution, we must be able to separate the smooth `continuum' from the noise and the contribution of the damping effect in the quasar light spectra. To predict the continuum in the Lyman-alpha forest, we use a nonparametric functional regression model in which both the response and the predictor variable (the smooth part of the damping-free portion of the spectrum) are function-valued random variables. We demonstrate that the proposed method accurately predicts the unobserv...

  2. The Multi-Wavelength Quasar Survey Ⅳ. Quasars in the Leo Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We aim to provide a quasar sample that is more complete than any previous surveys by using a combined selection technique to reduce the selection effects. Here we present the observational results for the X-ray candidates in the field of the Leo Cluster. We found 33 X-ray AGNs in this field of which 10 are new discoveries. The X-ray data and optical spectra of these AGNs are given. We also study the near-IR properties of the X-ray-selected AGNs by using the data from 2MASS. Most of the AGNs in our sample span the color range 0.0 < B- J < 2.5, 1.0 < J-Ks < 2.0 and 0.5 < H-Ks < 1.2.

  3. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Koren

    Full Text Available MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB. Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  4. Rhodacyanine derivative selectively targets cancer cells and overcomes tamoxifen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, John; Miyata, Yoshinari; Kiray, Janine; O'Leary, John C; Nguyen, Lana; Guo, Jianping; Blair, Laura J; Li, Xiaokai; Li, Xiokai; Jinwal, Umesh K; Cheng, Jin Q; Gestwicki, Jason E; Dickey, Chad A

    2012-01-01

    MKT-077, a rhodacyanine dye, was shown to produce cancer specific cell death. However, complications prevented the use of this compound beyond clinical trials. Here we describe YM-1, a derivative of MKT-077. We found that YM-1 was more cytotoxic and localized differently than MKT-077. YM-1 demonstrated this cytotoxicity across multiple cancer cell lines. This toxicity was limited to cancer cell lines; immortalized cell models were unaffected. Brief applications of YM-1 were found to be non-toxic. Brief treatment with YM-1 restored tamoxifen sensitivity to a refractory tamoxifen-resistant MCF7 cell model. This effect is potentially due to altered estrogen receptor alpha phosphorylation, an outcome precipitated by selective reductions in Akt levels (Akt/PKB). Thus, modifications to the rhodocyanine scaffold could potentially be made to improve efficacy and pharmacokinetic properties. Moreover, the impact on tamoxifen sensitivity could be a new utility for this compound family.

  5. Visual cells remember earlier applied target: plasticity of orientation selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis Ghisovan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A canonical proposition states that, in mature brain, neurons responsive to sensory stimuli are tuned to specific properties installed shortly after birth. It is amply demonstrated that that neurons in adult visual cortex of cats are orientation-selective that is they respond with the highest firing rates to preferred oriented stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In anesthetized cats, prepared in a conventional fashion for single cell recordings, the present investigation shows that presenting a stimulus uninterruptedly at a non-preferred orientation for twelve minutes induces changes in orientation preference. Across all conditions orientation tuning curves were investigated using a trial by trial method. Contrary to what has been previously reported with shorter adaptation duration, twelve minutes of adaptation induces mostly attractive shifts, i.e. toward the adapter. After a recovery period allowing neurons to restore their original orientation tuning curves, we carried out a second adaptation which produced three major results: (1 more frequent attractive shifts, (2 an increase of their magnitude, and (3 an additional enhancement of responses at the new or acquired preferred orientation. Additionally, we also show that the direction of shifts depends on the duration of the adaptation: shorter adaptation in most cases produces repulsive shifts, whereas adaptation exceeding nine minutes results in attractive shifts, in the same unit. Consequently, shifts in preferred orientation depend on the duration of adaptation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The supplementary response improvements indicate that neurons in area 17 keep a memory trace of the previous stimulus properties, thereby upgrading cellular performance. It also highlights the dynamic nature of basic neuronal properties in adult cortex since repeated adaptations modified both the orientation tuning selectivity and the response strength to the preferred orientation. These

  6. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  7. Some Results on the Target Set Selection Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, Chun-Ying; Li, Bo-Jr; Wu, Jiaojiao; Yeh, Hong-Gwa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a fundamental problem in the area of viral marketing, called T{\\scriptsize ARGET} S{\\scriptsize ET} S{\\scriptsize ELECTION} problem. We study the problem when the underlying graph is a block-cactus graph, a chordal graph or a Hamming graph. We show that if $G$ is a block-cactus graph, then the T{\\scriptsize ARGET} S{\\scriptsize ET} S{\\scriptsize ELECTION} problem can be solved in linear time, which generalizes Chen's result \\cite{chen2009} for trees, and the time complexity is much better than the algorithm in \\cite{treewidth} (for bounded treewidth graphs) when restricted to block-cactus graphs. We show that if the underlying graph $G$ is a chordal graph with thresholds $\\theta(v)\\leq 2$ for each vertex $v$ in $G$, then the problem can be solved in linear time. For a Hamming graph $G$ having thresholds $\\theta(v)=2$ for each vertex $v$ of $G$, we precisely determine an optimal target set $S$ for $(G,\\theta)$. These results partially answer an open problem raised by Dreyer and Robert...

  8. Exploitation of Intra-Spectral Band Correlation for Rapid Feature Selection, and Target Identification in Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    entitled “Improved Feature Extraction, Feature Selection, and Identification Techniques that Create a Fast Unsupervised Hyperspectral Target Detection...thesis proposal “Improved Feature Extraction, Feature Selection, and Identification Techniques that Create a Fast Unsupervised Hyperspectral Target...target or non-target classifications . Integration of this type of autonomous target detection algorithm along with hyperspectral imaging sensors

  9. Insights into the molecular basis of a bispecific antibody's target selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Hansen, Anna; Yang, Chunning; Chowdhury, Partha S; Wang, Jihong; Stephens, Geoffrey; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies constitute a valuable class of therapeutics owing to their ability to bind 2 distinct targets. Dual targeting is thought to enhance biological efficacy, limit escape mechanisms, and increase target selectivity via a strong avidity effect mediated by concurrent binding to both antigens on the surface of the same cell. However, factors that regulate the extent of target selectivity are not well understood. We show that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to promote efficient target selectivity, and report the substantial roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and valence. More particularly, various monovalent bispecific IgGs composed of an anti-CD70 moiety paired with variants of the anti-CD4 mAb ibalizumab were tested for preferential binding and selective depletion of CD4(+)/CD70(+) T cells over cells expressing only one of the target antigens that resulted from antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Variants exhibiting reduced CD4 affinity showed a greater degree of target selectivity, while the overall efficacy of the bispecific molecule was not affected.

  10. Four quasars above redshift 6 discovered by the Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Willott, Chris J; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Albert, Loic; Reyle, Celine; Hill, Gary J; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Vinten, Phillip; Crampton, David; Hutchings, John B; Schade, David; Simard, Luc; Sawicki, Marcin; Beelen, Alexandre; Cox, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The Canada-France High-z Quasar Survey (CFHQS) is an optical survey designed to locate quasars during the epoch of reionization. In this paper we present the discovery of the first four CFHQS quasars at redshift greater than 6, including the most distant known quasar, CFHQS J2329-0301 at z=6.43. We describe the observational method used to identify the quasars and present optical, infrared, and millimeter photometry and optical and near-infrared spectroscopy. We investigate the dust properties of these quasars finding an unusual dust extinction curve for one quasar and a high far-infrared luminosity due to dust emission for another. The mean millimeter continuum flux for CFHQS quasars is substantially lower than that for SDSS quasars at the same redshift, likely due to a correlation with quasar UV luminosity. For two quasars with sufficiently high signal-to-noise optical spectra, we use the spectra to investigate the ionization state of hydrogen at z>5. For CFHQS J1509-1749 at z=6.12, we find significant evol...

  11. Chemical tools selectively target components of the PKA system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drewianka Stephan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the eukaryotic cell the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA is a key enzyme in signal transduction and represents the main target of the second messenger cAMP. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterisation of specifically tailored cAMP analogs which can be utilised as a tool for affinity enrichment and purification as well as for proteomics based analyses of cAMP binding proteins. Results Two sets of chemical binders were developed based on the phosphorothioate derivatives of cAMP, Sp-cAMPS and Rp-cAMPS acting as cAMP-agonists and -antagonists, respectively. These compounds were tested via direct surface plasmon resonance (SPR analyses for their binding properties to PKA R-subunits and holoenzyme. Furthermore, these analogs were used in an affinity purification approach to analyse their binding and elution properties for the enrichment and improvement of cAMP binding proteins exemplified by the PKA R-subunits. As determined by SPR, all tested Sp-analogs provide valuable tools for affinity chromatography. However, Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS displayed (i superior enrichment properties while maintaining low unspecific binding to other proteins in crude cell lysates, (ii allowing mild elution conditions and (iii providing the capability to efficiently purify all four isoforms of active PKA R-subunit in milligram quantities within 8 h. In a chemical proteomics approach both sets of binders, Rp- and Sp-cAMPS derivatives, can be employed. Whereas Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS preferentially binds free R-subunit, Rp-AHDAA-cAMPS, displaying antagonist properties, not only binds to the free PKA R-subunits but also to the intact PKA holoenzyme both from recombinant and endogenous sources. Conclusion In summary, all tested cAMP analogs were useful for their respective application as an affinity reagent which can enhance purification of cAMP binding proteins. Sp-8-AEA-cAMPS was considered the most efficient analog since Sp-8-AHA-cAMPS and Sp-2-AHA

  12. Computing visual target distinctness through selective filtering, statistical features, and visual patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fdez-Vidal, X.R.; Toet, A.; Garcia, J.A.; Fdez-Valdivia, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents three computational visual distinctness measures, computed from image representational models based on selective filtering, statistical features, and visual patterns, respectively. They are applied to quantify the visual distinctness of targets in complex natural scenes. The

  13. A Survey of z>5.8 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. I. Discovery of Three New Quasars and the Spatial Density of Luminous Quasars at z~6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaohui; Narayanan, Vijay K.; Lupton, Robert H.; Strauss, Michael A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Pentericci, Laura; Leggett, S. K.; Haiman, Zoltán; Gunn, James E.; Ivezić, Željko; Schneider, Donald P.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brinkmann, J.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Csabai, István; Doi, Mamoru; Fukugita, Masataka; Geballe, Tom; Grebel, Eva K.; Harbeck, Daniel; Hennessy, Gregory; Lamb, Don Q.; Miknaitis, Gajus; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert; Okamura, Sadanori; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Prada, Francisco; Richards, Gordon T.; Szalay, Alex; York, Donald G.

    2001-12-01

    We present the results from a survey of i-dropout objects selected from ~1550 deg2 of multicolor imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to search for luminous quasars at z>~5.8. Objects with i*-z*>2.2 and z*0.90. The ARC 3.5 m spectrum of SDSSp J103027.10+052455.0 shows that over a range of ~300 Å immediately blueward of the Lyα emission, the average transmitted flux is only 0.003+/-0.020 times that of the continuum level, consistent with zero flux over a ~300 Å range of the Lyα forest region and suggesting a tentative detection of the complete Gunn-Peterson trough. The existence of strong metal lines in the quasar spectra suggests early metal enrichment in the quasar environment. The three new objects, together with the previously published z=5.8 quasar SDSSp J104433.04-012502.2, form a complete color-selected flux-limited sample at z>~5.8. We estimate the selection function of this sample, taking into account the estimated variations in the quasar spectral energy distribution, as well as observational photometric errors. We find that at z=6, the comoving density of luminous quasars at M1450Australian Research Council (Australia), CNPq (Brazil), and CONICET (Argentina) on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation; on observations obtained at the German-Spanish Astronomical Centre, Calar Alto Observatory, operated by the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg, jointly with the Spanish National Commission for Astronomy; and on observations obtained at UKIRT, which is operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the UK Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council.

  14. Chandra Observations of 12 Luminous Red Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrutia, T; Lacy, M; Gregg, M D; Becker, R H

    2005-03-11

    The authors present results of a study of 12 dust-reddened quasars with 0.4 < z < 2.65 and reddenings in the range 0.15 < E(B-V) < 1.7. They obtained ACIS-S X-ray spectra of these quasars, estimated the column densities towards them, and hence obtained the gas:dust ratios in the material obscuring the quasar. They detect all but one of the red quasars in the X-rays. Even though there is no obvious correlation between the X-ray determined column densities of the sources and their optical color or reddening, all of the sources show absorbed X-ray spectra. When they correct the luminosity for absorption, they can be placed among luminous quasars; therefore their objects belong to the group of high luminosity analogues of the sources contributing to the X-ray background seen in deep X-ray observations. Such sources are also found in serendipitous shallow X-ray surveys. There is a hint that the mean spectral slope of the red quasar is higher than that of normal, unobscured quasars, which could be an indication for higher accretion rates and/or an evolutionary effect. They investigate the number density of these sources compared to type 2 AGN based on the X-ray background and estimate how many moderate luminosity red quasars may be found in deep X-ray fields.

  15. New Quasar Surveys with WIRO: Data and Calibration for Studies of Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyke, Bradley; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William; Lee, Daniel; Haze Nunez, Evan; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of quasar variability offer the potential for understanding the physics of accretion processes around supermassive black holes. However, generating structure functions in order to characterize quasar variability can be observationally taxing as it requires imaging of quasars over a large variety of date ranges. To begin to address this problem, we have conducted an imaging survey of sections of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO). We used standard stars to calculate zero-point offsets between WIRO and SDSS observations in the urgiz magnitude system. After finding the zero-point offset, we accounted for further offsets by comparing standard star magnitudes in each WIRO frame to coadded magnitudes from Stripe 82 and applying a linear correction. Known (i.e. spectroscopically confirmed) quasars at the epoch we conducted WIRO observations (Summer, 2016) and at every epoch in SDSS Stripe 82 (~80 total dates) were hence calibrated to a similar magnitude system. The algorithm for this calibration compared 1500 randomly selected standard stars with an MJD within 0.07 of the MJD of each quasar of interest, for each of the five ugriz filters. Ultimately ~1000 known quasars in Stripe 82 were identified by WIRO and their SDSS-WIRO magnitudes were calibrated to a similar scale in order to generate ensemble structure functions.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1560461.

  16. No overdensity of Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies around a quasar at z~5.7

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucchelli, C; Decarli, R; Farina, E P; Venemans, B P; Walter, F; Overzier, R

    2016-01-01

    Bright quasars, observed when the Universe was less than one billion years old (z>5.5), are known to host massive black holes (~10$^{9}$ M$_{\\odot}$), and are thought to reside in the center of massive dark matter overdensities. In this picture, overdensities of galaxies are expected around high redshift quasars. However, observations based on the detection of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) around these quasars do not offer a clear picture: this may be due to the uncertain redshift constraints of LBGs, which are selected through broad-band filters only. To circumvent such uncertainties, we here perform a search for Lyman Alpha Emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the field of the quasar PSO J215.1512-16.0417 at z~5.73, through narrow band, deep imaging with FORS2 at the VLT. We study an area of 37 arcmin$^{2}$, i.e. ~206 comoving Mpc$^{2}$ at the redshift of the quasar. We find no evidence for an overdensity of LAEs in the quasar field with respect to blank field studies. Possible explanations for these findings include ...

  17. Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet BAL Quasars: A Detailed Ultraviolet Comparison

    CERN Document Server

    Rochais, Thomas B; Myers, Adam D; Brotherton, Michael S; Runnoe, Jessie C; Hall, Shannon W

    2014-01-01

    Studies of radio-loud (RL) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars indicate that popular orientation-based BAL models fail to account for all observations. Are these results extendable to radio-quiet (RQ) BAL quasars? Comparisons of RL and RQ BAL quasars show that many of their properties are quite similar. Here we extend these analyses to the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectral properties, using a sample of 73 RL and 473 RQ BAL quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each RQ quasar is individually matched to a RL quasar in both redshift (over the range $1.5 < z < 3.5$) and continuum luminosity. We compare several continuum, emission line, and absorption line properties, as well as physical properties derived from these measurements. Most properties in the samples are statistically identical, though we find slight differences in the velocity structure of the BALs that cause apparent differences in CIV emission line properties. Differences in the velocities may indicate an interaction bet...

  18. BROAD ABSORPTION LINE DISAPPEARANCE ON MULTI-YEAR TIMESCALES IN A LARGE QUASAR SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hall, P. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 (Canada); Anderson, S. F.; Gibson, R. R. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lundgren, B. F. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Myers, A. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Petitjean, P. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, Universite Paris 6, F-75014, Paris (France); Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 92420 (United States); Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); York, D. G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bizyaev, D.; Brinkmann, J.; Malanushenko, E.; Oravetz, D. J.; Pan, K.; Simmons, A. E. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Weaver, B. A., E-mail: nfilizak@astro.psu.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We present 21 examples of C IV broad absorption line (BAL) trough disappearance in 19 quasars selected from systematic multi-epoch observations of 582 bright BAL quasars (1.9 < z < 4.5) by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II (SDSS-I/II) and SDSS-III. The observations span 1.1-3.9 yr rest-frame timescales, longer than have been sampled in many previous BAL variability studies. On these timescales, Almost-Equal-To 2.3% of C IV BAL troughs disappear and Almost-Equal-To 3.3% of BAL quasars show a disappearing trough. These observed frequencies suggest that many C IV BAL absorbers spend on average at most a century along our line of sight to their quasar. Ten of the 19 BAL quasars showing C IV BAL disappearance have apparently transformed from BAL to non-BAL quasars; these are the first reported examples of such transformations. The BAL troughs that disappear tend to be those with small-to-moderate equivalent widths, relatively shallow depths, and high outflow velocities. Other non-disappearing C IV BALs in those nine objects having multiple troughs tend to weaken when one of them disappears, indicating a connection between the disappearing and non-disappearing troughs, even for velocity separations as large as 10,000-15,000 km s{sup -1}. We discuss possible origins of this connection including disk-wind rotation and changes in shielding gas.

  19. On the Correlation between Radio Properties and Black Hole Mass of Quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Guang Zhang; Ting-Gui Wang; You-Jun Lu

    2003-01-01

    The question whether the radio properties of quasars are related tothe mass of the central black hole or the accretion rate is important for our un-derstanding of the formation of relativistic jets, but no consensus has been reachedfrom statistical analyses. Using two large quasar samples, one radio-selected, oneoptical-selected, we re-examined these relations and find that previous differencesbetween radio- and optical- selected samples can be ascribed, at least partly, to theeffect of the narrow line component. All previous claimed correlations are muchweaker, if exist at all.

  20. Auditory Stream Segregation Improves Infants' Selective Attention to Target Tones Amid Distracters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas A.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of auditory stream segregation in the selective attention to target tones in infancy. Using a task adapted from Bregman and Rudnicky's 1975 study and implemented in a conditioned head-turn procedure, infant and adult listeners had to discriminate the temporal order of 2,200 and 2,400 Hz target tones presented alone,…

  1. Targeting MED1 LxxLL Motifs for Tissue-Selective Treatment of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    of a distinct band. Finally, we found that running a high percentage of agarose gel (3%) with high amount ethidium bromide provided relatively good...desired target, oligos that bind the non-desired target are often removed from the pool of aptamers through a process called “negative selection,” which

  2. The Neutrino Ball Model of a Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Manka, R; Karczewska, D

    1993-01-01

    It is suggested that the nonorthodox model of a quasar as a neutrino ball described in terms of the standard model extended by adding right-handed neutrinos and the Majorana scalar field can be presented in order to explain a quasar as a body of weak interacting neutrinos. Neutrino interaction with the scalar Majorana field violates the lepton number and produces the mass splitting of the neutrino due to the sea-saw mechanism. In this model a quasar is an object which appears in the result of the first order cosmological phase transition. In this interpretation a quasar may be regarded as a ball filled with Dirac neutrinos and can be treated as a remnant of phase transition with unbroken global lepton symmetry. In this paper we study the macroscopic parameters of such a configuration. In the result the mass-radius curve M(R) for the quasar is obtained.

  3. A Systematic Search for Changing-Look Quasars in SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    MacLeod, Chelsea L; Lawrence, Andy; Goad, Mike; Horne, Keith; Burgett, William; Chambers, Ken C; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Wainscoat, Richard; Waters, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic search for changing-look quasars based on repeat photometry from SDSS and Pan-STARRS1, along with repeat spectra from SDSS and SDSS-III BOSS. Objects with large, $|\\Delta g|>1$~mag photometric variations in their light curves are selected as candidates to look for changes in broad emission line (BEL) features. Out of a sample of 1011 objects that satisfy our selection criteria and have more than one epoch of spectroscopy, we find 10 examples of quasars that have variable and/or "changing-look'' BEL features. Four of our objects have emerging BELs; five have disappearing BELs, and one object shows tentative evidence for having both emerging and disappearing BELs. With redshifts in the range 0.2012% of luminous quasars that vary by |\\Delta g|>1 mag display changing-look BEL features on rest-frame timescales of 8 to 10 years. We discuss the possibilities for the origin of such BEL changes, such as a change in obscuration or in the central engine.

  4. A systematic search for changing-look quasars in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Lawrence, Andy; Goad, Mike; Horne, Keith; Burgett, William; Chambers, Ken C.; Flewelling, Heather; Hodapp, Klaus; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugene; Wainscoat, Richard; Waters, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic search for changing-look quasars based on repeat photometry from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Pan-STARRS1, along with repeat spectra from SDSS and SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Objects with large, |Δg| > 1 mag photometric variations in their light curves are selected as candidates to look for changes in broad emission line (BEL) features. Out of a sample of 1011 objects that satisfy our selection criteria and have more than one epoch of spectroscopy, we find 10 examples of quasars that have variable and/or `changing-look' BEL features. Four of our objects have emerging BELs, five have disappearing BELs, and one object shows tentative evidence for having both emerging and disappearing BELs. With redshifts in the range 0.20 15 per cent of strongly variable luminous quasars display changing-look BEL features on rest-frame time-scales of 8 to 10 yr. Plausible time-scales for variable dust extinction are factors of 2-10 too long to explain the dimming and brightening in these sources, and simple dust reddening models cannot reproduce the BEL changes. On the other hand, an advancement such as disc reprocessing is needed if the observed variations are due to accretion rate changes.

  5. The z~4 Quasar Luminosity Function: Implications for supermassive black hole growth, reionization, and future time domain surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSayyad, Yusra; Connolly, Andrew J.; McGreer, Ian D.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Fan, Xiaohui; LSST Data Management

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift (z > 4) quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying objects, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We develop these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 +60; -1.26 +1.26) known as Stripe 82, we extracted 40 million new lightcurves using the LSST data management software and selected a statistical sample of z~4 quasars based on colors and variability metrics. We confirmed these using a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity M*1450 = -26.7 from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z~4.

  6. Cell-SELEX-based selection of aptamers that recognize distinct targets on metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-Ming; Bing, Tao; Wei, Jia-Yi; Chen, Zhe-Zhou; Shangguan, Di-Hua; Fang, Jin

    2014-08-01

    The development of diagnostic/therapeutic strategies against metastasis-related molecular targets is critical for improving the survival rate of cancer patients. Subtractive Cell-SELEX was performed using highly metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) LoVo cells and non-metastatic HCT-8 cells as the target and negative cells, respectively, for the selection of metastatic-specific aptamers. This process generated seven aptamers that displayed highly specific binding to the target cells with Kds in the nanomolar range. Based on the distinct chemical/biological properties of their individual cell surface targets, the aptamers were separately functionalized: the receptor-targeting aptamer W14 was used as a carrier for doxorubicin, resulting in the specific delivery of the drug to the target cells and a significant reduction of its cytotoxicity to non-target cells, and the non-receptor-binding aptamer W3 was used as a molecular probe conjugated to quantum dots for the targeted imaging of metastatic cancer cell lines, spontaneous lung metastasis murine tissue, and metastatic CRC patient tissues. In addition, these aptamers can be used in combination due to their lack of detectable mutual-binding interference. The study demonstrates that a panel of aptamers that recognize distinct features of target molecules can be obtained through single Cell-SELEX selection, and the selected aptamers may be individually functionalized for specific applications and/or utilized in combination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Herschel observed Stripe 82 quasars and their host galaxies: connections between the AGN activity and the host galaxy star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Xiaoyi

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of $10^{46.4}$ erg s$^{-1}$. The redshift range of this sample is within $z<4$, with a mean value of $1.5\\pm0.78$. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, FIR luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 $M_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ and the mean gas mass is $\\sim 10^{11.3}$ $M_{\\odot}$. All these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Comparing with star format...

  8. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, So-Hyun

    2016-07-19

    Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images or infrared (IR) images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT) and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter) and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter) into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC)-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic database generated

  9. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR images or infrared (IR images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic

  10. The z=0.0912 and z=0.2212 damped Ly alpha galaxies along the sight line toward the quasar OI 363

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnshek, DA; Rao, S; Nestor, D; Lane, W; Monier, E; Bergeron, J; Smette, A

    2001-01-01

    New optical and infrared observations along the sight line toward the quasar OI 363 (0738+313) are presented and discussed. Excluding quasars selectively observed because they were known to be located behind gas-rich galaxies and systems which lack confirming UV spectroscopic observations of the

  11. Influence of target concentration and background binding on in vitro selection of affinity reagents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid-based aptamers possess many useful features that make them a promising alternative to antibodies and other affinity reagents, including well-established chemical synthesis, reversible folding, thermal stability and low cost. However, the selection process typically used to generate aptamers (SELEX often requires significant resources and can fail to yield aptamers with sufficient affinity and specificity. A number of seminal theoretical models and numerical simulations have been reported in the literature offering insights into experimental factors that govern the effectiveness of the selection process. Though useful, these previous models have not considered the full spectrum of experimental factors or the potential impact of tuning these parameters at each round over the course of a multi-round selection process. We have developed an improved mathematical model to address this important question, and report that both target concentration and the degree of non-specific background binding are critical determinants of SELEX efficiency. Although smaller target concentrations should theoretically offer superior selection outcome, we show that the level of background binding dramatically affect the target concentration that will yield maximum enrichment at each round of selection. Thus, our model enables experimentalists to determine appropriate target concentrations as a means for protocol optimization. Finally, we perform a comparative analysis of two different selection methods over multiple rounds of selection, and show that methods with inherently lower background binding offer dramatic advantages in selection efficiency.

  12. Determination of More Realistic Target 95% Values of Post Selection Delay in Modern Telephone Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Matić

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the telephone network and the recommendations, dealing with the greatest target values of Post Selection Delay. It is shown that the Post Selection Delay is the sum of the delays between the network nodes and that it has the smaller dispersion than the one, recommended as the greatest in the recommendations.

  13. Evidence for the alignment of quasar radio polarizations with large quasar group axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelgrims, V.; Hutsemékers, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been presented for the polarization vectors from quasars to preferentially align with the axes of the large quasar groups (LQG) to which they belong. This report was based on observations made at optical wavelengths for two LQGs at redshift ~1.3. The correlation suggests that the spin axes of quasars preferentially align with their surrounding large-scale structure that is assumed to be traced by the LQGs. Here, we consider a large sample of LQGs built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalogue in the redshift range 1.0-1.8. For quasars embedded in this sample, we collected radio polarization measurements with the goal to study possible correlations between quasar polarization vectors and the major axis of their host LQGs. Assuming the radio polarization vector is perpendicular to the quasar spin axis, we found that the quasar spin axis is preferentially parallel to the LQG major axis inside LQGs that have at least 20 members. This result independently supports the observations at optical wavelengths. We additionally found that when the richness of an LQG decreases, the quasar spin axis becomes preferentially perpendicular to the LQG major axis and that no correlation is detected for quasar groups with fewer than 10 members.

  14. Tracing dark energy with quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Średzińska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Kurcz, A; Marziani, P; Pollo, A; Pych, W; Udalski, A

    2016-01-01

    The nature of dark energy, driving the accelerated expansion of the Universe, is one of the most important issues in modern astrophysics. In order to understand this phenomenon, we need precise astrophysical probes of the universal expansion spanning wide redshift ranges. Quasars have recently emerged as such a probe, thanks to their high intrinsic luminosities and, most importantly, our ability to measure their luminosity distances independently of redshifts. Here we report our ongoing work on observational reverberation mapping using the time delay of the Mg II line, performed with the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  15. Pro and cons of targeted selective treatment against digestive-tract strongyles of ruminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabaret J.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of resistance to anthelmintics among gastrointestinal nematodes and the desire for lower input agriculture have promoted the idea that targeted selective treatment (treating the animals in need of such a treatment and only them could be a sustainable solution for controlling internal parasites of ruminants. The pros are the slowing of resistance prevalence, lower residues of anthelmintics in meat and milk, and lower cost; the cons are the difficulty and time spent on selecting animals in need of treatment and the possibility of lower production. Using actual experiments and modelling we show that targeted selective treatment can be used to sustainably control gastrointestinal nematode infections in flock.

  16. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  17. A general double library SELEX strategy for aptamer selection using unmodified nonimmobilized targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Hyun; Zeng, Huaqiang

    2017-08-01

    Aptamer discovery for unmodified nonimmobilized targets has been constantly presenting itself as a significant challenge to the research community. We demonstrate here a novel double library (DL) SELEX strategy and its usefulness and generality toward discovering both ssDNA- and RNA-based aptamers with nanomolar binding affinities toward unmodified targets of both small (e.g., doxycycline) and large (e.g., VEGF165) sizes. The same selection strategy further allows for concurrent selection of an aptamer pair, recognizing discrete epitopes on the same protein, from the same selection cycles for the sandwich aptamer pair-based biosensor development (e.g., one aptamer for the recognition and the other for the signal transduction). These results establish the DL-SELEX method developed here as a valuable and highly accessible selection strategy for aptamer discovery, especially when chemical modifications of target molecules are not preferred or simply impossible.

  18. Determination of target detection limits in hyperspectral data using band selection and dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, W.; Boehler, J.; Twizer, K.; Kedem, B.; Lenz, A.; Kneubuehler, M.; Wellig, P.; Oechslin, R.; Schilling, H.; Rotman, S.; Middelmann, W.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used for civil and military applications to robustly detect and classify target objects. High spectral resolution of hyperspectral data can compensate for the comparatively low spatial resolution, which allows for detection and classification of small targets, even below image resolution. Hyperspectral data sets are prone to considerable spectral redundancy, affecting and limiting data processing and algorithm performance. As a consequence, data reduction strategies become increasingly important, especially in view of near-real-time data analysis. The goal of this paper is to analyze different strategies for hyperspectral band selection algorithms and their effect on subpixel classification for different target and background materials. Airborne hyperspectral data is used in combination with linear target simulation procedures to create a representative amount of target-to-background ratios for evaluation of detection limits. Data from two different airborne hyperspectral sensors, AISA Eagle and Hawk, are used to evaluate transferability of band selection when using different sensors. The same target objects were recorded to compare the calculated detection limits. To determine subpixel classification results, pure pixels from the target materials are extracted and used to simulate mixed pixels with selected background materials. Target signatures are linearly combined with different background materials in varying ratios. The commonly used classification algorithms Adaptive Coherence Estimator (ACE) is used to compare the detection limit for the original data with several band selection and data reduction strategies. The evaluation of the classification results is done by assuming a fixed false alarm ratio and calculating the mean target-to-background ratio of correctly detected pixels. The results allow drawing conclusions about specific band combinations for certain target and background combinations. Additionally

  19. HST images of FeLoBAL quasars: Testing quasar-galaxy evolution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Hanna; Hamann, Fred; Villforth, Carolin; Caselli, Paola; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from an HST imaging study of FeLoBAL quasars, which have extremely low-ionization Broad Absorption Line (BAL) outflows and might be a young quasar population based on their red colors, large far-IR luminosities (suggesting high star formation rates), and powerful outflows. Some models of quasar - host galaxy evolution propose a triggering event, such as a merger, to fuel both a burst of star formation and the quasar/AGN activity. These models suggest young quasars are initially obscured inside the dusty starburst until a "blowout" phase, driven by the starburst or quasar outflows like FeLoBALs, ends the star formation and reveals the visibly luminous quasar. Despite the popularity of this evolution scheme, there is little observational evidence to support the role of mergers in triggering AGN or the youth of dust-reddened quasars (such as FeLoBALs) compared to normal blue quasars.Our Cycle 22 HST program is designed to test the youth of FeLoBAL quasars and the connection of FeLoBALs to mergers. We obtain WFC3/IR F160W images of 10 FeLoBAL quasars at redshift z~0.9 (covering ~8500A in the quasar rest frame). We will compare the host galaxy morphologies and merger signatures of FeLoBALs with normal blue quasars (which are older according to the evolution model) and non-AGN galaxies matched in redshift and stellar mass. If FeLoBAL quasars are indeed in a young evolutionary state, close in time to the initial merging event, they should have stronger merger features compared to blue quasars and non-AGN galaxies. Preliminary results suggest that this is not the case - FeLoBAL quasars appear to reside in faint, compact hosts with weak or absent merger signatures. We discuss the implications of these results for galaxy evolution models and other studies of dust-reddened quasar populations.

  20. Quasar bolometric corrections: theoretical considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Nemmen, Rodrigo S

    2010-01-01

    Bolometric corrections based on the optical-to-ultraviolet continuum spectrum of quasars are widely used to quantify their radiative output, although such estimates are affected by a myriad of uncertainties, such as the generally unknown line-of-sight angle to the central engine. In order to shed light on these issues, we investigate the state-of-the-art models of Hubeny et al. that describe the continuum spectrum of thin accretion discs and include relativistic effects. We explore the bolometric corrections as a function of mass accretion rates, black hole masses and viewing angles, restricted to the parameter space expected for type-1 quasars. We find that a nonlinear relationship log L_bol=A + B log(lambda L_lambda) with B<=0.9 is favoured by the models and becomes tighter as the wavelength decreases. We calculate from the model the bolometric corrections corresponding to the wavelengths lambda = 1450A, 3000A and 5100A. In particular, for lambda=3000A we find A=9.24 +- 0.77 and B=0.81 +- 0.02. We demons...

  1. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  2. Quasar Proximity Zones and Patchy Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Lidz, A; Zaldarriaga, M; Hernquist, L; Dutta, S; Lidz, Adam; Quinn, Matthew Mc; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Hernquist, Lars; Dutta, Suvendra

    2007-01-01

    Lyman-alpha forest absorption spectra towards quasars at z ~ 6 show regions of enhanced transmission close to their source. Several authors have argued that the apparently small sizes of these regions indicate that quasar ionization fronts at z >~ 6 expand into a largely or partly neutral intergalactic medium (IGM). Assuming that the typical region in the IGM is reionized by z <= 6, as is suggested by Ly-a forest observations, we argue that at {\\em least} 50% of the volume of the IGM was reionized before the highest redshift quasars turned on. Further, even if the IGM is as much as 50% neutral at quasar turn-on, the quasars are likely born into large galaxy-generated HII regions. The HII regions during reionization are themselves clustered, and using radiative transfer simulations, we find that long skewers through the IGM towards quasar progenitor halos pass entirely through ionized bubbles, even when the IGM is half neutral. These effects have been neglected in most previous analyses of quasar proximity ...

  3. Orientation effects on spectral emission features of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Bisogni, Susanna; Risaliti, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of the orientation effects in SDSS quasar composite spectra. In a previous work we have shown that the equivalent width EW of the [OIII] {\\lambda}5008{\\AA} line is a reliable indicator of the inclination of the accretion disk. Here, we have selected a sample of ~15,000 quasars from the SDSS 7th Data Release and divided it in sub-samples with different values of EW([OIII]). We find inclination effects both on broad and narrow quasars emission lines, among which an increasing broadening from low to high EW for the broad lines and a decreasing importance of the blue component for the narrow lines. These effects are naturally explained with a variation of source inclination from nearly face-on to edge-on, confirming the goodness of EW([OIII]) as an orientation indicator. Moreover, we suggest that orientation effects could explain, at least partially, the origin of the anticorrelation between [OIII] and FeII intensities, i.e. the well known Eigenvector 1.

  4. Orientation effects on spectral emission features of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisogni, Susanna; Marconi, Alessandro; Risaliti, Guido

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the orientation effects in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasar composite spectra. In a previous work, we have shown that the equivalent width (EW) of the [O III] λ5007 Å (vacuum rest wavelength 5008.24 Å) line is a reliable indicator of the inclination of the accretion disc. Here, we have selected a sample of ˜12 000 quasars from the SDSS 7th Data Release and divided it in subsamples with different values of EW_{[{O {III}]}}. We find inclination effects both on broad and narrow quasars emission lines, among which an increasing broadening from low to high EW for the broad lines and a decreasing importance of the blue component for the narrow lines. These effects are naturally explained with a variation of source inclination from nearly face-on to edge-on, confirming the goodness of EW_{[{O {III}]}} as an orientation indicator. Moreover, we suggest that orientation effects could explain, at least partially, the origin of the anticorrelation between [O III] and Fe II intensities, i.e. the well-known eigenvector 1.

  5. Transgenic gene knock-outs: functional genomics and therapeutic target selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S; Foord, S M

    2000-11-01

    The completion of the first draft of the human genome presents both a tremendous opportunity and enormous challenge to the pharmaceutical industry since the whole community, with few exceptions, will soon have access to the same pool of candidate gene sequences from which to select future therapeutic targets. The commercial imperative to select and pursue therapeutically relevant genes from within the overall content of the genome will be particularly intense for those gene families that currently represent the chemically tractable or 'drugable' gene targets. As a consequence the emphasis within exploratory research has shifted towards the evaluation and adoption of technology platforms that can add additional value to the gene selection process, either through functional studies or direct/indirect measures of disease alignment e.g., genetics, differential gene expression, proteomics, tissue distribution, comparative species data etc. The selection of biological targets for the development of potential new medicines relies, in part, on the quality of the in vivo biological data that correlates a particular molecular target with the underlying pathophysiology of a disease. Within the pharmaceutical industry, studies employing transgenic animals and, in particular, animals with specific gene deletions are playing an increasingly important role in the therapeutic target gene selection, drug candidate selection and product development phases of the overall drug discovery process. The potential of phenotypic information from gene knock-outs to contribute to a high-throughput target selection/validation strategy has hitherto been limited by the resources required to rapidly generate and characterise a large number of knock-out transgenics in a timely fashion. The offerings of several companies that provide an opportunity to overcome these hurdles, albeit at a cost, are assessed with respect to the strategic business needs of the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. First discoveries of z~6 quasars with the Kilo Degree Survey and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy survey

    CERN Document Server

    Venemans, B P; Mwebaze, J; Valentijn, E A; Bañados, E; Decarli, R; de Jong, J T A; Findlay, J R; Kuijken, K H; La Barbera, F; McFarland, J P; McMahon, R G; Napolitano, N; Sikkema, G; Sutherland, W J

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of our first year of quasar search in the on-going ESO public Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) and VISTA Kilo-Degree Infrared Galaxy (VIKING) surveys. These surveys go up to 2 magnitudes fainter than other wide-field imaging surveys that uncovered predominantly very luminous quasars at z~6. This allows us to probe a more common, fainter population of z~6 quasars. From this first set of combined survey catalogues covering ~250 deg^2 we selected point sources down to Z_AB=22 that had a very red i-Z (i-Z>2.2) colour. After follow-up imaging and spectroscopy, we discovered four new quasars in the redshift range 5.8quasars fainter than M^*, which at z=6 has been estimated to be between M^*=-25.1 and M^*=-27.6. The discovery of 4 quasars in 250 deg^2 of survey data is consistent with predictions based on the z~6 quasar luminosity function. We discuss variou...

  7. Blue outliers among intermediate redshift quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, P; Stirpe, G M; Dultzin, D; Del Olmo, A; Martínez-Carballo, M A

    2015-01-01

    [Oiii]{\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 "blue outliers" -- that are suggestive of outflows in the narrow line region of quasars -- appear to be much more common at intermediate z (high luminosity) than at low z. About 40% of quasars in a Hamburg ESO intermediate-z sample of 52 sources qualify as blue outliers (i.e., quasars with [OIII] {\\lambda}{\\lambda}4959,5007 lines showing large systematic blueshifts with respect to rest frame). We discuss major findings on what has become an intriguing field in active galactic nuclei research and stress the relevance of blue outliers to feedback and host galaxy evolution.

  8. Moderate resolution spectrophotometry of high redshift quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    A uniform set of photometry and high signal-to-noise moderate resolution spectroscopy of 33 quasars with redshifts larger than 3.1 is presented. The sample consists of 17 newly discovered quasars (two with redshifts in excess of 4.4) and 16 sources drawn from the literature. The objects in this sample have r magnitudes between 17.4 and 21.4; their luminosities range from -28.8 to -24.9. Three of the 33 objects are broad absorption line quasars. A number of possible high redshift damped Ly-alpha systems were found.

  9. Merging Galaxies Create a Binary Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Astronomers have found the first clear evidence of a binary quasar within a pair of actively merging galaxies. Quasars are the extremely bright centers of galaxies surrounding super-massive black holes, and binary quasars are pairs of quasars bound together by gravity. Binary quasars, like other quasars, are thought to be the product of galaxy mergers. Until now, however, binary quasars have not been seen in galaxies that are unambiguously in the act of merging. But images of a new binary quasar from the Carnegie Institution's Magellan telescope in Chile show two distinct galaxies with "tails" produced by tidal forces from their mutual gravitational attraction. "This is really the first case in which you see two separate galaxies, both with quasars, that are clearly interacting," says Carnegie astronomer John Mulchaey who made observations crucial to understanding the galaxy merger. Most, if not all, large galaxies, such as our galaxy the Milky Way, host super-massive black holes at their centers. Because galaxies regularly interact and merge, astronomers have assumed that binary super-massive black holes have been common in the Universe, especially during its early history. Black holes can only be detected as quasars when they are actively accreting matter, a process that releases vast amounts of energy. A leading theory is that galaxy mergers trigger accretion, creating quasars in both galaxies. Because most such mergers would have happened in the distant past, binary quasars and their associated galaxies are very far away and therefore difficult for most telescopes to resolve. The binary quasar, labeled SDSS J1254+0846, was initially detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a large scale astronomical survey of galaxies and over 120,000 quasars. Further observations by Paul Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and colleagues* using NASA's Chandra's X-ray Observatory and telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona and Palomar

  10. Quasars Probing Quasars IV: Joint Constraints on the Circumgalactic Medium from Absorption and Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Hennawi, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick HI gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly-a emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly-a scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive slit-spectroscopic search (1-sigma limits of SB_Lya ~= 3e-18 erg/s/cm^2/arcsec^2) for diffuse Ly-a emission in the environments of the foreground quasars is conducted. We fail to detect large-scale ~ 100 kpc Ly-a emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, w...

  11. A quasar companion to the puzzling quasar SDSS J0927+2943

    OpenAIRE

    Decarli, R.; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Barattini, M

    2010-01-01

    We report the discovery of a quasar close to SDSS J0927+2943 (z = 0.713), which is a massive binary / recoiling black hole candidate. The companion quasar is at a projected distance of 125 h_70^{-1} kpc and exhibits a radial velocity difference of ~1400 km/s with respect to the known quasar. We discuss the nature of this peculiar quasar pair and the properties of its environment. We propose that the overall system is caught in the process of ongoing structure formation.

  12. 搜寻高红移类星体%The search for high-redshift quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    左文文; 吴学兵

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, an international team consisting of mainly Chinese astronomers an-nounced the discovery of the most luminous quasar in the early Universe, powered by the most massive black hole known at the time. The discovery of this quasar, named SDSS J0100+2802, set a new record in the discovery of high redshift quasars with 2-meter telescopes, and sheds light just like a lighthouse to help us know more about the early Universe. Moreover, it presents sub-stantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes in the early Universe. This article will discuss the following topics:(1) the historical discovery of quasars;(2) the nature of quasars and parameters to describe them;(3) the scientific motivation to study quasars;(4) the ways to select quasars, especially high redshift quasars;(5) how we discovered the quasar SDSS J0100+2802;(6) a perspective of future research on high redshift quasars.%2015年,以中国天文学家为主的国际研究团队宣布发现了目前已知的宇宙早期发光本领最强、中心黑洞质量最大的类星体.这颗类星体SDSS J0100+2802如同一座最明亮的灯塔照亮了人类探索神秘的早期宇宙的道路,它的发现刷新了人类使用2米级望远镜发现高红移类星体的纪录,更对宇宙早期黑洞的成长理论提出了新的挑战.文章将着重介绍:(1)类星体的发现;(2)类星体的本质以及描述其物理性质的参数;(3)研究类星体的重大科学意义;(4)类星体尤其是高红移类星体的搜寻方法;(5)最亮的高红移类星体的发现历程;(6)对今后高红移类星体研究的展望.

  13. VLBI Detections of Parsec-Scale Nonthermal Jets in Radio-Loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Doi, Akihiro; Kono, Yusuke; Oyama, Tomoaki; Fujisawa, Kenta; Takaba, Hiroshi; Sudou, Hiroshi; Wakamatsu, Ken-ichi; Yamauchi, Aya; Murata, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Nanako; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Nagayama, Takumi; Nakai, Naomasa; Sorai, Kazuo; Kawai, Eiji; Sekido, Mamoru; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Asano, Shoichiro; Uose, Hisao

    2009-01-01

    We conducted radio detection observations at 8.4 GHz for 22 radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Third Data Release, by a very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique. The VLBI instrument we used was developed by the Optically ConnecTed Array for VLBI Exploration project (OCTAVE), which is operated as a subarray of the Japanese VLBI Network (JVN). We aimed at selecting BAL quasars with nonthermal jets suitable for measuring their orientation angles and ages by subsequent detailed VLBI imaging studies to evaluate two controversial issues of whether BAL quasars are viewed nearly edge-on, and of whether BAL quasars are in a short-lived evolutionary phase of quasar population. We detected 20 out of 22 sources using the OCTAVE baselines, implying brightness temperatures greater than 10^5 K, which presumably come from nonthermal jets. Hence, BAL outflows and nonthermal jets can be generated simultaneously in these central engines. We also found four...

  14. The 2QDES Pilot : The luminosity and redshift dependence of quasar clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Chehade, Ben; Findlay, J; Metcalfe, N; Sawangwit, U; Irwin, M; González-Solares, E; Fine, S; Drinkwater, M J; Croom, S; Jurek, R J; Parkinson, D; Bielby, R

    2016-01-01

    We present a new redshift survey, the 2dF Quasar Dark Energy Survey pilot (2QDESp), which consists of ${\\approx}10000$ quasars from ${\\approx}150$ deg$^2$ of the southern sky, based on VST-ATLAS imaging and 2dF/AAOmega spectroscopy. Combining our optical photometry with the WISE (W1,W2) bands we can select essentially contamination free quasar samples with $0.8{<}z{<}2.5$ and $g{<}20.5$. At fainter magnitudes, optical UVX selection is still required to reach our $g{\\approx}22.5$ limit. Using both these techniques we observed quasar redshifts at sky densities up to $90$ deg$^{-2}$. By comparing 2QDESp with other surveys (SDSS, 2QZ and 2SLAQ) we find that quasar clustering is approximately luminosity independent, with results for all four surveys consistent with a correlation scale of $r_{0}{=}6.1{\\pm}0.1 \\: h^{-1}$Mpc, despite their decade range in luminosity. We find a significant redshift dependence of clustering, particularly when BOSS data with $r_{0}{=}7.3{\\pm}0.1 \\: h^{-1}$Mpc are included at $z...

  15. A Quasar Catalog with Simultaneous UV, Optical and X-ray Observations by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jian; Grupe, Dirk; Koch, Scott; Gelbord, Jonathan; Schneider, Donald P; Gronwall, Caryl; Wesolowski, Sarah; Porterfield, Blair L

    2012-01-01

    We have compiled a catalog of optically-selected quasars with simultaneous observations in UV/optical and X-ray bands by the Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer. Objects in this catalog are identified by matching the Swift pointings with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog. The final catalog contains 843 objects, among which 637 have both UVOT and XRT observations and 354 of which are detected by both instruments. The overall X-ray detection rate is ~60% which rises to ~85% among sources with at least 10 ks of XRT exposure time. We construct the time-averaged spectral energy distribution for each of the 354 quasars using UVOT photometric measurements and XRT spectra. From model fits to these SEDs, we find that the big blue bump contributes about 0.3 dex to the quasar luminosity. We re-visit the alpha_ox-L_uv relation by selecting a clean sample with only type 1 radio-quiet quasars; the dispersion of this relation is reduced by at least 15% compared to studies that use non-simultaneous UV/opt...

  16. Comparison of the cancer gene targeting and biochemical selectivities of all targeted kinase inhibitors approved for clinical use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost C M Uitdehaag

    Full Text Available The anti-proliferative activities of all twenty-five targeted kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical use were measured in two large assay panels: (1 a panel of proliferation assays of forty-four human cancer cell lines from diverse tumour tissue origins; and (2 a panel of more than 300 kinase enzyme activity assays. This study provides a head-on comparison of all kinase inhibitor drugs in use (status Nov. 2013, and for six of these drugs, the first kinome profiling data in the public domain. Correlation of drug activities with cancer gene mutations revealed novel drug sensitivity markers, suggesting that cancers dependent on mutant CTNNB1 will respond to trametinib and other MEK inhibitors, and cancers dependent on SMAD4 to small molecule EGFR inhibitor drugs. Comparison of cellular targeting efficacies reveals the most targeted inhibitors for EGFR, ABL1 and BRAF(V600E-driven cell growth, and demonstrates that the best targeted agents combine high biochemical potency with good selectivity. For ABL1 inhibitors, we computationally deduce optimized kinase profiles for use in a next generation of drugs. Our study shows the power of combining biochemical and cellular profiling data in the evaluation of kinase inhibitor drug action.

  17. Contextual control over selective attention: evidence from a two-target method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLellan, Ellen; Shore, David I; Milliken, Bruce

    2015-07-01

    Selective attention is generally studied with conflict tasks, using response time as the dependent measure. Here, we study the impact of selective attention to a first target, T1, presented simultaneously with a distractor, on the accuracy of subsequent encoding of a second target item, T2. This procedure produces an "attentional blink" (AB) effect much like that reported in other studies, and allowed us to study the influence of context on cognitive control with a novel method. In particular, we examined whether preparation to attend selectively to T1 had an impact on the selective encoding of T1 that would translate to report of T2. Preparation to attend selectively was manipulated by varying whether difficult selective attention T1 trials were presented in the context of other difficult selective attention T1 trials. The results revealed strong context effects of this nature, with smaller AB effects when difficult selective attention T1 trials were embedded in a context with many, rather than few, other difficult selective attention T1 trials. Further, the results suggest that both the trial-to-trial local context and the block-wide global context modulate performance in this task.

  18. Subaru high-$z$ exploration of low-luminosity quasars (SHELLQs). I. Discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Niida, Mana; Toba, Yoshiki; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Atsushi J; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Silverman, John D; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Utsumi, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 15 quasars and bright galaxies at $5.7 < z < 6.9$. This is the initial result from the Subaru High-$z$ Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs) project, which exploits the exquisite multi-band imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Strategic Program survey. The candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm to reject stars and dwarfs. The spectroscopic identification was carried out with the Gran Telescopio Canarias and the Subaru Telescope for the first 80 deg$^2$ of the survey footprint. The success rate of our photometric selection is quite high, approaching 100 % at the brighter magnitudes ($z_{\\rm AB} < 23.5$ mag). Our selection also recovered all the known high-$z$ quasars on the HSC images. Among the 15 discovered objects, six are likely quasars, while the other six with interstellar absorption lines and in some cases narrow emission lines are likely bright Lyman-br...

  19. Target selection of classical pulsating variables for space-based photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachy, E.; Molnar, L.; Szabo, R.; Kolenberg, K.; Banyai, E.

    2016-05-01

    In a few years the Kepler and TESS missions will provide ultra- precise photometry for thousands of RR Lyrae and hundreds of Cepheid stars. In the extended Kepler mission all targets are proposed in the Guest Observer (GO) Program, while the TESS space telescope will work with full frame images and a ~15-16th mag brightness limit with the possibility of short cadence measurements for a limited number of pre-selected objects. This paper highlights some details of the enormous and important work of the target selection process made by the members of Working Group 7 (WG#7) of the Kepler and TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortium.

  20. Target selection of classical pulsating variables for space-based photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Plachy, E; Szabó, R; Kolenberg, K; Bányai, E

    2016-01-01

    In a few years the Kepler and TESS missions will provide ultra-precise photometry for thousands of RR Lyrae and hundreds of Cepheid stars. In the extended Kepler mission all targets are proposed in the Guest Observer (GO) Program, while the TESS space telescope will work with full frame images and a ~15-16th mag brightness limit with the possibility of short cadence measurements for a limited number of pre-selected objects. This paper highlights some details of the enormous and important work of the target selection process made by the members of Working Group 7 (WG#7) of the Kepler and TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortium.

  1. A glimpse at quasar host galaxy far-UV emission using damped Lyα's as natural coronagraphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian, E-mail: caize@arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Finley, Hayley; Petitjean, Patrick [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Carithers, Bill [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bian, Fuyan [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, Weston Creek, ACT, 2611 (Australia); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona (Spain); Pâris, Isabelle [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zakamska, Nadia L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ge, Jian [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. We have stacked the spectra of ∼2000 DLA systems (N {sub H} {sub I} > 10{sup 20.6} cm{sup –2}) with a median absorption redshift (z) = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift (z) = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ((L) = 2.5 × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} Å{sup –1}; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  2. A multi-wavelength survey of obscured and reddened quasars at the peak of galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandroff, Rachael

    2017-01-01

    While in the nearby universe the unification model seems firmly established, we are now seeing hints that at the peak of quasar activity and black hole growth (z~2.5) both obscured and reddened quasars may represent not just a specific quasar orientation but instead a unique stage of quasar evolution. Our group has developed several observational techniques to identify obscured and highly reddened quasars at z~2.5 using a combination of the SDSS spectroscopy and WISE photometry. Our sample contains objects with some of the most extreme ionized gas velocities observed (> 5000 km/s), indicating wind speeds too large to be contained by the galaxy potential though they are radio quiet. I will present both our sample selection and initial results from multi-wavelength follow-up of this sample using near-infrared spectroscopy, Keck spectropolarimentry and the VLA to test the AGN unification model and search for evidence of galaxy-wide quasar winds. High levels of polarized light (reaching ~20% of the total continuum emission in some cases) and changes in the polarization fraction and position angle across emission lines may argue for the presence of dusty outflows in our objects. This is supported by evidence from stacking analysis in the radio that presents a correlation between the observed outflow speeds in ionized gas (as measured by [OIII]) and the radio luminosity—arguing for a wind origin for the radio emission in these objects as well. The most extreme of these objects may thus represent the “blowout phase” of AGN evolution that proceeds or accompanies the cessation of star formation in the host galaxy due to the effects of radiatively-driven quasar driven winds.

  3. Extreme star formation events in quasar hosts over 0.5 < z < 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, L. K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Feltre, A.; Farrah, D.; Clarke, C.; Harris, K. A.; Hurley, P.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Wang, L.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the relationship between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation in a sample of 513 optically luminous type 1 quasars up to redshifts of ˜4 hosting extremely high star formation rates (SFRs). The quasars are selected to be individually detected by the Herschel SPIRE instrument at >3σ at 250 μm, leading to typical SFRs of order of 1000 M⊙ yr-1. We find the average SFRs to increase by almost a factor 10 from z ˜ 0.5 to z ˜ 3, mirroring the rise in the comoving SFR density over the same epoch. However, we find that the SFRs remain approximately constant with increasing accretion luminosity for accretion luminosities above 1012 L⊙. We also find that the SFRs do not correlate with black hole mass. Both of these results are most plausibly explained by the existence of a self-regulation process by the starburst at high SFRs, which controls SFRs on time-scales comparable to or shorter than the AGN or starburst duty cycles. We additionally find that SFRs do not depend on Eddington ratio at any redshift, consistent with no relation between SFR and black hole growth rate per unit black hole mass. Finally, we find that high-ionization broad absorption line (HiBAL) quasars have indistinguishable far-infrared properties to those of classical quasars, consistent with HiBAL quasars being normal quasars observed along a particular line of sight, with the outflows in HiBAL quasars not having any measurable effect on the star formation in their hosts.

  4. Constraining the cosmic evolution of supermassive black holes with statistical quasar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yue

    One of the fundamental questions in cosmology is how galaxies with different physical properties form and evolve across cosmic time. Supermassive black holes (SMBHs), believed to reside in the center of almost every massive galaxy, not only tell part of the story of galaxy formation, but may also influence the formation and evolution of the galaxy during their coevolution, as inferred from several correlations between the black hole mass and bulge properties observed in the local universe. Facilitated by modern dedicated surveys in different wavelength bands, the study of SMBHs has now entered an era of statistical investigations. In this thesis I study the statistical properties of optically-selected quasars, the luminous counterparts of SMBHs, across a wide redshift range (0.5 [Special characters omitted.] z [Special characters omitted.] 5), using large spectroscopic samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The first two chapters deal with the spatial clustering properties of quasars, with focuses on the high redshift (z [Special characters omitted.] 3) population (chapter 1), and on the dependence of clustering on physical properties of quasars such as luminosity, color, etc. (chapter 2). These clustering analyses, which become available only very recently, provide valuable information about the occupations of quasars within dark matter halos, and have important implications for the growth and evolution of SMBHs within the standard hierarchical structure formation paradigm. The third chapter presents black hole mass estimates and Eddington ratios of quasars measured from their optical spectra, based on the virial black hole mass estimators. Some comparisons between different virial estimators and potential biases are also discussed in chapter 3. In the final chapter, I present a simple, observationally motivated framework for the cosmic growth and evolution of SMBHs. Adopting the merger hypothesis of quasar triggering mechanism and halo merger rate from

  5. Population mixtures and searches of lensed and extended quasars across photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso

    2017-04-01

    Wide-field photometric surveys enable searches of rare yet interesting objects, such as strongly lensed quasars or quasars with a bright host galaxy. Past searches for lensed quasars based on their optical and near-infrared properties have relied on photometric cuts and spectroscopic preselection (as in the Sloan Quasar Lens Search), or neural networks applied to photometric samples. These methods rely on cuts in morphology and colours, with the risk of losing many interesting objects due to scatter in their population properties, restrictive training sets, systematic uncertainties in catalogue-based magnitudes and survey-to-survey photometric variations. Here, we explore the performance of a Gaussian mixture model to separate point-like quasars, quasars with an extended host and strongly lensed quasars using griz psf and model magnitudes and WISE W1, W2. The choice of optical magnitudes is due to their presence in all current and upcoming releases of wide-field surveys, whereas UV information is not always available. We then assess the contamination from blue galaxies and the role of additional features such as W3 magnitudes or psf-model terms as morphological information. As a demonstration, we conduct a search in a random 10 per cent of the SDSS footprint, and provide the catalogue of the 43 SDSS object with the highest 'lens' score in our selection that survive visual inspection, and are spectroscopically confirmed to host active nuclei. We inspect archival data and find images of 5/43 objects in the Hubble Legacy Archive, including two known lenses. The code and materials are available to facilitate follow-up.

  6. Topical liposome targeting of dyes, melanins, genes, and proteins selectively to hair follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, R M

    1998-01-01

    For therapeutic and cosmetic modification of hair, we have developed a hair-follicle-selective macromolecule and small molecule targeting system with topical application of phosphatidylcholine-based liposomes. Liposome-entrapped melanins, proteins, genes, and small-molecules have been selectively targeted to the hair follicle and hair shafts of mice. Liposomal delivery of these molecules is time dependent. Negligible amounts of delivered molecules enter the dermis, epidermis, or bloodstream thereby demonstrating selective follicle delivery. Naked molecules are trapped in the stratum corneum and are unable to enter the follicle. The potential of the hair-follicle liposome delivery system for therapeutic use for hair disease as well as for cosmesis has been demonstrated in 3-dimensional histoculture of hair-growing skin and mouse in vivo models. Topical liposome selective delivery to hair follicles has demonstrated the ability to color hair with melanin, the delivery of the active lac-Z gene to hair matrix cells and delivery of proteins as well. Liposome-targeting of molecules to hair follicles has also been achieved in human scalp in histoculture. Liposomes thus have high potential in selective hair follicle targeting of large and small molecules, including genes, opening the field of gene therapy and other molecular therapy of the hair process to restore hair growth, physiologically restore or alter hair pigment, and to prevent or accelerate hair loss.

  7. Directly imaging damped Ly-alpha galaxies at z>2. II: Imaging and spectroscopic observations of 32 quasar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fumagalli, Michele; Prochaska, J Xavier; Kanekar, Nissim; Wolfe, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Damped Ly-alpha absorbers (DLAs) are a well-studied class of absorption line systems, and yet the properties of their host galaxies remain largely unknown. To investigate the origin of these systems, we have conducted an imaging survey of 32 quasar fields with intervening DLAs between z~1.9-3.8, leveraging a technique that allows us to image galaxies at any small angular separation from the background quasars. In this paper, we present the properties of the targeted DLA sample, new imaging observations of the quasar fields, and the analysis of new and archival spectra of the background quasars. In a companion paper we use these data to obtain an unbiased census of the DLA host galaxy population(s) and to directly measure the in-situ star formation rates of gas-rich galaxies at z>2.

  8. Quasars as tracers of cosmic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Modzelewska, J; Bilicki, M; Hryniewicz, K; Krupa, M; Petrogalli, F; Pych, W; Kurcz, A; Udalski, A

    2014-01-01

    Quasars, as the most luminous persistent sources in the Universe, have broad applications for cosmological studies. In particular, they can be employed to directly measure the expansion history of the Universe, similarly to SNe Ia. The advantage of quasars is that they are numerous, cover a broad range of redshifts, up to $z = 7$, and do not show significant evolution of metallicity with redshift. The idea is based on the relation between the time delay of an emission line and the continuum, and the absolute monochromatic luminosity of a quasar. For intermediate redshift quasars, the suitable line is Mg II. Between December 2012 and March 2014, we performed five spectroscopic observations of the QSO CTS C30.10 ($z = 0.900$) using the South African Large Telesope (SALT), supplemented with photometric monitoring, with the aim of determining the variability of the line shape, changes in the total line intensity and in the continuum. We show that the method is very promising.

  9. Local Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies and Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Veilleux, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent results from a comprehensive investigation of the most luminous mergers in the local universe, the ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and the quasars. First, the frequency of occurrence and importance of black hole driven nuclear activity in ULIRGs are discussed using the latest sets of optical, near-infrared, mid-infrared, and X-ray spectra on these objects. Obvious trends with luminosity, infrared color, and morphology are pointed out. Next, the host galaxy properties of ULIRGs are described in detail and then compared with local quasar hosts and inactive spheroids. By and large, these data are consistent with the scenario where ULIRGs are intermediate-mass elliptical galaxies in formation and in the process of becoming moderate-luminosity optical quasars. The powerful galactic winds detected in many ULIRGs may help shed any excess gas during this transformation. However, this evolutionary scenario does not seem to apply to all ULIRGs and quasars: Ultraluminous infrared m...

  10. Quasars as probes of cosmological reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mortlock, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Quasars are the most luminous non-transient sources in the epoch of cosmological reionization (i.e., which ended a billion years after the Big Bang, corresponding to a redshift of z ~ 5), and are powerful probes of the inter-galactic medium at that time. This review covers current efforts to identify high-redshift quasars and how they have been used to constrain the reionization history. This includes a full description of the various processes by which neutral hydrogen atoms can absorb/scatter ultraviolet photons, and which lead to the Gunn-Peterson effect, dark gap and dark pixel analyses, quasar near zones and damping wing absorption. Finally, the future prospects for using quasars as probes of reionization are described.

  11. Quasars as Extreme Case of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nasiri, S

    1999-01-01

    We introduce a phenomenological investigation of the evolution and large scale distribution of quasars using a modified version of the Field and Colgate gravitational contraction model for proto-galaxies. By studying the distribution of about 7000 quasars in 5 luminosity classes, it seems that, such a model is capable of solving the energy problem and discussing some of the observational properties of these objects. A sketch of luminosity function of the quasars and the normal galaxies shows a unified aspect for these objects. The large scale distribution of the quasars in the galactic coordinate shows the existence of filamentary structures and voids in the same sence that have been resolved by exploring the clusters of galaxies.

  12. Extremely Variable Quasars from CRTS and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    I will present deep dives on a few examples of highly variable quasars identified from the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS) and WISE/NEOWISE. In particular, I will focus on a CRTS-identified iron low-ionization broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar which, over the past decade, has transformed into a more typical BAL quasar (Stern et al. 2017) and a WISE-identified quasar that has shut off in the past decade (Stern et al., in prep.). I will focus on what we learn about the physics of these systems from the multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopy. Given the pace of discovery, additional interesting examples are expected to be discovered before the conference.

  13. Evaluating gaze-based interface tools to facilitate point-and-select tasks with small targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsgaard, Henrik; Mateo, Julio C.; Hansen, John Paulin

    2011-01-01

    Gaze interaction affords hands-free control of computers. Pointing to and selecting small targets using gaze alone is difficult because of the limited accuracy of gaze pointing. This is the first experimental comparison of gaze-based interface tools for small-target (e.g. ... when using zoom, but total pointing times were shorter using zoom. Furthermore, participants perceived magnification as more fatiguing than zoom. The higher accuracy of magnification makes it preferable when interacting with small targets. Our findings may guide the development of interface tools...

  14. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  15. Numerical simulations of quasar absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Theuns, T

    2005-01-01

    The physical state of the intergalactic medium can be probed in great detail with the intervening absorption systems seen in quasar spectra. The properties of the Hydrogen absorbers depend on many cosmological parameters, such as the matter-power spectrum, reionisation history, ionising background and the nature of the dark matter. The spectra also contain metal lines, which can be used to constrain the star formation history and the feedback processes acting in large and small galaxies. Simulations have been instrumental in investigating to what extent these parameters can be unambiguously constrained with current and future data. This paper is meant as an introduction to this subject, and reviews techniques and methods for simulating the intergalactic medium.

  16. Selective attention modulates the effect of target location probability on redundant signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Yun; Little, Daniel R; Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the decision process underlying the detection of targets at multiple locations. In three experiments using the same observers, target location probability and attentional instructions were manipulated. A redundant-target detection task was conducted in which participants were required to detect a dot presented at one of two locations. When the dot appeared at the two locations with equal frequency (Experiment 1), those participants who were found to have limited to unlimited capacity were shown to adopt a parallel, self-terminating strategy. By contrast, those participants who had supercapacity were shown to process redundant targets in a coactive manner. When targets were presented with unequal probability, two participants adopted a parallel, self-terminating strategy regardless of whether they were informed the target location probability (Experiment 3) or not (Experiment 2). For the remaining two participants, the strategy changed from parallel, self-terminating to serial, self-terminating as a result of the probability instructions. In Experiments 2 and 3, all the participants were of unlimited to limited capacity. Taken together, these results suggest that target location probability differently affects the selection of a decision strategy and highlight the role of controlled attention in selecting a decision strategy.

  17. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly{alpha} emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly{alpha} scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1{sigma} surface-brightness limits of SB{sub Ly{alpha}}{approx_equal}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}) for diffuse Ly{alpha} emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale {approx}100 kpc Ly{alpha} emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R {approx}< 50 kpc extended Ly{alpha} nebulosities are detected in 34% of our sample, which are likely the high-redshift analogs of the extended emission-line regions (EELRs) commonly observed around low-redshift (z < 0.5) quasars. This may be fluorescent recombination radiation from a population of very dense clouds with a low covering fraction illuminated by the quasar. We also detect a compact high rest-frame equivalent width (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 50 A) Ly{alpha}-emitter with luminosity L{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.1 {+-} 0.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence

  18. Expanding space, quasars and St. Augustine's fireworks

    CERN Document Server

    Chashchina, O I

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  19. Dust in the Quasar Wind (Artist Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Dusty grains -- including tiny specks of the minerals found in the gemstones peridot, sapphires and rubies -- can be seen blowing in the winds of a quasar, or active black hole, in this artist's concept. The quasar is at the center of a distant galaxy. Astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that such quasar winds might have forged these dusty particles in the very early universe. The findings are another clue in an ongoing cosmic mystery: where did all the dust in our young universe come from? Dust is crucial for efficient star formation as it allows the giant clouds where stars are born to cool quickly and collapse into new stars. Once a star has formed, dust is also needed to make planets and living creatures. Dust has been seen as far back as when the universe was less than a tenth of its current age, but how did it get there? Most dust in our current epoch forms in the winds of evolved stars that did not exist when the universe was young. Theorists had predicted that winds from quasars growing in the centers of distant galaxies might be a source of this dust. While the environment close to a quasar is too hot for large molecules like dust grains to survive, dust has been found in the cooler, outer regions. Astronomers now have evidence that dust is created in these outer winds. Using Spitzer's infrared spectrograph instrument, scientists found a wealth of dust grains in a quasar called PG2112+059 located at the center of a galaxy 8 billion light-years away. The grains - including corundum (sapphires and rubies); forsterite (peridot); and periclase (naturally occurring in marble) - are not typically found in galaxies without quasars, suggesting they might have been freshly formed in the quasar's winds.

  20. Expanding Space, Quasars and St. Augustine's Fireworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chashchina, Olga; Silagadze, Zurab

    2015-10-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  1. Unveiling hidden black holes in the cosmic web: Dark matter halos of WISE quasars from Planck CMB lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, Ryan

    The WISE and Planck surveys have now produced groundbreaking data sets which, in concert, can be exploited to obtain revolutionary constraints on the evolution of structure in the Universe. One particularly powerful application of WISE has been to uncover millions of the previously "hidden" obscured quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes that are shrouded in gas and dust and so are not detectable using traditional ground-based optical and near-IR techniques. Recently, Planck has produced the most precise all-sky map to date of dark matter structures via the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose to combine these data sets to obtain a uniquely powerful measurement of the link between rapidly growing black holes and their host dark matter structures, by cross-correlating the density field of WISE-selected quasars with the CMB lensing convergence maps obtained from Planck. This proposal will build on our current ADAP program (NNX12AE38G), which studies the host dark matter halos of WISE-selected quasars via spatial clustering. NNX12AE38G involves a detailed characterization of the redshifts, luminosities, and spectral energy distributions of WISE-selected quasars and uses new techniques to measure how quasars cluster around themselves. NNX12AE38G has contributed to more than 10 journal articles and 5 conference proceedings. Building on our current work, an even more complete understanding of the link between black holes and their host dark matter structures is possible if we employ an independent method for measuring the clustering bias (and thus characteristic halo mass) of the quasar population. This has recently become possible using CMB lensing maps. In the past two years, our team has conducted an initial analysis covering 2500 square degrees using WISE-selected quasars and lensing maps from the South Pole Telescope (Geach, Hickox, Myers et al., 2013), and have implemented this technique with Planck over part of the SDSS region

  2. The Hunt for Red Quasars: Luminous Obscured Black Hole Growth Unveiled in the Stripe 82 X-Ray Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Glikman, Eilat; Brusa, Marcella; Rigby, Jane R.; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Stern, Daniel; Lira, Paulina; Urry, C. Megan; Salvato, Mara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allevato, Viola; Cardamone, Carolin; Civano, Francesca; Coppi, Paolo; Farrah, Duncan; Komossa, S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Marchesi, Stefano; Richards, Gordon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Treister, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    We present results of a ground-based near-infrared campaign with Palomar TripleSpec, Keck NIRSPEC, and Gemini GNIRS to target two samples of reddened active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates from the 31 deg2 Stripe 82 X-ray survey. One sample, which is ∼89% complete to K 4, Vega). The fainter sample (K> 17, Vega) represents a pilot program to follow-up four sources from a parent sample of 34 that are not detected in the single-epoch SDSS catalog and have WISE quasar colors. All 12 sources are broad-line AGNs (at least one permitted emission line has an FWHM exceeding 1300 km s‑1) and span a redshift range 0.59 0.5), and a greater percentage have high X-ray luminosities ({L}{{X},{full}}> {10}44 erg s‑1). Such outflows and high luminosities may be consistent with the paradigm that reddened broad-line AGNs represent a transitory phase in AGN evolution as described by the major merger model for black hole growth. Results from our pilot program demonstrate proof of concept that our selection technique is successful in discovering reddened quasars at z> 1 missed by optical surveys.

  3. The environment of low redshift quasar pairs

    CERN Document Server

    Sandrinelli, Angela; Treves, Aldo; Farina, Emanuele Paolo; Uslenghi, Michela

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the galaxy environment of a sample of 14 low redshift (z $<$ 0.85) quasar physical pairs extracted from SDSS DR10 archives. The pairs have a systemic radial velocity difference $\\Delta V_\\parallel \\leqslant$ 600 $km \\ s^{-1}$ (based on [OIII]5007 \\AA \\ line) and projected distance $ R_\\bot \\leqslant$ 600 kpc. The physical association of the pairs is statistically confirmed at a level of $\\sim$ 90 %. For most of the images of these quasars we are able to resolve their host galaxies that turn out to be on average similar to those of quasars not in pairs. We also found that quasars in a pair are on average in region of modest galaxy overdensity extending up 0.5 Mpc from the QSO. This galaxy overdensity is indistinguishable from that of a homogeneous sample of isolated quasars at the same redshift and with similar host galaxy luminosity. These results, albeit derived from a small (but homogeneous) sample of objects, suggest that the rare activation of two quasars with small phy...

  4. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ∼ 2 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H. R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 1A1 (Canada); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (≅ 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ∼20% at R ≅ 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξ{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup γ} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ∼ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  5. An Optically Faint Quasar Survey at z ∼ 5 in the CFHTLS Wide Field: Estimates of the Black Hole Masses and Eddington Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Kawakatu, N.; Kajisawa, M.; Akiyama, M.; Miyaji, T.; Morokuma, T.

    2017-09-01

    We present the result of our spectroscopic follow-up observation for faint quasar candidates at z ∼ 5 in part of the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey wide field. We select nine photometric candidates and identify three z ∼ 5 faint quasars, one z ∼ 4 faint quasar, and a late-type star. Since two faint quasar spectra show the C iv emission line without suffering from a heavy atmospheric absorption, we estimate their black hole masses ({M}{BH}) and Eddington ratios (L/{L}{Edd}). The inferred {log}{M}{BH} are 9.04 ± 0.14 and 8.53 ± 0.20, respectively. In addition, the inferred {log}(L/{L}{Edd}) are ‑1.00 ± 0.15 and ‑0.42 ± 0.22, respectively. If we adopt that L/{L}{Edd}={constant} {or}\\propto {(1+z)}2, the seed black hole masses ({M}{seed}) of our z ∼ 5 faint quasars are expected to be > {10}5 {M}ȯ in most cases. We also compare the observational results with a mass accretion model, where angular momentum is lost due to supernova explosions. Accordingly, {M}{BH} of the z ∼ 5 faint quasars in our sample can be explained even if {M}{seed} is ∼ {10}3 {M}ȯ . Since z ∼ 6 luminous qusars and our z ∼ 5 faint quasars are not on the same evolutionary track, z ∼ 6 luminous quasars and our z ∼ 5 quasars are not the same populations but different populations, due to the difference of a period of the mass supply from host galaxies. Furthermore, we confirm that one can explain {M}{BH} of z ∼ 6 luminous quasars and our z ∼ 5 faint quasars even if their seed black holes are formed at z ∼ 7.

  6. Frontoparietal theta activity supports behavioral decisions in movement-target selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRawle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available There is recent EEG evidence describing task-related changes of theta power in spatial attention and reaching/pointing tasks. Here, we aim to better characterize this theta activity and determine whether it is associated with visuospatial memory or with visuospatial selection functions of the frontoparietal cortex. We recorded EEG from 20 participants during a movement precuing task with centre-out joystick movements. Precues displayed 1, 2, or 4 potential targets and were followed (SOA 1.2 s by a central response cue indicating the movement target. Remembering the precued target location(s was mandatory in one and optional in a second version of the task. Analyses evaluated two slow brain potentials (CNV, contingent negative variation and CDA, contralateral delay activity and task-related power changes. Results showed a differential modulation of frontal CNV and parietal CDA, consistent with earlier described set-size effects on motor preparation and visual short-term memory. Short-lived phases of theta synchronization (ERS were found 150-500 ms after precue and response cue presentation, exhibiting parietal and frontal maxima. The increase of frontoparietal theta power following response cue presentation was strongly modulated by target load, i.e. absent for 1-target (when the movement target could be selected in advance, contrasting with a robust 20-50% ERS response in 2- and 4-target conditions. The scalp distribution, the timing, and the modulation by set-size suggest a role of theta activity in movement target selection. The results support a recently proposed view of theta as emerging around behavioral decision points, linked to the evaluation of choice-relevant information.

  7. Target Selection For The High Resolution Stereo Camera (hrsc) Experiment On Mars Express: Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, E.; Neukum, G.; HRSC/Src Target Selection Team

    In order to facilitate effective operations planning and to maximize the science return of the HRSC/SRC experiment, we are currently preparing a global list of targets to be imaged during the ESA Mars Express mission. The target list is organized as a table, each line of which represents a single target. Each target is specified in terms of geographic location, imaging mode (i.e., the required selection of imaging param- eters like resolution, color filter, etc.), and the types of geologic processes which are of interest (e.g., aeolian, volcanic, fluvial). We also list the geologic unit(s) covered by each target as mapped in global geologic maps of Mars, as well as already existing imagery (Viking Orbiter, Mars Global Surveyor). In separate documents, the scientific rationale for imaging each target is comprehensively specified. Important findings of the MGS mission related to the targets are also described separately. In order to es- timate future data rates, we determine the areal size of each target and calculate the number of standard images and the data volume required to obtain an image mosaic of the entire target. In addition to the table, each target is graphically marked on a global, Viking-based base map (i.e., the MDIM-2 imaging model of the U.S.G.S.), allowing for quick visual inspection. These target maps will later be used during the planning stage of the mission: An interactive software tool has been developed which will use orbit and orientation parameters to plot the groundtrack of the spacecraft and the field of view of the camera onto the target maps. An operator checks whether the track crosses a target. It is straightforward, then, to determine the start and end times of imaging in order to cover the target. These times will be stored together with ad- ditional parameters (e.g., imaging mode, illumination conditions) for each orbit. The stored data will then be converted to commanding sequences. The target list is orga- nized according to the U

  8. W::Neo: a novel dual-selection marker for high efficiency gene targeting in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke Zhou

    Full Text Available We have recently developed a so-called genomic engineering approach that allows for directed, efficient and versatile modifications of Drosophila genome by combining the homologous recombination (HR-based gene targeting with site-specific DNA integration. In genomic engineering and several similar approaches, a "founder" knock-out line must be generated first through HR-based gene targeting, which can still be a potentially time and resource intensive process. To significantly improve the efficiency and success rate of HR-based gene targeting in Drosophila, we have generated a new dual-selection marker termed W::Neo, which is a direct fusion between proteins of eye color marker White (W and neomycin resistance (Neo. In HR-based gene targeting experiments, mutants carrying W::Neo as the selection marker can be enriched as much as fifty times by taking advantage of the antibiotic selection in Drosophila larvae. We have successfully carried out three independent gene targeting experiments using the W::Neo to generate genomic engineering founder knock-out lines in Drosophila.

  9. DES J0454-4448: discovery of the first luminous z ≥ 6 quasar from the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S. L.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Becker, G. D.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Martini, P.; Ostrovski, F.; Rauch, M.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; da Costa, L. N.; D'Andrea, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Cunha, C. E.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J.; Merritt, K.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A.; Romer, K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first results of a survey for high-redshift, z ≥ 6, quasars using izY multicolour photometric observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Here we report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of the zAB, YAB = 20.2, 20.2 (M1450 = -26.5) quasar DES J0454-4448 with a redshift of z = 6.09±0.02 based on the onset of the Ly α forest and an H I near zone size of 4.1_{-1.2}^{+1.1} proper Mpc. The quasar was selected as an i-band drop out with i-z = 2.46 and zAB 6 including 3-10 with z > 7 dramatically increasing the numbers of quasars currently known that are suitable for detailed studies.

  10. The feasibility of targeted selective gene therapy of the hair follicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Hoffman, R M

    1995-07-01

    Loss of hair and hair colour is associated with ageing, and when it involves the scalp hair, it can be distressing to both sexes. Hair loss resulting from cancer chemotherapy is particularly distressing. However, safe, effective therapies directed to hair have only just started to be developed. The hair follicle is a complex skin appendage composed of epidermal and dermal tissue, with specialized keratinocytes, the hair matrix cells, forming the hair shaft. Specific therapy of the hair follicle depends on selective targeting of specific cells of the hair follicle. We have developed the histoculture of intact hair-growing skin on sponge-gel matrices. We have recently found in histocultured skin that liposomes can selectively target hair follicles to deliver both small and large molecules. That liposomes can target the hair follicle for delivery has been confirmed independently. Two decades ago we introduced the technique of entrapping DNA in liposomes for use in gene therapy. In this report we describe the selective targeting of the lacZ reporter gene to the hair follicles in mice after topical application of the gene entrapped in liposomes. These results demonstrate that highly selective, safe gene therapy for the hair process is feasible.

  11. The SDSS-IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminous Red Galaxy Target Selection

    CERN Document Server

    Prakash, Abhishek; Newman, Jeffrey A; Ross, Ashley J; Myers, Adam D; Dawson, Kyle S; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Percival, Will J; Bautista, Julian E; Comparat, Johan; Tinker, Jeremy L; Schlegel, David J; Tojeiro, Rita; Ho, Shirley; Lang, Dustin; Rao, Sandhya M; McBride, Cameron K; Zhu, Guangtun Ben; Brownstein, Joel R; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S; Delubac, Timothee; Mariappan, Vivek; Blanton, Michael R; Reid, Beth; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Prada, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the Luminous Red Galaxy (LRG) sample for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) using photometric data from both the SDSS and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). LRG targets are required to meet a set of color selection criteria and have z-band and i-band MODEL magnitudes z < 19.95 and 19.9 < i < 21.8, respectively. Our algorithm selects roughly 50 LRG targets per square degree, the great majority of which lie in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.0 (median redshift 0.71). We demonstrate that our methods are highly effective at eliminating stellar contamination and lower-redshift galaxies. We perform a number of tests using spectroscopic data from SDSS-III/BOSS to determine the redshift reliability of our target selection and its ability to meet the science requirements of eBOSS. The SDSS spectra are of high enough signal-to-noise ratio that at least 89% of the target sample yield...

  12. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasowski, G.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Andrews, B.; Epstein, C. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Frinchaboy, P. M.; Jackson, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Majewski, S. R.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beaton, R. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Nidever, D. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Pinto, H. J. Rocha; Girardi, L. [Laboratorio Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia-LIneA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 20921-400 (Brazil); Cudworth, K. M. [Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, Williams Bay, WI 53191 (United States); Munn, J. [US Naval Observatory, Flagstaff Station, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Blake, C. H. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Covey, K. [Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Deshpande, R.; Fleming, S. W. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Fabbian, D., E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); and others

    2013-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of {approx}10{sup 5} red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.

  13. Star formation in quasar hosts and the origin of radio emission in radio-quiet quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Zakamska, Nadia L; Petric, Andreea; Dicken, Daniel; Greene, Jenny E; Heckman, Timothy M; Hickox, Ryan C; Ho, Luis C; Krolik, Julian H; Nesvadba, Nicole P H; Strauss, Michael A; Geach, James E; Oguri, Masamune; Strateva, Iskra V

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from radio-quiet quasars may be due to star formation in the quasar host galaxy, to a jet launched by the supermassive black hole, or to relativistic particles accelerated in a wide-angle radiatively-driven outflow. In this paper we examine whether radio emission from radio-quiet quasars is a byproduct of star formation in their hosts. To this end we use infrared spectroscopy and photometry from Spitzer and Herschel to estimate or place upper limits on star formation rates in hosts of ~300 obscured and unobscured quasars at z<1. We find that low-ionization forbidden emission lines such as [NeII] and [NeIII] are likely dominated by quasar ionization and do not provide reliable star formation diagnostics in quasar hosts, while PAH emission features may be suppressed due to the destruction of PAH molecules by the quasar radiation field. While the bolometric luminosities of our sources are dominated by the quasars, the 160 micron fluxes are likely dominated by star formation, but they too should...

  14. NuSTAR Reveals Extreme Absorption in z < 0.5 Type 2 Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Lansbury, G B; Alexander, D M; Assef, R J; Aird, J; Annuar, A; Ballantyne, D R; Balokovic, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Brandt, W N; Brightman, M; Christensen, F E; Civano, F; Comastri, A; Craig, W W; Del Moro, A; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Puccetti, S; Stern, D; Treister, E; Vignali, C; Zappacosta, L; Zhang, W W

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic column density (NH) distribution of quasars is poorly known. At the high obscuration end of the quasar population and for redshifts z 1.5e24 cm^-2) type 2 quasars (CTQSO2s); five new NuSTAR observations are reported herein, and four have been previously published. The candidate CTQSO2s lie at z~ 90 net source counts at 8-24 keV). For these NuSTAR-detected sources direct (i.e., X-ray spectral) constraints on the intrinsic AGN properties are feasible, and we measure column densities ~2.5-1600 times higher and intrinsic (unabsorbed) X-ray luminosities ~10-70 times higher than pre-NuSTAR constraints from Chandra and XMM-Newton. Assuming the NuSTAR-detected type 2 quasars are representative of other Compton-thick candidates, we make a correction to the NH distribution for optically selected type 2 quasars as measured by Chandra and XMM-Newton for 39 objects. With this approach, we predict a Compton-thick fraction of f_CT = 36^{+14}_{-12} %, although higher fractions (up to 76%) are possible if indire...

  15. A VLBI survey of compact Broad Absorption Lines (BAL) quasars with BALnicity Index BI=0

    CERN Document Server

    Ceglowski, M; Roskowinski, C

    2015-01-01

    We present high-resolution observations, using both the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.7-GHz, and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 and 8.4-GHz to image radio structures of 14 compact sources classified as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars based on the absorption index (AI). All source but one were resolved, with the majority showing core-jet morphology typical for radio-loud quasars. We discuss in details the most interesting cases. The high radio luminosities and small linear sizes of the observed objects indicate they are strong young AGNs. Nevertheless, the distribution of the radio-loudness parameter, log(Ri), of a larger sample of AI quasars shows that the objects observed by us constitute the most luminous, small subgroup of AI population. Additionally we report that for the radio-loudness parameter, the distribution of AI quasars and those selected by using the traditional balnicity index (BI), BI quasars differ significantly. Strong absorption is connected with the lower log(Ri), and thus ...

  16. Evolution of the Quasar Luminosity Function Over 3 < z < 5 in the COSMOS Survey Field

    CERN Document Server

    Masters, Daniel; Salvato, Mara; Civano, Francesca; Mobasher, Bahram; Siana, Brian; Hasinger, Guenther; Impey, Christopher; Nagao, Tohru; Trump, Jonathan; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Elvis, Martin; Scoville, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the high-redshift quasar luminosity function (QLF) down to an apparent magnitude of I(AB) = 25 in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS). Careful analysis of the extensive COSMOS photometry and imaging data allows us to identify and remove stellar and low-redshift contaminants, enabling a selection that is nearly complete for type-1 quasars at the redshifts of interest. We find 155 likely quasars at z > 3.1, 39 of which have prior spectroscopic confirmation. We present our sample in detail and use these confirmed and likely quasars to compute the rest-frame UV QLF in the redshift bins 3.1 3 is similar to what has been found for more luminous optical and X-ray quasars. We compare the rest-frame UV luminosity functions found here with the X-ray luminosity function at z > 3, and find that they evolve similarly between z \\sim 3.2 and z \\sim 4; however, the different normalizations imply that roughly 75% of X-ray bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) at z \\sim 3 - 4 are optically obscured. This fractio...

  17. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  18. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marton Siklos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  19. Sequence-selective targeting of duplex DNA by peptide nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    Sequence-selective gene targeting constitutes an attractive drug-discovery approach for genetic therapy, with the aim of reducing or enhancing the activity of specific genes at the transcriptional level, or as part of a methodology for targeted gene repair. The pseudopeptide DNA mimic peptide...... nucleic acid (PNA) can recognize duplex DNA with high sequence specificity and affinity in triplex, duplex and double-duplex invasive modes or non-invasive triplex modes. Novel PNA modification has improved the affinity for DNA recognition via duplex invasion, double-duplex invasion and triplex...... recognition considerably. Such modifications have also resulted in new approaches to targeted gene repair and sequence-selective double-strand cleavage of genomic DNA....

  20. Patient selection and targeted treatment in the management of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leamon PC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher P Leamon,1 Chandra D Lovejoy,2 Binh Nguyen3 1Research and Development, 2Regulatory Affairs, 3Clinical Affairs, Endocyte Inc, West Lafayette, IN, USA Abstract: Ovarian cancer (OC has the highest mortality rate of any gynecologic cancer, and patients generally have a poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance and late stage disease diagnosis. Platinum-resistant OC can be treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy such as paclitaxel, topotecan, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, and gemcitabine, but many patients eventually relapse upon treatment. Fortunately, there are currently a number of targeted therapies in development for these patients who have shown promising results in recent clinical trials. These treatments often target the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway (eg, bevacizumab and aflibercept, DNA repair mechanisms (eg, iniparib and olaparib, or they are directed against folate related pathways (eg, pemetrexed, farletuzumab, and vintafolide. As many targeted therapies are only effective in a subset of patients, there is an increasing need for the identification of response predictive biomarkers. Selecting the right patients through biomarker screening will help tailor therapy to patients and decrease superfluous treatment to those who are biomarker negative; this approach should lead to improved clinical results and decreased toxicities. In this review the current targeted therapies used for treating platinum-resistant OC are discussed. Furthermore, use of prognostic and response predictive biomarkers to define OC patient populations that may benefit from specific targeted therapies is also highlighted. Keywords: platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, targeted therapy, patient selection, folate receptor, VEGF, biomarkers

  1. The near-IR properties and continuum shapes of high redshift quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentericci, L.; Rix, H.-W.; Prada, F.; Fan, X.; Strauss, M. A.; Schneider, D. P.; Grebel, E. K.; Harbeck, D.; Brinkmann, J.; Narayanan, V. K.

    2003-10-01

    We present J-H-K' photometry for a sample of 45 high redshift quasars found by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The sample was originally selected on the basis of optical colors and spans a redshift range from 3.6 to 5.03. Our photometry reflects the rest-frame SED longward of Lyalpha for all redshifts. The results show that the near-IR colors of high redshift quasars are quite uniform. We have modelled the continuum shape of the quasars (from just beyond Lyalpha to ~ 4000 Å) with a power law of the form fnu ~ nu \\alpha, and find =-0.57 with a scatter of 0.33. This value is similar to what is found for lower redshift quasars over the same restframe wavelength range, and {we conclude that} there is hardly any evolution in the continuum properties of optically selected quasars up to redshift 5. The spectral indices found by combining near-IR with optical photometry are in general consistent but slightly flatter than what is found for the same quasars using the optical spectra and photometry alone, showing that the continuum region used to determine the spectral indices can somewhat influence the results.

  2. Observing broad-absorption line quasars with Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.P.; Schnopper, H.W.; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    1998-01-01

    Broad-absorption line quasars are found to have extremely weak soft X-ray emission when compared with other optically selected quasars. In the only example of PHL 5200 for which a detailed X-ray spectrum has been obtained with ASCA, strong absorption in the source appears to be responsible for th...... from the line of sight passing through large column density clouds. Simultaneous UV observations will help to constrain the ionization state of the absorbers, and also improve the overall UV to X-ray continuum measurements in them....

  3. A Quasar Catalog with Simultaneous UV, Optical and X-ray Observations by Swift

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jian; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Grupe, Dirk; Koch, Scott; Gelbord, Jonathan; Schneider, Donald P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Wesolowski, Sarah; Porterfield, Blair L.

    2012-01-01

    We have compiled a catalog of optically-selected quasars with simultaneous observations in UV/optical and X-ray bands by the Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer. Objects in this catalog are identified by matching the Swift pointings with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 5 quasar catalog. The final catalog contains 843 objects, among which 637 have both UVOT and XRT observations and 354 of which are detected by both instruments. The overall X-ray detection rate is ~60% which rises to ~85% ...

  4. Obscured quasars at high redshift in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Ismael; Almaini, Omar; Hartley, Will; Mortlock, Alice; Lira, Paulina

    2014-07-01

    Obscured quasars hidden in deep X-ray surveys can be recovered by looking at mid-infrared wavelengths, where dust re-radiates the absorbed radiation. Here we present a sample of obscured quasars in the redshift range 1 < z < 4 based on data from the UKIDSS Ultra-Deep Survey (UDS), the deepest near-IR survey over ~ 1 sq. deg. to date. Candidates that are primarily selected by their 24 μm emission are probed by decomposing their spectral energy distribution (SED) to disentangle the emission from the AGN and its host galaxy. We show preliminary results on their host galaxy properties as well as their clustering, showing that obscured quasars are found in galaxies located in the green valley, residing in dark matter haloes not different from normal galaxies at those redshifts.

  5. The LAMOST Survey of Background Quasars in the Vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies -- II. Results from the Commissioning Observations and the Pilot Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Hui-Hua; Yan, Lin; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Chu, Jia-Ru; Chu, Yao-Quan; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Du, Bing; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jia, Lei; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Lei, Ya-Juan; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Guang-Wei; Li, Guo-Ping; Li, Jian; Li, Xin-Nan; Li, Yan; Li, Ye-Ping; Liu, Gen-Rong; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Qi-Shuai; Luo, A-Li; Luo, Yu; Men, Li; Ni, Ji-Jun; Qi, Yong-Jun; Qi, Zhao-Xiang; Shi, Jian-Rong; Shi, Huo-Ming; Sun, Shi-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Tian, Yuan; Tu, Liang-Ping; Wang, Dan; Wang, Feng-Fei; Wang, Gang; Wang, Jia-Ning; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shu-Qing; Wang, You; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wei, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Yue; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Yao, Zheng-Qiu; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Hui; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, En-Peng; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-Chao; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Xin-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Zou, Si-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the LAMOST during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available SDSS, KPNO 4 m telescope, XSTPS optical, and WISE near infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ~135 sq. deg from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey datasets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ~100 sq. deg that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning datasets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62 and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5 and 18.0 respectively, of which 5, 20 and 75 are newly-discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable c...

  6. NuSTAR unveils a compton-thick 2 quasar in MrK 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandhi, P.; Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) 3-40 keV observations of the optically selected Type 2 quasar (QSO2) SDSS J1034+6001 or Mrk 34. The high-quality hard X-ray spectrum and archival XMM-Newton data can be fitted self-consistently with a reflection-dominated continuum and a s...

  7. Allele-Selective Inhibition of Mutant Huntingtin Expression with Antisense Oligonucleotides Targeting the Expanded CAG Repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Keith T.; Pendergraff, Hannah M.; Deleavey, Glen F.; Swayze, Eric E.; Potier, Pierre; Randolph, John; Roesch, Eric B.; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti; Damha, Masad J.; Bennett, C. Frank; Montaillier, Christophe; Lemaitre, Marc; Corey, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat within the huntingtin (HTT) gene. Therapeutic approaches include selectively inhibiting the expression of the mutated HTT allele while conserving function of the normal allele. We have evaluated a series of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeted to the expanded CAG repeat within HTT mRNA for their ability to selectively inhibit expression of mutant HTT protein. Several ASOs incorporating a variety of modifications, including bridged nucleic acids and phosphorothioate internucleotide linkages, exhibited allele-selective silencing in patient-derived fibroblasts. Allele-selective ASOs did not affect the expression of other CAG repeat-containing genes and selectivity was observed in cell lines containing minimal CAG repeat lengths representative of most HD patients. Allele-selective ASOs left HTT mRNA intact and did not support ribonuclease H activity in vitro. We observed cooperative binding of multiple ASO molecules to CAG repeat-containing HTT mRNA transcripts in vitro. These results are consistent with a mechanism involving inhibition at the level of translation. ASOs targeted to the CAG repeat of HTT provide a starting point for the development of oligonucleotide-based therapeutics that can inhibit gene expression with allelic discrimination in patients with HD. PMID:21028906

  8. Quasar clustering in a galaxy and quasar formation model based on ultra high-resolution N-body simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Oogi, Taira; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate clustering properties of quasars using a new version of our semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation with state-of-the-art cosmological N-body simulations. In this study, we assume that a major merger of galaxies triggers cold gas accretion on to a supermassive black hole and quasar activity. Our model can reproduce the downsizing trend of the evolution of quasars. We find that the median mass of quasar host dark matter haloes increases with cosmic time by an order of magnitude from z=4 (a few 1e+11 Msun) to z=1 (a few 1e+12 Msun), and depends only weakly on the quasar luminosity. Deriving the quasar bias through the quasar--galaxy cross-correlation function in the model, we find that the quasar bias does not depend on the quasar luminosity, similar to observed trends. This result reflects the fact that quasars with a fixed luminosity have various Eddington ratios and thus have various host halo masses that primarily determine the quasar bias. We also show that the quasar bias increas...

  9. Lepidopteran HMG-CoA reductase is a potential selective target for pest control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-mei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of the negative impacts on the environment of some insecticides, discovery of eco-friendly insecticides and target has received global attention in recent years. Sequence alignment and structural comparison of the rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR revealed differences between lepidopteran pests and other organisms, which suggested insect HMGR could be a selective insecticide target candidate. Inhibition of JH biosynthesis in vitro confirmed that HMGR inhibitors showed a potent lethal effect on the lepidopteran pest Manduca sexta, whereas there was little effect on JH biosynthesis in Apis mellifera and Diploptera punctata. The pest control application of these inhibitors demonstrated that they can be insecticide candidates with potent ovicidal activity, larvicidal activity and insect growth regulatory effects. The present study has validated that Lepidopteran HMGR can be a potent selective insecticide target, and the HMGR inhibitors (especially type II statins could be selective insecticide candidates and lead compounds. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sequence alignment, homology modeling and structural comparison may be useful for determining potential enzymes or receptors which can be eco-friendly pesticide  targets.

  10. Lepidopteran HMG-CoA reductase is a potential selective target for pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-mei; Huang, Juan; Tobe, Stephen S.

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of the negative impacts on the environment of some insecticides, discovery of eco-friendly insecticides and target has received global attention in recent years. Sequence alignment and structural comparison of the rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGR) revealed differences between lepidopteran pests and other organisms, which suggested insect HMGR could be a selective insecticide target candidate. Inhibition of JH biosynthesis in vitro confirmed that HMGR inhibitors showed a potent lethal effect on the lepidopteran pest Manduca sexta, whereas there was little effect on JH biosynthesis in Apis mellifera and Diploptera punctata. The pest control application of these inhibitors demonstrated that they can be insecticide candidates with potent ovicidal activity, larvicidal activity and insect growth regulatory effects. The present study has validated that Lepidopteran HMGR can be a potent selective insecticide target, and the HMGR inhibitors (especially type II statins) could be selective insecticide candidates and lead compounds. Furthermore, we demonstrated that sequence alignment, homology modeling and structural comparison may be useful for determining potential enzymes or receptors which can be eco-friendly pesticide  targets. PMID:28133568

  11. Band selection method based on spectrum difference in targets of interest in hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohan; Yang, Guang; Yang, Yongbo; Huang, Junhua

    2016-10-01

    While hyperspectral data shares rich spectrum information, it has numbers of bands with high correlation coefficients, causing great data redundancy. A reasonable band selection is important for subsequent processing. Bands with large amount of information and low correlation should be selected. On this basis, according to the needs of target detection applications, the spectral characteristics of the objects of interest are taken into consideration in this paper, and a new method based on spectrum difference is proposed. Firstly, according to the spectrum differences of targets of interest, a difference matrix which represents the different spectral reflectance of different targets in different bands is structured. By setting a threshold, the bands satisfying the conditions would be left, constituting a subset of bands. Then, the correlation coefficients between bands are calculated and correlation matrix is given. According to the size of the correlation coefficient, the bands can be set into several groups. At last, the conception of normalized variance is used on behalf of the information content of each band. The bands are sorted by the value of its normalized variance. Set needing number of bands, and the optimum band combination solution can be get by these three steps. This method retains the greatest degree of difference between the target of interest and is easy to achieve by computer automatically. Besides, false color image synthesis experiment is carried out using the bands selected by this method as well as other 3 methods to show the performance of method in this paper.

  12. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    Full Text Available A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  13. The DESI Experiment Part I: Science,Targeting, and Survey Design

    OpenAIRE

    DESI Collaboration; Aghamousa, Amir; Aguilar, Jessica; Ahlen, Steve; Alam, Shadab; Allen, Lori E.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Annis, James; Bailey, Stephen; Balland, Christophe; Ballester, Otger; Baltay, Charles; Beaufore, Lucas; Bebek, Chris; Beers, Timothy C.

    2016-01-01

    DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. To trace the underlying dark matter distribution, spectroscopic targets will be selected in four classes from imaging data. We will measure luminous red galaxies up to $z=1.0$. To probe the Universe out to even higher redshift, DESI will...

  14. Chandra and XMM-Newton Observations of the First Quasars: X-Rays from the Age of Cosmic Enlightenment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignali, C.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Anderson, S. F.; Fan, X.; Gunn, J. E.; Kaspi, S.; Richards, G. T.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2003-06-01

    We report on Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of a sample of 13 quasars at z~4.7-5.4 mostly taken from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The present sample complements previous X-ray studies of z>=4 quasars, in which the majority of the objects are optically more luminous and at lower redshifts. All but two of our quasars have been detected in the X-ray band, thus doubling the number of z>=4.8 X-ray-detected quasars. The two nondetections are likely to be due to a short exposure time (SDSSp J033829.31+002156.3) and to the presence of intrinsic absorption (SDSSp J173744.87+582829.5). We confirm and extend to the highest redshifts the presence of a correlation between AB1450(1+z) magnitude and soft X-ray flux for z>=4 quasars and the presence of a steeper optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (parameterized by αox) for high-luminosity, high-redshift quasars than for lower luminosity, lower redshift quasars. The second effect is likely due to the known anticorrelation between αox and rest-frame 2500 Å luminosity, whose significance is confirmed via partial correlation analysis. The joint ~2.5-36 keV rest-frame spectrum of the z>4.8 SDSS quasars observed thus far by Chandra is well parameterized by a power law with photon index Γ=1.84+0.31-0.30; this photon index is consistent with those of z~0-3 quasars and that obtained from joint spectral fitting of z~4.1-4.5 optically luminous Palomar Digital Sky Survey quasars. No evidence for widespread intrinsic X-ray absorption has been found (NH<~4.0×1022 cm-2 on average at 90% confidence). We also obtained Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) photometric observations for eight of our target quasars. None of these shows significant (greater than 30%) optical variability over the time interval of a few years (in the observed frame) between the SDSS and HET observations.

  15. The Redshift Distribution of Intervening Weak MgII Quasar Absorbers and a Curious Dependence on Quasar Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Jessica L; Murphy, Michael T; Nielsen, Nikole M; Klimek, Elizabeth S

    2013-01-01

    We have identified 469 MgII doublet systems having W_r >= 0.02 {\\AA} in 252 Keck/HIRES and UVES/VLT quasar spectra over the redshift range 0.1 = 1.0 {\\AA}) absorbers. For weak absorption, dN/dz toward bright quasars is ~ 25% higher than toward faint quasars (10 sigma at low redshift, 0.4 <= z <= 1.4, and 4 sigma at high redshift, 1.4 < z <= 2.34). For strong absorption the trend reverses, with dN/dz toward faint quasars being ~ 20% higher than toward bright quasars (also 10 sigma at low redshift and 4 sigma at high redshift). We explore scenarios in which beam size is proportional to quasar luminosity and varies with absorber and quasar redshifts. These do not explain dN/dz's dependence on quasar luminosity.

  16. The High AV Quasar Survey: A z = 2.027 metal-rich damped Lyman-α absorber towards a red quasar at z = 3.21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krogager, J.-K.; Heintz, K. E.; Geier, S.; Møller, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Christensen, L.; Ledoux, C.; Jakobsson, P.

    2017-09-01

    It is important to understand the selection effects behind the quasar samples to fully exploit the potential of quasars as probes of cosmic chemical evolution and the internal gas dynamics of galaxies; in particular, it is vital to understand whether the selection criteria exclude foreground galaxies with certain properties, most importantly a high dust content. Here we present spectroscopic follow-up from the 10.4 m GTC telescope of a dust-reddened quasar, eHAQ0111+0641, from the extended High AV Quasar (HAQ) survey. We find that the z = 3.21 quasar has a foreground damped Lyman-α absorber (DLA) at z = 2.027 along the line of sight. The DLA has very strong metal lines due to a moderately high metallicity with an inferred lower limit of 25% of the solar metallicity, but a very large gas column density along the line of sight in its host galaxy. This discovery is further evidence that there is a dust bias affecting the census of metals, caused by the combined effect of dust obscuration and reddening, in existing samples of z > 2 DLAs. The case of eHAQ0111+0641 illustrates that dust bias is not only caused by dust obscuration, but also dust reddening. The reduced spectrum (FITS file) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A13

  17. Quasar evolution and gravitational collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaliere, A.; Giallongo, E.; Vagnetti, F.; Messina, A.

    1983-06-01

    The paper presents three convergent results concerning the sources in theactive nuclei of quasars and radio galaxies that derive their power fromconversion of gravitational energy. We first derive, for several leading modelsbased on liberation of gravitational energy from mass in a compact supply, thelaws governing the secular change L of the primary power driving the individual sources, and identify their common and key property: L increases, and eventually decreases, linearly or faster with the power itself, so that the associated time scales t/sub s/ = L/Vertical BarLVertical Bar obey dt/sub s/, (L)/dL<0. We then describe a general statistical framework to populate with sources the (luminosity, cosmic time)-plane, based on a continuity equation that embodies a given L. We show how the main features of the populations depend primarily on L, while the memory of the initial details is easily erased. With L as derived above, we obtain basic evolutions of the density (L>0) and of the luminosity (L<0) type, with a global differential character. Finally we compute the full evolution functions, comprising a brightening (L>0) and a dimming (L<0) phase, corresponding to three such models. Sub-Eddington accretion onto a massive black hole from a star cluster that self-destroys by collisions is close to reproduce the general course of the empirical models for the optical QSO population.

  18. Emergence of a Quasar Outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, F; Hidalgo, P Rodriguez; Prochaska, J X; Herbert-Fort, S

    2008-01-01

    We report the first discovery of the emergence of a high-velocity broad-line outflow in a luminous quasar, J105400.40+034801.2 at redshift z ~ 2.1. The outflow is evident in ultraviolet CIV and SiIV absorption lines with velocity shifts v ~ 26,300 km/s and deblended widths FWHM ~ 4000 km/s. These features are marginally strong and broad enough to be considered broad absorption lines (BALs), but their large velocities exclude them from the standard BAL definition. The outflow lines appeared between two observations in the years 2002.18 and 2006.96. A third observation in 2008.48 showed the lines becoming ~40% weaker and 10% to 15% narrower. There is no evidence for acceleration or for any outflow gas at velocities 21.2 and average space density n_H > 2 x 10^5 cm^-3. We attribute the emergence of the outflow lines to a substantial flow structure moving across our line of sight, possibly near the ragged edge of the main BAL flow or possibly related to the onset of a BAL evolutionary phase.

  19. Galaxy Clustering Around Nearby Luminous Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Karl B.; Bahcall, John N.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Schneider, Donald P.

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z approx. less than 0.30) quasars observed with the Wide Field Camera-2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST resolution makes possible galaxy identification brighter than V = 24.5 and as close as 1 min or 2 min to the quasar. We find a significant enhancement of galaxies within a projected separation of approx. less than 100 1/h kpc of the quasars. If we model the QSO/galaxy correlation function as a power law with a slope given by the galaxy/galaxy correlation function, we find that the ratio of the QSO/galaxy to galaxy/galaxy correlation functions is 3.8 +/- 0.8. The galaxy counts within r less than 15 1/h kpc of the quasars are too high for the density profile to have an appreciable core radius (approx. greater than 100 1/h kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  20. Long Term Variability of SDSS Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    De Vries, W; White, R; Becker, Bob; Vries, Wim de; White, Rick

    2003-01-01

    We use a sample of 3791 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Early Data Release (EDR), and compare their photometry to historic plate material for the same set of quasars in order to study their variability properties. The time base-line we attain this way ranges from a few months to up to 50 years. In contrast to monitoring programs, where relatively few quasars are photometrically measured over shorter time periods, we utilize existing databases to extend this base-line as much as possible, at the cost of sampling per quasar. Our method, however, can easily be extended to much larger samples. We construct variability Structure Functions and compare these to the literature and model functions. From our modeling we conclude that 1) quasars are more variable toward shorter wavelengths, 2) their variability is consistent with an exponentially decaying light-curve with a typical time-scale of ~2 years, 3) these outbursts occur on typical time-scales of ~200 years. With the upcoming first data release...

  1. On the Search for Quasar Light Echoes

    CERN Document Server

    Visbal, Eli

    2007-01-01

    The UV radiation from a quasar leaves a characteristic pattern in the distribution of ionized hydrogen throughout the surrounding space. This pattern or light echo propagates through the intergalactic medium at the speed of light, and can be observed by its imprint on the Ly-alpha forest spectra of background sources. As the echo persists after the quasar has switched off, it offers the possibility of searching for dead quasars, and constraining their luminosities and lifetimes. We outline a technique to search for and characterize these light echoes. To test the method, we create artificial Ly-alpha forest spectra from cosmological simulations at z=3, apply light echoes and search for them. We show how the simulations can also be used to quantify the significance level of any detection. We find that light echoes from the brightest quasars could be found in observational data. With absorption line spectra of 100 redshift z~3-3.5 quasars or galaxies in a 1 square degree area, we expect that ~10 echoes from qua...

  2. Target Selection for the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)

    CERN Document Server

    Zasowski, G; Frinchaboy, P M; Majewski, S R; Nidever, D L; Pinto, H J Rocha; Girardi, L; Andrews, B; Chojnowski, S D; Cudworth, K M; Jackson, K; Munn, J; Skrutskie, M F; Beaton, R L; Blake, C H; Covey, K; Deshpande, R; Epstein, C; Fabbian, D; Fleming, S W; Hernandez, A Garcia; Herrero, A; Mahadevan, S; Meszaros, Sz; Schultheis, M; Sellgren, K; Terrien, R; van Saders, J; Prieto, C Allende; Bizyaev, D; Burton, A; Cunha, K; da Costa, L N; Hasselquist, S; Hearty, F; Holtzman, J; Perez, A E Garcia; Maia, M A G; O'Connell, R W; O'Donnell, C; Pinsonneault, M; Santiago, B X; Schiavon, R P; Shetrone, M; Smith, V; Wilson, J C

    2013-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of ~100,000 red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and ...

  3. Microfluidics for drug discovery and development: from target selection to product lifecycle management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lifeng; Chung, Bong Geun; Langer, Robert; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Microfluidic technologies' ability to miniaturize assays and increase experimental throughput have generated significant interest in the drug discovery and development domain. These characteristics make microfluidic systems a potentially valuable tool for many drug discovery and development applications. Here, we review the recent advances of microfluidic devices for drug discovery and development and highlight their applications in different stages of the process, including target selection, lead identification, preclinical tests, clinical trials, chemical synthesis, formulations studies and product management.

  4. Targeting MED1 LxxLL Motifs for Tissue-Selective Treatment of Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    expression regulation (1). The latter can, in part, be attributed to small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro ...greatly limited their use. The objective of this study to isolate RNA aptamers that specifically target the estrogen receptor interacting NR boxes...for tissue-selective therapy. In this funding period, we have further tested and optimized the RNA aptamers obtained by SELEX method, based on its

  5. Targeted proteomics by selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry: applications to systems biology and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschenbroich, Sarah; Kislinger, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Mass Spectrometry-based proteomics is now considered a relatively established strategy for protein analysis, ranging from global expression profiling to the identification of protein complexes and specific post-translational modifications. Recently, Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry (SRM-MS) has become increasingly popular in proteome research for the targeted quantification of proteins and post-translational modifications. Using triple quadrupole instrumentation (QqQ), specific analyte molecules are targeted in a data-directed mode. Used routinely for the quantitative analysis of small molecular compounds for at least three decades, the technology is now experiencing broadened application in the proteomics community. In the current review, we will provide a detailed summary of current developments in targeted proteomics, including some of the recent applications to biological research and biomarker discovery.

  6. Candidate Targets for New Anti-Virulence Drugs: Selected Cases of Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Kvist, Malin

    2007-01-01

    Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the rising frequency of strains that are resistant to many current antibiotics. New types of antibiotics are, therefore, urgently needed. Virulence factors or virulence-associated phenotypes such as adhesins and biofilm...... is particularly problematic in medical contexts because biofilm-associated bacteria are particularly hard to eradicate. Several promising candidate drugs that target bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are being developed. Some of these might be valuable weapons for fighting infectious diseases in the future...... formation are highly attractive targets for new drugs. Specific adhesion provides bacteria with target selection and prevents removal by hydrodynamic flow forces. Bacterial adhesion is of paramount importance for bacterial pathogenesis. Adhesion is also the first step in biofilm formation. Biofilm formation...

  7. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  8. Merger and Acquisition Target Selection Based on Interval Neutrosophic Multigranulation Rough Sets over Two Universes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As a significant business activity, merger and acquisition (M&A generally means transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations or their operating units are transferred or combined. In a typical M&A procedure, M&A target selection is an important issue that tends to exert an increasingly significant impact on different business areas. Although some research works based on fuzzy methods have been explored on this issue, they can only deal with incomplete and uncertain information, but not inconsistent and indeterminate information that exists universally in the decision making process. Additionally, it is advantageous to solve M&A problems under the group decision making context. In order to handle these difficulties in M&A target selection background, we introduce a novel rough set model by combining interval neutrosophic sets (INSs with multigranulation rough sets over two universes, called an interval neutrosophic (IN multigranulation rough set over two universes. Then, we discuss the definition and some fundamental properties of the proposed model. Finally, we establish decision making rules and computing approaches for the proposed model in M&A target selection background, and the effectiveness of the decision making approach is demonstrated by an illustrative case analysis.

  9. Risk-targeted selection of agricultural holdings for post-epidemic surveillance: estimation of efficiency gains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G Handel

    Full Text Available Current post-epidemic sero-surveillance uses random selection of animal holdings. A better strategy may be to estimate the benefits gained by sampling each farm and use this to target selection. In this study we estimate the probability of undiscovered infection for sheep farms in Devon after the 2001 foot-and-mouth disease outbreak using the combination of a previously published model of daily infection risk and a simple model of probability of discovery of infection during the outbreak. This allows comparison of the system sensitivity (ability to detect infection in the area of arbitrary, random sampling compared to risk-targeted selection across a full range of sampling budgets. We show that it is possible to achieve 95% system sensitivity by sampling, on average, 945 farms with random sampling and 184 farms with risk-targeted sampling. We also examine the effect of ordering samples by risk to expedite return to a disease-free status. Risk ordering the sampling process results in detection of positive farms, if present, 15.6 days sooner than with randomly ordered sampling, assuming 50 farms are tested per day.

  10. A Peptidomimetic Antibiotic Targets Outer Membrane Proteins and Disrupts Selectively the Outer Membrane in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urfer, Matthias; Bogdanovic, Jasmina; Lo Monte, Fabio; Moehle, Kerstin; Zerbe, Katja; Omasits, Ulrich; Ahrens, Christian H; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo; Robinson, John A

    2016-01-22

    Increasing antibacterial resistance presents a major challenge in antibiotic discovery. One attractive target in Gram-negative bacteria is the unique asymmetric outer membrane (OM), which acts as a permeability barrier that protects the cell from external stresses, such as the presence of antibiotics. We describe a novel β-hairpin macrocyclic peptide JB-95 with potent antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. This peptide exhibits no cellular lytic activity, but electron microscopy and fluorescence studies reveal an ability to selectively disrupt the OM but not the inner membrane of E. coli. The selective targeting of the OM probably occurs through interactions of JB-95 with selected β-barrel OM proteins, including BamA and LptD as shown by photolabeling experiments. Membrane proteomic studies reveal rapid depletion of many β-barrel OM proteins from JB-95-treated E. coli, consistent with induction of a membrane stress response and/or direct inhibition of the Bam folding machine. The results suggest that lethal disruption of the OM by JB-95 occurs through a novel mechanism of action at key interaction sites within clusters of β-barrel proteins in the OM. These findings open new avenues for developing antibiotics that specifically target β-barrel proteins and the integrity of the Gram-negative OM.

  11. Selective autophagy of non-ubiquitylated targets in plants: looking for cognate receptor/adaptor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasko eVeljanovski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis is essential for the physiology of eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotic cells, including plant cells, utilize two main pathways to adjust the level of cytoplasmic components, namely the proteasomal and the lysosomal/vacuolar pathways. Macroautophagy is a lysosomal/vacuolar pathway which, until recently, was thought to be non-specific and a bulk degradation process. However, selective autophagy which can be activated in the cell under various physiological conditions, involves the specific degradation of defined macromolecules or organelles by a conserved molecular mechanism. For this process to be efficient, the mechanisms underlying the recognition and selection of the cargo to be engulfed by the double-membrane autophagosome are critical, and not yet well understood. Ubiquitin (poly-ubiquitin conjugation to the target appears to be a conserved ligand mechanism in many types of selective autophagy, and defined receptors/adaptors recognizing and regulating the autophagosomal capture of the ubiquitylated target have been characterized. However, non-proteinaceous and non-ubiquitylated cargoes are also selectively degraded by this pathway. This ubiquitin-independent selective autophagic pathway also involves receptor and/or adaptor proteins linking the cargo to the autophagic machinery. Some of these receptor/adaptor proteins including accessory autophagy-related (Atg and non-Atg proteins have been described in yeast and animal cells but not yet in plants. In this review we discuss the ubiquitin-independent cargo selection mechanisms in selective autophagy degradation of organelles and macromolecules and speculate on potential plant receptor/adaptor proteins.

  12. Chlorin e6 Conjugated Interleukin-6 Receptor Aptamers Selectively Kill Target Cells Upon Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kruspe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT uses the therapeutic properties of light in combination with certain chemicals, called photosensitizers, to successfully treat brain, breast, prostate, and skin cancers. To improve PDT, current research focuses on the development of photosensitizers to specifically target cancer cells. In the past few years, aptamers have been developed to directly deliver cargo molecules into target cells. We conjugated the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (ce6 with a human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R binding RNA aptamer, AIR-3A yielding AIR-3A-ce6 for application in high efficient PDT. AIR-3A-ce6 was rapidly and specifically internalized by IL-6R presenting (IL-6R+ cells. Upon light irradiation, targeted cells were selectively killed, while free ce6 did not show any toxic effect. Cells lacking the IL-6R were also not affected by AIR-3A-ce6. With this approach, we improved the target specificity of ce6-mediated PDT. In the future, other tumor-specific aptamers might be used to selectively localize photosensitizers into cells of interest and improve the efficacy and specificity of PDT in cancer and other diseases.

  13. Retroviral DNA integration: viral and cellular determinants of target-site selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K Lewinski

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses differ in their preferences for sites for viral DNA integration in the chromosomes of infected cells. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV integrates preferentially within active transcription units, whereas murine leukemia virus (MLV integrates preferentially near transcription start sites and CpG islands. We investigated the viral determinants of integration-site selection using HIV chimeras with MLV genes substituted for their HIV counterparts. We found that transferring the MLV integrase (IN coding region into HIV (to make HIVmIN caused the hybrid to integrate with a specificity close to that of MLV. Addition of MLV gag (to make HIVmGagmIN further increased the similarity of target-site selection to that of MLV. A chimeric virus with MLV Gag only (HIVmGag displayed targeting preferences different from that of both HIV and MLV, further implicating Gag proteins in targeting as well as IN. We also report a genome-wide analysis indicating that MLV, but not HIV, favors integration near DNase I-hypersensitive sites (i.e., +/- 1 kb, and that HIVmIN and HIVmGagmIN also favored integration near these features. These findings reveal that IN is the principal viral determinant of integration specificity; they also reveal a new role for Gag-derived proteins, and strengthen models for integration targeting based on tethering of viral IN proteins to host proteins.

  14. Selection of RIB targets using ion implantation at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, G. D.; Dellwo, J.

    1996-02-01

    Among several major challenges posed by generating and accelerating adequate intensities of RIBs, selection of the most appropriate target material is perhaps the most difficult because of the requisite fast and selective thermal release of minute amounts of the short-lived product atoms from the ISOL target in the presence of bulk amounts of target material. Experimental studies are under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which are designed to measure the time evolution of implanted elements diffused from refractory target materials which are candidates for forming radioactive ion beams (RIBs) at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF). The diffusion coefficients are derived by comparing experimental data with numerical solutions to a one-dimensional form of Fick's second equation for ion implanted distributions. In this report, we describe the experimental arrangement, experimental procedures, and provide time release data and diffusion coefficients for releasing ion implanted 37Cl from Zr 5Si 3 and 75As, 79Br, and 78Se from Zr 5Ge 3 and estimates of the diffusion coefficients for 35Cl, 63Cu, 65Cu, 69Ga, and 71Ga diffused from BN; 35Cl, 63Cu, 65Cu, 69Ga, 75As, and 78Se diffused from C; 35Cl, 68Cu, 69Ga, 75As, and 78Se diffused from Ta.

  15. BeppoSAX observations of quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, F.; Mineo, T.; Laor, A.; Giallongo, E

    1999-01-01

    We present results from recent BeppoSAX observations of low redshift (z<0.4, PG sample) and high redshift (2quasars. Significant curvature has been detected in the spectra of the observed PGs: the spectrum flattens by 0.5 above 2 keV. The possible presence of narrow features in the MECS spectra is discussed. Intrinsic absorption has been measured in the z=3.9 radio-loud quasar 1745+624. The z=2.3 radio-quiet quasar HE1104-1805 has been found at a very low flux level, in comparison with previous ROSAT and ASCA observations, implying large (factor of {approx} 4) variability on years timescales.

  16. An Intergalactic Magnetic Field from Quasar Outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Furlanetto, S; Furlanetto, Steven; Loeb, Abraham

    2001-01-01

    Outflows from quasars inevitably pollute the intergalactic medium (IGM) with magnetic fields. The short-lived activity of a quasar leaves behind an expanding magnetized bubble in the IGM. We model the expansion of the remnant quasar bubbles and calculate their distribution as a function magnetic field strength at different redshifts. We find that by a redshift z ~ 3, about 5-80% of the IGM volume is filled by magnetic fields with an energy density > 10% of the mean thermal energy density of a photo-ionized IGM (at ~ 10^4 K). As massive galaxies and X-ray clusters condense out of the magnetized IGM, the adiabatic compression of the magnetic field could result in the fields observed in these systems without a need for further dynamo amplification.

  17. Detecting the First Quasars with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, Marco; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2010-05-01

    We show that ALMA is the first telescope that can probe the dust-obscured central region of quasars at z > 5 with a maximum resolution of ~ 30 pc employing the 18 km baseline. We explore the possibility of detecting the first quasars with ALMA (Schleicher, Spaans, & Klessen 2009). For this purpose, we adopt the Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 as a reference system and calculate the expected fluxes if this galaxy were placed at high redshift. This choice is motivated by the detailed observations available for this system and the absence of any indication for an evolution in metallicity in high-redshift quasars. It is a conservative choice due to the moderate column densities in NGC 1068, leading to moderate fluxes.

  18. The Sudden Death of the Nearest Quasar

    CERN Document Server

    Schawinski, Kevin; Virani, Shanil; Urry, C Megan; Keel, William C; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Lintott, Chris J; Manning, Anna; Coppi, Paolo; Kaviraj, Sugata; Bamford, Steven P; Jozsa, Gyula I G; Garrett, Michael; van Arkel, Hanny; Gay, Pamela; Fortson, Lucy; 10.1088/2041-8205/724/1/L30

    2010-01-01

    Galaxy formation is significantly modulated by energy output from supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies which grow in highly efficient luminous quasar phases. The timescale on which black holes transition into and out of such phases is, however, unknown. We present the first measurement of the shutdown timescale for an individual quasar using X-ray observations of the nearby galaxy IC 2497, which hosted a luminous quasar no more than 70,000 years ago that is still seen as a light echo in `Hanny's Voorwerp', but whose present-day radiative output is lower by at least 2 and more likely by over 4 orders of magnitude. This extremely rapid shutdown provides new insights into the physics of accretion in supermassive black holes, and may signal a transition of the accretion disk to a radiatively inefficient state.

  19. Evidence for Fluorescent Fe II Emission from Extended Low Ionization Outflows in Obscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tinggui; Ferland, Gary J.; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that outflows in at least some broad absorption line (BAL) quasars are extended well beyond the putative dusty torus. Such outflows should be detectable in obscured quasars. We present four WISE selected infrared red quasars with very strong and peculiar ultraviolet Fe ii emission lines: strong UV Fe ii UV arising from transitions to ground/low excitation levels, and very weak Fe ii at wavelengths longer than 2800 Å. The spectra of these quasars display strong resonant emission lines, such as C iv, Al iii and Mg ii but sometimes, a lack of non-resonant lines such as C iii], S iii and He ii. We interpret the Fe ii lines as resonantly scattered light from the extended outflows that are viewed nearly edge-on, so that the accretion disk and broad line region are obscured by the dusty torus, while the extended outflows are not. We show that dust free gas exposed to strong radiation longward of 912 Å produces Fe ii emission very similar to that observed. The gas is too cool to collisionally excite Fe ii lines, accounting for the lack of optical emission. The spectral energy distribution from the UV to the mid-infrared can be modeled as emission from a clumpy dusty torus, with UV emission being reflected/scattered light either by the dusty torus or the outflow. Within this scenario, we estimate a minimum covering factor of the outflows from a few to 20% for the Fe ii scattering region, suggesting that Fe ii BAL quasars are at a special stage of quasar evolution.

  20. Transesophageal color Doppler evaluation of obstructive lesions using the new "Quasar" technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, P; Nanda, N C; Gatewood, R P; Cape, E G; Yoganathan, A P

    1995-01-01

    Due to the unavoidable problem of aliasing, color flow signals from high blood flow velocities cannot be measured directly by conventional color Doppler. A new technology termed Quantitative Un-Aliased Speed Algorithm Recognition (Quasar) has been developed to overcome this limitation. Employing this technology, we used transesophageal color Doppler echocardiography to investigate whether the velocities detected by the Quasar would correlate with those obtained by continuous-wave Doppler both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro study, a 5.0 MHz transesophageal transducer of a Kontron Sigma 44 color Doppler flow system was used. Fourteen different peak velocities calculated and recorded by color Doppler-guided continuous-wave Doppler were randomly selected. In the clinical study, intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography was performed using the same transducer 18 adults (13 aortic valve stenosis, 2 aortic and 2 mitral stenosis, 2 hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and 1 mitral valve stenosis). Following each continuous-wave Doppler measurement, the Quasar was activated, and a small Quasar marker was placed in the brightest area of the color flow jet to obtain the maximum mean velocity readout. The maximum mean velocities measured by Quasar closely correlated with maximum peak velocities obtained by color flow guided continuous-wave Doppler in both in vitro (0.53 to 1.65 m/s, r = 0.99) and in vivo studies (1.50 to 6.01 m/s, r = 0.97). We conclude that the new Quasar technology can accurately measure high blood flow velocities during transesophageal color Doppler echocardiography. This technique has the potential of obviating the need for continuous-wave Doppler.

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 4. Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W.N.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester,; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Johns Hopkins U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona

    2007-04-01

    We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 5740 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2-minutes rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

  2. Target Selection and Deselection at the Berkeley StructuralGenomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-03-22

    At the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center (BSGC), our goalis to obtain a near-complete structural complement of proteins in theminimal organisms Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae, two closelyrelated pathogens. Current targets for structure determination have beenselected in six major stages, starting with those predicted to be mosttractable to high throughput study and likely to yield new structuralinformation. We report on the process used to select these proteins, aswell as our target deselection procedure. Target deselection reducesexperimental effort by eliminating targets similar to those recentlysolved by the structural biology community or other centers. We measurethe impact of the 69 structures solved at the BSGC as of July 2004 onstructure prediction coverage of the M. pneumoniae and M. genitaliumproteomes. The number of Mycoplasma proteins for which thefold couldfirst be reliably assigned based on structures solved at the BSGC (24 M.pneumoniae and 21 M. genitalium) is approximately 25 percent of the totalresulting from work at all structural genomics centers and the worldwidestructural biology community (94 M. pneumoniae and 86M. genitalium)during the same period. As the number of structures contributed by theBSGC during that period is less than 1 percent of the total worldwideoutput, the benefits of a focused target selection strategy are apparent.If the structures of all current targets were solved, the percentage ofM. pneumoniae proteins for which folds could be reliably assigned wouldincrease from approximately 57 percent (391 of 687) at present to around80 percent (550 of 687), and the percentage of the proteome that could beaccurately modeled would increase from around 37 percent (254 of 687) toabout 64 percent (438 of 687). In M. genitalium, the percentage of theproteome that could be structurally annotated based on structures of ourremaining targets would rise from 72 percent (348 of 486) to around 76percent (371 of 486), with the

  3. The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability of Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Marziani, Paola; Zhang, Shaohua; Muzahid, Sowgat; O’Dea, Christopher P.

    2016-10-01

    We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) variability (rest frame wavelengths 500–920 Å) of high-luminosity quasars using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) (low to intermediate redshift sample) and Sloan Digital sky Survey (SDSS) (high redshift sample) archives. The combined HST and SDSS data indicates a much more pronounced variability when the sampling time between observations in the quasar rest frame is \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} compared to \\lt 1.5× {10}7 s. Based on an excess variance analysis, for time intervals \\lt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 10% of the quasars (4/40) show evidence of EUV variability. Similarly, for time intervals \\gt 2× {10}7 {{s}} in the quasar rest frame, 55% of the quasars (21/38) show evidence of EUV variability. The propensity for variability does not show any statistically significant change between 2.5× {10}7 {{s}} and 3.16× {10}7 {{s}} (1 year). The temporal behavior is one of a threshold time interval for significant variability as opposed to a gradual increase on these timescales. A threshold timescale can indicate a characteristic spatial dimension of the EUV region. We explore this concept in the context of the slim disk models of accretion. We find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the radial infall time to the plunge region of the optically thin surface layer of the slim disk that is responsible for the preponderance of the EUV flux emission (primarily within 0–7 black hole radii from the inner edge of the disk) is consistent with the empirically determined variability timescale.

  4. Library selection and directed evolution approaches to engineering targeted viral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae-Hyung; Lim, Kwang-il; Schaffer, David V

    2007-10-15

    Gene therapy, to delivery of genetic material to a patient for therapeutic benefit, has significant promise for translating basic knowledge of disease mechanism into biomedical treatments. The clinical development of the field has been slowed, however, by the need for improvements in the properties and capabilities of gene delivery vehicles. Vehicles based on viruses offer the potential for efficient gene delivery, but because viruses did not evolve to serve human therapeutic needs, many of their properties require significant improvement, including their safety, efficiency, and capacity for targeted gene delivery. Since viruses are highly complex biological entities, engineering such properties at the molecular level can be challenging. However, there has been significant progress in developing approaches that mimic the mechanisms by which viruses arose in the first place. In particular, library-based selection, the generation of one diverse genetic library and selection for new properties, and directed evolution, based on the multiple rounds of library generation and selection for iterative improvement of function, have strong potential in engineering novel properties into these complex biomolecular assemblies. This review will discuss progress in the application of peptide display, library selection, and directed evolution technologies toward engineering vectors based on retrovirus, adeno-associated virus, and adenovirus that are capable of targeted delivery to specific cell types. In addition to creating biomedically useful products, these approaches have future potential to yield novel insights into viral structure-function relationships. Copyright 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  6. Quasar polarization with ultralight (pseudo-)scalars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ki-Young choi; Subhayan Mandal; Chang Sub Shin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that the absence of circular polarization of visible light from quasars severely constrains the interpretation of axion-like particles (ALPs) as a solution for the generation of linear polarization. Furthermore, the new observation of linear polarization in radio wavelength from quasars, similar to the earlier observation performed in the optical bands, makes the ALPs scenario inconsistent with at least one of the two observations. In this study, we extend this scenario by including more scalars. We find that the effects from scalar and pseudoscalar neutralize each other, thereby suppressing the circular polarization, while preserving consistent linear polarization, as observed in both the visible and radio wave bands.

  7. Spectroscopic Identification of Type 2 Quasars at Z < 1 in SDSS-III/BOSS

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Sihan; Zakamska, Nadia L

    2016-01-01

    The physics and demographics of type 2 quasars remain poorly understood, and new samples of such objects selected in a variety of ways can give insight into their physical properties, evolution, and relationship to their host galaxies. We present a sample of 2758 type 2 quasars at z $\\leq$ 1 from the SDSS-III/BOSS spectroscopic database, selected on the basis of their emission-line properties. We probe the luminous end of the population by requiring the rest-frame equivalent width of [OIII] to be > 100 {\\AA}. We distinguish our objects from star-forming galaxies and type 1 quasars using line widths, standard emission line ratio diagnostic diagrams at z 0.52. The majority of our objects have [OIII] luminosities in the range 10^8.5-10^10 L$_{\\odot}$ and redshifts between 0.4 and 0.65. Our sample includes over 400 type 2 quasars with incorrectly measured redshifts in the BOSS database; such objects often show kinematic substructure or outflows in the [OIII] line. The majority of the sample has counterparts in t...

  8. Using quasars as standard clocks for measuring cosmological redshift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn D; Stojkovic, Branislav; Stojkovic, Dejan; Weltman, Amanda

    2012-06-08

    We report hitherto unnoticed patterns in quasar light curves. We characterize segments of the quasar's light curves with the slopes of the straight lines fit through them. These slopes appear to be directly related to the quasars' redshifts. Alternatively, using only global shifts in time and flux, we are able to find significant overlaps between the light curves of different pairs of quasars by fitting the ratio of their redshifts. We are then able to reliably determine the redshift of one quasar from another. This implies that one can use quasars as standard clocks, as we explicitly demonstrate by constructing two independent methods of finding the redshift of a quasar from its light curve.

  9. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    La Plante, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled $N$-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyman-$\\alpha$ forest and baryon temperature-density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models include two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function (QLF) given a halo catalog from an $N$-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurem...

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U.; Richards, Gordon T.; /Drexel U.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Boroson, Todd A.; /Kitt Peak Observ.; Ross, Nicholas P.; /Penn State U.; Shen, Yue; /Princeton U. Observ.; Brandt, W.N.; /Penn State U.; Fan, Xiaohui; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Southampton U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-04-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of {approx} 9380 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than 4, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than 5. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i < 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1-inch rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.

  11. Development of SED Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Ji, Tae-Geun; Hyun, Minhee; Choi, Changsu; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2016-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and performance of a camera system, Spectral energy distribution Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN). It was developed to measure SEDs of high redshift quasar candidates (z $\\gtrsim$ 5) and other targets, e.g., young stellar objects, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts, and to trace the time variability of SEDs of objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SQUEAN consists of an on-axis focal plane camera module, an auto-guiding system, and mechanical supporting structures. The science camera module is composed of a focal reducer, a customizable filter wheel, and a CCD camera on the focal plane. The filter wheel uses filter cartridges that can house filters with different shapes and sizes, enabling the filter wheel to hold twenty filters of 50 mm $\\times$ 50 mm size, ten filters of 86 mm $\\times$ 86 mm size, or many other combinations. The initial filter mask was applied to calibrate the filter wheel with high accuracy and we verified that the filter position is repea...

  12. Development of SED Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Jeon, Yiseul; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Ji, Tae-Geun; Hyun, Minhee; Choi, Changsu; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2016-11-01

    We describe the characteristics and performance of a camera system, Spectral energy distribution Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN). It was developed to measure SEDs of high-redshift quasar candidates (z ≳ 5) and other targets, e.g., young stellar objects, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts, and to trace the time variability of SEDs of objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SQUEAN consists of an on-axis focal plane camera module, an autoguiding system, and mechanical supporting structures. The science camera module is composed of a focal reducer, a customizable filter wheel, and a CCD camera on the focal plane. The filter wheel uses filter cartridges that can house filters with different shapes and sizes, enabling the filter wheel to hold 20 filters of 50 mm × 50 mm size, 10 filters of 86 mm × 86 mm size, or many other combinations. The initial filter mask was applied to calibrate the filter wheel with high accuracy, and we verified that the filter position is repeatable at much less than one pixel accuracy. We installed and tested 50 nm medium bandwidth filters of 600–1050 nm and other filters at the commissioning observation in 2015 February. We found that SQUEAN can reach limiting magnitudes of 23.3–25.3 AB mag at 5σ in a one-hour total integration time.

  13. Selective Targeting of Extracellular Insulin-Degrading Enzyme by Quasi-Irreversible Thiol-Modifying Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hay, Samer O; Bannister, Thomas D; Wang, Hui; Cameron, Michael D; Caulfield, Thomas R; Masson, Amandine; Bertrand, Juliette; Howard, Erin A; McGuire, Michael P; Crisafulli, Umberto; Rosenberry, Terrone R; Topper, Caitlyn L; Thompson, Caroline R; Schürer, Stephan C; Madoux, Franck; Hodder, Peter; Leissring, Malcolm A

    2015-12-18

    Many therapeutically important enzymes are present in multiple cellular compartments, where they can carry out markedly different functions; thus, there is a need for pharmacological strategies to selectively manipulate distinct pools of target enzymes. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is a thiol-sensitive zinc-metallopeptidase that hydrolyzes diverse peptide substrates in both the cytosol and the extracellular space, but current genetic and pharmacological approaches are incapable of selectively inhibiting the protease in specific subcellular compartments. Here, we describe the discovery, characterization, and kinetics-based optimization of potent benzoisothiazolone-based inhibitors that, by virtue of a unique quasi-irreversible mode of inhibition, exclusively inhibit extracellular IDE. The mechanism of inhibition involves nucleophilic attack by a specific active-site thiol of the enzyme on the inhibitors, which bear an isothiazolone ring that undergoes irreversible ring opening with the formation of a disulfide bond. Notably, binding of the inhibitors is reversible under reducing conditions, thus restricting inhibition to IDE present in the extracellular space. The identified inhibitors are highly potent (IC50(app) = 63 nM), nontoxic at concentrations up to 100 μM, and appear to preferentially target a specific cysteine residue within IDE. These novel inhibitors represent powerful new tools for clarifying the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this poorly understood protease, and their unusual mechanism of action should be applicable to other therapeutic targets.

  14. Selective innervation of foreign muscles following damage or removal of normal muscle targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, V; Wigston, D J

    1992-08-22

    The restoration of a normal pattern of neural connectivity following nerve injury depends upon the selective reinnervation of appropriate postsynaptic targets. Previous studies suggest that, in the neuromuscular system, recognition between regenerating motoneurons and target muscles depends upon the positions of origin of the motoneurons and muscles. In axolotls, portions of the motor pools of adjacent muscles overlap. We found that, following removal of a pair of adjacent hindlimb muscles, anterior and posterior iliotibialis, many regenerating iliotibialis motor axons invaded foreign muscles. A more anterior foreign muscle, puboischiofemoralis internus, received greater innervation from anterior iliotibialis motoneurons, whereas a more posterior muscle, iliofibularis, received greater innervation from posterior iliotibialis motoneurons. Furthermore, anterior iliotibialis motoneurons that reinnervated puboischiofemoralis internus occupied the rostral portion of anterior iliotibialis motor pool, which overlaps that of puboischiofemoralis internus. Anterior iliotibialis motoneurons that reinnervated iliofibularis occupied the caudal portion of the anterior iliotibialis motor pool, which overlaps that of iliofibularis. When both anterior and posterior iliotibialis were damaged so that their myofibers were permanently destroyed, the rostrocaudal origins of the motoneurons that reinnervated them were virtually the same, suggesting that the motoneurons had difficulty distinguishing between the myofiberless iliotibialis muscles. However, some iliotibialis motoneurons invaded puboischiofemoralis internus instead of their myofiberless targets. Puboischiofemoralis internus received more innervation from the anterior iliotibialis motoneurons than the positionally less appropriate posterior iliotibialis motoneurons. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that selective reinnervation of muscle depends upon a system of recognition cues based on position.

  15. STRUCTURE FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM QUASAR VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W; Becker, R; White, R; Loomis, C

    2004-11-15

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35,165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6,413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of {approx}40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts/flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

  16. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  17. The Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Variable Selection and Anticipated Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J.; Myers, Adam D.; Eracleous, Michael; Kelly, Brandon; Badenes, Carlos; Bañados, Eduardo; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Borissova, Jura; Brandt, William Nielsen; Burgett, William S.; Chambers, Kenneth; Draper, Peter W.; Davenport, James R. A.; Flewelling, Heather; Garnavich, Peter; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Isler, Jedidah C.; Kaiser, Nick; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kudritzki, Rolf P.; Metcalfe, Nigel; Morgan, Jeffrey S.; Pâris, Isabelle; Parvizi, Mahmoud; Poleski, Radosław; Price, Paul A.; Salvato, Mara; Shanks, Tom; Schlafly, Eddie F.; Schneider, Donald P.; Shen, Yue; Stassun, Keivan; Tonry, John T.; Walter, Fabian; Waters, Chris Z.

    2015-06-01

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg2 selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  18. New quasar surveys with WIRO: Searching for high redshift (z~6) quasar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze Nunez, Evan; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Griffith, Emily; Harvey, William Bradford; Lee, Daniel; Lyke, Bradley; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    High redshift quasars (z~6) are of great interest to fundamental astronomy due to the information they hold about the early universe. With their low number density in the sky, however, they are elusive objects. Reported here is our search for these high redshift quasars using the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) 2.3m telescope. We search for potential candidates that have been detected by surveys such as WISE, which have been mostly redshifted out of the optical. The main emission feature of these quasars (the Lyman-Alpha line at ~1216 Angstroms rest-frame) would be redshifted to the z-band or beyond. This means that the quasars should have very low levels of i-band flux. These objects are known as i-dropouts. By imaging the quasars in the i-band and running photometric analysis on our fields, candidates can be identified or rejected by whether or not they appear in our fields. We also provide an analysis of the colors of our candidate high-redshift quasars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST1560461

  19. Evodiamine selectively targets cancer stem-like cells through the p53-p21-Rb pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seula; Woo, Jong Kyu; Jung, Yuchae; Jeong, Dawoon; Kang, Minsook; Yoo, Young-Ji; Lee, Hani; Oh, Seung Hyun; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2016-01-22

    In spite of the recent improvements, the resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy followed by relapse is the main hurdle for the successful treatment of breast cancer, a leading cause of death in women. A small population of breast cancer cells that have stem-like characteristics (cancer stem-like cells; CSLC) may contribute to this resistance and relapse. Here, we report on a component of a traditional Chinese medicine, evodiamine, which selectively targets CSLC of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDAMB 231 at a concentration that does show a little or no cytotoxic effect on bulk cancer cells. While evodiamine caused the accumulation of bulk cancer cells at the G2/M phase, it did not hold CSLC in a specific cell cycle phase but instead, selectively killed CSLC. This was not due to the culture of CSLC in suspension or without FBS. A proteomic analysis and western blotting revealed that evodiamine changed the expression of cell cycle regulating molecules more efficiently in CSLC cells than in bulk cancer cells. Surprisingly, evodiamine selectively activated p53 and p21 and decreased inactive Rb, the master molecules in G1/S checkpoint. These data collectively suggest a novel mechanism involving CSLC-specific targeting by evodiamine and its possible use to the therapy of breast cancer.

  20. Trihydroxamate siderophore-fluoroquinolone conjugates are selective sideromycin antibiotics that target Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wencewicz, Timothy A; Long, Timothy E; Möllmann, Ute; Miller, Marvin J

    2013-03-20

    Siderophores are multidentate iron(III) chelators used by bacteria for iron assimilation. Sideromycins, also called siderophore-antibiotic conjugates, are a unique subset of siderophores that enter bacterial cells via siderophore uptake pathways and deliver the toxic antibiotic in a "Trojan horse" fashion. Sideromycins represent a novel antibiotic delivery technology with untapped potential for developing sophisticated microbe-selective antibacterial agents that limit the emergence of bacterial resistance. The chemical synthesis of a series of mono-, bis-, and trihydroxamate sideromycins are described here along with their biological evaluation in antibacterial susceptibility assays. The linear hydroxamate siderophores used for the sideromycins in this study were derived from the ferrioxamine family and inspired by the naturally occurring salmycin sideromycins. The antibacterial agents used were a β-lactam carbacepholosporin, Lorabid, and a fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin, chosen for the different locations of their biological targets, the periplasm (extracellular) and the cytoplasm (intracellular). The linear hydroxamate-based sideromycins were selectively toxic toward Gram-positive bacteria, especially Staphylococcus aureus SG511 (MIC = 1.0 μM for the trihydroxamate-fluoroquinolone sideromycin). Siderophore-sideromycin competition assays demonstrated that only the fluoroquinolone sideromycins required membrane transport to reach their cytoplasmic biological target and that a trihydroxamate siderophore backbone was required for protein-mediated active transport of the sideromycins into S. aureus cells via siderophore uptake pathways. This work represents a comprehensive study of linear hydroxamate sideromycins and teaches how to build effective hydroxamate-based sideromycins as Gram-positive selective antibiotic agents.

  1. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  2. Aurora B kinase is a potent and selective target in MYCN-driven neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogen, Dominik; Wei, Jun S; Azorsa, David O; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Buehler, Eugen; Guha, Rajarshi; Keller, Jonathan M; Mathews Griner, Lesley A; Ferrer, Marc; Song, Young K; Liao, Hongling; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Gryder, Berkley E; Sindri, Sivasish; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Zhang, Shile; Shern, John F; Yohe, Marielle E; Taschner-Mandl, Sabine; Shohet, Jason M; Thomas, Craig J; Martin, Scott E; Ambros, Peter F; Khan, Javed

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in multimodal treatment, neuroblastoma (NB) is often fatal for children with high-risk disease and many survivors need to cope with long-term side effects from high-dose chemotherapy and radiation. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed an siRNA screen of the druggable genome combined with a small molecule screen of 465 compounds targeting 39 different mechanisms of actions in four NB cell lines. We identified 58 genes as targets, including AURKB, in at least one cell line. In the drug screen, aurora kinase inhibitors (nine molecules) and in particular the AURKB-selective compound, barasertib, were the most discriminatory with regard to sensitivity for MYCN-amplified cell lines. In an expanded panel of ten NB cell lines, those with MYCN-amplification and wild-type TP53 were the most sensitive to low nanomolar concentrations of barasertib. Inhibition of the AURKB kinase activity resulted in decreased phosphorylation of the known target, histone H3, and upregulation of TP53 in MYCN-amplified, TP53 wild-type cells. However, both wild-type and TP53 mutant MYCN-amplified cell lines arrested in G2/M phase upon AURKB inhibition. Additionally, barasertib induced endoreduplication and apoptosis. Treatment of MYCN-amplified/TP53 wild-type neuroblastoma xenografts resulted in profound growth inhibition and tumor regression. Therefore, aurora B kinase inhibition is highly effective in aggressive neuroblastoma and warrants further investigation in clinical trials.

  3. Selective cellular uptake and induction of apoptosis of cancer-targeted selenium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanyu; He, Lizhen; Liu, Wen; Fan, Cundong; Zheng, Wenjie; Wong, Yum-Shing; Chen, Tianfeng

    2013-09-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) have garnered a great deal of attention as potential cancer therapeutic payloads. However, the in vivo targeting drug delivery has been challenging. Herein, we describe the synthesis of tansferrin (Tf)-conjugated SeNPs and its use as a cancer-targeted drug delivery system to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and anticancer efficacy. Tf as targeting ligand significantly enhances the cellular uptake of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded SeNPs through clathrin-mediated and caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis in cancer cells overexpressing transferrin receptor, and increases their selectivity between cancer and normal cells. DOX-loaded and Tf-conjugated SeNPs (Tf-SeNPs) exhibits unprecedented enhanced cytotoxicity toward cancer cells through induction of apoptosis with the involvement of intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. Internalized Tf-SeNPs triggers intracellular ROS overproduction, thus activates p53 and MAPKs pathways to promote cell apoptosis. In the nude mice xenograft experiment, Tf-SeNPs significantly inhibits the tumor growth via induction of p53-mediated apoptosis. This cancer-targeted design of SeNPs opens a new path for synergistic treating of cancer with higher efficacy and decreased side effects.

  4. Selection of target mutation in rat gastrointestinal tract E. coli by minute dosage of enrofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dachuan; Chen, Kaichao; Li, Ruichao; Liu, Lizhang; Guo, Jiubiao; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that bacterial resistance is selected within a mutation selection window of antibiotics. More recent studies showed that even extremely low concentration of antibiotic could select resistant bacteria in vitro. Yet little is known about the exact antibiotic concentration range that can effectively select for resistant organisms in animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study, the effect of different dosages of enrofloxacin on resistance and mutation development in rat GI tract E. coli was investigated by determining the number of resistant E. coli recoverable from rat fecal samples. Our data showed that high dose antibiotic treatment could effectively eliminate E. coli with single gyrA mutation in the early course of treatment, yet the eradication effects diminished upon prolonged treatment. Therapeutic and sub-therapeutic dose (1/10 and 1/100 of therapeutic doses) of enrofloxacin could effectively select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment and during the cessation periods. Surprisingly, very low dose of enrofloxacin (1/1000 therapeutic dose) could also select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment, only with slightly lower efficiency. No enrofloxacin-resistant E. coli could be selected at all test levels of enrofloxacin during long term treatment and the strength of antibiotic treatment does not alter the overall level of E. coli in rat GI tract. This study demonstrated that long term antibiotic treatment seems to be the major trigger for the development of target mutations in GI tract E. coli, which provided insight into the rational use of antibiotics in animal husbandry.

  5. Giant scattering cones in obscured quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Obied, Georges; Wylezalek, Dominika; Liu, Guilin

    2015-01-01

    We analyze Hubble Space Telescope observations of scattering regions in 20 luminous obscured quasars at $0.24quasar hosts' star formation rates. Modeling these regions as illuminated dusty cones, we estimate the radial density distributions of the interstellar medium as well as the geometric properties of circumnuclear quasar obscuration -- inclinations and covering factors. Small derived opening angles (median half-angle and standard deviation 27\\dg$\\pm$9\\dg) are inconsistent with a 1:1 type 1 / type 2 ratio. We suggest that quasar obscuration is patchy and that the observer has a $\\sim 40\\%$ chan...

  6. The Extreme Ultraviolet Variability of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Punsly, Brian; Zhang, Shaohua; Muzahid, Sowgat; O'Dea, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    We study the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) variability (rest frame wavelengths 500 - 920 $\\AA$) of high luminosity quasars using HST (low to intermediate redshift sample) and SDSS (high redshift sample) archives. The combined HST and SDSS data indicates a much more pronounced variability when the sampling time between observations in the quasar rest frame is $> 2\\times 10^{7}$ sec compared to $2\\times 10^{7}$ sec in the quasar rest frame, $55\\%$ of the quasars (21/38) show evidence of EUV variability. The propensity for variability does not show any statistically significant change between $2.5\\times 10^{7}$ sec and $3.16\\times 10^{7}$ sec (1 yr). The temporal behavior is one of a threshold time interval for significant variability as opposed to a gradual increase on these time scales. A threshold time scale can indicate a characteristic spatial dimension of the EUV region. We explore this concept in the context of the slim disk models of accretion. We find that for rapidly spinning black holes, the radial infall...

  7. Theoretical spectroscopy of quasars within Karlsson's law

    CERN Document Server

    Moret-Bailly, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The law introduced by Karlsson in spectroscopy of low-redshift quasars involves the Lyman spectrum of hydrogen atoms. Thus, it appears necessary to study the concepts introduced by a standard spectroscopy of quasars, studied here, with those deducted from $\\Lambda$-CDM.A visible absorption of a sharp and saturated spectral line in a gas requires a long path without perturbations as collisions or cosmological redshift. Spectra of absorbed, saturated lines of quasars obeying Karlsson's law mainly result from interactions of natural, thermal light radiated by quasar with relatively cold, low presure atomic hydrogen. These lines are produced by three processes: a) A conventional absorption in a relatively cold gas produces a set of lines; b) These lines are multiplied by absorption after fundamental 3K or 4K redshifts, where K is Karlsson's constant: Spectra show that redshifts 3K (or 4K) exactly bring absorbed Lyman beta (or gamma) line on Lyman alpha: redshift almost disappears, and gas lines are intensely abso...

  8. Black-hole masses of distant quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods commonly used to determine or estimate the black hole mass in quiescent or active galaxies is presented and it is argued that the use of mass-scaling relations is both a reliable and the preferred method to apply to large samples of distant quasars. The method uses...

  9. Measuring Distances to Remote Galaxies and Quasars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Patrick J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of spectroscopy and the redshift to measure how far an object is by measuring how fast it is receding from earth. Lists the most distant quasars yet found. Tables include "Redshift vs. Distance" and "Distances to Celestial Objects for Various Cosmologies." (CW)

  10. Quasar Mass Functions Across Cosmic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    I present mass functions of actively accreting black holes detected in different quasar surveys which in concert cover a wide range of cosmic history. I briefly address what we learn from these mass functions. I summarize the motivation for such a study and the methods by which we determine black...

  11. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Shields, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within...... the framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time...... scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note...

  12. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, M; Shields, J C; Constantin, A; Heidt, J; Jäger, K; Vestergaard, M; Wagner, S J

    2003-01-01

    We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within the framework of the most recent photoionization models to estimate the metallicity of the gas associated with the high-z quasars. Standard photoionization parameters and the assumption of secondary nitrogen enrichment indicate an average abundance of Z/Z_sol = 4 to 5 in the line emitting gas. Assuming a time scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note that this also appears to be the era of re-ionization of the universe. Finally, there is some evidence for a positive lum...

  13. Quasar feedback revealed by giant molecular outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Feruglio, Chiara; Piconcelli, Enrico; Menci, Nicola; Aussel, Herve'; Lamastra, Alessandra; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2010-01-01

    In the standard scenario for galaxy evolution the transformation of young star-forming galaxies into red bulge-dominated spheroids, where star formation has been quenched, is often explained by invoking a strong negative feedback generated by accretion onto a central super-massive black hole. The depletion of gas resulting from quasar-driven outflows should eventually stop star-formation across the host galaxy and lead to the black hole "suicide" for starvation. Direct observational evidence for a major quasar feedback onto the host galaxy is still missing, since outflows previously observed in quasars are associated with the ionized component of the gas, which only accounts for a minor fraction of the total gas content, and typically occur in the central regions. We used the IRAM PdBI to observe the CO(1-0) transition in Mrk 231, the closest quasar known. We detect broad wings of the CO line, with velocities up to 750 km/s and spatially resolved on the kpc scale. Such broad CO wings trace a giant molecular o...

  14. Magnetic Fields in Quasar Cores, 2

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, G B

    1999-01-01

    Multi-frequency polarimetry with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) telescope has revealed absolute Faraday Rotation Measures (RMs) in excess of 1000 rad/m/m in the central regions of 7 out of 8 strong quasars studied (e.g., 3C 273, 3C 279, 3C 395). Beyond a projected distance of ~20 pc, however, the jets are found to have |RM| < 100 rad/m/m. Such sharp RM gradients cannot be produced by cluster or galactic-scale magnetic fields, but rather must be the result of magnetic fields organized over the central 1-100 pc. The RMs of the sources studied to date and the polarization properties of BL Lacs, quasars and galaxies are shown to be consistent so far with the predictions of unified schemes. The direct detection of high RMs in these quasar cores can explain the low fractional core polarizations usually observed in quasars at centimeter wavelengths as the result of irregularities in the Faraday screen on scales smaller than the telescope beam. Variability in the RM of the core is reported for 3C 279 between ...

  15. Effects of Quasar Feedback in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Suman; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of quasar feedback on distributions of baryons in galaxy groups using high-resolution numerical simulations. We use the entropy-conserving Gadget code that includes gas cooling and star formation, modified to include a physically-based model of quasar feedback. For a sample of ten galaxy group-sized dark matter halos with masses in the range of 1 to $5\\times 10^{13} M_{\\odot}/h$, star formation is suppressed by more than 30% in the inner regions due to the additional pressure support by quasar feedback, while gas is driven from the inner region towards the outer region of the halos. As a result, the average gas density is 20% lower in the inner region and 10% higher in the outer region in the simulation, compared to a similar simulation with no quasar feedback. Gas pressure is also higher in the outer region, while temperature and entropy are enhanced in the inner region. The total group gas fraction in the two simulations generally differs by less than 10%. We also find a small enhancemen...

  16. Galaxy clustering around nearby luminous quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, K B; Kirhakos, S; Schneider, D P; Fisher, Karl B; Bahcall, John N; Schneider, Donald P

    1996-01-01

    We examine the clustering of galaxies around a sample of 20 luminous low redshift (z 100 kpc). Our results reinforce the idea that low redshift quasars are located preferentially in groups of 10-20 galaxies rather than in rich clusters. We see no significant difference in the clustering amplitudes derived from radio-loud and radio-quiet subsamples.

  17. A Connection between Obscuration and Star Formation in Luminous Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chien-Ting J; Alberts, Stacey; Harrison, Chris M; Alexander, David M; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J I; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R; Gorjian, Varoujan; Goulding, Andrew D; Hainline, Kevin N; Jones, Christine; Kochanek, Christopher S; Murray, Stephen S; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel; Stern, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We present a measurement of the star formation properties of a uniform sample of mid-IR selected, unobscured and obscured quasars (QSO1s and QSO2s) in the Bo\\"otes survey region. We use an spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis for photometric data spanning optical to far-IR wavelengths to decompose AGN and host galaxy components. We find that when compared to a matched sample of QSO1s, the QSO2s have higher far-IR detection fractions, far-IR fluxes and infrared star formation luminosities ($L_{\\rm IR}^{\\rm SF}$) by a factor of $\\sim2$. Correspondingly, we show that the AGN obscured fraction rises from 0.3 to 0.7 between $4-40\\times10^{11}L_\\odot$. We also find evidence associating the absorption in the X-ray emission with the presence of far-IR emitting dust. Overall, these results are consistent with galaxy evolution models in which quasar obscurations can be associated with a dust-enshrouded starburst galaxies.

  18. Star Formation in Luminous Quasars at 2

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Kathryn; Schulz, Bernhard; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Viero, Marco; Anderson, Nick; Bethermin, Matthieu; Chapman, Scott; Clements, David L; Cooray, Asantha; Efstathiou, Andreas; Feltre, Anne; Hurley, Peter; Ibar, Eduardo; Lacy, Mark; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mathew J; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petty, Sara M; Pitchford, Lura K; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, Myrto; Vieira, Joaquin; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between star formation rates ($\\dot{M}_{s}$) and AGN properties in optically selected type 1 quasars at $2quasars scaling with black hole mass, though we cannot rule out a separate relation with black hole accretion rate. Star formation rates...

  19. Broad Absorption Line Variability in Radio-Loud Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Welling, C A; Brandt, W N; Capellupo, D M; Gibson, R R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate C IV broad absorption line (BAL) variability within a sample of 46 radio-loud quasars (RLQs), selected from SDSS/FIRST data to include both core-dominated (39) and lobe-dominated (7) objects. The sample consists primarily of high-ionization BAL quasars, and a substantial fraction have large BAL velocities or equivalent widths; their radio luminosities and radio-loudness values span ~2.5 orders of magnitude. We have obtained 34 new Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) spectra of 28 BAL RLQs to compare to earlier SDSS data, and we also incorporate archival coverage (primarily dual-epoch SDSS) for a total set of 78 pairs of equivalent width measurements for 46 BAL RLQs, probing rest-frame timescales of ~80-6000 d (median 500 d). In general, only modest changes in the depths of segments of absorption troughs are observed, akin to those seen in prior studies of BAL RQQs. Also similar to previous findings for RQQs, the RLQs studied here are more likely to display BAL variability on longer rest-frame timescal...

  20. Masitinib (AB1010, a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting KIT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Dubreuil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The stem cell factor receptor, KIT, is a target for the treatment of cancer, mastocytosis, and inflammatory diseases. Here, we characterise the in vitro and in vivo profiles of masitinib (AB1010, a novel phenylaminothiazole-type tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets KIT. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In vitro, masitinib had greater activity and selectivity against KIT than imatinib, inhibiting recombinant human wild-type KIT with an half inhibitory concentration (IC(50 of 200+/-40 nM and blocking stem cell factor-induced proliferation and KIT tyrosine phosphorylation with an IC(50 of 150+/-80 nM in Ba/F3 cells expressing human or mouse wild-type KIT. Masitinib also potently inhibited recombinant PDGFR and the intracellular kinase Lyn, and to a lesser extent, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3. In contrast, masitinib demonstrated weak inhibition of ABL and c-Fms and was inactive against a variety of other tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. This highly selective nature of masitinib suggests that it will exhibit a better safety profile than other tyrosine kinase inhibitors; indeed, masitinib-induced cardiotoxicity or genotoxicity has not been observed in animal studies. Molecular modelling and kinetic analysis suggest a different mode of binding than imatinib, and masitinib more strongly inhibited degranulation, cytokine production, and bone marrow mast cell migration than imatinib. Furthermore, masitinib potently inhibited human and murine KIT with activating mutations in the juxtamembrane domain. In vivo, masitinib blocked tumour growth in mice with subcutaneous grafts of Ba/F3 cells expressing a juxtamembrane KIT mutant. CONCLUSIONS: Masitinib is a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting KIT that is active, orally bioavailable in vivo, and has low toxicity.

  1. Target selection and pharma industry productivity: what can we learn from technology S-curve theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David

    2006-07-01

    The number of new drug approvals per annum has been decreasing regularly over the past decade, and changes made 12 to 15 years ago to the research and development approach of the pharmaceutical industry may have contributed to this fall in productivity. In particular, the rapid switch at that time away from an 'observation-led' approach toward a 'hypothesis-led' approach to target selection may be a key contributing factor to this issue. The strengths and weaknesses of both approaches are analyzed herein, and it is suggested that unsolved weaknesses in both approaches are holding back the productivity of the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry.

  2. The Gaia Survey Contribution to EChO Target Selection and Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Sozzetti, A

    2014-01-01

    The scientific output of the proposed EChO mission (in terms of spectroscopic characterization of the atmospheres of transiting extrasolar planets) will be maximized by a careful selection of targets and by a detailed characterization of the main physical parameters (such as masses and radii) of both the planets and their stellar hosts. To achieve this aim, the availability of high-quality data from other space-borne and ground-based programs will play a crucial role. Here we identify and discuss the elements of the Gaia catalogue that will be of utmost relevance for the selection and characterization of transiting planet systems to be observed by the proposed EChO mission.

  3. Margin selection to compensate for loss of target dose coverage due to target motion during external-beam radiation therapy of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, W Kyle; Osei, Ernest; Barnett, Rob

    2015-01-08

    The aim of this study is to provide guidelines for the selection of external-beam radiation therapy target margins to compensate for target motion in the lung during treatment planning. A convolution model was employed to predict the effect of target motion on the delivered dose distribution. The accuracy of the model was confirmed with radiochromic film measurements in both static and dynamic phantom modes. 502 unique patient breathing traces were recorded and used to simulate the effect of target motion on a dose distribution. A 1D probability density function (PDF) representing the position of the target throughout the breathing cycle was generated from each breathing trace obtained during 4D CT. Changes in the target D95 (the minimum dose received by 95% of the treatment target) due to target motion were analyzed and shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. Furthermore, the amount of target D95 recovered per millimeter of increased field width was also shown to correlate with the standard deviation of the PDF. The sensitivity of changes in dose coverage with respect to target size was also determined. Margin selection recommendations that can be used to compensate for loss of target D95 were generated based on the simulation results. These results are discussed in the context of clinical plans. We conclude that, for PDF standard deviations less than 0.4 cm with target sizes greater than 5 cm, little or no additional margins are required. Targets which are smaller than 5 cm with PDF standard deviations larger than 0.4 cm are most susceptible to loss of coverage. The largest additional required margin in this study was determined to be 8 mm.

  4. Evodiamine selectively targets cancer stem-like cells through the p53-p21-Rb pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seula [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Jong Kyu [College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yuchae; Jeong, Dawoon; Kang, Minsook; Yoo, Young-Ji; Lee, Hani [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung Hyun [College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Ha [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Young, E-mail: wykim@sookmyung.ac.kr [The Research Center for Cell Fate Control, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-22

    In spite of the recent improvements, the resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy followed by relapse is the main hurdle for the successful treatment of breast cancer, a leading cause of death in women. A small population of breast cancer cells that have stem-like characteristics (cancer stem-like cells; CSLC) may contribute to this resistance and relapse. Here, we report on a component of a traditional Chinese medicine, evodiamine, which selectively targets CSLC of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDAMB 231 at a concentration that does show a little or no cytotoxic effect on bulk cancer cells. While evodiamine caused the accumulation of bulk cancer cells at the G2/M phase, it did not hold CSLC in a specific cell cycle phase but instead, selectively killed CSLC. This was not due to the culture of CSLC in suspension or without FBS. A proteomic analysis and western blotting revealed that evodiamine changed the expression of cell cycle regulating molecules more efficiently in CSLC cells than in bulk cancer cells. Surprisingly, evodiamine selectively activated p53 and p21 and decreased inactive Rb, the master molecules in G1/S checkpoint. These data collectively suggest a novel mechanism involving CSLC-specific targeting by evodiamine and its possible use to the therapy of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Evodiamine selectively kills breast cancer stem like cells at G1 phase. • Evodiamine utilizes different mechanism of cell cycle modulation in CSLC and in bulk cancer cells. • Evodiamine activate the p53, p21 and Rb pathway.

  5. Rapid and targeted introgression of genes into popular wheat cultivars using marker-assisted background selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpinder S Randhawa

    Full Text Available A marker-assisted background selection (MABS-based gene introgression approach in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. was optimized, where 97% or more of a recurrent parent genome (RPG can be recovered in just two backcross (BC generations. A four-step MABS method was developed based on 'Plabsim' computer simulations and wheat genome structure information. During empirical optimization of this method, double recombinants around the target gene were selected in a step-wise fashion during the two BC cycles followed by selection for recurrent parent genotype on non-carrier chromosomes. The average spacing between carrier chromosome markers was <4 cM. For non-carrier chromosome markers that flanked each of the 48 wheat gene-rich regions, this distance was approximately 12 cM. Employed to introgress seedling stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici resistance gene Yr15 into the spring wheat cultivar 'Zak', marker analysis of 2,187 backcross-derived progeny resulted in the recovery of a BC(2F(2ratio3 plant with 97% of the recurrent parent genome. In contrast, only 82% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in phenotypically selected BC(4F(7 plants developed without MABS. Field evaluation results from 17 locations indicated that the MABS-derived line was either equal or superior to the recurrent parent for the tested agronomic characteristics. Based on these results, MABS is recommended as a strategy for rapidly introgressing a targeted gene into a wheat genotype in just two backcross generations while recovering 97% or more of the recurrent parent genotype.

  6. The DESI Experiment Part I: Science,Targeting, and Survey Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghamousa, Amir; et al.

    2016-10-31

    DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. To trace the underlying dark matter distribution, spectroscopic targets will be selected in four classes from imaging data. We will measure luminous red galaxies up to $z=1.0$. To probe the Universe out to even higher redshift, DESI will target bright [O II] emission line galaxies up to $z=1.7$. Quasars will be targeted both as direct tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution and, at higher redshifts ($ 2.1 < z < 3.5$), for the Ly-$\\alpha$ forest absorption features in their spectra, which will be used to trace the distribution of neutral hydrogen. When moonlight prevents efficient observations of the faint targets of the baseline survey, DESI will conduct a magnitude-limited Bright Galaxy Survey comprising approximately 10 million galaxies with a median $z\\approx 0.2$. In total, more than 30 million galaxy and quasar redshifts will be obtained to measure the BAO feature and determine the matter power spectrum, including redshift space distortions.

  7. The selective processing of emotional visual stimuli while detecting auditory targets: an ERP analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Harald T; Stockburger, Jessica; Bublatzky, Florian; Junghöfer, Markus; Weike, Almut I; Hamm, Alfons O

    2008-09-16

    Event-related potential studies revealed an early posterior negativity (EPN) for emotional compared to neutral pictures. Exploring the emotion-attention relationship, a previous study observed that a primary visual discrimination task interfered with the emotional modulation of the EPN component. To specify the locus of interference, the present study assessed the fate of selective visual emotion processing while attention is directed towards the auditory modality. While simply viewing a rapid and continuous stream of pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant pictures in one experimental condition, processing demands of a concurrent auditory target discrimination task were systematically varied in three further experimental conditions. Participants successfully performed the auditory task as revealed by behavioral performance and selected event-related potential components. Replicating previous results, emotional pictures were associated with a larger posterior negativity compared to neutral pictures. Of main interest, increasing demands of the auditory task did not modulate the selective processing of emotional visual stimuli. With regard to the locus of interference, selective emotion processing as indexed by the EPN does not seem to reflect shared processing resources of visual and auditory modality.

  8. Selective Targeting of SH2 Domain–Phosphotyrosine Interactions of Src Family Tyrosine Kinases with Monobodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kükenshöner, Tim; Schmit, Nadine Eliane; Bouda, Emilie; Sha, Fern; Pojer, Florence; Koide, Akiko; Seeliger, Markus; Koide, Shohei; Hantschel, Oliver

    2017-05-01

    The binding of Src-homology 2 (SH2) domains to phosphotyrosine (pY) sites is critical for the autoinhibition and substrate recognition of the eight Src family kinases (SFKs). The high sequence conservation of the 120 human SH2 domains poses a significant challenge to selectively perturb the interactions of even the SFK SH2 family against the rest of the SH2 domains. We have developed synthetic binding proteins, termed monobodies, for six of the SFK SH2 domains with nanomolar affinity. Most of these monobodies competed with pY ligand binding and showed strong selectivity for either the SrcA (Yes, Src, Fyn, Fgr) or SrcB subgroup (Lck, Lyn, Blk, Hck). Interactome analysis of intracellularly expressed monobodies revealed that they bind SFKs but no other SH2-containing proteins. Three crystal structures of monobody–SH2 complexes unveiled different and only partly overlapping binding modes, which rationalized the observed selectivity and enabled structure-based mutagenesis to modulate inhibition mode and selectivity. In line with the critical roles of SFK SH2 domains in kinase autoinhibition and T-cell receptor signaling, monobodies binding the Src and Hck SH2 domains selectively activated respective recombinant kinases, whereas an Lck SH2-binding monobody inhibited proximal signaling events downstream of the T-cell receptor complex. Our results show that SFK SH2 domains can be targeted with unprecedented potency and selectivity using monobodies. They are excellent tools for dissecting SFK functions in normal development and signaling and to interfere with aberrant SFK signaling networks in cancer cells.

  9. Discovery of two gravitationally lensed quasars in the Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Agnello, Adriano; Ostrovski, Fernanda; Schechter, Paul L; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J; Lin, Huan; Auger, Matthew W; Courbin, Frederic; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Frieman, Josh; Kuropatkin, Nikolay; Marshall, Philip J; McMahon, Richard G; Meylan, Georges; More, Anupreeta; Suyu, Sherry H; Rusu, Cristian E; Finley, David; Abbott, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe B; Allam, Sahar; Annis, James; Banerji, Manda; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Burke, David L; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Kind, Matias Carrasco; Carretero, Jorge; Cunha, Carlos E; D'Andrea, Chris B; da Costa, Luiz N; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, H Thomas; Dietrich, Jörg P; Doel, Peter; Eifler, Tim F; Estrada, Juan; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Flaugher, Brenna; Fosalba, Pablo; Gerdes, David W; Gruen, Daniel; Gutierrez, Gaston; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David J; Kuehn, Kyler; Lahav, Ofer; Lima, Marco; Maia, Marcio A G; March, Marina; Marshall, Jennifer L; Martini, Paul; Melchior, Peter; Miller, Christopher J; Miquel, Ramon; Nichol, Robert C; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres A; Reil, Kevin; Romer, A Kathy; Roodman, Aaron; Sako, Masao; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basilio; Scarpine, Vic; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, R Chris; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly E C; Tarle, Gregory; Thaler, Jon; Tucker, Douglas; Walker, Alistair R; Wechsler, Risa H; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of two new lensed quasars via data obtained at the 6.5m Magellan/Baade Telescope. The lens candidates have been selected from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and WISE based on their multi-band photometry and extended morphology in DES images. Images of DES J0115-5244 show two blue point sources at either side of a red galaxy. Our long-slit data confirm that both point sources are images of the same quasar at $z_{s}=1.64.$ The Einstein Radius estimated from the DES images is $0.51$". DES J2200+0110 is in the area of overlap between DES and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Two blue components are visible in the DES and SDSS images. The SDSS fiber spectrum shows a quasar component at $z_{s}=2.38$ and absorption compatible with Mg II and Fe II at $z_{l}=0.799$, which we tentatively associate with the foreground lens galaxy. The long-slit Magellan spectra show that the blue components are resolved images of the same quasar. The Einstein Radius is $0.68$" corresponding to an e...

  10. EMPCA and Cluster Analysis of Quasar Spectra: Sample Preparation and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Cassidy; Leighly, Karen; Macinnis, Francis; Marrs, Adam; Richards, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    All quasars are fundamentally similar, powered by accretion of matter onto a super massive black hole. However, patterns of differences can be identified through the emission lines. Quasar broad absorption lines have been postulated to be responsible for feedback in galaxy evolution. Principal component analysis (PCA) quantifies trends in emission lines of quasars that can be used to predict and reconstruct the underlying continuum in broad absorption line quasars.Richards et al. 2011 hypothesized that emission-line variance across the rest-UV spectrum is correlated with C IV blueshift and equivalent width. We fit their composite spectra, constructed based on these properties, to identify trends for the purpose of creating simulated spectra to test the weighted Expectation Maximization PCA (EMPCA; Bailey 2012) and cluster analysis method discussed in adjacent poster by Marrs et al.More than 800 SDSS spectra from Allen et al. 2011, with a redshift range of z = 2.2 - 2.3, were selected for analysis, particularly spectra with high signal to noise ratios, without broad absorption lines, and without numerous narrow absorption lines. Interstellar and intergalactic absorption lines add variance that contaminates the principal components. To remove these lines, we smoothed the spectra using a Fourier transform and a low-pass filter. We then used a line-finding and -removal program to remove or flag narrow absorption lines. From the principal components that resulted from the PCA analysis we were able to reconstruct the continua of a small sample of BAL QSOs.

  11. Evidence for Fluorescent Fe II Emission from Extended Low Ionization Outflows in Obscured Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Shaohua

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that outflows in at least some broad absorption line (BAL) quasars are extended well beyond the putative dusty torus. Such outflows should be detectable in obscured quasars. We present four WISE selected infrared red quasars with very strong and peculiar ultraviolet Fe ii emission lines: strong UV Fe II UV arising from transitions to ground/low excitation levels, and very weak Fe II at wavelengths longer than 2800 {\\AA}. The spectra of these quasars display strong resonant emission lines, such as C IV, Al III and Mg II but sometimes, a lack of non-resonant lines such as C III], S III and He II. We interpret the Fe II lines as resonantly scattered light from the extended outflows that are viewed nearly edge-on, so that the accretion disk and broad line region are obscured by the dusty torus, while the extended outflows are not. We show that dust free gas exposed to strong radiation longward of 912 {\\AA} produces Fe II emission very similar to that observed. The gas is too cool to coll...

  12. NuSTAR Observations of Heavily Obscured Quasars at z ~ 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Lansbury, G B; Del Moro, A; Gandhi, P; Assef, R J; Stern, D; Aird, J; Ballantyne, D R; Balokovic, M; Bauer, F E; Boggs, S E; Brandt, W N; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Elvis, M; Grefenstette, B W; Hailey, C J; Harrison, F A; Hickox, R C; Koss, M; LaMassa, S M; Luo, B; Mullaney, J R; Teng, S H; Urry, C M; Zhang, W W

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray (3-79 keV) observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ~ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [OIII] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength diagnostics, their X-ray absorbing column densities (N_H) are poorly known. In this analysis: (1) we study X-ray emission at >10 keV, where X-rays from the central black hole are relatively unabsorbed, in order to better constrain N_H; (2) we further characterize the physical properties of the sources through broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution (SED) analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at >8 keV with a no-source probability of <0.1%, and its X-ray band ratio suggests near Compton-thick absorption with N_H \\gtrsim 5 x 10^23 cm^-2. The other two quasars are undetected, and have low X-ray to mid-IR luminosity ratios in both the low energy (2-10 keV) and high ener...

  13. CIV Broad Absorption Line Acceleration in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Grier, C J; Hall, P B; Trump, J R; Ak, N Filiz; Anderson, S F; Green, Paul J; Schneider, D P; Sun, M; Vivek, M; Beatty, T G; Brownstein, Joel R; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the largest systematic investigation of broad absorption line (BAL) acceleration to date. We use spectra of 140 quasars from three Sloan Digital Sky Survey programs to search for global velocity offsets in BALs over timescales of ~2.5-5.5 years in the quasar rest frame. We carefully select acceleration candidates by requiring monolithic velocity shifts over the entire BAL trough, avoiding BALs with velocity shifts that might be caused by profile variability. The CIV BALs of two quasars show velocity shifts consistent with the expected signatures of BAL acceleration, and the BAL of one quasar shows a velocity-shift signature of deceleration. In our two acceleration candidates, we see evidence that the magnitude of the acceleration is not constant over time; the magnitudes of the change in acceleration for both acceleration candidates are difficult to produce with a standard disk-wind model or via geometric projection effects. We measure upper limits to acceleration and deceleration for ...

  14. Environments of Nearby Quasars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Lietzen, H; Nurmi, P; Tago, E; Saar, E; Liivamagi, J; Tempel, E; Einasto, M; Einasto, J; Gramann, M; Takalo, L O

    2009-01-01

    For the first time spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys are reaching the scales where galaxies can be studied together with the nearest quasars. This gives an opportunity to study the dependence between the activity of a quasar and its environment in a more extensive way than before. We study the spatial distribution of galaxies and groups of galaxies in the environments of low redshift quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Our aim is to understand how the nearby quasars are embedded in the local and global density field of galaxies and how the environment affects quasar activity. We analyse the environments of nearby quasars using number counts of galaxies. We also study the dependence of group properties to their distance to the nearest quasar. The large scale environments are studied by analysing the locations of quasars in the luminosity density field. Our study of the number counts of galaxies in quasar environments shows an underdensity of bright galaxies at a few Mpc from quasars. Also, the ...

  15. In Vivo Selection Against Human Colorectal Cancer Xenografts Identifies an Aptamer That Targets RNA Helicase Protein DHX9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Mi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to selectively target disease-related tissues with molecules is critical to the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic reagents. Recognizing the differences between the in vivo environment and in vitro conditions, we employed an in vivo selection strategy to identify RNA aptamers (targeting motifs that could localize to tumor in situ. One of the selected molecules is an aptamer that binds to the protein DHX9, an RNA helicase that is known to be upregulated in colorectal cancer. Upon systemic administration, the aptamer preferentially localized to the nucleus of cancer cells in vivo and thus has the potential to be used for targeted delivery.

  16. SU-E-T-562: Motion Tracking Optimization for Conformal Arc Radiotherapy Plans: A QUASAR Phantom Based Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z; Wang, I; Yao, R; Podgorsak, M [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to use plan parameters optimization (Dose rate, collimator angle, couch angle, initial starting phase) to improve the performance of conformal arc radiotherapy plans with motion tracking by increasing the plan performance score (PPS). Methods: Two types of 3D conformal arc plans were created based on QUASAR respiratory motion phantom with spherical and cylindrical targets. Sinusoidal model was applied to the MLC leaves to generate motion tracking plans. A MATLAB program was developed to calculate PPS of each plan (ranges from 0–1) and optimize plan parameters. We first selected the dose rate for motion tracking plans and then used simulated annealing algorithm to search for the combination of the other parameters that resulted in the plan of the maximal PPS. The optimized motion tracking plan was delivered by Varian Truebeam Linac. In-room cameras and stopwatch were used for starting phase selection and synchronization between phantom motion and plan delivery. Gaf-EBT2 dosimetry films were used to measure the dose delivered to the target in QUASAR phantom. Dose profiles and Truebeam trajectory log files were used for plan delivery performance evaluation. Results: For spherical target, the maximal PPS (PPSsph) of the optimized plan was 0.79: (Dose rate: 500MU/min, Collimator: 90°, Couch: +10°, starting phase: 0.83π). For cylindrical target, the maximal PPScyl was 0.75 (Dose rate: 300MU/min, Collimator: 87°, starting phase: 0.97π) with couch at 0°. Differences of dose profiles between motion tracking plans (with the maximal and the minimal PPS) and 3D conformal plans were as follows: PPSsph=0.79: %ΔFWHM: 8.9%, %Dmax: 3.1%; PPSsph=0.52: %ΔFWHM: 10.4%, %Dmax: 6.1%. PPScyl=0.75: %ΔFWHM: 4.7%, %Dmax: 3.6%; PPScyl=0.42: %ΔFWHM: 12.5%, %Dmax: 9.6%. Conclusion: By achieving high plan performance score through parameters optimization, we can improve target dose conformity of motion tracking plan by decreasing total MLC leaf travel distance

  17. Selective pressures for accurate altruism targeting: evidence from digital evolution for difficult-to-test aspects of inclusive fitness theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, Jeff; Goldsby, Heather J; Ofria, Charles; Pennock, Robert T

    2011-03-01

    Inclusive fitness theory predicts that natural selection will favour altruist genes that are more accurate in targeting altruism only to copies of themselves. In this paper, we provide evidence from digital evolution in support of this prediction by competing multiple altruist-targeting mechanisms that vary in their accuracy in determining whether a potential target for altruism carries a copy of the altruist gene. We compete altruism-targeting mechanisms based on (i) kinship (kin targeting), (ii) genetic similarity at a level greater than that expected of kin (similarity targeting), and (iii) perfect knowledge of the presence of an altruist gene (green beard targeting). Natural selection always favoured the most accurate targeting mechanism available. Our investigations also revealed that evolution did not increase the altruism level when all green beard altruists used the same phenotypic marker. The green beard altruism levels stably increased only when mutations that changed the altruism level also changed the marker (e.g. beard colour), such that beard colour reliably indicated the altruism level. For kin- and similarity-targeting mechanisms, we found that evolution was able to stably adjust altruism levels. Our results confirm that natural selection favours altruist genes that are increasingly accurate in targeting altruism to only their copies. Our work also emphasizes that the concept of targeting accuracy must include both the presence of an altruist gene and the level of altruism it produces.

  18. Criteria for selection of target materials and design of high-efficiency-release targets for radioactive ion beam generation

    CERN Document Server

    Alton, G D; Liu, Y

    1999-01-01

    In this report, we define criteria for choosing target materials and for designing, mechanically stable, short-diffusion-length, highly permeable targets for generation of high-intensity radioactive ion beams (RIBs) for use at nuclear physics and astrophysics research facilities based on the ISOL principle. In addition, lists of refractory target materials are provided and examples are given of a number of successful targets, based on these criteria, that have been fabricated and tested for use at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF).

  19. Does Angling Technique Selectively Target Fishes Based on Their Behavioural Type?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D M Wilson

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been growing recognition that fish harvesting practices can have important impacts on the phenotypic distributions and diversity of natural populations through a phenomenon known as fisheries-induced evolution. Here we experimentally show that two common recreational angling techniques (active crank baits versus passive soft plastics differentially target wild largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides and rock bass (Ambloplites rupestris based on variation in their behavioural tendencies. Fish were first angled in the wild using both techniques and then brought back to the laboratory and tested for individual-level differences in common estimates of personality (refuge emergence, flight-initiation-distance, latency-to-recapture and with a net, and general activity in an in-lake experimental arena. We found that different angling techniques appear to selectively target these species based on their boldness (as characterized by refuge emergence, a standard measure of boldness in fishes but not other assays of personality. We also observed that body size was independently a significant predictor of personality in both species, though this varied between traits and species. Our results suggest a context-dependency for vulnerability to capture relative to behaviour in these fish species. Ascertaining the selective pressures angling practices exert on natural populations is an important area of fisheries research with significant implications for ecology, evolution, and resource management.

  20. SUMOylation modulates the transcriptional activity of androgen receptor in a target gene and pathway selective manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutinen, Päivi; Malinen, Marjo; Heikkinen, Sami; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2014-07-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays an important regulatory role in prostate cancer. AR's transcriptional activity is regulated by androgenic ligands, but also by post-translational modifications, such as SUMOylation. To study the role of AR SUMOylation in genuine chromatin environment, we compared androgen-regulated gene expression and AR chromatin occupancy in PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines stably expressing wild-type (wt) or doubly SUMOylation site-mutated AR (AR-K386R,K520R). Our genome-wide gene expression analyses reveal that the SUMOylation modulates the AR function in a target gene and pathway selective manner. The transcripts that are differentially regulated by androgen and SUMOylation are linked to cellular movement, cell death, cellular proliferation, cellular development and cell cycle. Fittingly, SUMOylation mutant AR cells proliferate faster and are more sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, ChIP-seq analyses show that the SUMOylation can modulate the chromatin occupancy of AR on many loci in a fashion that parallels their differential androgen-regulated expression. De novo motif analyses reveal that FOXA1, C/EBP and AP-1 motifs are differentially enriched at the wtAR- and the AR-K386R,K520R-preferred genomic binding positions. Taken together, our data indicate that SUMOylation does not simply repress the AR activity, but it regulates AR's interaction with the chromatin and the receptor's target gene selection.

  1. Update on the Pfam5000 Strategy for Selection of StructuralGenomics Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-06-27

    Structural Genomics is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy that is medically and biologically relevant, of good financial value, and tractable. In 2003, we presented the ''Pfam5000'' strategy, which involves selecting the 5,000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. In this update, we show that although both the Pfam database and the number of sequenced genomes have increased in size, the expected benefits of the Pfam5000 strategy have not changed substantially. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5,000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 65 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 54 percent of residues) and 63 percent of eukaryotic proteins (42 percent of residues). Fewer than 2,300 of the largest families on this list remain to be solved, making the project feasible in the next five years given the expected throughput to be achieved in the production phase of the Protein Structure Initiative.

  2. Selecting Targeted Symptoms/Syndromes for Syndromic Surveillance in Rural China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li; Zhang, Jie; Cheng, Liwei; Yan, Weirong; Diwan, Vinod K.; Long, Lu; Nie, Shaofa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To select the potential targeted symptoms/syndromes as early warning indicators for epidemics or outbreaks detection in rural China. Introduction Patients’ chief complaints (CCs) as a common data source, has been widely used in syndromic surveillance due to its timeliness, accuracy and availability (1). For automated syndromic surveillance, CCs always classified into predefined syndromic categories to facilitate subsequent data aggregation and analysis. However, in rural China, most outpatient doctors recorded the information of patients (e.g. CCs) into clinic logs manually rather than computers. Thus, more convenient surveillance method is needed in the syndromic surveillance project (ISSC). And the first and important thing is to select the targeted symptoms/syndromes. Methods Epidemiological analysis was conducted on data from case report system in Jingmen City (one study site in ISSC) from 2004 to 2009. Initial symptoms/syndromes were selected by literature reviews. And finally expert consultation meetings, workshops and field investigation were held to confirm the targeted symptoms/syndromes. Results 10 kinds of infectious diseases, 6 categories of emergencies, and 4 bioterrorism events (i.e. plague, anthrax, botulism and hemorrhagic fever) were chose as specific diseases/events for monitoring (Table 1). Two surveillance schemes were developed by reviewing on 565 literatures about clinical conditions of specific diseases/events and 14 literatures about CCs based syndromic surveillance. The former one was to monitor symptoms (19 initial symptoms), and then aggregation or analysis on single or combined symptom(s); and the other one was to monitor syndromes (9 initial syndromes) directly (Table 2). The consultation meeting and field investigation identified three issues which should be considered: 1) the abilities of doctors especially village doctors to understand the definitions of symptoms/syndromes; 2) the workload of data collection; 3) the

  3. Selection of flowing liquid lead target structural materials for accelerator driven transmutation applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, John J.; Buksa, John J.

    1995-09-01

    The beam entry window and container for a liquid lead spallation target will be exposed to high fluxes of protons and neutrons that are both higher in magnitude and energy than have been experienced in proton accelerators and fission reactors, as well as in a corrosive environment. The structural material of the target should have a good compatibility with liquid lead, a sufficient mechanical strength at elevated temperatures, a good performance under an intense irradiation environment, and a low neutron absorption cross section; these factors have been used to rank the applicability of a wide range of materials for structural containment. Nb-1Zr has been selected for use as the structural container for the LANL ABC/ATW molten lead target. Corrosion and mass transfer behavior for various candidate structural materials in liquid lead are reviewed, together with the beneficial effects of inhibitors and various coatings to protect substrate against liquid lead corrosion. Mechanical properties of some candidate materials at elevated temperatures and the property changes resulting from 800 MeV proton irradiation are also reviewed.

  4. Scientific objectives and selection of targets for the SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, A. T.; Keller, H. U.; Nathues, A.; Mall, U.; Hiesinger, H.; Rosiek, M.

    2004-12-01

    The European SMART-1 mission to the Moon, primarily a testbed for innovative technologies, was launched in September 2003 and will reach the Moon in 2005. On board are several scientific instruments, including the point-spectrometer SMART-1 Infrared Spectrometer (SIR). Taking into account the capabilities of the SMART-1 mission and the SIR instrument in particular, as well as the open questions in lunar science, a selection of targets for SIR observations has been compiled. SIR can address at least five topics: (1) Surface/regolith processes; (2) Lunar volcanism; (3) Lunar crust structure; (4) Search for spectral signatures of ices at the lunar poles; and (5) Ground truth and study of geometric effects on the spectral shape. For each topic we will discuss specific observation modes, necessary to achieve our scientific goals. The majority of SIR targets will be observed in the nadir-tracking mode. More than 100 targets, which require off-nadir pointing and off-nadir tracking, are planned. It is expected that results of SIR observations will significantly increase our understanding of the Moon. Since the exact arrival date and the orbital parameters of the SMART-1 spacecraft are not known yet, a more detailed planning of the scientific observations will follow in the near future.

  5. Unusual target selectivity of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acsády, L; Katona, I; Martínez-Guijarro, F J; Buzsáki, G; Freund, T F

    2000-09-15

    Perisomatic inhibitory innervation of all neuron types profoundly affects their firing characteristics and vulnerability. In this study we examined the postsynaptic targets of perisomatic inhibitory cells in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus where the proportion of potential target cells (excitatory mossy cells and inhibitory interneurons) is approximately equal. Both cholecystokinin (CCK)- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket cells formed multiple contacts on the somata and proximal dendrites of mossy cells. Unexpectedly, however, perisomatic inhibitory terminals arriving from these cell types largely ignored hilar GABAergic cell populations. Eighty-ninety percent of various GABAergic neurons including other CCK-containing basket cells received no input from CCK-positive terminals. Parvalbumin-containing cells sometimes innervated each other but avoided 75% of other GABAergic cells. Overall, a single mossy cell received 40 times more CCK-immunoreactive terminals and 15 times more parvalbumin-positive terminals onto its soma than the cell body of an average hilar GABAergic cell. In contrast to the pronounced target selectivity in the hilar region, CCK- and parvalbumin-positive neurons innervated each other via collaterals in stratum granulosum and moleculare. Our observations indicate that the inhibitory control in the hilar region is qualitatively different from other cortical areas at both the network level and the level of single neurons. The paucity of perisomatic innervation of hilar interneurons should have profound consequences on their action potential generation and on their ensemble behavior. These findings may help explain the unique physiological patterns observed in the hilus and the selective vulnerability of the hilar cell population in various pathophysiological conditions.

  6. Selective Vitamin D Receptor Activation as Anti-Inflammatory Target in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Donate-Correa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor (VDR activator used for treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease (CKD, has been associated with survival advantages, suggesting that this drug, beyond its ability to suppress parathyroid hormone, may have additional beneficial actions. In this prospective, nonrandomised, open-label, proof-of-concept study, we evaluated the hypothesis that selective vitamin D receptor activation with paricalcitol is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD patients. Eight patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate between 15 and 44 mL/min/1.73 m2 and an intact parathyroid hormone (PTH level higher than 110 pg/mL received oral paricalcitol (1 μg/48 hours as therapy for secondary hyperparathyroidism. Nine patients matched by age, sex, and stage of CKD, but a PTH level <110 pg/mL, were enrolled as a control group. Our results show that five months of paricalcitol administration were associated with a reduction in serum concentrations of hs-CRP (13.9%, P<0.01, TNF-α (11.9%, P=0.01, and IL-6 (7%, P<0.05, with a nonsignificant increase of IL-10 by 16%. In addition, mRNA expression levels of the TNFα and IL-6 genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells decreased significantly by 30.8% (P=0.01 and 35.4% (P=0.01, respectively. In conclusion, selective VDR activation is an effective target to modulate inflammation in CKD.

  7. Selectivity on-target of bromodomain chemical probes by structure-guided medicinal chemistry and chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdeano, Carles; Ciulli, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Targeting epigenetic proteins is a rapidly growing area for medicinal chemistry and drug discovery. Recent years have seen an explosion of interest in developing small molecules binding to bromodomains, the readers of acetyl-lysine modifications. A plethora of co-crystal structures has motivated focused fragment-based design and optimization programs within both industry and academia. These efforts have yielded several compounds entering the clinic, and many more are increasingly being used as chemical probes to interrogate bromodomain biology. High selectivity of chemical probes is necessary to ensure biological activity is due to an on-target effect. Here, we review the state-of-the-art of bromodomain-targeting compounds, focusing on the structural basis for their on-target selectivity or lack thereof. We also highlight chemical biology approaches to enhance on-target selectivity.

  8. Intranight Optical Variability of Radio-Quiet Weak Emission Line Quasars-IV

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Parveen; Gopal-Krishna,

    2016-01-01

    We report an extension of our program to search for radio-quiet BL Lac candidates using intra-night optical variability (INOV) as a probe. The present INOV observations cover a well-defined representative set of 10 `radio-quiet weak-emission-line quasars' (RQWLQs), selected from a newly published sample of 46 such sources, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data release 7). Intra-night CCD monitoring of the 10 RQWLQs was carried out in 18 sessions lasting at least 3.5 hours. For each session, differential light curves (DLCs) of the target RQWLQ were derived relative to two steady comparison stars monitored simultaneously. Combining these new data with those already published by us for 15 RQWLQs monitored in 30 sessions, we estimate an INOV duty cycle of $\\sim 3\\%$ for the RQWLQs, which appears inconsistent with BL Lacs. However, the observed INOV events (which occurred in just two of the sessions) are strong (with a fractional variability amplitude $\\psi >$ 10\\%), hence blazar-like. We briefly point o...

  9. Intranight optical variability of radio-quiet weak emission line quasars - IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parveen; Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna

    2016-09-01

    We report an extension of our programme to search for radio-quiet BL Lac candidates using intranight optical variability (INOV) as a probe. The present INOV observations cover a well-defined representative set of 10 `radio-quiet weak-emission-line quasars' (RQWLQs), selected from a newly published sample of 46 such sources, derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Data release 7). Intranight CCD monitoring of the 10 RQWLQs was carried out in 18 sessions lasting at least 3.5 h. For each session, differential light curves of the target RQWLQ were derived relative to two steady comparison stars monitored simultaneously. Combining these new data with those already published by us for 15 RQWLQs monitored in 30 sessions, we estimate an INOV duty cycle of ˜3 per cent for the RQWLQs, which appears inconsistent with BL Lacs. However, the observed INOV events (which occurred in just two of the sessions) are strong (with a fractional variability amplitude ψ > 10 per cent), hence blazar-like. We briefly point out the prospects of an appreciable rise in the estimated INOV duty cycle for RQWLQs with a relatively modest increase in sensitivity for monitoring these rather faint objects.

  10. Time variations of narrow absorption lines in high resolution quasar spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Boissé, P; Prochaska, J X; Péroux, C; York, D G

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We have searched for temporal variations of narrow absorption lines in high resolution quasar spectra. A sample of 5 distant sources have been assembled, for which 2 spectra - VLT/UVES or Keck/HIRES - taken several years apart are available. Methods. We first investigate under which conditions variations in absorption line profiles can be detected reliably from high resolution spectra, and discuss the implications of changes in terms of small-scale structure within the intervening gas or intrinsic origin. The targets selected allow us to investigate the time behavior of a broad variety of absorption line systems, sampling diverse environments: the vicinity of active nuclei, galaxy halos, molecular-rich galaxy disks associated with damped Lya systems, as well as neutral gas within our own Galaxy. Results. Absorption lines from MgII, FeII or proxy species with lines of lower opacity tracing the same kind of gas appear to be remarkably stable (1 sigma upper limits as low as 10 % for some components on scal...

  11. Galaxy Clusters in the Line of Sight to Background Quasars - III Multi-Object Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, H; Lopez, S; Lira, P; Padilla, N; Gilbank, D G; Lacerna, I; Maureira, M J; Ellingson, E; Gladders, M D; Yee, H K C

    2013-01-01

    We present Gemini/GMOS-S multi-object spectroscopy of 31 galaxy cluster candidates at redshifts between 0.2 and 1.0 and centered on QSO sight-lines taken from Lopez et al. (2008). The targets were selected based on the presence of a intervening MgII absorption system at a similar redshift to that of a galaxy cluster candidate lying at a projected distance < 2 h^{-1}Mpc from the QSO sight-line (a 'photometric-hit'). The absorption systems span rest-frame equivalent widths between 0.015 and 2.028 angstroms. Our aim was 3-fold: 1) identify the absorbing galaxies and determine their impact parameters, 2) confirm the galaxy cluster candidates in the vicinity of each quasar sightline, and 3) determine whether the absorbing galaxies reside in galaxy clusters. Our main findings are: 1) the identification of 10 out of 24 absorbing galaxies with redshifts up to 1.0955. 2) The spectroscopic confirmation of 20 out of 31 cluster/group candidates, with most of the confirmed clusters/groups at z < 0.7. 3) Following fr...

  12. Targeted Curing of All Lysogenic Bacteriophage from Streptococcus pyogenes Using a Novel Counter-selection Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Chad W; Juncosa, Barbara; Ryan, Patricia A; Deutsch, Douglas R; McShan, W Michael; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a human commensal and a bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide variety of human diseases differing in symptoms, severity, and tissue tropism. The completed genome sequences of >37 strains of S. pyogenes, representing diverse disease-causing serotypes, have been published. The greatest genetic variation among these strains is attributed to numerous integrated prophage and prophage-like elements, encoding several virulence factors. A comparison of isogenic strains, differing in prophage content, would reveal the effects of these elements on streptococcal pathogenesis. However, curing strains of prophage is often difficult and sometimes unattainable. We have applied a novel counter-selection approach to identify rare S. pyogenes mutants spontaneously cured of select prophage. To accomplish this, we first inserted a two-gene cassette containing a gene for kanamycin resistance (KanR) and the rpsL wild-type gene, responsible for dominant streptomycin sensitivity (SmS), into a targeted prophage on the chromosome of a streptomycin resistant (SmR) mutant of S. pyogenes strain SF370. We then applied antibiotic counter-selection for the re-establishment of the KanS/SmR phenotype to select for isolates cured of targeted prophage. This methodology allowed for the precise selection of spontaneous phage loss and restoration of the natural phage attB attachment sites for all four prophage-like elements in this S. pyogenes chromosome. Overall, 15 mutants were constructed that encompassed every permutation of phage knockout as well as a mutant strain, named CEM1ΔΦ, completely cured of all bacteriophage elements (a ~10% loss of the genome); the only reported S. pyogenes strain free of prophage-like elements. We compared CEM1ΔΦ to the WT strain by analyzing differences in secreted DNase activity, as well as lytic and lysogenic potential. These mutant strains should allow for the direct examination of bacteriophage relationships within S. pyogenes and

  13. Targeted Curing of All Lysogenic Bacteriophage from Streptococcus pyogenes Using a Novel Counter-selection Technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad W Euler

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes is a human commensal and a bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide variety of human diseases differing in symptoms, severity, and tissue tropism. The completed genome sequences of >37 strains of S. pyogenes, representing diverse disease-causing serotypes, have been published. The greatest genetic variation among these strains is attributed to numerous integrated prophage and prophage-like elements, encoding several virulence factors. A comparison of isogenic strains, differing in prophage content, would reveal the effects of these elements on streptococcal pathogenesis. However, curing strains of prophage is often difficult and sometimes unattainable. We have applied a novel counter-selection approach to identify rare S. pyogenes mutants spontaneously cured of select prophage. To accomplish this, we first inserted a two-gene cassette containing a gene for kanamycin resistance (KanR and the rpsL wild-type gene, responsible for dominant streptomycin sensitivity (SmS, into a targeted prophage on the chromosome of a streptomycin resistant (SmR mutant of S. pyogenes strain SF370. We then applied antibiotic counter-selection for the re-establishment of the KanS/SmR phenotype to select for isolates cured of targeted prophage. This methodology allowed for the precise selection of spontaneous phage loss and restoration of the natural phage attB attachment sites for all four prophage-like elements in this S. pyogenes chromosome. Overall, 15 mutants were constructed that encompassed every permutation of phage knockout as well as a mutant strain, named CEM1ΔΦ, completely cured of all bacteriophage elements (a ~10% loss of the genome; the only reported S. pyogenes strain free of prophage-like elements. We compared CEM1ΔΦ to the WT strain by analyzing differences in secreted DNase activity, as well as lytic and lysogenic potential. These mutant strains should allow for the direct examination of bacteriophage relationships within S

  14. Selective superoxide generation within mitochondria by the targeted redox cycler MitoParaquat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Ellen L; Gawel, Justyna M; Aksentijević, Dunja; Cochemé, Helena M; Stewart, Tessa S; Shchepinova, Maria M; Qiang, He; Prime, Tracy A; Bright, Thomas P; James, Andrew M; Shattock, Michael J; Senn, Hans M; Hartley, Richard C; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Superoxide is the proximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain and plays a major role in pathological oxidative stress and redox signaling. While there are tools to detect or decrease mitochondrial superoxide, none can rapidly and specifically increase superoxide production within the mitochondrial matrix. This lack impedes progress, making it challenging to assess accurately the roles of mitochondrial superoxide in cells and in vivo. To address this unmet need, we synthesized and characterized a mitochondria-targeted redox cycler, MitoParaquat (MitoPQ) that comprises a triphenylphosphonium lipophilic cation conjugated to the redox cycler paraquat. MitoPQ accumulates selectively in the mitochondrial matrix driven by the membrane potential. Within the matrix, MitoPQ produces superoxide by redox cycling at the flavin site of complex I, selectively increasing superoxide production within mitochondria. MitoPQ increased mitochondrial superoxide in isolated mitochondria and cells in culture ~a thousand-fold more effectively than untargeted paraquat. MitoPQ was also more toxic than paraquat in the isolated perfused heart and in Drosophila in vivo. MitoPQ enables the selective generation of superoxide within mitochondria and is a useful tool to investigate the many roles of mitochondrial superoxide in pathology and redox signaling in cells and in vivo.

  15. Selective targeting of the conserved active site cysteine of Mycobacterium tuberculosis methionine aminopeptidase with electrophilic reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Ravikumar; Arya, Tarun; Kishor, Chandan; Gumpena, Rajesh; Ganji, Roopa J; Bhukya, Supriya; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Methionine aminopeptidases (MetAPs) cleave initiator methionine from ~ 70% of the newly synthesized proteins in every living cell, and specific inhibition or knockdown of this function is detrimental. MetAPs are metalloenzymes, and are broadly classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Bacteria contain only type I MetAPs, and the active site of these enzymes contains a conserved cysteine. By contrast, in type II enzymes the analogous position is occupied by a conserved glycine. Here, we report the reactivity of the active site cysteine in a type I MetAP, MetAP1c, of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtMetAP1c) towards highly selective cysteine-specific reagents. The authenticity of selective modification of Cys105 of MtMetAP1c was established by using site-directed mutagenesis and crystal structure determination of covalent and noncovalent complexes. On the basis of these observations, we propose that metal ions in the active site assist in the covalent modification of Cys105 by orienting the reagents appropriately for a successful reaction. These studies establish, for the first time, that the conserved cysteine of type I MetAPs can be targeted for selective inhibition, and we believe that this chemistry can be exploited for further drug discovery efforts regarding microbial MetAPs.

  16. Selection between Michaelis-Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2010-02-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis-Menten (M-M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these two approaches. Theoretical derivations were used to determine conditions under which M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models are equivalent. Computer simulations and model fitting were conducted to demonstrate these conditions. Typical M-M and TMDD profiles were simulated based on literature data for an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (TRX1) and phenytoin administered intravenously. Both models were fitted to data and goodness of fit criteria were evaluated for model selection. A case study of recombinant human erythropoietin was conducted to qualify results. A rapid binding TMDD model is equivalent to the M-M model if total target density R ( tot ) is constant, and R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 where K ( D ) represents the dissociation constant and C is the free drug concentration. Under these conditions, M-M parameters are defined as: V ( max ) = k ( int ) R ( tot ) V ( c ) and K ( m ) = K ( D ) where k ( int ) represents an internalization rate constant, and V ( c ) is the volume of the central compartment. R ( tot ) is constant if and only if k ( int ) = k ( deg,) where k ( deg ) is a degradation rate constant. If the TMDD model predictions are not sensitive to k ( int ) or k ( deg ) parameters, the condition of R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 alone can preserve the equivalence between rapid binding TMDD and M-M models. The model selection process for drugs that exhibit TMDD should involve a full mechanistic model as well as reduced models. The best model

  17. A precisely substituted benzopyran targets androgen refractory prostate cancer cells through selective modulation of estrogen receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Jain, Ashish; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sarswat, Amit [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Maikhuri, Jagdamba P. [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Vishnu L. [Division of Medicinal & Process Chemistry, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR—Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2015-03-15

    Dietary consumption of phytoestrogens like genistein has been linked with lower incidence of prostate cancer. The estradiol-like benzopyran core of genistein confers estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) selectivity that imparts weak anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells. DL-2-[4-(2-piperidinoethoxy)phenyl]-3-phenyl-2H-1-benzopyran (BP), a SERM designed with benzopyran core, targeted androgen independent prostate cancer (PC-3) cells 14-times more potently than genistein, ~ 25% more efficiently than tamoxifen and 6.5-times more actively than ICI-182780, without forfeiting significant specificity in comparison to genistein. BP increased apoptosis (annexin-V and TUNEL labeling), arrested cell cycle, and significantly increased caspase-3 activity along with mRNA expressions of estrogen receptor (ER)-β and FasL (qPCR) in PC-3 cells. In classical ERE-luc reporter assay BP behaved as a potent ER-α antagonist and ER-β agonist. Accordingly, it decreased expression of ER-α target PS2 (P < 0.01) and increased expression of ER-β target TNF-α (P < 0.05) genes in PC-3. ER-β deficient PC-3 (siRNA-transfected) was resistant to apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions of SERMs, including stimulation of FasL expression by BP. BP significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and ERK-1/2, JNK and p38 in PC-3 (immunoblotting), and thus adopted a multi-pathway mechanism to exert a more potent anti-proliferative activity against prostate cancer cells than natural and synthetic SERMs. Its precise ER-subtype specific activity presents a unique lead structure for further optimization. - Highlights: • BP with benzopyran core of genistein was identified for ER-β selective action. • BP was 14-times more potent than genistien in targeting prostate cancer cells. • It behaved as a potent ER-β agonist and ER-α antagonist in gene reporter assays. • BP's anti-proliferative action was inhibited significantly in ER-β deficient cells. • BP — a unique lead

  18. QUality Assessment of System Architectures and their Requirements (QUASAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    2010 Carnegie Mellon University QUality Assessment of System Architectures and their Requirements ( QUASAR ) DoD and NDIA System-of-Systems...Architectures and their Requirements ( QUASAR ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 2 QUASAR Version 3.1, 1 Hour Overview Donald Firesmith, 18 May 2010 © 2010 Carnegie Mellon University Topics History

  19. Hidden blazars and emission line variability of high redshift quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Ma

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a survey to search for hidden blazars in a sample of z 2 radio{loud quasars. The idea is based on our prediction that we should be able to see large C IV line variability not associated with observed continuum variations or most other emission lines in every radio{loud quasar. Here we report the initial results including the discovery of large C IV line variations in two quasars.

  20. CarPrice versus CarpRice: Word Boundary Ambiguity Influences Saccade Target Selection during the Reading of Chinese Sentences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    As a contribution to a theoretical debate about the degree of high-level influences on saccade targeting during sentence reading, we investigated eye movements during the reading of structurally ambiguous Chinese character strings and examined whether parafoveal word segmentation could influence saccade-target selection. As expected, ambiguous…

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss,; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U.,

    2005-03-01

    We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

  2. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  3. NuSTAR observations of heavily obscured quasars at z ∼ 0.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Moro, A. Del; Gandhi, P.; Aird, J. [Department of Physics, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Assef, R. J. [Núcleo de Astronomía de la Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejército Libertador 441, Santiago (Chile); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ballantyne, D. R. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Baloković, M.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, 1216 East California Boulevard, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bauer, F. E. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Elvis, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W 120th Street, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Hickox, R. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Koss, M., E-mail: g.b.lansbury@durham.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); and others

    2014-04-10

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ≈ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured, Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength diagnostics, their X-ray absorbing column densities (N {sub H}) are poorly known. In this analysis, (1) we study X-ray emission at >10 keV, where X-rays from the central black hole are relatively unabsorbed, in order to better constrain N {sub H}. (2) We further characterize the physical properties of the sources through broad-band near-UV to mid-IR spectral energy distribution analyses. One of the quasars is detected with NuSTAR at >8 keV with a no-source probability of <0.1%, and its X-ray band ratio suggests near Compton-thick absorption with N {sub H} ≳ 5 × 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}. The other two quasars are undetected, and have low X-ray to mid-IR luminosity ratios in both the low-energy (2-10 keV) and high-energy (10-40 keV) X-ray regimes that are consistent with extreme, Compton-thick absorption (N {sub H} ≳ 10{sup 24} cm{sup –2}). We find that for quasars at z ∼ 0.5, NuSTAR provides a significant improvement compared to lower energy (<10 keV) Chandra and XMM-Newton observations alone, as higher column densities can now be directly constrained.

  4. Differential actions of insecticides on target sites: basis for selective toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahashi, T; Zhao, X; Ikeda, T; Nagata, K; Yeh, J Z

    2007-04-01

    Whereas the selective toxicity of insecticides between insects and mammals has a long history of studies, it is now becoming abundantly clear that, in many cases, the differential action of insecticides on insects and mammalian target receptor sites is an important factor. In this paper, we first introduce the mechanism of action and the selective toxicity of pyrethroids as a prototype of study. Then, a more detailed account is given for fipronil, based primarily on our recent studies. Pyrethroids keep the sodium channels open for a prolonged period of time, causing elevation of the depolarizing after-potential. Once the after-potential reaches the threshold for excitation, repetitive after-discharges are produced, resulting in hyperexcitation of intoxicated animals. Only about 1% of sodium channels needs to be modified to produce hyperexcitation, indicating a high degree of toxicity amplification from sodium channels to animals. Pyrethroids were >1000-fold more potent on cockroach sodium channels than rat sodium channels, and this forms the most significant factor to explain the selective toxicity of pyrethroids in insects over mammals. Fipronil, a phenylpyrazole, is known to act on the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor to block the chloride channel. It is effective against certain species of insects that have become resistant to most insecticides, including those acting on the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor, and is much more toxic to insects than to mammals. Recently, fipronil has been found to block glutamate-activated chloride channels in cockroach neurons in a potent manner. Since mammals are devoid of this type of chloride channel, fipronil block of the glutamate-activated chloride channel is deemed responsible, at least partially, for the higher selective toxicity to insects over mammals and for the lack of cross-resistance.

  5. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  6. A Generic Transferable EEG Decoder for Online Detection of Error Potential in Target Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saugat Bhattacharyya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reliable detection of error from electroencephalography (EEG signals as feedback while performing a discrete target selection task across sessions and subjects has a huge scope in real-time rehabilitative application of Brain-computer Interfacing (BCI. Error Related Potentials (ErrP are EEG signals which occur when the participant observes an erroneous feedback from the system. ErrP holds significance in such closed-loop system, as BCI is prone to error and we need an effective method of systematic error detection as feedback for correction. In this paper, we have proposed a novel scheme for online detection of error feedback directly from the EEG signal in a transferable environment (i.e., across sessions and across subjects. For this purpose, we have used a P300-speller dataset available on a BCI competition website. The task involves the subject to select a letter of a word which is followed by a feedback period. The feedback period displays the letter selected and, if the selection is wrong, the subject perceives it by the generation of ErrP signal. Our proposed system is designed to detect ErrP present in the EEG from new independent datasets, not involve