WorldWideScience

Sample records for quark number scaling

  1. Quark Number Scaling in Fluid Dynamics and Hadronization via Quarkyonic Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zschocke S.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available NCQ scaling of elliptic flow is studied in a non-equilibrium hadronization and freeze-out model from ideal, deconfined and chirally symmetric Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP, to final non-interacting hadrons. In this transition the quarks gain constituent quark mass while the background Bag-field breaks up. The constituent quarks then recombine into simplified hadron states, while chemical, thermal and flow equilibrium break down. Then the resulting temperatures and flow velocities of baryons and mesons will be different. In a simplified model, we reproduce the constituent quark number scaling.

  2. An explanation for deviations from the quark number scaling of elliptic flows in low pT region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Tao; XIE Qu-Bing; SHAO Feng-Lan

    2008-01-01

    We carry out a systematic study of the different contributions to the deviations of the elliptic flows from the quark number scaling in high energy heavy ion collision in a quark combination model.The effects that we considered are:the resonance decay,the flavor dependence of the quark elliptic flow and the combination of quarks/antiquarks with slightly different transverse momenta.Our results show that the deviations observed in experiments can be well reproduced within the combination framework if all the three effects are considered. We make a detailed analysis of the different contributions using a Monte-Carlo program and suggest measuring the quark number scaling in intermediate pT range more precisely.

  3. Differential elliptic flow of identified hadrons and constituent quark number scaling at FAIR

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaduri, Partha Pratim; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2010-01-01

    Differential elliptic flow $v_2(p_{T})$ for identified hadrons has been investigated in the FAIR energy regime, employing a hadronic-string transport model (UrQMD) as well as a partonic transport model (AMPT). It has been observed that both the models show a mass ordering of $v_2$ at low $p_{T}$ and a switch over resulting a baryon-meson crossing at intermediate $p_{T}$. AMPT generates higher $v_2$ values compared to UrQMD. In addition, constituent quark number scaling behavior of elliptic fl...

  4. Quark mass effects in quark number susceptibilities

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, Thorben

    2016-01-01

    The quark degrees of freedom of the QGP with special focus on mass effects are investigated. A next-to-leading-order perturbation theory approach with quark mass dependence is applied and compared to lattice QCD results.

  5. Does quark number scaling breakdown in Pb+Pb collisions at Root_s = 2.76 TeV?

    CERN Document Server

    Lacey, Roy A; Gong, X; Reynolds, D; Ajitanand, N N; Alexander, J M; Mawi, A; Taranenko, A

    2012-01-01

    The anisotropy coefficient $v_2$, for unidentified and identified charged hadrons [pions ($\\pi$), kaons ($K$) and protons ($p$)] measured in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 0.20$ TeV (RHIC) and Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV (LHC), are compared for several collision centralities ($\\text{cent}$) and particle transverse momenta $p_T$. In contrast to the measurements for charged hadrons, the comparisons indicate a sizable increase of $v_2(p_T)$ for $\\pi,K$ and $p$, as well as a blueshift of proton $v_2(p_T)$, from RHIC to LHC. When this blueshift is accounted for, the LHC data [for $\\pi$, $K$, $p$] show excellent scaling of $v_2({KE}_T)$ with the number of valence quarks ($n_q$), for a broad range of transverse kinetic energies (${KE}_T$) and collision centralities. These observations suggest a larger mean sound speed $$ for the plasma created in LHC collisions, and significant radial flow generation after its hadronization.

  6. On quark number susceptibilities at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bazavov, A; Hegde, P; Karsch, F; Miao, C; Mukherjee, Swagato; Petreczky, P; Schmidt, C; Velytsky, A

    2013-01-01

    We calculated second and fourth order quark number susceptibilities for 2+1 flavor QCD in the high temperature region using two improved staggered fermion formulations. The calculations are performed at several lattice spacing and we show that in the continuum limit the two formulations give consistent results. We compare our continuum extrapolated results on quark number susceptibilities with recent weak coupling calculations, and find that these cannot simultaneously explain the lattice results for second and fourth order quark number susceptibilities.

  7. A note on Quarks and numbers theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hage-Hassan, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    We express the basis vectors of Cartan fundamental representations of unitary groups by binary numbers. We determine the expression of Gel'fand basis of SU (3) based on the usual subatomic quarks notations and we represent it by binary numbers. By analogy with the mesons and quarks we find a new property of prime numbers.

  8. a Cosmological Lower Limit for Quark Compositeness Energy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarty, Somenath; Datta, Bhaskar; Sinha, Bikash

    Baryon number density inhomogeneity in the very early universe, due to an assumed first order preon-to-quark phase transition, at or around the electroweak symmetry breaking energy is discussed. Conformity with primordial nucleosynthesis suggests that quark compositeness energy scale must be higher than 500 GeV.

  9. A cosmological lower limit for quark compositeness energy scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarty, S.; Sinha, B. (Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, 1/af Bidham Nagar, Calcutta 700064 (India)); Datta, B. (Indian Inst. of Astrophysics, Bangalore (India))

    1992-08-30

    In this paper baryon number density inhomogeneity in the very early universe, due to an assumed first order preon-to-quark phase transition, at or around the electroweak symmetry breaking energy is discussed. Conformity with primordial nucleosynthesis suggests that quark compositeness energy scale must be higher than 500 GeV.

  10. Deviation from quark number scaling of the anisotropy parameter v2 of pions, kaons, and protons in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aramaki, Y.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bickley, A. A.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Ellinghaus, F.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Garishvili, I.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haslum, E.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kochenda, L.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Liebing, P.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Milov, A.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakashita, K.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Slunečka, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zolin, L.

    2012-06-01

    Measurements of the anisotropy parameter v2 of identified hadrons (pions, kaons, and protons) as a function of centrality, transverse momentum pT, and transverse kinetic energy KET at midrapidity (|η|<0.35) in Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV are presented. Pions and protons are identified up to pT= 6 GeV/c, and kaons up to pT= 4 GeV/c, by combining information from time-of-flight and aerogel Čerenkov detectors in the PHENIX Experiment. The scaling of v2 with the number of valence quarks (nq) has been studied in different centrality bins as a function of transverse momentum and transverse kinetic energy. A deviation from previously observed quark-number scaling is observed at large values of KET/nq in noncentral Au + Au collisions (20-60%), but this scaling remains valid in central collisions (0-10%).

  11. SCALING AND 4-QUARK FRAGMENTATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O; BOSVELD, GD

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed- The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  12. Deviation from quark-number scaling of the anisotropy parameter v_2 of pions, kaons, and protons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aramaki, Y; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Barish, K N; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bok, J S; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chen, C -H; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cole, B A; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgö, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Ellinghaus, F; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; \\,; Jr.,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Hartouni, E P; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hill, J C; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kang, J H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kochenda, L; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kunde, G J; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Liebing, P; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Milov, A; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Oka, M; Okada, K; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ružička, P; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakashita, K; Samsonov, V; Sano, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Slunečka, M; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Sparks, N A; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarafdar, S; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Vazquez-Zambrano, E; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, D; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wei, R; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Wood, J P; Woody, C L; Wright, R M; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; You, Z; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zolin, L

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of the anisotropy parameter v_2 of identified hadrons (pions, kaons, and protons) as a function of centrality, transverse momentum p_T, and transverse kinetic energy KE_T at midrapidity (|\\eta|<0.35) in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV are presented. Pions and protons are identified up to p_T = 6 GeV/c, and kaons up to p_T = 4 GeV/c, by combining information from time-of-flight and aerogel Cherenkov detectors in the PHENIX Experiment. The scaling of v_2 with the number of valence quarks (n_q) has been studied in different centrality bins as a function of transverse momentum and transverse kinetic energy. A deviation from previously observed quark-number scaling is observed at large values of KE_T/n_q in noncentral Au+Au collisions (20--60%), but this scaling remains valid in central collisions (0--10%).

  13. Quark number susceptibilities at finite chemical potential from fugacity expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Schadler, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Generalized quark number susceptibilities are expected to be good probes for the phase transitions in QCD and the search of a possible critical point. However, their computation in lattice QCD is plagued by the complex action problem which appears at finite chemical potential mu. In this work we explore the possibilities of an expansion in the fugacity parameter exp(mu beta) which has features that make, in particular quark number related bulk observables easily accessible. We present results at finite chemical potential for generalized susceptibilities up to the 4th order as well as their ratios and compare them to model calculations.

  14. Search for baryon number violation in top quark decays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Monika; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Dildick, Sven; Garcia, Guillaume; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jez, Pavel; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Malek, Magdalena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Yifei; Li, Qiang; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Morovic, Srecko; Tikvica, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Tuuva, Tuure

    2014-01-01

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at $\\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one having the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excess of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.

  15. Quark-number selection rule for nonleptonic weak decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ernest; Pakvasa, Sandip; Simmons, Walter A.

    1980-12-01

    Recent experimental observations such as τ( D 0)Nitto, and Ogawa, in which a quark-number selection rule for nonleptonic weak decays was proposed. We present here a diagrammatic interpretation of this selection rule and discuss several specific predictions and tests involving charmed mesons and baryons as well as b-flavored particles.

  16. Gluon number fluctuations with heavy quarks at HERA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xiang-Rong; ZHOU Dai-Cui

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of gluon number fluctuations (Pomeron loops) on the proton structure function at HERA.It is shown that the description of charm and bottom quarks and longitudinal structure functions are improved,with x2/d.o.f=0.803 (fluctuations) as compared with x2/d.o.f=0.908 (without fluctuations),once the gluon number fluctuations are included.We find that in the gluon number fluctuation case the heavy quarks do not play an important role in the proton structure function as the saturation model.The successful description of the HERA data indicates that the gluon number fluctuation could be one of the key mechanisms to describe the proton structure function at HERA energies.

  17. Quark Number Susceptibilities with Domain-Wall Fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hegde, Prasad; Schmidt, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We present results from calculations of different quark number and hadronic susceptibilities on 2+1-flavor dynamical domain wall ensembles. We find that the iso-spin and electric charge susceptibilities are especially well suited to determine the transition temperature, as these quantities show only small statistical errors. Moreover, the transition values of the coupling obtained from iso-spin and electrical charge susceptibilities are in good agreement with the one obtained from the chiral condensate.

  18. Quark flavour conserving violations of the lepton number

    CERN Document Server

    Binétruy, Pierre; Lavignac, Stephane; Savoy, C A

    1998-01-01

    We study supersymmetric models of lepton and baryon number violation based on an abelian family gauge group. Due to possible lepton-Higgs mixing, the lepton violating couplings are related to the Yukawa couplings and may be generated by them even if they were absent in the original theory. Such terms may be dominant and are not given by the naive family charge counting rules. This enhancement mechanism can provide an alignment between lepton-number violating terms and Yukawa couplings: as a result they conserve quark flavour. A natural way of suppressing baryon number violation in this class of models is also proposed.

  19. On Scale Determination in Lattice QCD with Dynamical Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    De, Asit K; Maiti, Jyotirmoy

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of a/r_c (inverse Sommer parameter in units of lattice spacing a) on am_q (quark mass in lattice unit) has been observed in all lattice QCD simulations with sea quarks including the ones with improved actions. How much of this dependence is a scaling violation has remained an intriguing question. Our approach has been to investigate the issue with an action with known lattice artifacts, i.e., the standard Wilson quark and gauge action with beta=5.6 and 2 degenerate flavors of sea quarks on 16^3 times 32 lattices. In order to study in detail the sea quark mass dependence, measurements are carried out at eight values of the PCAC quark mass values am_q from about 0.07 to below 0.015. Though scaling violations may indeed be present for relatively large am_q, a consistent scenario at sufficiently small am_q seems to emerge in the mass-independent scheme where for a fixed beta, 1/r_0 and sqrt{sigma} have linear dependence on m_q as physical effects similar to the quark mass dependence of the rho mass. We...

  20. Quark-Number Susceptibility at Finite Chemical Potential and Zero Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Deng-Ke; JIANG Yu; FENG Hong-Tao; SUN Wei-Min; ZONG Hong-Shi

    2008-01-01

    We give a direct method for calculating the quark-number susceptibility at finite chemical potential and zero temperature.In this approach the quark-number susceptibility is totally determined by G[μ](p)(the dressed quark propagator at finite chemical potential μ).By applying the general result in our previous study[Phys.Rev.C 71(2005)015205,034901,73 (2006) 016004] G[μ](p)is calculated from the model quark propagator proposed by Pagels and Stokar[Phys.Rev.D 20(1979)2947].The full analytic expression of the quark-number susceptibility at finite μ and zero T is obtained.

  1. On Scale Determination in Lattice QCD with Dynamical Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    De, A K; Maiti, J

    2008-01-01

    Dependence of $a/r_c$ (inverse Sommer parameter in units of lattice spacing $a$) on $am_q$ (quark mass in lattice unit) has been observed in all lattice QCD simulations with sea quarks including the ones with improved actions. How much of this dependence is a scaling violation has remained an intriguing question. Our approach has been to investigate the issue with an action with known lattice artifacts, i.e., the standard Wilson quark and gauge action with $\\beta=5.6$ and 2 degenerate flavors of sea quarks on $ 16^3 \\times 32 $ lattices. In order to study in detail the sea quark mass dependence, measurements are carried out at eight values of the Wilson hopping parameter $\\kappa$ in the range 0.156 - 0.158 corresponding to PCAC quark mass values $am_q$ from about 0.07 to below 0.015. We analyze the static potential by fitting to the familiar phenomenological form and extract $a/r_c$. Though scaling violations may indeed be present for relatively large $am_q$, a consistent scenario at sufficiently small $am_q$...

  2. Hard-Thermal-Loop QCD thermodynamics and quark number susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogliacci Sylvain

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The weak-coupling expansion of the QCD pressure is known up to the order g6 log g. However, at experimentally relevant temperatures, the corresponding series is poorly convergent. In this proceedings, we discuss at which extent the gauge-invariant resummation scheme, Hard-Thermal-Loop perturbation theory (HTLpt, improves the apparent convergence. We first present HTLpt results for QCD thermodynamic functions up to three-loop order at vanishing chemical potential. Then, we report a preliminary HTLpt result of one-loop quark number susceptibility, probing the finite density equation of state. Our results are consistent with lattice data down to 2 − 3Tc, reinforcing the weakly-coupled quasiparticle picture in the intermediate coupling regime.

  3. Hidden GeV-scale interactions of quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A; Frugiuele, Claudia

    2014-08-01

    We explore quark interactions mediated by new gauge bosons of masses in the 0.3-50 GeV range. A tight upper limit on the gauge coupling of light Z(') bosons is imposed by the anomaly cancellation conditions in conjunction with collider bounds on new charged fermions. Limits from quarkonium decays are model dependent, while electroweak constraints are mild. We derive the limits for a Z(') boson coupled to baryon number and then construct a Z(') model with relaxed constraints, allowing quark couplings as large as 0.2 for a mass of a few GeV.

  4. The Two-Loop Scale Dependence of the Static QCD Potential including Quark Masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    1999-06-14

    The interaction potential V(Q{sup 2}) between static test charges can be used to define an effective charge {alpha}{sub V}(Q{sup 2}) and a physically-based renormalization scheme for quantum chromodynamics and other gauge theories. In this paper we use recent results for the finite-mass fermionic corrections to the heavy-quark potential at two-loops to derive the next-to-leading order term for the Gell Mann-Low function of the V-scheme. The resulting effective number of flavors N{sub F}(Q{sup 2}/m{sup 2}) in the {alpha}{sub V} scheme is determined as a gauge-independent and analytic function of the ratio of the momentum transfer to the quark pole mass. The results give automatic decoupling of heavy quarks and are independent of the renormalization procedure. Commensurate scale relations then provide the next-to-leading order connection between all perturbatively calculable observables to the analytic and gauge-invariant {alpha}{sub V} scheme without any scale ambiguity and a well defined number of active flavors. The inclusion of the finite quark mass effects in the running of the coupling is compared with the standard treatment of finite quark mass effects in the {ovr MS} scheme.

  5. Scaling and four-quark fragmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.; Bosveld, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    The conditions for a scaling behaviour from the fragmentation process leading to slow protons are discussed. The scaling referred to implies that the fragmentation functions depend on the light-cone momentum fraction only. It is shown that differences in the fragmentation functions for valence- and

  6. Diagonal and off-diagonal quark number susceptibilities at high temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, H -T; Ohno, H; Petreczky, P; Schadler, H -P

    2015-01-01

    We present continuum extrapolated lattice QCD results for up to fourth order diagonal and off-diagonal quark number susceptibilities in the high temperature region of 300-700 MeV. Lattice QCD calculations are performed using 2+1 flavors of highly improved staggered quarks with nearly physical quark masses and at four different lattice spacings. Comparisons of our results with recent weak coupling perturbative calculations yield reasonably good agreements for the entire temperature range.

  7. Baryon number diffusion and instabilities in the quark/hadron phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, F C; Langer, J S; Adams, Fred C.; Freese, Katherine

    1992-01-01

    Hadron bubbles that nucleate with radius $R_{nuc}$ in a quark sea (if the phase transition is first order) are shown to be unstable to the growth of nonspherical structure when the bubble radii exceed a critical size of $20 - 10^3$ $R_{nuc}$. This instability is driven by a very thin layer of slowly diffusing excess baryon number that forms on the surface of the bubble wall and limits its growth. This instability occurs on a shorter length scale than those studied previously and these effects can thus be important for both cosmology and heavy ion collisions.

  8. Step scaling in coordinate space: running of the quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Cichy, Krzysztof; Korcyl, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We perform a benchmark study of the step scaling procedure for the ratios of renormalization constants extracted from position space correlation functions. We work in the quenched approximation and consider the pseudoscalar, scalar, vector and axial vector bilinears. The pseudoscalar/scalar cases allow us to obtain the non-perturbative running of the quark mass over a wide range of energy scales - from around 17 GeV to below 1.5 GeV - which agrees well with the 4-loop prediction of continuum perturbation theory. We find that step scaling is feasible in X-space and we discuss its advantages and potential problems.

  9. Step scaling in coordinate space. Running of the quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Korcyl, Piotr [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2016-12-15

    We perform a benchmark study of the step scaling procedure for the ratios of renormalization constants extracted from position space correlation functions. We work in the quenched approximation and consider the pseudoscalar, scalar, vector and axial vector bilinears. The pseudoscalar/scalar cases allow us to obtain the non-perturbative running of the quark mass over a wide range of energy scales - from around 17 GeV to below 1.5 GeV - which agrees well with the 4-loop prediction of continuum perturbation theory. We find that step scaling is feasible in X-space and we discuss its advantages and potential problems.

  10. Quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell-Mann, M.

    In these lectures I want to speak about at least two interpretations of the concept of quarks for hadrons and the possible relations between them. First I want to talk about quarks as "constituent quarks". These were used especially by G. Zweig (1964) who referred to them as aces. One has a sort of a simple model by which one gets elementary results about the low-lying bound and resonant states of mesons and baryons, and certain crude symmetry properties of these states, by saying that the hadrons act as if they were made up of subunits, the constituent quarks q. These quarks are arranged in an isotopic spin doublet u, d and an isotopic spin singlet s, which has the same charge as d and acts as if it had a slightly higher mass…

  11. The calculation of quark number susceptibility at finite chemical potential and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yu; Li Ning [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Sun Weimin [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zong Hongshi, E-mail: zonghs@chenwang.nju.edu.c [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Joint Center for Particle, Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, we calculate the quark number susceptibility (QNS) at finite chemical potential mu and finite temperature T in the framework of the Dyson-Schwinger approach using the meromorphic quark propagator proposed in [Phys. Rev. D 70, 014014 (2004)]. Analysis and discussions of the calculated result of the QNS is given.

  12. Baryon number segregation at the end of the cosmological quark-hadron transition

    CERN Document Server

    Rezzolla, L

    1996-01-01

    One of the most interesting questions regarding a possible first order cosmological quark--hadron phase transition concerns the final fate of the baryon number contained within the disconnected quark regions at the end of the transition. We here present a detailed investigation of the hydrodynamical evolution of an evaporating quark drop, using a multi-component fluid description to follow the mechanisms of baryon number segregation. With this approach, we are able to take account of the simultaneous effects of baryon number flux suppression at the phase interface, entropy extraction by means of particles having long mean-free-paths, and baryon number diffusion. A range of computations has been performed to investigate the permitted parameter-space and this has shown that significant baryon number concentrations, perhaps even up to densities above that of nuclear matter, represent an inevitable outcome within this scenario.

  13. Two-colour QCD at finite fundamental quark-number density and related theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hands, S J; Morrison, S E; Sinclair, D K

    2001-01-01

    We are simulating SU(2) Yang-Mills theory with four flavours of dynamical quarks in the fundamental representation of SU(2) `colour' at finite chemical potential, mu for quark number, as a model for QCD at finite baryon number density. In particular we observe that for mu large enough this theory undergoes a phase transition to a state with a diquark condensate which breaks quark-number symmetry. In this phase we examine the spectrum of light scalar and pseudoscalar bosons and see evidence for the Goldstone boson associated with this spontaneous symmetry breaking. This theory is closely related to QCD at finite chemical potential for isospin, a theory which we are now studying for SU(3) colour.

  14. Divergences in the quark number susceptibility : The origin and a cure

    CERN Document Server

    Gavai, Rajiv V

    2014-01-01

    Quark number susceptibility on the lattice, obtained by merely adding a $\\mu N$ term with $\\mu$ as the chemical potential and $N$ as the conserved quark number, has a quadratic divergence in the cut-off $a$. We show that it is simply a faithful representation of the corresponding continuum result. While one can eliminate it in the free theory by suitably modifying the action, as is popularly done, it can simply be subtracted off as well. Computations of higher order susceptibilities, needed for estimating the location of the QCD critical point, then need a lot fewer number of quark propagators at any order. We show that in the interacting theory this method of divergence removal works.

  15. Divergences in the quark number susceptibility: The origin and a cure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavai, Rajiv V. [Department of Theoretical Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Sharma, Sayantan, E-mail: sayantans@quark.phy.bnl.gov [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    Quark number susceptibility on the lattice, obtained by merely adding a μN term with μ as the chemical potential and N as the conserved quark number, has a quadratic divergence in the cut-off a. We show that such a divergence already exists for free fermions with a cut-off regulator. While one can eliminate it in the free lattice theory by suitably modifying the action, as is popularly done, it can simply be subtracted off as well. Computations of higher order susceptibilities, needed for estimating the location of the QCD critical point, then need a lot fewer number of quark propagators at any order. We show that this method of divergence removal works in the interacting theory.

  16. Divergences in the quark number susceptibility: The origin and a cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv V. Gavai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Quark number susceptibility on the lattice, obtained by merely adding a μN term with μ as the chemical potential and N as the conserved quark number, has a quadratic divergence in the cut-off a. We show that such a divergence already exists for free fermions with a cut-off regulator. While one can eliminate it in the free lattice theory by suitably modifying the action, as is popularly done, it can simply be subtracted off as well. Computations of higher order susceptibilities, needed for estimating the location of the QCD critical point, then need a lot fewer number of quark propagators at any order. We show that this method of divergence removal works in the interacting theory.

  17. Two-colour QCD at non-zero quark-number density

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, J B; Hands, S J; Morrison, S E

    2001-01-01

    We have simulated two-colour four-flavour QCD at non-zero chemical potential $\\mu$ for quark number. Simulations were performed on $8^4$ and $12^3 \\times 24$ lattices. Clear evidence was seen for the formation of a colourless diquark condensate which breaks quark number spontaneously, for $\\mu > \\mu_c \\sim m_\\pi/2$. The transition appears to be second order. We have measured the spectrum of scalar and pseudoscalar bosons which shows clear evidence for the expected Goldstone boson. Our results are in qualitative agreement with those from effective Lagrangians for the potential Goldstone excitations of this theory.

  18. Quark and gluon condensates in nuclear matter with Brown- Rho scaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭华; 杨树; 刘玉鑫

    2001-01-01

    Quark and gluon condensates in nuclear matter are investigated in a density-dependent relativistic mean-field theory. The in-medium quark condensate decreases rapidly as the density of nu-clear matter increases, if the Brown-Rho scaling is included. The decrease in the in-medium quark condensate with the nuclear matter density is consistent with the result predicted by the partial chiral symmetry restoration. The gluon condensate and the influence of the strange quark contents on the gluon condensate in nuclear matter are discussed.

  19. Scaling behavior and sea quark dependency of pion spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D; Kim, H J; Kim, J; Kim, K; Yoon, B; Lee, W; Jung, C; Sharpe, S R

    2008-01-01

    We study the pion spectrum (and in particular taste-symmetry breaking within it) using HYP-smeared valence staggered fermions on the coarse and fine MILC lattices (which have asqtad staggered sea quarks). We focus on the dependence on lattice spacing and sea-quark mass. We also update our results on source dependence. Our main conclusion is that on the MILC fine lattices the appropriate power-counting for SU(3) staggered chiral perturbation theory may have discretization errors entering at next-to-leading order rather than at leading-order.

  20. Lepton number conservation, long-lived quarks and superweak bileptonic decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Howard Frampton

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the upcoming LHC Run 2, at s∼13 TeV, it is suggested to seek unusually charged (Q=−4/3 and +5/3 quarks with mass MQ∼3 TeV which carry lepton number (L=+2 and −2 respectively and decay superweakly to a bilepton Y with mass MY∼2.5 TeV and a usual quark. These long-lived decays will have displaced decay vertices and produce a striking final state in pp which contains two separated jets together with two pairs of correlated like-sign charged leptons. Such a process was inaccessible energetically in LHC Run 1 with s∼8 TeV. The simplest theoretical explanation is the 331-model which has new physics necessarily below 4 TeV and which explains the existence of three families by anomaly cancellation.

  1. The Equation of State and Quark Number Susceptibility in Hard-Dense-Loop Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yu; Huang, Shi-song; Sun, Wei-min; Zong, Hong-shi

    2010-01-01

    Based on the method proposed in [ H. S. Zong, W. M. Sun, Phys. Rev. \\textbf{D 78}, 054001 (2008)], we calculate the equation of state (EOS) of QCD at zero temperature and finite quark chemical potential under the hard-dense-loop (HDL) approximation. A comparison between the EOS under HDL approximation and the cold, perturbative EOS of QCD proposed by Fraga, Pisarski and Schaffner-Bielich is made. It is found that the pressure under HDL approximation is generally smaller than the perturbative result. In addition, we also calculate the quark number susceptibility (QNS) at finite temperature and finite chemical potential under hard-thermal/dense-loop (HTL/HDL) approximation and compare our results with the corresponding ones in the previous literature.

  2. T-\\mu phase diagram of the chiral quark model from a large flavor number expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Jakovác, A; Szép, Z; Szépfalusy, P; Szep, Zs.

    2004-01-01

    The chiral phase boundary of strong matter is determined in the T-\\mu plane from the chiral quark model, applying a non-perturbatively renormalised treatment, involving chains of pion-bubbles and 1-loop fermion contributions. In the absence of explicit symmetry breaking the second order portion of the phase boundary and the location of the tricritical point (TCP) are determined analytically. Sensitivity of the results to the renormalisation scale is carefully investigated. The softening of the sigma-pole near the second order transitions is confirmed.

  3. Free energy of static quarks and Debye screening mass in 2+1-flavor lattice QCD with Wilson quark action based on fixed-scale approach

    CERN Document Server

    Maezawa, Y; Aoki, S; Ejiri, S; Hatsuda, T; Kanaya, K; Ohno, H

    2011-01-01

    Free energies between static quarks and Debye screening masses in the quark-gluon plasma are studied on the basis of Polyakov-line correlations in lattice simulations of 2+1 flavors QCD with the renormalization-group improved gluon action and the $O(a)$-improved Wilson quark action. We perform simulations at $m_{\\rm PS}/m_{\\rm V} = 0.63$ (0.74) for light (strange) flavors with lattice sizes of $32^3 \\times N_t$ with $N_t=4$--12. We adopt the fixed-scale approach, where temperature can be varied without changing the spatial volume and renormalization factor. We find that, at short distance, the free energies of static quarks in color-singlet channel converge to the static-quark potential evaluated from the Wilson-loop at zero-temperature, in accordance with the expected insensitivity of short distance physics to the temperature. At long distance, the free energies of static quarks approach to twice the single-quark free energies, implying that the interaction between static quarks is fully screened. The screen...

  4. What binds quarks together at different momentum scales? A conceptual scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Stefanis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The binding effects of quarks within hadrons are discussed in terms of the pion distribution amplitude over longitudinal momentum fractions. To understand the behavior of this quantity at different momentum scales, the concept of synchronization in complex systems has been employed. It is argued that at low momentum scales, the quarks get correlated by nonlocal quark/gluon condensates that cause an endpoint-suppressed, mainly bimodal structure of the pion distribution amplitude inferred from a sum-rule analysis. The mass generation mechanism, within the framework of Dyson–Schwinger equations, and evolution effects pull these two peaks back to the center to form at Q2→∞ the asymptotic distribution amplitude which represents the most synchronized q¯q state.

  5. Top quark physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadov, A.; Azuelos, G.; Bauer, U.; Belyaev, A.; Berger, E. L.; Sullivan, Z.; Tait, T. M. P.

    2000-03-24

    The top quark, when it was finally discovered at Fermilab in 1995 completed the three-generation structure of the Standard Model (SM) and opened up the new field of top quark physics. Viewed as just another SM quark, the top quark appears to be a rather uninteresting species. Produced predominantly, in hadron-hadron collisions, through strong interactions, it decays rapidly without forming hadrons, and almost exclusively through the single mode t {r_arrow} Wb. The relevant CKM coupling V{sub tb} is already determined by the (three-generation) unitarity of the CKM matrix. Rare decays and CP violation are unmeasurable small in the SM. Yet the top quark is distinguished by its large mass, about 35 times larger than the mass of the next heavy quark, and intriguingly close to the scale of electroweak (EW) symmetry breaking. This unique property raises a number of interesting questions. Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the SM predicts and is its mass related to the top-Higgs-Yukawa coupling? Or does it play an even more fundamental role in the EW symmetry breaking mechanism? If there are new particles lighter than the top quark, does the top quark decay into them? Could non-SM physics first manifest itself in non-standard couplings of the top quark which show up as anomalies in top quark production and decays? Top quark physics tries to answer these questions. Several properties of the top quark have already been examined at the Tevatron. These include studies of the kinematical properties of top production, the measurements of the top mass, of the top production cross-section, the reconstruction of t{bar t}pairs in the fully hadronic final states, the study of {tau} decays of the top quark, the reconstruction of hadronic decays of the W boson from top decays, the search for flavor changing neutral current decays, the measurement of the W helicity in top decays, and bounds on t{bar t} spin correlations. Most of these measurements are limited by

  6. Elliptic flow of ϕ mesons at intermediate pT: Influence of mass versus quark number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Subikash; Sarkar, Debojit; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2017-02-01

    We have studied elliptic flow (v2) of ϕ mesons in the framework of a multiphase transport (AMPT) model at CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy. In the realms of AMPT model we observe that ϕ mesons at intermediate transverse momentum (pT) deviate from the previously observed [at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)] particle type grouping of v2 according to the number of quark content, i.e, baryons and mesons. Recent results from the ALICE Collaboration have shown that ϕ meson and proton v2 has a similar trend, possibly indicating that particle type grouping might be due to the mass of the particles and not the quark content. A stronger radial boost at LHC compared to RHIC seems to offer a consistent explanation to such observation. However, recalling that ϕ mesons decouple from the hadronic medium before additional radial flow is built up in the hadronic phase, a similar pattern in ϕ meson and proton v2 may not be due to radial flow alone. Our study reveals that models incorporating ϕ -meson production from K K ¯ fusion in the hadronic rescattering phase also predict a comparable magnitude of ϕ meson and proton v2 particularly in the intermediate region of pT. Whereas, v2 of ϕ mesons created in the partonic phase is in agreement with quark-coalescence motivated baryon-meson grouping of hadron v2. This observation seems to provide a plausible alternative interpretation for the apparent mass-like behavior of ϕ -meson v2. We have also observed a violation of hydrodynamical mass ordering between proton and ϕ meson v2 further supporting that ϕ mesons are negligibly affected by the collective radial flow in the hadronic phase due to the small in-medium hadronic interaction cross sections.

  7. Top-quark p T -spectra at CMS and flavor independence of z-scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarev, M.; Zborovský, I.

    2017-09-01

    We present new results of analysis of top-quark differential cross sections obtained by the CMS Collaboration in pp collisions in the framework of the z-scaling approach. The spectra are measured over a wide range of collision energy √ s = 7,8,13TeV and transverse momentum p T = 30-500 GeV/ c of top-quark using leptonic and jet decay modes. Flavor independence of the scaling function ψ( z) is verified in the new kinematic range. The results of analysis of the top-quark spectra obtained at the LHC are compared with similar spectra measured in \\overline p p collisions at the Tevatron energy √ s = 1.96TeV. A tendency to saturation of ψ(z) for the process at low z and a power-law behavior of ψ( z) at high z is observed. The measurements of high- p T is observed. The measurements of highspectra of the top-quark production at highest LHC energy is of interest for verification of self-similarity of particle production, understanding flavor origin and search for new physics symmetries with top-quark probe.

  8. Tidal Love Numbers of Neutron and Self-Bound Quark Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Postnikov, Sergey; Lattimer, James

    2010-01-01

    Gravitational waves from the final stages of inspiralling binary neutron stars are expected to be one of the most important sources for ground-based gravitational wave detectors. The masses of the components are determinable from the orbital and chirp frequencies during the early part of the evolution during which tidal effects provide small correction; however, during this phase the signal is relatively clean. The accumulated phase shift due to tidal corrections is characterized by a single quantity, the Love number, which is sensitive to the compactness parameter M/R and the star's internal structure, and its determination could constrain the star's radius. We show that the Love number of normal neutron stars are much different from those of self-bound strange quark matter stars and could therefore provide an important way to distinguish between these two classes of stars.

  9. Higher order quark number fluctuations via imaginary chemical potentials in Nf=2 +1 QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, Massimo; Gagliardi, Giuseppe; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    We discuss analytic continuation as a tool to extract the cumulants of the quark number fluctuations in the strongly interacting medium from lattice QCD simulations at imaginary chemical potentials. The method is applied to Nf=2 +1 QCD, discretized with stout improved staggered fermions, physical quark masses and the tree level Symanzik gauge action, exploring temperatures ranging from 135 up to 350 MeV and adopting mostly lattices with Nt=8 sites in the temporal direction. The method is based on a global fit of various cumulants as a function of the imaginary chemical potentials. We show that it is particularly convenient to consider cumulants up to order two, and that below Tc the method can be advantageous, with respect to a direct Montecarlo sampling at μ =0 , for the determination of generalized susceptibilities of order four or higher, and especially for mixed susceptibilities, for which the gain is well above one order of magnitude. We provide cumulants up to order eight, which are then used to discuss the radius of convergence of the Taylor expansion and the possible location of the second-order critical point at real μ : no evidence for such a point is found in the explored range of T and for chemical potentials within present determinations of the pseudocritical line.

  10. Baryon number transfer could delay Quark-Hadron transition in cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Bonometto, Silvio A

    2016-01-01

    In the early Universe, s.i. matter was a quark-gluon plasma. Both lattice computations and heavy ion collision experiments however tell us that, in the absence of chemical potentials, no plasma survives at $T <\\sim 150\\, $MeV. The cosmological QH transition, however, seems to have been a crossover; cosmological consequences envisaged when it was believed to be a phase transition no longer hold. In this paper we discuss whether even a crossover transition can leave an imprint that cosmological observations can seek or, viceversa, there are questions cosmology should still ask QCD specialists. In this context, we outline, first of all, that it is still unclear how baryons (not hadrons) could form at the cosmological transition. A critical role should be played by diquark states, whose abundance in the early plasma needs to be accurately evaluated. We estimate that, if the number of quarks belonging to a diquark state, at the eve of the cosmological transition, is $<\\sim 1:10^6$, its dynamics could be modi...

  11. Thermodynamics in 2+1 flavor QCD with improved Wilson quarks by the fixed scale approach

    CERN Document Server

    Umeda, T; Ejiri, S; Hatsuda, T; Kanaya, K; Maezawa, Y; Ohno, H

    2012-01-01

    We study thermodynamic properties of 2+1 flavor QCD with improved Wilson quarks coupled with the RG improved Iwasaki glue, using the fixed scale approach. We present the results for the equation of state, renormalized Polyakov loop, and chiral condensate.

  12. Equation of state in 2+1 flavor QCD with improved Wilson quarks by the fixed scale approach

    CERN Document Server

    Umeda, T; Ejiri, S; Hatsuda, T; Kanaya, K; Maezawa, Y; Ohno, H

    2012-01-01

    We study the equation of state in 2+1 flavor QCD with nonperturbatively improved Wilson quarks coupled with the RG-improved Iwasaki glue. We apply the $T$-integration method to nonperturbatively calculate the equation of state by the fixed-scale approach. With the fixed-scale approach, we can purely vary the temperature on a line of constant physics without changing the system size and renormalization constants. Unlike the conventional fixed-$N_t$ approach, it is easy to keep scaling violations small at low temperature in the fixed scale approach. We study 2+1 flavor QCD at light quark mass corresponding to $m_\\pi/m_\\rho \\simeq 0.63$, while the strange quark mass is chosen around the physical point. Although the light quark masses are heavier than the physical values yet, our equation of state is roughly consistent with recent results with highly improved staggered quarks at large $N_t$.

  13. Relativistic Effects in a QCD Inspired quark model and the necessity of a short distance scale

    CERN Document Server

    Pathak, Krishna Kingkar

    2010-01-01

    We study the masses and decay constants of heavy light flavoured mesons in a QCD Inspired Quark model. We modify the relativistic correction procedure by introducing a short distance scale r0 in analogy with relativistic Hydrogen atom and estimate the values of masses and decay constants of heavy-light mesons. Necessity of a short distance scale r0 \\leq 10-3 - 10-5 fm in the model is indicated. Keywords: heavy- light mesons, masses, decay constants

  14. Scaling and low energy constants in lattice QCD with N_f=2 maximally twisted Wilson quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, P; Herdoiza, G; Urbach, C; Wenger, U

    2007-01-01

    We report on the scaling of basic hadronic observables in lattice QCD with N_f=2 maximally twisted Wilson dynamical quarks. We give preliminary results for some of the Gasser-Leutwyler low energy constants, the chiral condensate and the average mass of u and d quarks.

  15. Scales of mass generation for quarks, leptons, and majorana neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicus, Duane A; He, Hong-Jian

    2005-06-10

    We study 2-->n inelastic fermion-(anti)fermion scattering into multiple longitudinal weak gauge bosons and derive universal upper bounds on the scales of fermion mass generation by imposing unitarity of the S matrix. We place new upper limits on the scales of fermion mass generation, independent of the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. Strikingly, we find that the strongest 2-->n limits fall in a narrow range, 3-170 TeV (with n=2-24), depending on the observed fermion masses.

  16. Quantum Numbers of AGUT Higgs Fields from the Quark-Lepton Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Froggatt, Colin D; Smith, D J

    2002-01-01

    A series of Higgs field quantum numbers in the anti-grand unification model, based on the gauge group $SMG^3 \\times U(1)_f$, is tested against the spectrum of quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. A more precise formulation of the statement that the couplings are assumed of order unity is given. It is found that the corrections coming from this more precise assumption do not contain factors of order of the number of colours, $N_c= 3$, as one could have feared. We also include a combinatorial correction factor, taking account of the distinct internal orderings within the chain Feynman diagrams in our statistical estimates. Strictly speaking our model predicts that the uncertainty in its predictions and thus the accuracy of our fits should be $\\pm 60\\%$. Many of the best fitting quantum numbers give a higher accuracy fit to the masses and mixing angles, although within the expected fluctuations in a $\\chi^2$. This means that our fit is as good as it can possibly be.

  17. Quark number density and susceptibility calculation under one-loop correction in the mean-field potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S SOMORENDRO SINGH; G SAXENA

    2017-06-01

    We calculate quark number density and susceptibility under one-loop correction in the mean-field potential. The calculation shows continuous increase in the number density and susceptibility up to the temperature $T = 0.4 \\rm{GeV}$. Then the values of number density and susceptibility approach the very weakly result with higher values of temperature. The result indicates that the calculated values fit well with increase in temperature to match the lattice QCD simulations of the same quantities.

  18. Bottom-flavored hadrons from top-quark decay at next-to-leading order in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniehl, Bernd A.; Kramer, Gustav [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Moosavi Nejad, Seyed M. [Yazd Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Physics; Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). School of Particles

    2012-03-15

    We study the scaled-energy (x{sub B}) distribution of bottom-flavored hadrons (B) inclusively produced in top-quark decays at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme endowed with realistic, nonperturbative fragmentation functions that are obtained through a global fit to e{sup +}e{sup -} data from CERN LEP1 and SLAC SLC exploiting their universality and scaling violations. Specifically, we study the effects of gluon fragmentation and finite bottom-quark and B-hadron masses. We find the NLO corrections to be significant. Gluon fragmentation leads to an appreciable reduction in the partial decay width at low values of x{sub B}. Hadron masses are responsible for the low-x{sub B} threshold, while the bottom-quark mass is of minor importance. Neglecting the latter, we also study the doubly differential distribution d{sup 2}{gamma}/(dx{sub B}d cos {theta}) of the partial width of the decay t{yields} bW{sup +} {yields} Bl{sup +}{nu}{sub l}+X, where {theta} is the decay angle of the charged lepton in the W-boson rest frame.

  19. Continuum-limit scaling of overlap fermions as valence quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Adam Mickiewicz Univ., Poznan (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Herdoiza, Gregorio; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2009-10-15

    We present the results of a mixed action approach, employing dynamical twisted mass fermions in the sea sector and overlap valence fermions, with the aim of testing the continuum limit scaling behaviour of physical quantities, taking the pion decay constant as an example. To render the computations practical, we impose for this purpose a fixed finite volume with lattice size L{approx}1.3 fm. We also briefly review the techniques we have used to deal with overlap fermions. (orig.)

  20. Quark and gluon condensates in nuclear matter with Brown- Rho scaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Hua(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Brown, G. E., Rho, M., Scaling effective Lagrangian in a dense medium, Phys. Rev. Lett., 1991, 66: 2720-2723.[2]Delfino, A., Dey, J., Dey, M. et al., Decoupling of quark condensate from the effective nucleon at high density and tem-perature, Phys. Lett. B, 1995, 363: 17-23.[3]Guo, H., In-medium QMC model parameters and quark condensate in nuclear matter, J. Physics (London) G, 1999, 25: 1701-1711.[4]Li, G. Q., Ko, C. M., Quark condensate in nuclear matter, Phys. Lett. B, 1994, 338: 118-122.[5]Mitsumori, T., Noda, N., Kouno, H. et al., Quark condensate in nuclear matter based on nuclear Schwinger-Dyson for-mulism, Phys. Rev. C, 1997, 55: 1577-1579.[6]Malheiro, M., Dey, M., Delfino, A. et al., Connection between the nuclear matter mean-field equation of state and the quark and gluon condensates at high density, Phys. Rev. C, 1997, 55: 521-524.[7]Li, L., Shen, H., Ning, P. Z., Quark condensate in dense and hot baryonic matter, in Proceedings of CCAST-World Labo-ratory Workshop (CCAST-WL, Beijing), 1996, 77-98.[8]Haddad, S., Weigel, M. K., Finite nuclear systems in a relativistic extended Thomas-Fermi approach with density-dependent coupling parameters, Phys. Rev. C, 1993, 48: 2740-2745.[9]Brockman, R., Machleidt, R., Relativistic nuclear structure. I. Nuclear Matter, Phys. Rev. C, 1990, 42: 1965-1980.[10]Haddad, S., Weigel, M. K., Thermostatic properties and Coulomb instability of highly excited nuclei, Phys. Rev. C, 1994, 49: 3228-3233.[11]Fuchs, C., Lenske, H., Wolter, H., Density dependent hadron field theory, Phys. Rev. C, 1995, 52: 3043-3060.[12]Ineichen, F., Weigel, M. K., Eiff, D., Nuclear structure calculation in the density-dependent relativistic Hartree theory, Phys. Rev. C, 1996, 53: 2158-2162.[13]Guo, H., Liu, B., Toro, D. M., Phase transition in warm nuclear matter, Phys. Rev. C, 2000, 62: 1-8.[14]Cohen, T. D., Furnstahl, R. J., Griegel, D. K., Quark and gluon condensates in nuclear matter, Phys

  1. The B=2 system in the chiral quark-soliton model with broken scale invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Sarti, Valentina Mantovani; Vento, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We study the interaction between two B=1 states in the Chiral-Dilaton Model with scale invariance where baryons are described as non-topological solitons arising from the interaction of chiral mesons and quarks. By using the hedgehog solution for the B=1 states we construct, via a product ansatz, three possible B=2 configurations to analyse the role of the relative orientation of the hedgehog quills in the dynamics. We investigate the behaviour of these solutions in the range of long and intermediate distances between the two solitons. Since the product ansatz breaks down as the two solitons get close, we explore the short range distances regime by building up a six quarks bag and by evaluating the interaction energy as a function of the inter-soliton separation. We calculate the interaction energy as a function of the inter-soliton distance for the B=2 system and we show that for small separations the six quarks bag, assuming a hedgehog structure, provides a stable bound state that at large separations conne...

  2. Asymmetries at the Z pole: The Quark and Lepton Quantum Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Tenchini, R

    2016-01-01

    The impressive progress on the knowledge of lepton and quark electroweak couplings over the LEP and SLC decade is reviewed. The experimental methods for measuring the forward-backward asymmetry of charged-fermion pair-production are described, for different fermion species. The precise measurements of the left–right asymmetry and of tau polarisation at the Z resonance are also reminded. After discussing the determination of the Weinberg electroweak mixing angle, lepton and quark couplings are extracted by combining asymmetry and polarisation measurements with measurements of partial decay widths of the Z boson, performed at LEP in the same years.

  3. Asymmetries at the Z pole: The Quark and Lepton Quantum Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenchini, R.

    2016-10-01

    The impressive progress on the knowledge of lepton and quark electroweak couplings over the LEP and SLC decade is reviewed. The experimental methods for measuring the forward-backward asymmetry of charged-fermion pair-production are described, for different fermion species. The precise measurements of the l-right asymmetry and of tau polarisation at the Z resonance are also reminded. After discussing the determination of the Weinberg electroweak mixing angle, lepton and quark couplings are extracted by combining asymmetry and polarisation measurements with measurements of partial decay widths of the Z boson, performed at LEP in the same years.

  4. Clustered Quark Matter Calculation for Strange Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Na, Xuesen

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the need for a solid state strange quark matter to better explain some observational phenomena, we discussed possibility of color singlet cluster formation in cold strange quark matter by a rough calculation following the excluded volume method proposed by Clark et al (1986) and adopted quark mass density dependent model with cubic scaling. It is found that 70% to 75% of volume and 80% to 90% of baryon number is in clusters at temperature from 10MeV to 50MeV and 1 to 10 times nuclear density.

  5. Thermal Recombination: Beyond the Valence Quark Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, B; Bass, S A

    2005-01-01

    Quark counting rules derived from recombination models agree well with data on hadron production at intermediate transverse momenta in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. They convey a simple picture of hadrons consisting only of valence quarks. We discuss the inclusion of higher Fock states that add sea quarks and gluons to the hadron structure. We show that, when recombination occurs from a thermal medium, hadron spectra remain unaffected by the inclusion of higher Fock states. However, the quark number scaling for elliptic flow is somewhat affected. We discuss the implications for our understanding of data from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  6. Double Parton Distributions Incorporating Perturbative QCD Evolution and Momentum and Quark Number Sum Rules

    CERN Document Server

    Gaunt, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    It is anticipated that hard double parton scatterings will occur frequently in the collisions of the LHC, producing interesting signals and significant backgrounds to certain single scattering processes. For double scattering processes in which the same hard scale t = ln(Q^2) is involved in both collisions, we require the double parton distributions (dPDFs) D_h^{j_1j_2}(x_1,x_2;t) in order to make theoretical predictions of their rates and properties. We describe the development of a new set of leading order dPDFs that represents an improvement on approaches used previously. First, we derive momentum and number sum rules that the dPDFs must satisfy. The fact that these must be obeyed at any scale is used to construct improved dPDFs at the input scale Q_0, for a particular choice of input scale (Q_0^2 = 1 GeV^2) and corresponding single PDFs (the MSTW2008LO set). We then describe a novel program which uses a direct x-space method to numerically integrate the LO DGLAP equation for the dPDFs, and which may be us...

  7. Quark Models and Quark Phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Lipkin, Harry Jeannot

    1997-01-01

    Overwhelming experimental evidence for quarks as real physical constituents of hadrons along with the QCD analogs of the Balmer Formula, Bohr Atom and Schroedinger Equation already existed in 1966. A model of colored quarks interacting with a one-gluon-exchange potential explained the systematics of the meson and baryon spectrum and gave a hadron mass formula in surprising agreement with experiment. The simple quark model dismissed as heresy and witchcraft by the establishment predicted quantum numbers of an enormous number of hadronic states as well as relations between masses, reaction cross sections and electromagnetic properties, all unexplained by other approaches. Further developments leading to QCD included confinement in the large $N_c$ limit, duality, dual resonance and string models, high energy scattering systematics, unified treatment of mesons and baryons, no exotics and no free quarks.

  8. An advanced course in computational nuclear physics bridging the scales from quarks to neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, Maria; Kolck, Ubirajara

    2017-01-01

    This graduate-level text collects and synthesizes a series of ten lectures on the nuclear quantum many-body problem. Starting from our current understanding of the underlying forces, it presents recent advances within the field of lattice quantum chromodynamics before going on to discuss effective field theories, central many-body methods like Monte Carlo methods, coupled cluster theories, the similarity renormalization group approach, Green’s function methods and large-scale diagonalization approaches. Algorithmic and computational advances show particular promise for breakthroughs in predictive power, including proper error estimates, a better understanding of the underlying effective degrees of freedom and of the respective forces at play. Enabled by recent improvements in theoretical, experimental and numerical techniques, the state-of-the art applications considered in this volume span the entire range, from our smallest components – quarks and gluons as the mediators of the strong force – to the c...

  9. Higher order quark number fluctuations via imaginary chemical potentials in $N_f=2+1$ QCD

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, Massimo; Sanfilippo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We discuss analytic continuation as a tool to extract the cumulants of the quark number fluctuations in the strongly interacting medium from lattice QCD simulations at imaginary chemical potentials. The method is applied to $N_f = 2+1$ QCD, discretized with stout improved staggered fermions, physical quark masses and the tree level Symanzik gauge action, exploring temperatures ranging from 135 up to 350 MeV and adopting mostly lattices with $N_t = 8$ sites in the temporal direction. The method is based on a global fit of various cumulants as a function of the imaginary chemical potentials. We show that it is particularly convenient to consider cumulants up to order two, and that below $T_c$ the method can be advantageous, with respect to a direct Montecarlo sampling at $\\mu = 0$, for the determination of generalized susceptibilities of order four or higher, and especially for mixed susceptibilities, for which the gain is well above one order of magnitude. We provide cumulants up to order eight, which are then...

  10. The Body Center Cubic Quark Lattice Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lin Xu, Jiao

    2004-01-01

    The Standard Model while successful in many ways is incomplete; many questions remain. The origin of quark masses and hadronization of quarks are awaiting an answer. From the Dirac sea concept, we infer that two kinds of elementary quarks (u(0) and d(0)) constitute a body center cubic (BCC) quark lattice with a lattice constant a < $10^{-18}$m in the vacuum. Using energy band theory and the BCC quark lattice, we can deduce the rest masses and the intrinsic quantum numbers (I, S, C, b and Q) of quarks. With the quark spectrum, we deduce a baryon spectrum. The theoretical spectrum is in agreement well with the experimental results. Not only will this paper provide a physical basis for the Quark Model, but also it will open a door to study the more fundamental nature at distance scales <$10^{-18}$m. This paper predicts some new quarks $u_{c}$(6490) and d$_{b}$(9950), and new baryons $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}$(6500), $\\Lambda_{b}^{0}$(9960).

  11. Emergent Lifshitz scaling from N=4 SYM with supersymmetric heavy-quark density

    CERN Document Server

    Faedo, Anton F; Kumar, S Prem

    2014-01-01

    We consider supersymmetric configurations in Type IIB supergravity obtained by the beackreaction of fundamental strings ending on a stack of D3-branes and smeared uniformly in the three spatial directions along the D3-branes. These automatically include a distribution of D5-brane baryon vertices necessary to soak up string charge. The backgrounds are static, preserving eight supersymmetries, an SO(5) global symmetry and symmetry under spatial translations and rotations. We obtain the most general BPS configurations consistent with the symmetries. We show that the solutions to the Type IIB field equations are completely specified by a single function (the dilaton) satisfying a Poisson-like equation in two dimensions. We further find that the equation admits a class of solutions displaying Lifshitz-like scaling with dynamical critical exponent z=7. The equations also admit an asymptotically AdS_5 x S^5 solution deformed by the presence of backreacted string sources that yield a uniform density of heavy quarks i...

  12. Properties of the Top Quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 and was the last of the quarks to be discovered. As the partner of the bottom quark the top quark is expected to have quantum numbers identical to that of the other known up-type quarks. Only the mass is a free parameter. We now know that it is more than 30 times heavier than the next heaviest quark, the bottom quark. Thus, within the Standard Model all production and decay properties are fully defined. Having the complete set of quarks further allows to verify constraints that the Standard Model puts on the sum of all quarks or particles. This alone is reason enough to experimentally study the top quark properties. The high value of the top quark mass and its closeness to the electroweak scale has inspired people to speculate that the top quark could have a special role in the electroweak symmetry breaking. Confirming the expected properties of the top quark experimentally establishes the top quark as we expect it to be. Any deviation from the expectations gives hints to new physics that may help to solve the outstanding questions. In this review the recent results on top quark properties obtained by the Tevatron experiments CDF and D0 are summarized. At the advent of the LHC special emphasis is given to the basic measurement methods and the dominating systematic uncertainties. After a short introduction to the Standard Model and the experimental environment in the remainder of this chapter, Chapter 2 describes the current status of top quark mass measurements. Then measurments of interaction properties are described in Chapter 3. Finally, Chapter 4 deals with analyses that consider hypothetical particles beyond the Standard Model in the observed events.

  13. Inclusive photoproduction of bottom quarks for low and medium pT in the general-mass variable-flavour-number scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kramer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We present predictions for b-quark production in photoproduction and compare with experimental data from HERA. Our theoretical predictions are obtained at next-to-leading-order in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, an approach which takes into account the finite mass of the b quarks. We use realistic evolved nonperturbative fragmentation functions obtained from fits to e+e− data. We find in general good agreement of data with both the GM-VFNS and the FFNS calculations, while the more precise ZEUS data seem to prefer the GM-VFNS predictions.

  14. Inclusive photoproduction of bottom quarks for low and medium p{sub T} in the general-mass variable-flavour-number scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Spiesberger, H. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Prisma Cluster of Excellence; Cape Town Univ., Rondebosch (South Africa). Centre for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics and Dept. of Physics

    2015-09-15

    We present predictions for b-quark production in photoproduction and compare with experimental data from HERA. Our theoretical predictions are obtained at next-to-leading-order in the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme, an approach which takes into account the finite mass of the b quarks. We use realistic evolved nonperturbative fragmentation functions obtained from fits to e{sup +}e{sup -} data. We find in general good agreement of data with both the GM-VFNS and the FFNS calculations, while the more precise ZEUS data seem to prefer the GM-VFNS predictions.

  15. Scaling behavior of chiral phase transition in two-flavor QCD with improved Wilson quarks at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    Ejiri, S; Aoki, S; Kanaya, K; Ohno, H; Saito, H; Hatsuda, T; Maezawa, Y; Umeda, T

    2010-01-01

    We study scaling behavior of a chiral order parameter performing a simulation of two-flavor QCD with improved Wilson quarks. It has been shown that the scaling behavior of the chiral order parameter defined by a Ward-Takahashi identity agrees with the scaling function of the three-dimensional O(4) spin model at zero chemical potential. We extend the scaling study to finite density QCD. Calculating derivatives of the chiral order parameter with respect to the chemical potential in two-flavor QCD, the scaling property of chiral phase transition is discussed in the low density region. We moreover calculate the curvature of the phase boundary of the chirl phase transition in the temperature and chemical potential plane assuming the O(4) scaling relation.

  16. Measurement of the High-Mass Drell-Yan Cross Section and Limits on Quark-Electron Compositeness Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tong; Ito, A. S.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Wu, Z.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.

    1999-06-01

    We present a measurement of the Drell-Yan cross section at high dielectron invariant mass using 120 pb -1 of data collected in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV by the D0 Collaboration during 1992-1996. No deviation from standard model expectations is observed. We use the data to set limits on the quark-electron compositeness scale. The 95% confidence level lower limits on the compositeness scale vary between 3.3 and 6.1 TeV depending on the assumed form of the effective contact interaction.

  17. Scale-invariant correlations and the distribution of prime numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdom, B.

    2009-08-01

    Negative correlations in the distribution of prime numbers are found to display a scale invariance. This occurs in conjunction with a nonstationary behavior. We compare the prime number series to a type of fractional Brownian motion which incorporates both the scale invariance and the nonstationary behavior. Interesting discrepancies remain. The scale invariance also appears to imply the Riemann hypothesis and we study the use of the former as a test of the latter.

  18. Simultaneous measurement of top quark mass and jet energy scale using template fits at the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann-Emme, Sebastian

    2011-07-15

    In this thesis, pairs of top quarks produced in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and decaying in the muon+jets channel t anti t {yields} (b{mu}{nu})(bqq{sup '}) are analyzed using data that were recorded by the CMS detector in the year 2010 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 pb{sup -1}. A sample of 78 events is selected by requiring exactly one isolated muon and at least four jets, two of them being identified as jets from the decay of b quarks. Given these selection criteria, the expected fraction of t anti t events is 94%. The trijet mass, M3, and the dijet mass, M2, are reconstructed, taking into account the b-tagging information. M3 and M2 are estimators of the masses of hadronically decaying top quarks and the corresponding W bosons, respectively. Templates for M2 and for the event-wise mass difference {delta}M{sub 32}=M3-M2 are parametrized as linear functions of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and the jet energy scale (JES). Based on the precise knowledge of the W boson mass, M2 provides a strong handle on the energy scale of jets from light quarks. The reconstructed M2 and {delta}M{sub 32} in data are compared to the template functions from simulation in a combined likelihood fit. The overall JES in the selected sample is found to be 1.048{+-}0.040(stat){+-}0.015(syst) relative to the simulated JES and the measured m{sub t} is 167.8{+-}7.1(stat+JES){+-}3.1(syst) GeV. This is one of the first measurements of m{sub t} at the Large Hadron Collider. Furthermore, the JES measurement is an important input for the commissioning of the CMS experiment for the upcoming measurements with more data in the near future. (orig.)

  19. Quark Mass Correction to Chiral Separation Effect and Pseudoscalar Condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Er-dong

    2016-01-01

    We derived an analytic structure of the quark mass correction to chiral separation effect (CSE) in small mass regime. We confirmed this structure by a D3/D7 holographic model study in a finite density, finite magnetic field background. The quark mass correction to CSE can be related to correlators of pseudo-scalar condensate, quark number density and quark condensate in static limit. We found scaling relations of these correlators with spatial momentum in the small momentum regime. They characterize medium responses to electric field, inhomogeneous quark mass and chiral shift. Beyond the small momentum regime, we found existence of normalizable mode, which possibly leads to formation of spiral phase. The normalizable mode exists beyond a critical magnetic field, whose magnitude decreases with quark chemical potential.

  20. Measurements and searches with top quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Reinhild Yvonne [Univ. of Wuppertal (Germany)

    2008-08-01

    In 1995 the last missing member of the known families of quarks, the top quark, was discovered by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab near Chicago. Until today, the Tevatron is the only place where top quarks can be produced. The determination of top quark production and properties is crucial to understand the Standard Model of particle physics and beyond. The most striking property of the top quark is its mass--of the order of the mass of a gold atom and close to the electroweak scale--making the top quark not only interesting in itself but also as a window to new physics. Due to the high mass, much higher than of any other known fermion, it is expected that the top quark plays an important role in electroweak symmetry breaking, which is the most prominent candidate to explain the mass of particles. In the Standard Model, electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by one Higgs field, producing one additional physical particle, the Higgs boson. Although various searches have been performed, for example at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP), no evidence for the Higgs boson could yet be found in any experiment. At the Tevatron, multiple searches for the last missing particle of the Standard Model are ongoing with ever higher statistics and improved analysis techniques. The exclusion or verification of the Higgs boson can only be achieved by combining many techniques and many final states and production mechanisms. As part of this thesis, the search for Higgs bosons produced in association with a top quark pair (t$\\bar{t}$H) has been performed. This channel is especially interesting for the understanding of the coupling between Higgs and the top quark. Even though the Standard Model Higgs boson is an attractive candidate, there is no reason to believe that the electroweak symmetry breaking is induced by only one Higgs field. In many models more than one Higgs boson are expected to exist, opening even more

  1. About the number of generators of a musical scale

    CERN Document Server

    Amiot, Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    Several musical scales, like the major scale, can be described as finite arithmetic sequences modulo octave, i.e. chunks of an arithmetic sequence in a cyclic group. Hence the question of how many different arithmetic sequences in a cyclic group will give the same support set. We prove that this number is always a totient number and characterize the different possible cases. In particular, there exists scales with an arbitrarily large number of different generators, but none with 14 generators. Some connex results and extensions are also given, for instance on characterization via a Discrete Fourier Transform, and about finite or infinite arithmetic sequences in the torus R/Z.

  2. Predicting {theta}{sub 13} and the neutrino mass scale from quark lepton mass hierarchies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.; Domcke, V.; Schmitz, K.

    2011-11-15

    Flavour symmetries of Froggatt-Nielsen type can naturally reconcile the large quark and charged lepton mass hierarchies and the small quark mixing angles with the observed small neutrino mass hierarchies and their large mixing angles. We point out that such a flavour structure, together with the measured neutrino mass squared differences and mixing angles, strongly constrains yet undetermined parameters of the neutrino sector. Treating unknown O(1) parameters as random variables, we obtain surprisingly accurate predictions for the smallest mixing angle, sin{sup 2}2{theta}{sub 13}=0.07{sup +0.11}{sub -0.05}, the smallest neutrino mass, m{sub 1}=2.5{sup +1.7}{sub -1.6} x 10{sup -3} eV, and one Majorana phase, {alpha}{sub 21}/{pi}=1.0{sup +0.2}{sub -0.2}. (orig.)

  3. Scaling of the F_2 structure function in nuclei and quark distributions at x>1

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, N; Day, D B; Gaskell, D; Daniel, A; Seely, J; Asaturyan, R; Benmokhtar, F; Boeglin, W; Boillat, B; Bosted, P; Bruell, A; Bukhari, M H S; Christy, M E; Chudakov, E; Clasie, B; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Fassi, L El; Fenker, H; Filippone, B W; Garrow, K; Hill, C; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; Jourdan, J; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kiselev, D; Kotulla, M; Lindgren, R; Lung, A F; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Miyoshi, T; Mkrtchyan, H; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Okayasu, Y; Opper, A K; Perdrisat, C; Potterveld, D H; Punjabi, V; Qian, X; Reimer, P E; Roche, J; Rodriguez, V M; Rondon, O; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Slifer, K; Smith, G R; Solvignon, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tajima, S; Tang, L; Testa, G; Trojer, R; Tvaskis, V; Vulcan, W F; Wasko, C; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A; Wright, J; Zheng, X

    2010-01-01

    We present new data on electron scattering from a range of nuclei taken in Hall C at Jefferson Lab. For heavy nuclei, we observe a rapid falloff in the cross section for $x>1$, which is sensitive to short range contributions to the nuclear wave-function, and in deep inelastic scattering corresponds to probing extremely high momentum quarks. This result agrees with higher energy muon scattering measurements, but is in sharp contrast to neutrino scattering measurements which suggested a dramatic enhancement in the distribution of the `super-fast' quarks probed at x>1. The falloff at x>1 is noticeably stronger in ^2H and ^3He, but nearly identical for all heavier nuclei.

  4. A Chain Perspective on Large-scale Number Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grijpink, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    As large-scale number systems gain significance in social and economic life (electronic communication, remote electronic authentication), the correct functioning and the integrity of public number systems take on crucial importance. They are needed to uniquely indicate people, objects or phenomena i

  5. A Chain Perspective on Large-scale Number Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grijpink, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    As large-scale number systems gain significance in social and economic life (electronic communication, remote electronic authentication), the correct functioning and the integrity of public number systems take on crucial importance. They are needed to uniquely indicate people, objects or phenomena i

  6. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓ^{ϑ}, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm^{(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ)}. We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rm_{crit}, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rm_{crit} is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rm_{crit} provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  7. Small-scale dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2012-12-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude, fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(ℓ)∝ℓϑ, where v(ℓ) is the eddy velocity at a scale ℓ. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with ϑ=1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with ϑ=1/2. In this work, we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the evolution of the small-scale magnetic field, using the WKB approximation. In the limit of low magnetic Prandtl numbers, the growth rate is proportional to Rm(1-ϑ)/(1+ϑ). We furthermore discuss the critical magnetic Reynolds number Rmcrit, which is required for small-scale dynamo action. The value of Rmcrit is roughly 100 for Kolmogorov turbulence and 2700 for Burgers. Furthermore, we discuss that Rmcrit provides a stronger constraint in the limit of low Pm than it does for large Pm. We conclude that the small-scale dynamo can operate in the regime of low magnetic Prandtl numbers if the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough. Thus, the magnetic field amplification on small scales can take place in a broad range of physical environments and amplify week magnetic seed fields on short time scales.

  8. Top quark and neutrino composite Higgs bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetana, Adam [Czech Technical University in Prague, Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Prague 2 (Czech Republic)

    2013-08-15

    In the context of top-quark condensation models, the top quark alone is too light to saturate the correct value of the electroweak scale by its condensate. Within the seesaw scenario the neutrinos can have their Dirac masses large enough so that their condensates can provide a significant contribution to the value of the electroweak scale. We address the question of a phenomenological feasibility of the top-quark and neutrino condensation conspiracy against the electroweak symmetry. It is mandatory to reproduce the masses of electroweak gauge bosons, the top-quark mass and the recently observed scalar mass of 125 GeV and to satisfy the upper limits on absolute value of active neutrino masses. To accomplish that we design a reasonably simplified effective model with two composite Higgs doublets. Additionally, we work with a general number N of right-handed neutrino flavor triplets participating on the seesaw mechanism. There are no experimental constraints limiting this number. The upper limit is set by the model itself. Provided that the condensation scale is of order 10{sup 17-18} GeV and the number of right-handed neutrinos is O(100-1000), the model predicts masses of additional Higgs bosons below 250 GeV and a suppression of the top-quark Yukawa coupling to the 125 GeV particle at the {proportional_to}60 % level of the Standard model value. (orig.)

  9. Top quark and neutrino composite Higgs bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Adam

    2013-08-01

    In the context of top-quark condensation models, the top quark alone is too light to saturate the correct value of the electroweak scale by its condensate. Within the seesaw scenario the neutrinos can have their Dirac masses large enough so that their condensates can provide a significant contribution to the value of the electroweak scale. We address the question of a phenomenological feasibility of the top-quark and neutrino condensation conspiracy against the electroweak symmetry. It is mandatory to reproduce the masses of electroweak gauge bosons, the top-quark mass and the recently observed scalar mass of 125 GeV and to satisfy the upper limits on absolute value of active neutrino masses. To accomplish that we design a reasonably simplified effective model with two composite Higgs doublets. Additionally, we work with a general number N of right-handed neutrino flavor triplets participating on the seesaw mechanism. There are no experimental constraints limiting this number. The upper limit is set by the model itself. Provided that the condensation scale is of order 1017-18 GeV and the number of right-handed neutrinos is , the model predicts masses of additional Higgs bosons below 250 GeV and a suppression of the top-quark Yukawa coupling to the 125 GeV particle at the ˜60 % level of the Standard model value.

  10. Measurement of the High-Mass Drell-Yan Cross Section and Limits on Quark-Electron Compositeness Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; Maciel, A.K.; da Motta, H.; Oliveira, E.; Santoro, A. [LAFEX, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Gomez, B.; Hoeneisen, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P. [Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia); Ducros, Y. [DAPNIA/Service de Physique des Particules, CEA, Saclay (France); Beri, S.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kohli, J.M.; Singh, J.B. [Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Shivpuri, R.K. [Delhi University, Delhi (India); Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Parua, N.; Shankar, H.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Park, Y.M. [Kyungsung University, Pusan (Korea); Choi, S.; Kim, S.K. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A. [CINVESTAV, Mexico City (Mexico); Pawlik, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Gavrilov, V.; Gershtein, Y.; Kuleshov, S. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russia); Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E. [Moscow State University, Moscow (Russia); Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russia); Babukhadia, L.; Davis, K.; Fein, D.; Forden, G.E.; Guida, J.A.; Johns, K.; Nang, F.; Narayanan, A.; Rutherfoord, J.; Shupe, M. [University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Aihara, H.; Barberis, E.; Clark, A.R.; and others

    1999-06-01

    We present a measurement of the Drell-Yan cross section at high dielectron invariant mass using 120 pb{sup {minus}1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV by the D0 Collaboration during 1992{endash}1996. No deviation from standard model expectations is observed. We use the data to set limits on the quark-electron compositeness scale. The 95{percent} confidence level lower limits on the compositeness scale vary between 3.3 and 6.1thinspthinspTeV depending on the assumed form of the effective contact interaction. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Top quark theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Laenen

    2011-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of a number of top quark properties such as its mass and its couplings are reviewed. Essential aspects in the theoretical description of top quark production, singly, in pairs and in association, as well as its decay related to spin and angular correlations are discussed.

  12. Top quark theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eric Laenen

    2012-10-01

    The theoretical aspects of a number of top quark properties such as its mass and its couplings are reviewed. Essential aspects in the theoretical description of top quark production, singly, in pairs and in association, as well as its decay related to spin and angular correlations are discussed.

  13. Small scale turbulence and the finite Reynolds number effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonia, R. A.; Djenidi, L.; Danaila, L.; Tang, S. L.

    2017-02-01

    Failure to recognize the importance of the finite Reynolds number effect on small scale turbulence has, by and large, resulted in misguided assessments of the first two hypotheses of Kolmogorov ["Local structure of turbulence in an incompressible fluid for very large Reynolds numbers," Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 30, 299-303 (1941)] or K41 as well as his third hypothesis [A. N. Kolmogorov, "A refinement of previous hypotheses concerning the local structure of turbulence in a viscous incompressible fluid at high Reynolds number," J. Fluid Mech. 13, 82-85 (1962)] or K62. As formulated by Kolmogorov, all three hypotheses require local isotropy to be valid and the Reynolds number to be very large. In the context of the first hypothesis, there is now strong evidence to suggest that this requirement can be significantly relaxed, at least for dissipative scales and relatively low order moments of the velocity structure function. As the scale increases, the effect of the large scale motion on these moments becomes more prominent and higher Reynolds numbers are needed before K41 and K62 can be tested unambiguously.

  14. Discovery pattern and species number of scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jun; Li, Kunming; Chen, Cui; Wu, Sanan

    2016-01-01

    Few investigations have been made of the species description trend of scale insects. The present study reports the discovery pattern and taxonomic efforts for this group based on global species and a literature dataset. In addition, three asymptotic models (Logistic, Gompertz, and Extreme Value) based on a discovery curve were used to predict the species number of scale insects. Our results showed that the species description rate has been changing over time, with certain peaks and valleys in the past 250 years. The mean number of species described per year was 30, with the highest number of 195 described species in 1985. The increasing number of authors and the almost constant proportion of species described by 10% most prolific authors since the 1900s suggested that taxonomic effort has been increasing over time. The Gompertz model with lowest AIC value suggested that there are about 10,450 species of scale insects on Earth, nearly 30% of which remain to be described. Our study offers insights into the discovery pattern of scale insect diversity. PMID:27703864

  15. Reynolds number scaling of velocity increments in isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Kartik P.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-02-01

    Using the largest database of isotropic turbulence available to date, generated by the direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations on an 81923 periodic box, we show that the longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale identically in the inertial range. By examining the DNS data at several Reynolds numbers, we infer that the contradictory results of the past on the inertial-range universality are artifacts of low Reynolds number and residual anisotropy. We further show that both longitudinal and transverse velocity increments scale on locally averaged dissipation rate, just as postulated by Kolmogorov's refined similarity hypothesis, and that, in isotropic turbulence, a single independent scaling adequately describes fluid turbulence in the inertial range.

  16. Scaling in large Prandtl number turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrulle, B

    2011-01-01

    We study the scaling properties of heat transfer $Nu$ in turbulent thermal convection at large Prandtl number $Pr$ using a quasi-linear theory. We show that two regimes arise, depending on the Reynolds number $Re$. At low Reynolds number, $Nu Pr^{-1/2}$ and $Re$ are a function of $Ra Pr^{-3/2}$. At large Reynolds number $Nu Pr^{1/3}$ and $Re Pr$ are function only of $Ra Pr^{2/3}$ (within logarithmic corrections). In practice, since $Nu$ is always close to $Ra^{1/3}$, this corresponds to a much weaker dependence of the heat transfer in the Prandtl number at low Reynolds number than at large Reynolds number. This difference may solve an existing controversy between measurements in SF6 (large $Re$) and in alcohol/water (lower $Re$). We link these regimes with a possible global bifurcation in the turbulent mean flow. We further show how a scaling theory could be used to describe these two regimes through a single universal function. This function presents a bimodal character for intermediate range of Reynolds num...

  17. Calcium quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggli, Ernst; Egger, Marcel

    2002-05-01

    Elementary subcellular Ca2+ signals arising from the opening of single ion channels may offer the possibility to examine the stochastic behavior and the microscopic chemical reaction rates of these channel proteins in their natural environment. Such an analysis can yield detailed information about the molecular function that cannot be derived from recordings obtained from an ensemble of channels. In this review, we summarize experimental evidence suggesting that Ca2+ sparks, elementary Ca2+ signaling events of cardiac and skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling, may be comprised of a number of smaller Ca2+ signaling events, the Ca2+ quarks.

  18. Coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Herculano-Houzel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available While larger brains possess concertedly larger cerebral cortices and cerebella, the relative size of the cerebral cortex increases with brain size, but relative cerebellar size does not. In the absence of data on numbers of neurons in these structures, this discrepancy has been used to dispute the hypothesis that the cerebral cortex and cerebellum function and have evolved in concert and to support a trend towards neocorticalization in evolution. However, the rationale for interpreting changes in absolute and relative size of the cerebral cortex and cerebellum relies on the assumption that they reflect absolute and relative numbers of neurons in these structures across all species – an assumption that our recent studies have shown to be flawed. Here I show for the first time that the numbers of neurons in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum are directly correlated across 19 mammalian species of 4 different orders, including humans, and increase concertedly in a similar fashion both within and across the orders Eulipotyphla (Insectivora, Rodentia, Scandentia and Primata, such that on average a ratio of 3.6 neurons in the cerebellum to every neuron in the cerebral cortex is maintained across species. This coordinated scaling of cortical and cerebellar numbers of neurons provides direct evidence in favor of concerted function, scaling and evolution of these brain structures, and suggests that the common notion that equates cognitive advancement with neocortical expansion should be revisited to consider in its stead the coordinated scaling of neocortex and cerebellum as a functional ensemble.

  19. Topological susceptibility with three flavors of staggered quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Aubin, C; Billeter, B; DeTar, C; Gottlieb, S; Gregory, E; Heller, U M; Hetrick, J E; Osborn, J; Sugar, R L; Toussaint, D; Billeter, Brian; Gottlieb, Steven

    2005-01-01

    As one test of the validity of the staggered-fermion fourth-root determinant trick, we examine the suppression of the topological susceptibility of the QCD vacuum in the limit of small quark mass. The suppression is sensitive to the number of light sea quark flavors. Our study is done in the presence of 2+1 flavors of dynamical quarks in the improved staggered fermion formulation. Variance-reduction techniques provide better control of statistical errors. New results from staggered chiral perturbation theory account for taste-breaking effects in the low-quark mass behavior of the susceptibility, thereby reducing scaling violations from this source. Measurements over a range of quark masses at two lattice spacings permit a rough continuum extrapolation to remove the remaining lattice artifacts. The results are consistent with chiral perturbation theory with the correct flavor counting.

  20. The Small-Scale Dynamo at Low Magnetic Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Bovino, Stefano; Klessen, Ralf S

    2012-01-01

    The present-day Universe is highly magnetized, even though the first magnetic seed fields were most probably extremely weak. To explain the growth of the magnetic field strength over many orders of magnitude fast amplification processes need to operate. The most efficient mechanism known today is the small-scale dynamo, which converts turbulent kinetic energy into magnetic energy leading to an exponential growth of the magnetic field. The efficiency of the dynamo depends on the type of turbulence indicated by the slope of the turbulence spectrum v(l) \\propto l^{theta}, where v(l) is the eddy velocity at a scale l. We explore turbulent spectra ranging from incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence with theta = 1/3 to highly compressible Burgers turbulence with theta = 1/2. In this work we analyze the properties of the small-scale dynamo for low magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, which denotes the ratio of the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm, to the hydrodynamical one, Re. We solve the Kazantsev equation, which describes the...

  1. Chemical Evolution of Strongly Interacting Quark-Gluon Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Pan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At very initial stage of relativistic heavy ion collisions a wave of quark-gluon matter is produced from the break-up of the strong color electric field and then thermalizes at a short time scale (~1 fm/c. However, the quark-gluon plasma (QGP system is far out of chemical equilibrium, especially for the heavy quarks which are supposed to reach chemical equilibrium much late. In this paper a continuing quark production picture for strongly interacting QGP system is derived, using the quark number susceptibilities and the equation of state; both of them are from the results calculated by the Wuppertal-Budapest lattice QCD collaboration. We find that the densities of light quarks increase by 75% from the temperature T=400 MeV to T=150 MeV, while the density of strange quark annihilates by 18% in the temperature region. We also offer a discussion on how this late production of quarks affects the final charge-charge correlations.

  2. Quark masses and their hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, M.

    1987-12-01

    Electroweak symmetry breaking is attributed to dynamical generation of quark masses. Quarks q (and leptons l) are assumed to be produced by hypercolor confinement of preons at an intermediate scale Λ hc. Hierarchies observed in the q mass spectra can be explained by a BCS mechanism if the color interaction is enough asymptotically free and if residual ones emerging by the confinement are medium strong. The former assumption claims that N≦4, where N is the family number of q and l. Dynamical equations to determine q masses and mixings are given, but they require knowledge on the physics at Λ hc. A phenomenological approach is also made on the basis of an SU(7)× SU(7) chiral preon model with N=4. The mass ratio m t/ mb is related to ( m c/ m s)ηB with η B≃1.1 and m t'/ mb' to ( m u/ m d)ηA with η A≃1.4. In this scheme the fourth down quark is the heaviest (˜ 110 GeV) and contributes dominantly to F 2, where F is the Fermi scale.

  3. A Scale Invariant Distribution of the Prime Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne S. Kendal

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The irregular distribution of prime numbers amongst the integers has found multiple uses, from engineering applications of cryptography to quantum theory. The degree to which this distribution can be predicted thus has become a subject of current interest. Here, we present a computational analysis of the deviations between the actual positions of the prime numbers and their predicted positions from Riemann’s counting formula, focused on the variance function of these deviations from sequential enumerative bins. We show empirically that these deviations can be described by a class of probabilistic models known as the Tweedie exponential dispersion models that are characterized by a power law relationship between the variance and the mean, known by biologists as Taylor’s power law and by engineers as fluctuation scaling. This power law behavior of the prime number deviations is remarkable in that the same behavior has been found within the distribution of genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the human genome, the distribution of animals and plants within their habitats, as well as within many other biological and physical processes. We explain the common features of this behavior through a statistical convergence effect related to the central limit theorem that also generates 1/f noise.

  4. Particle Number Concentrations for HI-SCALE Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, Susanne V [Aerosol Dynamics, Inc.

    2016-06-01

    In support of the Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) project to study new particle formation in the atmosphere, a pair of custom water condensation particle counters were provided to the second intensive field campaign, from mid-August through mid-September 2017, at the U.S. Department of Energy Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility observatory. These custom instruments were developed by Aerosol Dynamics, Inc. (Hering et al. 2017) to detect particles into the nanometer size range. Referred to as “versatile water condensation particle counter (vWCPC)”, they are water-based, laminar-flow condensational growth instruments whose lower particle size threshold can be set based on user-selected operating temperatures. For HI-SCALE, the vWCPCs were configured to measure airborne particle number concentrations in the size range from approximately 2nm to 2μm. Both were installed in the particle sizing system operated by Chongai Kuang of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). One of these was operated in parallel to a TSI Model 3776, upstream of the mobility particle sizing system, to measure total ambient particle concentrations. The airborne particle concentration data from this “total particle number vWCPC” (Ntot-vWCPC) system has been reported to the ARM database. The data are reported with one-second resolution. The second vWCPC was operated in parallel with the BNL diethylene glycol instrument to count particles downstream of a separate differential mobility size analyzer. Data from this “DMA-vWCPC” system was logged by BNL, and will eventually be provided by that laboratory.

  5. On the difference between the pole and the MS masses of the top quark at the electroweak scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegerlehner, Fred [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Kalmykov, Mikhail Yu.; Kniehl, Bernd A. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2012-12-15

    We argue that for a Higgs boson mass M{sub H} {proportional_to} 125 GeV, as estimated from recent Higgs searches at the LHC, the inclusion of the electroweak radiative corrections in the relationship between the pole and MS masses of the top quark reduces the difference to about 1 GeV. This fact is relevant for the scheme dependence of electroweak observables as well as for the extraction of the top quark mass from experimental data.

  6. LATTICE QCD THERMODYNAMICS WITH WILSON QUARKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EJIRI,S.

    2007-11-20

    We review studies of QCD thermodynamics by lattice QCD simulations with dynamical Wilson quarks. After explaining the basic properties of QCD with Wilson quarks at finite temperature including the phase structure and the scaling properties around the chiral phase transition, we discuss the critical temperature, the equation of state and heavy-quark free energies.

  7. Duality between quark-quark and quark-antiquark pairing in 1+1 dimensional large N models

    CERN Document Server

    Thies, M

    2003-01-01

    We identify a canonical transformation which maps the chiral Gross-Neveu model onto a recently proposed Cooper pair model. Baryon number and axial charge are interchanged. The same physics can be described either as chiral symmetry breaking (quark-antiquark pairing) or as superconductivity (quark-quark pairing).

  8. Anatomy of double heavy-quark initiated processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Matthew; Maltoni, Fabio; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Ubiali, Maria

    2016-09-01

    A number of phenomenologically relevant processes at hadron colliders, such as Higgs and Z boson production in association with b quarks, can be conveniently described as scattering of heavy quarks in the initial state. We present a detailed analysis of this class of processes, identifying the form of the leading initial-state collinear logarithms that allow the relation of calculations performed in different flavour schemes in a simple and reliable way. This procedure makes it possible to assess the size of the logarithmically enhanced terms and the effects of their resummation via heavy-quark parton distribution functions. As an application, we compare the production of (SM-like and heavy) scalar and vector bosons in association with b quarks at the LHC in the four- and five-flavour schemes as well as the production of a heavy Z ' in association with top quarks at a future 100 TeV hadron collider in the five- and six-flavour schemes. We find that, in agreement with a previous analysis of single heavy-quark initiated processes, the size of the initial-state logarithms is mitigated by a kinematical suppression. The most important effects of the resummation are a shift of the central predictions typically of about 20% at a justified value of the scale of each considered process and a significant reduction of scale variation uncertainties.

  9. Readiness for Change. Scaling-Up Brief. Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, Dean L.; Blase, Karen A.; Horner, Rob; Sugai, George

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this "Brief" is to define the variables a state or large district leadership team may wish to consider as they determine if they are "ready" to invest in the scaling-up of an innovation in education. As defined here, "scaling up" means that at least 60% of the students who could benefit from an innovation have access to that…

  10. Numbers, scale and symbols: the public understanding of nanotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batt, Carl A. [Cornell University, Department of Food Science (United States); Waldron, Anna M., E-mail: amw37@cornell.ed [Waldron Educational Consulting (United States); Broadwater, Natalie [Cornell University, Department of Food Science (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Nanotechnology will be an increasing part of the everyday lives of most people in the world. There is a general recognition that few people understand the implications of the technology, the technology itself or even the definition of the word. This lack of understanding stems from a lack of knowledge about science in general but more specifically difficulty in grasping the size scale and symbolism of nanotechnology. A potential key to informing the general public is establishing the ability to comprehend the scale of nanotechnology. Transitioning from the macro to the nanoscale seems to require an ability to comprehend scales of one-billion. Scaling is a skill not common in most individuals and tests of their ability to extrapolate size based upon scaling a common object demonstrates that most individuals cannot scale to the extent needed to make the transition to nanoscale. Symbolism is another important vehicle to providing the general public with a basis to understand the concepts of nanotechnology. With increasing age, individuals are able to draw representations of atomic scale objects, but these tend to be iconic and the different representations not easily translated. Ball and stick models are most recognized by the public, which provides an opportunity to present not only useful symbolism but also a reference point for the atomic scale.

  11. Bootstrapping quarks and gluons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, G.F.

    1979-04-01

    Dual topological unitarization (DTU) - the approach to S-matrix causality and unitarity through combinatorial topology - is reviewed. Amplitudes associated with triangulated spheres are shown to constitute the core of particle physics. Each sphere is covered by triangulated disc faces corresponding to hadrons. The leading current candidate for the hadron-face triangulation pattern employs 3-triangle basic subdiscs whose orientations correspond to baryon number and topological color. Additional peripheral triangles lie along the hadron-face perimeter. Certain combinations of peripheral triangles with a basic-disc triangle can be identified as quarks, the flavor of a quark corresponding to the orientation of its edges that lie on the hadron-face perimeter. Both baryon number and flavor are additively conserved. Quark helicity, which can be associated with triangle-interior orientation, is not uniformly conserved and interacts with particle momentum, whereas flavor does not. Three different colors attach to the 3 quarks associated with a single basic subdisc, but there is no additive physical conservation law associated with color. There is interplay between color and quark helicity. In hadron faces with more than one basic subdisc, there may occur pairs of adjacent flavorless but colored triangles with net helicity +-1 that are identifiable as gluons. Broken symmetry is an automatic feature of the bootstrap. T, C and P symmetries, as well as up-down flavor symmetry, persist on all orientable surfaces.

  12. Chiral quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Weigel

    2003-11-01

    In this talk I review studies of hadron properties in bosonized chiral quark models for the quark flavor dynamics. Mesons are constructed from Bethe–Salpeter equations and baryons emerge as chiral solitons. Such models require regularization and I show that the two-fold Pauli–Villars regularization scheme not only fully regularizes the effective action but also leads the scaling laws for structure functions. For the nucleon structure functions the present approach serves to determine the regularization prescription for structure functions whose leading moments are not given by matrix elements of local operators. Some numerical results are presented for the spin structure functions.

  13. Using heavy quark fragmentation into heavy hadrons to determine QCD parameters and test heavy quark symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Randall, Lisa

    1994-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the use of heavy quark fragmentation into heavy hadrons for testing the heavy quark effective theory through comparison of the measured fragmentation parameters of the c and b quarks. Our analysis is entirely model independent. We interpret the known perturbative evolution in a way useful for exploiting heavy quark symmetry at low energy. We first show consistency with perturbative QCD scaling for measurements done solely with c quarks. We then apply the perturbative analysis and the heavy quark expansion to relate measurements from ARGUS and LEP. We place bounds on a nonperturbative quark mass suppressed parameter, and compare the values for the b and c quarks. We find consistency with the heavy quark expansion but fairly sizable QCD uncertainties. We also suggest that one might reduce the systematic uncertainty in the result by not extrapolating to low z.

  14. Quark-Antiquark and Diquark Condensates in Vacuum in Two-Flavor Four-Fermion Interaction Models with Any Color Number Nc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Bang-Rong

    2009-01-01

    The color number No-dependence of the interplay between quark-antiquark condensates and diquark condensates in vacuum in two-flavor four-fermion interaction models is researched. The results show that the Gs-Hs (the coupling constant of scalar (qq)2-scalar (qq)2 channel) phase diagrams will be qualitatively consistent with the case of Nc = 3 as Nc varies in 4D Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and 2D Gross-Neveu (GN) model. However, in 3D GN model, the behavior of the Gs-Hp (the coupling constant of pseudoscalar (qq)2 channel) phase diagram will obviously depend on No. The known characteristic that a 3D GN model does not have the coexistence phase of the eondensates and is proven to appear only in the ease of Nc≤ 4. In all the models, the regions occupied by the phases containing the diquark condensates in corresponding phase diagrams will gradually decrease as Nc grows up and finally go to zero if Nc →∞, i.e. in this limit only the pure phase could exist.

  15. Acoustic scaling of anisotropic flow in shape-engineered events: implications for extraction of the specific shear viscosity of the quark gluon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Roy A.; Reynolds, D.; Taranenko, A.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J. M.; Liu, Fu-Hu; Gu, Yi; Mwai, A.

    2016-10-01

    It is shown that the acoustic scaling patterns of anisotropic flow for different event shapes at a fixed collision centrality (shape-engineered events), provide robust constraints for the event-by-event fluctuations in the initial-state density distribution from ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. The empirical scaling parameters also provide a dual-path method for extracting the specific shear viscosity {(η /s)}{QGP} of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in these collisions. A calibration of these scaling parameters via detailed viscous hydrodynamical model calculations, gives {(η /s)}{QGP} estimates for the plasma produced in collisions of Au + Au (\\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=0.2 {TeV}) and Pb + Pb (\\sqrt{{s}{NN}}=2.76 {TeV}). The estimates are insensitive to the initial-state geometry models considered.

  16. ATLAS top quark results

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, Sven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronises, analyses of events containing top quarks allow to probe the properties of bare quarks and to test perturbative QCD. This talk will focus on recent precision top-quark measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration: Single top-quark and top-quark pair production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented, as well as measurements of top-quark pair production in association with a W or Z boson and measurements of top quark properties such as the spin correlation and W boson helicity in top quark pair events.

  17. Top Quark Physics: Future Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, John A

    2003-05-09

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  18. Pourquoi les quarks restent invisibles

    CERN Multimedia

    Gross, David J

    2005-01-01

    At the beginning of the seventies, physicists discovered a new scale in the matter structure. Protons and neutrons, components of the atomic nucleus, seemed to be constituted by even more elementar particles: the quarks. But while they seemed to move freely inside the protons, it was impossible to isolate one of these quarks. The Nobel Prize for physics rewarded the explanation of this phenomenon (3 pages)

  19. Validation of the flux number as scaling parameter for top-spray fluidised bed systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, P.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    2SO4 using Dextrin as binder in three top-spray fluidised bed scales, i.e. a small-scale (type: GEA Aeromatic-Fielder Strea-1), medium-scale (type: Niro MP-1) and large-scale (type: GEA MP-2/3). Following the parameter guidelines adapted from the original patent description, the flux number...

  20. Reynolds number trend of hierarchies and scale interactions in turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, W. J.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2017-03-01

    Small-scale velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers are often coupled with the larger-scale motions. Studying the nature and extent of this scale interaction allows for a statistically representative description of the small scales over a time scale of the larger, coherent scales. In this study, we consider temporal data from hot-wire anemometry at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ≈2800 to 22 800, in order to reveal how the scale interaction varies with Reynolds number. Large-scale conditional views of the representative amplitude and frequency of the small-scale turbulence, relative to the large-scale features, complement the existing consensus on large-scale modulation of the small-scale dynamics in the near-wall region. Modulation is a type of scale interaction, where the amplitude of the small-scale fluctuations is continuously proportional to the near-wall footprint of the large-scale velocity fluctuations. Aside from this amplitude modulation phenomenon, we reveal the influence of the large-scale motions on the characteristic frequency of the small scales, known as frequency modulation. From the wall-normal trends in the conditional averages of the small-scale properties, it is revealed how the near-wall modulation transitions to an intermittent-type scale arrangement in the log-region. On average, the amplitude of the small-scale velocity fluctuations only deviates from its mean value in a confined temporal domain, the duration of which is fixed in terms of the local Taylor time scale. These concentrated temporal regions are centred on the internal shear layers of the large-scale uniform momentum zones, which exhibit regions of positive and negative streamwise velocity fluctuations. With an increasing scale separation at high Reynolds numbers, this interaction pattern encompasses the features found in studies on internal shear layers and concentrated vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number wall turbulence.

  1. The relation between the fundamental scale controlling high-energy interactions of quarks and the proton mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deur, Alexandre [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); de Teramond, Guy F. [Univ. de Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica)

    2015-04-06

    Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) provides a fundamental description of the physics binding quarks into protons, neutrons, and other hadrons. QCD is well understood at short distances where perturbative calculations are feasible. Establishing an explicit relation between this regime and the large-distance physics of quark confinement has been a long-sought goal. A major challenge is to relate the parameter Λs, which controls the predictions of perturbative QCD (pQCD) at short distances, to the masses of hadrons. Here we show how new theoretical insights into QCD's behavior at large and small distances lead to an analytical relation between hadronic masses and Λs. The resulting prediction, Λs = 0.341 ± 0.024 GeV agrees well with the experimental value 0.339 ± 0.016 GeV. Conversely, the experimental value of Λs can be used to predict the masses of hadrons, a task which had so far only been accomplished through intensive numerical lattice calculations, requiring several phenomenological input parameters.

  2. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, André H. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Erwin Schrödinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 9, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Mateu, Vicent [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Theory Group, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-01-22

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup −} → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  3. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Andre H. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Erwin Schroedinger International Institute for Mathematical Physics; Mateu, Vicent [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Gruppe Theorie

    2014-12-15

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup -}→hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  4. Is Heavy Quark Axion Necessarily Hadronic Axion?

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Sanghyeon; Kim, Jihn E.

    1993-01-01

    We show that heavy quark axion is not necessarily a hadronic axion, which manifests in the quark and lepton seesaw mechanism. We introduce a heavy $SU(2)$ singlet fermion for each known fermion in order to unify the axion scale and the seesaw scale. The light quarks and leptons gain their masses by the seesaw mechanism. Even though our axion model gives a kind of heavy quark axion, the axion has tree level lepton--axion coupling suppressed by $F_a$, contrary to a widely known belief that heav...

  5. Is the up-quark massless?

    CERN Document Server

    Irving, A C; Michael, C; Sharkey, K J; Wittig, H

    2001-01-01

    We report on determinations of the low-energy constants alpha5 and alpha8 in the effective chiral Lagrangian at O(p^4), using lattice simulations with N_f=2 flavours of dynamical quarks. Precise knowledge of these constants is required to test the hypothesis whether or not the up-quark is massless. Our results are obtained by studying the quark mass dependence of suitably defined ratios of pseudoscalar meson masses and matrix elements. Although comparisons with an earlier study in the quenched approximation reveal small qualitative differences in the quark mass behaviour, numerical estimates for alpha5 and alpha8 show only a weak dependence on the number of dynamical quark flavours. Our results disfavour the possibility of a massless up-quark, provided that the quark mass dependence in the physical three-flavour case is not fundamentally different from the two-flavour case studied here.

  6. QQqq Four-Quark Bound States in Chiral SU(3) Quark Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ming; ZHANG Hai-Xia; ZHANG Zong-Ye

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of QQqq heavy-light four-quark bound states has been analyzed by means of the chiral SU(3) quark model, where Q is the heavy quark (c or b) and q is the light quark (u, d, or s). We obtain a bound state for the bbnn configuration with quantum number JP=1+, I=0 and for the ccnn (JP=1+, I=0) configuration, which is not bound but slightly above the D*D* threshold (n is u or d quark). Meanwhile, we also conclude that a weakly bound state in bbnn system can also be found without considering the chiral quark interactions between the two light quarks, yet its binding energy is weaker than that with the chiral quark interactions.

  7. Top quark mass measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Tuula [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-03-18

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle. Its mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics, and an important input to precision electroweak tests. This thesis describes three measurements of the top-quark mass in the dilepton decay channel. The dilepton events have two neutrinos in the final state; neutrinos are weakly interacting particles that cannot be detected with a multipurpose experiment. Therefore, the signal of dilepton events consists of a large amount of missing energy and momentum carried off by the neutrinos. The top-quark mass is reconstructed for each event by assuming an additional constraint from a top mass independent distribution. Template distributions are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parametrized to form continuous probability density functions. The final top-quark mass is derived using a likelihood fit to compare the reconstructed top mass distribution from data to the parametrized templates. One of the analyses uses a novel technique to add top mass information from the observed number of events by including a cross-section-constraint in the likelihood function. All measurements use data samples collected by the CDF II detector.

  8. Generation of strong magnetic fields in dense quark matter driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2016-12-01

    We study the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in dense quark matter. The magnetic field growth is owing to the magnetic field instability driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks. We discuss the situation when the chiral symmetry is unbroken in the degenerate quark matter. In this case we predict the amplification of the seed magnetic field 1012G to the strengths (1014 -1015)G. In our analysis we use the typical parameters of the quark matter in the core of a hybrid star or in a quark star. We also discuss the application of the obtained results to describe the magnetic fields generation in magnetars.

  9. Hydrodynamics of anisotropic quark and gluon fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Maj, Radoslaw; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2013-03-01

    The recently developed framework of anisotropic hydrodynamics is generalized to describe the dynamics of coupled quark and gluon fluids. The quark and gluon components of the fluids are characterized by different dynamical anisotropy parameters. The dynamical equations describing such mixtures are derived from kinetic theory, with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation-time approximation, allowing for different relaxation times for quarks and gluons. Baryon number conservation is enforced in the quark and antiquark components of the fluid, but overall parton number nonconservation is allowed in the system. The resulting equations are solved numerically in the (0+1)-dimensional boost-invariant case at zero and finite baryon density.

  10. Hydrodynamics of anisotropic quark and gluon fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw; Strickland, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The recently developed framework of anisotropic hydrodynamics is generalized to describe the dynamics of coupled quark and gluon fluids. The quark and gluon components of the fluids are characterized by different dynamical anisotropy parameters. The dynamical equations describing such mixtures are derived from kinetic theory with the collisional kernel treated in the relaxation-time approximation. Baryon number conservation is enforced in the quark and anti-quark components of the fluid, but overall parton number non-conservation is allowed in the system. The resulting equations are solved numerically in the (0+1)-dimensional boost-invariant case at zero and finite baryon density.

  11. Psychological Distance between Categories in the Likert Scale: Comparing Different Numbers of Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Takafumi; Ueshima, Natsumi; Noguchi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether the number of options in the Likert scale influences the psychological distance between categories. The most important assumption when using the Likert scale is that the psychological distance between options is equal. The authors proposed a new algorithm for calculating the scale values of options by applying item…

  12. Quark Model and multiquark system

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Cristiane Oldoni

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of many particles, especially in the 50's, when the firsts accelerators appeared, caused the searching for a model that would describe in a simple form the whole of known particles. The Quark Model, based in the mathematical structures of group theory, provided in the beginning of the 60's a simplified description of hadronic matter already known, proposing that three particles, called quarks, would originate all the observed hadrons. This model was able to preview the existence of particles that were later detected, confirming its consistency. Extensions of the Quark Model were made in the beginning of the 70's, focusing in describing observed particles that were excited states of the fundamental particles and others that presented new quantum numbers (flavors). Recently, exotic states as tetraquarks and pentaquarks types, also called multiquarks systems, previewed by the model, were observed, what renewed the interest in the way as quarks are confined inside the hadrons. In this article we pre...

  13. Reynolds number trend of hierarchies and scale interactions in turbulent boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, W J; Hutchins, N; Marusic, I

    2017-03-13

    Small-scale velocity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers are often coupled with the larger-scale motions. Studying the nature and extent of this scale interaction allows for a statistically representative description of the small scales over a time scale of the larger, coherent scales. In this study, we consider temporal data from hot-wire anemometry at Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ≈2800 to 22 800, in order to reveal how the scale interaction varies with Reynolds number. Large-scale conditional views of the representative amplitude and frequency of the small-scale turbulence, relative to the large-scale features, complement the existing consensus on large-scale modulation of the small-scale dynamics in the near-wall region. Modulation is a type of scale interaction, where the amplitude of the small-scale fluctuations is continuously proportional to the near-wall footprint of the large-scale velocity fluctuations. Aside from this amplitude modulation phenomenon, we reveal the influence of the large-scale motions on the characteristic frequency of the small scales, known as frequency modulation. From the wall-normal trends in the conditional averages of the small-scale properties, it is revealed how the near-wall modulation transitions to an intermittent-type scale arrangement in the log-region. On average, the amplitude of the small-scale velocity fluctuations only deviates from its mean value in a confined temporal domain, the duration of which is fixed in terms of the local Taylor time scale. These concentrated temporal regions are centred on the internal shear layers of the large-scale uniform momentum zones, which exhibit regions of positive and negative streamwise velocity fluctuations. With an increasing scale separation at high Reynolds numbers, this interaction pattern encompasses the features found in studies on internal shear layers and concentrated vorticity fluctuations in high-Reynolds-number wall turbulence.This article is part of the

  14. Color Screening and Quark-Quark Interactions in Finite Temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Döring, M; Kaczmarek, O; Karsch, F

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the screening of static diquark sources in 2-flavor QCD and compare results with the screening of static quark-antiquark pairs. We show that a two quark system in a fixed color representations is screened at short distances like a single quark source in the same color representation whereas at large distances the two quarks are screened independently. At high temperatures we observe that the relative strength of the interaction in diquark and quark-antiquark systems, respectively, obeys Casimir scaling. We use this result to examine the possible existence of heavy quark-quark bound states in the high temperature phase of QCD. We find support for the existence of $bb$ states up to about $2T_c$ while $cc$ states are unlikely to be formed above $T_c$.

  15. Unquenched QCD with Light Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Duncan, A; Yoo, J

    2003-01-01

    We present recent results in unquenched lattice QCD with two degenerate light sea quarks using the truncated determinant approximation (TDA). In the TDA the infrared modes contributing to the quark determinant are computed exactly up to some cutoff in quark off-shellness (typically 2$\\Lambda_{QCD}$). This approach allows simulations to be performed at much lighter quark masses than possible with conventional hybrid MonteCarlo techniques. Results for the static energy and topological charge distributions are presented using a large ensemble generated on very coarse (6$^4$) but physically large lattices. Preliminary results are also reported for the static energy and meson spectrum on 10$^3$x20 lattices (lattice scale $a^{-1}$=1.15 GeV) at quark masses corresponding to pions of mass $\\leq$ 200 MeV. Using multiboson simulation to compute the ultraviolet part of the quark determinant the TDA approach becomes an exact with essentially no increase in computational effort. Some preliminary results using this fully u...

  16. Is Ultra-High Reynolds Number Necessary for Comprehensive Log Scaling in a Turbulent Boundary Layer?

    CERN Document Server

    Dixit, Shivsai Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Experiments in an extraordinary turbulent boundary layer called the sink flow, displaying a perfect streamwise invariance, show a wide extent of logarithmic scaling for moments of streamwise velocity up to order 12, even at moderate Reynolds numbers. This is in striking contrast to canonical constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers that show such comprehensive log scaling only at ultra-high Reynolds numbers. This suggests that for comprehensive log scaling, ultra-high-Reynolds-number is not a necessary condition; while specific details of the sink flow are special, the relevance to general turbulent boundary layers is that the sink flow underscores the importance of the streamwise invariance condition that needs to be met in a general flow for obtaining log scaling. Indeed, a simple theory shows that, for log scaling in the inertial sublayer, the invariance of dimensionless mean velocity and higher-order moments along a mean streamline is a necessary and sufficient condition. Ultra-high Reynolds number pri...

  17. Heavy quark production in pp collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGaughey, P.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Quack, E. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Ruuskanen, P.V. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)]|[Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    A systematic study of the inclusive single heavy quark and heavy-quark pair production cross sections in pp collisions is presented for RHIC and LHC energies. We compare with existing data when possible. The dependence of the rates on the renormalization and factorization scales is discussed. Predictions of the cross sections are given for two different sets of parton distribution functions.

  18. Quark deconfinement in the proto-magnetar model of long gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, A. G.; Bucciantini, N.; Drago, A.; Pagliara, G.; Del Zanna, L.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the possible implications of quark deconfinement on the phenomenology of long gamma-ray bursts focusing, in particular, on the possibility to describe multiple prompt emission phases in the context of the proto-magnetar model. Starting from numerical models of rotating Hadron Stars and Quark Stars in full general relativity we track the electromagnetic spin-down evolution in both the hadronic and quark phase, linking the two families through conservation of baryon number and angular momentum. We give estimates of the time-scales and the energetics involved in the spin-down process deriving, in the relevant spin range, the relation between the initial and the final masses and rotational energies, whenever hadron-quark conversion is possible. We show how the results can be used in relevant astrophysical cases such as the double burst GRB 110709B.

  19. Arrangement of scale-interaction and large-scale modulation in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between small- and large-scale motions are inherent in the near-wall dynamics of wall-bounded flows. We here examine the scale-interaction embedded within the streamwise velocity component. Data were acquired using hot-wire anemometry in ZPG turbulent boundary layers, for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ≡ δUτ / ν ~ 2800 to 22800. After first decomposing velocity signals into contributions from small- and large-scales, we then represent the time-varying small-scale energy with time series of its instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency, via a wavelet-based method. Features of the scale-interaction are inferred from isocorrelation maps, formed by correlating the large-scale velocity with its concurrent small-scale amplitude and frequency. Below the onset of the log-region, the physics constitutes aspects of amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Time shifts, associated with the correlation extrema--representing the lead/lag of the small-scale signatures relative to the large-scales--are shown to be governed by inner-scaling. Wall-normal trends of time shifts are explained by considering the arrangement of scales in the log- and intermittent-regions, and how they relate to stochastic top-down and bottom-up processes.

  20. Nuclear Structure Functions from Constituent Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Arash, F; Arash, Firooz; Atashbar-Tehrani, Shahin

    1999-01-01

    We have used the notion of the constituent quark model of nucleon, where a constituent quark carries its own internal structure, and applied it to determine nuclear structure functions ratios. It is found that the description of experimental data require the inclusion of strong shadowing effect for $x<0.01$. Using the idea of vector meson dominance model and other ingredients this effect is calculated in the context of the constituent quark model. It is rather striking that the constituent quark model, used here, gives a good account of the data for a wide range of atomic mass number from A=4 to A=204.

  1. Quark mass dependence of quarkonium properties at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ohno, H; Kaczmarek, O

    2014-01-01

    Quarkonium properties at finite temperature have been studied with quark masses of the charm and bottom quarks. Our simulations have been performed in quenched QCD with the $O(a)$-improved Wilson quarks on large and fine isotropic lattices with the spatial lattice extents $N_\\sigma =$ 96, 192 and the corresponding lattice spacings $a =$ 0.0190, 0.00967 fm, respectively, at temperatures in a range between about 0.7$T_c$ and 1.4$T_c$. We show temperature and quark mass dependence of quarkonium correlation functions and related physical quantities: the quark number susceptibility and the heavy quark diffusion constant.

  2. CHARACTERISTIC DIMENSIONLESS NUMBERS IN MULTI-SCALE AND RATE-DEPENDENT PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yilong Bai; Mengfen Xia; Haiying Wang; Fujiu Ke

    2003-01-01

    Multi-scale modeling of materials properties and chemical processes has drawn great attention from science and engineering. For these multi-scale and rate-dependent processes, how to characterize their trans-scale formulation is a key point. Three questions should be addressed:● How do multi-sizes affect the problems?● How are length scales coupled with time scales?● How to identify emergence of new structure in process and its effect?For this sake, the macroscopic equations of mechanics and the kinetic equations of the microstructural transformations should form a unified set that be solved simultaneously.As a case study of coupling length and time scales, the trans-scale formulation of wave-induced damage evolution due to mesoscopic nucleation and growth is discussed. In this problem, the trans-scaling could be reduced to two independent dimensionless numbers: the imposed Deborah number De*=(ac*)/(LV*) and the intrinsic Deborah number D* = (nN*c*5)/V* , where a, L, c*, V* and nN* are wave speed, sample size, microcrack size, the rate of microcrack growth and the rate of microcrack nucleation density, respectively. Clearly, the dimensionless number De*=(ac*)/(LV*) includes length and time scales on both meso- and macro- levels and governs the progressive process.Whereas, the intrinsic Deborah number D* indicates the characteristic transition of microdamage to macroscopic rupture since D* is related to the criterion of damage localization, which is a precursor of macroscopic rupture. This case study may highlight the scaling in multi-scale and rate-dependent problems.Then, more generally, we compare some historical examples to see how trans-scale formulations were achieved and what are still open now. The comparison of various mechanisms governing the enhancement of meso-size effects reminds us of the importance of analyzing multi-scale and rate-dependent processes case by case.For multi-scale and rate-dependent processes with chemical reactions and

  3. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with In Situ Jet Energy Scale Calibration Using Hadronic W Boson Decays at CDF-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguin, Jean-Francois [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-01-01

    We report a measurement of the top quark mass with the upgraded collider detector at Fermilab (CDF-II). The top quarks are produced in pairs (tt) in proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV.

  4. Scaling violations of quark and gluon jet fragmentation functions in $e^{+}e^{-}$ annihilations at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91.2 and 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Amaral, P; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Azuelos, Georges; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, J Richard; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Bock, P; Boeriu, O; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Donkers, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F L; Feld, L; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gaycken, G; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, R J; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Kramer, T; Krieger, P; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Layter, J G; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Martin, A J; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, M; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poli, B; Pooth, O; Przybycien, M B; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Scott, W G; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spanó, F; Stahl, A; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Tran, P; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vannerem, P; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Vollmer, C F; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L; Von Krogh, J

    2004-01-01

    Flavour inclusive, udsc and b fragmentation functions in unbiased jets, and flavour inclusive, udsc, b and gluon fragmentation functions in biased jets are measured in e^{+}e^{-} annihilations from data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 91.2, and 183-209 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The unbiased jets are defined by hemispheres of inclusive hadronic events, while the biased jet measurements are based on three-jet events selected with jet algorithms. Several methods are employed to extract the fragmentation functions over a wide range of scales. Possible biases are studied in the results obtained. The fragmentation functions are compared to results from lower energy e^{+}e^{-} experiments and with earlier LEP measurements and are found to be consistent. Scaling violations are observed and are found to be stronger for the fragmentation functions of gluon jets than for those of quarks. The measured fragmentation functions are compared to three recent theoretical next-to-leading order calculations and ...

  5. Scaling violations of quark and gluon jet fragmentation functions in $e^{+}e{-}$ annihilations at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 91.2 and 183-209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2004-01-01

    Flavour inclusive, udsc and b fragmentation functions in unbiased jets, and flavour inclusive, udsc, b and gluon fragmentation functions in biased jets are measured in e+e- annihilations from data collected at centre-of-mass energies of 91.2, and 183-209 GeV with the OPAL detector at LEP. The unbiased jets are defined by hemispheres of inclusive hadronic events, while the biased jet measurements are based on three-jet events selected with jet algorithms. Several methods are employed to extract the fragmentation functions over a wide range of scales. Possible biases are studied in the results are obtained. The fragmentation functions are compared to results from lower energy e+e- experiments and with earlier LEP measurements and are found to be consistent. Scaling violations are observed and are found to be stronger for the fragmentation functions of gluon jets than for those of quarks. The measured fragmentation functions are compared to three recent theoretical next-to-leading order calculations and to the p...

  6. Quark-Quark Forces in Quantum Chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, A A

    2014-01-01

    By single-time reduction technique of Bethe-Salpeter formalism for two-fermion systems analytical expressions for the quasipotential of quark-quark interactions in QCD have been obtained in one-gluon exchange approximation. The influence of infrared singularities of gluon Green`s functions on the character of quark-quark forces in QCD has been investigated. The way the asymptotic freedom manifests itself in terms of two-quark interaction quasipotential in quantum chromodynamics is shown. Consistent relativistic consideration of quark interaction problem by single-time reduction technique in QFT allows one to establish a nontrivial energy dependence of the two-quark interaction quasipotential. As a result of the energy dependence of the interaction quasipotential, the character of the forces changes qualitatively during the transition from the discrete spectrum (the region of the negative values of the binding energy) to the continuous spectrum (that of the positive values of the binding energy): the smooth be...

  7. ATLAS Top Quark Results

    CERN Document Server

    Black, Kevin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk will present highlights of a few recent precision measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration of the top quark using 13 TeV and 8 TeV collision data: top-quark pair and single top production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented alongside top quark properties measurements. These measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime. Measurements of the top quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  8. Reynolds number scaling to predict droplet size distribution in dispersed and undispersed subsurface oil releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pu; Weng, Linlu; Niu, Haibo; Robinson, Brian; King, Thomas; Conmy, Robyn; Lee, Kenneth; Liu, Lei

    2016-12-15

    This study was aimed at testing the applicability of modified Weber number scaling with Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude oil, and developing a Reynolds number scaling approach for oil droplet size prediction for high viscosity oils. Dispersant to oil ratio and empirical coefficients were also quantified. Finally, a two-step Rosin-Rammler scheme was introduced for the determination of droplet size distribution. This new approach appeared more advantageous in avoiding the inconsistency in interfacial tension measurements, and consequently delivered concise droplet size prediction. Calculated and observed data correlated well based on Reynolds number scaling. The relation indicated that chemical dispersant played an important role in reducing the droplet size of ANS under different seasonal conditions. The proposed Reynolds number scaling and two-step Rosin-Rammler approaches provide a concise, reliable way to predict droplet size distribution, supporting decision making in chemical dispersant application during an offshore oil spill.

  9. The extent of strangeness equilibration in quark gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipali Pal; Abhijit Sen; Munshi Golam Mustafa; Dinesh Kumar Srivastava

    2003-05-01

    The evolution and production of strangeness from chemically equilibrating and transversely expanding quark gluon plasma which may be formed in the wake of relativistic heavy-ion collisions is studied with initial conditions obtained from the self screened parton cascade (SSPC) model. The extent of partonic equilibration increases almost linearly with the square of the initial energy density, which can then be scaled with the number of participants.

  10. The Physical Foundation of the Quark Model the Quark Model as an approximation of the BCC Model

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, J L

    2001-01-01

    From the Dirac sea concept, the BCC model infers that the quarks u and d constitute a body center cubic quark lattice in the vacuum; when a quark $q^*$ is excited from the vacuum, the nearest primitive cell u' and d' is accompanying excited by the quark $q^*$. Using the energy band theory, the model deduces the quantum numbers (I, S, C, b, and Q) and the masses of all quarks using a united mass formula. Then, it shows that the system of} 3 excited quarks ($q^*u'd'

  11. Baryon Ratios in Quark-Gluon Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zhong-Biao; MIAO Hong; GAO Chong-Shou

    2003-01-01

    A way to calculate ratios of baryon produced from quark gluon plasma in relativistic heavyion collisionsis presented. It is assumed that at the beginning of the hadronization there are diquarks and anti-diquarks in the quarkmatter. The number of three-quark states is distributed between the corresponding multiplets, and hadronic decays aretaken into account. The results are shown at last.

  12. Medicine in words and numbers: a cross-sectional survey comparing probability assessment scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koele Pieter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the complex domain of medical decision making, reasoning under uncertainty can benefit from supporting tools. Automated decision support tools often build upon mathematical models, such as Bayesian networks. These networks require probabilities which often have to be assessed by experts in the domain of application. Probability response scales can be used to support the assessment process. We compare assessments obtained with different types of response scale. Methods General practitioners (GPs gave assessments on and preferences for three different probability response scales: a numerical scale, a scale with only verbal labels, and a combined verbal-numerical scale we had designed ourselves. Standard analyses of variance were performed. Results No differences in assessments over the three response scales were found. Preferences for type of scale differed: the less experienced GPs preferred the verbal scale, the most experienced preferred the numerical scale, with the groups in between having a preference for the combined verbal-numerical scale. Conclusion We conclude that all three response scales are equally suitable for supporting probability assessment. The combined verbal-numerical scale is a good choice for aiding the process, since it offers numerical labels to those who prefer numbers and verbal labels to those who prefer words, and accommodates both more and less experienced professionals.

  13. Small-scale anisotropic intermittency in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence at low magnetic Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Naoya; Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Small-scale anisotropic intermittency is examined in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence subjected to a uniformly imposed magnetic field. Orthonormal wavelet analyses are applied to direct numerical simulation data at moderate Reynolds number and for different interaction parameters. The magnetic Reynolds number is sufficiently low such that the quasistatic approximation can be applied. Scale-dependent statistical measures are introduced to quantify anisotropy in terms of the flow components, either parallel or perpendicular to the imposed magnetic field, and in terms of the different directions. Moreover, the flow intermittency is shown to increase with increasing values of the interaction parameter, which is reflected in strongly growing flatness values when the scale decreases. The scale-dependent anisotropy of energy is found to be independent of scale for all considered values of the interaction parameter. The strength of the imposed magnetic field does amplify the anisotropy of the flow.

  14. Unified Explanation of Quark-Lepton Mass Spectra in q-Deformed Quantum Mechanics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Zu

    2000-01-01

    The quark-lepton mass spectra in q-deformed quantum mechanics are investigated. The theoretical formula of the spectrum includes two new quantum numbers: the q-exciting number n describing generations and the scaling indexes Mi describing families. This formula shows two exponential increases in the mass distribution as generation n increases, the intervals of masses in a given family exponentially increase, and the mass splittings among different members in a generation also exponentially increase. The theoretical values of masses o[ quarks and leptons reasonably agree with the experimental data except for the electron mass which is one order larger.

  15. Experimental Investigation of a Hypersonic Glider Configuration at a Mach Number of 6 and at Full-Scale Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiff, Alvin; Wilkins, Max E.

    1961-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a hypersonic glider configuration, consisting of a slender ogive cylinder with three highly swept wings, spaced 120 apart, with the wing chord equal to the body length, were investigated experimentally at a Mach number of 6 and at Reynolds numbers from 6 to 16 million. The objectives were to evaluate the theoretical procedures which had been used to estimate the performance of the glider, and also to evaluate the characteristics of the glider itself. A principal question concerned the viscous drag at full-scale Reynolds number, there being a large difference between the total drags for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. It was found that the procedures which had been applied for estimating minimum drag, drag due to lift, lift curve slope, and center of pressure were generally accurate within 10 percent. An important exception was the non-linear contribution to the lift coefficient which had been represented by a Newtonian term. Experimentally, the lift curve was nearly linear within the angle-of-attack range up to 10 deg. This error affected the estimated lift-drag ratio. The minimum drag measurements indicated that substantial amounts of turbulent boundary layer were present on all models tested, over a range of surface roughness from 5 microinches maximum to 200 microinches maximum. In fact, the minimum drag coefficients were nearly independent of the surface smoothness and fell between the estimated values for turbulent and laminar boundary layers, but closer to the turbulent value. At the highest test Reynolds numbers and at large angles of attack, there was some indication that the skin friction of the rough models was being increased by the surface roughness. At full-scale Reynolds number, the maximum lift-drag ratio with a leading edge of practical diameter (from the standpoint of leading-edge heating) was 4.0. The configuration was statically and dynamically stable in pitch and yaw, and the center of pressure was less

  16. On the strange quark mass with improved staggered quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Hein, J.; Davies, C.; Lepage, G. P.; Mason, Q.; Trottier, H.

    2002-01-01

    We present results on the sum of the masses of light and strange quark using improved staggered quarks. Our calculation uses 2+1 flavours of dynamical quarks. The effects of the dynamical quarks are clearly visible.

  17. Hadron energy spectrum in polarized top-quark decays considering the effects of hadron and bottom quark masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejad, S.M.M. [Yazd University, Faculty of Physics, P.O. Box 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O.Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Balali, Mahboobe [Yazd University, Faculty of Physics, P.O. Box 89195-741, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    We present the analytical expressions for the next-to-leading order corrections to the partial decay width t(↑) → bW{sup +}, followed by b @→ H{sub b}X, for nonzero b-quark mass (m{sub b} ≠ 0) in the fixed-flavor-number scheme (FFNs). To make the predictions for the energy distribution of outgoing hadrons H{sub b}, as a function of the normalized H{sub b}-energy fraction x{sub H}, we apply the general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme (GM-VFNs) in a specific helicity coordinate system where the polarization of top quark is evaluated relative to the b-quark momentum. We also study the effects of gluon fragmentation and finite hadron mass on the hadron energy spectrum so that hadron masses are responsible for the low x{sub H} threshold. In order to describe both the b-quark and the gluon hadronizations in top decays we apply realistic and nonperturbative fragmentation functions extracted through a global fit to the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data from CERN LEP1 and SLAC SLC by relying on their universality and scaling violations. (orig.)

  18. Commissioning ATLAS and CMS with top quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, B S; Corcella, G; Di Sipio, R; Petrucciani, G

    2008-01-01

    The large ttbar production cross-section at the LHC suggests the use of top quark decays to calibrate several critical parts of the detectors, such as the trigger system, the jet energy scale and b-tagging.

  19. Major evolutionary transitions of life, metabolic scaling and the number and size of mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okie, Jordan G; Smith, Val H; Martin-Cereceda, Mercedes

    2016-05-25

    We investigate the effects of trophic lifestyle and two types of major evolutionary transitions in individuality-the endosymbiotic acquisition of organelles and development of multicellularity-on organellar and cellular metabolism and allometry. We develop a quantitative framework linking the size and metabolic scaling of eukaryotic cells to the abundance, size and metabolic scaling of mitochondria and chloroplasts and analyse a newly compiled, unprecedented database representing unicellular and multicellular cells covering diverse phyla and tissues. Irrespective of cellularity, numbers and total volumes of mitochondria scale linearly with cell volume, whereas chloroplasts scale sublinearly and sizes of both organelles remain largely invariant with cell size. Our framework allows us to estimate the metabolic scaling exponents of organelles and cells. Photoautotrophic cells and organelles exhibit photosynthetic scaling exponents always less than one, whereas chemoheterotrophic cells and organelles have steeper respiratory scaling exponents close to one. Multicellularity has no discernible effect on the metabolic scaling of organelles and cells. In contrast, trophic lifestyle has a profound and uniform effect, and our results suggest that endosymbiosis fundamentally altered the metabolic scaling of free-living bacterial ancestors of mitochondria and chloroplasts, from steep ancestral scaling to a shallower scaling in their endosymbiotic descendants.

  20. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Physique Theorique

    1995-07-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model`s phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density.

  1. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  2. Top quark properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuji Takeuchi

    2012-10-01

    Since the top quark was discovered at Tevatron in 1995, many top quark properties have been measured. However, the top quark is still interesting due to unique features which originate from the extremely heavy mass, and providing various test grounds on the Standard Model as well as searches for a new physics. Though the measurements of the top quark had been performed only at Tevatron so far, LHC is now ready for measurements with more top quarks than Tevatron. In this article, recent measurements of top quark properties from Tevatron (CDF and DØ) as well as LHC (ATLAS and CMS) are presented.

  3. A Lattice Determination of Light Quark Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Göckeler, M; Oelrich, H; Petters, D; Pleiter, D; Rakow, P E L; Schierholz, G; Stephenson, P

    2000-01-01

    A fully non-perturbative lattice determination of the up/down and strange quark masses is given for quenched QCD using both, $O(a)$ improved Wilson fermions and ordinary Wilson fermions. For the strange quark mass with $O(a)$ improved fermions we obtain $m^{\\msbar}_s(\\mu=2 {GeV}) = 105(4) {MeV}$, using the interquark force scale $r_0$. Due to quenching problems fits are only possible for quark masses larger than the strange quark mass. If we extrapolate our fits to the up/down quark mass we find for the average mass $m^{\\msbar}_l(\\mu=2 {GeV}) = 4.4(2) {MeV}$.

  4. A Study on Time-Scales Ratio and Turbulent Prandtl Number in Ducts of Industrial Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokni, Masoud

    2006-01-01

    This investigation concerns numerical time-scales ratio and turbulent Prandtl number in fully developed turbulent flows in ducts of various cross-sections. The low Reynolds number version of a non-linear eddy viscosity model is proposed to predict the Reynolds stresses and the temperature field...... is solved using a two-equation heat flux model. The computed results compare satisfactory with the available experimental data. The time-scale ratio R is defined as the ratio between the dynamic time-scale (k/ε) and the scalar time-scale(0.5θθ/εθ). Based on existing DNS data and calculations in this work...

  5. Gluon propagator with dynamical quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Papavassiliou, Joannis

    2014-01-01

    We review recent work on the effects of quark loops on the gluon propagator in the Landau gauge, relying mainly on the Schwinger-Dyson equations that describe the two-point sector of QCD. Particularly important in this context is the detailed study of how the standard gluon mass generation mechanism, which is responsible for the infrared finiteness of the quenched gluon propagator, is affected by the inclusions of dynamical quarks. This issue is especially relevant and timely, given the qualitative picture that emerges from recent unquenched lattice simulations. Our results demonstrate clearly that the gluon mass generation persists, and that the corresponding saturation points of the unquenched gluon propagators are progressively suppressed, as the number of quark flavors increases.

  6. Small Current Quark Mass Effects on Dressed-Quark Propagator in an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; WU Xiao-Hua; SUN Wei-Min; ZHAO En-Guang; WANG Fan

    2003-01-01

    A method for obtaining the smallcurrent quark mass dependence of the dressed quark propagator froman effective quark-quark interaction model is developed. Within this approach the small current quark mass effects ondressed-quark propagator have been studied. A comparison with previous results is given.

  7. Measuring the running top-quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenfeld, U.; Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Uwer, P. [Berlin Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2009-06-15

    We present the first direct determination of the running top-quark mass based on the total cross section of top-quark pair-production as measured at the Tevatron. Our theory prediction for the cross section includes various next-to-next-to-leading order QCD contributions, in particular all logarithmically enhanced terms near threshold, the Coulomb corrections at two loops and all explicitly scale dependent terms at NNLO accuracy. The result allows for an exact and independent variation of the renormalization and factorization scales. For Tevatron and LHC we study its dependence on all scales, on the parton luminosity and on the top-quark mass using both the conventional pole mass definition as well as the running mass in the MS scheme. We extract for the top-quark an MS mass of m({mu}=m) =160.0{sup +3.3}{sub -3.2} GeV. (orig.)

  8. Quarks and partons. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschos, E A

    1976-01-01

    This contribution reviews the evidence accumulated over the past year in favor of quarks and partons. Then it applies the quark ideas in order to interpret the neutrino-induced production of charm and the structure of neutral currents.

  9. The QCD spectrum with three quark flavors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, C; DeGrand, T A; Datta, S; DeTar, C E; Gottlieb, S; Heller, U M; Orginos, K; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Bernard, Claude; Burch, Tom; Grand, Thomas A. De; Datta, Saumen; Tar, Carleton De; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, Urs M.; Orginos, Kostas; Sugar, Robert; Toussaint, Doug

    2001-01-01

    We present results from a lattice hadron spectrum calculation using three flavors of dynamical quarks - two light and one strange, and quenched simulations for comparison. These simulations were done using a one-loop Symanzik improved gauge action and an improved Kogut-Susskind quark action. The lattice spacings, and hence also the physical volumes, were tuned to be the same in all the runs to better expose differences due to flavor number. Lattice spacings were tuned using the static quark potential, so as a byproduct we obtain updated results for the effect of sea quarks on the static quark potential. We find indications that the full QCD meson spectrum is in better agreement with experiment than the quenched spectrum. For the 0++ (a0) meson we see a coupling to two pseudoscalar mesons, or a meson decay on the lattice.

  10. Top quark measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of top quarks from Run-I and Run-II of the LHC are presented. Results on dif- ferential and inclusive top quark production cross sections, measured by the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments, and measurements of top quark properties and mass are reported.

  11. Top Quark Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS collaboration; LHCb collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of top quarks from Run-I and Run-II of the LHC are presented. Results on differential and inclusive top quark production cross sections, measured by the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments, and measurements of top quark properties and mass are reported.

  12. Weighing and Body Monitoring among College Women: The Scale Number as an Emotional Barometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Awad, Germine H.; Stinson, Rebecca D.; Bledman, Rashanta A.; Coker, Angela D.; Kashubeck-West, Susan; Connelly, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated weighing and body-monitoring behaviors, as well as psychological and behavioral reactions to weighing, among female college students. Weighing and body monitoring were engaged in by the majority of participants. Participants changed food intake and exercise based on weight. About 63% reported that the scale number impacts…

  13. On the optimal number of scale points in graded paired comparisons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuckelaer, A. De; Toonen, S.; Davidov, E.

    2013-01-01

    In market research, it is common practice to measure individuals’ brand or product preference through graded paired comparisons (GPCs). One important decision concerns the (odd) number of scale points (e.g., five, seven, nine, or eleven) that has to be assigned to either brands or products in each

  14. Fiber bundle description of number scaling in gauge theory and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Benioff, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This work uses fiber bundles as a framework to describe effects of number scaling on gauge theory and geometry. A brief description of number scaling and fiber bundles over a space time manifold, $M$, is followed by a description of gauge theory. A fiber at point $x$ of $M$ contains a vector space, $V_{x},$ and a set, $C_{x},$ of complex scalars and scaled structures, $C_{c,x},V_{c,x}$ for each complex number, $c.$ Number scaling induces connections, $c_{x,y}\\times c_{x,y}$ between fibers at $x$ and $y$. Connections are given as exponentials of a complex vector field, $\\vec{A}(x)+i\\vec{B}(x).$ The choice of the gauge group as $GL(1,C)$ for $V_{x}$ and $C_{x}$ gives the result that $\\vec{B}$ is massless, and no mass restrictions for $\\vec{A}.$ In the Mexican hat Higgs mechanism $\\vec{B}$ combines with a Goldstone boson to create massive vector bosons, the photon field, and the Higgs field. The very speculative possibility that $\\vec{A}$ might be the gradient of the Higgs field is noted. The association of $\\ve...

  15. Weighing and Body Monitoring among College Women: The Scale Number as an Emotional Barometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Awad, Germine H.; Stinson, Rebecca D.; Bledman, Rashanta A.; Coker, Angela D.; Kashubeck-West, Susan; Connelly, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated weighing and body-monitoring behaviors, as well as psychological and behavioral reactions to weighing, among female college students. Weighing and body monitoring were engaged in by the majority of participants. Participants changed food intake and exercise based on weight. About 63% reported that the scale number impacts…

  16. Scaling Chromosomes for an Evolutionary Karyotype: A Chromosomal Tradeoff between Size and Number across Woody Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Guolu; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the expected scaling relationships between chromosome size and number across woody species and to clarify the importance of the scaling for the maintenance of chromosome diversity by analyzing the scaling at the inter- & intra-chromosomal level. To achieve for the goals, chromosome trait data were extracted for 191 woody species (including 56 evergreen species and 135 deciduous species) from the available literature. Cross-species analyses revealed a tradeoff among chromosomes between chromosome size and number, demonstrating there is selective mechanism crossing chromosomes among woody species. And the explanations for the result were presented from intra- to inter-chromosome contexts that the scaling may be compromises among scale symmetry, mechanical requirements, and resource allocation across chromosomes. Therein, a 3/4 scaling pattern was observed between total chromosomes and m-chromosomes within nucleus which may imply total chromosomes may evolve from more to less. In addition, the primary evolutionary trend of karyotype and the role of m-chromosomes in the process of karyotype evolution were also discussed.

  17. Exact duality and Bjorken sum rule in heavy quark models à la Bakamjian-Thomas

    CERN Document Server

    Le Yaouanc, A; Pène, O; Raynal, J C

    1996-01-01

    The heavy mass limit of quark models based on the Bakamjian-Thomas cons\\-truction reveals remarkable features. In addition to previously demonstrated properties of covariance and Isgur-Wise scaling, exact duality, leading to the Bjorken-Isgur-Wise sum rule, is proven, for the first time to our knowledge in relativistic quark models. Inelastic as well as elastic contributions to the sum rule are then discussed in terms of ground state averages of a few number of operators corresponding to the nonrelativistic dipole operator and various relativistic corrections.

  18. How many of the scaling trends in p p collisions will be violated at √{sNN }=14 TeV ? Predictions from Monte Carlo quark-gluon string model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleibel, J.; Bravina, L. V.; Zabrodin, E. E.

    2016-06-01

    Multiplicity, rapidity and transverse momentum distributions of hadrons produced both in inelastic and nondiffractive p p collisions at energies from √{s }=200 GeV to 14 TeV are studied within the Monte Carlo quark-gluon string model. Good agreement with the available experimental data up to √{s }=13 TeV is obtained, and predictions are made for the collisions at top LHC energy √{s }=14 TeV . The model indicates that Feynman scaling and extended longitudinal scaling remain valid in the fragmentation regions, whereas strong violation of Feynman scaling is observed at midrapidity. The Koba-Nielsen-Olesen (KNO) scaling in multiplicity distributions is violated at LHC also. The origin of both maintenance and violation of the scaling trends is traced to short range correlations of particles in the strings and interplay between the multistring processes at ultrarelativistic energies.

  19. Chiral symmetry and the constituent quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Glozman, L Ya

    1995-01-01

    New results on baryon structure and spectrum developed in collaboration with Dan Riska [1-4] are reported. The main idea is that beyond the chiral symmetry spontaneous breaking scale light and strange baryons should be considered as systems of three constituent quarks with an effective confining interaction and a chiral interaction that is mediated by the octet of Goldstone bosons (pseudoscalar mesons) between the constituent quarks.

  20. Baryons in chiral constituent quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Glozman, L Ya

    1996-01-01

    Beyond the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking scale light and strange baryons should be considered as systems of three constituent quarks with an effective confining interaction and a flavor-spin chiral interaction that is mediated by the octet of Goldstone bosons (pseudoscalar mesons) between the constituent quarks. One cannot exclude, however, the possibility that this flavor-spin interaction has an appreciable vector- and higher meson exchange component.

  1. Space-Time Geometry of Quark and Strange Quark Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We study quark and strange quark matter in the context of general relativity. For this purpose, we solve Einstein's field equations for quark and strange quark matter in spherical symmetric space-times. We analyze strange quark matter for the different equations of state (EOS) in the spherical symmetric space-times, thus we are able to obtain the space-time geometries of quark and strange quark matter. Also, we discuss die features of the obtained solutions. The obtained solutions are consistent with the results of Brookhaven Laboratory, i.e. the quark-gluon plasma has a vanishing shear (i.e. quark-gluon plasma is perfect).

  2. Performance and slipstream characteristics of small-scale propellers at low Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deters, Robert W.

    The low Reynolds number effects of small-scale propellers were investigated. At the Reynolds numbers of interest (below 100,000), a decrease in lift and an increase in drag is common making it difficult to predict propeller performance characteristics. A propeller testing apparatus was built to test small scale propellers in static conditions and in an advancing flow. Twenty-seven off-the-shelf propellers, with diameters ranging from 2.25 in to 9 in, were tested in order to determine the general effects of low Reynolds numbers on small propellers. From these tests, increasing the Reynolds number for a propeller increases its efficiency by either increasing the thrust produced or decreasing the power. By doubling the Reynolds number of a propeller, it is not uncommon to increase the efficiency by more the 10%. Using off-the-shelf propellers limits the geometry available and finding propellers of the same geometry but of different scale is very difficult. To solve this problem, four propellers were design and built using a 3D printer. Two of the propellers were simple rectangular twisted blades of different chords. Another propeller was modeled after a full-scale propeller. The fourth propeller was created using inverse design to minimize power loss. Each propeller was built in a 5-in and 9-in diameter version in order to test a larger range of Reynolds numbers. A separate propeller blade and hub system was created to allow each propeller to be tested with different pitch angles and to test each propeller in a 2-, 3-, and 4-blade version. From the performance results of the 3D printed propellers, it was shown that propellers of different scale, but tested at the same Reynolds number, had about the same performance results. Finally, the slipstreams of different propellers were measured using a 7-hole probe. Propeller slipstreams can have a large effect on the aerodynamics of lifting surfaces downstream of the propeller. Small UAVs and MAVs flying in close proximity

  3. On the ultimate uncertainty of the top quark pole mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneke, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Marquard, P. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Nason, P. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca (Italy); Steinhauser, M. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik

    2016-05-15

    We combine the known asymptotic behaviour of the QCD perturbation series expansion, which relates the pole mass of a heavy quark to the MS mass, with the exact series coefficients up to the four-loop order to determine the ultimate uncertainty of the top-quark pole mass due to the renormalon divergence. We perform extensive tests of our procedure by varying the number of colours and flavours, as well as the scale of the strong coupling and the MS mass, and conclude that this uncertainty is around 70 MeV. We further estimate the additional contribution to the mass relation from the five-loop correction and beyond to be 250 MeV.

  4. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  5. Four Preon Composite Quarks and Leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpoot, S.; Samuel, Mark A.

    A model is presented in which quarks and leptons are composites of three spin-(1)/(2) preons and a scalar preon. The model is an extension of the rishon model and consists of two spin-(1)/(2) preons T, V and a scalar preon S as the fundamental building blocks of matter. Assuming distinguishability of states due to the order assigned to the preons in forming the quark and lepton states, the concepts of flavour, colour and generation number acquire meaning only at the level of compositeness. The model predicts four generations of conventional quarks and leptons.

  6. Quark Confinement and Force Unification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone R. A. Jr.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available String theory had to adopt a bi-scale approach in order to produce the weakness of gravity. Taking a bi-scale approach to particle physics along with a spin connection produces 1 the measured proton radius, 2 a resolution of the multiplicity of measured weak angle values 3 a correct theoretical value for the Z 0 4 a reason that h is a constant and 5 a “neutral current” source. The source of the “neutral current” provides 6 an alternate solution to quark confinement, 7 produces an effective r like potential, and 8 gives a reason for the observed but unexplained Regge trajectory like J M 2 behavior seen in quark composite particle spin families.

  7. Scaling Properties of the Number of Random Sequential Adsorption Iterations Needed to Generate Saturated Random Packing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieśla, Michał

    2016-11-01

    The properties of the number of iterations in random sequential adsorption protocol needed to generate finite saturated random packing of spherically symmetric shapes were studied. Numerical results obtained for one, two, and three dimensional packings were supported by analytical calculations valid for any dimension d. It has been shown that the number of iterations needed to generate finite saturated packing is subject to Pareto distribution with exponent -1-1/d and the median of this distribution scales with packing size according to the power-law characterized by exponent d. Obtained results can be used in designing effective random sequential adsorption simulations.

  8. Effect of the number of vortices on the torque scaling in Taylor-Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Arias, B; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2014-01-01

    Torque measurements in Taylor-Couette flow, with large radius ratio and large aspect ratio, over a range of velocities up to a Reynolds number of 24 000 are presented. Following a specific procedure, nine states with distinct number of vortices along the axis were found and the aspect ratio of the vortices were measured. The relationship between the speed and the torque for a given number of vortices is reported. In the turbulent Taylor vortex flow regime, at relatively high Reynolds number, a change in behaviour is observed corresponding to intersections of the torque-speed curves for different states. Before each intersection, the torque for a state with larger number of vortices is higher. After each intersection, the torque for a state with larger number of vortices is lower. The exponent, from the scaling laws of the torque, always depends on the aspect ratio of the vortices. When the Reynolds number is rescaled using the mean aspect ratio of the vortices, only a partial collapse of the exponent data is ...

  9. Cellular scaling rules for the brains of an extended number of primate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabi, Mariana; Collins, Christine E; Wong, Peiyan; Torres, Laila B; Kaas, Jon H; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    What are the rules relating the size of the brain and its structures to the number of cells that compose them and their average sizes? We have shown previously that the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and the remaining brain structures increase in size as a linear function of their numbers of neurons and non-neuronal cells across 6 species of primates. Here we describe that the cellular composition of the same brain structures of 5 other primate species, as well as humans, conform to the scaling rules identified previously, and that the updated power functions for the extended sample are similar to those determined earlier. Accounting for phylogenetic relatedness in the combined dataset does not affect the scaling slopes that apply to the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, but alters the slope for the remaining brain structures to a value that is similar to that observed in rodents, which raises the possibility that the neuronal scaling rules for these structures are shared among rodents and primates. The conformity of the new set of primate species to the previous rules strongly suggests that the cellular scaling rules we have identified apply to primates in general, including humans, and not only to particular subgroups of primate species. In contrast, the allometric rules relating body and brain size are highly sensitive to the particular species sampled, suggesting that brain size is neither determined by body size nor together with it, but is rather only loosely correlated with body size. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Generation of strong magnetic fields in dense quark matter driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    We study the generation of strong large scale magnetic fields in dense quark matter. The magnetic field growth is owing to the magnetic field instability driven by the electroweak interaction of quarks. We discuss the situation when the chiral symmetry is unbroken in the degenerate quark matter. In this case we predict the amplification of the seed magnetic field $10^{12}\\,\\text{G}$ to the strengths $(10^{14}-10^{15})\\,\\text{G}$. In our analysis we use the typical parameters of the quark matter in the core of a hybrid star or in a quark star. We also discuss the application of the obtained results to describe the magnetic fields generation in magnetars.

  11. Tomo-PIV Measurement of High Reynolds Number Dissipation Scale Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, Nicholas; Nickels, Timothy

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the sources of dissipative intermittency in high Reynolds number turbulence is of significant interest, especially given the increasing affordability of LES. Coherent dissipation scale structures have been identified in numerous numerical and experiment investigations, although the latter are typically restricted by the need for accurate resolution of extremely small fast motions. These investigations are therefore often limited to one-dimensional measurements, making the study of these 3D structures and their relationship to the dissipation field difficult. The current investigation employs a very large water mixing tank (2m in diameter), which uses counter-rotating impellors to generate high Reynolds number turbulence (Rλ 1000) that is close to isotropic and homogeneous. The large scale of the tank brings the smallest scales within the resolution of Tomo-PIV, allowing full 3D realization of these structures. This unique experimental setup presents a number of challenges, which include: seeding density limitations imposed by optical attenuation through the tank; demanding light sheet intensity requirements; and the extremely high computational cost of Tomographic reconstruction for the thousands of velocity fields required for statistical analysis. Initial results will be presented along with future plans for measurement refinement.

  12. Variable Flavor Number Scheme for Final State Jets in DIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Andre H. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Wien Univ. (Austria). Erwin Schroedinger International Inst. for Mathematical Physics; Pietrulewicz, Piotr [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Samitz, Daniel [Wien Univ. (Austria). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    2015-08-15

    We discuss massive quark effects in the endpoint region x→1 of inclusive deep inelastic scattering, where the hadronic final state is collimated and thus represents a jet. In this regime heavy quark pairs are generated via secondary radiation, i.e. due to a gluon splitting in light quark initiated contributions starting at O(α{sup 2}{sub s}) in the fixed-order expansion. Based on the factorization framework for massless quarks in Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET), we construct a variable flavor number scheme that deals with arbitrary hierarchies between the mass scale and the kinematic scales exhibiting a continuous behavior between the massless limit for very light quarks and the decoupling limit for very heavy quarks. We show that the threshold matching corrections for all gauge invariant components at the mass scale are related to each other via consistency conditions. This is explicitly demonstrated by recalculating the known threshold correction for the parton distribution function at O(α{sup 2}{sub s}C{sub F}T{sub F}) within SCET. The latter contains large rapidity logarithms ∝ln(1-x) that can be summed by exponentiation. Their coefficients are universal which can be used to obtain potentially relevant higher order results for generic threshold corrections at colliders from computations in deep inelastic scattering. In particular, we extract the O(α{sup 3}{sub s}) threshold correction multiplied by a single rapidity logarithm from results obtained earlier.

  13. Heavy quark jets at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Voutilainen, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    We summarize measurements of b and c jet production at the LHC, which are an important signature and background for decays of massive particles such as H-to-b-bbar. These include measurements of the inclusive and dijet production of heavy quark jets, b and c jets produced in association with vector bosons Z and W, and decays of boosted Z bosons into pairs of b-bbar. The current status of b tagging and b jet energy scale is also reviewed. These measurements test perturbative QCD in the four and five-flavor number schemes, and provide insight into the relative importance of heavy flavor production through flavor creation, flavor excitation and gluon splitting channels. The W+c measurement provides additionally a powerful way to probe the strange quark and antiquark sea in the proton. The recent studies looking separately at production of one and two b jets find generally good agreement with theory predictions for two b-jet production, while some discrepancies are observed for singly produced b jets, particularl...

  14. Prandtl number scaling of unsteady natural convection boundary layers for Pr>1 fluids under isothermal heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenxian; Armfield, S W; Patterson, J C; Lei, Chengwang

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the scalings incorporating the Prandtl number (Pr) dependence have been obtained by a scaling analysis for the unsteady natural convection boundary layer of an initially quiescent isothermal Newtonian fluid of Pr>1 produced by the sudden imposition of a higher temperature on a vertical plate. It is shown that the transient flow behavior of the resulting boundary layer can be described by a three-region structure and at the start-up stage the boundary layer development is one dimensional and independent of height due to the dominance of pure conduction; however, at steady state it becomes two dimensional and height dependent as the flow becomes dominated by convection. Numerical results demonstrate that the scalings representing the thermal boundary layer development accurately represent their Pr dependence over the whole stage of flow development. The scalings representing the viscous boundary layer development are generally in good agreement with the numerical results with the Pr variation over the whole stage of flow development, although there are small deviations from the numerical results with the Pr variation that are within acceptable limits for scaling.

  15. Chiral phases of fundamental and adjoint quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natale, A. A. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC 09210-170, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Física Teórica - UNESP Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz, 271, Bl.II - 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-01-22

    We consider a QCD chiral symmetry breaking model where the gap equation contains an effective confining propagator and a dressed gluon propagator with a dynamically generated mass. This model is able to explain the ratios between the chiral transition and deconfinement temperatures in the case of fundamental and adjoint quarks. It also predicts the recovery of the chiral symmetry for a large number of quarks (n{sub f} ≈ 11 – 13) in agreement with lattice data.

  16. The small-scale dynamo: Breaking universality at high Mach numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dominik R G; Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schmidt, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) The small-scale dynamo may play a substantial role in magnetizing the Universe under a large range of conditions, including subsonic turbulence at low Mach numbers, highly supersonic turbulence at high Mach numbers and a large range of magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm, i.e. the ratio of kinetic viscosity to magnetic resistivity. Low Mach numbers may in particular lead to the well-known, incompressible Kolmogorov turbulence, while for high Mach numbers, we are in the highly compressible regime, thus close to Burgers turbulence. In this study, we explore whether in this large range of conditions, a universal behavior can be expected. Our starting point are previous investigations in the kinematic regime. Here, analytic studies based on the Kazantsev model have shown that the behavior of the dynamo depends significantly on Pm and the type of turbulence, and numerical simulations indicate a strong dependence of the growth rate on the Mach number of the flow. Once the magnetic field saturates on the current ...

  17. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    CERN Document Server

    Blanke, Monika; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Higgs Model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. We present a new analysis of quark observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare $K$ and $B$ decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes $K^+\\to\\pi^+\

  18. Heavy quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  19. Deep-inelastic production of heavy quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Laenen, Eric; Harris, B W; Matiounine, Y; Migneron, R; Riemersma, S; Smith, J; van Neerven, W L

    1996-01-01

    Deep-inelastic production of heavy quarks at HERA, especially charm, is an excellent signal to measure the gluon distribution in the proton at small $x$ values. By measuring various differential distributions of the heavy quarks this reaction permits additional more incisive QCD analyses due to the many scales present. Furthermore, the relatively small mass of the charm quark, compared to the typical momentum transfer $Q$, allows one to study whether and when to treat this quark as a parton. This reaction therefore sheds light on some of the most fundamental aspects of perturbative QCD. We discuss the above issues and review the feasibility of their experimental investigation in the light of a large integrated luminosity.

  20. Report of the Quark Flavor Physics Working Group

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, J N; Ritchie, J L; Cirigliano, V; Kettell, S; Briere, R; Petrov, A A; Schwartz, A; Skwarnicki, T; Zupan, J; Christ, N; Sharpe, S R; Van de Water, R S; Altmannshofer, W; Arkani-Hamed, N; Artuso, M; Asner, D M; Bernard, C; Bevan, A J; Blanke, M; Bonvicini, G; Browder, T E; Bryman, D A; Campana, P; Cenci, R; Cline, D; Comfort, J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Datta, A; Dobbs, S; Duraisamy, M; El-Khadra, A X; Fast, J E; Forty, R; Flood, K T; Gershon, T; Grossman, Y; Hamilton, B; Hill, C T; Hill, R J; Hitlin, D G; Jaffe, D E; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Kagan, A L; Kaplan, D M; Kohl, M; Krizan, P; Kronfeld, A S; Lee, K; Littenberg, L S; MacFarlane, D B; Mackenzie, P B; Meadows, B T; Olsen, J; Papucci, M; Parsa, Z; Paz, G; Perez, G; Piilonen, L E; Pitts, K; Purohit, M V; Quinn, B; Ratcliff, B N; Roberts, D A; Rosner, J L; Rubin, P; Seeman, J; Seth, K K; Schmidt, B; Schopper, A; Sokoloff, M D; Soni, A; Stenson, K; Stone, S; Sundrum, R; Tschirhart, R; Vainshtein, A; Wah, Y W; Wilkinson, G; Wise, M B; Worcester, E; Xu, J; Yamanaka, T

    2013-01-01

    This report represents the response of the Intensity Frontier Quark Flavor Physics Working Group to the Snowmass charge. We summarize the current status of quark flavor physics and identify many exciting future opportunities for studying the properties of strange, charm, and bottom quarks. The ability of these studies to reveal the effects of new physics at high mass scales make them an essential ingredient in a well-balanced experimental particle physics program.

  1. Recent results in the NJL model with heavy quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Feldmann, T

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the interplay of chiral and heavy quark symmetries by using the NJL quark model. Heavy quarks with finite masses m(Q) as well as the limit m(Q) to infinity are studied. We found large corrections to the heavy mass scaling law for the pseudoscalar decay constant. The influence of external momenta on the shape parameters of the Isgur-Wise form factor is discussed.

  2. Top Quark Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A

    2006-01-01

    Ten years after its discovery at the Tevatron collider, we still know little about the top quark. Its large mass suggests it may play a key role in the mechanism of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (EWSB), or open a window of sensitivity to new physics related to EWSB and preferentially coupled to it. To determine whether this is the case, precision measurements of top quark properties are necessary. The high statistics samples being collected by the Tevatron experiments during Run II start to incisively probe the top quark sector. This report summarizes the experimental status of the top quark, focusing in particular on the recent measurements from the Tevatron Run II.

  3. Top quark properties

    CERN Document Server

    Cuevas Maestro, Javier

    2016-01-01

    An overview of recent top quark measurements in proton-proton collisions at 7, and 8 TeV in data collected with the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the LHC, using a data sample collected during the years 2011, 2012 is presented. The results include measurements of top-quark pairs spin correlation, the top pair charge asymmetry, the cross section of top-quark pair events produced in association with a W or a Z boson. The mass of the top quark is estimated by different methods. Some results on the same topics are also presented in data collected by the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Tevatron collider.

  4. Scale-setting, flavor dependence, and chiral symmetry restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binosi, Daniele; Roberts, Craig D.; Rodríguez-Quintero, José

    2017-06-01

    We determine the flavor dependence of the renormalization-group-invariant running interaction through judicious use of both unquenched Dyson-Schwinger equation and lattice results for QCD's gauge-sector two-point functions. An important step is the introduction of a physical scale setting procedure that enables a realistic expression of the effect of different numbers of active quark flavours on the interaction. Using this running interaction in concert with a well constrained class of dressed-gluon-quark vertices, we estimate the critical number of active lighter-quarks above which dynamical chiral symmetry breaking becomes impossible: nfcr≈9 ; and hence in whose neighborhood QCD is plausibly a conformal theory.

  5. New quarks: exotic versus strong

    OpenAIRE

    Holdom, B.

    2011-01-01

    The new quarks of a fourth family are being pushed into the strongly interacting regime due to the lower limits on their masses. The theoretical basis and experimental implications of such quarks are compared with exotic quarks.

  6. The Quark - A Decade Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  7. The Quark - A Decade Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  8. The Meson Spectrum of the BCC Quark Model (A Modification of the Quark Model)

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, J L; Xu, Jiao Lin; Yu, Xin

    2002-01-01

    Using the quark spectrum of the BCC Quark Model [1] and the phenomenological formula for the binding energies of the mesons, not only have we deduced the intrinsic quantum numbers (I, S, C, b, and Q) of all mesons as was done with the Quark Model [2], but also we deduced the meson mass spectrum in agreement with experimental results [3] that we could not deduce using the Quark Model. The experimental meson spectrum gives some evidence of the existence of the new quarks $q_S^*(1391)$, $q_S^*(2551)$ and $q_C^*(6591)$..., which are predicted by the BCC Quark Model. The meson $\\chi (1600)$ $[2^+(2^{++})]$ with I = 2 (predicted by the BCC Quark Model--T(1603)) has already been discovered [4]. If this is finally confirmed, it will provide a strong support for the BCC Quark Model. We propose a search for the mesons D(5996), $D_S (6151)$, B(9504), $B_S (9659)$, $B_C (11031)$, $\\eta (5926)$, $\\eta (17837)$, $\\psi (25596)$, $\\Upsilon (17805)$, $\\Upsilon (29597)$, T(960), T(1282), T(1603), and T(1924).

  9. Micro-scale variability of urban particle number and mass concentrations in Leipzig, Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birmili, Wolfram; Rehn, Johanna; Rasch, Fabian [Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (Tropos), Leipzig (Germany); Vogel, Andreas; Boehlke, Christoph; Weber, Konradin [Fachhochschule Duesseldorf (Germany). FB4 - Umweltmesstechnik

    2013-04-15

    We investigated the micro-scale variability of particle number and mass concentrations in the urban atmosphere of Leipzig, Germany. Particles were sampled in May and June 2011 using portable instrumentation along a fixed measurement route, representing different degrees of outdoor particle exposure that can be experienced by a pedestrian. The instrumentation comprised a Grimm NanoCheck sensor for particle number (25-300 nm) and a Grimm OPC for particle mass concentrations. The mobile measurements conducted at a time resolution of 10 s revealed rich details in the spatio-temporal distribution of urban particles that were not visible in fixed-site measurements. Motor traffic proved to be a major source of particle number and mass in the area, although the corresponding concentrations declined rapidly when moving away from the traffic sources. The experiments demonstrate that traffic-free zones and green park areas are useful measures to limit outdoor exposure to traffic-related particles even if they are rather modest in size. Unexpected findings include high fine particle concentrations (PM{sub [0.25;1]}) near outdoor seating areas of restaurants, and the apparent dependence of coarse particle concentrations (PM{sub [2.5;10]}) on the ability of surfaces to release particles by resuspension. The study illustrates the usefulness of the spatial sensing of airborne particles in the urban roughness layer and encourages the use of such data for the validation of micro-scale dispersion models. (orig.)

  10. Introducing a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Fu, Matthew; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry is commonly used for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly because of its continuous signal and high bandwidth. However, measuring two components of velocity in high Reynolds number wall-bounded flows has proven to be quite challenging with conventional crossed hot-wires, especially close to the wall, due to insufficient resolution and obstruction from the probe. The Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) is a miniature hot-wire that drastically increased the spatial and temporal resolutions for single-component measurements by using a nano-scale platinum wire. Applying a novel combining method and reconfiguration of the NSTAP design, we created a sensor (x-NSTAP) that is capable of two-component velocity measurements with a sensing volume of approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, providing spatial and temporal resolutions similar to the single component NSTAP. The x-NSTAP is deployed in the Superpipe facility for accurate measurements of the Reynolds stresses at very high Reynolds numbers. Supported under NSF Grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  11. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  12. The scaling transition between Nu number and boundary thickness in RB convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hong-Yue; Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A quantitative theory is developed for the vertical mean temperature profile (MTP) and mean velocity profile (MVP) in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection(RBC), which explains the experimental and numerical observations of logarithmic law in MTP and the coefficient A varying along the Ra. Based on a new mean-field approach via symmetry analysis to wall-bounded turbulent flows it yields accurate scaling of the sub-layer buffer layer and log-layer over a wide range of Rayleigh number and gives an explanation of their physical mechanism. In particular, based on the scaling of multi-layer thickness for mean temperature and velocity, we first prove that the coefficient A follows a -0.121 scaling, which agrees well with the experimental data, and the scaling transition of Nu from 1/3 to 0.38 is due to the thickness variation of the multi-layer. The new explanation of mean temperature logarithmic law is that the effect of inverse pressure gradient (LSC) driving the plume to side wall, which yields the similarity between vertical temperature transport and vertical momentum.

  13. Number theoretic example of scale-free topology inducing self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Bartolo; Miramontes, Octavio; Lacasa, Lucas

    2008-10-10

    In this Letter we present a general mechanism by which simple dynamics running on networks become self-organized critical for scale-free topologies. We illustrate this mechanism with a simple arithmetic model of division between integers, the division model. This is the simplest self-organized critical model advanced so far, and in this sense it may help to elucidate the mechanism of self-organization to criticality. Its simplicity allows analytical tractability, characterizing several scaling relations. Furthermore, its mathematical nature brings about interesting connections between statistical physics and number theoretical concepts. We show how this model can be understood as a self-organized stochastic process embedded on a network, where the onset of criticality is induced by the topology.

  14. Number theoretic example of scale-free topology inducing self-organized criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Bartolo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present a general mechanism by which simple dynamics running on networks become self-organized critical for scale free topologies. We illustrate this mechanism with a simple arithmetic model of division between integers, the division model. This is the simplest self-organized critical model advanced so far, and in this sense it may help to elucidate the mechanism of self-organization to criticality. Its simplicity allows analytical tractability, characterizing several scaling relations. Furthermore, its mathematical nature brings about interesting connections between statistical physics and number theoretical concepts. We show how this model can be understood as a self-organized stochastic process embedded on a network, where the onset of criticality is induced by the topology.

  15. Analysis of combinatorial regulation: scaling of partnerships between regulators with the number of governed targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Bhardwaj

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Through combinatorial regulation, regulators partner with each other to control common targets and this allows a small number of regulators to govern many targets. One interesting question is that given this combinatorial regulation, how does the number of regulators scale with the number of targets? Here, we address this question by building and analyzing co-regulation (co-transcription and co-phosphorylation networks that describe partnerships between regulators controlling common genes. We carry out analyses across five diverse species: Escherichia coli to human. These reveal many properties of partnership networks, such as the absence of a classical power-law degree distribution despite the existence of nodes with many partners. We also find that the number of co-regulatory partnerships follows an exponential saturation curve in relation to the number of targets. (For E. coli and Bacillus subtilis, only the beginning linear part of this curve is evident due to arrangement of genes into operons. To gain intuition into the saturation process, we relate the biological regulation to more commonplace social contexts where a small number of individuals can form an intricate web of connections on the internet. Indeed, we find that the size of partnership networks saturates even as the complexity of their output increases. We also present a variety of models to account for the saturation phenomenon. In particular, we develop a simple analytical model to show how new partnerships are acquired with an increasing number of target genes; with certain assumptions, it reproduces the observed saturation. Then, we build a more general simulation of network growth and find agreement with a wide range of real networks. Finally, we perform various down-sampling calculations on the observed data to illustrate the robustness of our conclusions.

  16. Is Baryon Number Conserved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Jogesh C.; Salam, Abdus

    We suggest that baryon-number conservation may not be absolute and that an integrally charged quark may disintegrate into two leptons and an antilepton with a coupling strength G Bmp2≲ 10-9. On the other hand, if quarks are much heavier than low-lying hadrons, the decay of a three-quark system like the proton is highly forbidden (proton lifetime ≳ 1028 y). Motivation for these ideas appears to arise within a unified theory of hadrons and leptons and their gauge interactions. We emphasize the consequences of such a possibility for real quark searches.

  17. Prompt quark production by exploding sphalerons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuryak, Edward; Zahed, Ismail

    2003-01-01

    Following recent works on the production and subsequent explosive decay of QCD sphaleronlike clusters, we discuss the mechanism of quark pair production in this process. We first show how the gauge field explosive solution of Luscher and Schechter can be achieved by noncentral conformal mapping from the O(4)-symmetric solution. Our main result is a new solution to the Dirac equation in real time in this configuration, obtained by the same inversion of the fermion O(4) zero mode. It explicitly shows how the quark acceleration occurs, starting from the spherically O(3)-symmetric zero energy chiral quark state to the final spectrum of nonzero energies. The sphaleronlike clusters with any Chern-Simons number always produce NFL¯R quarks, and the antisphaleron-like clusters the opposite chirality. The result are relevant for hadron-hadron and nucleus-nucleus collisions at large (s), wherein such clusters can be produced.

  18. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  19. Maximal Wavelength of Confined Quarks and Gluons and Properties of Quantum Chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /YITP, Stony Brook /Durham U.; Shrock, Robert; /YITP, Stony Brook

    2008-08-01

    Because quarks and gluons are confined within hadrons, they have a maximum wavelength of order the confinement scale. Propagators, normally calculated for free quarks and gluons using Dyson-Schwinger equations, are modified by bound-state effects in close analogy to the calculation of the Lamb shift in atomic physics. Because of confinement, the effective quantum chromodynamic coupling stays finite in the infrared. The quark condensate which arises from spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the bound state Dyson-Schwinger equation is the expectation value of the operator {bar q}q evaluated in the background of the fields of the other hadronic constituents, in contrast to a true vacuum expectation value. Thus quark and gluon condensates reside within hadrons. The effects of instantons are also modified. We discuss the implications of the maximum quark and gluon wavelength for phenomena such as deep inelastic scattering and annihilation, the decay of heavy quarkonia, jets, and dimensional counting rules for exclusive reactions. We also discuss implications for the zero-temperature phase structure of a vectorial SU(N) gauge theory with a variable number N{sub f} of massless fermions.

  20. Néel-XXZ state overlaps: odd particle numbers and Lieb-Liniger scaling limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, M.; De Nardis, J.; Wouters, B.; Caux, J.-S.

    2014-08-01

    We specialize a recently-proposed determinant formula (Brockmann, De Nardis, Wouters and Caux 2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47 145003) for the overlap of the zero-momentum Néel state with Bethe states of the spin-1/2 XXZ chain to the case of an odd number of downturned spins, showing that it is still of ‘Gaudin-like’ form, similar to the case of an even number of down spins. We generalize this result to the overlap of q-raised Néel states with parity-invariant Bethe states lying in a nonzero magnetization sector. The generalized determinant expression can then be used to derive the corresponding determinants and their prefactors in the scaling limit to the Lieb-Liniger (LL) Bose gas. The odd number of down spins directly translates to an odd number of bosons. We furthermore give a proof that the Néel state has no overlap with non-parity-invariant Bethe states. This is based on a determinant expression for overlaps with general Bethe states that was obtained in the context of the XXZ chain with open boundary conditions (Pozsgay 2013 arXiv:1309.4593, Kozlowski and Pozsgay 2012 J. Stat. Mech. P05021, Tsuchiya 1998 J. Math. Phys. 39 5946). The statement that overlaps with non-parity-invariant Bethe states vanish is still valid in the scaling limit to LL which means that the Bose-Einstein condensate state (De Nardis, Wouters, Brockmann and Caux 2014 Phys. Rev. A 89 033601) has zero overlap with non-parity-invariant LL Bethe states.

  1. A supersymmetric composite model of quarks and leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luty, Markus A.; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    1997-02-01

    We present a class of supersymmetric models with complete generations of composite quarks and leptons using recent non-perturbative results for the low energy dynamics of supersymmetric QCD. In these models, the quarks arise as composite ``mesons'' and the leptons emerge as composite ``baryons''. The quark and lepton flavor symmetries are linked at the preon level. Baryon number violation is automatically suppressed by accidental symmetries. We give some speculations on how this model might be made realistic.

  2. Top-quark mass measurements at the LHC: alternative methods

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Alternative top quark mass determinations can provide inputs to the world average with orthogonal systematic uncertainties and may help to refine the interpretation of the standard method. Among a number of recent results I focus on the extractions by ATLAS and CMS of the top quark pole mass from the top quark pair and tt + 1 jet production cross-section, which have now reached a precision of 1%.

  3. Quark-gluon plasma phase transition using cluster expansion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam Kumar, A. M.; Prasanth, J. P.; Bannur, Vishnu M.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the phase transitions in QCD using Mayer's cluster expansion method. The inter quark potential is modified Cornell potential. The equation of state (EoS) is evaluated for a homogeneous system. The behaviour is studied by varying the temperature as well as the number of Charm Quarks. The results clearly show signs of phase transition from Hadrons to Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP).

  4. Dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking with color-sextet quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukazawa, Kenji; Muta, Taizo; Saito, Juichi; Watanabe, Isamu; Yonezawa, Minoru (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Inoue, Masato

    1991-01-01

    Massive quarks belonging to a sextet representation of the color SU(3) of quantum chromodynamics are assumed to exist and to trigger the dynamical breaking of the electroweak SU(2) x U(1) symmetry. Quantum numbers are assigned to the color-sextet quarks and their masses are estimated together with the mass of the top quark by using the mass formulae for the weak-boson masses. Phenomenological implication of the model is discussed. (author).

  5. Search for Excited Quarks in ep Collisions at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Alimujiang, K; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Asmone, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Barrelet, E; Bartel, W; Begzsuren, K; Belousov, A; Bizot, J C; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deak, M; de Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Fischer, D J; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Goerlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Hennekemper, E; Henschel, H; Herbst, M; Herrera, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Kraemer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kruger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastovicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mudrinic, M; Muller, K; Murin, P; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Perez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Pokorny, B; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schoning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Sheviakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, Ivan; Soloviev, Y; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, Arnd E; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Stoicea, G; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truol, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Turnau, J; Urban, K; Valkarova, A; Vallee, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; von den Driesch, M; Wegener, D; Wissing, Ch; Wunsch, E; Zacek, J; Zalesak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zus, R

    2009-01-01

    A search for excited quarks is performed using the full ep data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 475 pb^-1. The electroweak decays of excited quarks q* -> q gamma, q* -> q Z and q* -> q W with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for first generation excited quark production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on q* production cross sections and on the ratio f/Lambda of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited quark searches.

  6. Improvements of a nano-scale crossed hot-wire for high Reynolds number measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuyang; Hultmark, Marcus

    2015-11-01

    Hot-wire anemometry, despite its limited spatial and temporal resolution, is still the preferred tool for high Reynolds number flow measurements, mainly due to the continuous signal. To address the resolution issues, the Nano-Scale Thermal Anemometry Probe (NSTAP) was developed at Princeton University. The NSTAP has a sensing volume more than one order of magnitude smaller than conventional hot-wires, and it has displayed superior performance. However, the NSTAP can only measure a single component of the velocity. Using a novel combining method, a probe that enables two-component velocity measurements has been created (the x-NSTAP). The measurement volume is approximately 50 × 50 × 50 μ m, more than one order of magnitude smaller in all directions compared to conventional crossed hot-wires. The x-NSTAP has been further improved to allow more accurate measurements with the help of flow visualization using a scaled model but matching Reynolds number. Results from turbulent flow measurements with the new x-NSTAP are also presented. Supported under NSF grant CBET-1510100 (program manager Dimitrios Papavassiliou).

  7. The Role of Markstein Number on the Turbulent Flame Speed and Its Scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo; Law, Chung K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we clarify the role of the Markstein Number (Mk) on the turbulent flame speed and its scaling, from experimental measurements on constant-pressure expanding turbulent flames. Turbulent flame speed data are presented for methane, ethylene and n-butane-air premixed flames with negative and positive Mk, propagating in nearly homogenous isotropic turbulence in a dual-chamber, fan-stirred vessel. The cold flow is characterized by high-speed particle image velocimetry, while the flame propagation rate is obtained by tracking high-speed Schlieren images. For all fuel-air mixtures of C1-C4 hydrocarbons presented in this work, the normalized turbulent flame speed data follows the recent theoretical [Chaudhuri, Akkerman and Law, Physical Review E, 84, (2011) 026322] and experimental [Chaudhuri, Wu, Zhu and Law, Physical Review Letters, 108, (2012), 044503], [Re_{T,f}]^{0.5} scaling, where the average radius is the length scale and thermal diffusivity is the transport property. For a constant Re_{T,f} it i...

  8. Top quark physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbacher, Robin D.; /UC, Davis

    2005-10-01

    While the top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab Tevatron, a decade later they still have very little information about the top. As the heaviest particle yet discovered, the top quark is interesting in and of itself, but some speculate that it may play a special role in physics beyond the Standard Model. With Run 2 of the Tevatron well underway, they have the opportunity to study top quark properties with much better sensitivity, and to test whether top quarks behave as predicted by current theories. This article focuses on the basics of top quark physics at the Tevatron, highlighting only a sample of the many recent measurements, as new results are being released monthly, and constantly changing the landscape of our knowledge of top.

  9. Long-range lPIV to resolve the small scales in a jet at high Reynolds number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiscaletti, D.; Westerweel, J.; Elsinga, G.E.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of flows at high Reynolds number is of great interest for the theory of turbulence, in that the large and the small scales of turbulence show a clear separation. But, as the Reynolds number of the flow increases, the size of the Kolmogorov length scale ( η ) drops almost proportion

  10. Light Quark Mass Effects in Bottom Quark Mass Determinations

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, A. H.

    2001-01-01

    Recent results for charm quark mass effects in perturbative bottom quark mass determinations from $\\Upsilon$ mesons are reviewed. The connection between the behavior of light quark mass corrections and the infrared sensitivity of some bottom quark mass definitions is examined in some detail.

  11. Large scale Direct Numerical Simulation of premixed turbulent jet flames at high Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attili, Antonio; Luca, Stefano; Lo Schiavo, Ermanno; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Creta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    A set of direct numerical simulations of turbulent premixed jet flames at different Reynolds and Karlovitz numbers is presented. The simulations feature finite rate chemistry with 16 species and 73 reactions and up to 22 Billion grid points. The jet consists of a methane/air mixture with equivalence ratio ϕ = 0 . 7 and temperature varying between 500 and 800 K. The temperature and species concentrations in the coflow correspond to the equilibrium state of the burnt mixture. All the simulations are performed at 4 atm. The flame length, normalized by the jet width, decreases significantly as the Reynolds number increases. This is consistent with an increase of the turbulent flame speed due to the increased integral scale of turbulence. This behavior is typical of flames in the thin-reaction zone regime, which are affected by turbulent transport in the preheat layer. Fractal dimension and topology of the flame surface, statistics of temperature gradients, and flame structure are investigated and the dependence of these quantities on the Reynolds number is assessed.

  12. Quark matter formation in dense stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Phatak

    2001-08-01

    It is expected that at very large densities and/or temperatures a quark-hadron phase transition takes place. Lattice QCD calculations at zero baryon density indicate that the transition occurs at c∼ 150-170 MeV. The transition is likely to be second order or a cross over phenomenon. Although not much is known about the density at which the phase transition takes place at small temperatures, it is expected to occur around the nuclear densities of few times nuclear matter density. Also, there is a strong reason to believe that the quark matter formed after the phase transition is in colour superconducting phase. The matter densities in the interior of neutron stars being larger than the nuclear matter density, the neutron star cores may possibly consist of quark matter which may be formed during the collapse of supernova. Starting with the assumption that the quark matter, when formed consists of predominantly and quarks, we consider the evolution of quarks by weak interactions in the present work. The reaction rates and time required to reach the chemical equilibrium are computed here. Our calculations show that the chemical equilibrium is reached in about 10-7 seconds. Further more during the equilibration process enormous amont of energy is released and copious numbers of neutrinos are produced. Implications of these on the evolution of supernovae will be discussed.

  13. Heavy-quark parton distribution functions and their uncertainties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Sullivan and P.M. Nadolsky

    2001-12-07

    We investigate the uncertainties of the heavy-quark parton distribution functions in the variable avor number scheme. Because the charm- and bottom-quark parton distribution functions (PDFs) are constructed predominantly from the gluon PDF, it is a common practice to assume that the heavy-quark and gluon uncertainties are the same. We show that this approximation is a reasonable first guess, but it is better for bottom quarks than charm quarks. We calculate the PDF uncertainty for t-channel single-top-quark production using the Hessian matrix method, and predict a cross section of 2.12{sub -0.29}{sup +0.32} pb at run II of the Tevatron.

  14. Surface structure of quark stars with magnetic fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prashanth Jaikumar

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the impact of magnetic fields on the electron distribution of the electrosphere of quark stars. For moderately strong magnetic fields of ∼ 1013 G, quantization effects are generally weak due to the large number density of electrons at surface, but can nevertheless affect the photon emission properties of quark stars. We outline the main observational characteristics of quark stars as determined by their surface emission, and briefly discuss their formation in explosive events termed as quark-novae, which may be connected to the -process.

  15. Quark i mattoni del mondo

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    1983-01-01

    Quark rossi, verdi e blu ; quark dotati di stranezza e di incanto ; quark 'su' e 'giù' : sembra che i fisici delle particelle giochino a confondere la curiosità del profano, con queste denominazioni fantasiose. Che cosa significano ? e, soprattutto, i quark sono i costituenti davvero elementari della materia ?

  16. An experimental investigation on Lagrangian correlations of small-scale turbulence at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Michele; Liberzon, Alexander; Tsinober, Arkady; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    Lagrangian auto- and cross-correlation functions of the rate of strain s(2) , enstrophy omega (2) , their respective production terms -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki} and omega_{i}omega_{j}s_{ij}, and material derivatives, Ds s(2/Ds) t and Dsomega(2/Ds) t are estimated using experimental results obtained through three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (three-dimensional-PTV) in homogeneous turbulence at Re_{lambda} {=} 50. The autocorrelation functions are used to estimate the Lagrangian time scales of different quantities, while the cross-correlation functions are used to clarify some aspects of the interaction mechanisms between vorticity omega and the rate of strain tensor s_{ij}, that are responsible for the statistically stationary, in the Eulerian sense, levels of enstrophy and rate of strain in homogeneous turbulent flow. Results show that at the Reynolds number of the experiment these quantities exhibit different time scales, varying from the relatively long time scale of omega(2) to the relatively shorter time scales of s(2) , omega_{i}omega_{j}s_{ij} and -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki}. Cross-correlation functions suggest that the dynamics of enstrophy and strain, in this flow, is driven by a set of different-time-scale processes that depend on the local magnitudes of s(2) and omega(2) . In particular, there are indications that, in a statistical sense, (i) strain production anticipates enstrophy production in low-strain low-enstrophy regions (ii) strain production and enstrophy production display high correlation in high-strain high-enstrophy regions, (iii) vorticity dampening in high-enstrophy regions is associated with weak correlations between -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki} and s(2) and between -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki} and Ds s(2) /Ds t, in addition to a marked anti-correlation between omega_{i}omega_{j}s_{ij} and Ds s(2) /Ds t. Vorticity dampening in high-enstrophy regions is thus related to the decay of s(2) and its production term, -s_{ij}s_{jk}s_{ki}.

  17. Reynolds number dependence of large-scale friction control in turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Jacopo; Örlü, Ramis; Chin, Cheng; Schlatter, Philipp

    2016-12-01

    The present work investigates the effectiveness of the control strategy introduced by Schoppa and Hussain [Phys. Fluids 10, 1049 (1998), 10.1063/1.869789] as a function of Reynolds number (Re). The skin-friction drag reduction method proposed by these authors, consisting of streamwise-invariant, counter-rotating vortices, was analyzed by Canton et al. [Flow, Turbul. Combust. 97, 811 (2016), 10.1007/s10494-016-9723-8] in turbulent channel flows for friction Reynolds numbers (Reτ) corresponding to the value of the original study (i.e., 104) and 180. For these Re, a slightly modified version of the method proved to be successful and was capable of providing a drag reduction of up to 18%. The present study analyzes the Reynolds number dependence of this drag-reducing strategy by performing two sets of direct numerical simulations (DNS) for Reτ=360 and 550. A detailed analysis of the method as a function of the control parameters (amplitude and wavelength) and Re confirms, on the one hand, the effectiveness of the large-scale vortices at low Re and, on the other hand, the decreasing and finally vanishing effectiveness of this method for higher Re. In particular, no drag reduction can be achieved for Reτ=550 for any combination of the parameters controlling the vortices. For low Reynolds numbers, the large-scale vortices are able to affect the near-wall cycle and alter the wall-shear-stress distribution to cause an overall drag reduction effect, in accordance with most control strategies. For higher Re, instead, the present method fails to penetrate the near-wall region and cannot induce the spanwise velocity variation observed in other more established control strategies, which focus on the near-wall cycle. Despite the negative outcome, the present results demonstrate the shortcomings of the control strategy and show that future focus should be on methods that directly target the near-wall region or other suitable alternatives.

  18. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  19. Laboratory-Scale Simulation of Spiral Plumes in Fluid with Hight Ptandtl Number

    CERN Document Server

    Sharifulin, A N

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the appearance of a plumes from local hot spot and study its interaction with cellular flow in closed cavity filled by silicon oil with Prandtl number Pr ~2*10^3 . Convective plume is generated by a local heat source, located on the top of the small rubber cylinder, which is located in the center of the bottom of the rectangular cell. Green laser has been used to simulate the hot-spot. Roll-type large-scale convective flow is generated by heating of the one vertical sides of cavity. Influence of power of hot point on the shape of plume has been investigated. It is shown that the presence of cellular convective motion may lead to the formation of a strange spiral convective plume. This plume looks like Archimedes spiral replaced on vertical plane. Physical mechanism of the formation of strange spiral plume and application of obtained results for mantle convection problems are discussed.

  20. Heavy Quarks, Origin of Mass, and CP Violation for Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, George W S

    2013-01-01

    A scale-invariant "Gap Equation" is constructed for chiral quark $Q$ by Goldstone, or $V_L$, exchange, where massless input is guaranteed by gauge invariance. A numerical solution is found for Yukawa coupling $\\sim 4\\pi$. In turn, because this gap equation is scale invariant, the strong coupling solution is compatible with a 126 GeV dilaton, which would be a true messenger from higher energies. Some possible phenomena pertaining to heavy chiral quarks at few TeV scale is offered. Adding this heavy quark sector may provide enough CP violation for generating the matter dominance of the Universe.

  1. Micro-Scale Genomic DNA Copy Number Aberrations as Another Means of Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Hann-Hsiang; He, Xiaping; Parker, Joel S.; Zhao, Wei; Perou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In breast cancer, the basal-like subtype has high levels of genomic instability relative to other breast cancer subtypes with many basal-like-specific regions of aberration. There is evidence that this genomic instability extends to smaller scale genomic aberrations, as shown by a previously described micro-deletion event in the PTEN gene in the Basal-like SUM149 breast cancer cell line. Methods We sought to identify if small regions of genomic DNA copy number changes exist by using a high density, gene-centric Comparative Genomic Hybridizations (CGH) array on cell lines and primary tumors. A custom tiling array for CGH (244,000 probes, 200 bp tiling resolution) was created to identify small regions of genomic change, which was focused on previously identified basal-like-specific, and general cancer genes. Tumor genomic DNA from 94 patients and 2 breast cancer cell lines was labeled and hybridized to these arrays. Aberrations were called using SWITCHdna and the smallest 25% of SWITCHdna-defined genomic segments were called micro-aberrations (micro-aberrations, most of which are undetectable using typical-density genome-wide aCGH arrays. The basal-like subtype exhibited the highest incidence of these events. These micro-aberrations sometimes altered expression of the involved gene. We confirmed the presence of the PTEN micro-amplification in SUM149 and by mRNA-seq showed that this resulted in loss of expression of all exons downstream of this event. Micro-aberrations disproportionately affected the 5′ regions of the affected genes, including the promoter region, and high frequency of micro-aberrations was associated with poor survival. Conclusion Using a high-probe-density, gene-centric aCGH microarray, we present evidence of small-scale genomic aberrations that can contribute to gene inactivation. These events may contribute to tumor formation through mechanisms not detected using conventional DNA copy number analyses. PMID:23284754

  2. The Spectral Amplitude of Stellar Convection and Its Scaling in the High-Rayleigh-number Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, Nicholas A.; Hindman, Bradley W.

    2016-02-01

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique test bed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation owing to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of three-dimensional stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of convective flows are established within a star’s interior. While these simulations are nonmagnetic and nonrotating in nature, they demonstrate two robust phenomena. When run with sufficiently high Rayleigh number, the integrated kinetic energy of the convection becomes effectively independent of thermal diffusion, but the spectral distribution of that kinetic energy remains sensitive to both of these quantities. A simulation that has converged to a diffusion-independent value of kinetic energy will divide that energy between spatial scales such that low-wavenumber power is overestimated and high-wavenumber power is underestimated relative to a comparable system possessing higher Rayleigh number. We discuss the implications of these results in light of the current inconsistencies between models and observations.

  3. Quantitative analysis of production traits in saltwater crocodiles (Crocodylus porosus): IV. number of scale rows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isberg, S R; Thomson, P C; Nicholas, F W; Webb, G J W; Manolis, S C; Barker, S G; Moran, C

    2006-02-01

    A total of 3156 scale row records, comprising 1739 full-sibling records from 30 families from Janamba Croc Farm (NT, Australia) and 1417 parent-offspring records from 19 families from Wildlife Management International, Pty Ltd (NT, Australia), collected at each facility using a different method, were analysed using ASReml. The full-sibling heritability estimate for the Janamba data was 0.37 (SE 0.03). The animal model estimate of heritability for the Wildlife Management International (WMI) data, also based predominantly on full-sibling data, was 0.42 (SE 0.04). The counts from three counting methods were evaluated by regression analysis on 100 individuals and were found to be highly correlated. Using the regression relationship, the WMI data were transformed and pooled with the Janamba data to give an animal model heritability estimate of 0.42 (SE 0.04). A multitrait analysis revealed negligible correlations (both phenotypical and genetical) between hatchling size traits and the number of scale rows. There is ample genetic variation to incorporate this trait into a genetic improvement programme for farmed saltwater crocodiles.

  4. Top quark measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Grancagnolo, Sergio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk will present highlights of a few recent precision measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration of the top quark using 13 TeV and 8 TeV collision data: top-quark pair and single top production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented alongside top quark properties measurements. These measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime. Measurements of the top quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  5. Lepton number violation as a key to low-scale leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abada, Asmaa; Arcadi, Giorgio [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay,Rue Henri Becquerel Batiment 210, Orsay, 91405 (France); Domcke, Valerie [SISSA,Via Bonomea 265, Trieste, 34136 (Italy); INFN-Sezione di Trieste,via Valerio 2, Trieste, 34127 (Italy); Lucente, Michele [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay,Rue Henri Becquerel Batiment 210, Orsay, 91405 (France); SISSA,Via Bonomea 265, Trieste, 34136 (Italy)

    2015-11-24

    We explore the possibility of having a successful leptogenesis through oscillations between new sterile fermion states added to the Standard Model field content in a well motivated framework, naturally giving rise to the required mass splitting between the sterile states through a small total lepton number violation. We propose a framework with only two sterile states forming a pseudo-Dirac state, in which their mass difference as well as the smallness of the neutrino masses are due to two sources of lepton number violation with ΔL=2, corresponding to an Inverse Seesaw framework extended by a Linear Seesaw mass term. We also explore the pure Inverse Seesaw mechanism in its minimal version, requiring at least four new sterile states in order to comply with neutrino data. Our analytical and numerical studies reveal that one can have a successful leptogenesis at the temperature of the electroweak scale through oscillations between the two sterile states with a “natural” origin of the strong degeneracy in their mass spectrum. We also revisit the analytical expression of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe in the weak washout regime of this framework.

  6. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed-Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun; SUN Wei-Min; CHANG Chao-Hsi; WANG Fan

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagatorfrom an effective quark-quark interaction model. Within this approach we explore the chemical potential dependenceof the dressed-quark propagator, which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinementorder parameters. A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  7. Quark-Gluon Plasma Fireball

    OpenAIRE

    Hamieh, Salah; Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-01-01

    Lattice-QCD results provide an opportunity to model, and extrapolate to finite baryon density, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Upon fixing the scale of the thermal coupling constant and vacuum energy to the lattice data, the properties of resulting QGP equations of state (EoS) are developed. We show that the physical properties of the dense matter fireball formed in heavy ion collision experiments at CERN-SPS are well described by the QGP-EoS we presented. We also estimate the...

  8. Top quark physics: Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, S.

    1998-01-01

    In this presentation I will primarily focus on top quark physics but I will include a discussion of the W-boson mass and the possibility of discovering a light Higgs boson via associated production at the Tevatron.

  9. Quarks in finite nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Guichon, P A M; Thomas, A W

    1996-01-01

    We describe the development of a theoretical description of the structure of finite nuclei based on a relativistic quark model of the structure of the bound nucleons which interact through the (self-consistent) exchange of scalar and vector mesons.

  10. Hermitian quark matrices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Narendra Singh

    2003-01-01

    Assuming a relation between the quark mass matrices of the two sectors a unique solution can be obtained for the CKM flavor mixing matrix. A numerical example is worked out which is in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  11. Do Quarks Propagate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Paul Haase; Taylor, John C.

    1984-01-01

    Processes with coloured particles in the initial state are generally infrared divergent. We investigate the effect of this on processes with colourless particles in the initial state, when the amplitude is near an intermediate quark pole. The result is a characteristic logarithmic depedence...... on the 'binding energy'(even though spectator interactions are taken into account), and the result is gauge-invariant. Summed to all orders the logarithms could perhaps suppress the quark pole....

  12. Nuclear and Quark Matter at High Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Biro, T S; Schram, Z

    2016-01-01

    We review important ideas on nuclear and quark matter description on the basis of high- temperature field theory concepts, like resummation, dimensional reduction, interaction scale separation and spectral function modification in media. Statistical and thermodynamical concepts are spotted in the light of these methods concentrating on the - partially still open - problems of the hadronization process.

  13. Nuclear and quark matter at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biro, Tamas S. [H.A.S. Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Jakovac, Antal [Roland Eotvos University, Budapest (Hungary); Schram, Zsolt [University of Debrecen, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2017-03-15

    We review important ideas on nuclear and quark matter description on the basis of high-temperature field theory concepts, like resummation, dimensional reduction, interaction scale separation and spectral function modification in media. Statistical and thermodynamical concepts are spotted in the light of these methods concentrating on the -partially still open- problems of the hadronization process. (orig.)

  14. Pion valence-quark parton distribution function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Within the Dyson–Schwinger equation formulation of QCD, a rainbow ladder truncation is used to calculate the pion valence-quark distribution function (PDF. The gap equation is renormalized at a typical hadronic scale, of order 0.5 GeV, which is also set as the default initial scale for the pion PDF. We implement a corrected leading-order expression for the PDF which ensures that the valence-quarks carry all of the pion's light-front momentum at the initial scale. The scaling behavior of the pion PDF at a typical partonic scale of order 5.2 GeV is found to be (1−xν, with ν≃1.6, as x approaches one.

  15. Wall-modeled large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow at high Reynolds number using the von Karman length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinglei; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Longfei

    2016-12-01

    The von Karman length scale is able to reflect the size of the local turbulence structure. However, it is not suitable for the near wall region of wall-bounded flows, for its value is almost infinite there. In the present study, a simple and novel length scale combining the wall distance and the von Karman length scale is proposed by introducing a structural function. The new length scale becomes the von Karman length scale once local unsteady structures are detected. The proposed method is adopted in a series of turbulent channel flows at different Reynolds numbers. The results show that the proposed length scale with the structural function can precisely simulate turbulence at high Reynolds numbers, even with a coarse grid resolution.

  16. Dynamical Self-mass for Massive Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Z; Huang, Zheng

    1992-01-01

    We examine dynamical mass generation in QCD with large current mass quarks. A renormalization group analysis is performed to separate fermion self-mass into a dynamical and a kinematical part. It is shown that the energy scale og the Schwinger-Dyson (SD) equation and the effective gauge coupling are fixed by the current mass. The dynamical self-mass satisfies a homogeneous SD equation which has a trivial solution when the current mass exceeds a critical value. We therefore suggest that the quark condensate, as the function of the current mass, observes a local minimum around 2.7\\Lambda_(QCD).

  17. A pore scale study on fluid flow through two dimensional dual scale porous media with small number of intraparticle pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabet Safa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the fluid flow in a periodic, non-isotropic dual scale porous media consisting of permeable square rods in inline arrangement is analyzed to determine permeability, numerically. The continuity and Navier-Stokes equations are solved to obtain the velocity and pressure distributions in the unit structures of the dual scale porous media for flows within Darcy region. Based on the obtained results, the intrinsic inter and intraparticle permeabilities and the bulk permeability tensor of the dual scale porous media are obtained for different values of inter and intraparticle porosities. The study is performed for interparticle porosities between 0.4 and 0.75 and for intraparticle porosities from 0.2 to 0.8. A correlation based on Kozeny-Carman relationship in terms of inter and intraparticle porosities and permeabilities is proposed to determine the bulk permeability tensor of the dual scale porous media.

  18. The FLIC Overlap Quark Propagator

    CERN Document Server

    Kamleh, W; Leinweber, D B; Williams, A G; Zhang, J; Kamleh, Waseem; Bowman, Patrick O.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.; Zhang, Jianbo

    2004-01-01

    FLIC overlap fermions are a variant of the standard (Wilson) overlap action, with the FLIC (Fat Link Irrelevant Clover) action as the overlap kernel rather than the Wilson action. The structure of the FLIC overlap fermion propagator in momentum space is studied, and a comparison against previous studies of the Wilson overlap propagator in quenched QCD is performed. To explore the scaling properties of the propagator for the two actions, numerical calculations are performed in Landau Gauge across three lattices with different lattice spacing $a$ and similar physical volumes. We find that at light quark masses the acti ons agree in both the infrared and the ultraviolet, but at heavier masses some disagreement in the ultraviolet appears. This is attributed to the two action s having different discretisation errors with the FLIC overlap providing superior performance in this regime. Both actions scale reasonably, but some scaling violations are observed.

  19. Boosted Top Quarks, Top Pair Resonances, and Top Partner Searches at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilot Justin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The increased center-of-mass energy of proton-proton collisions at the LHC allows for higher and higher mass scales to be probed in the search for new physics. These searches for new physics can often involve the reconstruction of top quark decays. In this high-mass regime, event topologies can change and top quark decay products become highly boosted, requiring the use of special identification algorithms. This report summarizes the latest techniques used in the reconstruction of boosted top quarks, and highlights several new physics searches from ATLAS and CMS where they are utilized. Such analyses include the search for top quark pair resonances as is expected from Z’ decays, as well as top quark partner searches, such as fourth generation vector-like quarks, excited top quarks, and top quark partners with non-standard charges

  20. Boosted Top Quarks, Top Pair Resonances, and Top Partner Searches at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pilot, Justin Robert

    2013-01-01

    The increased center-of-mass energy of proton-proton collisions at the LHC allows for higher and higher mass scales to be probed in the search for new physics. These searches for new physics can often involve the reconstruction of top quark decays. In this high-mass regime, event topologies can change and top quark decay products become highly boosted, requiring the use of special identification algorithms. This report summarizes the latest techniques used in the reconstruction of boosted top quarks, and highlights several new physics searches from ATLAS and CMS where they are utilized. Such analyses include the search for top quark pair resonances as is expected from $Z^{\\prime}$ decays, as well as top quark partner searches, such as fourth generation vector-like quarks, excited top quarks, and top quark partners with non-standard charges.

  1. Large-Scale Fluctuations in the Number Density of Galaxies in Independent Surveys of Deep Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Shirokov, S I; Baryshev, Yu V; Gorokhov, V L

    2016-01-01

    New arguments supporting the reality of large-scale fluctuations in the density of the visible matter in deep galaxy surveys are presented. A statistical analysis of the radial distributions of galaxies in the COSMOS and HDF-N deep fields is presented. Independent spectral and photometric surveys exist for each field, carried out in different wavelength ranges and using different observing methods. Catalogs of photometric redshifts in the optical (COSMOS-Zphot) and infrared (UltraVISTA) were used for the COSMOS field in the redshift interval $0.1 < z < 3.5$, as well as the zCOSMOS (10kZ) spectroscopic survey and the XMM-COSMOS and ALHAMBRA-F4 photometric redshift surveys. The HDFN-Zphot and ALHAMBRA-F5 catalogs of photometric redshifts were used for the HDF-N field. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the fluctuations in the numbers of galaxies obtained for independent surveys of the same deep field reaches $R = 0.70 \\pm 0.16$. The presence of this positive correlation supports the reality of fluctu...

  2. Strange quark mass and Lambda parameter by the ALPHA collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Marinkovic, Marina; Sommer, Rainer; Virotta, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We determine f_K for lattice QCD in the two flavor approximation with non-perturbatively improved Wilson fermions. The result is used to set the scale for dimensionful quantities in CLS/ALPHA simulations. To control its dependence on the light quark mass, two different strategies for the chiral extrapolation are applied. Combining f_K and the bare strange quark mass with non-perturbative renormalization factors and step scaling functions computed in the Schroedinger Functional, we determine the RGI strange quark mass and the Lambda parameter in units of f_K.

  3. Essence of the Vacuum Quark Condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; Roberts, Craig D.; /Argonne, PHY /Peking U.; Shrock, Robert; /YITP, Stony Brook; Tandy, Peter C.; /Kent State U.

    2010-08-25

    We show that the chiral-limit vacuum quark condensate is qualitatively equivalent to the pseudoscalar meson leptonic decay constant in the sense that they are both obtained as the chiral-limit value of well-defined gauge-invariant hadron-to-vacuum transition amplitudes that possess a spectral representation in terms of the current-quark mass. Thus, whereas it might sometimes be convenient to imagine otherwise, neither is essentially a constant mass-scale that fills all spacetime. This means, in particular, that the quark condensate can be understood as a property of hadrons themselves, which is expressed, for example, in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wavefunctions.

  4. Meson Spectroscopy in the Light Quark Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vita, R.; Lunardi, S.; Bizzeti, P. G.; Bucci, C.; Chiari, M.; Dainese, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Menegazzo, R.; Nannini, A.; Signorini, C.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the hadron spectrum is one of the fundamental issues in modern particle physics. We know that existing hadron configurations include baryons, made of three quarks, and mesons, made of quark-antiquark pairs. However most of the mass of the hadrons is not due to the mass of these elementary constituents but to their binding force. Studying the hadron spectrum is therefore a tool to understand one of the fundamental forces in nature, the strong force, and Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD), the theory that describes it. This investigation can provide an answer to fundamental questions as what is the origin of the mass of hadrons, what is the origin of quark confinement, what are the relevant degrees of freedom to describe these complex systems and how the transition between the elementary constituents, quarks and gluons, and baryons and mesons occurs. In this field a key tool is given by meson spectroscopy. Mesons, being made by a quark and an anti-quark, are the simplest quark bound system and therefore the ideal benchmark to study the interaction between quarks and understand what the role of gluons is. In this investigation, it is fundamental to precisely determine the spectrum and properties of mesons but also to search for possible unconventional states beyond the configuration q{anti q} as tetraquarks (qq{anti qq}), hybrids (q{anti q}g) and glueballs. These states can be distinguished unambiguously from regular mesons when they have exotic quantum numbers, i.e. combinations of total angular momentum, spin and parity that are not allowed for q{anti q} states. These are called exotic quantum numbers and the corresponding states are referred to as exotics. The study of the meson spectrum and the search for exotics is among the goals of several experiments in the world that exploit different reaction processes, as e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, p{anti p} annihilation, pion scattering, proton-proton scattering and photo-production, to produce meson states

  5. Quark mixings as a test of a new symmetry of quark Yukawa couplings

    CERN Document Server

    González, H; Kielanowski, Piotr; López-Castro, G

    1998-01-01

    Based on the hierarchy exhibited by quarks masses at low energies, we assume that Yukawa couplings of up and down quarks are related by $Y_u\\propto Y_d^2$ at grand unification scales. This ansatz gives rise to a symmetrical CKM matrix at the grand unification (GU) scale. Using three specific models as illustrative examples for the evolution down to low energies, we obtain the entries and asymmetries of the CKM matrix which are in very good agreement with their measured values. This indicates that the small asymmetry of the CKM matrix at low energies may be the effect of the renormalization group evolution only.

  6. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chen; Roberts, Craig D; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-01-01

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed-quarks carry all a meson's momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanishing as $(1-x)^2$ when Bjorken-$x\\to 1$. Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of SU(3)-flavour symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavour dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulae may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison...

  7. LHC Signatures of Warped-space Vectorlike Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalakrishna, Shrihari; Mitra, Subhadip; Moreau, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We study the LHC signatures of TeV scale vectorlike quarks $b'$, $t'$ and $\\chi$ with electromagnetic charges -1/3, 2/3 and 5/3 that appear in many beyond the standard model (BSM) extensions. We consider warped extradimensional models and analyze the phenomenology of such vectorlike quarks that are the custodial partners of third generation quarks. In addition to the usually studied pair-production channels which depend on the strong coupling, we put equal emphasis on single production channels that depend on electroweak couplings and on electroweak symmetry breaking induced mixing effects between the heavy vectorlike quarks and standard model quarks. Although the motivation is from warped models, we present many of our results model-independently.

  8. Experimental container shape dependence and heat transport scaling of Rayleigh-Bénard convection of high-Prandtl-number fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Stephen; Fonda, Enrico; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Both experiments and simulations on Rayleigh-Bénard convection with fluids of Prandtl numbers 5 and below have shown that the container shape influences the flow structure. Here, we investigate similar dependences of convection of fluids with Prandtl numbers of up to 104. The convection cells have aspect ratio of order unity, and we use cubic and cylindrical shapes. Visual analysis using a noninvasive photochromic dye technique indicates the distinct large-scale flow patterns in both square and cylindrical test cells. The stability of these flow patterns is explored. Also presented are results on the Nusselt-Rayleigh scaling for moderate Rayleigh numbers.

  9. Recursive fragmentation model with quark spin. Application to quark polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Artru, X

    2010-01-01

    An elementary recursive model accounting for the quark spin in the fragmentation of a quark into mesons is presented. The quark spin degree of freedom is represented by a two-components spinor. Spin one meson can be included. The model produces Collins effect and jet handedness. The influence of the initial quark polarisation decays exponentially with the rank of the meson, at dierent rates for longitudinal and transverse polarisations

  10. Composite Leptons and Quarks from Hexad Preons

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shun-Zhi

    2011-01-01

    A Hexad Preon model where leptons, quarks and W Z bosons are composite is proposed. Six Hexad Preons transform under $U(3)\\otimes U(3)$ local gauge theory which is identified with $U(1)_Q\\otimes SU(3)_C\\otimes SU(3)_f\\otimes U(1)_w$. All salient features of the standard model can be obtained from the compositeness of leptons and quarks: There are exactly six quarks and six leptons with evident three families (generations); All quantum numbers of leptons and quarks can be given out of that of preons; QED and QCD are given by electro-strong interaction $U(1)_Q\\otimes SU(3)_C$ ; The weak interaction is residual "Van der Waals" forces between preons and dipreons. It is shown that all processes in standard model are just reshuffle of preons. In addition, a possible dark matter candidate is presented. Other questions like the electroweak symmetry breaking, the spin of fermions, the origin of quark and lepton mixing, \\textit{etc.}, are also addressed.

  11. Decays of heavy quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, T G

    1979-01-01

    The weak decay of heavy b and t quarks is discussed using the mixing angles obtained in Fritzsch's model (1978). The author finds that the decay b to c dominates over b to u for 7quark lifetime is approximately 1.6*10/sup -13/ sec. for m /sub t/ approximately=14 GeV. For t quarks of this mass he finds tau /sub t/quark cascade decay is found to be an insignificant source of multimuons in nu interactions and suitably small in nu interactions, consistent with the data of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay and Harvard-Pennsylvania-Wisconsin- Fermilab collaborations. Several branching ratios for exotic final states produced via b quarks in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are discussed. (23 refs).

  12. Multiplicity fluctuation and correlation of identified baryons in quark combination model

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Jun; Wang, Rui-qin; Shao, Feng-lan

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical fluctuation and correlation of multiplicity distributions of identified baryons and antibaryons produced by the hadronization of the bulk quark system are systematically studied in quark combination model. Starting from the most basic dynamics of quark combination which are necessary for multiplicity study, we analyze moments (variance, skewness and kurtosis) of inclusive multiplicity distribution of identified baryons, two-baryon multiplicity correlations, and baryon-antibaryon multiplicity correlations after the hadronization of quark system with given quark number and antiquark number. We obtain a series of interesting findings, e.g., binomial behavior of multiplicity moments, coincide flavor dependent two-baryon correlation and universal baryon-antibaryon correlation, which can be regarded as general features of quark combination. We further take into account correlations and fluctuations of quark numbers before hadronization to study their influence on multiple production of baryons and ant...

  13. Gauge-invariant approach to quark dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sazdjian, H

    2016-01-01

    The main aspects of a gauge-invariant approach to the description of quark dynamics in the nonperturbative regime of QCD are first reviewed. In particular, the role of the parallel transport operation in constructing gauge-invariant Green's functions is presented, and the relevance of Wilson loops for the representation of the interaction is emphasized. Recent developments, based on the use of polygonal lines for the parallel transport operation, are then presented. An integro-differential equation is obtained for the quark Green's function defined with a phase factor along a single, straight line segment. It is solved exactly and analytically in the case of two-dimensional QCD in the large $N_c$ limit. The solution displays the dynamical mass generation phenomenon for quarks, with an infinite number of branch-cut singularities that are stronger than simple poles.

  14. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Theoretical Physics Group]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-08

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the standard model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the standard model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  15. Lattice QCD Thermodynamics with Physical Quark Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Soltz, R A; Karsch, F; Mukherjee, Swagato; Vranas, P

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few years new physics methods and algorithms as well as the latest supercomputers have enabled the study of the QCD thermodynamic phase transition using lattice gauge theory numerical simulations with unprecedented control over systematic errors. This is largely a consequence of the ability to perform continuum extrapolations with physical quark masses. Here we review recent progress in lattice QCD thermodynamics, focussing mainly on results that benefit from the use of physical quark masses: the crossover temperature, the equation of state, and fluctuations of the quark number susceptibilities. In addition, we place a special emphasis on calculations that are directly relevant to the study of relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC.

  16. Quark vs Gluon Jet Tagging at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbo, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Distinguishing quark-initiated from gluon-initiated jets is useful for many measurements and searches at the LHC. We present a quark-initiated versus gluon-initiated jet tagger from the ATLAS experiment using the number of reconstructed charged particles inside the jet. The measurement of the charged-particle multiplicity inside jets from Run 1 is used to derive uncertainties on the tagger performance for Run 2. With an efficiency of 60% to select quark-initiated jets, the efficiency to select gluon-initiated jets is between 10 and 20% across a wide range in jet pT up to 1.5 TeV with about an absolute 5% systematic uncertainty on the efficiencies. In addition, we also present preliminary studies on a tagger for the ATLAS experiment using the full radiation pattern inside a jet processed as images in deep neural network classifiers.

  17. The heavy top quark and supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, L.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Three aspects of supersymmetric theories are discussed: electroweak symmetry breaking, the issues of flavor, and gauge unification. The heavy top quark plays an important, sometimes dominant, role in each case. Additional symmetries lead to extensions of the Standard Model which can provide an understanding for many of the outstanding problems of particle physics. A broken supersymmetric extension of spacetime allows electroweak symmetry breaking to follow from the dynamics of the heavy top quark; an extension of isospin provides a constrained framework for understanding the pattern of quark and lepton masses; and a grand unified extension of the Standard Model gauge group provides an elegant understanding of the gauge quantum numbers of the components of a generation. Experimental signatures for each of these additional symmetries are discussed.

  18. On thermal nucleation of quark matter in compact stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mintz, B W; Schaffner-Bielich, J; Pagliara, G

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of a hadron-quark phase transition in extreme astrophysical phenomena such as the collapse of a supernova is not discarded by the modern knowledge of the high-energy nuclear and quark-matter equations of state. Both the density and the temperature attainable in such extreme processes are possibly high enough to trigger a chiral phase transition. However, the time scales involved are an important issue. Even if the physical conditions for the phase transition are favorable (for a system in equilibrium), there may not be enough time for the dynamical process of phase conversion to be completed. We analyze the relevant time scales for the phase conversion via thermal nucleation of bubbles of quark matter and compare them to the typical astrophysical time scale, in order to verify the feasibility of the scenario of hadron-quark phase conversion during, for example, the core-collapse of a supernova.

  19. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  20. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  1. Quark structure of chiral solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonov, D

    2004-01-01

    There is a prejudice that the chiral soliton model of baryons is something orthogonal to the good old constituent quark models. In fact, it is the opposite: the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in strong interactions explains the appearance of massive constituent quarks of small size thus justifying the constituent quark models, in the first place. Chiral symmetry ensures that constituent quarks interact very strongly with the pseudoscalar fields. The ``chiral soliton'' is another word for the chiral field binding constituent quarks. We show how the old SU(6) quark wave functions follow from the ``soliton'', however, with computable relativistic corrections and additional quark-antiquark pairs. We also find the 5-quark wave function of the exotic baryon Theta+.

  2. Spinodal instabilities of baryon-rich quark matter in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Using the test-particle method to solve the transport equation derived from the Nambu-Jona-Lasino (NJL) model, we study how phase separation occurs in an expanding quark matter like that in a heavy ion collision. To test our method, we first investigate the growth rates of unstable modes of quark matter in a static cubic box and find them to agree with the analytical results that were previously obtained using the linear response theory. In this case, we also find the higher-order scaled density moments to increase with time and saturate at values significantly larger than one, which corresponds to a uniform density distribution, after the phase separation. The skewness of the quark number event-by-event distribution in a small sub-volume of the system is also found to increase, but this feature disappears if the sub-volume is large. For the expanding quark matter, two cases are considered with one using a blast-wave model for the initial conditions and the other using initial conditions from a mulple-phase t...

  3. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using ~ 1 fb-1 of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t → W+b and an exotic event as t → W-b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0.35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  4. Top Quark Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Mulders, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of the top quark at the Tevatron collider in 1995 the measurement of its mass has been a high priority. As one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Theory of particle physics, the precise value of the top quark mass together with other inputs provides a test for the self-consistency of the theory, and has consequences for the stability of the Higgs field that permeates the Universe. In this review I will briefly summarize the experimental techniques used at the Tevatron and the LHC experiments throughout the years to measure the top quark mass with ever improving accuracy, and highlight the recent progress in combining all measurements in a single world average combination. As experimental measurements became more precise, the question of their theoretical interpretation has become important. The difficulty of relating the measured quantity to the fundamental top mass parameter has inspired alternative measurement methods that extract the top mass in complementary ways. I wil...

  5. Modelling high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions in laboratory experiments using large-scale free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Eda; Hearst, R. Jason; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2017-03-01

    A turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence is investigated in order to ascertain the scale interactions that dominate the near-wall region. The results are discussed in relation to a canonical high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer because previous studies have reported considerable similarities between these two flows. Measurements were acquired simultaneously from four hot wires mounted to a rake which was traversed through the boundary layer. Particular focus is given to two main features of both canonical high Reynolds number boundary layers and boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence: (i) the footprint of the large scales in the logarithmic region on the near-wall small scales, specifically the modulating interaction between these scales, and (ii) the phase difference in amplitude modulation. The potential for a turbulent boundary layer subjected to free-stream turbulence to `simulate' high Reynolds number wall-turbulence interactions is discussed. The results of this study have encouraging implications for future investigations of the fundamental scale interactions that take place in high Reynolds number flows as it demonstrates that these can be achieved at typical laboratory scales.

  6. Gauge theory extension to include number scaling by boson field: Effects on some aspects of physics and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Benioff, Paul

    2012-01-01

    In gauge theories, separate vector spaces, Vx, are assigned to each space time point x with unitary operators as maps between basis vectors in neighboring Vx. Here gauge theories are extended by replacing the single underlying set of complex scalars, C, with separate sets, Cx, at each x, and including scaling between the Cx. In gauge theory Lagrangians, number scaling shows as a scalar boson field, B, with small coupling to matter fields. Freedom of number scaling is extended to a model with separate number structures assigned to each point x. Separate collections, Ux, of all mathematical systems based on numbers, are assigned to each x. Mathematics available to an observer, Ox, at x is that in Ux. The B field induces scaling between structures in the different Ux. Effects of B scaling on some aspects of physics and geometry are described. The lack of experimentally observed scaling means that B(z) is essentially constant for all points, z, in a region, Z, that can be occupied by us as observers. This restric...

  7. The stokes number approach to support scale-up and technology transfer of a mixing process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsz, T.A.; Hooijmaijers, R.; Rubingh, C.M.; Frijlink, H.W.; Vromans, H.; Voort Maarschalk, K. van der

    2012-01-01

    Transferring processes between different scales and types of mixers is a common operation in industry. Challenges within this operation include the existence of considerable differences in blending conditions between mixer scales and types. Obtaining the correct blending conditions is crucial for

  8. The stokes number approach to support scale-up and technology transfer of a mixing process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsz, T.A.; Hooijmaijers, R.; Rubingh, C.M.; Frijlink, H.W.; Vromans, H.; Voort Maarschalk, K. van der

    2012-01-01

    Transferring processes between different scales and types of mixers is a common operation in industry. Challenges within this operation include the existence of considerable differences in blending conditions between mixer scales and types. Obtaining the correct blending conditions is crucial for th

  9. Preon Trinity a new model of leptons and quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Dugne, J J; Hansson, J; Predazzi, Enrico; Dugne, Jean-Jacques; Fredriksson, Sverker; Hansson, Johan; Predazzi, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    A new model for the substructure of quarks, leptons and weak gauge bosons, is discussed. It is based on three fundamental and absolutely stable spin-1/2 preons. Its preon flavour SU(3) symmetry leads to a prediction of nine quarks, nine leptons and nine heavy vector bosons. One of the quarks has charge $-4e/3$, and is speculated to be the top quark (whose charge has not been measured). The flavour symmetry leads to three conserved lepton numbers in all known weak processes, except for some neutrinos, which might either oscillate or decay. There is also a (Cabibbo) mixing of the $d$ and $s$ quarks due to an internal preon-antipreon annihilation channel. An identical channel exists inside the composite $Z^0$, leading to a relation between the Cabibbo and Weinberg mixing angles.

  10. Strange baryon spectroscopy in the relativistic quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Faustov, R N

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectra of strange baryons are calculated in the framework of the relativistic quark model based on the quasipotential approach. Baryons are treated as the relativistic quark-diquark bound systems. It is assumed that two quarks with equal constituent masses form a diquark. The diquark excitations and its internal structure are consistently taken into account. Calculations are performed up to rather high orbital and radial excitations of strange baryons. On this basis the Regge trajectories are constructed. The obtained results are compared with available experimental data and previous predictions. It is found that all masses of the 4- and 3-star, as well as most of the 2- and 1-star states of strange baryons with established quantum numbers are well reproduced. The developed relativistic quark-diquark model predicts less excited states than three-quark models of strange baryons.

  11. Strange baryon spectroscopy in the relativistic quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, R. N.; Galkin, V. O.

    2015-09-01

    Mass spectra of strange baryons are calculated in the framework of the relativistic quark model based on the quasipotential approach. Baryons are treated as relativistic quark-diquark bound systems. It is assumed that two quarks with equal constituent masses form a diquark. The diquark excitations and its internal structure are consistently taken into account. Calculations are performed up to rather high orbital and radial excitations of strange baryons. On this basis the Regge trajectories are constructed. The obtained results are compared with available experimental data and previous predictions. It is found that all masses of the 4- and 3-star states of strange baryons with established quantum numbers, as well as most of the 2- and 1-star states, are well reproduced. The developed relativistic quark-diquark model predicts less excited states than three-quark models of strange baryons.

  12. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  13. Heavy-quark production in deep-inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekhin, Sergey [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino (Russian Federation); Bluemlein, Johannes [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Moch, Sven-Olaf [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-08-15

    We report recent experimental and theoretical progress concerning the heavy-quark electro-production in the context of the ABM11 parton distribution function (PDF) fit. In the updated ABM11 analysis, including the recent combined HERA charm data, the MS-values of the c-quark mass m{sub c}(m{sub c})=1.24{+-}0.03(exp){sup +0.03}{sub -0.02}(scale){sup +0.00}{sub -0.07}(th) and m{sub c}(m{sub c})=1.15{+-}0.04(exp){sup +0.04}{sub -0.00}(scale) are determined at NNLO and NLO, respectively. The values of m{sub c} obtained are compared to other determinations including the ones based on the various variable-flavor-number (VFN) scheme prescriptions.The VFN scheme uncertainties related to the matching of the 4(5)-flavor PDFs with the 3(4)-flavor ones are discussed.

  14. Quark Helicity and Transversity Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Dae Sung

    2016-01-01

    The quark transversity distribution inside nucleon is less understood than the quark unpolarized and helicity distributions inside nucleon. In particular, it is important to know clearly why the quark helicity and transversity distributions are different. We investigate the origin of their discrepancy.

  15. Color confinement multi quark resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Fan [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Joint Center for Particle Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing University and Pupil Mountain Observatory, Nanjing, 210008 (China); Ping, J.L. [Department of Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing, 210097 (China); Pang, H.R. [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing, 210008 (China); Chen, L.Z. [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Joint Center for Particle Nuclear Physics and Cosmology, Nanjing University and Pupil Mountain Observatory, Nanjing, 210008 (China)

    2007-06-15

    A new kind microscopic resonance, the color confinement multi quark resonance is proposed and studied. The quark delocalization color screening model is compared to one of the chiral quark model, the Salamanca model, and a new mechanism of the intermediate range NN interaction, the mutual distortion of interacting nucleons, is checked to be similar to the {sigma} meson exchange.

  16. (Super)Yang-Mills at Finite Heavy-Quark Density

    CERN Document Server

    Faedo, Anton F; Mateos, David; Tarrio, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We study the gravitational duals of $d$-dimensional Yang-Mills theories with $d\\leq 6$ in the presence of an ${\\cal O} (N^2)$ density of heavy quarks, with $N$ the number of colors. For concreteness we focus on maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills, but our results apply to a larger class of theories with or without supersymmetry. The gravitational solutions describe renormalization group flows towards infrared scaling geometries characterized by fixed dynamical and hyperscaling-violating exponents. The special case $d=5$ yields an $AdS_3 \\times \\mathbb{R}^4 \\times S^4$ geometry upon uplifting to M-theory. We discuss the multitude of physical scales that separate different dynamical regimes along the flows, as well as the validity of the supergravity description. We also present exact black brane solutions that encode the low-temperature thermodynamics.

  17. On Spatial Resolution in Habitat Models: Can Small-scale Forest Structure Explain Capercaillie Numbers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Storch

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effects of spatial resolution on the performance and applicability of habitat models in wildlife management and conservation. A Habitat Suitability Index (HSI model for the Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus in the Bavarian Alps, Germany, is presented. The model was exclusively built on non-spatial, small-scale variables of forest structure and without any consideration of landscape patterns. The main goal was to assess whether a HSI model developed from small-scale habitat preferences can explain differences in population abundance at larger scales. To validate the model, habitat variables and indirect sign of Capercaillie use (such as feathers or feces were mapped in six study areas based on a total of 2901 20 m radius (for habitat variables and 5 m radius sample plots (for Capercaillie sign. First, the model's representation of Capercaillie habitat preferences was assessed. Habitat selection, as expressed by Ivlev's electivity index, was closely related to HSI scores, increased from poor to excellent habitat suitability, and was consistent across all study areas. Then, habitat use was related to HSI scores at different spatial scales. Capercaillie use was best predicted from HSI scores at the small scale. Lowering the spatial resolution of the model stepwise to 36-ha, 100-ha, 400-ha, and 2000-ha areas and relating Capercaillie use to aggregated HSI scores resulted in a deterioration of fit at larger scales. Most importantly, there were pronounced differences in Capercaillie abundance at the scale of study areas, which could not be explained by the HSI model. The results illustrate that even if a habitat model correctly reflects a species' smaller scale habitat preferences, its potential to predict population abundance at larger scales may remain limited.

  18. Heavy Quarks, QCD, and Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Mehen

    2012-10-09

    The research supported by this OJI award is in the area of heavy quark and quarkonium production, especially the application Soft-Collinear E ective Theory (SCET) to the hadronic production of quarkonia. SCET is an e ffective theory which allows one to derive factorization theorems and perform all order resummations for QCD processes. Factorization theorems allow one to separate the various scales entering a QCD process, and in particular, separate perturbative scales from nonperturbative scales. The perturbative physics can then be calculated using QCD perturbation theory. Universal functions with precise fi eld theoretic de nitions describe the nonperturbative physics. In addition, higher order perturbative QCD corrections that are enhanced by large logarithms can be resummed using the renormalization group equations of SCET. The applies SCET to the physics of heavy quarks, heavy quarkonium, and similar particles.

  19. Measurement of the dijet angular distributions and search for quark compositeness with the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinzmann, Andreas Dominik

    2011-10-07

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the Conseil Europeen pour la Recherche Nucleaire (CERN) allows to study the interactions of quarks and gluons in a yet unexplored energy regime. In 2010, the LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of more than 36 pb{sup -1} of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV. In these proton-proton collisions, the interactions of the constituent quarks and gluons produced a considerable amount of jets of particles with transverse momenta above 1 TeV. Well suited for the study of these jet processes is the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment situated at the LHC point 5 as it can measure jets with the necessary energy and angular resolutions over a large range of transverse momentum ({proportional_to}30 GeVquarks (quark compositeness). Models describing quarks as bound states of constituent particles may be able to explain the number of quark generations, quark masses and charges. A common signature of these models are additional contact interactions between quarks in high-momentum-transfer interactions, observable in the cross section of jet processes. Inspired by the Rutherford experiment, the scattering angle of two-jet processes (dijets) is measured to study the point-like quark and gluon scattering processes predicted by QCD. The dijet scattering angle is expressed in terms of {chi}{sub dijet} = e {sup vertical} {sup stroke} {sup y{sub 1}-y

  20. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-01

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed quarks carry all the meson's momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanish as (1 -x )2 when Bjorken-x →1 . Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of S U (3 ) -flavor symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavor dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulas may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment which allows us to identify and highlight basic features of measurable pion and kaon valence-quark distributions. We find that whereas roughly two thirds of the pion's light-front momentum is carried by valence dressed quarks at a characteristic hadronic scale; this fraction rises to 95% in the kaon; evolving distributions with these features to a scale typical of available Drell-Yan data produces a kaon-to-pion ratio of u -quark distributions that is in agreement with the single existing data set, and predicts a u -quark distribution within the pion that agrees with a modern reappraisal of π N Drell-Yan data. Precise new data are essential in order to validate this reappraisal and because a single modest-quality measurement of the kaon-to-pion ratio cannot be considered definitive.

  1. Valence-quark distribution functions in the kaon and pion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chen; Chang, Lei; Roberts, Craig D.; Wan, Shaolong; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-04-18

    We describe expressions for pion and kaon dressed-quark distribution functions that incorporate contributions from gluons which bind quarks into these mesons and hence overcome a flaw of the commonly used handbag approximation. The distributions therewith obtained are purely valence in character, ensuring that dressed quarks carry all the meson’s momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale and vanish as ( 1 - x ) 2 when Bjorken- x → 1 . Comparing such distributions within the pion and kaon, it is apparent that the size of S U ( 3 ) -flavor symmetry breaking in meson parton distribution functions is modulated by the flavor dependence of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. Corrections to these leading-order formulas may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea quarks. Working with available empirical information, we build an algebraic framework that is capable of expressing the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment which allows us to identify and highlight basic features of measurable pion and kaon valence-quark distributions. We find that whereas roughly two thirds of the pion’s light-front momentum is carried by valence dressed quarks at a characteristic hadronic scale; this fraction rises to 95% in the kaon; evolving distributions with these features to a scale typical of available Drell-Yan data produces a kaon-to-pion ratio of u -quark distributions that is in agreement with the single existing data set, and predicts a u -quark distribution within the pion that agrees with a modern reappraisal of π N Drell-Yan data. Precise new data are essential in order to validate this reappraisal and because a single modest-quality measurement of the kaon-to-pion ratio cannot be considered definitive.

  2. Search For Scalar Top Quark And Scalar Bottom Quark In Proton Antiproton Collisions At 1.8 Tev

    CERN Document Server

    Holck, C

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of a search for direct pair production of scalar top (or scalar bottom) quarks followed by the decay of scalar top (or scalar bottom) quark to a charm quark (or bottom quark) and a neutralino using 88 pb– 1 of data from pp&d1; collisions at s = 1.8 TeV. The experimental signature is two charm (or two bottom) jets plus significant missing energy. The number of events which pass all our selection criteria is consistent with our expectations from Standard Model processes. We observe 11(5) events in the scalar top (scalar bottom) analysis and expect 14.5 ± 4.2(5.8 ± 1.8). We use a next-to-leading order scalar quark cross section calculation to excluded points, at the 95% C.L., as a function of the scalar top mass (or scalar bottom mass) and the neutralino mass. --- 18 --- AN

  3. Enhanced azimuthal rotation of the large-scale flow through stochastic cessations in turbulent rotating convection with large Rossby numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Wang, Xue-ying

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the azimuthal orientation {\\theta}(t) and thermal amplitude {\\delta}(t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) of turbulent rotating convection within an unprecedented large Rossby number range 170. We identify the mechanism through which the mean retrograde rotation speed can be enhanced by stochastic cessations in the presence of weak Coriolis force, and show that a low-dimensional, stochastic model provides predictions of the observed large-scale flow dynamics and interprets its retrograde rotation.

  4. Magnetic field amplification by small-scale dynamo action: dependence on turbulence models and Reynolds and Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Jennifer; Schleicher, Dominik; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2012-02-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus it is expected to depend crucially on the nature of the turbulence. In this paper, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(ℓ)proportional ℓ([symbol see text])V}, where ℓ and v(ℓ) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_{crit}, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is Rm(crit) (K) ≈ 110 and for Burgers turbulence ([symbol see text] = 1/2) Rm(crit)(B) ≈ 2700. Furthermore, we derive that the growth rate of the small-scale magnetic field for a general type of turbulence is Γ proportional Re((1-[symbol see text])/(1+[symbol see text])) in the limit of infinite magnetic Prandtl number. For decreasing magnetic Prandtl number (down to Pm >/~ 10), the growth rate of the small-scale dynamo decreases. The details of this drop depend on the WKB approximation, which becomes invalid for a magnetic Prandtl number of about unity.

  5. Basic features of the pion valence-quark distribution function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The impulse-approximation expression used hitherto to define the pion's valence-quark distribution function is flawed because it omits contributions from the gluons which bind quarks into the pion. A corrected leading-order expression produces the model-independent result that quarks dressed via the rainbow–ladder truncation, or any practical analogue, carry all the pion's light-front momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale. Corrections to the leading contribution may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we use an algebraic model to express the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment that allows us to highlight the basic features of the pion's measurable valence-quark distribution, qπ(x; namely, at a characteristic hadronic scale, qπ(x∼(1−x2 for x≳0.85; and the valence-quarks carry approximately two-thirds of the pion's light-front momentum.

  6. Vector-like quarks with a scalar triplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Coluccio Leskow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We study a minimal extension to the Standard Model with an additional real scalar triplet, Σ, and a single vector-like quark, T. This class of models appear naturally in extensions of the Littlest Higgs model that incorporate dark matter without the need of T-parity. We assume the limit that the triplet does not develop a vacuum expectation value and that all dimension five operators coupling the triplet to Standard Model fields and the vector-like quarks are characterized by the scale Λ at which we expect new physics to arise. We introduce new non-renormalizable interactions between the new scalar sector and fermion sector that allow mixing between the Standard Model third generation up-type quark and the vector-like quark in a way that leads to the cancellation of the leading quadratic divergences to the one-loop corrections from the top quark to the mass of the Higgs boson. Within this framework, new decay modes of the vector-like quark to the real scalar triplet and SM particles arise and bring forth an opportunity to probe this model with existing and future LHC data. We contrast constraints from direct colliders searches with low energy precision measurements and find that heavy vector-like top quarks with a mass as low as 650 GeV are consistent with current experimental constraints in models where new physics arises at scales below 2 TeV.

  7. Phase structure of cold magnetized quark matter within the SU(3) NJL model

    CERN Document Server

    Grunfeld, A G; Pinto, M B; Scoccola, N N

    2014-01-01

    The possible different phases of cold quark matter in the presence of a finite magnetic field and chemical potential are obtained within the SU(3) NJL model for two parameter sets often used in the literature. Although the general pattern is the same in both cases, the number of intermediate phases is parameter dependent. The chiral susceptibilities, as usually defined, are different not only for the s-quark as compared with the two light quarks, but also for the u and d-quarks, yielding non identical crossover lines for the light quark sector.

  8. Top quark pair properties: spin correlation, charge asymmetry and complex final states at LHC in ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubbo Francesco

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In proton–proton collisions at the LHC, pairs of top and anti-top quarks are expected to be mostly produced through gluon fusion, in contrast to production at the Tevatron, where quark annihilation dominates. Making use of the large number of top quark pairs, we present measurements of the spin correlation between top and anti-top quarks as well as of the top quark charge asymmetry, which constitute important tests of QCD and are sensitive to new physics. We also discuss top production in association of photons and Z bosons.

  9. Evolution of proto-neutron stars with quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, J A; Steiner, A W; Prakash, M; Lattimer, J M

    2001-06-01

    Neutrino fluxes from proto-neutron stars with and without quarks are studied. Observable differences become apparent after 10-20 s of evolution. Sufficiently massive stars containing negatively charged, strongly interacting, particles collapse to black holes during the first minute of evolution. Since the neutrino flux vanishes when a black hole forms, this is the most obvious signal that quarks (or other types of strange matter) have appeared. The metastability time scales for stars with quarks are intermediate between those containing hyperons and kaon condensates.

  10. Top-quark pair production in a running mass scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Moch, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-11-15

    Between the Tevatron and LHC, top-quark physics is now becoming an area for precision physics. This has lead to an increase in theoretical activity to match the experimental accuracy of top anti-top production. We discuss the difficulty in properly defining the top-quark mass as measured by experiments and present results for differential distributions of top-quark pair production in a running mass scheme. The use of such a scheme shows better convergence in the perturbative expansion and improves the scale dependence as opposed to the typical on-shell scheme.

  11. Top quark properties in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Demilly, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Properties of the top quark are measured with the ATLAS detector using LHC proton-proton collisions data. Measurements of the top-quark mass and polarisation, as well as of the polarization of W bosons in top quark decays to probe the Wtb-vertex are presented. In addition, measurements of the spin correlation between top and anti-top quarks as well as of the top- quark charge asymmetry, which constitute important tests of QCD and are sensitive to new physics, are discussed.

  12. Top Quark Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, Martijn

    2016-10-01

    Ever since the discovery of the top quark at the Tevatron collider in 1995 the measurement of its mass has been a high priority. As one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Theory of particle physics, the precise value of the top quark mass together with other inputs provides a test for the self-consistency of the theory, and has consequences for the stability of the Higgs field that permeates the Universe. In this review I will briefly summarize the experimental techniques used at the Tevatron and the LHC experiments throughout the years to measure the top quark mass with ever improving accuracy, and highlight the recent progress in combining all measurements in a single world average combination. As experimental measurements became more precise, the question of their theoretical interpretation has become important. The difficulty of relating the measured quantity to the fundamental top mass parameter has inspired alternative measurement methods that extract the top mass in complementary ways. I will discuss the status of those techniques and their results, and present a brief outlook of further improvements in the experimental determination of the top quark mass to be expected at the LHC and beyond.

  13. Quark gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C P Singh

    2000-04-01

    Recent trends in the research of quark gluon plasma (QGP) are surveyed and the current experimental and theoretical status regarding the properties and signals of QGP is reported. We hope that the experiments commencing at relativistic heavy-ion collider (RHIC) in 2000 will provide a glimpse of the QGP formation.

  14. Quark-resonance model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallante, E.; Petronzio, R.

    1995-01-01

    We construct an effective Lagrangian for low energy hadronic interactions through an infinite expansion in inverse powers of the low energy cutoff Λχ of all possible chiral invariant non-renormalizable interactions between quarks and mesons degrees of freedom arising from the bosonization of a gen

  15. John Cage's Number Pieces as Stochastic Processes: a Large-Scale Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Popoff, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The Number Pieces are a corpus of works by composer John Cage, which rely on a particular time-structure used for determining the temporal location of sounds, named the "time-bracket". The time-bracket system is an inherently stochastic process, which complicates the analysis of the Number Pieces as it leads to a large number of possibilities in terms of sonic content instead of one particular fixed performance. The purpose of this paper is to propose a statistical approach of the Number Pieces by assimilating them to stochastic processes. Two Number Pieces, "Four" and "Five", are studied here in terms of pitch-class set content: the stochastic processes at hand lead to a collection of random variables indexed over time giving the distribution of the possible pitch-class sets. This approach allows for a static and dynamic analysis of the score encompassing all the possible outcomes during the performance of these works.

  16. Top quark pair production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baernreuther, Peter

    2012-06-28

    production in quark anti-quark annihilation channel, and the result of the double virtual corrections in the gluon fusion channel. The latter was calculated by the author in his doctoral thesis autonomously. Our results agree with already published partial results. Furthermore, the author was involved in the improvement of the double virtual corrections in the quark annihilation channel through implementation of newly developed methods. The complete NNLO results enable a reduction of the scale dependence of the production process from 15% to 4%. This allows an excellent comparison with the experimental results. Another essential component of this work, was the development and implementation of new methods for the computer-aided calculation of the production process.

  17. Effective degrees of freedom of the quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorina, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Catania, and INFN Sezione di Catania, Via Santa Sofia 64, I-95100 Catania (Italy); Mannarelli, M. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)]. E-mail: massimo@lns.mit.edu

    2007-01-25

    The effective degrees of freedom of the quark-gluon plasma are studied in the temperature range {approx}(1-2)T{sub c}. We show that including light bosonic states one can reproduce the pressure and energy density of the quark-gluon plasma obtained by lattice simulations. The number of the bosonic states required is at most of the order of 20, consistent with the number of light mesonic states and in disagreement with a recently proposed picture of the quark-gluon plasma as a system populated with exotic bound states. We also constrain the quark quasiparticle chiral invariant mass to be {approx}300 MeV. Some remarks regarding the role of the gluon condensation and the baryon number-strangeness correlation are also presented.

  18. Spin dependence of heavy quark fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornet, Fernando [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos and Centro Anadaluz de Fisica de Particulas, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: cornet@ugr.es; Garcia Canal, Carlos A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, La Plata (1900) (Argentina)

    2008-05-01

    We propose that the non-perturbative part of the fragmentation function describing the transition from a heavy quark to a heavy meson is proportional to the square of the produced meson wave function at the origin, taking into account hyperfine interactions. We analyze the effects of this proposal on the number of pseudoscalar mesons compared to the number of vector mesons produced and find a good agreement with experimental data. Finally, we discuss further experimental checks for our hypothesis.

  19. Effects of heavy sea quarks at low energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Mattia; Finkenrath, Jacob; Knechtli, Francesco; Leder, Björn; Sommer, Rainer

    2015-03-13

    We present a factorization formula for the dependence of light hadron masses and low energy hadronic scales on the mass M of a heavy quark: apart from an overall mass-independent factor Q, ratios such as r_{0}(M)/r_{0}(0) are computable in perturbation theory at large M. The perturbation theory part is stable concerning different loop orders. Our nonperturbative Monte Carlo results obtained in a model calculation, where a doublet of heavy quarks is decoupled, match quantitatively to the perturbative prediction. Upon taking ratios of different hadronic scales at the same mass, the perturbative function drops out and the ratios are given by the decoupled theory up to M^{-2} corrections. We verify-in the continuum limit-that the sea quark effects of quarks with masses around the charm mass are very small in such ratios.

  20. The breaking of flavor democracy in the quark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Xing, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Di

    2017-09-01

    The democracy of quark flavors is a well-motivated flavor symmetry, but it must be properly broken in order to explain the observed quark mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. We reconstruct the texture of flavor democracy breaking and evaluate its strength in a novel way, by assuming a parallelism between the Q=+2/3 and Q=‑1/3 quark sectors and using a nontrivial parametrization of the flavor mixing matrix. Some phenomenological implications of such democratic quark mass matrices, including their variations in the hierarchy basis and their evolution from the electroweak scale to a super-high energy scale, are also discussed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375207) and National Basic Research Program of China (2013CB834300)

  1. Scaling and interaction of self-similar modes in models of high Reynolds number wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. S.; Moarref, R.; McKeon, B. J.

    2017-03-01

    Previous work has established the usefulness of the resolvent operator that maps the terms nonlinear in the turbulent fluctuations to the fluctuations themselves. Further work has described the self-similarity of the resolvent arising from that of the mean velocity profile. The orthogonal modes provided by the resolvent analysis describe the wall-normal coherence of the motions and inherit that self-similarity. In this contribution, we present the implications of this similarity for the nonlinear interaction between modes with different scales and wall-normal locations. By considering the nonlinear interactions between modes, it is shown that much of the turbulence scaling behaviour in the logarithmic region can be determined from a single arbitrarily chosen reference plane. Thus, the geometric scaling of the modes is impressed upon the nonlinear interaction between modes. Implications of these observations on the self-sustaining mechanisms of wall turbulence, modelling and simulation are outlined.

  2. More about unphysical zeroes in quark mass matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmanuel-Costa, David; González Felipe, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    We look for all weak bases that lead to texture zeroes in the quark mass matrices and contain a minimal number of parameters in the framework of the standard model. Since there are ten physical observables, namely, six nonvanishing quark masses, three mixing angles and one CP phase, the maximum number of texture zeroes in both quark sectors is altogether nine. The nine zero entries can only be distributed between the up- and down-quark sectors in matrix pairs with six and three texture zeroes or five and four texture zeroes. In the weak basis where a quark mass matrix is nonsingular and has six zeroes in one sector, we find that there are 54 matrices with three zeroes in the other sector, obtainable through right-handed weak basis transformations. It is also found that all pairs composed of a nonsingular matrix with five zeroes and a nonsingular and nondecoupled matrix with four zeroes simply correspond to a weak basis choice. Without any further assumptions, none of these pairs of up- and down-quark mass matrices has physical content. It is shown that all non-weak-basis pairs of quark mass matrices that contain nine zeroes are not compatible with current experimental data. The particular case of the so-called nearest-neighbour-interaction pattern is also discussed.

  3. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.-B.; Schulze, H.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 × 10^{53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  4. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H; Schulze, H -J

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9--11 km. We obtain an energy release as large as $3.6 \\times 10^{53}\\,\\text{erg}$ from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars.

  5. Strange quark matter and quark stars with the Dyson-Schwinger quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H.; Wei, J.B. [China University of Geosciences, School of Mathematics and Physics, Wuhan (China); Schulze, H.J. [Universita di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica, Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    We calculate the equation of state of strange quark matter and the interior structure of strange quark stars in a Dyson-Schwinger quark model within rainbow or Ball-Chiu vertex approximation. We emphasize constraints on the parameter space of the model due to stability conditions of ordinary nuclear matter. Respecting these constraints, we find that the maximum mass of strange quark stars is about 1.9 solar masses, and typical radii are 9-11 km. We obtain an energy release as large as 3.6 x 10{sup 53} erg from conversion of neutron stars into strange quark stars. (orig.)

  6. Towards the quark--gluon plasma Equation of State with dynamical strange and charm quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Burger, F; Lombardo, M P; Muller-Preussker, M; Trunin, A

    2015-01-01

    We present an ongoing project aimed at determining the thermodynamic Equation of State (EoS) of quark--gluon matter from lattice QCD with two generations of dynamical quarks. We employ the Wilson twisted mass implementation for the fermionic fields and the improved Iwasaki gauge action. Relying on $T=0$ data obtained by the ETM Collaboration the strange and charm quark masses are fixed at their physical values, while the pion mass takes four values in the range from 470 MeV down to 210 MeV. The temperature is varied within a fixed--lattice scale approach. The values for the pseudocritical temperature are obtained from various observables. For the EoS we show preliminary results for the pure gluonic contribution obtained at the pion mass value 370 MeV, where we can compare with previously obtained results with $N_f=2$ degenerate light flavours.

  7. Search for vector-like quarks and excited quarks at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Rauco, Giorgia

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of the latest searches for new hypothetical heavy quarks using proton-proton collisions data collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Vector-like quarks are postulated to solve the hierarchy problem and stabilize the Higgs mass and they are not constrained by the Higgs discovery and electroweak measurements, as for the case of a fourth generation of fermions. They can either be produced singly or pair-wise and their decays result in a variety of final states, containing massive standard model quarks and bosons (Z, W, H). Being these new particles expected to be appearing at the TeV scale, they give rise to boosted topologies, in which jet substructures techniques play a fundamental role. An alternative type of heavy quark resonance are the excited quarks, which are predicted by the compositeness model, being their evidence a clear signature of the composite structure of the ordinary matter. Their decay leads to the corresponding ordinary qua...

  8. Quark-gluon plasma fireball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamieh, Salah; Letessier, Jean; Rafelski, Johann

    2000-12-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics results provide an opportunity to model, and extrapolate to finite baryon density, the properties of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Upon fixing the scale of the thermal coupling constant and vacuum energy to the lattice data, the properties of resulting QGP equations of state (EoS) are developed. We show that the physical properties of the dense matter fireball formed in heavy ion collision experiments at CERN-SPS are well described by the QGP-EoS we presented. We also estimate the properties of the fireball formed in early stages of nuclear collision, and argue that QGP formation must be expected down to 40A GeV in central Pb-Pb interactions.

  9. HUNTING THE QUARK GLUON PLASMA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUDLAM, T.; ARONSON, S.

    2005-04-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) construction project was completed at BNL in 1999, with the first data-taking runs in the summer of 2000. Since then the early measurements at RHIC have yielded a wealth of data, from four independent detectors, each with its international collaboration of scientists: BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS, and STAR [1]. For the first time, collisions of heavy nuclei have been carried out at colliding-beam energies that have previously been accessible only for high-energy physics experiments with collisions of ''elementary'' particles such as protons and electrons. It is at these high energies that the predictions of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory that describes the role of quarks and gluons in nuclear matter, come into play, and new phenomena are sought that may illuminate our view of the basic structure of matter on the sub-atomic scale, with important implications for the origins of matter on the cosmic scale. The RHIC experiments have recorded data from collisions of gold nuclei at the highest energies ever achieved in man-made particle accelerators. These collisions, of which hundreds of millions have now been examined, result in final states of unprecedented complexity, with thousands of produced particles radiating from the nuclear collision. All four of the RHIC experiments have moved quickly to analyze these data, and have begun to understand the phenomena that unfold from the moment of collision as these particles are produced. In order to provide benchmarks of simpler interactions against which to compare the gold-gold collisions, the experiments have gathered comparable samples of data from collisions of a very light nucleus (deuterium) with gold nuclei, as well as proton-proton collisions, all with identical beam energies and experimental apparatus. The early measurements have revealed compelling evidence for the existence of a new form of nuclear

  10. Enhanced reaction kinetics and reactive mixing scale dynamics in mixing fronts under shear flow for arbitrary Damk\\"ohler numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Méheust, Yves; Dentz, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Mixing fronts, where fluids of different chemical compositions mix with each other, are typically subjected to velocity gradients, ranging from the pore scale to the catchment scale due to permeability variations and flow line geometries. A common trait of these processes is that the mixing interface is strained by shear. Depending on the P\\'eclet number $Pe$, which represents the ratio of the characteristic diffusion time to the characteristic advection time, and the Damk\\"ohler number $Da$, which represents the ratio of the characteristic diffusion time to the characteristic reaction time, the local reaction rates can be strongly impacted by the dynamics of the mixing interface. This impact has been characterized mostly either in kinetics-limited or in mixing-limited conditions, that is, for either very low or very high $Da$. Here the coupling of shear flow and chemical reactivity is investigated for arbitrary Damk\\"ohler numbers, for a bimolecular reaction and an initial interface with separated reactants....

  11. Third-order QCD corrections to heavy quark pair production near threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Kurt

    2008-11-07

    The measurement of the top quark mass is an important task at the future International Linear Collider. The most promising process is the top quark pair production in the threshold region. In this region the top quarks behave non-relativistically and a perturbative treatment using effective field theories is possible. Current second order theoretical predictions in a fixed order approach show an uncertainty which is bigger than the expected experimental errors. Therefore, an improvement of the cross section calculation is desirable. There are two ways to incorporate higher order effects, one is to calculate the full next order in the fixed order approach, another possibility is to resum large logarithms. In this work, the fixed order calculation has been extended to the third order in perturbation theory for the QCD corrections. The result is a strongly improved scale behavior and a better understanding of heavy quarkonium systems. The Green function result is given in a semi-analytic form. The energy levels and wave functions for heavy quarkonium states have been calculated from the poles of the Green function and are presented for arbitrary quantum number n. The results have been implemented in a Mathematica program which makes the data easily accessible. Once some missing matching coefficients are calculated, and a complete electroweak calculation is available, the results of this work can be used to improve the precision of the top quark mass measurement to an uncertainty of less than 50 MeV. An inclusion of initial state radiation and beam effects are essential for a realistic observable. In the future, the results obtained could be used for a third order resummation of large logarithms. Further applications are also the extraction of the bottom quark mass with sum rules. (orig.)

  12. Galaxy Bias and Halo-Occupation Numbers from Large-Scale Clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Sefusatti, E; Sefusatti, Emiliano; Scoccimarro, Roman

    2005-01-01

    We show that current surveys have at least as much signal to noise in higher-order statistics as in the power spectrum at weakly nonlinear scales. We discuss how one can use this information to determine the mean of the galaxy halo occupation distribution (HOD) using only large-scale information, through galaxy bias parameters determined from the galaxy bispectrum and trispectrum. After introducing an averaged, reasonably fast to evaluate, trispectrum estimator, we show that the expected errors on linear and quadratic bias parameters can be reduced by at least 20-40%. Also, the inclusion of the trispectrum information, which is sensitive to "three-dimensionality" of structures, helps significantly in constraining the mass dependence of the HOD mean. Our approach depends only on adequate modeling of the abundance and large-scale clustering of halos and thus is independent of details of how galaxies are distributed within halos. This provides a consistency check on the traditional approach of using two-point st...

  13. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF QUARKS IN THE QUARK-GLUON PLASMA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KARSCH,F.; KITAZAWA, M.

    2007-07-30

    We analyze the spectral properties of the quark propagator above the critical temperature for the deconfinement phase transition in quenched lattice QCD using clover improved Wilson fermions. The bare quark mass dependence of the quark spectral function is analyzed by varying the hopping parameter {kappa} in Landau gauge. We assume a two-pole structure for the quark spectral function, which is numerically found to work quite well for any value of {kappa}. It is shown that in the chiral limit the quark spectral function has two collective modes that correspond to the normal and plasmino excitations, while it is dominated by a single-pole structure when the bare quark mass becomes large.

  14. Spectral Properties of Quarks in the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, F

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the spectral properties of the quark propagator above the critical temperature for the deconfinement phase transition in quenched lattice QCD using clover improved Wilson fermions. The bare quark mass dependence of the quark spectral function is analyzed by varying the hopping parameter \\kappa in Landau gauge. We assume a two-pole structure for the quark spectral function, which is numerically found to work quite well for any value of \\kappa. It is shown that in the chiral limit the quark spectral function has two collective modes that correspond to the normal and plasmino excitations, while it is dominated by a single-pole structure when the bare quark mass becomes large.

  15. Quark confinement and the renormalization group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Michael C

    2011-07-13

    Recent approaches to quark confinement are reviewed, with an emphasis on their connection to renormalization group (RG) methods. Basic concepts related to confinement are introduced: the string tension, Wilson loops and Polyakov lines, string breaking, string tension scaling laws, centre symmetry breaking and the deconfinement transition at non-zero temperature. Current topics discussed include confinement on R(3)×S(1), the real-space RG, the functional RG and the Schwinger-Dyson equation approach to confinement.

  16. Quark Confinement and the Renormalization Group

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Recent approaches to quark confinement are reviewed, with an emphasis on their connection to renormalization group methods. Basic concepts related to confinement are introduced: the string tension, Wilson loops and Polyakov lines, string breaking, string tension scaling laws, center symmetry breaking, and the deconfinement transition at non-zero temperature. Current topics discussed include confinement on $R^3\\times S^1$, the real-space renormalization group, the functional renormalization group, and the Schwinger-Dyson equation approach to confinement.

  17. Social Responsiveness Scale-aided analysis of the clinical impact of copy number variations in autism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daalen, E. van; Kemner, C.; Verbeek, N.E.; Zwaag, B. van der; Dijkhuizen, T.; Rump, P.; Houben, R.; Slot, R. van 't; Jonge, M.V. de; Staal, W.G.; Beemer, F.A.; Vorstman, J.A.; Burbach, J.P.H.; Amstel, H.K. van; Hochstenbach, R.; Brilstra, E.H.; Poot, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent array-based studies have detected a wealth of copy number variations (CNVs) in patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Since CNVs also occur in healthy individuals, their contributions to the patient's phenotype remain largely unclear. In a cohort of children with symptoms of ASD, diag

  18. Néel-XXZ state overlaps: odd particle numbers and Lieb-Liniger scaling limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brockmann, M.; De Nardis, J.; Wouters, B.; Caux, J.-S.

    2014-01-01

    We specialize a recently-proposed determinant formula (Brockmann, De Nardis, Wouters and Caux 2014 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 47 145003) for the overlap of the zero-momentum Néel state with Bethe states of the spin-1/2 XXZ chain to the case of an odd number of downturned spins, showing that it is stil

  19. Up quark mass in lattice QCD with three light dynamical quarks and implications for strong CP invariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel R; Fleming, George T; Kilcup, Gregory W

    2003-01-17

    A standing mystery in the standard model is the unnatural smallness of the strong CP violating phase. A massless up quark has long been proposed as one potential solution. A lattice calculation of the constants of the chiral Lagrangian essential for the determination of the up quark mass, 2alpha(8)-alpha(5), is presented. We find 2alpha(8)-alpha(5)=0.29+/-0.18, which corresponds to m(u)/m(d)=0.410+/-0.036. This is the first such calculation using a physical number of dynamical light quarks, N(f)=3.

  20. A Study of charm quark production in beauty quark decays with the OPAL detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Waller, David

    2003-01-01

    The production of charm quarks in beauty quark decays has been studied with the OPAL detector at the Large Electron Positron collider near Geneva, Switzerland. The branching ratio Br(b -1 DDX) has been measured using hadronic zo decays collected between 1993 and 1995. Here b refers to the admixture of weakly decaying hadrons containing ab quark that are produced in electron-positron annihilations at a centre of mass energy equal to the mass of the zo boson. The impact parameter significance of tracks in tagged b-jets is used to differentiate b -1 DDX decays from other decays. The result is Br(b -1 DDX) = (10.0 ± 3.2(stat.)~~:~(syst. det.)~~~04 (syst. phys.))%. where syst. det. is the systematic uncertainty due to the modelling of the detector, and syst. phys. is the systematic uncertainty due to the modelling of the underlying particle physics. Using this result, the average number of charm and anti-charm quarks produced in a beauty quark decay, nc, is found to be l.12~8:i6- Ill

  1. Magnetic Field Amplification by Small-Scale Dynamo Action: Dependence on Turbulence Models, Reynolds and Prandtl Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Schober, Jennifer; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf; Banerjee, Robi

    2011-01-01

    The small-scale dynamo is a process by which turbulent kinetic energy is converted into magnetic energy, and thus is expected to depend crucially on the nature of turbulence. In this work, we present a model for the small-scale dynamo that takes into account the slope of the turbulent velocity spectrum v(l) ~ l^theta, where l and v(l) are the size of a turbulent fluctuation and the typical velocity on that scale. The time evolution of the fluctuation component of the magnetic field, i.e., the small-scale field, is described by the Kazantsev equation. We solve this linear differential equation for its eigenvalues with the quantum-mechanical WKB-approximation. The validity of this method is estimated as a function of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. We calculate the minimal magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action, Rm_crit, using our model of the turbulent velocity correlation function. For Kolmogorov turbulence (theta=1/3), we find that the critical magnetic Reynolds number is approximately 110 and for Burger...

  2. Parametrization of Fully Dressed Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Wei-Xing; ZHU Ji-Zhen; ZHOU Li-Juan; SHEN Peng-Nian; HU Zhao-Hui

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensive study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the "rainbow" approximation, a parametrized form of the quark propagator is suggested. The corresponding quark selfform of the quark propagator proposed in this work describes a confining quark propagation, and is quite convenient to be used in any numerical calculations.

  3. Color-Neutral Superconducting Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, A W; Prakash, M; Steiner, Andrew W.; Reddy, Sanjay; Prakash, Madappa

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of enforcing local color neutrality on the color superconducting phases of quark matter by utilizing the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model supplemented by diquark and the t'Hooft six-fermion interactions. In neutrino free matter at zero temperature, color neutrality guarantees that the number densities of $u, d, {\\rm and} s$ quarks in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase will be equal even with physical current quark masses. Electric charge neutrality follows as a consequence and without the presence of electrons. In contrast, electric charge neutrality in the less symmetric 2-flavor superconducting (2SC) phase with $ud$ pairing requires more electrons than the normal quark phase. The free energy density cost of enforcing color and electric charge neutrality in the CFL phase is lower than that in the 2SC phase, which favors the formation of the CFL phase. With increasing temperature and neutrino content, an unlocking transition occurs from the CFL phase to the 2SC phase with the order of...

  4. The Multimedia Project Quarked!

    CERN Document Server

    Bean, Alice

    2011-01-01

    Can exposure to fundamental ideas about the nature of matter help motivate children in math and science and support the development of their understanding of these ideas later? Physicists, designers, and museum educators at the University of Kansas created the Quarked!(tm) Adventures in the subatomic Universe project to provide an opportunity for youth to explore the subatomic world in a fun and user friendly way. The project components include a website (located at http://www.quarked.org) and hands-on education programs. These are described and assessment results are presented. Questions addressed include the following. Can you engage elementary and middle school aged children with concepts related to particle physics? Can young children make sense of something they can't directly see? Do teachers think the material is relevant to their students?

  5. Emergence of small numbers in complex systems and the origin of the electroweak scale

    CERN Document Server

    Dermisek, Radovan

    2016-01-01

    In sufficiently complex models with many parameters that are unknown or undetermined from first principles, a small coupling or mass can naturally arise even if it is not protected by a symmetry or a result of some dynamics. On the example of the minimal supersymmetric model we demonstrate that, contrary to commonly accepted views, the electroweak scale up to 3 orders of magnitude below superpartner masses naturally occurs, without fine tuning of model parameters, and it is not probabilistically disfavored compared to any other possibility.

  6. A Quark Matter Contribution to the Cosmic Ray Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Kyle

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available I will describe a possible dark matter model in which the dark matter is composed of heavy “nuggets” of standard model quarks and antiquarks bound in a high density phase of QCD. If objects of this type are formed early in the universe's history they may provide the observed dark matter content. In this scenario the nuggets are dark not because of their fundamentally weak interactions but because of the incredibly small number density required to explain the observed mass density of the dark matter. The correspondingly small flux of these objects through the earth renders them invisible to conventional high sensitivity dark matter searches intended to detect weakly interacting particles with a flux many orders of magnitude larger. Instead the greatest search potential for dark matter models of this form may come from the largest scale cosmic ray detectors. I will briefly describe the properties of quark nugget dark matter and then use these properties in order to predict the signal they would produce in a variety of cosmic ray detectors.

  7. The discovery of quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, M

    1992-05-29

    Quarks are widely recognized today as being among the elementary particles of which matter is composed. The key evidence for their existence came from a series of inelastic electron-nucleon scattering experiments conducted between 1967 and 1973 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Other theoretical and experimental advances of the 1970s confirmed this discovery, leading to the present standard model of elementary particle physics.

  8. Melting Hadrons, Boiling Quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustra...

  9. What is a Quark?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Gordon L.; Perry, Malcolm J.

    2015-03-01

    We are used to thinking of quarks as fundamental particles in the same way we think of the electron, or gauge bosons, neutrinos, leptons. In strong theory, these objects are unified with gravitation and the physics of spacetime into what is hoped to be an ultimate theory, string/M theory. The string/M theory paradigm completely changes the way we think of the socalled elementary particles in quantum field theory.

  10. The unquenched quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Santopinto, E

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, we briefly discuss the results for charmonium and bottomonium spectra with self-energy corrections in the unquenched quark model, due to the coupling to the meson-meson continuum. The UQM formalism can be extended to include also the effects of hybrid mesons, i.e. hybrid loops. Finally, we discuss the results of a calculation of hybrid mesons spectrum in Coulomb Gauge QCD.

  11. Top quark pair production and top quark properties at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang-Seong [INFN, Pisa

    2016-06-02

    We present the most recent measurements of top quark pairs production and top quark properties in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using CDF II detector at the Tevatron. The combination of top pair production cross section measurements and the direct measurement of top quark width are reported. The test of Standard Model predictions for top quark decaying into $b$-quarks, performed by measuring the ratio $R$ between the top quark branching fraction to $b$-quark and the branching fraction to any type of down quark is shown. The extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the ratio $R$ is discussed. We also present the latest measurements on the forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in top anti-top quark production. With the full CDF Run II data set, the measurements are performed in top anti-top decaying to final states that contain one or two charged leptons (electrons or muons). In addition, we combine the results of the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry in $t\\bar t$ system between the two final states. All the results show deviations from the next-to-leading order (NLO) standard model (SM) calculation.

  12. Nearfield Unsteady Pressures at Cruise Mach Numbers for a Model Scale Counter-Rotation Open Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, David B.

    2012-01-01

    An open rotor experiment was conducted at cruise Mach numbers and the unsteady pressure in the nearfield was measured. The system included extensive performance measurements, which can help provide insight into the noise generating mechanisms in the absence of flow measurements. A set of data acquired at a constant blade pitch angle but various rotor speeds was examined. The tone levels generated by the front and rear rotor were found to be nearly equal when the thrust was evenly balanced between rotors.

  13. Quark gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Tapan; Sarkar, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    At extremely high temperatures and densities, protons and neutrons may dissolve into a "soup" of quarks and gluons, called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). For a few microseconds, shortly after the Big Bang, the Universe was filled with the QGP matter. The search and study of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is one of the most fundamental research topics of our times. The QGP matter has been probed by colliding heavy ions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva. By colliding heavy-ions at a speed close to that of light, scientists aim to obtain - albeit over a tiny volume of the size of a nucleus and for an infinitesimally short instant - a QGP state. This QGP state can be observed by dedicated experiments, as it reverts to hadronic matter through expansion and cooling. This volume presents some of the current theoretical and experimental understandings in the field of QGP.

  14. Top-quark mass measurements at the LHC: alternative methods

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00240580; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Alternative top quark mass determinations can provide inputs to the world average with orthogonal systematic uncertainties and may help to refine the interpretation of the standard method. Among a number of recent results I focus on the extractions by ATLAS and CMS of the top quark pole mass from the \\ttbar{} pair and \\ttbar{} + 1 jet production cross-section, which have now reached a precision of 1\\%.

  15. Role of heavy quarks in light hadron fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epele, Manuel; García Canal, Carlos; Sassot, R.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the role of heavy quarks in the production of light flavored hadrons and in the determination of the corresponding nonperturbative hadronization probabilities. We define a general mass variable flavor number scheme for fragmentation functions that accounts for heavy quark mass effects, and perform a global QCD analysis to an up-to-date data set including very precise Belle and BABAR results. We show that the mass dependent picture provides a much more accurate and consistent description of the data.

  16. Validity of Parametrized Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUJi-Zhen; ZHOULi-Juan; MAWei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensively study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the “rainbow”approximation, a parametrized fully dressed quark propagator is proposed in this paper. The parametrized propagator describes a confining quark propagator in hadron since it is analytic everywhere in complex p2-plane and has no Lemmann representation. The validity of the new propagator is discussed by comparing its predictions on selfenergy functions A/(p2), Bl(p2) and effective mass M$(p2) of quark with flavor f to their corresponding theoretical results produced by Dyson-Schwinger equations. Our comparison shows that the parametrized quark propagator is a good approximation to the fully dressed quark propagator given by the solutions of Dyson-Schwinger equations in the rainbow approximation and is convenient to use in any theoretical calculations.

  17. Validity of Parametrized Quark Propagator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ji-Zhen; ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Based on an extensively study of the Dyson-Schwinger equations for a fully dressed quark propagator in the "rainbow" approximation, a parametrized fully dressed quark propagator is proposed in this paper. The parametrized propagator describes a confining quark propagator in hadron since it is analytic everywhere in complex p2-plane and has no Lemmann representation. The validity of the new propagator is discussed by comparing its predictions on selfenergy functions Af(p2), Bf(p2) and effective mass Mf(p2) of quark with flavor f to their corresponding theoretical results produced by Dyson-Schwinger equations. Our comparison shows that the parametrized quark propagator is a good approximation to the fully dressed quark propagator given by the solutions of Dyson-Schwinger equations in the rainbow approximation and is convenient to use in any theoretical calculations.

  18. String worldsheet for accelerating quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Semenoff, Gordon W.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the AdS bulk dual to an external massive quark in SYM following an arbitrary trajectory on Minkowski background. While a purely outgoing boundary condition on the gluonic field allows one to express the corresponding string worldsheet in a closed form, the setup has curious consequences. In particular, we argue that any quark whose trajectory on flat spacetime approaches that of a light ray in the remote past (as happens e.g. in the case of uniform acceleration) must necessarily be accompanied by an anti-quark. This is puzzling from the field theory standpoint, since one would expect that a sole quark following any timelike trajectory should be allowed. We explain the resolution in terms of boundary and initial conditions. We analyze the configuration in global AdS, which naturally suggests a modification to the boundary conditions allowing for a single accelerated quark without accompanying anti-quark. We contrast this resolution with earlier proposals.

  19. A Precision Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Kevin Matthew

    2005-05-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass using events recorded during a {approx} 230 pb{sup -1} exposure of the D0 detector to proton-anti-proton (p{bar p}) collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that the top quark will decay into a bottom quark and a W boson close to 100% of the time. The bottom quark will hadronize (bind with another quark) and produce a jet of hadronic particles. The W bosons can decay either into a charged lepton and a neutrino or a pair of quarks. this dissertation focuses on the top quark (t{bar t}) events in which one W decays hadronically and the other decays leptonically. Two methods of identifying t{bar t} events from the large number of events produced are used. The first is based on the unique topology of the final state particles of a heavy particle. By using the topological information of the event, the t{bar t} events can be efficiently extracted from the background. The second method relies on the identification of the remnants of the long lived bottom quarks that are expected to be produced in the decay of almost every top quark. Because the largest background processes do not contain bottom quarks, this is an extremely efficient way to select the events retaining about 60% of the t{bar t} events and removing almost 90% of the background. A kinematic fit to the top quark mass is performed on the t{bar t} candidate events using the final state particles that are seen in the detector. A likelihood technique is then used to extract the most likely value of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and signal fraction. The result for the topological selection is m{sub t} = 169.9 {+-} 5.8(statistical){sub -7.8}{sup +8.0}(systematic) GeV while the results on the sample selected from identification of a b quark in the event is m{sub t} = 170.6 {+-} 4.2(statistical){sub -6.8}{sup +6.3}(systematic) GeV.

  20. A Precision Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Kevin Matthew [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass using events recorded during a ~ 230 pb-1 exposure of the D0 detector to proton-anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that the top quark will decay into a bottom quark and a W boson close to 100% of the time. The bottom quark will hadronize (bind with another quark) and produce a jet of hadronic particles. The W bosons can decay either into a charged lepton and a neutrino or a pair of quarks. this dissertation focuses on the top quark (t$\\bar{t}$) events in which one W decays hadronically and the other decays leptonically. Two methods of identifying t$\\bar{t}$ events from the large number of events produced are used. The first is based on the unique topology of the final state particles of a heavy particle. By using the topological information of the event, the t$\\bar{t}$ events can be efficiently extracted from the background. The second method relies on the identification of the remnants of the long lived bottom quarks that are expected to be produced in the decay of almost every top quark. Because the largest background processes do not contain bottom quarks, this is an extremely efficient way to select the events retaining about 60% of the t$\\bar{t}$ events and removing almost 90% of the background. A kinematic fit to the top quark mass is performed on the t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events using the final state particles that are seen in the detector. A likelihood technique is then used to extract the most likely value of the top quark mass, mt, and signal fraction. The result for the topological selection is mt = 169.9 ± 5.8(statistical)$+8.0\\atop{-7.8}$(systematic) GeV while the results on the sample selected from identification of a b quark in the event is mt = 170.6 ± 4.2(statistical)$+6.3\\atop{-6.8}$(systematic) GeV.

  1. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  2. The Spectral Amplitude of Stellar Convection and its Scaling in the High-Rayleigh-Number Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Featherstone, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Convection plays a central role in the dynamics of any stellar interior, and yet its operation remains largely-hidden from direct observation. As a result, much of our understanding concerning stellar convection necessarily derives from theoretical and computational models. The Sun is, however, exceptional in that regard. The wealth of observational data afforded by its proximity provides a unique testbed for comparing convection models against observations. When such comparisons are carried out, surprising inconsistencies between those models and observations become apparent. Both photospheric and helioseismic measurements suggest that convection simulations may overestimate convective flow speeds on large spatial scales. Moreover, many solar convection simulations have difficulty reproducing the observed solar differential rotation due to this apparent overestimation. We present a series of 3-dimensional (3-D) stellar convection simulations designed to examine how the amplitude and spectral distribution of ...

  3. A light front quark-diquark model for the nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Tanmay

    2016-01-01

    We present a quark-diquark model for the nucleons where the light front wave functions are constructed from the soft-wall AdS/QCD prediction. The model is consistent with quark counting rule and Drell-Yan-West relation. The model reproduces the scale evolution of unpolarized PDF of proton for a wide range of energy scale. Helicity and transversity distributions for the proton predicted in this model agree with phenomenological fits. The axial and tensor charges are also shown to agree with the experimental data. The model can be used to evaluate distributions like GPDS, TMDs etc. and their scale evolutions.

  4. Excitation rates of heavy quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canal, C.A.G.; Santangelo, E.M.; Ducati, M.B.G.

    1985-06-01

    We obtain the production rates for c, b, and t quarks in deep-inelastic neutrino- (antineutrino-) nucleon interactions, in the standard six-quark model with left-handed couplings. The results are obtained with the most recent mixing parameters and we include a comparison between quark parametrizations. The excitations are calculated separately for each flavor, allowing the understanding of the role of threshold effects when considered through different rescaling variables.

  5. Quark matter or new particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  6. Quark matter or new particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  7. Static quark-antiquark potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, B.B.; Barik, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    A heavy-quark--antiquark potential is suggested which connects asymptotic freedom and quark confinement in a unified manner by formal methods of field theory using some plausible assumptions. The potential has only one additional adjustable parameter B which is proportional to (M/sub q//m/sub q/), where M/sub q/ and m/sub q/ are the constituent and current quark masses, respectively.

  8. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model. (LEW)

  9. Exotic Signals of Vectorlike Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A. [Fermilab; Yu, Felix [U. Mainz, PRISMA

    2016-12-06

    Vectorlike fermions are an important target for hadron collider searches. We show that the vectorlike quarks may predominantly decay via higher-dimensional operators into a quark plus a couple of other Standard Model fermions. Pair production of vectorlike quarks of charge 2/3 at the LHC would then lead to a variety of possible final states, including $t\\bar t + 4\\tau$, $t\\bar b\

  10. Reynolds number scaling of influence of boundary layers on the global behavior of laboratory quasi-Keplerian flows

    CERN Document Server

    Edlund, E M

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of quasi-Keplerian flows in a Taylor-Couette device that identify the boundary conditions required to generate near-ideal flows that exhibit self-similarity under scaling of the Reynolds number. These experiments are contrasted with alternate boundary configurations that result in flows that progressively deviate from ideal Couette rotation as the Reynolds number is increased. These behaviors are quantitatively explained in terms of the tendency to generate global Ekman circulation and the balance of angular momentum fluxes through the axial and radial boundary layers.

  11. New LUX result compensates LHC searches for exotic quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chuan-Ren

    2016-01-01

    The scenario of the compressed mass spectrum between heavy quark and dark matter is a challenge for LHC searches. However, the elastic scattering cross section between dark matter and nuclei in dark matter direct detection experiments can be enhanced with nearly degenerate masses between heavy quarks and dark matter. In this paper, we illustrate such scenario with a vector dark matter, using the latest result from LUX 2016. The mass constraints on heavy quarks can be more stringent than current limits from LHC, unless the coupling strength is very small. However, the compress mass spectrum with allowed tiny coupling strength makes the decay lifetime of heavy quarks longer than the time scale of QCD hadronization.

  12. Helicity probabilities for heavy quark fragmentation into excited mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, T C

    1995-01-01

    Abstract: In the fragmentation of a heavy quark into a heavy meson whose light degrees of freedom have angular momentum 3/2, all the helicity probabilities are completely determined in the heavy quark limit up to a single probability w_{3/2}. We point out that this probability depends on the longitudinal momentum fraction z of the meson and on its transverse momentum p_\\bot relative to the jet axis. We calculate w_{3/2} as a function of scaling variables corresponding to z and p_\\bot for the heavy quark limit of the perturbative QCD fragmentation functions for b quark to fragment into (b \\bar c) mesons. In this model, the light degrees of freedom prefer to have their angular momentum aligned transverse to, rather than along, the jet axis. Implications for the production of excited heavy mesons, like D^{**} and B^{**}, are discussed.

  13. Search for excited quarks in ep collisions at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Alimujiang, K. [DESY, Hamburg (DE)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    A search for excited quarks is performed using the full e{sup {+-}}p data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 475 pb{sup -1}. The electroweak decays of excited quarks q{sup *}{yields}q{gamma}, q{sup *}{yields}qZ and q{sup *}{yields}qW with subsequent hadronic or leptonic decays of the W and Z bosons are considered. No evidence for first generation excited quark production is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits on q{sup *} production cross sections and on the ratio f/{lambda} of the coupling to the compositeness scale are derived within gauge mediated models. These limits extend the excluded region compared to previous excited quark searches. (orig.)

  14. Quark mass functions and pion structure in Minkowski space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biernat, Elmer P. [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico; Gross, Franz L. [JLAB; Pena, Maria Teresa [CFTP, Institute Superior Tecnico; Stadler, Alfred [University of Evora

    2014-03-01

    We present a study of the dressed quark mass function and the pion structure in Minkowski space using the Covariant Spectator Theory (CST). The quark propagators are dressed with the same kernel that describes the interaction between different quarks. We use an interaction kernel in momentum space that is a relativistic generalization of the linear confining q-qbar potential and a constant potential shift that defines the energy scale. The confining interaction has a Lorentz scalar part that is not chirally invariant by itself but decouples from the equations in the chiral limit and therefore allows the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) mechanism to work. We adjust the parameters of our quark mass function calculated in Minkowski-space to agree with LQCD data obtained in Euclidean space. Results of a calculation of the pion electromagnetic form factor in the relativistic impulse approximation using the same mass function are presented and compared with experimental data.

  15. Model-based scaling and prediction of the streamwise energy intensity in high-Reynolds number turbulent channels

    CERN Document Server

    Moarref, Rashad; Tropp, Joel A; McKeon, Beverley J

    2013-01-01

    We study the Reynolds number scaling of a gain-based, low-rank approximation to turbulent channel flows, determined by the resolvent formulation of McKeon & Sharma (2010), in order to obtain a description of the streamwise turbulence intensity from direct consideration of the Navier-Stokes equations. Under this formulation, the velocity field is decomposed into propagating waves (with single streamwise and spanwise wavelengths and wave speed) whose wall-normal shapes are determined from the principal singular function of the corresponding resolvent operator. We establish that the resolvent formulation admits three classes of wave parameters that induce universal behavior with Reynolds number on the low-rank model, and which are consistent with scalings proposed throughout the wall turbulence literature. For the rank-1 model subject to broadband forcing, the integrated streamwise energy density takes a universal form which is consistent with the dominant near-wall turbulent motions. When the shape of the f...

  16. Investigation of the splitting of quark and gluon jets

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brown, R; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerruti, C; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Almagne, B; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Ghodbane, N; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neufeld, N; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Silvestre, R; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1998-01-01

    The splitting processes in identified quark and gluon jets are investigated using longitudinal and transverse observables. The jets are selected from symmetric three-jet events measured in Z decays L with the {\\sc Delphi} detector in 1991-1994. Gluon jets are identified using heavy quark anti-tagging. Scaling violations in identified gluon jets are observed for the first time. The scale energy dependence of the gluon fragmentation function is found to be about two times larger than for the corresponding quark jets, consistent with the QCD expectation $C_A/C_F$. The primary splitting of gluons and quarks into subjets agrees with fragmentation models and, for specific regions of the jet resolution $y$, with NLLA calculations. The maximum of the ratio of the primary subjet splittings in quark and gluon jets is $2.77\\pm0.11\\pm0.10$. Due to non-perturbative effects, the data are below the expectation at small $y$. The transition from the perturbative to the non-perturbative domain appears at smaller $y$ for quark ...

  17. PREFACE: Hot Quarks 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antinori, Federico; Bass, Steffen A.; Bellwied, Rene; Ullrich, Thomas; Velkovska, Julia; Wiedemann, Urs

    2005-04-01

    Why another conference devoted to ultra-relativistic heavy-ion physics? As we looked around the landscape of the existing international conferences and workshops, we realized that there was not a single one tailored to the people who are most directly involved with the actual research work: students, post-docs, and junior faculty/research scientists. Of course there are schools, but that was not what we had in mind. We wanted a meeting where young researchers could come together to discuss in depth the physics that they are working on without any hindrance. The major conferences have very limited time for discussions which is often shared amongst the most established. This leaves little room for young people to ask their questions and to get the detailed feedback which they deserve and which satisfies their curiosity. A discussion-driven workshop, centering on those without whom there will be no future—that seemed like what was needed. And thus the Hot Quarks workshop was born. The aim of Hot Quarks was to enhance the direct exchange of scientific information among the younger members of the community, from both experiment and theory. Participation was by invitation only in order to emphasize the contributions from junior researchers. This approach makes the workshop unique among the many forums in the field. For young scientists it represented an opportunity for exposure that they would not have had in one of the major conferences. The hope is that this meeting has helped to stimulate the next generation of scientists in our field and, at the same time, strengthened their sense of community. It all came together from 18 24 July 2004, when the 77 participants met at The Inn at Snakedance in the Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, USA, for the first Hot Quarks workshop. Photograph Participants gather in the sunshine at the foot of the Taos Ski Valley chairlift. By all accounts, Hot Quarks 2004 was a great success. Every participant had the opportunity to present her or

  18. Top Quark Current Experimental Status

    CERN Document Server

    Juste, A

    2006-01-01

    Ten years after its discovery at the Tevatron collider, we still know little about the top quark. Its large mass suggests it may play a key role in the mechanism of Electroweak Symmetry Breaking (EWSB), or open a window of sensitivity to new physics related to EWSB and preferentially coupled to it. To determine whether this is the case, precision measurements of top quark properties are necessary. The high statistics samples being collected by the Tevatron experiments during Run II start to incisively probe the top quark sector. This report summarizes the experimental status of the top quark, focusing in particular on the recent measurements from the Tevatron.

  19. Quark forces from hadronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2009-04-17

    We consider the implications of the most general two-body quark-quark interaction Hamiltonian for the spin-flavor structure of the negative parity L = 1 excited baryons. Assuming the most general two-body quark interaction Hamiltonian, we derive two correlations among the masses and mixing angles of these states, which constrain the mixing angles, and can be used to test for the presence of three-body quark interactions. We find that the pure gluon-exchange model is disfavored by data, independently of any assumptions about hadronic wave functions.

  20. Particle-number scaling of the phase sensitivity in realistic Bayesian twin-mode Heisenberg-limited interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pooser, R; Pfister, Olivier; Pooser, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the scaling of the phase sensitivity of a nonideal Heisenberg-limited interferometer with the particle number N, in the case of the Bayesian detection procedure proposed by Holland and Burnett [p.r.l. 71, p. 1355 (1993)] for twin boson input modes. Using Monte Carlo simulations for up to 10,000 bosons, we show that the phase error of a nonideal interferometer scales with the Heisenberg limit if the losses are of the order of N^-1. Greater losses degrade the scaling which is then in N^-1/2, like the shot-noise limit, yet the sensitivity stays sub-shot-noise as long as photon correlations are present. These results give the actual limits of Bayesian detection for twin-mode interferometry and prove that it is an experimentally feasible scheme, contrary to what is implied by the coincidence-detection analysis of Kim et al. [p.r.a. 60, p. 708 (1999)].

  1. Particle number scale invariant feature of the states around the critical point of the first order nuclear shape phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We study systematically the evolutive behaviors of some energy ratios,E2 transition rate ratios and isomer shift in the nuclear shape phase transitions.We find that the quantities sensitive to the phase transition and independent of free parameter(s) are approximately particle number N scale invariant around the critical point of the first order phase transition,similar to that in the second order phase transition.

  2. Particle number scale invariant feature of the states around the critical point of the first order nuclear shape phase transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu; HOU ZhanFeng; LIU YuXin

    2009-01-01

    We study systematically the evolutive behaviors of some energy ratios,E2 transition rate ratios and Isomer shift in the nuclear shape phase transitions.We find that the quantities sensitive to the phase transition and independent of free parameter(s) are approximately particle number N scale invariant around the critical point of the first order phase transition,similar to that in the second order phase transition.

  3. The golden mean, scale free extension of real number system, fuzzy sets and 1/f spectrum in physics and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, D P

    2003-01-01

    We show that the generic 1/f spectrum problem acquires a natural explanation in a class of scale free solutions to the ordinary differential equations. We prove the existence and uniqueness of this class of solutions and show how this leads to a nonstandard, fuzzy extension of the ordinary framework of calculus, and hence, that of the classical dynamics and quantum mechanics. The exceptional role of the golden mean irrational number is also explained.

  4. Cold quark matter in compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzon, B.; Fogaca, D. A.; Navarra, F. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Horvath, J. E. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    We used an equation of state for the cold quark matter to the study of properties of quark stars. We also discuss the absolute stability of quark matter and compute the mass-radius relation for self-bound stars.

  5. A scale-space method for detecting recurrent DNA copy number changes with analytical false discovery rate control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Ewald; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2013-05-01

    Tumor formation is partially driven by DNA copy number changes, which are typically measured using array comparative genomic hybridization, SNP arrays and DNA sequencing platforms. Many techniques are available for detecting recurring aberrations across multiple tumor samples, including CMAR, STAC, GISTIC and KC-SMART. GISTIC is widely used and detects both broad and focal (potentially overlapping) recurring events. However, GISTIC performs false discovery rate control on probes instead of events. Here we propose Analytical Multi-scale Identification of Recurrent Events, a multi-scale Gaussian smoothing approach, for the detection of both broad and focal (potentially overlapping) recurring copy number alterations. Importantly, false discovery rate control is performed analytically (no need for permutations) on events rather than probes. The method does not require segmentation or calling on the input dataset and therefore reduces the potential loss of information due to discretization. An important characteristic of the approach is that the error rate is controlled across all scales and that the algorithm outputs a single profile of significant events selected from the appropriate scales. We perform extensive simulations and showcase its utility on a glioblastoma SNP array dataset. Importantly, ADMIRE detects focal events that are missed by GISTIC, including two events involving known glioma tumor-suppressor genes: CDKN2C and NF1.

  6. A regular Strouhal number for large-scale instability in the far wake of a rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery; Naumov, Igor V.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    The flow behind a model of a wind turbine rotor is investigated experimentally in a water flume using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). The study performed involves a three-bladed wind turbine rotor designed using the optimization technique of Glauert (Aerodynam...... visualizations and a reconstruction of the flow field using LDA and PIV measurements it is found that the wake dynamics is associated with a precession (rotation) of the helical vortex core....... Theory, vol. IV, 1935, pp. 169–360). The wake properties are studied for different tip speed ratios and free stream speeds. The data for the various rotor regimes show the existence of a regular Strouhal number associated with the development of an instability in the far wake of the rotor. From...

  7. Quantum chromodynamics phase transition in the early Universe and quark nuggets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Bhattacharyya; Shibaji Banerjee; Sanjay K Ghosh; Sibaji Raha; Bikash Sinha; Hiroshi Toki

    2003-05-01

    A first-order quark hadron phase transition in the early Universe may lead to the formation of quark nuggets. The baryon number distribution of these quark nuggets have been calculated and it has been found that there are sizeable number of quark nuggets in the stable sector. The nuggets can clump and form bigger objects in the mass range of 0.0003$M_{\\odot}$ to 0.12$M_{\\odot}$. It has been discussed that these bigger objects can be possible candidates for cold dark matter.

  8. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  9. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  10. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  11. Reynolds number dependence of the drag coefficient for laminar flow through fine-scale photoetched screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hern, T. J.; Torczynski, J. R.

    1993-06-01

    The laminar steady flow downstream of fine-mesh screens is studied. Instead of woven-wire screens, high-uniformity screens are fabricated by photoetching holes into 50.8-micron-thick Inconel sheets. The resulting screens have minimum wire widths of 50.8 microns and inter-wire separations of 254 and 318 microns for the two screens examined. A flow facility has been constructed for experiments with these screens. Air is passed through the screens at upstream velocities yielding wire width Reynolds numbers from 2 to 35. To determine the drag coefficient, pressure drops across the screens are measured using pressure transducers and manometers. Three-dimensional flow simulations are also performed. The computational drag coefficients consistently overpredict the experimental values. However, the computational results exhibit sensitivity to the assumed wire cross section, indicating that detailed knowledge of the wire cross section is essential for unambiguous interpretation of experiments using photoetched screens. Standard semiempirical drag correlations for woven-wire screens do not predict the present experimental results with consistent accuracy.

  12. New Relativistic Atomic Mass Spectra of Quark (u, d and s) for Extended Modified Cornell Potential in Nano and Plank’s Scales

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmadjid Maireche

    2016-01-01

    A novel study for the exact solvability of relativistic quantum spectrum systems for extended Cornell potential is discussed used both Boopp’s shift method and standard perturbation theory in non-commutativity three dimensional real space (NC-3DS), furthermore the exact corrections for the spectrum of studied potential was depended on infinitesimal parameter  and a new discreet quantum numbers and we have also found the corresponding noncommutative Hamiltonian.

  13. Self-mass for Massive Quark

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Z; Huang, Zheng

    1993-01-01

    We study the behavior of the self-mass for a quark with a current mass larger than $\\Lambda_QCD$, as a function of its Euclidean momentum and mass, in QCD. An expression for the Bethe-Salpeter kernel of the Schwinger-Dyson (SD) equation valid in both the infrared and ultraviolet regions is obtained based on a renormalization group analysis. The resulting SD equation is solved numerically. It is found that the quark constituent mass at zero momentum is substantially enhanced due to its effective gauge interaction. The solution in the ultraviolet region agrees well with the known asymptotic solution. The self-mass scales exactly as the on-shell current mass at a fixed momentum.

  14. Instanton effects on the heavy-quark static potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhshiev, U. T.; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Turimov, B.; Musakhanov, M. M.; Hiyama, Emiko

    2017-08-01

    We investigate instanton effects on the heavy-quark potential, including its spin-dependent part, based on the instanton liquid model. Starting with the central potential derived from the instanton vacuum, we obtain the spin-dependent part of the heavy-quark potential. We discuss the results of the heavy-quark potential from the instanton vacuum. Finally, we solve the nonrelativistic two-body problem, associated with the heavy-quark potential from the instanton vacuum. The instanton effects on the quarkonia spectra are marginal but are required for quantitative description of the spectra. Supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Korea funded by the Korean government (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, MEST), Grant Numbers 2016R1D1A1B03935053 (UY) and 2015R1D1A1A01060707 (HChK) and The work was also partly Supported by RIKEN iTHES Project

  15. Resummation and matching of b-quark mass effects in b anti bH production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonvini, Marco [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Rudolf Peierls Center for Theoretical Physics; Papanastasiou, Andrew S.; Tackmann, Frank J. [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2015-11-15

    We use a systematic effective field theory setup to derive the b anti bH production cross section. Our result combines the merits of both fixed 4-flavor and 5-flavor schemes. It contains the full 4-flavor result, including the exact dependence on the b-quark mass, and improves it with a resummation of collinear logarithms of m{sub b}/m{sub H}. In the massless limit, it corresponds to a reorganized 5-flavor result. While we focus on b anti bH production, our method applies to generic heavy-quark initiated processes at hadron colliders. Our setup resembles the variable flavor number schemes known from heavy-flavor production in deep-inelastic scattering, but also differs in some key aspects. Most importantly, the effective b-quark PDF appears as part of the perturbative expansion of the final result where it effectively counts as an O(α{sub s}) object. The transition between the fixed-order (4-flavor) and resummation (5-flavor) regimes is governed by the low matching scale at which the b-quark is integrated out. Varying this scale provides a systematic way to assess the perturbative uncertainties associated with the resummation and matching procedure and reduces by going to higher orders. We discuss the practical implementation and present numerical results for the b anti bH production cross section at NLO+NLL. We also provide a comparison to the corresponding predictions in the fixed 4-flavor and 5-flavor results and the Santander matching prescription. Compared to the latter, we find a slightly reduced uncertainty and a larger central value, with its central value lying at the lower edge of our uncertainty band.

  16. Hyperquarks and generation number

    CERN Document Server

    Buchmann, Alfons J

    2013-01-01

    In a model in which quarks and leptons are built up from two spin 1/2 preons as fundamental entities, a new class of fermionic bound states (hyperquarks) arises. It turns out that these hyperquarks are necessary to fulfill the 't Hooft anomaly constraint, which then links the number of fermionic generations to the number of colors and hypercolors.

  17. More about unphysical zeroes in quark mass matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Emmanuel-Costa, David

    2016-01-01

    We look for all weak bases that lead to texture zeroes in the quark mass matrices and contain a minimal number of parameters in the framework of the standard model. Since there are ten physical observables, namely, six nonvanishing quark masses, three mixing angles and one CP phase, the maximum number of texture zeroes in both quark sectors is altogether nine. The nine zero entries can only be distributed between the up- and down-quark sectors in matrix pairs with six and three texture zeroes or five and four texture zeroes. In the weak basis where a quark mass matrix is nonsingular and has six zeroes in one sector, we find that there are 54 matrices with three zeroes in the other sector, obtainable through right-handed weak basis transformations. It is also found that all pairs composed of a nonsingular matrix with five zeroes and a nonsingular and nondecoupled matrix with four zeroes simply correspond to a weak basis choice. Without any further assumptions, none of these pairs of up- and down-quark mass mat...

  18. Cool Quark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2016-07-22

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative equation of state of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to O(g^{5}) in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated via a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft nonzero modes are resummed using the hard thermal loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  19. Cool quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative Equation of State of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to order g^5 in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated using a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft non-zero modes are resummed using the Hard Thermal Loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  20. Properties of the Top Quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Déliot, Frédéric [IRFU, Saclay; Hadley, Nicholas [Maryland U., College Park; Parke, Stephen [Fermilab; Schwarz, Tom [Michigan U.

    2014-10-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known elementary particle, and it is often seen as a window to search for new physics processes in particle physics. A large program to study the top-quark properties has been performed both at the Tevatron and LHC colliders by the D0, CDF, ATLAS and CMS experiments. The most recent results are discussed in this article.

  1. Heavy quark spectroscopy at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00165164

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of $3.0 fb^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions collected with the LHCb detector has yielded a broad range of results in spectroscopy of conventional and exotic hadrons with heavy quark(s) inside. We review the LHCb results which have been obtained over the last year.

  2. Wounded quarks at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Broniowski, Wojciech; Rybczynski, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    We review the results of the wounded quark model, with a stress on eccentricity observables in small systems. A new element is a presentation of symmetric cumulants for the elliptic and triangular flow correlations, obtained in the wounded-quark approach.

  3. Quantitative study of the violation of kperpendicular factorization in hadroproduction of quarks at collider energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hirotsugu; Gelis, François; Venugopalan, Raju

    2005-10-14

    We demonstrate the violation of kperpendicular factorization for quark production in high energy hadronic collisions. This violation is quantified in the color glass condensate framework and studied as a function of the quark mass, the quark transverse momentum, and the saturation scale Q(s), which is a measure of large parton densities. At x values where parton densities are large but leading twist shadowing effects are still small, violations of kperpendicularkfactorization can be significant--especially for lighter quarks. At very small x, where leading twist shadowing is large, we show that violations of kperpendicular factorization are relatively weaker.

  4. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  5. Direct measurement of the total decay width of the top quark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2013-11-15

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the full Tevatron run II data set of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the CDF II detector. The top quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson are reconstructed for each event and compared with distributions derived from simulated signal and background samples to extract the top quark width (Γtop) and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. For a top quark mass Mtop=172.5  GeV/c2, we find 1.10quark width to date.

  6. Development of a Watershed-Scale Long-Term Hydrologic Impact Assessment Model with the Asymptotic Curve Number Regression Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jichul Ryu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 52 asymptotic Curve Number (CN regression equations were developed for combinations of representative land covers and hydrologic soil groups. In addition, to overcome the limitations of the original Long-term Hydrologic Impact Assessment (L-THIA model when it is applied to larger watersheds, a watershed-scale L-THIA Asymptotic CN (ACN regression equation model (watershed-scale L-THIA ACN model was developed by integrating the asymptotic CN regressions and various modules for direct runoff/baseflow/channel routing. The watershed-scale L-THIA ACN model was applied to four watersheds in South Korea to evaluate the accuracy of its streamflow prediction. The coefficient of determination (R2 and Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE values for observed versus simulated streamflows over intervals of eight days were greater than 0.6 for all four of the watersheds. The watershed-scale L-THIA ACN model, including the asymptotic CN regression equation method, can simulate long-term streamflow sufficiently well with the ten parameters that have been added for the characterization of streamflow.

  7. Quark mass dependence of H-dibaryon

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The H-dibaryon is the exotic multiquark state with baryon number 2 and strangeness $-2$. The existence of the deeply bound H-dibaryon is excluded by the observation of the double hypernuclei. However the recent Lattice QCD simulations have found the bound state below the $\\Lambda\\Lambda$ threshold with large quark masses by HALQCD and NPLQCD collaborations. In this talk, the quark mass dependence of the H-dibaryon mass is discussed using the pionless effective field theory (EFT) where a bare H-dibaryon field is coupled with two-baryon states. We determine the parameters in this theory by fitting the recent Lattice QCD results in the SU(3) limit. As a result, we obtain the attractive scattering length at the physical point where the H-dibaryon is unbound.

  8. Quark-flavored scalar dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Datta, Alakabha; Dupuis, Grace; London, David

    2015-01-01

    It is an intriguing possibility that dark matter (DM) could have flavor quantum numbers like the quarks. We propose and investigate a class of UV-complete models of this kind, in which the dark matter is in a scalar triplet of an SU(3) flavor symmetry, and interacts with quarks via a colored flavor-singlet fermionic mediator. Such mediators could be discovered at the LHC if their masses are $\\sim 1$ TeV. We constrain the DM-mediator couplings using relic abundance, direct detection, and flavor-changing neutral-current considerations. We find that, for reasonable values of its couplings, scalar flavored DM can contribute significantly to the real and imaginary parts of the $B_s$-$\\bar B_s$ mixing amplitude. We further assess the potential for such models to explain the galactic center GeV gamma-ray excess.

  9. QCD Corrections to Higgs Pair Production in Bottom Quark Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Kao, Chung; /Fermilab /Oklahoma U.; Wang, Yili; Williams, Peter; /Oklahoma U.

    2006-10-01

    We present a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion (b{bar b} {yields} hh) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model. The NLO QCD corrections lead to less dependence on the renormalization scale ({mu}{sub R}) and the factorization scale ({mu}{sub F}) than the leading-order (LO) cross section, and they significantly increase the LO cross section. The rate for inclusive Higgs pair production is small in the Standard Model, but can be large in models with enhanced couplings of the b quark to the Higgs bosons.

  10. Heavy Quarks Production in Hadronic Processes: Qualitative Study of Higher-Order Fock States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Mebarki; K. Benhizia; Z. Belghobsi; D. Bouaziz

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of the two particles Fock states for the production of a heavy quark in proton-pion and photon-pion collisions is studied. It is shown that the effect depends strongly on the produced heavy quark mass, and the choice of the factorization scale.

  11. Enhanced breaking of heavy quark spin symmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Kun Guo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heavy quark spin symmetry is useful to make predictions on ratios of decay or production rates of systems involving heavy quarks. The breaking of spin symmetry is generally of the order of O(ΛQCD/mQ, with ΛQCD the scale of QCD and mQ the heavy quark mass. In this paper, we will show that a small S- and D-wave mixing in the wave function of the heavy quarkonium could induce a large breaking in the ratios of partial decay widths. As an example, we consider the decays of the ϒ(10860 into the χbJω (J=0,1,2, which were recently measured by the Belle Collaboration. These decays exhibit a huge breaking of the spin symmetry relation were the ϒ(10860 a pure 5S bottomonium state. We propose that this could be a consequence of a mixing of the S-wave and D-wave components in the ϒ(10860. Prediction on the ratio Γ(ϒ(10860→χb0ω/Γ(ϒ(10860→χb2ω is presented assuming that the decay of the D-wave component is dominated by the coupled-channel effects.

  12. Scalable electron correlation methods I.: PNO-LMP2 with linear scaling in the molecular size and near-inverse-linear scaling in the number of processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Hans-Joachim; Knizia, Gerald; Krause, Christine; Schwilk, Max; Dornbach, Mark

    2015-02-10

    We propose to construct electron correlation methods that are scalable in both molecule size and aggregated parallel computational power, in the sense that the total elapsed time of a calculation becomes nearly independent of the molecular size when the number of processors grows linearly with the molecular size. This is shown to be possible by exploiting a combination of local approximations and parallel algorithms. The concept is demonstrated with a linear scaling pair natural orbital local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (PNO-LMP2) method. In this method, both the wave function manifold and the integrals are transformed incrementally from projected atomic orbitals (PAOs) first to orbital-specific virtuals (OSVs) and finally to pair natural orbitals (PNOs), which allow for minimum domain sizes and fine-grained accuracy control using very few parameters. A parallel algorithm design is discussed, which is efficient for both small and large molecules, and numbers of processors, although true inverse-linear scaling with compute power is not yet reached in all cases. Initial applications to reactions involving large molecules reveal surprisingly large effects of dispersion energy contributions as well as large intramolecular basis set superposition errors in canonical MP2 calculations. In order to account for the dispersion effects, the usual selection of PNOs on the basis of natural occupation numbers turns out to be insufficient, and a new energy-based criterion is proposed. If explicitly correlated (F12) terms are included, fast convergence to the MP2 complete basis set (CBS) limit is achieved. For the studied reactions, the PNO-LMP2-F12 results deviate from the canonical MP2/CBS and MP2-F12 values by <1 kJ mol(-1), using triple-ζ (VTZ-F12) basis sets.

  13. Anatomy of double heavy-quark initiated processes

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Matthew; Ridolfi, Giovanni; Ubiali, Maria

    2016-01-01

    A number of phenomenologically relevant processes at hadron colliders, such as Higgs and Z boson production in association with b quarks, can be conveniently described as scattering of heavy quarks in the initial state. We present a detailed analysis of this class of processes, identifying the form of the leading initial-state collinear logarithms that allow the relation of calculations performed in different flavour schemes in a simple and reliable way. This procedure makes it possible to assess the size of the logarithmically enhanced terms and the effects of their resummation via heavy-quark parton distribution functions. As an application, we compare the production of (SM-like and heavy) scalar and vector bosons in association with b quarks at the LHC in the four- and five-flavour schemes as well as the production of a heavy Z' in association with top quarks at a future 100 TeV hadron collider in the five- and six-flavour schemes. We find that, in agreement with a previous analysis of single heavy-quark i...

  14. A new parametric equation of state and quark stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NA Xue-Sen; XU Ren-Xin

    2011-01-01

    It is still a matter of debate to understand the equation of state of cold matter with supra-nuclear density in compact stars because of unknown non-perturbative strong interaction between quarks. Nevertheless,it is speculated from an astrophysical view point that quark clusters could form in cold quark matter due to strong coupling at realistic baryon densities. Although it is hard to calculate this conjectured matter from first principles, one can expect that the inter-cluster interaction will share some general features with the nucleonnucleon interaction successfully depicted by various models. We adopt a two-Gaussian component soft-core potential with these general features and show that quark clusters can form stable simple cubic crystal structure if we assume that the wave function of quark clusters have a Gaussian form. With this parametrization, the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation is solved with reasonably constrained parameter space to give massradius relations of crystalline solid quark stars. With baryon number densities truncated at 2n0 at surface and the range of the interaction fixed at 2 fm we can reproduce similar mass-radius relations to that obtained with bag model equations of state. The maximum mass ranges from ~ 0.5M⊙ to>~ 3M⊙. The recently measured high pulsar mass (~>2M⊙) is then used to constrain the parameters of this simple interaction potential.

  15. Surface tension of highly magnetized degenerate quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lugones, G

    2016-01-01

    We study the surface tension of highly magnetized three flavor quark matter within the formalism of multiple reflection expansion (MRE). Quark matter is described as a mixture of free Fermi gases composed by quarks $u$, $d$, $s$ and electrons, in chemical equilibrium under weak interactions. Due to the presence of strong magnetic fields the particles' transverse motion is quantized into Landau levels, and the surface tension has a different value in the parallel and transverse directions with respect to the magnetic field. We calculate the transverse and longitudinal surface tension for different values of the magnetic field and for quark matter drops with different sizes, from a few fm to the bulk limit. For baryon number densities between $2-10$ times the nuclear saturation density, the surface tension falls in the range $2 - 20$ MeV /fm$^{2}$. The largest contribution comes from strange quarks which have a surface tension an order of magnitude larger than the one for $u$ or $d$ quarks and more than two ord...

  16. Consequences Of Fully Dressing Quark-Gluon Vertex Function With Two-Point Gluon Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H; Tandy, Peter C

    2007-01-01

    We extend recent studies of the effects of quark-gluon vertex dressing upon the solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator. A momentum delta function is used to represent the dominant infrared strength of the effective gluon propagator so that the resulting integral equations become algebraic. The quark-gluon vertex is constructed from the complete set of diagrams involving only 2-point gluon lines. The additional diagrams, including those with crossed gluon lines, are shown to make an important contribution to the DSE solutions for the quark propagator, because of their large color factors and the rapid growth in their number.

  17. Strange quark polarization of the nucleon: a parameter-independent prediction of the chiral potential model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X B; Chen, X S; Wang, F

    2001-07-02

    We perform a one-loop calculation of the strange quark polarization (Deltas) of the nucleon in an SU(3) chiral potential model. We find that if the intermediate quark excited states are summed over in a proper way, i.e., summed up to a given energy instead of given radial and orbital quantum numbers, Deltas turns out to be almost independent of all the model parameters: quark masses and potential strengths. The contribution from the quark-antiquark pair creation and annihilation " Z" diagrams is found to be significant. Our numerical results agree quite reasonably with experiments and lattice QCD calculations.

  18. Baryons in the unquenched quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R; Lopez-Ruiz, M A; Santopinto, E

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution, we present the unquenched quark model as an extension of the constituent quark model that includes the effects of sea quarks via a $^{3}P_{0}$ quark-antiquark pair-creation mechanism. Particular attention is paid to the spin and flavor content of the proton, magnetic moments and $\\beta$ decays of octet baryons.

  19. Evidence for production of single top quarks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abazov, V.M.; et al., [Unknown; de Jong, S.J.; Demarteau, M.; Houben, P.; van den Berg, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present first evidence for the production of single top quarks in the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p (p) over bar collider. The standard model predicts that the electroweak interaction can produce a top quark together with an antibottom quark or light quark, without the antiparticle top-q

  20. Top Quark Properties Measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Yazgan, Efe

    Recent top quark properties measurements made with the CMS detector at the LHC are presented. The measurements summarized include spin correlation of top quark pairs, asymmetries, top quark mass, and the underlying event in top quark pair events. The results are compared to the standard model predictions and new physics models.

  1. Top quark properties at ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Brock, Ian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Recent results from ATLAS and CMS connected to the properties of the top quark are presented. The talk concentrates on asymmetries connected with top-quark production and the measurement of spin correlations between the top quark and antiquark. A search for CP violation in top-quark-antiquark production is also discussed.

  2. Top quark properties measurements in CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazgan, E.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-07-01

    Recent top quark properties measurements made with the CMS detector at the LHC are presented. The measurements summarized include spin correlation of top quark pairs, asymmetries, top quark mass, and the underlying event in top quark pair events. The results are compared to the standard model predictions and new physics models.

  3. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]. Taking into account the constraints from [Formula: see text] processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours [Formula: see text], which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in [Formula: see text] decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the [Formula: see text] constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for [Formula: see text] with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of [Formula: see text]. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of indirect measurements and

  4. Quark flavour observables in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity after LHC Run 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) belongs to the simplest new physics scenarios with new sources of flavour and CP violation. The latter originate in the interactions of ordinary quarks and leptons with heavy mirror quarks and leptons that are mediated by new heavy gauge bosons. Also a heavy fermionic top partner is present in this model which communicates with the SM fermions by means of standard W^± and Z^0 gauge bosons. We present a new analysis of quark flavour observables in the LHT model in view of the oncoming flavour precision era. We use all available information on the CKM parameters, lattice QCD input and experimental data on quark flavour observables and corresponding theoretical calculations, taking into account new lower bounds on the symmetry breaking scale and the mirror quark masses from the LHC. We investigate by how much the branching ratios for a number of rare K and B decays are still allowed to depart from their SM values. This includes K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }, KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν }, K_L→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ X_sγ , B_{s,d}→ μ ^+μ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^-, B→ K^{(*)}ν bar{ν }, and \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon . Taking into account the constraints from Δ F=2 processes, significant departures from the SM predictions for K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν } and KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } are possible, while the effects in B decays are much smaller. In particular, the LHT model favours B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-) ≥ B(Bs→ μ ^+μ ^-)_SM, which is not supported by the data, and the present anomalies in B→ K^{(*)}ℓ ^+ℓ ^- decays cannot be explained in this model. With the recent lattice and large N input the imposition of the \\varepsilon '/\\varepsilon constraint implies a significant suppression of the branching ratio for KL→ π ^0ν bar{ν } with respect to its SM value while allowing only for small modifications of K^+→ π ^+ν bar{ν }. Finally, we investigate how the LHT physics could be distinguished from other models by means of

  5. Strangeness -2 and -3 Baryons in a Constituent Quark Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts

    2007-09-19

    We apply a quark model developed in earlier work to the spectrum of baryons with strangeness -2 and -3. The model describes a number of well-established baryons successfully, and application to cascade baryons allows the quantum numbers of some known states to be deduced.

  6. Large scale motions of multiple limit-cycle high Reynolds number annular and toroidal rotor/stator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridel-Bertomeu, Thibault; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Staffelbach, G.

    2017-06-01

    Rotating cavity flows are essential components of industrial applications but their dynamics are still not fully understood when it comes to the relation between the fluid organization and monitored pressure fluctuations. From computer hard-drives to turbo-pumps of space launchers, designed devices often produce flow oscillations that can either destroy the component prematurely or produce too much noise. In such a context, large scale dynamics of high Reynolds number rotor/stator cavities need better understanding especially at the flow limit-cycle or associated statistically stationary state. In particular, the influence of curvature as well as cavity aspect ratio on the large scale organization and flow stability at a fixed rotating disc Reynolds number is fundamental. To probe such flows, wall-resolved large eddy simulation is applied to two different rotor/stator cylindrical cavities and one annular cavity. Validation of the predictions proves the method to be suited and to capture the disc boundary layer patterns reported in the literature. It is then shown that in complement to these disc boundary layer analyses, at the limit-cycle the rotating flows exhibit characteristic patterns at mid-height in the homogeneous core pointing the importance of large scale features. Indeed, dynamic modal decomposition reveals that the entire flow dynamics are driven by only a handful of atomic modes whose combination links the oscillatory patterns observed in the boundary layers as well as in the core of the cavity. These fluctuations form macro-structures, born in the unstable stator boundary layer and extending through the homogeneous inviscid core to the rotating disc boundary layer, causing its instability under some conditions. More importantly, the macro-structures significantly differ depending on the configuration pointing the need for deeper understanding of the influence of geometrical parameters as well as operating conditions.

  7. Quark Virtuality and QCD Vacuum Condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; MA Wei-Xing

    2004-01-01

    @@ Based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) in the ‘rainbow' approximation, we investigate the quark virtuality in the vacuum state and quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) vacuum condensates. In particular, we calculate the local quark vacuum condensate and quark-gluon mixed condensates, and then the virtuality of quark. The calculated quark virtualities are λ2u,d = 0.7 GeV2 for u, d quarks, and 2s 1.6 GeV2 for s quark.Our theoretical predictions are consistent with empirical values used in QCD sum rules, and also fit to lattice QCD predictions.

  8. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  9. Top quark physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzione, A. [INFN Sezione di Pisa (Italy)

    1995-10-01

    Most of the material presented in this report, comes from contributions to the parallel session PL20 of this conference. We summarise the experimental results of direct production of Top quarks, coming from the CDF and C0 Collaborations at Fermilab, and compare these results to what one expects within current theoretical understanding. Particular attention is given to new results such as all hadronic modes of t{bar t} decay. As far as the mass is concerned, a comparison is made with precision measurements of related quantities, coming from LEP and other experiments. An attempt is made to look at the medium-term future and understand which variables and with what accuracy one can measure them with increased integrated luminosity.

  10. Melting Hadrons, Boiling Quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustrated. In the second part I discuss the corresponding theoretical ideas and show how experimental results can be used to describe the properties of QGP at hadronization. Finally in two appendices I present previously unpublished reports describing the early prediction of the different forms of hadron matter and of the formation of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions, including the initial prediction of strangeness and in particular strange antibaryon signature of QGP.

  11. Melting hadrons, boiling quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafelski, Johann [CERN-PH/TH, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); The University of Arizona, Department of Physics, Tucson, Arizona (United States)

    2015-09-15

    In the context of the Hagedorn temperature half-centenary I describe our understanding of the hot phases of hadronic matter both below and above the Hagedorn temperature. The first part of the review addresses many frequently posed questions about properties of hadronic matter in different phases, phase transition and the exploration of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The historical context of the discovery of QGP is shown and the role of strangeness and strange antibaryon signature of QGP illustrated. In the second part I discuss the corresponding theoretical ideas and show how experimental results can be used to describe the properties of QGP at hadronization. The material of this review is complemented by two early and unpublished reports containing the prediction of the different forms of hadron matter, and of the formation of QGP in relativistic heavy ion collisions, including the discussion of strangeness, and in particular strange antibaryon signature of QGP. (orig.)

  12. Decays of the b quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Edward H.; Poling, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0- overlineB0 mi xing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent.

  13. Semiclassical projection of hedgehog models with quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, T.D.; Broniowski, W.

    1986-12-01

    A simple semiclassical method is presented for calculating physical observables in states with good angular momentum and isospin for models whose mean-field solutions are hedgehogs. The method is applicable for theories which have both quark and meson degrees of freedom. The basic approach is to find slowly rotating solutions to the time-dependent mean-field equations. A nontrivial set of differential equations must be solved to find the quark configuration for these rotating hedgehogs. The parameters which specify the rotating solutions are treated as the collective degrees of freedom. They are requantized by imposing a set of commutation relations which ensures the correct algebra for the SU(2) x SU(2) group of angular momentum and isospin. Collective wave functions can then be found and with these wave functions all matrix elements can be calculated. The method is applied to a simple version of the chiral quark-meson model. A number of physical quantities such as magnetic moments, charge distributions, g/sub A/, g/sub ..pi..//sub N//sub N/, N-..delta.. mass splitting, properties of the N-..delta.. transition, etc., are calculated.

  14. Scale-setting, flavour dependence and chiral symmetry restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Binosi, Daniele; Rodriguez-Quintero, Jose

    2016-01-01

    We determine the flavour dependence of the renormalisation-group-invariant running interaction through judicious use of both unquenched Dyson-Schwinger equation and lattice results for QCD's gauge-sector two-point functions. An important step is the introduction of a physical scale setting procedure that enables a realistic expression of the effect of different numbers of active quark flavours on the interaction. Using this running interaction in concert with a well constrained class of dressed--gluon-quark vertices, we estimate the critical number of active lighter-quarks above which dynamical chiral symmetry breaking becomes impossible: $n_f^{\\rm cr}\\approx 9$; and hence in whose neighbourhood QCD is plausibly a conformal theory.

  15. Direct top-quark width measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-12-03

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt events produced in p p collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson that comes from the top-quark decay are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths (Γ(t)) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale (Δ(JES)) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where Δ(JES) is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of Γ(t) quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c(2), which are consistent with the standard model prediction.

  16. Sketching the pion's valence-quark generalised parton distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mezrag

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to learn effectively from measurements of generalised parton distributions (GPDs, it is desirable to compute them using a framework that can potentially connect empirical information with basic features of the Standard Model. We sketch an approach to such computations, based upon a rainbow-ladder (RL truncation of QCD's Dyson–Schwinger equations and exemplified via the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD, Hπv(x,ξ,t. Our analysis focuses primarily on ξ=0, although we also capitalise on the symmetry-preserving nature of the RL truncation by connecting Hπv(x,ξ=±1,t with the pion's valence-quark parton distribution amplitude. We explain that the impulse-approximation used hitherto to define the pion's valence dressed-quark GPD is generally invalid owing to omission of contributions from the gluons which bind dressed-quarks into the pion. A simple correction enables us to identify a practicable improvement to the approximation for Hπv(x,0,t, expressed as the Radon transform of a single amplitude. Therewith we obtain results for Hπv(x,0,t and the associated impact-parameter dependent distribution, qπv(x,|b→⊥|, which provide a qualitatively sound picture of the pion's dressed-quark structure at a hadronic scale. We evolve the distributions to a scale ζ=2 GeV, so as to facilitate comparisons in future with results from experiment or other nonperturbative methods.

  17. Holographic quark-gluon plasmas at finite quark density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigazzi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze), Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Cotrone, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino (Italy); Mas, J. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tarrio, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Universiteit Utrecht, 3584 CE, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mayerson, D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Gravity solutions holographically dual to strongly coupled quark-gluon plasmas with non-zero quark density are reviewed. They are motivated by the urgency of finding novel tools to explore the phase diagram of QCD-like theories at finite chemical potential. After presenting the solutions and their regime of validity, some of their physical properties are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Quark-anti-quark potential in N = 4 SYM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Nikolay; Levkovich-Maslyuk, Fedor

    2016-12-01

    We construct a closed system of equations describing the quark-anti-quark potential at any coupling in planar N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. It is based on the Quantum Spectral Curve method supplemented with a novel type of asymptotics. We present a high precision numerical solution reproducing the classical and one-loop string predictions very accurately. We also analytically compute the first 7 nontrivial orders of the weak coupling expansion.

  19. Heavy quarks and CP: Moriond 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The presentations at the Fifth Moriond Workshop on Heavy Quarks, Flavor Mixing, and CP Violation (La Plagne, France, January 13-19, 1985) are summarized. The following topics are reviewed. What's New (beyond the top, top quarks, bottom quarks, charm quarks, strange quarks, and others); why is all this being done (strong interactions and hadron structure, and electroweak properties); and what next (facilities and can one see CP violation in the B-anti B system). 64 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Structure of Nonlocal Vacuum Condensate of Quarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽娟; 马维兴

    2003-01-01

    The Dyson-Schwinger formalism is used to derive a fully dressed quark propagator. By use of the derived form of the quark propagator, the structure of non-local quark vacuum condensate is studied, and the values of local quark vacuum condensate as well as quark gluon mixed condensate are calculated. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the empirical one used commonly in the literature.

  1. Topological Charges, Prequarks and Presymmetry: a Topological Approach to Quark Fractional Charges

    CERN Document Server

    Matute, E A

    2004-01-01

    A topological approach to quark fractional charges, based on charge constraints unexplained by the Standard Model of particle physics, is discussed. Charge fractionalization is related to a tunneling process occurring in time between pure gauge field configurations at the far past and future associated with integer-charged bare quarks, named prequarks. This transition conforms to a topologically nontrivial configuration of the weak gauge fields in Euclidean space-time. In this context, an electroweak $Z_{2}$ symmetry between bare quarks and leptons, named presymmetry, is revealed. It is shown that an effective topological charge equal to the ratio between baryon number and the number of fermion generations may be associated with baryonic matter. The observed conservation of baryon number is then connected with the conservation of this charge on quarks. Similar results are obtained for leptons in the dual scenario with local quark charges.

  2. Multiplicity fluctuation and correlation of identified baryons in a quark combination model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Li, Hai-hong; Wang, Rui-qin; Shao, Feng-lan

    2017-01-01

    The dynamical multiplicity fluctuations and correlations of identified baryons and antibaryons produced by the hadronization of a bulk quark system are systematically studied in a quark combination model. Starting from the most basic dynamics of the quark combination which is necessary for multiplicity study, we analyze moments (variance, skewness, and kurtosis) of inclusive multiplicity distributions of identified baryons, two-baryon multiplicity correlations, and baryon-antibaryon multiplicity correlations after the hadronization of a quark system with given quark number and antiquark number. We obtain a series of interesting results, e.g., binomial behavior of multiplicity moments, coinciding flavor-dependent two-baryon correlation, and universal baryon-antibaryon correlation, which can be regarded as general features of the quark combination. We further take into account correlations and fluctuations of quark numbers before hadronization and study their influence on multiple production of baryons and antibaryons. We find that quark number fluctuations and flavor conservation lead to a series of important results such as the negative p Ω¯ + multiplicity correlation and universal two-baryon correlations. We also study the influence of resonance decays in order to compare our results with future experimental data in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass and ppbar -> ttbar Cross Section in the All-Hadronic Mode with the CDFII Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass and of the top-antitop pair production cross section using p{bar p} data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 fb{sup -1}. We select events with six or more jets satisfying a number of kinematical requirements imposed by means of a neural network algorithm. At least one of these jets must originate from a b quark, as identified by the reconstruction of a secondary vertex inside the jet. The mass measurement is based on a likelihood fit incorporating reconstructed mass distributions representative of signal and background, where the absolute jet energy scale (JES) is measured simultaneously with the top quark mass. The measurement yields a value of 174.8 {+-} 2.4(stat+JES){sub -1.0}{sup +1.2}(syst)GeV/c{sup 2}, where the uncertainty from the absolute jet energy scale is evaluated together with the statistical uncertainty. The procedure measures also the amount of signal from which we derive a cross section, {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.2 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.0(syst) {+-} 0.4(lum) pb, for the measured values of top quark mass and JES.

  4. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass and ppbar -> ttbar Cross Section in the All-Hadronic Mode with the CDFII Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-02-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass and of the top-antitop pair production cross section using p{bar p} data collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 fb{sup -1}. We select events with six or more jets satisfying a number of kinematical requirements imposed by means of a neural network algorithm. At least one of these jets must originate from a b quark, as identified by the reconstruction of a secondary vertex inside the jet. The mass measurement is based on a likelihood fit incorporating reconstructed mass distributions representative of signal and background, where the absolute jet energy scale (JES) is measured simultaneously with the top quark mass. The measurement yields a value of 174.8 {+-} 2.4(stat+JES){sub -1.0}{sup +1.2}(syst)GeV/c{sup 2}, where the uncertainty from the absolute jet energy scale is evaluated together with the statistical uncertainty. The procedure measures also the amount of signal from which we derive a cross section, {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} = 7.2 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.0(syst) {+-} 0.4(lum) pb, for the measured values of top quark mass and JES.

  5. High temperature quark localization by Polyakov loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacs, Tamas G; Bruckmann, Falk; Schierenberg, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    We study the low eigenmodes of the overlap and staggered Dirac operator at high temperature. We show that the recently found localized quark modes obeying Poisson statistics are connected to physical gauge field objects with their size and density scaling in the continuum limit. The localized modes are also strongly correlated with large fluctuations of the Polyakov loop. Based on that we construct a random matrix model of the low Dirac modes inspired by dimensional reduction. Our model reproduces the Poisson to random matrix transition seen in the lattice Dirac spectrum.

  6. Lab cooks up quark soup

    CERN Multimedia

    Dumé, Belle

    2003-01-01

    "Physicists working at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the US say that they have come closer than ever before to creating a quark-gluon plasma" (0.5 page)

  7. Observation of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alitti, J.; Álvarez, G.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Aronson, S. H.; Astur, R.; Avery, R. E.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Bendich, J.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Bischoff, A.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Borders, J.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Chevalier, L.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; de, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisenko, K.; Denisenko, N.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Dharmaratna, W.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Dixon, R.; Draper, P.; Drinkard, J.; Ducros, Y.; Dugad, S. R.; Durston-Johnson, S.; Edmunds, D.; Efimov, A. O.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahey, S.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Yu.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Franzini, P.; Fredriksen, S.; Fuess, S.; Galjaev, A. N.; Gallas, E.; Gao, C. S.; Gao, S.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glaubman, M.; Glebov, V.; Glenn, S.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gomez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Griffin, G.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Guryn, W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hatcher, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Igarashi, S.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johari, H.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnstad, H.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M.; Kernan, A.; Kerth, L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klochkov, B. I.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lanou, R. E.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li, Y. K.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Mandrichenko, I. V.; Mangeot, Ph.; Mani, S.; Mansoulié, B.; Mao, H. S.; Margulies, S.; Markeloff, R.; Markosky, L.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Marx, M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; Melanson, H. L.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Milder, A.; Milner, C.; Mincer, A.; de Miranda, J. M.; Mishra, C. S.; Mohammadi-Baarmand, M.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; Mudan, M.; Murphy, C.; Murphy, C. T.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neis, E.; Nemethy, P.; NešiĆ, D.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, C. H.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peryshkin, A.; Peters, M.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pluquet, A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Pušeljić, D.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rao, M. V.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rasmussen, L.; Read, A. L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Roldan, J. M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rusin, S.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schmid, D.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, A.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stocker, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Taketani, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Taylor, T. L.; Teiger, J.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Virador, P. R.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; von Goeler, E.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, J.; Wang, L. Z.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; Wenzel, W. A.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Wilcox, J.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Wolf, Z.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, Y. H.; Zhu, Q.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1995-04-01

    The D0 Collaboration reports on a search for the standard model top quark in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron with an integrated luminosity of approximately 50 pb-1. We have searched for tt¯ production in the dilepton and single-lepton decay channels with and without tagging of b-quark jets. We observed 17 events with an expected background of 3.8+/-0.6 events. The probability for an upward fluctuation of the background to produce the observed signal is 2×10-6 (equivalent to 4.6 standard deviations). The kinematic properties of the excess events are consistent with top quark decay. We conclude that we have observed the top quark and measured its mass to be 199+19-21 (stat) +/-22 (syst) GeV/c2 and its production cross section to be 6.4+/-2.2 pb.

  8. Solid Bare Strange Quark Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, R X

    2003-01-01

    The reason, we need three terms of `strange', `bare', and `solid' before quark stars, is presented concisely though some fundamental issues are not certain. Observations favoring these stars are introduced.

  9. Large-scale flow and Reynolds numbers in the presence of boiling in locally heated turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefnagels, Paul B. J.; Wei, Ping; Narezo Guzman, Daniela; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Guenter

    2017-07-01

    We report on an experimental study of the large-scale flow (LSF) and Reynolds numbers in turbulent convection in a cylindrical sample with height equal to its diameter and heated locally around the center of its bottom plate (locally heated convection). The sample size and shape are the same as those of Narezo Guzman et al. [D. Narezo Guzman et al., J. Fluid Mech. 787, 331 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.701; D. Narezo Guzman et al., J. Fluid Mech. 795, 60 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.178]. Measurements are made at a nearly constant Rayleigh number as a function of the mean temperature, both in the presence of controlled boiling (two-phase flow) and for the superheated fluid (one-phase flow). Superheat values Tb-To n up to about 11 K (Tb is the bottom-plate temperature and To n is the lowest Tb at which boiling is observed) are used. The LSF is less organized than it is in (uniformly heated) Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), where it takes the form of a single convection roll. Large-scale-flow-induced sinusoidal azimuthal temperature variations (like those found for RBC) could be detected only in the lower portion of the sample, indicating a less organized flow in the upper portions. Reynolds numbers are determined using the elliptic model (EM) of He and Zhang [G.-W. He and J.-B. Zhang, Phys. Rev. E 73, 055303(R) (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.055303]. We found that for our system the EM is applicable over a wide range of space and time displacements, as long as these displacements are within the inertial range of the temporal and spatial spectrum. At three locations in the sample the results show that the vertical mean-flow velocity component is reduced while the fluctuation velocity is enhanced by the bubbles of the two-phase flow. Enhancements of velocity fluctuations up to about 60% are found at the largest superheat values. Local temperature measurements within the sample reveal temperature oscillations that also used to determine a Reynolds number. These results are

  10. Stability of Quark Star Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, M.; Mardan, S. A.; Rehman, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the stability of quark stars with four different types of inner matter configurations; isotropic, charged isotropic, anisotropic and charged anisotropic by using the concept of cracking. For this purpose, we have applied local density perturbations technique to the hydrostatic equilibrium equation as well as on physical parameters involved in the model. We conclude that quark stars become potentially unstable when inner matter configuration is changed and electromagnetic field is applied.

  11. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation.

  12. The strange-quark distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, V. [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Teorica; Genovese, M. [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Teorica]|[European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland). Theory Div.; Nikolaev, N.N. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik]|[L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Predazzi, E. [Turin Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Teorica; Zakharov, B.G. [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    We discuss the latest CCFR determination of the strange sea density of the proton. We comment on the differences with a previous, leading-order, result and point out the relevance of quark mass effects and current non-conservation effects. By taking them into account it is possible to solve the residual discrepancy with another determination of the strange-quark distribution. Two important sources of uncertainties are also analysed. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  13. Deconfinement and virtual quark loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, T.; Engels, J.; Satz, H.

    1983-12-01

    We calculate paer Monte Carlo evaluation on an 83 × 3 lattice the energy density ɛG of the gluon sector of QCD, including virtual quark loops up to the fourth power in the hopping parameter expansion. For light quarks of one flavour, we observe at T/ΛL 95 +/- 10 a rapid variation of ɛG in T, accompanied by strong fluctuations from iteration to iteration. as clear signal of the deconfinement transition.

  14. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  15. Properties of the top quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, A. W. [Fermilab

    2014-09-24

    Recent measurements of top-quark properties at the LHC and the Tevatron are presented. Most recent measurements of the top quark mass have been carried out by CMS using $19.7/$fb of $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data including the study of the dependence on event kinematics. ATLAS uses the full Run I data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV for a "3D" measurement that significantly reduces systematic uncertainties. D0 employs the full Run II data using the matrix element method to measure the top quark mass with significantly reduced systematic uncertainties. Many different measurements of the top quark exist to date and the most precise ones per decay channel per experiment have been combined into the first world combination with a relative precision of 0.44%. Latest updates of measurements of production asymmetries include the measurement of the \\ttbar production asymmetry by D0 employing the full Run II data set, by CMS and ATLAS (including the polarization of the top quark) employing both the full data set at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV. CMS uses the full $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV data to measure the top quark polarization in single top production, the ratio ${\\cal R}$ of the branching fractions ${\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wb) / {\\cal B}(t \\rightarrow Wq)$ and to search for flavor changing neutral currents. The results from all these measurements agree well with their respective Standard Model expectation.

  16. Nonlinear Landau damping in quark-gluon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaofei, Zhang; Jiarong, Li

    1995-08-01

    The semiclassical kinetic equations for the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) are discussed by the multiple time-scale method. The mechanism of nonlinear Landau damping owing to non-Abelian and nonlinear wave-particle interactions in QGP is investigated, and the nonlinear Landau damping rate for the longitudinal color eigenwaves in the long-wavelength limit is calculated.

  17. Properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma: A lattice perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof

    2007-01-01

    We discuss results from lattice calculations for a few observables that are sensitive to different length scales in the high temperature phase of QCD and can give insight into its non-perturbative structure. We compare lattice results with perturbative calculations at high temperature obtained for vanishing and non-vanishing quark chemical potential.

  18. Measurement of Dijet Angular Distributions and Search for Quark Compositeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amidi, E.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bazizi, K.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M.; Fatyga, M. K.; Featherly, J.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goforth, M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Greenlee, H.; Grim, G.; Grinstein, S.; Grossman, N.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutnikov, Y. E.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klatchko, A.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Klyukhin, V. I.; Kochetkov, V. I.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovski, E. A.; Krane, J.; Kirshnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kunori, S.; Lami, S.; Lan, H.; Lander, R.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Q.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Nicola, M.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Pang, M.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roe, N. A.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sood, P. M.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoianova, D. A.; Stoker, D.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yanagisawa, C.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the dijet angular distribution in s = 1.8 TeV pp¯ collisions using the D0 detector. Order α3s QCD predictions are in good agreement with the data. At 95% confidence limit the data exclude models of quark compositeness in which the contact interaction scale is below 2 TeV.

  19. Heavy-Quark Associated Production with One Hard Photon at Hadron Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Heribertus Bayu [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We present the calculation of heavy-quark associated production with a hard photon at hadron colliders, namely $pp(p\\bar p) → Q\\bar Q +X$γ (for $Q=t,b$), at Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We study the impact of NLO QCD corrections on the total cross section and several differential distributions at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For $t\\bar t$γ production we observe a sizeable reduction of the renormalization and factorization scale dependence when the NLO QCD corrections are included, while for $b\\bar b$γ production a considerable scale dependence still persists at NLO in QCD. This is consistent with what emerges in similar processes involving $b$ quarks and vector bosons and we explain its origin in detail. For $b\\bar b$γ production we study both the case in which at least one $b$ jet and the case in which at least two $b$ jets are observed. We perform the $b\\bar b$γ calculation using the Four Flavor Number Scheme (4FNS) and compare the case where at least one $b$ jet is observed with the corresponding results from the Five Flavor Number Scheme (5FNS) calculation. Finally we compare our results for $p\\bar p →+b+X$γ with the Tevatron data.

  20. Modification of the large-scale features of high Reynolds number wall turbulence by passive surface obtrusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monty, J.P.; Lien, K.; Chong, M.S. [University of Melbourne, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Parkville, VIC (Australia); Allen, J.J. [New Mexico State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A high Reynolds number boundary-layer wind-tunnel facility at New Mexico State University was fitted with a regularly distributed braille surface. The surface was such that braille dots were closely packed in the streamwise direction and sparsely spaced in the spanwise direction. This novel surface had an unexpected influence on the flow: the energy of the very large-scale features of wall turbulence (approximately six-times the boundary-layer thickness in length) became significantly attenuated, even into the logarithmic region. To the author's knowledge, this is the first experimental study to report a modification of 'superstructures' in a rough-wall turbulent boundary layer. The result gives rise to the possibility that flow control through very small, passive surface roughness may be possible at high Reynolds numbers, without the prohibitive drag penalty anticipated heretofore. Evidence was also found for the uninhibited existence of the near-wall cycle, well known to smooth-wall-turbulence researchers, in the spanwise space between roughness elements. (orig.)

  1. The effect of varying the number of response alternatives in rating scales: experimental evidence from intra-individual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Kramp, Uwe; García-Forero, Carlos; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Coffman, Donna

    2009-05-01

    Despite a hundred years of questionnaire testing, no consensus has been reached on the optimal number of response alternatives in rating scales. Differences in prior research may have been due to the use of various psychometric models (classical test theory, item factor analysis, and item response theory) and different performance criteria (reliability, convergent/discriminant validity, and internal structure of the questionnaire). Furthermore, previous empirical studies on this issue have tackled the experimental design from a between-subjects perspective, thus ignoring intra-individual effects. In contrast with this approach, we propose a within-subjects experimental design and a comprehensive statistical methodology using structural equation models for studying all of these aspects simultaneously, therefore increasing statistical power. To illustrate the method, two personality questionnaires were examined using a repeated measures design. Results indicated that as the number of response alternatives increased, (1) internal consistency increased, (2) there was no effect on convergent validity, and (3) goodness of fit worsened. Finally, the article assesses the practical consequences of this research for the design of future personality questionnaires.

  2. Phase diagram and critical end point for strongly interacting quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Si-xue; Chang, Lei; Chen, Huan; Liu, Yu-xin; Roberts, Craig D

    2011-04-29

    We introduce a method based on chiral susceptibility, which enables one to draw a phase diagram in the chemical-potential-temperature plane for strongly interacting quarks whose interactions are described by any reasonable gap equation, even if the diagrammatic content of the quark-gluon vertex is unknown. We locate a critical end point at (μ(E),T(E))∼(1.0,0.9)T(c), where T(c) is the critical temperature for chiral-symmetry restoration at μ=0, and find that a domain of phase coexistence opens at the critical end point whose area increases as a confinement length scale grows.

  3. The quark-hadron phase transition and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1987-01-01

    After presenting the current view of the processes taking place during the cosmological transition from 'quark soup' to normal hadron matter, attention is given to what happens to cosmological nucleosynthesis in the presence of small-scale baryon inhomogeneities. The QCD phase transition is among the plausible sources of this inhomogeneity. It is concluded that the formation of primordial 'quark nuggets' and other cold exotica requires very low entropy regions at the outset, and that even the more modest nonlinearities perturbing nucleosynthesis probably require some ingredient in addition to a quiescent, mildly supercooled transition.

  4. Hadron Masses and Quark Condensate from Overlap Fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K. F.; Dong, S. J.; Lee, F. X.; Zhang, J. B.

    We present results on hadron masses and quark condensate from Neuberger's overlap fermion. The scaling and chiral properties and finite volume effects from this new Dirac operator are studied. We find that the generalized Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation is well satisfied down to the physical u and d quark mass range. We find that in the range of the lattice spacing we consider, the π and ϱ masses at a fixed mπ/ mϱ ratio have weak O( a2) dependence.

  5. The quark-hadron phase transition and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1987-01-01

    After presenting the current view of the processes taking place during the cosmological transition from 'quark soup' to normal hadron matter, attention is given to what happens to cosmological nucleosynthesis in the presence of small-scale baryon inhomogeneities. The QCD phase transition is among the plausible sources of this inhomogeneity. It is concluded that the formation of primordial 'quark nuggets' and other cold exotica requires very low entropy regions at the outset, and that even the more modest nonlinearities perturbing nucleosynthesis probably require some ingredient in addition to a quiescent, mildly supercooled transition.

  6. On the Renormalization of Heavy Quark Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Kilian, W

    1994-01-01

    The construction of heavy quark effective field theory (HqEFT) is extended to arbitrary order in both expansion parameters $\\alpha_s$ and $1/m_q$. Matching conditions are discussed for the general case, and it is verified that this approach correctly reproduces the infrared behaviour of full QCD. Choosing a renormalization scheme in the full theory fixes the renormalization scheme in the effective theory except for the scale of the heavy quark field. Explicit formulae are given for the effective Lagrangian, and one--loop matching renormalization constants are computed for the operators of order $1/m$. Finally, the multiparticle sector of HqEFT is considered.

  7. The quark-hadron phase transition and primordial nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    After presenting the current view of the processes taking place during the cosmological transition from 'quark soup' to normal hadron matter, attention is given to what happens to cosmological nucleosynthesis in the presence of small-scale baryon inhomogeneities. The QCD phase transition is among the plausible sources of this inhomogeneity. It is concluded that the formation of primordial 'quark nuggets' and other cold exotica requires very low entropy regions at the outset, and that even the more modest nonlinearities perturbing nucleosynthesis probably require some ingredient in addition to a quiescent, mildly supercooled transition.

  8. Towards thermodynamics of the quark quasi-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Molodtsov, S V

    2011-01-01

    Some features of hot and dense gas of quarks which are considered as the quasi-particles of the model Hamiltonian with four-fermion interaction are studied. Being adapted to the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model this approach allows us to accommodate a phase transition similar to the nuclear liquid-gas one at the proper scale and to argue an existence of the mixed phase of vacuum and normal baryonic matter as a plausible scenario of chiral symmetry (partial) restoration. Analyzing the transition layer between two phases we estimate the surface tension coefficient and discuss the possibility of quark droplet formation.

  9. Measurement of top quark properties at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Piedra Gomez, Jonatan

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of top quark properties in top quark decays are presented, using data collected by the CMS experiment during the years 2011 and 2012. The polarization of W bosons in top quark decays is measured. The W boson helicity fractions and angular asymmetries are extracted, and limits on anomalous contributions to the Wtb vertex are determined. Furthermore, searches for flavor changing neutral currents in top quark decays are presented. The flavor contents in top quark pair events are measured using the fraction of top quarks decaying into a W boson and a b quark relative to all top quark decays, $R=BR({\\rm t} \\to {\\rm Wb})/BR({\\rm t} \\to {\\rm Wq})$, and the result is used to determine the CKM matrix element $V_{\\rm tb}$ as well as the width of the top quark resonance.

  10. Precise measurement of the top quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, ee G; De, K; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, e A; Dong, H; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Geng, W; Gerber, e C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, o H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, e M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kura, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, cJ; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; vanden Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-01-01

    We measure the mass of the top quark using top quark pair candidate events in the lepton+jets channel from data corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We use a likelihood technique that reduces the jet energy scale uncertainty by combining an in-situ jet energy calibration with the independent constraint on the jet energy scale (JES) from the calibration derived using photon+jets and dijet samples. We find the mass of the top quark to be 171.5+-1.8(stat.+JES)+-1.1(syst.) GeV.

  11. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton + jets events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Jesus, A C S Assis; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Y Garzón, G J Otero; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-10-31

    We measure the mass of the top quark using top-quark pair candidate events in the lepton+jets channel from data corresponding to 1 fb;{-1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We use a likelihood technique that reduces the jet energy scale uncertainty by combining an in situ jet energy calibration with the independent constraint on the jet energy scale (JES) from the calibration derived using photon+jets and dijet samples. We find the mass of the top quark to be 171.5+/-1.8(stat.+JES)+/-1.1(syst.) GeV.

  12. The Ways of Four-Quark Hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Ten years after the discovery of the X(3872) we can assert that a number of exotic four-quark hadrons with hidden charm and beauty have been discovered, the most recent, Z(3900), found by BES in 2013, being among the top-striking ones. However, ten years have not been enough to dispel the controversy about their inner structure, with two body hadron molecules and compact multiquark states being the withstanding antipodal models. In this seminar I will review the status of the field, presenting both the experimental facts and the theoretical pictures attempting to interpret them.

  13. From hadron gas to quark matter, 1

    CERN Document Server

    Hagedorn, Rolf

    1981-01-01

    An analytical, non-perturbative description of a strongly interacting hadron gas is presented. Its main features are: the formulation is relativistically covariant, hadrons have finite extensions which are treated a la Van der Waals and their strong interactions are simulated by a hadronic mass spectrum generated by a bootstrap equation under the constraints of baryon number conservation. The system exhibits a singularity, which has the typical features of a phase transition gas to liquid, but which the authors interpret here as the transition into a quark-gluon plasma phase, which, however, cannot be described by this model. (16 refs).

  14. Eta --> 3 pi and quark masses

    CERN Document Server

    Lanz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the decay eta --> 3 pi has received considerable attention from experimental and theoretical side. It is of particular theoretical interest because it allows for the determination of (m_u - m_d). In addition, for many years now theory has had difficulties to understand the slope of the neutral channel Dalitz plot distribution, which in contrast is very well measured. I discuss here the relation of the decay to the masses of the light quarks and review a number of theoretical and experimental works that are concerned with these questions.

  15. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  16. Nucleating quark droplets in the core of magnetars

    CERN Document Server

    Kroff, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    To assess the possibility of homogeneous nucleation of quark matter in magnetars, we investigate the formation of chirally symmetric droplets in a cold and dense environment in the presence of an external magnetic field. As a framework, we use the one-loop effective potential of the two-flavor quark-meson model. Within the thin-wall approximation, we extract all relevant nucleation parameters and provide an estimate for the typical time scales for the chiral phase conversion in magnetized compact star matter. We show how the critical chemical potential, critical radius, correlation length and surface tension are affected, and how their combination to define the nucleation time seems to allow for nucleation of quark droplets in magnetar matter even for not so small values of the surface tension.

  17. Nucleating quark droplets in the core of magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroff, D.; Fraga, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the possibility of homogeneous nucleation of quark matter in magnetars, we investigate the formation of chirally symmetric droplets in a cold and dense environment in the presence of an external magnetic field. As a framework, we use the one-loop effective potential of the two-flavor quark-meson model. Within the thin-wall approximation, we extract all relevant nucleation parameters and provide an estimate for the typical time scales for the chiral phase conversion in magnetized compact star matter. We show how the critical chemical potential, critical radius, correlation length and surface tension are affected, and how their combination to define the nucleation time seems to allow for nucleation of quark droplets in magnetar matter even for not so small values of the surface tension.

  18. Nucleon form factors, generalized parton distributions and quark angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kroll, Peter [Bergische Univ., Wuppertal (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2013-02-15

    We extract the individual contributions from u and d quarks to the Dirac and Pauli form factors of the proton, after a critical examination of the available measurements of electromagnetic nucleon form factors. From this data we determine generalized parton distributions for valence quarks, assuming a particular form for their functional dependence. The result allows us to study various aspects of nucleon structure in the valence region. In particular, we evaluate Ji's sum rule and estimate the total angular momentum carried by valence quarks at the scale {mu}=2 GeV to be J{sup u}{sub v}=0.230{sup +0.009}{sub -0.024} and J{sup d}{sub v}=-0.004{sup +0.010}{sub -0.016}.

  19. Anomalous Viscosity of the Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, Juhee

    2013-01-01

    The shear viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma is predicted to be lower than the collisional viscosity for weak coupling. The estimated ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density is rather close to the ratio calculated by N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory for strong coupling, which indicates that the quark-gluon plasma might be strongly coupled. However, in presence of momentum anisotropy, the Weibel instability can arise and affect transport properties. Shear viscosity can be lowered by enhanced collisionality due to turbulence, but the decorrelation time and its relation to underlying dynamics and color-magnetic fields have not been calculated self-consistently. In this paper, we use resonance broadening theory for strong turbulence to calculate the anomalous viscosity of the quark-gluon plasma for nonequilibrium. For saturated Weibel instability, we estimate the scalings of the decorrelation rate and viscosity and compare these with collisional transport. This calculation yields an explicit connection betw...

  20. Vector-like quarks with a scalar triplet

    CERN Document Server

    Leskow, Estefania Coluccio; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We study a model independent extension to the Standard Model with an addi- tional real scalar triplet, {\\Sigma}, and a single vector-like quark, T . This class of models appear naturally in extensions of the Littlest Higgs model that incorporate dark matter without the need of T -parity. We assume that the triplet does not develop a vacuum expectation value and that all dimension five operators coupling the triplet to Standard Model fields and the vector-like quarks are parametrized by the scale {\\Lambda} at which we expect new physics to arise. We introduce new non-renormalizable interactions between the new scalar sector and fermion sector that allow mixing between the Standard Model third generation up-type quark and the vector-like quark in a way that leads to the cancellation of the leading quadratic divergences to the one-loop corrections to the mass of the Higgs boson. Within this framework, new de- cay modes of the vector-like quark to the real scalar triplet and SM particles arise and bring forth an ...

  1. Plane Symmetric Cosmological Model with Quark and Strange Quark Matter in ${f (R, T)}$ Theory of Gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. K. AGRAWAL; D. D. PAWAR

    2017-03-01

    We studied plane symmetric cosmological model in the presence of quark and strange quark matter with the help of ${f(R, T)}$ theory. To decipher solutions of plane symmetric space-time, we used power law relation between scale factor and deceleration parameter. We considered the special law of variation of Hubble’s parameter proposed by Berman (Nuovo Cimento B74, 182, 1983) which yields constant deceleration parameter. We also discussed the physical behavior of the solutions by using some physical parameters.

  2. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  3. Selected top quark mass measurements at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bouvier, Elvire

    2016-01-01

    Selected measurements of the top quark mass are presented, obtained from CMS data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV. ``Standard'' techniques are employed in each decay channel of top quark pair events and their results are combined. The mass of the top quark is also measured using several ``alternative'' methods, including measurements from shapes of top quark decay distributions in single top quark and top quark pair events as well as pole mass measurements.

  4. Propagators and Masses of Light Quarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Juan; ZHU Ji-Zhen; MA Wei-Xing

    2003-01-01

    Based on Dyson-Schwinger equations in "rainbow" approximation, fully dressed confining quark propagator is obtained, and then the masses of light quarks (mu, md, and ms) are derived from the fully dressed confining quark propagator. At the same time, the local and non-local quark vacuum condensates as well as the quark-gluon mixed condensate are also predicted. Furthermore, the quark masses are also deduced from the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation and chiral perturbative theory. The results from different methods are consistent with each other.

  5. Propagators and Masses of Light Quarks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOULi-Juan; ZHUJi-Zhen; MAWei-Xing

    2003-01-01

    Based on Dyson-Schwinger equations in “rainbow” approximation, fully dressed confining quark propagator is obtained, and then the masses of light quarks (mu, md, and ms) are derived from the fully dressed confining quark propagator. At the same time, the local and non-local quark vacuum condensates as well as the quark-gluon mixed condensate are also predicted. Furthermore, the quark masses are also deduced from the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner relation and chiral perturbative theory. The results from different methods are consistent with each other.

  6. Quarkonium states in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Yun

    2009-09-10

    In this work we study the properties of quarkonium states in a quark-gluon plasma which, due to expansion and non-zero viscosity, exhibits a local anisotropy in momentum space. We determine the hard-loop resummed gluon propagator in an anisotropic QCD plasma in general linear gauges and define a potential between heavy quarks from the Fourier transform of its static limit. This potential which arises due to one-gluon exchange describes the force between a quark and anti-quark at short distances. It is closer to the vacuum potential as compared to the isotropic Debye screened potential which indicates the reduced screening in an anisotropic QCD plasma. In addition, angular dependence appears in the potential; we find that there is stronger attraction on distance scales on the order of the inverse Debye mass for quark pairs aligned along the direction of anisotropy than for transverse alignment. The potential at long distances, however, is non-perturbative and modeled as a QCD string which is screened at the same scale as the Coulomb field. At asymptotic separation the potential energy is non-zero and inversely proportional to the temperature. With a phenomenological potential model which incorporates the different behaviors at short and long distances, we solve the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation. Our numerical results show that quarkonium binding is stronger at non-vanishing viscosity and expansion rate, and that the anisotropy leads to polarization of the P-wave states. Furthermore, we determine viscosity corrections to the imaginary part of the heavy-quark potential in the weak-coupling hard-loop approximation. The imaginary part is found to be smaller (in magnitude) than at vanishing viscosity. This implies a smaller decay width of quarkonium bound states in an anisotropic plasma. (orig.)

  7. On the effects of heavy sea quarks at low energies

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Mattia; Knechtli, Francesco; Leder, Bjoern; Sommer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We present a factorisation formula for the dependence of light hadron masses and low energy hadronic scales on the mass $M$ of a heavy quark: apart from an overall factor $Q$, ratios such as $r_0(M)/r_0(0)$ are computable in perturbation theory at large $M$. The mass-independent factor $Q$ is obtained from the theory in the limit $M\\to0$ and the decoupled theory with the heavy quark removed. The perturbation theory part is stable concerning different loop orders and our non-perturbative results match on quantitatively to the perturbative prediction. Upon taking ratios of different hadronic scales at the same mass, the perturbative function drops out and the ratios are given by the decoupled theory up to $M^{-2}$ corrections. Our present numerical results are obtained in a model calculation where there are no light quarks and a heavy doublet of quarks is decoupled. They are limited to masses a factor two below the charm. This is not large enough to see the $M^{-2}$ scaling predicted by the theory, but it is su...

  8. Sea quark transverse momentum distributions and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, Peter [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Strikman, Mark [Penn State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Weiss, Christian [JLAB Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have provided new insight into the intrinsic transverse momentum distributions of valence and sea quarks in the nucleon at a low scale. The valence quark transverse momentum distributions (q - qbar) are governed by the nucleon's inverse hadronic size R{sup -1} ~ 0.2 GeV and drop steeply at large p{sub T}. The sea quark distributions (qbar) are in large part generated by non-perturbative chiral-symmetry breaking interactions and extend up to the scale rho{sup -1} ~ 0.6 GeV. These findings have many implications for modeling the initial conditions of perturbative QCD evolution of TMD distributions (starting scale, shape of p{sub T}. distributions, coordinate-space correlation functions). The qualitative difference between valence and sea quark intrinsic p{sub T}. distributions could be observed experimentally, by comparing the transverse momentum distributions of selected hadrons in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, or those of dileptons produced in pp and pbar-p scattering.

  9. Light front quark-diquark model for the nucleons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Tanmay; Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2016-11-01

    We present a quark-diquark model for the nucleons where the light front wave functions are constructed from the soft-wall AdS/QCD prediction. The model is consistent with the quark counting rule and Drell-Yan-West relation. The scale evolution of unpolarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) of protons is simulated by making the parameters in the PDF scale dependent. The evolution of the PDFs are reproduced for a wide range of evolution scale. Helicity and transversity distributions for the proton predicted in this model agree with phenomenological fits. The axial and tensor charges are also shown to agree with the experimental data. The model can be used to evaluate distributions like generalized parton distributions, transverse momentum dependent distributions, etc., and their scale evolutions.

  10. Flavor Physics in the Quark Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonelli, Mario; /Frascati; Asner, David Mark; /Carleton U.; Bauer, Daniel Adams; /Imperial Coll., London; Becher, Thomas G.; /Fermilab; Beneke, M.; /Aachen, Tech. Hochsch.; Bevan, Adrian John; /Queen Mary, U. of London; Blanke, Monika; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Bloise, C.; /Frascati; Bona, Marcella; /CERN; Bondar, Alexander E.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Bozzi, Concezio; /INFN, Ferrara; Brod, Joachim; /Karlsruhe U.; Buras, Andrzej J.; /Munich, Tech. U.; Cabibbo, N.; /INFN, Rome /Rome U.; Carbone, A.; /INFN, Bologna; Cavoto, Gianluca; /INFN, Rome; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; /Los Alamos; Ciuchini, Marco; /INFN, Rome; Coleman, Jonathon P.; /SLAC; Cronin-Hennessy, Daniel P.; /Minnesota U.; Dalseno, J.P.; /KEK, Tsukuba /Glasgow U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Freiburg U. /Charles U. /Pisa U. /Vienna, OAW /Imperial Coll., London /Bergen U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Munich, Tech. U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Southampton U. /INFN, Rome /Nara Women' s U. /Florida U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Edinburgh U. /Warwick U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /KEK, Tsukuba /Bern U. /CERN /Munich, Tech. U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Wayne State U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /CERN /Frascati /Brookhaven /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Munich, Tech. U. /Siegen U. /Imperial Coll., London /Victoria U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Fermilab /Washington U., St. Louis /Frascati /Warwick U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Madras /Melbourne U. /Princeton U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome3 /Fermilab /SLAC /York U., Canada /Brookhaven /UC, Irvine /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Valencia U., IFIC /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Barcelona U. /Warwick U. /Tata Inst. /Frascati /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Vienna U. /KEK, Tsukuba /Orsay, LPT /Frascati /Munich, Tech. U. /Brookhaven /Bern U. /CERN /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Wayne State U. /Valencia U., IFIC /CERN /Kentucky U. /Oxford U. /Iowa State U. /Bristol U. /INFN, Rome /Rutherford /CERN /Orsay, LAL /Glasgow U. /INFN, Padua /Queen Mary, U. of London /Texas U. /LPHE, Lausanne /Fermilab /UC, Santa Cruz /Vienna, OAW /Cincinnati U. /Frascati /Orsay, LAL /Ohio State U. /Purdue U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /Frascati /INFN, Rome /Padua U. /INFN, Rome /Bern U. /Karlsruhe U. /Brookhaven /CERN /Paris U., VI-VII /Zurich, ETH /Pisa U. /Frascati /Oxford U. /Orsay, LAL /INFN, Rome2 /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome3 /Princeton U. /Fermilab /Queen' s U., Kingston /KEK, Tsukuba /Melbourne U. /Brookhaven /Indiana U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Pisa U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Karlsruhe U. /Oxford U. /Cambridge U., DAMTP /Edinburgh U. /CERN

    2010-08-26

    In the past decade, one of the major challenges of particle physics has been to gain an in-depth understanding of the role of quark flavor. In this time frame, measurements and the theoretical interpretation of their results have advanced tremendously. A much broader understanding of flavor particles has been achieved, apart from their masses and quantum numbers, there now exist detailed measurements of the characteristics of their interactions allowing stringent tests of Standard Model predictions. Among the most interesting phenomena of flavor physics is the violation of the CP symmetry that has been subtle and difficult to explore. In the past, observations of CP violation were confined to neutral K mesons, but since the early 1990s, a large number of CP-violating processes have been studied in detail in neutral B mesons. In parallel, measurements of the couplings of the heavy quarks and the dynamics for their decays in large samples of K,D, and B mesons have been greatly improved in accuracy and the results are being used as probes in the search for deviations from the Standard Model. In the near future, there will be a transition from the current to a new generation of experiments, thus a review of the status of quark flavor physics is timely. This report is the result of the work of the physicists attending the 5th CKM workshop, hosted by the University of Rome 'La Sapienza', September 9-13, 2008. It summarizes the results of the current generation of experiments that is about to be completed and it confronts these results with the theoretical understanding of the field which has greatly improved in the past decade.

  11. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  12. The QCD string with quarks; 1, spinless quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Dubin, A Yu; Simonov, Yu A

    1993-01-01

    Starting from the QCD Lagrangian we derive the effective action for massive quark and antiquark at large distances, corresponding to the minimal area low of the Wilson loop. The path integral method is used to quantize the system and the spectrum is obtained with asymptotically linear Regge trajectories. Two dynamical regimes distinguished by the string energy--momentum distribution are found: at large orbital excitations ($l\\gg 1$) the system behaves as a string and yields the Regge slope of $\\frac{1}{2 \\pi \\sigma}$, while at small $l$ one obtains a potential-like regime for relativistic or nonrelativistic system . The problem of relative time is clarified. It is shown that in the valence quark approximation one can reduce the initial four-dimensional dynamics to the three-dimensional one. The limiting case of a pure string (without quark kinetic terms) is studied and the spectrum of the straight-line string is obtained.

  13. Generalized Gauge U(1) Family Symmetry for Quarks and Leptons

    CERN Document Server

    Kownacki, Corey; Pollard, Nicholas; Zakeri, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    If the standard model of quarks and leptons is extended to include three singlet right-handed neutrinos, then the resulting fermion structure admits an infinite number of anomaly-free solutions with just one simple constraint. Well-known examples satisfying this constraint are $B-L$, $L_{\\mu}-L_{\\tau}$ , $B-3L_{\\tau}$ , etc. We derive this simple constraint, and discuss two new examples which offer some insights to the structure of mixing among quark and lepton families, together with their possible verification at the Large Hadron Collider.

  14. Generalized gauge U(1) family symmetry for quarks and leptons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kownacki, Corey; Ma, Ernest; Pollard, Nicholas; Zakeri, Mohammadreza

    2017-03-01

    If the standard model of quarks and leptons is extended to include three singlet right-handed neutrinos, then the resulting fermion structure admits an infinite number of anomaly-free solutions with just one simple constraint. Well-known examples satisfying this constraint are B- L, Lμ-Lτ, B- 3Lτ, etc. We derive this simple constraint, and discuss two new examples which offer some insights to the structure of mixing among quark and lepton families, together with their possible verification at the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Measurement of the charge asymmetry and the W boson helicity in top-antitop quark events with the CDF II experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschbuehl, Dominic [Univ. of Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-12-23

    In 1995 the heaviest elementary particle, top quark, was discovered at the Tevatron collider in top-antitop quark pair production. Since the top quark mass is of the same order as the electroweak symmetry breaking scale, measurements of the properties of the top quark like mass, charge, spin or the production mechanism, offer a good opportunity to test the Standard Model at such high energies. Top quarks at the Tevatron are predominantly pair-produced through light quark-antiquark annihilation. Higher order perturbative QCD calculations predict a sizeable asymmetry between the number of top quarks and antitop quarks produced in forward direction. This asymmetry is induced through radiative corrections. A measurement of the asymmetry can check the perturbative QCD predictions. Due to the high mass of the top quark, nearly the mass of a gold nucleus, the life time of the top quark is much shorter than the hadronization time-scale. This means that the top quark decays before it has a chance to form a bound state. The Standard Model predicts that the top quark decays in nearly 100% of the cases into a W boson and a b quark via a charge-current weak interaction. The measurement of the W boson helicity probes the V-A structure of the weak interaction and differences to the expectation would give evidence for new physics. Until the start of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Tevatron is the only experiment where top quarks can be directly produced and their properties be measured. The Tevatron reaches a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton antiproton collisions. The data used in this analysis were taken in Run II of the Tevatron with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in the years 2001-2004 and represent an integrated luminosity of 319 pb{sup -1}. The thesis is organized in the following way: In the first chapter a short overview of the Standard Model is given. The theoretical aspects of the top quark decay are described with particular emphasis on the

  16. Measurement of beauty quark mass at HERA and impact on Higgs production in association with beauty quarks at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizhko, Andrii

    2016-06-15

    Three different, but related topics are the subject of this thesis, performed in the context of the ZEUS and CMS groups at DESY. The first measurement of the MS beauty-quark mass m{sub b}(m{sub b}) at an electron-proton collider is presented. The measurement is based on a QCD analysis of beauty production cross sections in deep inelastic (DIS) ep scattering measured by ZEUS at HERA, together with inclusive DIS HERA data, using Next-to-Leading-Order QCD predictions. The measured value of the running beauty-quark mass in the MS scheme was found to be m{sub b}(m{sub b})=4.07±0.14 (fit){sup +0.01}{sub -0.07}(mod.){sup +0.05}{sub -0.00}(param.){sup +0.08}{sub -0.05}( theo.) GeV, which is in good agreement with the world average Particle Data Group value and previous measurements at electron-positron colliders. It is also found to be consistent with the expected running of m{sub b}(μ). A first measurement of the charm-quark mass m{sub c}(μ) running in the MS scheme is presented. The measurement is based on a QCD analysis of the published H1 and ZEUS combination of charm cross section measurements in DIS ep scattering at HERA, together with inclusive DIS HERA data, using Next-to-Leading-Order QCD predictions. The running charm-quark mass m{sub c}(μ) was measured at different scales μ and is presented in a charm-quark mass running plot with a comparison to the world average Particle Data Group m{sub c}(m{sub c}) evolved to higher scales. The running is found to be consistent with the expectations from QCD. The uncertainties of the theoretical predictions for Higgs production in association with beauty-quarks originating from the beauty-quark mass were studied and reduced for massive and massless QCD calculations. The beauty-quark mass measurement m{sub b}(m{sub b}) was used to decrease the variation of the beauty-quark mass to 0.17 GeV. It was shown that the uncertainty from the beauty-quark mass m{sub b}(m{sub b}) in the case of massive calculations for Hb anti b

  17. Instanton-dyon Ensembles III: Exotic Quark Flavors

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    "Exotic quarks" in the title refers to a modification of quark periodicity condition on the thermal circle by introduction of some phases -- known also as "flavor holonomies" -- different quark flavors. These phases provide a valuable tool, to be used for better understanding of deconfinement and chiral restoration phase transitions: by changing them one can dramatically modify both phase transitions. In the language of instanton constituents -- instanton-dyons or monopoles -- it has a very direct explanation: the interplay of flavor and color holonomies can switch topological zero modes between various dyon types. The model we will study in detail, the so called $Z_{N_c}$-symmetric QCD model with equal number of colors and flavors $N_c=N_f=2$ and special arrangement of flavor and color holonomies, ensure "most democratic" setting, in which each quark flavor and each dyon type are in one-to-one correspondence. The usual QCD has the opposite "most exclusive" arrangement: all quarks are antiperiodic and thus al...

  18. ND^(*) and NB^(*) interactions in a chiral quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Dan; Zhang, Dan

    2015-01-01

    ND and ND^* interactions become a hot topic after the observation of new charmed hadrons \\Sigma_c(2800) and \\Lambda_c(2940)^+. In this letter, we have preliminary investigated S-wave ND and ND^* interactions with possible quantum numbers in the chiral SU(3) quark model and the extended chiral SU(3) quark model by solving the resonating group method equation. The numerical results show that the interactions between N and D or N and D^* are both attractive, which are mainly from \\sigma exchanges between light quarks. Further bound-state studies indicate the attractions are strong enough to form ND or ND^* molecules, except for (ND)_{J=3/2} and (ND^*)_{J=3/2} in the chiral SU(3) quark model. In consequence ND system with J=1/2 and ND^* system with J=3/2 in the extended SU(3) quark model could correspond to the observed \\Sigma_c(2800) and \\Lambda_c(2940)^+, respectively. Naturally, the same method can be applied to research NB and NB^* interactions, and similar conclusions obtained, i.e. NB and NB^* attractive fo...

  19. Heavy quark effective theory computation of the mass of the bottom quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Morte, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Garron, N.; Sommer, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Papinutto, M. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Rome (Italy)

    2006-10-15

    We present a fully non-perturbative computation of the mass of the b-quark in the quenched approximation. Our strategy starts from the matching of HQET to QCD in a finite volume and finally relates the quark mass to the spin averaged mass of the B{sub s} meson in HQET. All steps include the terms of order {lambda}{sup 2}/m{sub b}. We discuss the computation and renormalization of correlation functions at order 1/m{sub b}. With the strange quark mass fixed from the Kaon mass and the QCD scale set through r{sub 0}=0.5 fm, we obtain a renormalization group invariant mass M{sub b}=6.758(86) GeV or anti m{sub b}(anti m{sub b})=4.347(48) GeV in the MS scheme. The uncertainty in the computed {lambda}{sup 2}/m{sub b} terms contributes little to the total error and {lambda}{sup 3}/m{sup 2}{sub b} terms are negligible. The strategy is promising for full QCD as well as for other B-physics observables. (orig.)

  20. Can mass-less QCD dynamically generate heavy quarks?

    CERN Document Server

    Cabo-Montes de Oca, Alejandro; Oca, Alejandro Cabo Montes de; Martinez-Pedrera, Danny

    2005-01-01

    As it was suggested by previous works on a modified perturbation expansion for QCD, the possibility for the generation of large quark condensates in the mass-less version of the theory is explored. For this purpose, it is firstly presented a way of well define the Feynman diagrams at any number of loops by just employing dimensional regularization. After that, the calculated zero and one loop corrections to the effective potential indicate a strong instability of the system under the generation of quark condensates. The also evaluated quark condensate dependence of particular two loop terms does not modify the instability picture arising at one loop. The results suggest a possible mechanism for a sort of Top Condensate Model to be a dynamically fixed effective action for mass-less QCD. The inability of lattice calculations in detecting this possibility could be related with the limitations in treating the fermion determinants.