WorldWideScience

Sample records for quantum transport calculations

  1. Efficient calculation of dissipative quantum transport properties in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greck, Peter

    2012-11-26

    We present a novel quantum transport method that follows the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework but side steps any self-consistent calculation of lesser self-energies by replacing them by a quasi-equilibrium expression. We termed this method the multi-scattering Buettiker-Probe (MSB) method. It generalizes the so-called Buettiker-Probe model but takes into account all relevant individual scattering mechanisms. It is orders of magnitude more efficient than a fully selfconsistent non-equilibrium Green's function calculation for realistic devices, yet accurately reproduces the results of the latter method as well as experimental data. This method is fairly easy to implement and opens the path towards realistic three-dimensional quantum transport calculations. In this work, we review the fundamentals of the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism for quantum transport calculations. Then, we introduce our novel MSB method after briefly reviewing the original Buettiker-Probe model. Finally, we compare the results of the MSB method to NEGF calculations as well as to experimental data. In particular, we calculate quantum transport properties of quantum cascade lasers in the terahertz (THz) and the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral domain. With a device optimization algorithm based upon the MSB method, we propose a novel THz quantum cascade laser design. It uses a two-well period with alternating barrier heights and complete carrier thermalization for the majority of the carriers within each period. We predict THz laser operation for temperatures up to 250 K implying a new temperature record.

  2. Efficient wave-function matching approach for quantum transport calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Hansen, Per Christian; Petersen, Dan Erik;

    2009-01-01

    The wave-function matching (WFM) technique has recently been developed for the calculation of electronic transport in quantum two-probe systems. In terms of efficiency it is comparable to the widely used Green's function approach. The WFM formalism presented so far requires the evaluation of all ...

  3. Using the Chebychev expansion in quantum transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Bogdan; Rahman, Hasan; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich, E-mail: u.kleinekathoefer@jacobs-university.de [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-04-21

    Irradiation by laser pulses and a fluctuating surrounding liquid environment can, for example, lead to time-dependent effects in the transport through molecular junctions. From the theoretical point of view, time-dependent theories of quantum transport are still challenging. In one of these existing transport theories, the energy-dependent coupling between molecule and leads is decomposed into Lorentzian functions. This trick has successfully been combined with quantum master approaches, hierarchical formalisms, and non-equilibrium Green’s functions. The drawback of this approach is, however, its serious limitation to certain forms of the molecule-lead coupling and to higher temperatures. Tian and Chen [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204114 (2012)] recently employed a Chebychev expansion to circumvent some of these latter problems. Here, we report on a similar approach also based on the Chebychev expansion but leading to a different set of coupled differential equations using the fact that a derivative of a zeroth-order Bessel function can again be given in terms of Bessel functions. Test calculations show the excellent numerical accuracy and stability of the presented formalism. The time span for which this Chebychev expansion scheme is valid without any restrictions on the form of the spectral density or temperature can be determined a priori.

  4. Using the Chebychev expansion in quantum transport calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Bogdan; Rahman, Hasan; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-04-21

    Irradiation by laser pulses and a fluctuating surrounding liquid environment can, for example, lead to time-dependent effects in the transport through molecular junctions. From the theoretical point of view, time-dependent theories of quantum transport are still challenging. In one of these existing transport theories, the energy-dependent coupling between molecule and leads is decomposed into Lorentzian functions. This trick has successfully been combined with quantum master approaches, hierarchical formalisms, and non-equilibrium Green's functions. The drawback of this approach is, however, its serious limitation to certain forms of the molecule-lead coupling and to higher temperatures. Tian and Chen [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204114 (2012)] recently employed a Chebychev expansion to circumvent some of these latter problems. Here, we report on a similar approach also based on the Chebychev expansion but leading to a different set of coupled differential equations using the fact that a derivative of a zeroth-order Bessel function can again be given in terms of Bessel functions. Test calculations show the excellent numerical accuracy and stability of the presented formalism. The time span for which this Chebychev expansion scheme is valid without any restrictions on the form of the spectral density or temperature can be determined a priori.

  5. Efficient method for the calculation of dissipative quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greck, Peter; Birner, Stefan; Huber, Bernhard; Vogl, Peter

    2015-03-09

    We present a novel and very efficient method for calculating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). It follows the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) framework but sidesteps the calculation of lesser self-energies by replacing them by a quasi-equilibrium expression. This method generalizes the phenomenological Büttiker probe model by taking into account individual scattering mechanisms. It is orders of magnitude more efficient than a fully self-consistent NEGF calculation for realistic devices. We apply this method to a new THz QCL design which works up to 250 K - according to our calculations.

  6. Efficient algorithms for large-scale quantum transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Sascha; Calderara, Mauro; Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost; Luisier, Mathieu

    2017-08-01

    Massively parallel algorithms are presented in this paper to reduce the computational burden associated with quantum transport simulations from first-principles. The power of modern hybrid computer architectures is harvested in order to determine the open boundary conditions that connect the simulation domain with its environment and to solve the resulting Schrödinger equation. While the former operation takes the form of an eigenvalue problem that is solved by a contour integration technique on the available central processing units (CPUs), the latter can be cast into a linear system of equations that is simultaneously processed by SplitSolve, a two-step algorithm, on general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). A significant decrease of the computational time by up to two orders of magnitude is obtained as compared to standard solution methods.

  7. Critical comparison of electrode models in density functional theory based quantum transport calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D; Palacios, J J

    2011-01-28

    We study the performance of two different electrode models in quantum transport calculations based on density functional theory: parametrized Bethe lattices and quasi-one-dimensional wires or nanowires. A detailed account of implementation details in both the cases is given. From the systematic study of nanocontacts made of representative metallic elements, we can conclude that the parametrized electrode models represent an excellent compromise between computational cost and electronic structure definition as long as the aim is to compare with experiments where the precise atomic structure of the electrodes is not relevant or defined with precision. The results obtained using parametrized Bethe lattices are essentially similar to the ones obtained with quasi-one-dimensional electrodes for large enough cross-sections of these, adding a natural smearing to the transmission curves that mimics the true nature of polycrystalline electrodes. The latter are more demanding from the computational point of view, but present the advantage of expanding the range of applicability of transport calculations to situations where the electrodes have a well-defined atomic structure, as is the case for carbon nanotubes, graphene nanoribbons, or semiconducting nanowires. All the analysis is done with the help of codes developed by the authors which can be found in the quantum transport toolbox ALACANT and are publicly available.

  8. An approximate framework for quantum transport calculation with model order reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Quan, E-mail: quanchen@eee.hku.hk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Li, Jun [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yam, Chiyung [Beijing Computational Science Research Center (China); Zhang, Yu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wong, Ngai [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Chen, Guanhua [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2015-04-01

    A new approximate computational framework is proposed for computing the non-equilibrium charge density in the context of the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method for quantum mechanical transport problems. The framework consists of a new formulation, called the X-formulation, for single-energy density calculation based on the solution of sparse linear systems, and a projection-based nonlinear model order reduction (MOR) approach to address the large number of energy points required for large applied biases. The advantages of the new methods are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  9. An Approximate Framework for Quantum Transport Calculation with Model Order Reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Quan; Yam, Chiyung; Zhang, Yu; Wong, Ngai; Chen, Guanhua

    2014-01-01

    A new approximate computational framework is proposed for computing the non-equilibrium charge density in the context of the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method for quantum mechanical transport problems. The framework consists of a new formulation, called the X-formulation, for single-energy density calculation based on the solution of sparse linear systems, and a projection-based nonlinear model order reduction (MOR) approach to address the large number of energy points required for large applied biases. The advantages of the new methods are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  10. Calculation of electrical transport properties and electron entanglement in inhomogeneous quantum wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Shokri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the spin-dependent transport properties and electron entanglement in a mesoscopic system, which consists of two semi-infinite leads (as source and drain separated by a typical quantum wire with a given potential. The properties studied include current-voltage characteristic, electrical conductivity, Fano factor and shot noise, and concurrence. The calculations are based on the transfer matrix method within the effective mass approximation. Using the Landauer formalism and transmission coefficient, the dependence of the considered quantities on type of potential well, length and width of potential well, energy of transmitted electron, temperature and the voltage have been theoretically studied. Also, the effect of the above-mentioned factors has been investigated in the nanostructure. The application of the present results may be useful in designing spintronice devices.

  11. QmeQ 1.0: An open-source Python package for calculations of transport through quantum dot devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiršanskas, Gediminas; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Karlström, Olov

    2017-01-01

    QmeQ is an open-source Python package for numerical modeling of transport through quantum dot devices with strong electron–electron interactions using various approximate master equation approaches. The package provides a framework for calculating stationary particle or energy currents driven...... by differences in chemical potentials or temperatures between the leads which are tunnel coupled to the quantum dots. The electronic structures of the quantum dots are described by their single-particle states and the Coulomb matrix elements between the states. When transport is treated perturbatively to lowest...

  12. Quantum Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-14

    Barbara , California, March 1993. I Carrier Dynamics in Quantum Wires Investigators: Wolfgang Porod I I Using the Monte Carlo technique, we have...8217.ubtle correlations between impunty scanenng events tin the "res;ence oft a ma.’neuc fle!dlp which are beyond Fermi’s Golden Rule. In this caper . we

  13. Large-scale quantum transport calculations for electronic devices with over ten thousand atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenchang; Lu, Yan; Xiao, Zhongcan; Hodak, Miro; Briggs, Emil; Bernholc, Jerry

    The non-equilibrium Green's function method (NEGF) has been implemented in our massively parallel DFT software, the real space multigrid (RMG) code suite. Our implementation employs multi-level parallelization strategies and fully utilizes both multi-core CPUs and GPU accelerators. Since the cost of the calculations increases dramatically with the number of orbitals, an optimal basis set is crucial for including a large number of atoms in the ``active device'' part of the simulations. In our implementation, the localized orbitals are separately optimized for each principal layer of the device region, in order to obtain an accurate and optimal basis set. As a large example, we calculated the transmission characteristics of a Si nanowire p-n junction. The nanowire is along (110) direction in order to minimize the number dangling bonds that are saturated by H atoms. Its diameter is 3 nm. The length of 24 nm is necessary because of the long-range screening length in Si. Our calculations clearly show the I-V characteristics of a diode, i.e., the current increases exponentially with forward bias and is near zero with backward bias. Other examples will also be presented, including three-terminal transistors and large sensor structures.

  14. Quantum Transport in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    SRS i 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum Transport in Semiconductors 5. FUNDING NUMBER söMtos-rizk-ooss 6. AUTHOR(S) D. K. Ferry ©fte ELECTE...OF ABSTRACT UL NSN 7540-01-280-5500 O 1 9 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Presented by ANSI Std «9-18 298-102 Final Report Quantum Transport in... Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices This final report describes a program of research investigating quantum effects which become important in

  15. Effectively calculable quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bolotin, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    According to mathematical constructivism, a mathematical object can exist only if there is a way to compute (or "construct") it; so, what is non-computable is non-constructive. In the example of the quantum model, whose Fock states are associated with Fibonacci numbers, this paper shows that the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics is non-constructive since it permits an undecidable (or effectively impossible) subset of Hilbert space. On the other hand, as it is argued in the paper, if...

  16. Vibration enhanced quantum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Semião, F L; Milburn, G J

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the role of a collective vibrational motion in the phenomenon of electronic energy transfer (EET) between chromophores with different electronic transition frequencies. Previous experimental work on EET in conjugated polymer samples has suggested that the common structural framework of the macromolecule introduce correlations in the energy gap fluctuations which cause coherent EET. We present a simple model describing the coupling between the chromophores and a common vibrational mode, and find that vibration can indeed lead to an enhancement in the transport of excitations across the quantum network. Furthermore, in our model phase information is partially retained in the transfer process from a donor to an acceptor, as experimentally demonstrated in the conjugated polymer system. Consequently, this mechanism of vibration enhanced quantum transport might find applications in quantum information transfer of qubit states or entanglement.

  17. Quantum transport through hierarchical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, S; Varghese, C; Novotny, M A

    2011-04-01

    The transport of quantum electrons through hierarchical lattices is of interest because such lattices have some properties of both regular lattices and random systems. We calculate the electron transmission as a function of energy in the tight-binding approximation for two related Hanoi networks. HN3 is a Hanoi network with every site having three bonds. HN5 has additional bonds added to HN3 to make the average number of bonds per site equal to five. We present a renormalization group approach to solve the matrix equation involved in this quantum transport calculation. We observe band gaps in HN3, while no such band gaps are observed in linear networks or in HN5. We provide a detailed scaling analysis near the edges of these band gaps.

  18. Symmetry and Quantum Transport on Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Salimi, S; Soltanzadeh, M M

    2011-01-01

    We study the classical and quantum transport processes on some finite networks and model them by continuous-time random walks (CTRW) and continuous-time quantum walks (CTQW), respectively. We calculate the classical and quantum transition probabilities between two nodes of the network. We numerically show that there is a high probability to find the walker at the initial node for CTQWs on the underlying networks due to the interference phenomenon, even for long times. To get global information (independent of the starting node) about the transport efficiency, we average the return probability over all nodes of the network. We apply the decay rate and the asymptotic value of the average of the return probability to evaluate the transport efficiency. Our numerical results prove that the existence of the symmetry in the underlying networks makes quantum transport less efficient than the classical one. In addition, we find that the increasing of the symmetry of these networks decreases the efficiency of quantum t...

  19. Noise-induced quantum transport

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Pulak Kumar; Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the problem of directed quantum transport induced by external exponentially correlated telegraphic noise. In addition to quantum nature of the heat bath, nonlinearity of the periodic system potential brings in quantum contribution. We observe that quantization, in general, enhances classical current at low temperature, while the differences become insignificant at higher temperature. Interplay of quantum diffusion and quantum correction to system potential is analyzed for various r...

  20. Fractal dynamics in chaotic quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotimäki, V; Räsänen, E; Hennig, H; Heller, E J

    2013-08-01

    Despite several experiments on chaotic quantum transport in two-dimensional systems such as semiconductor quantum dots, corresponding quantum simulations within a real-space model have been out of reach so far. Here we carry out quantum transport calculations in real space and real time for a two-dimensional stadium cavity that shows chaotic dynamics. By applying a large set of magnetic fields we obtain a complete picture of magnetoconductance that indicates fractal scaling. In the calculations of the fractality we use detrended fluctuation analysis-a widely used method in time-series analysis-and show its usefulness in the interpretation of the conductance curves. Comparison with a standard method to extract the fractal dimension leads to consistent results that in turn qualitatively agree with the previous experimental data.

  1. Quantum transport in graphene nanonetworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botello-Méndez, Andrés R; Cruz-Silva, Eduardo; Romo-Herrera, José M; López-Urías, Florentino; Terrones, Mauricio; Sumpter, Bobby G; Terrones, Humberto; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Meunier, Vincent

    2011-08-10

    The quantum transport properties of graphene nanoribbon networks are investigated using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory. Focusing on systems that can be experimentally realized with existing techniques, both in-plane conductance in interconnected graphene nanoribbons and tunneling conductance in out-of-plane nanoribbon intersections were studied. The characteristics of the ab initio electronic transport through in-plane nanoribbon cross-points is found to be in agreement with results obtained with semiempirical approaches. Both simulations confirm the possibility of designing graphene nanoribbon-based networks capable of guiding electrons along desired and predetermined paths. In addition, some of these intersections exhibit different transmission probability for spin up and spin down electrons, suggesting the possible applications of such networks as spin filters. Furthermore, the electron transport properties of out-of-plane nanoribbon cross-points of realistic sizes are described using a combination of first-principles and tight-binding approaches. The stacking angle between individual sheets is found to play a central role in dictating the electronic transmission probability within the networks.

  2. Thermoelectric transport through quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merker, Lukas Heinrich

    2016-06-30

    In this thesis the thermoelectric properties (electrical conductance, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductance)of quantum dots described by the Anderson impurity model have been investigated by using the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method. In order to make accurate calculations for thermoelectric properties of quantum impurity systems, a number of recent developments and refinements of the NRG have been implemented. These include the z-averaging and Campo discretization scheme, which enable the evaluation of physical quantities on an arbitrary temperature grid and at large discretization parameter Λ and the full density matrix (FDM) approach, which allows a more accurate calculation of spectral functions and transport coefficients. The implementation of the z-averaging and Campo discretization scheme has been tested within a new method for specific heats of quantum impurities. The accuracy of this new method was established by comparison with the numerical solution of the Bethe-ansatz equations for the Anderson model. The FDM approach was implemented and tested within a new approach to the calculation of impurity contributions to the uniform susceptibilities. Within this method a non-negligible contribution from the ''environmental'' degrees of freedom needs to be taken into account to recover the correct susceptibility, as shown by comparison with the Bethe-ansatz approach. An accurate method to calculate the conductance of a quantum dot is implemented, enabling the extraction of the Fermi liquid scaling coefficients c{sub T} and c{sub B} to high accuracy, being able to verify the results of the renormalized super perturbation theory approach (within its regime of validity). The method was generalized to higher order moments of the local level spectral function. This, as well as reduction of the SU(2) code to the U(1) symmetry, enabled the investigation of the effect of a magnetic field on the thermoelectric properties of quantum

  3. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, Tillmann Christoph

    2009-11-15

    several controversially discussed questions on the nature of transport in this type of nanodevices. In contrast to previous approximate approaches, we show that the nature of transport in QCLs is sensitive to the applied bias voltage and can be tuned from the coherent to the incoherent regime. We point out that the elastic scattering at rough interfaces is among the most efficient incoherent scattering mechanisms in THz-QCLs and significantly influences the laser performance. Up to now, this has been utterly underestimated in approximate studies of THz-QCLs with direct optical transitions. All current theoretical models apply periodic (or field-periodic) boundary conditions on the transport in QCLs. Our revision of the open boundary conditions allows us to consider the QCL as an open quantum devices, instead. In this way, we illustrate that charge distributions in QCLs can develop periodicities that are only commensurable or even incommensurable with the QCL periodicity. This effect leads to efficient non-radiative transitions between the laser levels and is - due to the common periodic boundary conditions - completely missed in literature. We also propose several novel THz-QCLs with larger optical gain, lower thermal load and a higher resistivity against growth imperfections. The third part of this thesis is dedicated to the spin transport in two-dimensional semicon- ductor heterostructures. It is common to apply an approximate envelope function model (EFT) for the spin-orbit interaction in such devices, in spite of the well-known fact that EFT calculations typically incorrectly predict the spin-splitting in semiconductor heterostructures. For this reason, we represent the NEGF method in the EFT model as well as in a microscopic atomistic tight binding model. In the later model, the spin-orbit interaction is treated nonperturbatively going far beyond the approximate EFT model. We show that the numerically efficient EFT model yields results that qualitatively agree with

  4. Efficient self-consistent quantum transport simulator for quantum devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, X., E-mail: xngao@sandia.gov; Mamaluy, D.; Nielsen, E.; Young, R. W.; Lilly, M. P.; Bishop, N. C.; Carroll, M. S.; Muller, R. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Shirkhorshidian, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, 1515 Eubank SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    We present a self-consistent one-dimensional (1D) quantum transport simulator based on the Contact Block Reduction (CBR) method, aiming for very fast and robust transport simulation of 1D quantum devices. Applying the general CBR approach to 1D open systems results in a set of very simple equations that are derived and given in detail for the first time. The charge self-consistency of the coupled CBR-Poisson equations is achieved by using the predictor-corrector iteration scheme with the optional Anderson acceleration. In addition, we introduce a new way to convert an equilibrium electrostatic barrier potential calculated from an external simulator to an effective doping profile, which is then used by the CBR-Poisson code for transport simulation of the barrier under non-zero biases. The code has been applied to simulate the quantum transport in a double barrier structure and across a tunnel barrier in a silicon double quantum dot. Extremely fast self-consistent 1D simulations of the differential conductance across a tunnel barrier in the quantum dot show better qualitative agreement with experiment than non-self-consistent simulations.

  5. Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-30

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS " Quantum Transport in Semiconductor Devices" 6. AUTHOR(S) ,DftftLo3-91-6-oo 7 David K. Ferry 7. PERFORMING...OF ABSTRACT UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL NZIN 1540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev 2-89) PrinCrlt>• oy ANSI SIC Z39-18 QUANTUM ... TRANSPORT IN SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Final Report on DAAL03-91-G-0067 (28461-EL) David K. Ferry, Principal Investigator Department of Electrical Engineering

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Pieper, Steven C

    2007-01-01

    During the last 15 years, there has been much progress in defining the nuclear Hamiltonian and applying quantum Monte Carlo methods to the calculation of light nuclei. I describe both aspects of this work and some recent results.

  7. Quantum transport with two interacting conduction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Alexander J; Migliore, Agostino; Galperin, Michael; Nitzan, Abraham

    2013-05-07

    The transport properties of a conduction junction model characterized by two mutually coupled channels that strongly differ in their couplings to the leads are investigated. Models of this type describe molecular redox junctions (where a level that is weakly coupled to the leads controls the molecular charge, while a strongly coupled one dominates the molecular conduction), and electron counting devices in which the current in a point contact is sensitive to the charging state of a nearby quantum dot. Here we consider the case where transport in the strongly coupled channel has to be described quantum mechanically (covering the full range between sequential tunneling and co-tunneling), while conduction through the weakly coupled channel is a sequential process that could by itself be described by a simple master equation. We compare the result of a full quantum calculation based on the pseudoparticle non-equilibrium Green function method to that obtained from an approximate mixed quantum-classical calculation, where correlations between the channels are taken into account through either the averaged rates or the averaged energy. We find, for the steady state current, that the approximation based on the averaged rates works well in most of the voltage regime, with marked deviations from the full quantum results only at the threshold for charging the weekly coupled level. These deviations are important for accurate description of the negative differential conduction behavior that often characterizes redox molecular junctions in the neighborhood of this threshold.

  8. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.;

    2015-01-01

    by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, we also state clearly open questions for the field. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both...... and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and from valley freedom. We focus on the interplay between the two....... In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  9. Nonequilibrium electron transport through quantum dots in the Kondo regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wölfle, Peter; Paaske, Jens; Rosch, Achim

    2005-01-01

    Electron transport at large bias voltage through quantum dots in the Kondo regime is described within the perturbative renormalization group extended to nonequilibrium. The conductance, local magnetization, dynamical spin susceptibility and local spectral function are calculated. We show how the ...

  10. Quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubis, Tillmann Christoph

    2009-11-15

    several controversially discussed questions on the nature of transport in this type of nanodevices. In contrast to previous approximate approaches, we show that the nature of transport in QCLs is sensitive to the applied bias voltage and can be tuned from the coherent to the incoherent regime. We point out that the elastic scattering at rough interfaces is among the most efficient incoherent scattering mechanisms in THz-QCLs and significantly influences the laser performance. Up to now, this has been utterly underestimated in approximate studies of THz-QCLs with direct optical transitions. All current theoretical models apply periodic (or field-periodic) boundary conditions on the transport in QCLs. Our revision of the open boundary conditions allows us to consider the QCL as an open quantum devices, instead. In this way, we illustrate that charge distributions in QCLs can develop periodicities that are only commensurable or even incommensurable with the QCL periodicity. This effect leads to efficient non-radiative transitions between the laser levels and is - due to the common periodic boundary conditions - completely missed in literature. We also propose several novel THz-QCLs with larger optical gain, lower thermal load and a higher resistivity against growth imperfections. The third part of this thesis is dedicated to the spin transport in two-dimensional semicon- ductor heterostructures. It is common to apply an approximate envelope function model (EFT) for the spin-orbit interaction in such devices, in spite of the well-known fact that EFT calculations typically incorrectly predict the spin-splitting in semiconductor heterostructures. For this reason, we represent the NEGF method in the EFT model as well as in a microscopic atomistic tight binding model. In the later model, the spin-orbit interaction is treated nonperturbatively going far beyond the approximate EFT model. We show that the numerically efficient EFT model yields results that qualitatively agree with

  11. Quantum thermal transport in stanene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hangbo; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2016-07-01

    By way of the nonequilibrium Green's function simulations and analytical expressions, the quantum thermal conductance of stanene is studied. We find that, due to the existence of Dirac fermion in stanene, the ratio of electron thermal conductance and electric conductance becomes a chemical-potential-dependent quantity, violating the Wiedemann-Franz law. This finding is applicable to any two-dimensional (2D) materials that possess massless Dirac fermions. In strong contrast to the negligible electronic contribution in graphene, surprisingly, the electrons and phonons in stanene carry a comparable heat current. The unusual behaviors in stanene widen our knowledge of quantum thermal transport in 2D materials.

  12. Self-consistent calculation of transport properties in Si {delta}-doped GaAs quantum wells as a function of the temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaggero-Sager, L.M. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, MOR. (Mexico); Naumis, G.G., E-mail: naumis@fisica.unam.m [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, MOR. (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica-Quimica, Instituto de Fisica, UNAM. Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Munoz-Hernandez, M.A.; Montiel-Palma, V. [Centro de Investigaciones Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, 62209 Cuernavaca, MOR. (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The electronic structure of a delta-doped quantum well of Si in GaAs is studied at different temperatures. The calculation is carried out self-consistently in the framework of the Hartree approximation. The energy levels and the mobility trends are reported for various impurity densities. As a consequence, the temperature dependence of the mobility can be explained by means of the temperature variation of the electronic structure. The calculated ratios between mobilities at 300 and 77 K, at different impurity densities, are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. These results can also be extrapolated to other similar systems like B, GaN, InSb, InAs and GaAs.

  13. Quantum transport and electroweak baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2013-02-15

    We review the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis. The main focus of the review lies on the development of quantum transport equations from first principles in the Kadanoff-Baym framework. We emphasize the importance of the semi-classical force that leads to reliable predictions in most cases. Besides, we discuss the status of electroweak baryogenesis in the light of recent electric dipole moment probes and collider experiments in a variety of models.

  14. Quantum Transport and Electroweak Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Konstandin, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We review the mechanism of electroweak baryogenesis. The main focus of the review lies on the development of quantum transport equations from first principles in the Kadanoff-Baym framework. We emphasize the importance of the semi-classical force that leads to reliable predictions in most cases. Besides, we discuss the status of electroweak baryogenesis in the light of recent electric dipole moment probes and collider experiments in a variety of models.

  15. Relaxation Method For Calculating Quantum Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Tucci, R R

    2001-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed how entanglement of formation can be defined as a minimum of the quantum conditional mutual information (a.k.a. quantum conditional information transmission). In classical information theory, the Arimoto-Blahut method is one of the preferred methods for calculating extrema of mutual information. We present a new method akin to the Arimoto-Blahut method for calculating entanglement of formation. We also present several examples computed with a computer program called Causa Comun that implements the ideas of this paper.

  16. Quantum Pumping and Adiabatic Transport in Nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, G.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a theoretical exploration of quantum transport phenomena and quantum dynamics in nanostructures. Specifically, we investigate adiabatic quantum pumping of charge in several novel types of nanostructures involving open quantum dots or graphene. For a bilayer of graphene we fin

  17. Two-time quantum transport and quantum diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, P

    2009-05-01

    Based on the nonequilibrium Green's function technique, a unified theory is developed that covers quantum transport and quantum diffusion in bulk semiconductors on the same footing. This approach, which is applicable to transport via extended and localized states, extends previous semiphenomenological studies and puts them on a firm microscopic basis. The approach is sufficiently general and applies not only to well-studied quantum-transport problems, but also to models, in which the Hamiltonian does not commute with the dipole operator. It is shown that even for the unified treatment of quantum transport and quantum diffusion in homogeneous systems, all quasimomenta of the carrier distribution function are present and fulfill their specific function. Particular emphasis is put on the double-time nature of quantum kinetics. To demonstrate the existence of robust macroscopic transport effects that have a true double-time character, a phononless steady-state current is identified that appears only beyond the generalized Kadanoff-Baym ansatz.

  18. Challenges in Large Scale Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Ratcliff, Laura E; Huhs, Georg; Deutsch, Thierry; Masella, Michel; Genovese, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, quantum mechanical methods have undergone an amazing transition from pioneering investigations of experts into a wide range of practical applications, made by a vast community of researchers. First principles calculations of systems containing up to a few hundred atoms have become a standard in many branches of science. The sizes of the systems which can be simulated have increased even further during recent years, and quantum-mechanical calculations of systems up to many thousands of atoms are nowadays possible. This opens up new appealing possibilities, in particular for interdisciplinary work, bridging together communities of different needs and sensibilities. In this review we will present the current status of this topic, and will also give an outlook on the vast multitude of applications, challenges and opportunities stimulated by electronic structure calculations, making this field an important working tool and bringing together researchers of many different domains.

  19. Quantum spin transport in semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Christoph

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we study and quantitatively predict the quantum spin Hall effect, the spin-orbit interaction induced intrinsic spin-Hall effect, spin-orbit induced magnetizations, and spin-polarized electric currents in nanostructured two-dimensional electron or hole gases with and without the presence of magnetic fields. We propose concrete device geometries for the generation, detection, and manipulation of spin polarization and spin-polarized currents. To this end a novel multi-band quantum transport theory, that we termed the multi-scattering Buettiker probe model, is developed. The method treats quantum interference and coherence in open quantum devices on the same footing as incoherent scattering and incorporates inhomogeneous magnetic fields in a gauge-invariant and nonperturbative manner. The spin-orbit interaction parameters that control effects such as band energy spin splittings, g-factors, and spin relaxations are calculated microscopically in terms of an atomistic relativistic tight-binding model. We calculate the transverse electron focusing in external magnetic and electric fields. We have performed detailed studies of the intrinsic spin-Hall effect and its inverse effect in various material systems and geometries. We find a geometry dependent threshold value for the spin-orbit interaction for the inverse intrinsic spin-Hall effect that cannot be met by n-type GaAs structures. We propose geometries that spin polarize electric current in zero magnetic field and analyze the out-of-plane spin polarization by all electrical means. We predict unexpectedly large spin-orbit induced spin-polarization effects in zero magnetic fields that are caused by resonant enhancements of the spin-orbit interaction in specially band engineered and geometrically designed p-type nanostructures. We propose a concrete realization of a spin transistor in HgTe quantum wells, that employs the helical edge channel in the quantum spin Hall effect.

  20. Efficient method for transport simulations in quantum cascade lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maczka Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient method for simulating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers is presented. The calculations are performed within a simple approximation inspired by Büttiker probes and based on a finite model for semiconductor superlattices. The formalism of non-equilibrium Green’s functions is applied to determine the selected transport parameters in a typical structure of a terahertz laser. Results were compared with those obtained for a infinite model as well as other methods described in literature.

  1. Efficient method for transport simulations in quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maczka, Mariusz; Pawlowski, Stanislaw

    2016-12-01

    An efficient method for simulating quantum transport in quantum cascade lasers is presented. The calculations are performed within a simple approximation inspired by Büttiker probes and based on a finite model for semiconductor superlattices. The formalism of non-equilibrium Green's functions is applied to determine the selected transport parameters in a typical structure of a terahertz laser. Results were compared with those obtained for a infinite model as well as other methods described in literature.

  2. Radiation transport calculations and simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassò, A; Ferrari, A; Sala, P R

    2009-11-01

    This article is an introduction to the Monte Carlo method as used in particle transport. After a description at an elementary level of the mathematical basis of the method, the Boltzmann equation and its physical meaning are presented, followed by Monte Carlo integration and random sampling, and by a general description of the main aspects and components of a typical Monte Carlo particle transport code. In particular, the most common biasing techniques are described, as well as the concepts of estimator and detector. After a discussion of the different types of errors, the issue of quality assurance is briefly considered.

  3. Radiation Transport Calculations and Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasso, Alberto; /SLAC; Ferrari, A.; /CERN

    2011-06-30

    This article is an introduction to the Monte Carlo method as used in particle transport. After a description at an elementary level of the mathematical basis of the method, the Boltzmann equation and its physical meaning are presented, followed by Monte Carlo integration and random sampling, and by a general description of the main aspects and components of a typical Monte Carlo particle transport code. In particular, the most common biasing techniques are described, as well as the concepts of estimator and detector. After a discussion of the different types of errors, the issue of Quality Assurance is briefly considered.

  4. Quantum Transport Through Heterocyclic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Santanu K.; Karmakar, S. N.

    We explore electron transport properties in molecular wires made of heterocyclic molecules (pyrrole, furan and thiophene) by using the Green's function technique. Parametric calculations are given based on the tight-binding model to describe the electron transport in these wires. It is observed that the transport properties are significantly influenced by (a) the heteroatoms in the heterocyclic molecules and (b) the molecule-to-electrodes coupling strength. Conductance (g) shows sharp resonance peaks associated with the molecular energy levels in the limit of weak molecular coupling, while they get broadened in the strong molecular coupling limit. These resonances get shifted with the change of the heteroatoms in these heterocyclic molecules. All the essential features of the electron transfer through these molecular wires become much more clearly visible from the study of our current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, and they provide several key information in the study of molecular transport.

  5. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  6. Quantum transport localization through graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Kino, Hiori; Nakaharai, Shu; Verveniotis, Elisseos; Okawa, Yuji; Ogawa, Shinichi; Joachim, Christian; Aono, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    Localization of atomic defect-induced electronic transport through a single graphene layer is calculated using a full-valence electronic structure description as a function of the defect density and taking into account the atomic-scale deformations of the layer. The elementary electronic destructive interferences leading to Anderson localization are analyzed. The low-voltage current intensity decreases with increasing length and defect density, with a calculated localization length ζ = 3.5 nm for a defect density of 5%. The difference from the experimental defect density of 0.5% required for an oxide surface-supported graphene to obtain the same ζ is discussed, pointing out how interactions of the graphene supporting surface and surface chemical modifications also control electronic transport localization.

  7. Quantum transport of the single metallocene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Chang, Jing; Wei, Rong-Kai; Liu, Xiu-Ying; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-01

    The Quantum transport of three single metallocene molecule is investigated by performing theoretical calculations using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory. We find that the three metallocen molecules structure become stretched along the transport direction, the distance between two Cp rings longer than the other theory and experiment results. The lager conductance is found in nickelocene molecule, the main transmission channel is the electron coupling between molecule and the electrodes is through the Ni dxz and dyz orbitals and the s, dxz, dyz of gold. This is also confirmed by the highest occupied molecular orbital resonance at Fermi level. In addition, negative differential resistance effect is found in the ferrocene, cobaltocene molecules, this is also closely related with the evolution of the transmission spectrum under applied bias.

  8. Nonequilibrium Electron Transport Through a Quantum Dot from Kubo Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Rong; ZHANG Guang-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Kubo formula for an electron tunneling junction, we revisit the nonequilibrium transport properties through a quantum dot. Since the Fermi level of the quantum dot is set by the conduction electrons of the leads, we calculate the electron current from the left side by assuming the quantum dot coupled to the right lead as another side of the tunneling junction, and the other way round is used to calculate the current from the right side. By symmetrizing these two currents, an effective local density states on the dot can be obtained, and is discussed at high and low temperatures, respectively.

  9. Quantum Statistical Calculation of Exchange Bias

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Huai-Yu; DAI Zhen-Hong

    2004-01-01

    The phenomenon of exchange bias of ferromagnetic (FM) films, which are coupled with an antiferromagnetic (AFM) film, is studied by Heisenberg model by use of the many-body Green's function method of quantum statistical theory for the uncompensated case. Exchange bias HE and coercivity Hc are calculated as functions of the FM film thickness L, temperature, the strength of the exchange interaction across the interface between FM and AFM and the anisotropy of the FM. Hc decreases with increasing L when the FM film is beyond some thickness. The dependence of the exchange bias HE on the FM film thickness and on temperature is also qualitatively in agreement with experiments.

  10. Feedback network models for quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, John

    2014-12-01

    Quantum feedback networks have been introduced in quantum optics as a framework for constructing arbitrary networks of quantum mechanical systems connected by unidirectional quantum optical fields, and has allowed for a system theoretic approach to open quantum optics systems. Our aim here is to establish a network theory for quantum transport systems where typically the mediating fields between systems are bidirectional. Mathematically, this leads us to study quantum feedback networks where fields arrive at ports in input-output pairs, making it a special case of the unidirectional theory where inputs and outputs are paired. However, it is conceptually important to develop this theory in the context of quantum transport theory-the resulting theory extends traditional approaches which tend to view the components in quantum transport as scatterers for the various fields, in the process allowing us to consider emission and absorption of field quanta by these components. The quantum feedback network theory is applicable to both Bose and Fermi fields, moreover, it applies to nonlinear dynamics for the component systems. We advance the general theory, but study the case of linear passive quantum components in some detail.

  11. Spin transport through quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, A.T. da Cunha; Anda, Enrique V. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Full text: We investigate the spin polarized transport properties of a nanoscopic device constituted by a quantum dot connected to two leads. The electrical current circulates with a spin polarization that is modulated via a gate potential that controls the intensity of the spin-orbit coupling, the Rashba effect. We study a polarized field-effect transistor when one of its parts is constituted by a small quantum dot, which energies are controlled by another gate potential operating inside the confined region. The high confinement and correlation suffered by the charges inside the dot gives rise to novel phenomena. We show that through the manipulation of the gate potential applied to the dot it is possible to control, in a very efficient way, the intensity and polarization of the current that goes along the system. Other crucial parameters to be varied in order to understand the behavior of this system are the intensity of the external applied electric and magnetic field. The system is represented by the Anderson Impurity Hamiltonian summed to a spin-orbit interaction, which describes the Rashba effect. To obtain the current of this out-of-equilibrium system we use the Keldysh formalism.The solution of the Green function are compatible with the Coulomb blockade regime. We show that under the effect of a external magnetic field, if the dot is small enough the device operates as a complete spin filter that can be controlled by the gate potential. The behavior of this device when it is injected into it a polarized current and modulated by the Rashba effect is as well studied. (author)

  12. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    . In single quantum dots defined in short lengths of nanotube, the energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are revealed by Coulomb blockade spectroscopy. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli...

  13. Quantum Transport Theory for Photonic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Chan U

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a quantum transport theory to describe photonic transport in photonic networks. The photonic networks concerned in the paper consist of all-optical circuits incorporating photonic bandgap waveguides and driven resonators. The photoncurrents flowing through waveguides are entirely determined from the exact master equation of the driven resonators. The master equation of the driven resonators is obtained by explicitly eliminating all the waveguide degrees of freedom while the back-reactions between resonators and waveguides are fully taken into account. The relations between the driven photonic dynamics and photoncurrents are obtained. The quantum dissipation and quantum noise effects in photonic transport are also fully addressed. As an illustration, the theory is applied to the transport phenomena of a driven nanocavity coupled to two waveguides in photonic crystals. The controllability of photonic transport through the driven resonator is demonstrated.

  14. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Neutron Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, J; Ravenhall, D G

    2003-01-01

    Uniform neutron matter is approximated by a cubic box containing a finite number of neutrons, with periodic boundary conditions. We report variational and Green's function Monte Carlo calculations of the ground state of fourteen neutrons in a periodic box using the Argonne $\\vep $ two-nucleon interaction at densities up to one and half times the nuclear matter density. The effects of the finite box size are estimated using variational wave functions together with cluster expansion and chain summation techniques. They are small at subnuclear densities. We discuss the expansion of the energy of low-density neutron gas in powers of its Fermi momentum. This expansion is strongly modified by the large nn scattering length, and does not begin with the Fermi-gas kinetic energy as assumed in both Skyrme and relativistic mean field theories. The leading term of neutron gas energy is ~ half the Fermi-gas kinetic energy. The quantum Monte Carlo results are also used to calibrate the accuracy of variational calculations ...

  15. Charge transport and localization in atomically coherent quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Savitzky, Benjamin H.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial attachment of quantum dots into ordered superlattices enables the synthesis of quasi-two-dimensional materials that theoretically exhibit features such as Dirac cones and topological states, and have major potential for unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Initial studies found that disorder in these structures causes localization of electrons within a few lattice constants, and highlight the critical need for precise structural characterization and systematic assessment of the effects of disorder on transport. Here we fabricated superlattices with the quantum dots registered to within a single atomic bond length (limited by the polydispersity of the quantum dot building blocks), but missing a fraction (20%) of the epitaxial connections. Calculations of the electronic structure including the measured disorder account for the electron localization inferred from transport measurements. The calculations also show that improvement of the epitaxial connections will lead to completely delocalized electrons and may enable the observation of the remarkable properties predicted for these materials.

  16. Quantum transport velocity in strongly scattering media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malfliet, R

    1998-01-01

    Based on the Kadanoff-Baym equations of quantum transport: theory, an approach is proposed which goes beyond the usual quasiparticle approximation. It allows one to deduct the correct transport velocity for propagation in strongly scattering media, a quantity of great importance for localization phe

  17. Centro-symmetric Hamiltonians foster quantum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Walschaers, Mattia; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model for fast and highly efficient quantum transport of excitations, through finite, disordered systems. The presented mechanism is statistically robust against configurational changes which alter the realization of disorder. We finally discuss the potential relevance of our findings for excitation transport in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes.

  18. Quantum biological channel modeling and capacity calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2012-12-10

    Quantum mechanics has an important role in photosynthesis, magnetoreception, and evolution. There were many attempts in an effort to explain the structure of genetic code and transfer of information from DNA to protein by using the concepts of quantum mechanics. The existing biological quantum channel models are not sufficiently general to incorporate all relevant contributions responsible for imperfect protein synthesis. Moreover, the problem of determination of quantum biological channel capacity is still an open problem. To solve these problems, we construct the operator-sum representation of biological channel based on codon basekets (basis vectors), and determine the quantum channel model suitable for study of the quantum biological channel capacity and beyond. The transcription process, DNA point mutations, insertions, deletions, and translation are interpreted as the quantum noise processes. The various types of quantum errors are classified into several broad categories: (i) storage errors that occur in DNA itself as it represents an imperfect storage of genetic information, (ii) replication errors introduced during DNA replication process, (iii) transcription errors introduced during DNA to mRNA transcription, and (iv) translation errors introduced during the translation process. By using this model, we determine the biological quantum channel capacity and compare it against corresponding classical biological channel capacity. We demonstrate that the quantum biological channel capacity is higher than the classical one, for a coherent quantum channel model, suggesting that quantum effects have an important role in biological systems. The proposed model is of crucial importance towards future study of quantum DNA error correction, developing quantum mechanical model of aging, developing the quantum mechanical models for tumors/cancer, and study of intracellular dynamics in general.

  19. Quantum Biological Channel Modeling and Capacity Calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan B. Djordjevic

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics has an important role in photosynthesis, magnetoreception, and evolution. There were many attempts in an effort to explain the structure of genetic code and transfer of information from DNA to protein by using the concepts of quantum mechanics. The existing biological quantum channel models are not sufficiently general to incorporate all relevant contributions responsible for imperfect protein synthesis. Moreover, the problem of determination of quantum biological channel capacity is still an open problem. To solve these problems, we construct the operator-sum representation of biological channel based on codon basekets (basis vectors, and determine the quantum channel model suitable for study of the quantum biological channel capacity and beyond. The transcription process, DNA point mutations, insertions, deletions, and translation are interpreted as the quantum noise processes. The various types of quantum errors are classified into several broad categories: (i storage errors that occur in DNA itself as it represents an imperfect storage of genetic information, (ii replication errors introduced during DNA replication process, (iii transcription errors introduced during DNA to mRNA transcription, and (iv translation errors introduced during the translation process. By using this model, we determine the biological quantum channel capacity and compare it against corresponding classical biological channel capacity. We demonstrate that the quantum biological channel capacity is higher than the classical one, for a coherent quantum channel model, suggesting that quantum effects have an important role in biological systems. The proposed model is of crucial importance towards future study of quantum DNA error correction, developing quantum mechanical model of aging, developing the quantum mechanical models for tumors/cancer, and study of intracellular dynamics in general.

  20. Quantum Transport Through Tunable Molecular Diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Joshua Tobechukwu

    2017-07-31

    Employing self-interaction corrected density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method, we study the quantum transport through molecules with different numbers of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings in order to evaluate the effects of the molecular composition on the transport properties. Excellent agreement with the results of recent experiments addressing the rectification behavior of molecular junctions is obtained, which demonstrates the potential of quantum transport simulations for designing high performance junctions by tuning the molecular specifications.

  1. Quantum mechanical calculations and mineral spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubicki, J. D.

    2006-05-01

    Interpretation of spectra in systems of environmental interest is not generally straightforward due to the lack of close analogs and a clear structure of some components of the system. Computational chemistry can be used as an objective method to test interpretations of spectra. This talk will focus on applying ab initio methods to complement vibrational, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopic information. Examples of systems studied include phosphate/Fe-hydroxides, arsenate/Al- and Fe-hydroxide, fractured silica surfaces. Phosphate interactions with Fe-hydroxides are important in controlling nutrient availability in soils and transport within streams. In addition, organo-phosphate bonding may be a key attachment mechanism for bacteria at Fe-oxide surfaces. Interpretation of IR spectra is enhanced by model predictions of vibrational frequencies for various surface complexes. Ab initio calculations were used to help explain As(V) and As(III) adsorption behavior onto amorphous Al- and Fe-hydroxides in conjunction with EXAFS measurements. Fractured silica surfaces have been implicated in silicosis. These calculations test structures that could give rise to radical formation on silica surfaces. Calculations to simulate the creation of Si and SiO radical species on sufaces and their subsequent production of OH radicals will be discussed.

  2. Charge transport through a semiconductor quantum dot-ring nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpas, Marcin; Kędzierska, Barbara; Janus-Zygmunt, Iwona; Gorczyca-Goraj, Anna; Wach, Elżbieta; Zipper, Elżbieta; Maśka, Maciej M

    2015-07-08

    Transport properties of a gated nanostructure depend crucially on the coupling of its states to the states of electrodes. In the case of a single quantum dot the coupling, for a given quantum state, is constant or can be slightly modified by additional gating. In this paper we consider a concentric dot-ring nanostructure (DRN) and show that its transport properties can be drastically modified due to the unique geometry. We calculate the dc current through a DRN in the Coulomb blockade regime and show that it can efficiently work as a single-electron transistor (SET) or a current rectifier. In both cases the transport characteristics strongly depend on the details of the confinement potential. The calculations are carried out for low and high bias regime, the latter being especially interesting in the context of current rectification due to fast relaxation processes.

  3. Quantum Transport Simulations of Nanoscale Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Obodo, Tobechukwu Joshua

    2016-01-07

    Nanoscale materials have many potential advantages because of their quantum confinement, cost and producibility by low-temperature chemical methods. Advancement of theoretical methods as well as the availability of modern high-performance supercomputers allow us to control and exploit their microscopic properties at the atomic scale, hence making it possible to design novel nanoscale molecular devices with interesting features (e.g switches, rectifiers, negative differential conductance, and high magnetoresistance). In this thesis, state-of-the-art theoretical calculations have been performed for the quantum transport properties of nano-structured materials within the framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Nonequilibrium Green\\'s Function (NEGF) formalism. The switching behavior of a dithiolated phenylene-vinylene oligomer sandwiched between Au(111) electrodes is investigated. The molecule presents a configurational bistability, which can be exploited in constructing molecular memories, switches, and sensors. We find that protonation of the terminating thiol groups is at the origin of the change in conductance. H bonding at the thiol group weakens the S-Au bond, and thus lowers the conductance. Our results allow us to re-interpret the experimental data originally attributing the conductance reduction to H dissociation. Also examined is current-induced migration of atoms in nanoscale devices that plays an important role for device operation and breakdown. We studied the migration of adatoms and defects in graphene and carbon nanotubes under finite bias. We demonstrate that current-induced forces within DFT are non-conservative, which so far has only been shown for model systems, and can lower migration barrier heights. Further, we investigated the quantum transport behavior of an experimentally observed diblock molecule by varying the amounts of phenyl (donor) and pyrimidinyl (acceptor) rings under finite bias. We show that a tandem configuration of

  4. Delayed feedback control in quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emary, Clive

    2013-09-28

    Feedback control in quantum transport has been predicted to give rise to several interesting effects, among them quantum state stabilization and the realization of a mesoscopic Maxwell's daemon. These results were derived under the assumption that control operations on the system are affected instantaneously after the measurement of electronic jumps through it. In this contribution, I describe how to include a delay between detection and control operation in the master equation theory of feedback-controlled quantum transport. I investigate the consequences of delay for the state stabilization and Maxwell's daemon schemes. Furthermore, I describe how delay can be used as a tool to probe coherent oscillations of electrons within a transport system and how this formalism can be used to model finite detector bandwidth.

  5. Transport calculations of antiproton-nucleus interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Larionov, A B; Pshenichnov, I A; Satarov, L M; Greiner, W

    2010-01-01

    The Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck transport model is extended and applied to the antiproton-nucleus interactions in a wide beam momentum range. The model calculations are compared with the experimental data on $\\bar p$-absorption cross sections on nuclei with an emphasis on extraction of the real part of an antiproton optical potential. The possibility of the cold compression of a nucleus by an antiproton in-flight is also considered.

  6. Automated quantum conductance calculations using maximally-localised Wannier functions

    CERN Document Server

    Shelley, Matthew; Mostofi, Arash A; Marzari, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    A robust, user-friendly, and automated method to determine quantum conductance in disordered quasi-one-dimensional systems is presented. The scheme relies upon an initial density- functional theory calculation in a specific geometry after which the ground-state eigenfunctions are transformed to a maximally-localised Wannier function (MLWF) basis. In this basis, our novel algorithms manipulate and partition the Hamiltonian for the calculation of coherent electronic transport properties within the Landauer-Buttiker formalism. Furthermore, we describe how short- ranged Hamiltonians in the MLWF basis can be combined to build model Hamiltonians of large (>10,000 atom) disordered systems without loss of accuracy. These automated algorithms have been implemented in the Wannier90 code[Mostofi et al, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 685 (2008)], which is interfaced to a number of electronic structure codes such as Quantum-ESPRESSO, AbInit, Wien2k, SIESTA and FLEUR. We apply our methods to an Al atomic chain with a Na defect...

  7. BITLLES: Electron Transport Simulation with Quantum Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Albareda, Guillermo; Benali, Abdelilah; Alarcón, Alfonso; Moises, Simeon; Oriols, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    After the seminal work of R. Landauer in 1957 relating the electrical resistance of a conductor to its scattering properties, much progress has been made in our ability to predict the performance of electron devices in the DC (stationary) regime. Computational tools to describe their dynamical behavior (including the AC, transient and noise performance), however, are far from being as trustworthy as would be desired by the electronic industry. While there is no fundamental limitation to correctly modeling the high-frequency quantum transport and its fluctuations, certainly more careful attention must be paid to delicate issues such as overall charge neutrality, total current conservation, or the back action of the measuring apparatus. In this review, we will show how the core ideas behind the Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics can be exploited to design an efficient Monte Carlo algorithm that provides a quantitative description of electron transport in open quantum systems. By making the most of traject...

  8. Optimally designed quantum transport across disordered networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walschaers, Mattia; Diaz, Jorge Fernandez-de-Cossio; Mulet, Roberto; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    We establish a general mechanism for highly efficient quantum transport through finite, disordered 3D networks. It relies on the interplay of disorder with centrosymmetry and a dominant doublet spectral structure and can be controlled by the proper tuning of only coarse-grained quantities. Photosynthetic light harvesting complexes are discussed as potential biological incarnations of this design principle.

  9. Quantum transport through 3D Dirac materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, M. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, S.A., E-mail: jafari@physics.sharif.edu [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for Complex Systems and Condensed Matter (CSCM), Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 1458889694 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Bismuth and its alloys provide a paradigm to realize three dimensional materials whose low-energy effective theory is given by Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions. We study the quantum transport properties of three dimensional Dirac materials within the framework of Landauer–Büttiker formalism. Charge carriers in normal metal satisfying the Schrödinger equation, can be split into four-component with appropriate matching conditions at the boundary with the three dimensional Dirac material (3DDM). We calculate the conductance and the Fano factor of an interface separating 3DDM from a normal metal, as well as the conductance through a slab of 3DDM. Under certain circumstances the 3DDM appears transparent to electrons hitting the 3DDM. We find that electrons hitting the metal-3DDM interface from metallic side can enter 3DDM in a reversed spin state as soon as their angle of incidence deviates from the direction perpendicular to interface. However the presence of a second interface completely cancels this effect.

  10. Quantum transport in magnetic topological insulator thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Zhou; Zhao, An; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2013-10-04

    The experimental observation of the long-sought quantum anomalous Hall effect was recently reported in magnetically doped topological insulator thin films [Chang et al., Science 340, 167 (2013)]. An intriguing observation is a rapid decrease from the quantized plateau in the Hall conductance, accompanied by a peak in the longitudinal conductance as a function of the gate voltage. Here, we present a quantum transport theory with an effective model for magnetic topological insulator thin films. The good agreement between theory and experiment reveals that the measured transport originates from a topologically nontrivial conduction band which, near its band edge, has concentrated Berry curvature and a local maximum in group velocity. The indispensable roles of the broken structure inversion and particle-hole symmetries are also revealed. The results are instructive for future experiments and transport studies based on first-principles calculations.

  11. Molecular transport calculations with Wannier Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2005-01-01

    We present a scheme for calculating coherent electron transport in atomic-scale contacts. The method combines a formally exact Green's function formalism with a mean-field description of the electronic structure based on the Kohn-Sham scheme of density functional theory. We use an accurate plane...... is applied to a hydrogen molecule in an infinite Pt wire and a benzene-dithiol (BDT) molecule between Au(111) surfaces. We show that the transmission function of BDT in a wide energy window around the Fermi level can be completely accounted for by only two molecular orbitals. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All...

  12. Nonequilibrium Spin Magnetization Quantum Transport Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Buot, F A; Otadoy, R E S; Villarin, D L

    2011-01-01

    The classical Bloch equations of spin magnetization transport is extended to fully time-dependent and highly-nonlinear nonequilibrium quantum distribution function (QDF) transport equations. The leading terms consist of the Boltzmann kinetic equation with spin-orbit coupling in a magnetic field together with spin-dependent scattering terms which do not have any classical analogue, but should incorporate the spatio-temporal-dependent phase-space dynamics of Elliot-Yafet and D'yakonov-Perel scatterings. The resulting magnetization QDF transport equation serves as a foundation for computational spintronic and nanomagnetic device applications, in performing simulation of ultrafast-switching-speed/low-power performance and reliability analyses.

  13. Semiconductor Nanostructures Quantum States and Electronic Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Ihn, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This textbook describes the physics of semiconductor nanostructures with emphasis on their electronic transport properties. At its heart are five fundamental transport phenomena: quantized conductance, tunnelling transport, the Aharonov-Bohm effect, the quantum Hall effect, and the Coulomb blockade effect. The book starts out with the basics of solid state and semiconductor physics, such as crystal structure, band structure, and effective mass approximation, including spin-orbit interaction effects important for research in semiconductor spintronics. It contains material aspects such as band e

  14. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarillo-Herrero, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Electronic transport through nanostructures can be very different from trans- port in macroscopic conductors, especially at low temperatures. Carbon na- notubes are tiny cylinders made of carbon atoms. Their remarkable electronic and mechanical properties, together with their small size (a few nm in

  15. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laird, E.A.; Kuemmeth, F.; Steele, G.A.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygard, J.; Flensberg, K.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This revie

  16. Exciton size and quantum transport in nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelzer, Kenley M., E-mail: kpelzer@anl.gov; Gray, Stephen K. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Darling, Seth B. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5747 S. Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Schaller, Richard D. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Two-dimensional nanoplatelets (NPLs) are an exciting class of materials with promising optical and energy transport properties. The possibility of efficient energy transport between nanoplatelets raises questions regarding the nature of energy transfer in these thin, laterally extended systems. A challenge in understanding exciton transport is the uncertainty regarding the size of the exciton. Depending on the material and defects in the nanoplatelet, an exciton could plausibly extend over an entire plate or localize to a small region. The variation in possible exciton sizes raises the question how exciton size impacts the efficiency of transport between nanoplatelet structures. Here, we explore this issue using a quantum master equation approach. This method goes beyond the assumptions of Förster theory to allow for quantum mechanical effects that could increase energy transfer efficiency. The model is extremely flexible in describing different systems, allowing us to test the effect of varying the spatial extent of the exciton. We first discuss qualitative aspects of the relationship between exciton size and transport and then conduct simulations of exciton transport between NPLs for a range of exciton sizes and environmental conditions. Our results reveal that exciton size has a strong effect on energy transfer efficiency and suggest that manipulation of exciton size may be useful in designing NPLs for energy transport.

  17. Exciton size and quantum transport in nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Kenley M; Darling, Seth B; Gray, Stephen K; Schaller, Richard D

    2015-12-14

    Two-dimensional nanoplatelets (NPLs) are an exciting class of materials with promising optical and energy transport properties. The possibility of efficient energy transport between nanoplatelets raises questions regarding the nature of energy transfer in these thin, laterally extended systems. A challenge in understanding exciton transport is the uncertainty regarding the size of the exciton. Depending on the material and defects in the nanoplatelet, an exciton could plausibly extend over an entire plate or localize to a small region. The variation in possible exciton sizes raises the question how exciton size impacts the efficiency of transport between nanoplatelet structures. Here, we explore this issue using a quantum master equation approach. This method goes beyond the assumptions of Förster theory to allow for quantum mechanical effects that could increase energy transfer efficiency. The model is extremely flexible in describing different systems, allowing us to test the effect of varying the spatial extent of the exciton. We first discuss qualitative aspects of the relationship between exciton size and transport and then conduct simulations of exciton transport between NPLs for a range of exciton sizes and environmental conditions. Our results reveal that exciton size has a strong effect on energy transfer efficiency and suggest that manipulation of exciton size may be useful in designing NPLs for energy transport.

  18. Non-Equilibrium Quantum Transport of Bosons through a Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zuo-Zi; L(U) Rong; ZHAI Hui; CHANG Lee

    2006-01-01

    @@ The quantum dot coupled to reservoirs is known as a typical mesoscopic setup to manifest the quantum characteristics of particles in transport. In analogue to many efforts made on the study of electronic quantum dots in the past decades, we study the transport of bosons through such a device. We first generalize the formula which relates the current to the local properties of dot in the bosonic situation. Then, as an illustrative example, we calculate the local density of state and lesser Green function of the localized boson with a bosonic Fano-Anderson model The current-voltage (Ⅰ-Ⅴ) behaviour at zero temperature is presented, and in the bosonic dot it is the Ⅰ-Ⅴ curve, in contrast to the differential conductance in the electronic dot, which is found to be proportional to the spectral function.

  19. Quantum transport efficiency and Fourier's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Daniel; Tiersch, Markus; Asadian, Ali; Briegel, Hans J

    2012-12-01

    We analyze the steady-state energy transfer in a chain of coupled two-level systems connecting two thermal reservoirs. Through an analytic treatment we find that the energy current is independent of the system size, hence violating Fourier's law of heat conduction. The classical diffusive behavior in Fourier's law of heat conduction can be recovered by introducing decoherence to the quantum systems constituting the chain. We relate these results to recent discussions of energy transport in biological light-harvesting systems, and discuss the role of quantum coherence and entanglement.

  20. Electron transport in coupled double quantum wells and wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harff, N.E.; Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Due to inter-quantum well tunneling, coupled double quantum wells (DQWs) contain an extra degree of electronic freedom in the growth direction, giving rise to new transport phenomena not found in single electron layers. This report describes work done on coupled DQWs subject to inplane magnetic fields B{sub {parallel}}, and is based on the lead author`s doctoral thesis, successfully defended at Oregon State University on March 4, 1997. First, the conductance of closely coupled DQWs in B{sub {parallel}} is studied. B{sub {parallel}}-induced distortions in the dispersion, the density of states, and the Fermi surface are described both theoretically and experimentally, with particular attention paid to the dispersion anticrossing and resulting partial energy gap. Measurements of giant distortions in the effective mass are found to agree with theoretical calculations. Second, the Landau level spectra of coupled DQWs in tilted magnetic fields is studied. The magnetoresistance oscillations show complex beating as Landau levels from the two Fermi surface components cross the Fermi level. A third set of oscillations resulting from magnetic breakdown is observed. A semiclassical calculation of the Landau level spectra is then performed, and shown to agree exceptionally well with the data. Finally, quantum wires and quantum point contacts formed in DQW structures are investigated. Anticrossings of the one-dimensional DQW dispersion curves are predicted to have interesting transport effects in these devices. Difficulties in sample fabrication have to date prevented experimental verification. However, recently developed techniques to overcome these difficulties are described.

  1. Electron-phonon interaction in quantum transport through quantum dots and molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Duque, C. A.; Laroze, D.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum transport and effects of decoherence properties are studied in quantum dots systems and finite homogeneous chains of aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. We study these systems based on the tight-binding approach through Green's function technique within a real space renormalization and polaron transformation schemes. In particular, we calculate the transmission probability following the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the I - V characteristics and the noise power of current fluctuations taken into account the decoherence. Our results may explain the inelastic effects through nanoscopic systems.

  2. Quantum transport model for zigzag molybdenum disulfide nanoribbon structures : A full quantum framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Nan Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mainly based on non-equilibrium Green’s function technique in combination with the three-band model, a full atomistic-scale and full quantum method for solving quantum transport problems of a zigzag-edge molybdenum disulfide nanoribbon (zMoSNR structure is proposed here. For transport calculations, the relational expressions of a zMoSNR crystalline solid and its whole device structure are derived in detail and in its integrity. By adopting the complex-band structure method, the boundary treatment of this open boundary system within the non-equilibrium Green’s function framework is so straightforward and quite sophisticated. The transmission function, conductance, and density of states of zMoSNR devices are calculated using the proposed method. The important findings in zMoSNR devices such as conductance quantization, van Hove singularities in the density of states, and contact interaction on channel are presented and explored in detail.

  3. Kondo effect for electron transport through an artificial quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Ke-Wei; Xiong Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    We have calculated the transport properties of electron through an artificial quantum dot by using the numerical renormalization group technique in this paper.We obtain the conductance for the system of a quantum dot which is embedded in a one-dimensional chain in zero and finite temperature cases.The external magnetic field gives rise to a negative magnetoconductance in the zero temperature case.It increases as the external magnetic field increases.We obtain the relation between the coupling coefficient and conductance.If the interaction is big enough to prevent conduction electrons from tunnelling through the dot,the dispersion effect is dominant in this case.In the Kondo temperature regime,we obtain the conductivity of a quantum dot system with Kondo correlation.

  4. SymGF: A Symbolic Tool for Quantum Transport Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zi Min

    -to-lead tunneling. Finally, at the post-analysis level, we have combined SymGF with an ab initio numerical modeling method to calculate quantum transport features involving atomistic degrees of freedom.

  5. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-10-05

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  6. Quantum chemical calculations of glycine glutaric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arioǧlu, ćaǧla; Tamer, Ömer; Avci, Davut; Atalay, Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of glycine glutaric acid were performed by using B3LYP levels with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The theoretical structural parameters such as bond lengths and bond angles are in a good agreement with the experimental values of the title compound. HOMO and LUMO energies were calculated, and the obtained energy gap shows that charge transfer occurs in the title compound. Vibrational frequencies were calculated and compare with experimental ones. 3D molecular surfaces of the title compound were simulated using the same level and basis set. Finally, the 13C and 1H NMR chemical shift values were calculated by the application of the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method.

  7. Quantum Transport: The Link between Standard Approaches in Superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    Theories describing electrical transport in semiconductor superlattices can essentially be divided in three disjoint categories: (i) transport in a miniband; (ii) hopping between Wannier-Stark ladders; and (iii) sequential tunneling. We present a quantum transport model, based on nonequilibrium...

  8. Quantum Simulator for Transport Phenomena in Fluid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacapo, A; Sanz, M; Lamata, L; Egusquiza, I L; Succi, S; Solano, E

    2015-08-17

    Transport phenomena still stand as one of the most challenging problems in computational physics. By exploiting the analogies between Dirac and lattice Boltzmann equations, we develop a quantum simulator based on pseudospin-boson quantum systems, which is suitable for encoding fluid dynamics transport phenomena within a lattice kinetic formalism. It is shown that both the streaming and collision processes of lattice Boltzmann dynamics can be implemented with controlled quantum operations, using a heralded quantum protocol to encode non-unitary scattering processes. The proposed simulator is amenable to realization in controlled quantum platforms, such as ion-trap quantum computers or circuit quantum electrodynamics processors.

  9. Monte-carlo calculations for some problems of quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselov, A. A., E-mail: novoselov@goa.bog.msu.ru; Pavlovsky, O. V.; Ulybyshev, M. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    The Monte-Carlo technique for the calculations of functional integral in two one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems had been applied. The energies of the bound states in some potential wells were obtained using this method. Also some peculiarities in the calculation of the kinetic energy in the ground state had been studied.

  10. Environment-assisted quantum transport in ordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kassal, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Noise-assisted transport in quantum systems occurs when quantum time-evolution and decoherence conspire to produce a transport efficiency that is higher than what would be seen in either the purely quantum or purely classical cases. It has been understood as the suppression of coherent quantum localization through noise, which brings detuned quantum levels into resonance and thus facilitates transport. We report several new mechanisms of environment-assisted transport in ordered systems, in which there is no localization to be overcome.

  11. Vibrational Spectra and Quantum Calculations of Ethylbenzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Xue-jun Qiu; Yan-mei Wang; Song Zhang; Bing Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Normal vibrations of ethylbenzene in the first excited state have been studied using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy.The band origin of ethylbenzene of S1←S0 transition appeared at 37586 cm-1.A vibrational spectrum of 2000 cm-1 above the band origin in the first excited state has been obtained.Several chain torsions and normal vibrations are obtained in the spectrum.The energies of the first excited state are calculated by the time-dependent density function theory and configuration interaction singles (CIS) methods with various basis sets.The optimized structures and vibrational frequencies of the S0 and S1 states are calculated using Hartree-Fock and CIS methods with 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set.The calculated geometric structures in the S0 and S1 states are gauche conformations that the symmetric plane of ethyl group is perpendicular to the ring plane.All the observed spectral bands have been successfully assigned with the help of our calculations.

  12. Dephasing-assisted selective incoherent quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Naghi; Ahansaz, Bahram; Kasani, Hadi

    2015-10-01

    Selective energy transport throughout a quantum network connected to more than one reaction center can play an important role in many natural and technological considerations in photosystems. In this work, we propose a method in which an excitation can be transported from the original site of the network to one of the reaction centers arbitrarily using independent sources of dephasing noises. We demonstrate that in the absence of dephasing noises, the coherent evolution of the system does not have any role in energy transport in the network. Therefore, incoherent evolution via application of dephasing noises throughout a selected path of the network leads to complete transferring of the excitation to a desired reaction center.

  13. Quantum Simulator for Transport Phenomena in Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzacapo, A; Lamata, L; Egusquiza, I L; Succi, S; Solano, E

    2015-01-01

    Transport phenomena are one of the most challenging problems in computational physics. We present a quantum simulator based on pseudospin-boson quantum systems, which is suitable for encoding fluid dynamics problems within a lattice kinetic formalism. This quantum simulator is obtained by exploiting the analogies between Dirac and lattice Boltzmann equations. It is shown that both the streaming and collision processes of lattice Boltzmann dynamics can be implemented with controlled quantum operations, using a heralded quantum protocol to encode non-unitary scattering processes. The proposed simulator is amenable to realization in controlled quantum platforms, such as ion-trap quantum computers or circuit quantum electrodynamics processors.

  14. Quantum transport in RTD and atomistic modeling of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengping

    As devices are scaled down to nanometer scale, new materials and device structures are introduced to extend Moore's law beyond Si devices. In this length scale, carrier transport moves from classical transport to quantum transport; material granularity has more and more impacts on performance. Computer Aided Design (CAD) becomes essential for both industrial and educational purposes. First part focuses on physical models and numerical issues in nano-scale devices modeling. Resonance Tunneling Diode (RTD) is simulated and used to illustrate phenomena in carrier transport. Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) formulism is employed in quantum transport simulation. Inhomogeneous energy grid is used in energy integration, which is critical to capture essential physics in RTD simulation. All simulation results could be reproduced by developed simulators RTDNEGF and NEMO5. In nanostructures, device length becomes comparable to material granularity; it is not proper to consider materials as continuous in many situations. Second part of this work resolves this problem by introducing atomistic modeling method. Valley degeneracy in Si (110) QW is investigated. Inconsistency of experimental observations is resolved by introducing miscut in surface. Impacts of strain and electric field on electronic bandstructure are studied. Research of SiGe barrier disorder effects on valley splitting in Si (100) QW is then conducted. Behaviors of valley splitting in different well widths under electric field are predicted by atomistic simulation. Nearest neighbor empirical tight-binding method is used in electronic calculation and VFF Keating model is used in strain relaxation.

  15. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, L.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms.

  16. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-10-05

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  17. Transport Properties of the Universal Quantum Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.I.Arbab

    2012-01-01

    The universal quantum equation (UQE) is found to describe the transport properties of the quantum particles.This equation describes a wave equation interacting with constant scalar and vector potentials propagating in spacetime.A new transformation that sends the Schr(o)dinger equation with a potential energy V =-1/2mc2 to Dirac's equation is proposed.The Cattaneo telegraph equation as well as a one-dimensional UQE are compatible with our recently proposed generalized continuity equations.Furthermore,a new wave equation resulted from the invariance of the UQE under the post-Galilean transformations is derived.This equation is found to govern a Klein Gordon's particle interacting with a photon-like vector field (ether) whose magnitude is proportional to the particle's mass.

  18. Quantum and Ionic Transport Across Superconductor-based Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfeh, Osama; Dinh, Son; Taylor, Benjamin; de Andrade, Marcio; Swanson, Paul; Offord, Bruce; de Escobar, Anna Leese; Claussen, Stephanie; Kassegne, Sam

    2015-03-01

    We present analysis of quantum and ionic transport across superconductor/barrier/ionic/barrier/superconductor (SBIBS) heterostructures. Calculations for various ionic configurations demonstrate modification of the quantum transport coherence length and energy profile with moderate ionic transport away from the superconductor-barrier interface. The effect of electric field and cryogenic temperature on the stability of the ionic configurations for quantum information state storage is examined. Characterization and analysis of constructed Al and Nb-based device structures are presented. Acknowledgements: We acknowledge the support of the SSC Pacific In-house Laboratory Independent Research Science and Technology Program managed by Dr. Dave Rees, the Naval Innovative Science and Engineering Program managed by Mr. Robin Laird, and the ONR Summer Faculty Research Program. Interactions with Dr. Van Vechten (ONR) and Dr. Manheimer (IARPA) are appreciated. The views and conclusions contained in this document are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official policies, either expressed or implied, of SPAWAR or the U.S. Government. Approved for Public Release; distribution is unlimited.

  19. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, Chi Yung; Chen, GuanHua

    2013-04-28

    A dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory is developed to treat the transient current through molecular or nanoscopic devices in presence of electron-phonon interaction. The dissipation via phonon is taken into account by introducing a self-energy for the electron-phonon coupling in addition to the self-energy caused by the electrodes. Based on this, a numerical method is proposed. For practical implementation, the lowest order expansion is employed for the weak electron-phonon coupling case and the wide-band limit approximation is adopted for device and electrodes coupling. The corresponding hierarchical equation of motion is derived, which leads to an efficient and accurate time-dependent treatment of inelastic effect on transport for the weak electron-phonon interaction. The resulting method is applied to a one-level model system and a gold wire described by tight-binding model to demonstrate its validity and the importance of electron-phonon interaction for the quantum transport. As it is based on the effective single-electron model, the method can be readily extended to time-dependent density functional theory.

  20. Reactivity of Tourmaline by Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    ZnAb initio calculations on reactivity of tourmaline were performed using both Gaussian and density function theory discrete variation method (DFT-DVM). The HF, B3LYP methods and basis sets STO-3G(3d,3p),6-31G(3d,3p) and 6-311++G(3df,3pd) were used in the calculations. The experimental results show energy value obtained from B3LYP and 6-31++1G(3df,3pd) basis sets is more accurate than those from other methods. The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the tourmaline cluster mainly consists of O atom of hydroxyl group with relative higher energy level, suggesting that chemical bond between those of electron acceptor and this site may readily form, indicating the higher reactivity of hydroxyl group. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the tourmaline cluster are dominantly composed of Si, O of tetrahedron and Na with relative lower energy level, suggesting that these atoms may tend to form chemical bond with those of electron donor. The results also prove that the O atoms of the tourmaline cluster have stronger reactivity than other atoms.

  1. Temperature-dependent coherent carrier transport in quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Menyuk, Curtis R, E-mail: anisuzzaman@umbc.edu [Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The temperature dependence of coherent carrier transport in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is studied in this paper. It was found that coherent carrier transport in QCLs decreases as the temperature increases because the coherence between the injector and active region energy levels decays at a faster rate with increasing temperature. Calculations show that the coherence time decreases by at least a factor of two as the temperature increases from 100 K to room temperature. Electron transport from the injector regions into the active regions and vice versa is a highly coherent process that becomes less efficient with decreasing coherence time and hence becomes less efficient with increasing temperature. As a consequence, when the temperature increases, the population of the upper lasing levels in active regions decreases, the population of the lower lasing levels increases and performance suffers.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamics and Quantum Transport in Small Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    Dynamics and Quantum Transport in Small Systems.” The PI is Ying-Cheng Lai from Arizona State University. The duration of the project was 12/1/2008...military systems may contain some graphene components. To understand various fundamental aspects of quantum transport dynamics is key to developing...conductance fluctuations, not seen previously in any quantum transport systems. This phenomenon has profound implications to the development of graphene

  3. One-hundred-nm-scale electronic structure and transport calculations of organic polymers on the K computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imachi, Hiroto; Yokoyama, Seiya; Kaji, Takami; Abe, Yukiya; Tada, Tomofumi; Hoshi, Takeo

    2016-12-01

    One-hundred-nm-scale electronic structure calculations were carried out on the K supercomputer by our original simulation code ELSES (http://www.elses.jp/) The present paper reports preliminary results of transport calculations for condensed organic polymers. Large-scale calculations are realized by novel massively parallel order-N algorithms. The transport calculations were carried out as a theoretical extension for the quantum wavepacket dynamics simulation. The method was applied to a single polymer chain and condensed polymers.

  4. A quantum transport model for atomic line radiation in plasmas*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Joël

    2017-02-01

    Emission and absorption lines in plasmas are investigated theoretically using a phase space formulation of quantum electrodynamics. A transport equation for the one-photon Wigner function is derived and formulated in terms of the noncommutative Moyal product. This equation reduces to the standard radiative transfer equation at the large spectral band limit, when the characteristic spectral band of the emission and absorption coefficients is larger than the inverse photon absorption length and time. We examine deviations to this limit. An ideal slab geometry is considered. The Wigner function relative to hydrogen Lyman α in stellar atmospheric conditions is calculated.

  5. Computation of electron quantum transport in graphene nanoribbons using GPU

    CERN Document Server

    Ihnatsenka, S

    2011-01-01

    The performance potential for simulating quantum electron transport on graphical processing units (GPUs) is studied. Using graphene ribbons of realistic sizes as an example it is shown that GPUs provide significant speed-ups in comparison to central processing units as the transverse dimension of the ribbon grows. The recursive Green's function algorithm is employed and implementation details on GPUs are discussed. Calculated conductances were found to accumulate significant numerical error due to single-precision floating-point arithmetic at energies close to the charge neutrality point of the graphene.

  6. Calculation of transport coefficients in an axisymmetric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumaker, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method of calculating the transport coefficient in an axisymmetric toroidal plasma is presented. This method is useful in calculating the transport coefficients in a Tokamak plasma confinement device. The particle density and temperature are shown to be a constant on a magnetic flux surface. Transport equations are given for the total particle flux and total energy flux crossing a closed toroidal surface. Also transport equations are given for the toroidal magnetic flux. A computer code was written to calculate the transport coefficients for a three species plasma, electrons and two species of ions. This is useful for calculating the transport coefficients of a plasma which contains impurities. It was found that the particle and energy transport coefficients are increased by a large amount, and the transport coefficients for the toroidal magnetic field are reduced by a small amount.

  7. SPECTRAL CALCULATIONS OF HAMILTONIAN FOR A QUANTUM FRACTAL NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A general formulation for the spectral calculations of the Hamiltonian operator of a Quantum Fractal Network(QFN) is presented. The QFN can be constructed by placing artificial neurons on each site of the fractal lattice. An artificial neuron may consist of a cell of a quantum cellular automaton or a quantum dot, which confines a single electron. The Coulomb interaction or the spin-spin interaction between neurons can be used to transmit signals and perform logic operations.The recursive formulas of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors between sub-lattices are obtained explicitly. As the application of the formulations,the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Hamiltonian operator for the Sierpinski gasket are calculated.

  8. Nonrenewal statistics in transport through quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptaszyński, Krzysztof

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of waiting times between successive tunneling events is an already established method to characterize current fluctuations in mesoscopic systems. Here, I investigate mechanisms generating correlations between subsequent waiting times in two model systems, a pair of capacitively coupled quantum dots and a single-level dot attached to spin-polarized leads. Waiting time correlations are shown to give insight into the internal dynamics of the system; for example they allow distinction between different mechanisms of the noise enhancement. Moreover, the presence of correlations breaks the validity of the renewal theory. This increases the number of independent cumulants of current fluctuation statistics, thus providing additional sources of information about the transport mechanism. I also propose a method for inferring the presence of waiting time correlations based on low-order current correlation functions. This method gives a way to extend the analysis of nonrenewal current fluctuations to the systems for which single-electron counting is not experimentally feasible. The experimental relevance of the findings is also discussed; for example reanalysis of previous results concerning transport in quantum dots is suggested.

  9. Quantum transport enhancement by time-reversal symmetry breaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimborás, Zoltán; Faccin, Mauro; Kádár, Zoltán; Whitfield, James D; Lanyon, Ben P; Biamonte, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics still provides new unexpected effects when considering the transport of energy and information. Models of continuous time quantum walks, which implicitly use time-reversal symmetric Hamiltonians, have been intensely used to investigate the effectiveness of transport. Here we show how breaking time-reversal symmetry of the unitary dynamics in this model can enable directional control, enhancement, and suppression of quantum transport. Examples ranging from exciton transport to complex networks are presented. This opens new prospects for more efficient methods to transport energy and information.

  10. Opto-electronic and quantum transport properties of semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabathil, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a novel and efficient method for the calculation of the ballistic transport properties of open semiconductor nanostructures connected to external reservoirs is presented. It is based on the Green's function formalism and reduces the effort to obtain the transmission and the carrier density to a single solution of a hermitian eigenvalue problem with dimensions proportional to the size of the decoupled device and the multiple inversion of a small matrix with dimensions proportional to the size of the contacts to the leads. Using this method, the 4-band GaAs hole transport through a 2-dimensional three-terminal T-junction device, and the resonant tunneling current through a 3-dimensional InAs quantum dot molecule embedded into an InP heterostructure have been calculated. The further extension of the method into a charge self-consistent scheme enables the efficient prediction of the IV-characteristics of highly doped nanoscale field effect transistors in the ballistic regime, including the influence of quasi bound states and the exchange-correlation interaction. Buettiker probes are used to emulate the effect of inelastic scattering on the current for simple 1D devices, systematically analyzing the dependence of the density of states and the resulting self-consistent potential on the scattering strength. The second major topic of this work is the modeling of the optical response of quantum confined neutral and charged excitons in single and coupled self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. For this purpose the existing device simulator nextnano{sup 3} has been extended to incorporate particle-particle interactions within the means of density functional theory in local density approximation. In this way the exciton transition energies for neutral and charged excitons as a function of an externally applied electric field have been calculated, revealing a systematic reduction of the intrinsic dipole with the addition of extra holes to the exciton, a finding

  11. Simulations of quantum transport in nanoscale systems: application to atomic gold and silver wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2002-01-01

    's function techniques are used to calculate the quantum conductance. Here we apply the method to the study of the electronic transport in wires of gold and silver with atomic thickness. We show the results of our calculations, and compare with some of the abundant experimental data on these systems....

  12. Quantum-chemical calculations of dye-sensitized semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P.; Lundqvist, M. J.; Nilsing, M.; van Duin, A. C. T.; Goddard, W. A., III

    2006-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations providing detailed information of dye-sensitized semiconductor nanocrystals are presented. The calculations are used to elucidate both structural and electronic properties of photoelectrochemical devices, such as environmentally friendly Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs), at the molecular level. Quantum chemical calculations have recently been performed on both organic and organometallic dye molecules attached to titanium dioxide (TiO II) nanocrystals via different anchor and spacer groups. Strategies to make accurate quantum chemical calculations, e.g. at the DFT level of theory, on increasingly realistic models of such dye-sensitized semiconductor interfaces are presented. The ability of different anchor and spacer groups to act as mediators of ultrafast photo-induced electron injection from the dye molecules into the semiconductor nanocrystals is, in particular, discussed in terms of calculated electronic coupling strengths, and direct comparisons with experimental information are made whenever possible. Progress in the development of multi-scale simulation techniques using so called reactive force fields is illustrated for dye-sensitized solar cell systems.

  13. Computational approach for calculating bound states in quantum field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Q. Z.; Norris, S.; Brennan, R.; Stefanovich, E.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a nonperturbative approach to calculate bound-state energies and wave functions for quantum field theoretical models. It is based on the direct diagonalization of the corresponding quantum field theoretical Hamiltonian in an effectively discretized and truncated Hilbert space. We illustrate this approach for a Yukawa-like interaction between fermions and bosons in one spatial dimension and show where it agrees with the traditional method based on the potential picture and where it deviates due to recoil and radiative corrections. This method permits us also to obtain some insight into the spatial characteristics of the distribution of the fermions in the ground state, such as the bremsstrahlung-induced widening.

  14. Minimum-Time Quantum Transport with Bounded Trap Velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanatos, Dionisis

    2011-01-01

    We formulate the problem of efficient transport of a quantum particle trapped in a harmonic potential which can move with a bounded velocity, as a minimum-time problem on a linear system with bounded input. We completely solve the corresponding optimal control problem and obtain an interesting bang-bang solution. These results are expected to find applications in quantum information processing, where quantum transport between the storage and processing units of a quantum computer is an essential step. They can also be extended to the efficient transport of Bose-Einstein condensates, where the ability to control them is crucial for their potential use as interferometric sensors.

  15. Uncertainty calculation in transport models and forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    in a four-stage transport model related to different variable distributions (to be used in a Monte Carlo simulation procedure), assignment procedures and levels of congestion, at both the link and the network level. The analysis used as case study the Næstved model, referring to the Danish town of Næstved2...... the uncertainty propagation pattern over time specific for key model outputs becomes strategically important. 1 Manzo, S., Nielsen, O. A. & Prato, C. G. (2014). The Effects of uncertainty in speed-flow curve parameters on a large-scale model. Transportation Research Record, 1, 30-37. 2 Manzo, S., Nielsen, O. A...

  16. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu, E-mail: zhy@yangtze.hku.hk; Kwok, YanHo; Chen, GuanHua, E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfluam Road (Hong Kong); Yam, ChiYung [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfluam Road (Hong Kong); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  17. A variational approach for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-09-14

    Recent development of theoretical method for dissipative quantum transport has achieved notable progresses in the weak or strong electron-phonon coupling regime. However, a generalized theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide parameter space had not been established. In this work, a variational polaron theory for dissipative quantum transport in a wide range of electron-phonon coupling is developed. The optimal polaron transformation is determined by the optimization of the Feynman-Bogoliubov upper bound of free energy. The free energy minimization ends up with an optimal mean-field Hamiltonian and a minimal interaction Hamiltonian. Hence, second-order perturbation can be applied to the transformed system, resulting in an accurate and efficient method for the treatment of dissipative quantum transport with different electron-phonon coupling strength. Numerical benchmark calculation on a single site model coupled to one phonon mode is presented.

  18. Transport through Zero-Dimensional States in a Quantum Dot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Wees, Bart J. van; Harmans, Kees J.P.M.; Williamson, John G.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the electron transport through zero-dimensional (0D) states. 0D states are formed when one-dimensional edge channels are confined in a quantum dot. The quantum dot is defined in a two-dimensional electron gas with a split gate technique. To allow electronic transport, connection to

  19. Time-resolved electron transport in quantum-dot systems; Zeitaufgeloester Elektronentransport in Quantendotsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croy, Alexander

    2010-06-30

    In this thesis the time-resolved electron transport in quantum dot systems was studied. For this two different formalisms were presented: The nonequilibrium Green functions and the generalized quantum master equations. For both formalisms a propagation method for the numerical calculation of time-resolved expectation values, like the occupation and the electron current, was developed. For the demonstration of the propagation method two different question formulations were considered. On the one hand the stochastically driven resonant-level model was studied. On the other hand the pulse-induced transport through a double quantum dot was considered.

  20. LDRD Final Review: Radiation Transport Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goorley, John Timothy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, George Lake [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lestone, John Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-22

    Both high-fidelity & toy simulations are being used to understand measured signals and improve the Area 11 NDSE diagnostic. We continue to gain more and more confidence in the ability for MCNP to simulate neutron and photon transport from source to radiation detector.

  1. Quantum Transport in Solids: Two-Electron Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The central objective of this research program has been to study theoretically the underlying principles of quantum transport in solids. The area of...research investigated has emphasized the understanding of two electron processes in quantum transport . The problems have been treated analytically to...the extent possible through the use of dynamical localized Wannier functions. These results have been and are being incorporated in a full quantum

  2. Harnessing quantum transport by transient chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso; Pecora, Louis M

    2013-03-01

    Chaos has long been recognized to be generally advantageous from the perspective of control. In particular, the infinite number of unstable periodic orbits embedded in a chaotic set and the intrinsically sensitive dependence on initial conditions imply that a chaotic system can be controlled to a desirable state by using small perturbations. Investigation of chaos control, however, was largely limited to nonlinear dynamical systems in the classical realm. In this paper, we show that chaos may be used to modulate or harness quantum mechanical systems. To be concrete, we focus on quantum transport through nanostructures, a problem of considerable interest in nanoscience, where a key feature is conductance fluctuations. We articulate and demonstrate that chaos, more specifically transient chaos, can be effective in modulating the conductance-fluctuation patterns. Experimentally, this can be achieved by applying an external gate voltage in a device of suitable geometry to generate classically inaccessible potential barriers. Adjusting the gate voltage allows the characteristics of the dynamical invariant set responsible for transient chaos to be varied in a desirable manner which, in turn, can induce continuous changes in the statistical characteristics of the quantum conductance-fluctuation pattern. To understand the physical mechanism of our scheme, we develop a theory based on analyzing the spectrum of the generalized non-Hermitian Hamiltonian that includes the effect of leads, or electronic waveguides, as self-energy terms. As the escape rate of the underlying non-attracting chaotic set is increased, the imaginary part of the complex eigenenergy becomes increasingly large so that pointer states are more difficult to form, making smoother the conductance-fluctuation pattern.

  3. Infinite variance in fermion quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, and lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied on to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple subareas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calculation unreliable or meaningless. We discuss how to identify the infinite variance problem. An approach is then proposed to solve the problem. The solution does not require major modifications to standard algorithms, adding a "bridge link" to the imaginary-time path integral. The general idea is applicable to a variety of situations where the infinite variance problem may be present. Illustrative results are presented for the ground state of the Hubbard model at half-filling.

  4. Infinite variance in fermion quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, and lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied on to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple subareas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calculation unreliable or meaningless. We discuss how to identify the infinite variance problem. An approach is then proposed to solve the problem. The solution does not require major modifications to standard algorithms, adding a "bridge link" to the imaginary-time path integral. The general idea is applicable to a variety of situations where the infinite variance problem may be present. Illustrative results are presented for the ground state of the Hubbard model at half-filling.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  6. Mixed-state quantum transport in correlated spin networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ajoy, Ashok; 10.1103/PhysRevA.85.042305

    2012-01-01

    Quantum spin networks can be used to transport information between separated registers in a quantum information processor. To find a practical implementation, the strict requirements of ideal models for perfect state transfer need to be relaxed, allowing for complex coupling topologies and general initial states. Here we analyze transport in complex quantum spin networks in the maximally mixed state and derive explicit conditions that should be satisfied by propagators for perfect state transport. Using a description of the transport process as a quantum walk over the network, we show that it is necessary to phase correlate the transport processes occurring along all the possible paths in the network. We provide a Hamiltonian that achieves this correlation, and use it in a constructive method to derive engineered couplings for perfect transport in complicated network topologies.

  7. Calculating Casimir Energies in Renormalizable Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A

    2003-01-01

    Quantum vacuum energy has been known to have observable consequences since 1948 when Casimir calculated the force of attraction between parallel uncharged plates, a phenomenon confirmed experimentally with ever increasing precision. Casimir himself suggested that a similar attractive self-stress existed for a conducting spherical shell, but Boyer obtained a repulsive stress. Other geometries and higher dimensions have been considered over the years. Local effects, and divergences associated with surfaces and edges have been considered by several authors. Quite recently, Graham et al. have re-examined such calculations, using conventional techniques of perturbative quantum field theory to remove divergences, and have suggested that previous self-stress results may be suspect. Here we show that the examples considered in their work are misleading; in particular, it is well-known that in two dimensions a circular boundary has a divergence in the Casimir energy for massless fields, while for general dimension $D$...

  8. Tensor RG calculations and quantum simulations near criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Meurice, Y; Tsai, Shan-Wen; Unmuth-Yockey, J; Yang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the reformulation of the O(2) model with a chemical potential and the Abelian Higgs model on a 1+1 dimensional space-time lattice using the Tensor Renormalization Group (TRG) method. The TRG allows exact blocking and connects smoothly the classical Lagrangian approach to the quantum Hamiltonian approach. We calculate the entanglement entropy in the superfluid phase of the O(2) model and show that it approximately obeys the logarithmic Calabrese-Cardy scaling obtained from Conformal Field Theory (CFT). We calculate the Polyakov loop in the Abelian Higgs model and discuss the possibility of a deconfinement transition at finite volume. We propose Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonians implementable on optical lattices as quantum simulators for CFT models.

  9. Hydrodynamic transport functions from quantum kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Calzetta, E A; Ramsey, S

    2000-01-01

    Starting from the quantum kinetic field theory [E. Calzetta and B. L. Hu, Phys. Rev. D37, 2878 (1988)] constructed from the closed-time-path (CTP), two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action we show how to compute from first principles the shear and bulk viscosity functions in the hydrodynamic-thermodynamic regime. For a real scalar field with $\\lambda \\Phi ^{4}$ self-interaction we need to include 4 loop graphs in the equation of motion. This work provides a microscopic field-theoretical basis to the ``effective kinetic theory'' proposed by Jeon and Yaffe [S. Jeon and L. G. Yaffe, Phys. Rev. D53, 5799 (1996)], while our result for the bulk viscosity reproduces their expression derived from linear response theory and the imaginary-time formalism of thermal field theory. Though unavoidably involved in calculations of this sort, we feel that the approach using fundamental quantum kinetic field theory is conceptually clearer and methodically simpler than the effective kinetic theory approach, as the success...

  10. Charge transport in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzel, Tamar Shoshana

    In this thesis, we study charge transport in arrays of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots. Nanocrystals are synthesized in solution, and an organic ligand on the surface of the nanocrystal creates a potential barrier that confines charges in the nanocrystal. Optical absorption measurements reveal discrete electronic energy levels in the nanocrystals resulting from quantum confinement. When nanocrystals are deposited on a surface, they self-assemble into a close-packed array forming a nanocrystal solid. We report electrical transport measurements of a PbSe nanocrystal solid that serves as the channel of an inverted field-effect transistor. We measure the conductance as a function of temperature, source-drain bias and. gate voltage. The data indicates that holes are the majority carriers; the Fermi energy lies in impurity states in the bandgap of the nanocrystal; and charges hop between the highest occupied valence state in the nanocrystals (the 1S h states). At low source-drain voltages, the activation energy for hopping is given by the energy required to generate holes in the 1Sh state plus activation over barriers resulting from site disorder. The barriers from site disorder are eliminated with a sufficiently high source-drain bias. From the gate effect, we extract the Thomas-Fermi screening length and a density of states that is consistent with the estimated value. We consider variable-range hopping as an alternative model, and find no self-consistent evidence for it. Next, we employ charge sensing as an alternative to current measurements for studying transport in materials with localized sites. A narrow-channel MOSFET serves as a charge sensor because its conductance is sensitive to potential fluctuations in the nearby environment caused by the motion of charge. In particular, it is sensitive to the fluctuation of single electrons at the silicon-oxide interface within the MOSFET. We pattern a strip of amorphous germanium within 100 nm of the transistor. The

  11. Quantum transport in coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L., E-mail: jinliang@nankai.edu.cn

    2016-07-15

    Quantum transport properties are instrumental to understanding quantum coherent transport processes. Potential applications of quantum transport are widespread, in areas ranging from quantum information science to quantum engineering, and not restricted to quantum state transfer, control and manipulation. Here, we study light transport in a ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic flux. The ring configuration, with an arbitrary number of resonators embedded, forms a two-arm Aharonov–Bohm interferometer. The influence of magnetic flux on light transport is investigated. Tuning the magnetic flux can lead to resonant transmission, while half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to completely destructive interference and transmission zeros in an interferometer with two equal arms. -- Highlights: •The light transport is investigated through ring array of coupled resonators enclosed synthetic magnetic field. •Aharonov–Bohm ring interferometer of arbitrary configuration is investigated. •The half-integer magnetic flux quantum leads to destructive interference and transmission zeros for two-arm at equal length. •Complete transmission is available via tuning synthetic magnetic flux.

  12. Nonlinear acceleration of SN transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichtl, Erin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Warsa, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Calef, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-20

    The use of nonlinear iterative methods, Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) in particular, for solving eigenvalue problems in transport applications has recently become an active subject of research. While JFNK has been shown to be effective for k-eigenvalue problems, there are a number of input parameters that impact computational efficiency, making it difficult to implement efficiently in a production code using a single set of default parameters. We show that different selections for the forcing parameter in particular can lead to large variations in the amount of computational work for a given problem. In contrast, we present a nonlinear subspace method that sits outside and effectively accelerates nonlinear iterations of a given form and requires only a single input parameter, the subspace size. It is shown to consistently and significantly reduce the amount of computational work when applied to fixed-point iteration, and this combination of methods is shown to be more efficient than JFNK for our application.

  13. Quantum Spin Transport in Mesoscopic Interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein W. A.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Spin-dependent conductance of ballistic mesoscopic interferometer is investigated. The quantum interferometer is in the form of ring, in which a quantum dot is embedded in one arm. This quantum dot is connected to one lead via tunnel barrier. Both Aharonov- Casher and Aharonov-Bohm e ects are studied. Our results confirm the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and quantum interference e ects in such confined quantum systems. This investigation is valuable for spintronics application, for example, quantum information processing.

  14. Topological phases and transport properties of screened interacting quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hengyi; Xiong, Ye; Wang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We study theoretically the effects of long-range and on-site Coulomb interactions on the topological phases and transport properties of spin-orbit-coupled quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires imposed on a s-wave superconductor. The distributions of the electrostatic potential and charge density are calculated self-consistently within the Hartree approximation. Due to the finite width of the wires and charge repulsion, the potential and density distribute inhomogeneously in the transverse direction and tend to accumulate along the lateral edges where the hard-wall confinement is assumed. This result has profound effects on the topological phases and the differential conductance of the interacting quantum wires and their hybrid junctions with superconductors. Coulomb interactions renormalize the gate voltage and alter the topological phases strongly by enhancing the topological regimes and producing jagged boundaries. Moreover, the multicritical points connecting different topological phases are modified remarkably in striking contrast to the predictions of the two-band model. We further suggest the possible non-magnetic topological phase transitions manipulated externally with the aid of long-range interactions. Finally, the transport properties of normal-superconductor junctions are further examined, in particular, the impacts of Coulomb interactions on the zero-bias peaks related to the Majorana fermions and near zero-energy peaks.

  15. Boltzmann transport calculation of collinear spin transport on short timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenno, Dennis M.; Kaltenborn, Steffen; Schneider, Hans Christian

    2016-09-01

    A spin-dependent Boltzmann transport equation is used to describe charge and spin dynamics resulting from the excitation of hot electrons in a ferromagnet/normal metal heterostructure. As the microscopic Boltzmann equation works with k -dependent distribution functions, it can describe far-from-equilibrium excitations, which are outside the scope of drift-diffusion theories. We study different scenarios for spin-dependent carrier injection into a nonmagnetic metal using an effectively two-dimensional phase space. While the charge signal is robust for various excitation schemes, the shape of the resulting spin current/density depends critically on the interplay between transport and scattering, and on the energetic distribution of the injected carriers. Our results imply that the energy dependence of the injected hot electrons has a decisive effect on the spin dynamics.

  16. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrodinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail.

  17. Precision decay rate calculations in quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Andreassen, Anders; Frost, William; Schwartz, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling in quantum field theory is worth understanding properly, not least because it controls the long term fate of our universe. There are however, a number of features of tunneling rate calculations which lack a desirable transparency, such as the necessity of analytic continuation, the appropriateness of using an effective instead of classical potential, and the sensitivity to short-distance physics. This paper attempts to review in pedagogical detail the physical origin of tunneling and its connection to the path integral. Both the traditional potential-deformation method and a recent more direct propagator-based method are discussed. Some new insights from using approximate semi-classical solutions are presented. In addition, we explore the sensitivity of the lifetime of our universe to short distance physics, such as quantum gravity, emphasizing a number of important subtleties.

  18. Calculation of hyperfine interaction in spherical quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakar, Yusuf; Çakır, Bekir; Özmen, Ayhan

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we have calculated the unperturbed wavefunctions and energy eigenvalues of the ground and excited states of a spherical quantum dot, GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs, by using quantum genetic algorithm and Hartree-Fock Roothaan method. Hyperfine coupling constant and hyperfine energy of 1s, 2p, 3d and 4f levels are carried out as a function of dot radius. The results show that the hyperfine constant and hyperfine energy varies rapidly in the strong and medium confining regions as dot radius decreases. It is worth pointing out that dot radius, impurity charge and angular momentum have a strong influence on the hyperfine energy. It is also found that hyperfine energy and hyperfine splitting vary with aluminium concentration ratio x.

  19. Delay time calculation for dual-wavelength quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamadou, A., E-mail: abd-hamado@yahoo.fr [Département des Sciences et Techniques, Faculté des Sciences et de la Technologie, Université de Bordj Bou Arreridj 34000 (Algeria); Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Lamari, S. [Laboratoire d’étude des surfaces et interfaces des matériaux solides (LESIMS), Sétif 19000 (Algeria); Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences, Université Sétif 1, 19000 (Algeria); Thobel, J.-L. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR 8520, Université Lille1, Avenue Poincaré, BP 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France)

    2013-11-28

    In this paper, we calculate the turn-on delay (t{sub th}) and buildup (Δt) times of a midinfrared quantum cascade laser operating simultaneously on two laser lines having a common upper level. The approach is based on the four-level rate equations model describing the variation of the electron number in the states and the photon number present within the cavity. We obtain simple analytical formulae for the turn-on delay and buildup times that determine the delay times and numerically apply our results to both the single and bimode states of a quantum cascade laser, in addition the effects of current injection on t{sub th} and Δt are explored.

  20. Calculation and Improvement on External Quantum Efficiency of OLEDs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The calculation of the external quantum efficiency(ηext) of organic light-emitting devices(OLEDs) is presented theoretically. The basic idea is to obtain ηext by calculating the fraction of the generated light that can escape through the top surface and the average transmittance over the escape cone. During the calculation, the effects of the interference, absorption and multiple reflections are neglected. Then a result of a typical 8-tris-hydroxyquinoline aluminum(Alq3)-based OLEDs on a planar glass substrate is obtained. And a twice increase in ηext can be achieved by using a high-index-glass substrate with an antireflection coating(SiO2) on substrate surface.

  1. Spectroscopic and quantum chemical calculation study on 2-ethoxythiazole molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcı, Davut; Dede, Bülent; Bahçeli, Semiha; Varkal, Döndü

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the 2-ethoxythiazole molecule (C5H7NSO) which is a member of the five-membered heterocyles with one nitrogen atom group has been investigated by using the experimental UV-vis (in three different solvents) and FT-IR spectral results as well as some magnetic properties. Furthermore, the calculated molecular geometric parameters, vibrational wavenumbers, HOMO-LUMO energies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift values and natural bond orbitals (NBO) of the title molecule have been calculated at the B3LYP and HSEH1PBE levels of theory with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The spectral results obtained from the quantum chemical calculations are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  3. Relativistic quantum transport theory for electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, P; Zhuang, P; Heinz, U

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the relationship between the covariant and the three-dimensional (equal-time) formulations of quantum kinetic theory. We show that the three-dimensional approach can be obtained as the energy average of the covariant formulation. We illustrate this statement in scalar and spinor QED. For scalar QED we derive Lorentz covariant transport and constraint equations directly from the Klein-Gordon equation rather than through the previously used Feshbach-Villars representation. We then consider pair production in a spatially homogeneous but time-dependent electric field and show that the pair density is derived much more easily via the energy averaging method than in the equal-time representation. Proceeding to spinor QED, we derive the covariant version of the equal-time equation derived by Bialynicki-Birula et al. We show that it must be supplemented by another self-adjoint equation to obtain a complete description of the covariant spinor Wigner operator. After spinor decomposition and energy averag...

  4. Parallel transport quantum logic gates with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    de Clercq, Ludwig; Marinelli, Matteo; Nadlinger, David; Oswald, Robin; Negnevitsky, Vlad; Kienzler, Daniel; Keitch, Ben; Home, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing will require combinations of gate operations and communication, with each applied in parallel to large numbers of quantum systems. These tasks are often performed sequentially, with gates implemented by pulsed fields and information transported either by moving the physical qubits or using photonic links. For trapped ions, an alternative approach is to implement quantum logic gates by transporting the ions through static laser beams, combining qubit operations with transport. This has significant advantages for scalability since the voltage waveforms required for transport can potentially be generated using micro-electronics integrated into the trap structure itself, while both optical and microwave control elements are significantly more bulky. Using a multi-zone ion trap, we demonstrate transport gates on a qubit encoded in the hyperfine structure of a beryllium ion. We show the ability to perform sequences of operations, and to perform parallel gates on two ions transported t...

  5. Quantum critical transport at a continuous metal-insulator transition

    OpenAIRE

    Haldar, P.; Laad, M. S.; Hassan, S. R.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the first-order correlation-driven Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT), contin- uous disorder-driven transitions are intrinsically quantum critical. Here, we investigate transport quantum criticality in the Falicov-Kimball model, a representative of the latter class in the "strong disorder" category. Employing cluster-dynamical mean-field theory (CDMFT), we find clear and anomalous quantum critical scaling behavior manifesting as perfect mirror symmetry of scaling curves on b...

  6. Infinite Variance in Fermion Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Hao

    2015-01-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties, without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, lattice QCD calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied upon to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple sub-areas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations turn out to have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calc...

  7. Initialization and Readout of Spin Chains for Quantum Information Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Gurneet

    2011-01-01

    Linear chains of spins acting as quantum wires are a promising approach to achieve scalable quantum information processors. Nuclear spins in apatite crystals provide an ideal test-bed for the experimental study of quantum information transport, as they closely emulate a one-dimensional spin chain. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance techniques can be used to drive the spin chain dynamics and probe the accompanying transport mechanisms. Here we demonstrate initialization and readout capabilities in these spin chains, even in the absence of single-spin addressability. These control schemes enable preparing desired states for quantum information transport and probing their evolution under the transport Hamiltonian. We further optimize the control schemes by a detailed analysis of $^{19}$F NMR lineshape.

  8. Numerical Evidence for Robustness of Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Shabani, A; Rabitz., H; Lloyd, S

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies show that decoherence process can enhance transport efficiency in quantum systems. This effect is known as environment-assisted quantum transport (ENAQT). The role of ENAQT in optimal quantum transport is well investigated, however, it is less known how robust ENAQT is with respect to variations in the system or its environment characteristic. Toward answering this question, we simulated excitonic energy transfer in Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) photosynthetic complex. We found that ENAQT is robust with respect to many relevant parameters of environmental interactions and Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian including reorganization energy, bath frequency cutoff, temperature, and initial excitations, dissipation rate, trapping rate, disorders, and dipole moments orientations. Our study suggests that the ENAQT phenomenon can be exploited in robust design of highly efficient quantum transport systems.

  9. Numerical evidence for robustness of environment-assisted quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, A; Mohseni, M; Rabitz, H; Lloyd, S

    2014-04-01

    Recent theoretical studies show that decoherence process can enhance transport efficiency in quantum systems. This effect is known as environment-assisted quantum transport (ENAQT). The role of ENAQT in optimal quantum transport is well investigated; however, it is less known how robust ENAQT is with respect to variations in the system or its environment characteristic. Toward answering this question, we simulated excitonic energy transfer in Fenna-Matthews-Olson photosynthetic complex. We found that ENAQT is robust with respect to many relevant parameters of environmental interactions and Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonians, including reorganization energy, bath-frequency cutoff, temperature, initial excitations, dissipation rate, trapping rate, disorders, and dipole moments orientations. Our study suggests that the ENAQT phenomenon can be exploited in robust design of highly efficient quantum transport systems.

  10. Quantum transport in strongly interacting one-dimensional nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agundez, R. R.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we study quantum transport in several one-dimensional systems with strong electronic interactions. The first chapter contains an introduction to the concepts treated throughout this thesis, such as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, the Kondo effect, the Fano effect and quantum state transfer.

  11. Electron transport and coherence in semiconductor quantum dots and rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Wiel, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    A number of experiments on electron transport and coherence in semiconductor vertical and lateral quantum dots and semiconductor rings is described. Quantum dots are often referred to as "artificial atoms", because of their similarities with real atoms. Examples of such atom-like properties that

  12. Riccati equation for simulation of leads in quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, M.; Farchioni, R.; Grosso, G.; Pastori Parravicini, G.

    2014-10-01

    We present a theoretical procedure with numerical demonstration of a workable and efficient method to evaluate the surface Green's function of semi-infinite leads connected to a device. Such a problem always occurs in quantum transport calculations but also in the study of surfaces and heterojunctions. We show here that these semi-infinite leads can be properly described by real-energy Green's functions obtained analytically by a smart solution of the Riccati matrix equation. The performance of our method is demonstrated in the case of a multichain two-dimensional electron-gas system, composed of a central ribbon connected to two semi-infinite leads, pierced by two opposite magnetic fields.

  13. Selective spin transport through a quantum heterostructure: Transfer matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Moumita; Maiti, Santanu K.

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, we propose that a one-dimensional quantum heterostructure composed of magnetic and non-magnetic (NM) atomic sites can be utilized as a spin filter for a wide range of applied bias voltage. A simple tight-binding framework is given to describe the conducting junction where the heterostructure is coupled to two semi-infinite one-dimensional NM electrodes. Based on transfer matrix method, all the calculations are performed numerically which describe two-terminal spin-dependent transmission probability along with junction current through the wire. Our detailed analysis may provide fundamental aspects of selective spin transport phenomena in one-dimensional heterostructures at nanoscale level.

  14. An Emphasis of Electron Energy Calculation in Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAOShao-Wen; CAOJun-Cheng; FENGSong-Lin

    2004-01-01

    We investigate various methods for the calculation of the electron energy in semiconductor quantum wells and focus on a matrix algorithm method. The results show better fitness of the factor -h2/2 э/эz 1/m*(z) э/эz than that of -h2/2 1/m*(z) э2/эz2 in the first part of the Schroedinger equation. The effect of nonparabolicity in the conduction band is also discussed.

  15. Importance of parametrizing constraints in quantum-mechanical variational calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kwong T.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    In variational calculations of quantum mechanics, constraints are sometimes imposed explicitly on the wave function. These constraints, which are deduced by physical arguments, are often not uniquely defined. In this work, the advantage of parametrizing constraints and letting the variational principle determine the best possible constraint for the problem is pointed out. Examples are carried out to show the surprising effectiveness of the variational method if constraints are parameterized. It is also shown that misleading results may be obtained if a constraint is not parameterized.

  16. Calculation of exchange interaction for modified Gaussian coupled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.

    2017-08-01

    A system of two laterally coupled quantum dots with modified Gaussian potential has been considered. Each quantum dot has an electron under electric and magnetic field. The quantum dots have been considered as hydrogen-like atoms. The physical picture has translated into the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian. The Schrödinger equation using finite element method has been numerically solved. The exchange energy factor has been calculated as a functions of electric field, magnetic field, and the separation distance between the centers of the dots ( d). According to the results, it is found that there is the transition from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic for constant electric field. Also, the transition occurs from ferromagnetic to anti-ferromagnetic for constant magnetic field (B>1 T). With decreasing the distance between the centers of the dots and increasing magnetic field, the transition occurs from anti-ferromagnetic to ferromagnetic. It is found that a switching of exchange energy factor is presented without canceling the interactions of the electric and magnetic fields on the system.

  17. Electron transport in n-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazic, I.; Ikonic, Z.; Milanovic, V.; Kelsall, R.W.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2007-01-01

    An electron transport model in n-Si/SiGe quantum cascade or superlattice structures is described. The model uses the electronic structure calculated within the effective-mass complex-energy framework, separately for perpendicular (Xz) and in-plane (Xxy) valleys, the degeneracy of which is lifted by

  18. Electron transport in n-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazic, I.; Ikonic, Z.; Milanovic, V.; Kelsall, R.W.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2007-01-01

    An electron transport model in n-Si/SiGe quantum cascade or superlattice structures is described. The model uses the electronic structure calculated within the effective-mass complex-energy framework, separately for perpendicular (Xz) and in-plane (Xxy) valleys, the degeneracy of which is lifted by

  19. Quantum Transport in Strongly Correlated Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Dan

    2007-01-01

    describes the leads in momentum-space. We benchmark each of these schemes against exact Greens function results for the conductance in the non-interacting limit, thus demonstrating the accuracy of the lead descriptions. We first use the DMRG implementations to calculate the conductance of an interacting...... suppression when having the interaction inside the chain, and conjecture that the enhancement by interacting contacts is universal. This result challenges the commonly used division between interacting transport region and non-interacting leads, and shows that care should be taken when making....... Thus both coherence and correlation effects are important in this model, and the methods applied should be able to handle both these effects rigorously. We present the DMRG setup for this model and benchmark against existing Greens function results for the model. Then we present initial DMRG results...

  20. Effects of anisotropy and Coulomb interactions on quantum transport in a quadruple quantum-dot structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Val'kov, V. V.; Aksenov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical investigation of the spectral and transport properties of a quadruple quantum-dot (QQD) structure which is one of the popular low-dimensional systems in the context of fundamental quantum physics study, future electronic applications, and quantum calculations. The density of states, occupation numbers, and conductance of the structure were analyzed using the nonequilibrium Green's functions in the tight-binding approach and the equation-of-motion method. In particular the anisotropy of hopping integrals and on-site electron energies as well as the effects of the finite intra- and interdot Coulomb interactions were investigated. It was found out that the anisotropy of the kinetic processes in the system leads to the Fano-Feshbach asymmetrical peak. We demonstrated that the conductance of the QQD device has a wide insulating band with steep edges separating triple-peak structures if the intradot Coulomb interactions are taken into account. The interdot Coulomb correlations between the central QDs result in the broadening of this band and the occurrence of an additional band with low conductance due to the Fano antiresonances. It was shown that in this case the conductance of the anisotropic QQD device can be dramatically changed by tuning the anisotropy of on-site electron energies.

  1. Quantum transport through an array of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuguang; Xie, Hang; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiaodong; Chen, Guanhua

    2013-01-07

    The transient current through an array of as many as 1000 quantum dots is simulated with two newly developed quantum mechanical methods. To our surprise, upon switching on the bias voltage, the current increases linearly with time before reaching its steady state value. And the time required for the current to reach its steady state value is proportional to the length of the array, and more interestingly, is exactly the time for a conducting electron to travel through the array at the Fermi velocity. These quantum phenomena can be understood by a simple analysis on the energetics of an equivalent classical circuit. An experimental design is proposed to confirm the numerical findings.

  2. Accelerating atomistic calculations of quantum energy eigenstates on graphic cards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Walter; Pecchia, A.; Lopez, M.; Auf der Maur, M.; Di Carlo, A.

    2014-10-01

    Electronic properties of nanoscale materials require the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of large matrices. This bottleneck can be overcome by parallel computing techniques or the introduction of faster algorithms. In this paper we report a custom implementation of the Lanczos algorithm with simple restart, optimized for graphical processing units (GPUs). The whole algorithm has been developed using CUDA and runs entirely on the GPU, with a specialized implementation that spares memory and reduces at most machine-to-device data transfers. Furthermore parallel distribution over several GPUs has been attained using the standard message passing interface (MPI). Benchmark calculations performed on a GaN/AlGaN wurtzite quantum dot with up to 600,000 atoms are presented. The empirical tight-binding (ETB) model with an sp3d5s∗+spin-orbit parametrization has been used to build the system Hamiltonian (H).

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiringa, R. B.; Nollett, Kenneth M.; Pieper, Steven C.; Brida, I.

    2009-10-01

    We report recent quantum Monte Carlo (variational and Green's function) calculations of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering. We are adding the cases of proton-^4He, neutron-^3H and proton-^3He scattering to a previous GFMC study of neutron-^4He scattering [1]. To do this requires generalizing our methods to include long-range Coulomb forces and to treat coupled channels. The two four-body cases can be compared to other accurate four-body calculational methods such as the AGS equations and hyperspherical harmonic expansions. We will present results for the Argonne v18 interaction alone and with Urbana and Illinois three-nucleon potentials. [4pt] [1] K.M. Nollett, S. C. Pieper, R.B. Wiringa, J. Carlson, and G.M. Hale, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 022502 (2007)

  4. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  5. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  6. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Álvarez, L; Las Heras, U; Mezzacapo, A; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2016-06-21

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  7. Semiclassical matrix model for quantum chaotic transport with time-reversal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novaes, Marcel, E-mail: marcel.novaes@gmail.com

    2015-10-15

    We show that the semiclassical approach to chaotic quantum transport in the presence of time-reversal symmetry can be described by a matrix model. In other words, we construct a matrix integral whose perturbative expansion satisfies the semiclassical diagrammatic rules for the calculation of transport statistics. One of the virtues of this approach is that it leads very naturally to the semiclassical derivation of universal predictions from random matrix theory.

  8. Quantum noise theory for phonon transport through nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Huang, Yunmi; Huang, Changcheng

    2017-04-01

    We have developed a quantum noise approach to study the phonon transport through nanostructures. The nanostructures acting as phonon channels are attached to two phonon reservoirs. And the temperature drop between the two reservoirs drives the phonon transport through the channels. We have derived a quantum Langevin equation(QLE) to describe the phonon transport with the quantum noise originated from the thermal fluctuation of the reservoirs. Within the Markov approximation, the QLE is used to get the thermal conductivity κ of the nanostructures and the finite size effect of the κ then is studied. In this study, the advantage of the quantum noise approach lays on the fact that no any local temperature needs to be defined for the nanostructures in its non-equilibrium state.

  9. Quantum Transport Simulation of High-Power 4.6-μm Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olafur Jonasson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a quantum transport simulation of a 4.6- μ m quantum cascade laser (QCL operating at high power near room temperature. The simulation is based on a rigorous density-matrix-based formalism, in which the evolution of the single-electron density matrix follows a Markovian master equation in the presence of applied electric field and relevant scattering mechanisms. We show that it is important to allow for both position-dependent effective mass and for effective lowering of very thin barriers in order to obtain the band structure and the current-field characteristics comparable to experiment. Our calculations agree well with experiments over a wide range of temperatures. We predict a room-temperature threshold field of 62 . 5 kV/cm and a characteristic temperature for threshold-current-density variation of T 0 = 199 K . We also calculate electronic in-plane distributions, which are far from thermal, and show that subband electron temperatures can be hundreds to thousands of degrees higher than the heat sink. Finally, we emphasize the role of coherent tunneling current by looking at the size of coherences, the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix. At the design lasing field, efficient injection manifests itself in a large injector/upper lasing level coherence, which underscores the insufficiency of semiclassical techniques to address injection in QCLs.

  10. Ehrenfest-time dependence of quantum transport corrections and spectral statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltner, Daniel; Kuipers, Jack

    2010-12-01

    The Ehrenfest-time scale in quantum transport separates essentially classical propagation from wave interference and here we consider its effect on the transmission and reflection through quantum dots. In particular, we calculate the Ehrenfest-time dependence of the next-to-leading-order quantum corrections to the transmission and reflection for dc and ac transport and check that our results are consistent with current conservation relations. Looking as well at spectral statistics in closed systems, we finally demonstrate how the contributions analyzed here imply changes in the calculation, given by Brouwer [Phys. Rev. E 74, 066208 (2006)], of the next-to-leading order of the spectral form factor. Our semiclassical result coincides with the result obtained by Tian and Larkin [Phys. Rev. B 70, 035305 (2004)] by field-theoretical methods.

  11. Hot electrons in superlattices: quantum transport versus Boltzmann equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, S.;

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent solution of the transport equation is presented for semiconductor superlattices within different approaches: (i) a full quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, (ii) the semiclassical Boltzmann equation for electrons in a miniband, and (iii) Boltzmann...

  12. Quantum coherence in ion channels: Resonances, Transport and Verification

    CERN Document Server

    Vaziri, A

    2010-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that long-lived quantum coherence exists during excitation energy transport in photosynthesis. It is a valid question up to which length, time and mass scales quantum coherence may extend, how to one may detect this coherence and what if any role it plays for the dynamics of the system. Here we suggest that the selectivity filter of ion channels may exhibit quantum coherence which might be relevant for the process of ion selectivity and conduction. We show that quantum resonances could provide an alternative approch to ultrafast 2D spectroscopy to probe these quantum coherences. We demonstrate that the emergence of resonances in the conduction of ion channels that are modulated periodicallly by time dependent external electric fields can serve as signitures of quantum coherence in such a system. Assessments of experimental feasibility and specific paths towards the experimental realization of such experiments are presented. We show that this may be probed by direct 2-D spectroscop...

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations Applied to Magnetic Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Larry [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We have calculated the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg spin systems using a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method. We have used some of these systems as models to describe recently synthesized magnetic molecules, and-upon comparing the results of these calculations with experimental data-have obtained accurate estimates for the basic parameters of these models. We have also performed calculations for other systems that are of more general interest, being relevant both for existing experimental data and for future experiments. Utilizing the concept of importance sampling, these calculations can be carried out in an arbitrarily large quantum Hilbert space, while still avoiding any approximations that would introduce systematic errors. The only errors are statistical in nature, and as such, their magnitudes are accurately estimated during the course of a simulation. Frustrated spin systems present a major challenge to the QMC method, nevertheless, in many instances progress can be made. In this chapter, the field of magnetic molecules is introduced, paying particular attention to the characteristics that distinguish magnetic molecules from other systems that are studied in condensed matter physics. We briefly outline the typical path by which we learn about magnetic molecules, which requires a close relationship between experiments and theoretical calculations. The typical experiments are introduced here, while the theoretical methods are discussed in the next chapter. Each of these theoretical methods has a considerable limitation, also described in Chapter 2, which together serve to motivate the present work. As is shown throughout the later chapters, the present QMC method is often able to provide useful information where other methods fail. In Chapter 3, the use of Monte Carlo methods in statistical physics is reviewed, building up the fundamental ideas that are necessary in order to understand the method that has been used in this work. With these

  14. Road Transport Congestion Costs Calculations-Adaptation to Engineering Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Lep

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article represents so called “engineering” approach for computing the total road transport congestion costs. According to economic welfare theory, the total costs of transport congestion are defined as dead weight loss (DWL of infrastructure use. With a set of equations DWL could be formulated in a mathematical way. Because such form of equation is not directly applicable for concrete road network calculations it should be transformed into “engineering” form, which comprises transport engineering related data as classified road links, traffic volumes, passenger unit costs, etc. The equation is well applicable on the interurban road network; adaptations are needed for the urban road network cost calculations, where time losses are not so much related to the link travel time. The final equation was derived for the purposes of national road congestion cost calculation.

  15. Numerical methods for spin-dependent transport calculations and spin bound states analysis in Rashba waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hang; Sha, Wei E I

    2015-01-01

    Numerical methods are developed in the quantum transport calculations for electron in the waveguides with spin-orbital (Rashba) interaction. The methods are based on a hybrid mode-matching scheme in which the wavefunctions are expressed as the superposition of eigenmodes in the lead regions and in the device region the wavefunction is expressed on the discrete basis. Two versions are presented for the lead without and with the Rashba interaction. In the latter case the eigenmodes are obtained from a quadratic eigenproblem calculation. These methods are suitable for the systems with variable geometries or arbitrary potential profiles. The computation can be effectively accelerated by the sparse matrix technique. We also investigate the Fano-Rashba bound states in the Rashba waveguides by some nonlinear eigenstate calculation. This calculation is based on a mode-matching method and self-consistent results are obtained in our calculations.

  16. Complex Quantum Networks: From Universal Breakdown to Optimal Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Muelken, Oliver; Galiceanu, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    We show that all sequentially growing networks yield the same universal behavior at the breakdown of single-particle quantum transport. For this, we study the global time-averaged transport efficiency of excitations on complex quantum networks. Further, we observe the transition to optimal transport by starting from a network with complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs and systematically reducing the number of loops. These effects are explained on the basis of the spectral properties of the network's Hamiltonian. Our theoretical considerations are supported by numerical Monte-Carlo simulations for complex quantum networks with a scale-free size distribution of sequential subgraphs and a small-world-type transition to optimal transport.

  17. Disorder-assisted quantum transport in suboptimal decoherence regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Leonardo; Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser

    2016-01-04

    We investigate quantum transport in binary tree structures and in hypercubes for the disordered Frenkel-exciton Hamiltonian under pure dephasing noise. We compute the energy transport efficiency as a function of disorder and dephasing rates. We demonstrate that dephasing improves transport efficiency not only in the disordered case, but also in the ordered one. The maximal transport efficiency is obtained when the dephasing timescale matches the hopping timescale, which represent new examples of the Goldilocks principle at the quantum scale. Remarkably, we find that in weak dephasing regimes, away from optimal levels of environmental fluctuations, the average effect of increasing disorder is to improve the transport efficiency until an optimal value for disorder is reached. Our results suggest that rational design of the site energies statistical distributions could lead to better performances in transport systems at nanoscale when their natural environments are far from the optimal dephasing regime.

  18. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengqin Shi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  19. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pengqin; Hu, Menghan; Ying, Yaofeng; Jin, Jinshuang

    2016-09-01

    Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tews, Ingo

    2015-10-12

    The neutron-matter equation of state connects several physical systems over a wide density range, from cold atomic gases in the unitary limit at low densities, to neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate densities, up to neutron stars which reach supranuclear densities in their core. An accurate description of the neutron-matter equation of state is therefore crucial to describe these systems. To calculate the neutron-matter equation of state reliably, precise many-body methods in combination with a systematic theory for nuclear forces are needed. Chiral effective field theory (EFT) is such a theory. It provides a systematic framework for the description of low-energy hadronic interactions and enables calculations with controlled theoretical uncertainties. Chiral EFT makes use of a momentum-space expansion of nuclear forces based on the symmetries of Quantum Chromodynamics, which is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. In chiral EFT, the description of nuclear forces can be systematically improved by going to higher orders in the chiral expansion. On the other hand, continuum Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most precise many-body methods available to study strongly interacting systems at finite densities. They treat the Schroedinger equation as a diffusion equation in imaginary time and project out the ground-state wave function of the system starting from a trial wave function by propagating the system in imaginary time. To perform this propagation, continuum QMC methods require as input local interactions. However, chiral EFT, which is naturally formulated in momentum space, contains several sources of nonlocality. In this Thesis, we show how to construct local chiral two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) interactions and discuss results of first QMC calculations for pure neutron systems. We have performed systematic auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for neutron matter using local chiral NN interactions. By

  1. Matrix product state calculations for one-dimensional quantum chains and quantum impurity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muender, Wolfgang

    2011-09-28

    involving a Kondo exciton and population switching in quantum dots. It turns out that both phenomena rely on the various manifestations of Anderson orthogonality (AO), which describes the fact that the response of the Fermi sea to a quantum quench (i.e. an abrupt change of some property of the impurity or quantum dot) is a change of the scattering phase shifts of all the single-particle wave functions, therefore drastically changing the system. In this context, we demonstrate that NRG, a highly accurate method for quantum impurity models, allows for the calculation of all static and dynamic quantities related to AO and present an extensive NRG study for population switching in quantum dots. (orig.)

  2. Quantum Chemical Calculations Resolved Identification of Methylnitrocatechols in Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frka, Sanja; Šala, Martin; Kroflič, Ana; Huš, Matej; Čusak, Alen; Grgić, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Methylnitrocatechols (MNCs) are secondary organic aerosol (SOA) tracers and major contributors to atmospheric brown carbon; however, their formation and aging processes in atmospheric waters are unknown. To investigate the importance of aqueous-phase electrophilic substitution of 3-methylcatechol with nitronium ion (NO2(+)), we performed quantum calculations of their favorable pathways. The calculations predicted the formation of 3-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (3M5NC), 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol (3M4NC), and a negligible amount of 3-methyl-6-nitrocatechol (3M6NC). MNCs in atmospheric PM2 samples were further inspected by LC/(-)ESI-MS/MS using commercial as well as de novo synthesized authentic standards. We detected 3M5NC and, for the first time, 3M4NC. In contrast to previous reports, 3M6NC was not observed. Agreement between calculated and observed 3M5NC/3M4NC ratios cannot unambiguously confirm the electrophilic mechanism as the exclusive formation pathway of MNCs in aerosol water. However, the examined nitration by NO2(+) is supported by (1) the absence of 3M6NC in the ambient aerosols analyzed and (2) the constant 3M5NC/3M4NC ratio in field aerosol samples, which indicates their common formation pathway. The magnitude of error one could make by incorrectly identifying 3M4NC as 3M6NC in ambient aerosols was also assessed, suggesting the importance of evaluating the literature regarding MNCs with special care.

  3. Quantum-Mechanical Calculations on Molecular Substructures Involved in Nanosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Szefler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, four ideas are discussed: (a aromaticity of fullerenes patched with flowers of 6-and 8-membered rings, optimized at the HF and DFT levels of theory, in terms of HOMA and NICS criteria; (b polybenzene networks, from construction to energetic and vibrational spectra computations; (c quantum-mechanical calculations on the repeat units of various P-type crystal networks and (d construction and stability evaluation, at DFTB level of theory, of some exotic allotropes of diamond D5, involved in hyper-graphenes. The overall conclusion was that several of the yet hypothetical molecular nanostructures herein described are serious candidates to the status of real molecules.

  4. Quantum plasmonics: from jellium models to ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varas Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Light-matter interaction in plasmonic nanostructures is often treated within the realm of classical optics. However, recent experimental findings show the need to go beyond the classical models to explain and predict the plasmonic response at the nanoscale. A prototypical system is a nanoparticle dimer, extensively studied using both classical and quantum prescriptions. However, only very recently, fully ab initio time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT calculations of the optical response of these dimers have been carried out. Here, we review the recent work on the impact of the atomic structure on the optical properties of such systems. We show that TDDFT can be an invaluable tool to simulate the time evolution of plasmonic modes, providing fundamental understanding into the underlying microscopical mechanisms.

  5. Conformational analysis of small molecules: NMR and quantum mechanics calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormena, Cláudio F

    2016-08-01

    This review deals with conformational analysis in small organic molecules, and describes the stereoelectronic interactions responsible for conformational stability. Conformational analysis is usually performed using NMR spectroscopy through measurement of coupling constants at room or low temperature in different solvents to determine the populations of conformers in solution. Quantum mechanical calculations are used to address the interactions responsible for conformer stability. The conformational analysis of a large number of small molecules is described, using coupling constant measurements in different solvents and at low temperature, as well as recent applications of through-space and through-hydrogen bond coupling constants JFH as tools for the conformational analysis of fluorinated molecules. Besides NMR parameters, stereoelectronic interactions such as conjugative, hyperconjugative, steric and intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions involved in conformational preferences are discussed.

  6. Graphical User Interface for Simplified Neutron Transport Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Randolph; Carter, Leland L

    2011-07-18

    A number of codes perform simple photon physics calculations. The nuclear industry is lacking in similar tools to perform simplified neutron physics shielding calculations. With the increased importance of performing neutron calculations for homeland security applications and defense nuclear nonproliferation tasks, having an efficient method for performing simple neutron transport calculations becomes increasingly important. Codes such as Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) can perform the transport calculations; however, the technical details in setting up, running, and interpreting the required simulations are quite complex and typically go beyond the abilities of most users who need a simple answer to a neutron transport calculation. The work documented in this report resulted in the development of the NucWiz program, which can create an MCNP input file for a set of simple geometries, source, and detector configurations. The user selects source, shield, and tally configurations from a set of pre-defined lists, and the software creates a complete MCNP input file that can be optionally run and the results viewed inside NucWiz.

  7. Hidden symmetries enhance quantum transport in Light Harvesting systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zech, Tobias; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    For more than 50 years we have known that photosynthetic systems harvest solar energy with almost unit {\\it quantum efficiency}. However, recent experimental evidence of {\\it quantum coherence} during the excitonic energy transport in photosynthetic organisms challenges our understanding of this fundamental biological function. Currently, and despite numerous efforts, the causal connection between coherence and efficiency is still a matter of debate. We show, through the study of extensive simulations of quantum coherent transport on networks, that three dimensional structures characterized by centro-symmetric Hamiltonians are statistically more efficient than random arrangements. Moreover, we demonstrate that the experimental data available for the electronic Hamiltonians of the Fenna-Mathew-Olson (FMO) complex of sulfur bacteria and of the crypophyte PC645 complex of marine algae are consistent with this strong correlation of centro-symmetry with quantum efficiency. These results show that what appears to b...

  8. Scattering matrix approach to non-stationary quantum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Moskalets, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to introduce the basic elements of the scattering matrix approach to transport phenomena in dynamical quantum systems of non-interacting electrons. This approach admits a physically clear and transparent description of transport processes in dynamical mesoscopic systems promising basic elements of solid-state devices for quantum information processing. One of the key effects, the quantum pump effect, is considered in detail. In addition, the theory for a recently implemented new dynamical source - injecting electrons with time delay much larger than the electron coherence time - is offered. This theory provides a simple description of quantum circuits with such a single-particle source and shows in an unambiguous way that the tunability inherent to the dynamical systems leads to a number of unexpected but fundamental effects.

  9. Coherent quantum transport features in carbon superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, R.; Henley, S. J.; Silva, S. R. P.; Bhattacharyya, S.

    2016-10-01

    Whilst resonant transmission is well understood and can be fully harnessed for crystalline superlattices, a complete picture has not yet emerged for disordered superlattices. It has proven difficult to tune resonant transmission in disordered diamond-like carbon (DLC) superlattices as conventional models are not equipped to incorporate significant structural disorder. In this work, we present concurrent experimental and theoretical analysis which addresses resonant transmission in DLC superlattices. Devices were fabricated by growing alternate layers of DLC with different percentages of sp3 hybridized carbon.Coherent quantum transport effects were demonstrated in these structurally disordered DLC superlattices through distinct current modulation with negative differential resistance (NDR) in the current-voltage (I-V) measurements. A model was developed using tight-binding calculations assuming a random variation of the hopping integral to simulate structural (bond-length) disorder. Calculations of the I-V characteristics compliment the interpretation of the measurements and illustrate that while DLC superlattice structures are unlike their classical counterparts, the near-field structural order will help with the confinement of quantised states. The present model provides an empirical guide for tailoring the properties of future devices, giving rise to much hope that carbon electronics operating at high frequencies over large areas can now be developed.

  10. Nanoelectronics. Spin transport in the NEGF method and quantum spin Hall effect by «bottom-up» approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.A. Kruglyak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spin transport with the NEGF method in the spinor representation, in particular, spin valve, rotating magnetic contacts, spin precession and rotating spins, Zeeman and Rashba spin Hamiltonians, quantum spin Hall effect, calculation the spin potential, and four-component description of transport are discussed in the frame of the «bottom – up» approach of modern nanoelectronics.

  11. Quantum transport efficiency and Fourier's law

    CERN Document Server

    Manzano, Daniel; Asadian, Ali; Briegel, Hans J

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the steady-state energy transfer in a chain of coupled two-level systems connecting two thermal reservoirs. Through an analytic treatment we find that the energy current is independent of the system size, hence violating Fourier's law of heat conduction. The classical diffusive behavior in Fourier's law of heat conduction can be recovered by introducing decoherence to the quantum systems constituting the chain. Implications of these results on energy transfer in biological light harvesting systems, and the role of quantum coherences and entanglement are discussed.

  12. Structure of Quantum Chaotic Wavefunctions Ergodicity, Localization, and Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1999-01-01

    We discuss recent developments in the study of quantum wavefunctions and transport in classically ergodic systems. Surprisingly, short-time classical dynamics leaves permanent imprints on long-time and stationary quantum behavior, which are absent from the long-time classical motion. These imprints can lead to quantum behavior on single-wavelength or single-channel scales which are very different from random matrix theory expectations. Robust and quantitative predictions are obtained using semiclassical methods. Applications to wavefunction intensity statistics and to resonances in open systems are discussed.

  13. Environment-assisted quantum walks in excitonic energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Rebentrost, Patrick; Lloyd, Seth; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Long-lived quantum coherence has recently been observed experimentally via ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy in excitonic energy transfer within light-harvesting photosynthetic complexes, conjugated polymers, and marine alga even at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate that directed quantum walks lead to an enhancement of energy transfer efficiency in such systems. We introduce two complementary theoretical approaches, based on a Green's function method and energy transfer susceptibilities, to partition open quantum dynamics. We quantify the role of fundamental physical processes involved in energy transport. In particular, we examine the contributions of classical hopping, coherent excitonic Hamiltonian, and phonon-induced decoherence effects for pure dephasing, Markovian, and non-Markovian limits.

  14. Topological Effects on Quantum Phase Slips in Superfluid Spin Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigate effects of quantum fluctuations on superfluid spin transport through easy-plane quantum antiferromagnetic spin chains in the large-spin limit. Quantum fluctuations result in the decaying spin supercurrent by unwinding the magnetic order parameter within the easy plane, which is referred to as phase slips. We show that the topological term in the nonlinear sigma model for the spin chains qualitatively differentiates the decaying rate of the spin supercurrent between the integer versus half-odd-integer spin chains. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which the dependence of the decaying rate on constituent spins can be verified by measuring the nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  15. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    to as artificial atoms [2, 3]. Additionally, in order for the system to be truly quantum, the size of the dot has to be comparable to the de Broglie wavelength of the electrons in it. What we have mentioned so far is rather abstract conditions, which practically can be realized in various systems, such as...... in all three directions, which makes it effectively zero dimensional and corresponds to discrete electronic orbitals (levels) and excitation spectrum. This is analogous to the situation in atoms, where confinement potential replaces the potential of the nucleus, thus quantum dots are often referred...

  16. Centrosymmetry enhances quantum transport in disordered molecular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zech, Tobias; Mulet, Roberto; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    For more than 50 years we have known that photosynthetic systems harvest solar energy with almost unit quantum efficiency. However, recent experimental evidence of quantum coherence during the excitonic energy transport in photosynthetic organisms challenges our understanding of this fundamental biological function. Currently, and despite numerous efforts, the causal connection between coherence and efficiency is still a matter of debate. We show, through extensive simulations of quantum coherent transport on networks, that three dimensional structures characterized by centro-symmetric Hamiltonians are statistically more efficient than random arrangements. Moreover, a strong correlation of centro-symmetry with quantum efficiency is also observed under the coherent transport dynamics induced by experimentally estimated electronic Hamiltonians of the Fenna-Mathew-Olson complex of sulfur bacteria and of the cryptophyte PC645 complex of marine algae. The application of a genetic algorithm results in a set of optimized Hamiltonians only when seeded from the experimentally estimated Hamiltonian. These results suggest that what appears to be geometrically disordered complexes may well exhibit an inherent hidden symmetry which enhances the energy transport between chromophores. We are confident that our results will motivate research to explore the properties of nearly centro-symmetric Hamiltonians in realistic environments, and to unveil the role of symmetries for quantum effects in biology. The unravelling of such symmetries may open novel perspectives and suggest new design principles in the development of artificial devices.

  17. Geometry of quantum transport for dephasing Lindbladians

    CERN Document Server

    Avron, J E; Graf, G M; Kenneth, O

    2010-01-01

    We develop a geometric theory of adiabatic transport in driven open systems governed by dephasing Lindbladians. The coefficients of dissipative transport are determined by the Fubini-Study metric and the coefficients of non-dissipative transport by the adiabatic curvature. This gives a possible mechanism for residual resistance for gapped systems at low temperatures. When the metric and symplectic form are compatible non-dissipative terms in the inverse matrix of transport coefficients are immune to dephasing. We give three examples of compatible systems: The qubit, coherent states for the Harmonic oscillator and the lowest Landau level on a torus.

  18. Transporting continuous quantum variables of individual light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eto, Yujiro; Zhang, Yun; Hirano, Takuya

    2011-01-17

    We experimentally demonstrate transporting continuous quantum variables of individual light pulses at telecommunication wavelengths by using continuous-variable Bell measurements and post-processing displacement techniques. Time-domain pulsed homodyne detectors are used in the Bell measurements and the quantum variables of input light are transported pulse-by-pulse. Fidelity of F = 0.57±0.03 is experimentally achieved with the aid of entanglement, which is higher than the bound (F(c) = 0.5) of the classical case in the absence of entanglement.

  19. Three dimensions transport calculations for PWR core; Calcul de coeur R.E.P. en transport 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richebois, E

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this work is to define improved 3-D core calculation methods based on the transport theory. These methods can be particularly useful and lead to more precise computations in areas of the core where anisotropy and steep flux gradients occur, especially near interface and boundary conditions and in regions of high heterogeneity (bundle with absorbent rods). In order to apply the transport theory a new method for calculating reflector constants has been developed, since traditional methods were only suited for 2-group diffusion core calculations and could not be extrapolated to transport calculations. In this thesis work, the new method for obtaining reflector constants is derived regardless of the number of energy groups and of the operator used. The core calculations results using the reflector constants thereof obtained have been validated on the EDF's power reactor Saint Laurent B1 with MOX loading. The advantages of a 3-D core transport calculation scheme have been highlighted as opposed to diffusion methods; there are a considerable number of significant effects and potential advantages to be gained in rod worth calculations for instance. These preliminary results obtained with on particular cycle will have to be confirmed by more systematic analysis. Accidents like MSLB (main steam line break) and LOCA (loss of coolant accident) should also be investigated and constitute challenging situations where anisotropy is high and/or flux gradients are steep. This method is now being validated for others EDF's PWRs' reactors, as well as for experimental reactors and other types of commercial reactors. (author)

  20. Theory of quantum transport at nanoscale an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ryndyk, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    This book is an introduction to a rapidly developing field of modern theoretical physics – the theory of quantum transport at nanoscale. The theoretical methods considered in the book are in the basis of our understanding of charge, spin and heat transport in nanostructures and nanostructured materials and are widely used in nanoelectronics, molecular electronics, spin-dependent electronics (spintronics) and bio-electronics. The book is based on lectures for graduate and post-graduate students at the University of Regensburg and the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden). The first part is devoted to the basic concepts of quantum transport: Landauer-Büttiker method and matrix Green function formalism for coherent transport, Tunneling (Transfer) Hamiltonian and master equation methods for tunneling, Coulomb blockade, vibrons and polarons. The results in this part are obtained as possible without sophisticated techniques, such as nonequilibrium Green functions, which are considered in detail in the...

  1. Direct method for calculating temperature-dependent transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Yuan, Zhe; Wesselink, R. J. H.; Starikov, Anton A.; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Kelly, Paul J.

    2015-06-01

    We show how temperature-induced disorder can be combined in a direct way with first-principles scattering theory to study diffusive transport in real materials. Excellent (good) agreement with experiment is found for the resistivity of Cu, Pd, Pt (and Fe) when lattice (and spin) disorder are calculated from first principles. For Fe, the agreement with experiment is limited by how well the magnetization (of itinerant ferromagnets) can be calculated as a function of temperature. By introducing a simple Debye-like model of spin disorder parameterized to reproduce the experimental magnetization, the temperature dependence of the average resistivity, the anisotropic magnetoresistance, and the spin polarization of a Ni80Fe20 alloy are calculated and found to be in good agreement with existing data. Extension of the method to complex, inhomogeneous materials as well as to the calculation of other finite-temperature physical properties within the adiabatic approximation is straightforward.

  2. Quantized Thermal Transport in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, C. L.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze thermal transport in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), employing a Luttinger liquid model of edge states. Impurity mediated inter-channel scattering events are incorporated in a hydrodynamic description of heat and charge transport. The thermal Hall conductance, $K_H$, is shown to provide a new and universal characterization of the FQHE state, and reveals non-trivial information about the edge structure. The Lorenz ratio between thermal and electrical Hall conductances {\\i...

  3. Quantum Model of Energy Transport in Collagen Molecules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yi; LIN Xian-Zhe

    2001-01-01

    A semi-quantum model for energy transport in collagen molecules is presented. Soliton-like dynamics of this model is investigated numerically without and with the temperature effect taking into account. It is found that in both the cases energy can transport for a long distance along the collagen chain. This indicates that collagen molecules can be taken as a candidate for the acupuncture channel.

  4. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical calculation and molecular docking of dipfluzine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Karnica; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Sinha, Kirti; Wang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Molecular structure and vibrational analysis of dipfluzine (C27H29FN2O) were presented using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The theoretical ground state geometry and electronic structure of dipfluzine are optimized by the DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G (d,p) method and compared with those of the crystal data. The 1D potential energy scan was performed by varying the dihedral angle using B3LYP functional at 6-31G(d,p) level of theory and thus the most stable conformer of the compound were determined. Molecular electrostatic potential surface (MEPS), frontier orbital analysis and electronic reactivity descriptor were used to predict the chemical reactivity of molecule. Energies of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds in molecule and their electronic aspects were investigated by natural bond orbital (NBO). To find out the anti-apoptotic activity of the title compound molecular docking studies have been performed against protein Fas.

  5. Electron transport through a linear tri-quantum-dot molecule Aharonov-Bohm interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jiyuan; He, Zelong; Li, Li; Ye, Shujiang; Sun, Weimin

    2017-09-01

    Using the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green's function technique, electron transport properties through a two-terminal linear tri-quantum-dot molecule Aharonov-Bohm (A-B) interference are investigated. The conductance as a function of electron energy is numerically calculated. The influence of magnetic flux and interdot coupling strength on the conductance is researched. Fano resonances emerge in the conductance spectrum, and two bound states in the continuum form simultaneously when the interdot couplings take appropriate values. A conductance dip is observed and evolves into an antiresonance band with increasing magnetic flux. The system can be designed as a quantum switch by adjusting the intramolecular couplings.

  6. Nonlinearly-enhanced energy transport in many dimensional quantum chaos

    KAUST Repository

    Brambila, D. S.

    2013-08-05

    By employing a nonlinear quantum kicked rotor model, we investigate the transport of energy in multidimensional quantum chaos. This problem has profound implications in many fields of science ranging from Anderson localization to time reversal of classical and quantum waves. We begin our analysis with a series of parallel numerical simulations, whose results show an unexpected and anomalous behavior. We tackle the problem by a fully analytical approach characterized by Lie groups and solitons theory, demonstrating the existence of a universal, nonlinearly-enhanced diffusion of the energy in the system, which is entirely sustained by soliton waves. Numerical simulations, performed with different models, show a perfect agreement with universal predictions. A realistic experiment is discussed in two dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein-Condensates (BEC). Besides the obvious implications at the fundamental level, our results show that solitons can form the building block for the realization of new systems for the enhanced transport of matter.

  7. Quantum quasi-steady states in current transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agosta, Roberto; Zwolak, Michael; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2007-03-01

    We investigate quasi-steady state solutions to transport in quantum systems by finding states which at some time minimize the change in density throughout all space and have a given current density flowing from one part of the system to another [1]. Contrary to classical dynamics, in a quantum mechanical system there are many states with a given energy and particle number which satisfy this minimization criterion. Taking as an example spinless fermions on a one-dimensional lattice, we explicitly show the phase space of a class of quasi-steady states. We also discuss the possibility of coherent and incoherent mixing of these steady state solutions leading to a new type of noise in quantum transport. [1] M. Di Ventra and T.N. Todorov J. Phys. Cond. Matt. 16, 8025 (2004).

  8. A Transport Equation Approach to Green Functions and Self-force Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Wardell, Barry

    2010-01-01

    In a recent work, we presented the first application of the Poisson-Wiseman-Anderson method of `matched expansions' to compute the self-force acting on a point particle moving in a curved spacetime. The method employs two expansions for the Green function which are respectively valid in the `quasilocal' and `distant past' regimes, and which may be matched together within the normal neighbourhood. In this article, we introduce the method of matched expansions and discuss transport equation methods for the calculation of the Green function in the quasilocal region. These methods allow the Green function to be evaluated throughout the normal neighborhood and are also relevant to a broad range of problems from radiation reaction to quantum field theory in curved spacetime and quantum gravity.

  9. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu, E-mail: zhy@yangtze.hku.hk; Chen, GuanHua, E-mail: ghc@everest.hku.hk [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Yam, ChiYung [Department of Chemistry, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  10. Dissipative time-dependent quantum transport theory: Quantum interference and phonon induced decoherence dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yam, ChiYung; Chen, GuanHua

    2015-04-28

    A time-dependent inelastic electron transport theory for strong electron-phonon interaction is established via the equations of motion method combined with the small polaron transformation. In this work, the dissipation via electron-phonon coupling is taken into account in the strong coupling regime, which validates the small polaron transformation. The corresponding equations of motion are developed, which are used to study the quantum interference effect and phonon-induced decoherence dynamics in molecular junctions. Numerical studies show clearly quantum interference effect of the transport electrons through two quasi-degenerate states with different couplings to the leads. We also found that the quantum interference can be suppressed by the electron-phonon interaction where the phase coherence is destroyed by phonon scattering. This indicates the importance of electron-phonon interaction in systems with prominent quantum interference effect.

  11. Charge injection and transport in quantum confined and disordered systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtepen, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum dots and conducting polymers are modern semiconductors with a high potential for applications such as lasers, LEDs, displays, solar cells etc. These applications require the controlled addition of charge carriers into the material and knowledge of the details of charge transport. This thesis

  12. The Landauer-Büttiker formula and resonant quantum transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia; Jensen, Arne; Moldoveanu, Valeriu

    2006-01-01

    We give a short presentation of two recent results. The first one is a rigorous proof of the Landauer-Büttiker formula, and the second one concerns resonant quantum transport. The detailed results are in [2]. In the last section we present the results of som numerical computations on a model syst...

  13. Chaotic Dynamics and Transport in Classical and Quantum Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this summer school is to provide a set of extended and pedagogical lectures, on the major present-day topics in dynamical systems and statistical mechanics including applications. Some articles are dedicated to chaotic transport in plasma turbulence and to quantum chaos. This document gathers the summaries of some presentations.

  14. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on quantum transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardarson, Jens Hjorleifur

    2008-01-01

    The effect of spin-orbit coupling on various quantum transport phenomena is considered. The main topics discussed are: * How spin-orbit coupling can induce shot noise through trajectory splitting. * How spin-orbit coupling can degrade electron-hole entanglement (created by a tunnel barrier) by mo

  15. Charge injection and transport in quantum confined and disordered systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtepen, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Quantum dots and conducting polymers are modern semiconductors with a high potential for applications such as lasers, LEDs, displays, solar cells etc. These applications require the controlled addition of charge carriers into the material and knowledge of the details of charge transport. This thesis

  16. What is novel in quantum transport for mesoscopics?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mukunda P Das; Frederick Green

    2006-07-01

    The understanding of mesoscopic transport has now attained an ultimate simplicity. Indeed, orthodox quantum kinetics would seem to say little about mesoscopics that has not been revealed – nearly effortlessly – by more popular means. Such is far from the case, however. The fact that kinetic theory remains very much in charge is best appreciated through the physics of a quantum point contact. While discretization of its conductance is viewed as the exclusive result of coherent, single-electron-wave transmission, this does not begin to address the paramount feature of all metallic conduction: dissipation. A perfect quantum point contact still has finite resistance, so its ballistic carriers must dissipate the energy gained from the applied field. How do they manage that? The key is in standard many-body quantum theory, and its conservation principles.

  17. Quantum critical transport at a continuous metal-insulator transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, P.; Laad, M. S.; Hassan, S. R.

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to the first-order correlation-driven Mott metal-insulator transition, continuous disorder-driven transitions are intrinsically quantum critical. Here, we investigate transport quantum criticality in the Falicov-Kimball model, a representative of the latter class in the strong disorder category. Employing cluster-dynamical mean-field theory, we find clear and anomalous quantum critical scaling behavior manifesting as perfect mirror symmetry of scaling curves on both sides of the MIT. Surprisingly, we find that the beta function β (g ) scales as log(g ) deep into the bad-metallic phase as well, providing a sound unified basis for these findings. We argue that such strong localization quantum criticality may manifest in real three-dimensional systems where disorder effects are more important than electron-electron interactions.

  18. Calculation method of quantum efficiency to TiO2 nanocrystal photocatalysis reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The quantum yield is an important factor to evaluate the efficiency of photoreactor. This article gives an overall calculation method of the quantum efficiency(ф) and the apparent quantum efficiency(ф2) to the TiO2/UV photocatalysis system. Furthermore, for the immobility system (IS), the formulation of the faction of light absorbed by the TiO2 thin film is proposed so as to calculate the quantum efficiency by using the measured value and theoretic calculated value of transmissivity (T). For the suspension system(SS), due to the difficulty to obtain the absorption coefficient (α) of TiO2 particulates, the quantum efficiency is calculated by means of the relative photonic efficiency (ξr) and the standard quantum yield (фstandard).

  19. Heats of Segregation of BCC Binaries from ab Initio and Quantum Approximate Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian S.

    2004-01-01

    We compare dilute-limit heats of segregation for selected BCC transition metal binaries computed using ab initio and quantum approximate energy methods. Ab initio calculations are carried out using the CASTEP plane-wave pseudopotential computer code, while quantum approximate results are computed using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method with the most recent LMTO-based parameters. Quantum approximate segregation energies are computed with and without atomistic relaxation, while the ab initio calculations are performed without relaxation. Results are discussed within the context of a segregation model driven by strain and bond-breaking effects. We compare our results with full-potential quantum calculations and with available experimental results.

  20. Accounting for chemical kinetics in field scale transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, N.D. [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2005-04-01

    The modelling of column experiments has shown that the humic acid mediated transport of metal ions is dominated by the non-exchangeable fraction. Metal ions enter this fraction via the exchangeable fraction, and may transfer back again. However, in both directions these chemical reactions are slow. Whether or not a kinetic description of these processes is required during transport calculations, or an assumption of local equilibrium will suffice, will depend upon the ratio of the reaction half-time to the residence time of species within the groundwater column. If the flow rate is sufficiently slow or the reaction sufficiently fast then the assumption of local equilibrium is acceptable. Alternatively, if the reaction is sufficiently slow (or the flow rate fast), then the reaction may be 'decoupled', i.e. removed from the calculation. These distinctions are important, because calculations involving chemical kinetics are computationally very expensive, and should be avoided wherever possible. In addition, column experiments have shown that the sorption of humic substances and metal-humate complexes may be significant, and that these reactions may also be slow. In this work, a set of rules is presented that dictate when the local equilibrium and decoupled assumptions may be used. In addition, it is shown that in all cases to a first approximation, the behaviour of a kinetically controlled species, and in particular its final distribution against distance at the end of a calculation, depends only upon the ratio of the reaction first order rate to the residence time, and hence, even in the region where the simplifications may not be used, the behaviour is predictable. In this way, it is possible to obtain an estimate of the migration of these species, without the need for a complex transport calculation. (orig.)

  1. Quantum transport simulation scheme including strong correlations and its application to organic radicals adsorbed on gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droghetti, Andrea; Rungger, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    We present a computational method to quantitatively describe the linear-response conductance of nanoscale devices in the Kondo regime. This method relies on a projection scheme to extract an Anderson impurity model from the results of density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions calculations. The Anderson impurity model is then solved by continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo. The developed formalism allows us to separate the different contributions to the transport, including coherent or noncoherent transport channels, and also the quantum interference between impurity and background transmission. We apply the method to a scanning tunneling microscope setup for the 1,3,5-triphenyl-6-oxoverdazyl (TOV) stable radical molecule adsorbed on gold. The TOV molecule has one unpaired electron, which when brought in contact with metal electrodes behaves like a prototypical single Anderson impurity. We evaluate the Kondo temperature, the finite-temperature spectral function, and transport properties, finding good agreement with published experimental results.

  2. Superiority of semiclassical over quantum mechanical calculations for a three-dimensional system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Main, Joerg; Wunner, Guenter; Atilgan, Erdinc; Taylor, Howard S.; Dando, Paul A

    2002-12-02

    In systems with few degrees of freedom modern quantum calculations are, in general, numerically more efficient than semiclassical methods. However, this situation can be reversed with increasing dimension of the problem. For a three-dimensional system, viz. the hyperbolic four-sphere scattering system, we demonstrate the superiority of semiclassical versus quantum calculations. Semiclassical resonances can easily be obtained even in energy regions which are unattainable with the currently available quantum techniques.

  3. Superiority of semiclassical over quantum mechanical calculations for a three-dimensional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Jörg; Wunner, Günter; Atılgan, Erdinç; Taylor, Howard S.; Dando, Paul A.

    2002-12-01

    In systems with few degrees of freedom modern quantum calculations are, in general, numerically more efficient than semiclassical methods. However, this situation can be reversed with increasing dimension of the problem. For a three-dimensional system, viz. the hyperbolic four-sphere scattering system, we demonstrate the superiority of semiclassical versus quantum calculations. Semiclassical resonances can easily be obtained even in energy regions which are unattainable with the currently available quantum techniques.

  4. Walking in the woods with quantum chemistry--applications of quantum chemical calculations in natural products research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Dean J

    2013-08-01

    This Highlight describes applications of quantum chemical calculations to problems in natural products chemistry, including the elucidation of natural product structures (distinguishing between constitutional isomers, distinguishing between diastereomers, and assigning absolute configuration) and determination of reasonable mechanisms for their formation.

  5. Edge-state blockade of transport in quantum dot arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Mónica; Niklas, Michael; Platero, Gloria; Kohler, Sigmund

    2016-03-01

    We propose a transport blockade mechanism in quantum dot arrays and conducting molecules based on an interplay of Coulomb repulsion and the formation of edge states. As a model we employ a dimer chain that exhibits a topological phase transition. The connection to a strongly biased electron source and drain enables transport. We show that the related emergence of edge states is manifest in the shot noise properties as it is accompanied by a crossover from bunched electron transport to a Poissonian process. For both regions we develop a scenario that can be captured by a rate equation. The resulting analytical expressions for the Fano factor agree well with the numerical solution of a full quantum master equation.

  6. Hydrodynamic transport in strongly coupled disordered quantum field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We compute direct current (dc) thermoelectric transport coefficients in strongly coupled quantum field theories without long lived quasiparticles, at finite temperature and charge density, and disordered on long wavelengths compared to the length scale of local thermalization. Many previous transport computations in strongly coupled systems are interpretable hydrodynamically, despite formally going beyond the hydrodynamic regime. This includes momentum relaxation times previously derived by the memory matrix formalism, and non-perturbative holographic results; in the latter case, this is subject to some important subtleties. Our formalism may extend some memory matrix computations to higher orders in the perturbative disorder strength, as well as give valuable insight into non-perturbative regimes. Strongly coupled metals with quantum critical contributions to transport generically transition between coherent and incoherent metals as disorder strength is increased at fixed temperature, analogous to mean field...

  7. Dephasing-assisted transport: quantum networks and biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plenio, M B [QOLS, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Huelga, S F [School of Physics, Astronomy and Mathematics, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.plenio@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-11-15

    Transport phenomena are fundamental in physics. They allow for information and energy to be exchanged between individual constituents of communication systems, networks or even biological entities. Environmental noise will generally hinder the efficiency of the transport process. However, and contrary to intuition, there are situations in classical systems where thermal fluctuations are actually instrumental in assisting transport phenomena. Here we show that, even at zero temperature, transport of excitations across dissipative quantum networks can be enhanced by local dephasing noise. We explain the underlying physical mechanisms behind this phenomenon and propose possible experimental demonstrations in quantum optics. Our results suggest that the presence of entanglement does not play an essential role for energy transport and may even hinder it. We argue that Nature may be routinely exploiting dephasing noise and show that the transport of excitations in simplified models of light harvesting molecules does benefit from such noise assisted processes. These results point toward the possibility for designing optimized structures for transport, for example in artificial nanostructures, assisted by noise.

  8. Directed transport in quantum star graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusupov, Jambul; Dolgushev, Maxim; Blumen, Alexander; Mülken, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of Gaussian wave packets on star graphs whose arms feature each a periodic potential and an external time-dependent field. Assuming that the potentials and the field can be manipulated separately for each arm of the star, we show that it is possible to manipulate the direction of the motion of a Gaussian wave packet through the bifurcation point by a suitable choice of the parameters of the external fields. In doing so, one can achieve a transmission of the wave packet into the desired arm with nearly 70 % while also keeping the shape of the wave packet approximately intact. Since a star graph is the simplest element of many other complex graphs, the obtained results can be considered as the first step to wave packet manipulations on complex networks.

  9. Calculations of Bed-Material Transport, Chetco River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S.; Wallick, R.; Cannon, C.; O'Connor, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Chetco River drains 914 square kilometers of the Klamath Mountains in far southwestern Oregon. The lower 18 kilometers of the river are flanked by large and abundant gravel bars, which have been commercially mined for aggregate during most of the last century. Increasing concern regarding the impact of this mining on aquatic habitats motivated an assessment of historical channel change and sediment transport rates along this lower reach. A key component of this research was estimating bed-material transport through the application of sediment transport equations at multiple locations along the study reach. Flow hydraulics were estimated with a 1-D hydraulic model constructed in HEC-RAS, using a combination of LiDAR and bathymetric surveys to characterize the valley morphology. Once calibrated to USGS rating curves, low flow water surfaces, and several high flow photos, this model allowed us to calculate energy slopes for a given cross section at a variety of flows. These flow-energy slope pairs, along with cross sections and sediment data collected from surface pebble counts, were then applied to a number of different modern bedload transport equations. This process was facilitated by the Bedload Assessment in Gravel-bedded Streams Excel macro, or BAGS, which allows users to quickly apply multiple transport equations using a single set of inputs (Pitlick et al., 2009). A review of the literature, along with tests of internal consistency and comparisons to direct bedload measurements taken in the winter of 2008-09, led us to choose the Parker (1991) and Wilcock-Crowe (2003) equations as the two most applicable to the Chetco River. Sediment transport-flow curves for both equations were calculated for seven cross sections spanning the study area. For each of these cross sections, we estimated annual transport fluxes using derived transport rating curves in conjunction with unit flow data from a USGS gage at the upstream end of study reach, with data extending back

  10. An accurate {delta}f method for neoclassical transport calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.X.; Nakajima, N.; Murakami, S.; Okamoto, M. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-03-01

    A {delta}f method, solving drift kinetic equation, for neoclassical transport calculation is presented in detail. It is demonstrated that valid results essentially rely on the correct evaluation of marker density g in weight calculation. A general and accurate weighting scheme is developed without using some assumed g in weight equation for advancing particle weights, unlike the previous schemes. This scheme employs an additional weight function to directly solve g from its kinetic equation using the idea of {delta}f method. Therefore the severe constraint that the real marker distribution must be consistent with the initially assumed g during a simulation is relaxed. An improved like-particle collision scheme is presented. By performing compensation for momentum, energy and particle losses arising from numerical errors, the conservations of all the three quantities are greatly improved during collisions. Ion neoclassical transport due to self-collisions is examined under finite banana case as well as zero banana limit. A solution with zero particle and zero energy flux (in case of no temperature gradient) over whole poloidal section is obtained. With the improvement in both like-particle collision scheme and weighting scheme, the {delta}f simulation shows a significantly upgraded performance for neoclassical transport study. (author)

  11. Towards Quantum Transport for Central Nuclear Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Danielewicz, Pawel; Barker, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium Green's functions represent a promising tool for describing central nuclear reactions. Even at the single-particle level, though, the Green's functions contain more information that computers may handle in the foreseeable future. In this study, we explore slab collisions in one dimension, first in the mean field approximation and demonstrate that only function elements close to the diagonal in arguments are relevant, in practice, for the reaction calculations. This bodes well for the application of the Green's functions to the reactions. Moreover we demonstrate that an initial state for a reaction calculation may be generated through adiabatic transformation of interactions. Finally, we report on our progress in incorporating correlations into the dynamic calculations.

  12. Hydraulic calculation of gravity transportation pipeline system for backfill slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qin-li; HU Guan-yu; WANG Xin-min

    2008-01-01

    Taking cemented coal gangue pipeline transportation system in Suncun Coal Mine, Xinwen Mining Group, Shandong Province, China, as an example, the hydraulic calculation approaches and process about gravity pipeline transportation of backfill slurry were investigated. The results show that the backfill capability of the backfill system should be higher than 74.4m3/h according to the mining production and backfill times in the mine; the minimum velocity (critical velocity) and practical working velocity of the backfill slurry are 1.44 and 3.82m/s, respectively. Various formulae give the maximum ratio of total length to vertical height of pipeline (L/H ratio) of the backfill system of 5.4, and then the reliability and capability of the system can be evaluated.

  13. Quantum-walk transport properties on graphene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougroura, Hamza; Aissaoui, Habib; Chancellor, Nicholas; Kendon, Viv

    2016-12-01

    We present numerical studies of quantum walks on C60 and related graphene structures to investigate their transport properties. Also known as a honeycomb lattice, the lattice formed by carbon atoms in the graphene phase can be rolled up to form nanotubes of various dimensions. Graphene nanotubes have many important applications, some of which rely on their unusual electrical conductivity and related properties. Quantum walks on graphs provide an abstract setting in which to study such transport properties independent of the other chemical and physical properties of a physical substance. They can thus be used to further the understanding of mechanisms behind such properties. We find that nanotube structures are significantly more efficient in transporting a quantum walk than cycles of equivalent size, provided the symmetry of the structure is respected in how they are used. We find faster transport on zigzag nanotubes compared to armchair nanotubes, which is unexpected given that for the actual materials the armchair nanotube is metallic, while the zigzag is semiconducting.

  14. Nonequilibrium charge susceptibility and dynamical conductance: identification of scattering processes in quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, H; Dash, L K

    2012-03-23

    We calculate the nonequilibrium charge transport properties of nanoscale junctions in the steady state and extend the concept of charge susceptibility to the nonequilibrium conditions. We show that the nonequilibrium charge susceptibility is related to the nonlinear dynamical conductance. In spectroscopic terms, both contain the same features versus applied bias when charge fluctuation occurs in the corresponding electronic resonances. However, we show that, while the conductance exhibits features at biases corresponding to inelastic scattering with no charge fluctuations, the nonequilibrium charge susceptibility does not. We suggest that measuring both the nonequilibrium conductance and charge susceptibility in the same experiment will permit us to differentiate between different scattering processes in quantum transport.

  15. Quantum Transport in Strongly Correlated Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Dan

    2007-01-01

    the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We present two DMRG setups for calculating the linear conductance of strongly correlated nanostructures in the infinitesimal source-drain voltage regime. The first setup describes the leads by modified real-space tight-binding chains, whereas the second...... describes the leads in momentum-space. We benchmark each of these schemes against exact Greens function results for the conductance in the non-interacting limit, thus demonstrating the accuracy of the lead descriptions. We first use the DMRG implementations to calculate the conductance of an interacting...... spinless resonant 7 site chain, studying the effect of repulsive interaction inside the chain. We demonstrate that both weak and strong interactions inside the chain lead to Coulomb blockade renormalization of the resonances in the conductance spectrum. Additionally the strongly interacting case sharpens...

  16. Thermal effects on photon-induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, M O; de Oliveira, E J R; Villas-Bôas, J M; Souza, F M

    2013-04-03

    We theoretically investigate laser induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot attached to electrical contacts. Our approach, based on a nonequilibrium Green function technique, allows us to include thermal effects on the photon-induced quantum transport and excitonic dynamics, enabling the study of non-Markovian effects. By solving a set of coupled integrodifferential equations, involving correlation and propagator functions, we obtain the photocurrent and the dot occupation as a function of time. Two distinct sources of decoherence, namely, incoherent tunneling and thermal fluctuations, are observed in the Rabi oscillations. As temperature increases, a thermally activated Pauli blockade results in a suppression of these oscillations. Additionally, the interplay between photon and thermally induced electron populations results in a switch of the current sign as time evolves and its stationary value can be maximized by tuning the laser intensity.

  17. Spin-polarized quantum transport through an Aharonov-Bohm quantum-dot-ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Ming; Wang Rui; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the quantum transport through an Aharonov-Bohm (AB) quantum-dot-ring with two dot-array arms described by a single-band tight-binding Hamiltonian is investigated in the presence of additional magnetic fields applied to the dot-array arms to produce spin flip of electrons. A far richer interference pattern than that in the charge transport alone is found. Besides the usual AB oscillation the tunable spin polarization of the current by the magnetic flux is a new observation and is seen to be particularly useful in technical applications. The spectrum of transmission probability is modulated by the quantum dot numbers on the up-arc and down-arc of the ring, which, however, does not affect the period of the AB oscillation.

  18. Role of inter-tube coupling and quantum interference on electrical transport in carbon nanotube junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Srijeet; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2016-09-01

    Due to excellent transport properties, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) show a lot of promise in sensor and interconnect technology. However, recent studies indicate that the conductance in CNT/CNT junctions are strongly affected by the morphology and orientation between the tubes. For proper utilization of such junctions in the development of CNT based technology, it is essential to study the electronic properties of such junctions. This work presents a theoretical study of the electrical transport properties of metallic Carbon nanotube homo-junctions. The study focuses on discerning the role of inter-tube interactions, quantum interference and scattering on the transport properties on junctions between identical tubes. The electronic structure and transport calculations are conducted with an Extended Hückel Theory-Non Equilibrium Green's Function based model. The calculations indicate conductance to be varying with a changing crossing angle, with maximum conductance corresponding to lattice registry, i.e. parallel configuration between the two tubes. Further calculations for such parallel configurations indicate onset of short and long range oscillations in conductance with respect to changing overlap length. These oscillations are attributed to inter-tube coupling effects owing to changing π orbital overlap, carrier scattering and quantum interference of the incident, transmitted and reflected waves at the inter-tube junction.

  19. Fractional quantum mechanics on networks: Long-range dynamics and quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riascos, A P; Mateos, José L

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we study the quantum transport on networks with a temporal evolution governed by the fractional Schrödinger equation. We generalize the dynamics based on continuous-time quantum walks, with transitions to nearest neighbors on the network, to the fractional case that allows long-range displacements. By using the fractional Laplacian matrix of a network, we establish a formalism that combines a long-range dynamics with the quantum superposition of states; this general approach applies to any type of connected undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, and can be implemented from the spectral properties of the Laplacian matrix. We study the fractional dynamics and its capacity to explore the network by means of the transition probability, the average probability of return, and global quantities that characterize the efficiency of this quantum process. As a particular case, we explore analytically these quantities for circulant networks such as rings, interacting cycles, and complete graphs.

  20. Neutron and photon transport calculations in fusion system. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    On the application of MCNP to the neutron and {gamma}-ray transport calculations for fusion reactor system, the wide range design calculation has been carried out in the engineering design activities for the international thermonuclear fusion experimental reactor (ITER) being developed jointly by Japan, USA, EU and Russia. As the objects of shielding calculation for fusion reactors, there are the assessment of dose equivalent rate for living body shielding and the assessment of the nuclear response for the soundness of in-core structures. In the case that the detailed analysis of complicated three-dimensional shapes is required, the assessment using MCNP has been carried out. Also when the nuclear response of peripheral equipment due to the gap streaming between blanket modules is evaluated with good accuracy, the calculation with MCNP has been carried out. The analyses of the shieldings for blanket modules and NBI port are explained, and the examples of the results of analyses are shown. In the blanket modules, there are penetrating holes and continuous gap. In the case of the NBI port, shielding plug cannot be installed. These facts necessitate the MCNP analysis with high accuracy. (K.I.)

  1. Neutron and gamma ray transport calculations in shielding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro; Sakamoto, Hiroki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In the shields for radiation in nuclear facilities, the penetrating holes of various kinds and irregular shapes are made for the reasons of operation, control and others. These penetrating holes and gaps are filled with air or the substances with relatively small shielding performance, and radiation flows out through them, which is called streaming. As the calculation techniques for the shielding design or analysis related to the streaming problem, there are the calculations by simplified evaluation, transport calculation and Monte Carlo method. In this report, the example of calculation by Monte Carlo method which is represented by MCNP code is discussed. A number of variance reduction techniques which seem effective for the analysis of streaming problem were tried. As to the investigation of the applicability of MCNP code to streaming analysis, the object of analysis which are the concrete walls without hole and with horizontal hole, oblique hole and bent oblique hole, the analysis procedure, the composition of concrete, and the conversion coefficient of dose equivalent, and the results of analysis are reported. As for variance reduction technique, cell importance was adopted. (K.I.)

  2. Far-from-equilibrium spin transport in Heisenberg quantum magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, Sebastian; Fukuhara, Takeshi; Schauß, Peter; Zeiher, Johannes; Knap, Michael; Demler, Eugene; Bloch, Immanuel; Gross, Christian

    2014-10-03

    We study experimentally the far-from-equilibrium dynamics in ferromagnetic Heisenberg quantum magnets realized with ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. After controlled imprinting of a spin spiral pattern with an adjustable wave vector, we measure the decay of the initial spin correlations through single-site resolved detection. On the experimentally accessible time scale of several exchange times, we find a profound dependence of the decay rate on the wave vector. In one-dimensional systems, we observe diffusionlike spin transport with a dimensionless diffusion coefficient of 0.22(1). We show how this behavior emerges from the microscopic properties of the closed quantum system. In contrast to the one-dimensional case, our transport measurements for two-dimensional Heisenberg systems indicate anomalous superdiffusion.

  3. Nanoelectronics and quantum transport based on semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Charles

    2010-03-01

    Semiconductor nanowires represent a uniquely powerful platform for exploring a diverse range of physical phenomena at the nanoscale due to the demonstrated capabilities of rational design and precise control of diameter, composition, morphology electronic properties during synthesis. In this talk, we will review advances of nanowires as high performance transistor and quantum devices with a focus on the prototypical Ge/Si core/shell nanowire heterostructure model system. First, a clean one-dimensional hole gas is formed due to band structure design, which sustains ballistic transport up to room temperature. Large subband spacing indicates a truly one-dimensional channel. Second, field-effect transistors utilizing Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure as the active channel are discussed with results demonstrating that these devices can outperform state-of-the-art Si MOSFETs. Third, the scaling of transistors with sub-100 nm channels are discussed with respect to pushing performance limit. Measurements and analyses show that devices with channel lengths down to 40 nm operate close to the ballistic limit and provide an intrinsic speed of 2 THz. Finally, advances in top-gate defined multi-quantum dot devices are reviewed, where control of contact transparency is used to enable studies in different quantum regimes. A fully tunable double quantum dot with integrated charge sensor is demonstrated. The characterization of charge transport and spin states, as well as its promise as a long coherence time spin qubit will be discussed.

  4. Hand calculations for transport of radioactive aerosols through sampling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Mark; Thompson, Martha; Farfan, Eduardo; Hadlock, Dennis

    2014-05-01

    Workplace air monitoring programs for sampling radioactive aerosols in nuclear facilities sometimes must rely on sampling systems to move the air to a sample filter in a safe and convenient location. These systems may consist of probes, straight tubing, bends, contractions and other components. Evaluation of these systems for potential loss of radioactive aerosols is important because significant losses can occur. However, it can be very difficult to find fully described equations to model a system manually for a single particle size and even more difficult to evaluate total system efficiency for a polydispersed particle distribution. Some software methods are available, but they may not be directly applicable to the components being evaluated and they may not be completely documented or validated per current software quality assurance requirements. This paper offers a method to model radioactive aerosol transport in sampling systems that is transparent and easily updated with the most applicable models. Calculations are shown with the R Programming Language, but the method is adaptable to other scripting languages. The method has the advantage of transparency and easy verifiability. This paper shows how a set of equations from published aerosol science models may be applied to aspiration and transport efficiency of aerosols in common air sampling system components. An example application using R calculation scripts is demonstrated. The R scripts are provided as electronic attachments.

  5. Simulations of quantum transport in nanoscale systems: application to atomic gold and silver wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozos, J.L.; Ordejon, P.; Brandbyge, Mads

    2002-01-01

    . The potential drop profile and induced electronic current (and therefore the conductance) are obtained from first principles. The method takes into account the atomic structure of both the nanoscale structure and the semi-infinite electrodes through which the potential is applied. Non-equilibrium Green......'s function techniques are used to calculate the quantum conductance. Here we apply the method to the study of the electronic transport in wires of gold and silver with atomic thickness. We show the results of our calculations, and compare with some of the abundant experimental data on these systems....

  6. Mechanisms of carrier transport and temperature performance evaluation in terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjin, D.; Ikonic, Z.; Jovanovic, V. D.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2004-04-01

    Electron transport in GaN/AlGaN and GaAs/AlGaAs terahertz quantum cascade lasers is calculated using a fully self-consistent intersubband scattering model with thermal balancing. Subband populations and carrier transition rates are calculated and all relevant intra- and inter-period electron-electron and electron-LO-phonon scattering mechanisms are included. In particular, the influence of the lattice temperature on relevant scattering rates, carrier lifetimes and the population inversion is investigated in both cases.

  7. The Landauer-Büttiker formula and resonant quantum transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornean, Horia Decebal; Jensen, Arne; Moldoveanu, Valeriu

    We give a short presentation of two recent results. The firrst one is a rigorous proof of the Landauer-Büttiker formula, and the second one concerns resonant quantum transport. The detailed results are in [2]. In the last section we present the results of some numerical computations on a model sy...... system.Concerning the literature, then see the starting point of our work, [6]. In [4] a related, but different, problem is studied. See also [5] and the recentwork [1]....

  8. Hole transport simulations in SiGe cascade quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonić, Z.; Harrison, P.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2004-03-01

    Hole transport in p-Si/SiGe quantum well cascade structures has been analyzed using a rate equation method with thermal balancing (self-consistent energy balance method). The carrier and energy relaxation due to alloy disorder, acoustic and optical phonon scattering are included. The model includes the in-plane k-space anisotropy. The results are compared to those obtained from Monte Carlo simulations and from the basic particle rate equation method.

  9. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandoloff, Rossen [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Balakrishnan, Radha [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2005-07-08

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion.

  10. Quantum transport in ferromagnetic graphene: Role of Berry curvature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Debashree; Basu, Banasri [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 Barrackpore Trunk Road, Kolkata 700 108 (India)

    2014-12-10

    The magnetic effects in ferromagnetic graphene basically depend on the principle of exchange interaction when ferromagntism is induced by depositing an insulator layer on graphene. Here we deal with the consequences of non-uniformity in the exchange coupling strength of the ferromagnetic graphene. We discuss how the in- homogeneity in the coordinate and momentum of the exchange vector field can provide interesting results in the conductivity analysis of the ferromagnetic graphene. Our analysis is based on the Kubo formalism of quantum transport.

  11. Quantum Transport and Optoelectronics in Gapped Graphene Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-30

    Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Aug 2011 to 31 Jul 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUANTUM TRANSPORT AND OPTOELECTRONICS IN GAPPED GRAPHENE...nanodevices. To achieve this we will combine optoelectronic and plasmonic device structures with atomically seamless electrical contacts. The devices will...be based on fully band gap engineered bilayer graphene and graphene nanoribbons, resulting in all-carbon nanoelectronic devices with optoelectronic

  12. Spin incoherent transport in density-modulated quantum wires

    OpenAIRE

    K.M. Liu; Lin, H. I.; Umansky, V.; S. Y. Hsu

    2009-01-01

    Density, temperature and magnetic field dependences on electron transport in a quantum wire were studied. Decrease of carrier density gives a negative conductance correction on the first plateau at low temperatures. The prominent and mysterious "0.7 structure" is more clearly resolved at low densities. The thermal behavior of the conductance follows the predictions of the spin-incoherent transport. The 0.7 structure at a low density drops to $e^2/h$ in a smaller in-plane magnetic field. The f...

  13. First Cost Calculation Methods for Road Freight Transport Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovács György

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The transport activity is one of the most expensive processes in the supply chain. Forwarding and transport companies focuses on the optimization of transportation and the reduction of transport costs.

  14. Density matrix theory of transport and gain in quantum cascade lasers in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Ivana; Vukmirović, Nenad; Ikonić, Zoran; Indjin, Dragan; Kelsall, Robert W.; Harrison, Paul; Milanović, Vitomir

    2007-10-01

    A density matrix theory of electron transport and optical gain in quantum cascade lasers in an external magnetic field is formulated. Starting from a general quantum kinetic treatment, we describe the intraperiod and interperiod electron dynamics at the non-Markovian, Markovian, and Boltzmann approximation levels. Interactions of electrons with longitudinal optical phonons and classical light fields are included in the present description. The non-Markovian calculation for a prototype structure reveals a significantly different gain spectra in terms of linewidth and additional polaronic features in comparison to the Markovian and Boltzmann ones. Despite strongly controversial interpretations of the origin of the transport processes in the non-Markovian or Markovian and the Boltzmann approaches, they yield comparable values of the current densities.

  15. Improved master equation approach to quantum transport: From Born to self-consistent Born approximation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Jinshuang, E-mail: jsjin@hznu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); Li, Jun [Department of Physics, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310036 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Liu, Yu [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Xin-Qi, E-mail: lixinqi@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Superlattices and Microstructures, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Yan, YiJing, E-mail: yyan@ust.hk [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-06-28

    Beyond the second-order Born approximation, we propose an improved master equation approach to quantum transport under self-consistent Born approximation. The basic idea is to replace the free Green's function in the tunneling self-energy diagram by an effective reduced propagator under the Born approximation. This simple modification has remarkable consequences. It not only recovers the exact results for quantum transport through noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltages, but also predicts the challenging nonequilibrium Kondo effect. Compared to the nonequilibrium Green's function technique that formulates the calculation of specific correlation functions, the master equation approach contains richer dynamical information to allow more efficient studies for such as the shot noise and full counting statistics.

  16. Improved master equation approach to quantum transport: from Born to self-consistent Born approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jinshuang; Li, Jun; Liu, Yu; Li, Xin-Qi; Yan, YiJing

    2014-06-28

    Beyond the second-order Born approximation, we propose an improved master equation approach to quantum transport under self-consistent Born approximation. The basic idea is to replace the free Green's function in the tunneling self-energy diagram by an effective reduced propagator under the Born approximation. This simple modification has remarkable consequences. It not only recovers the exact results for quantum transport through noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltages, but also predicts the challenging nonequilibrium Kondo effect. Compared to the nonequilibrium Green's function technique that formulates the calculation of specific correlation functions, the master equation approach contains richer dynamical information to allow more efficient studies for such as the shot noise and full counting statistics.

  17. Analytic continuation average spectrum method for transport in quantum liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kletenik-Edelman, Orly [School of Chemistry, Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Rabani, Eran, E-mail: rabani@tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Reichman, David R. [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 3000 Broadway, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Recently, we have applied the analytic continuation averaged spectrum method (ASM) to calculate collective density fluctuations in quantum liquid . Unlike the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) method, the ASM approach is capable of revealing resolved modes in the dynamic structure factor in agreement with experiments. In this work we further develop the ASM to study single-particle dynamics in quantum liquids with dynamical susceptibilities that are characterized by a smooth spectrum. Surprisingly, we find that for the power spectrum of the velocity autocorrelation function there are pronounced differences in comparison with the MaxEnt approach, even for this simple case of smooth unimodal dynamic response. We show that for liquid para-hydrogen the ASM is closer to the centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) result while for normal liquid helium it agrees better with the quantum mode coupling theory (QMCT) and with the MaxEnt approach.

  18. Transmission zero in a quantum dot with strong electron-electron interaction: Perturbative conductance calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sejoong; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2006-05-01

    A pioneering experiment [E. Schuster, E. Buks, M. Heiblum, D. Mahalu, V. Umansky, and Hadas Shtrikman, Nature 385, 417 (1997)] reported the measurement of the transmission phase of an electron traversing a quantum dot and found the intriguing feature of a sudden phase drop in the conductance valleys. Based on the Friedel sum rule for a spinless effective one-dimensional system, it has been previously argued [H.-W. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2358 (1999)] that the sudden phase drop should be accompanied by the vanishing of the transmission amplitude, or transmission zero. Here we address roles of strong electron-electron interactions on the electron transport through a two-level quantum dot where one level couples with the leads much more strongly than the other level does [P. G. Silvestrov and Y. Imry, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2565 (2000)]. We perform a perturbative conductance calculation with an explicit account of large charging energy and verify that the resulting conductance exhibits transmission zero, in agreement with the analysis based on the Friedel sum rule.

  19. Calculated characteristics of subcritical assembly with anisotropic transport of neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorin, N.V.; Lipilina, E.N.; Lyutov, V.D.; Saukov, A.I. [Zababakhin Russian Federal Nuclear Center - All-Russian Scientific Researching Institute of Technical Physics (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    There was considered possibility of creating enough sub-critical system that multiply neutron fluence from a primary source by many orders. For assemblies with high neutron tie between parts, it is impossible. That is why there was developed a construction consisting of many units (cascades) having weak feedback with preceding cascades. The feedback attenuation was obtained placing layers of slow neutron absorber and moderators between the cascades of fission material. Anisotropy of fast neutron transport through the layers was used. The system consisted of many identical cascades aligning one by another. Each cascade consists of layers of moderator, fissile material and absorber of slow neutrons. The calculations were carried out using the code MCNP.4a with nuclear data library ENDF/B5. In this construction neutrons spread predominantly in one direction multiplying in each next fissile layer, and they attenuate considerably in the opposite direction. In a calculated construction, multiplication factor of one cascade is about 1.5 and multiplication factor of whole construction composed of n cascades is 1.5{sup n}. Calculated keff value is 0.9 for one cascade and does not exceed 0.98 for a system containing any number of cascades. Therefore the assembly is always sub-critical and therefore it is safe in respect of criticality. There was considered using such a sub-critical assembly to create a powerful neutron fluence for neutron boron-capturing therapy. The system merits and demerits were discussed. (authors)

  20. First-principles calculations of mass transport in magnesium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chao; Ozolins, Vidvuds

    2013-03-01

    Mg(BH4)2 is a hydrogen storage material which can decompose to release hydrogen in the following reaction: Mg(BH4)2(solid) -->1/6 MgB12H12(solid) + 5/6MgH2(solid) +13/6 H2(gas) --> MgH2(solid) + 2B(solid) + 4H2(gas). However, experiments show that hydrogen release only occurs at temperatures above 300 °C, which severely limits applications in mobile storage. Using density-functional theory calculations, we systematically study bulk diffusion of defects in the reactant Mg(BH4)2 and products MgB12H12 and MgH2 during the first step of the solid-state dehydrogenation reaction. The defect concentrations and concentration gradients are calculated for a variety of defects, including charged vacancies and interstitials. We find that neutral [BH3] vacancies have the highest bulk concentration and concentration gradient in Mg(BH4)2. The diffusion mechanism of [BH3] vacancy in Mg(BH4)2 is studied using the nudged elastic band method. Our results shows that the calculated diffusion barrier for [BH3] vacancies is ~ . 2 eV, suggesting that slow mass transport limits the kinetics of hydrogen desorption.

  1. A perspective on quantum mechanics calculations in ADMET predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, J Phillip; Güner, Osman F

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of drug action has been an important objective for pharmaceutical scientists. With the increasing speed of computers and the implementation of quantum chemistry methodologies, pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic problems have become more computationally tractable. Historically the former has been the focus of drug design, but within the last two decades efforts to understand the latter have increased. It takes about fifteen years and over $1 billion dollars for a drug to go from laboratory hit, through lead optimization, to final approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. While the costs have increased substantially, the overall clinical success rate for a compound to emerge from clinical trials is approximately 10%. Most of the attrition rate can be traced to ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) problems, which is a powerful impetus to study these issues at an earlier stage in drug discovery. Quantum mechanics offers pharmaceutical scientists the opportunity to investigate pharmacokinetic problems at the molecular level prior to laboratory preparation and testing. This review will provide a perspective on the use of quantum mechanics or a combination of quantum mechanics coupled with other classical methods in the pharmacokinetic phase of drug discovery. A brief overview of the essential features of theory will be discussed, and a few carefully selected examples will be given to highlight the computational methods.

  2. Calculating Two-Dimensional Spectra with the Mixed Quantum-Classical Ehrenfest Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegte, C. P.; Dijkstra, A. G.; Knoester, J.; Jansen, T. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a mixed quantum-classical simulation approach to calculate two-dimensional spectra of coupled two-level electronic model systems. We include the change in potential energy of the classical system due to transitions in the quantum system using the Ehrenfest method. We study how this

  3. Calculation of quantum discord and entanglement measures using the random mutations optimization algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Chernyavskiy, A. Yu.

    2013-01-01

    The simple and universal global optimization method based on simplified multipopulation genetic algorithm is presented. The method is applied to quantum information problems. It is compared to the genetic algorithm on standard test functions, and also tested on the calculation of quantum discord and minimal entanglement entropy, which is an entanglement measure for pure multipartite states.

  4. Calculation of Quantum Probability in O(2,2) String Cosmology with a Dilaton Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun

    2006-01-01

    The quantum properties of O(2,2) string cosmology with a dilaton potential are studied in this paper. The cosmological solutions are obtained on three-dimensional space-time. Moreover, the quantum probability of transition between two duality universe is calculated through a Wheeler-De Witt approach.

  5. Calculating Two-Dimensional Spectra with the Mixed Quantum-Classical Ehrenfest Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegte, C. P.; Dijkstra, A. G.; Knoester, J.; Jansen, T. L. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present a mixed quantum-classical simulation approach to calculate two-dimensional spectra of coupled two-level electronic model systems. We include the change in potential energy of the classical system due to transitions in the quantum system using the Ehrenfest method. We study how this feedba

  6. Low-temperature transport in ac-driven quantum dots in the Kondo regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Rosa; Aguado, Ramon; Platero, Gloria; Tejedor, Carlos

    2001-08-15

    We present a fully nonequilibrium calculation of the low-temperature transport properties of a quantum dot in the Kondo regime when an ac potential is applied to the gate. We solve a time-dependent Anderson model with finite on-site Coulomb interaction. The interaction self-energy is calculated up to second order in perturbation theory in the on-site interaction, in the context of the Keldysh nonequilibrium technique, and the effect of the ac voltage is taken into account exactly for all ranges of ac frequencies and ac intensities. The obtained linear conductance and time-averaged density of states of the quantum dot evolve in a nontrivial way as a function of the ac frequency and ac intensity of the harmonic modulation.

  7. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  8. Theory of quantum transport in disordered systems driven by voltage pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenyi; Chen, Xiaobin; Guo, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Predicting time-dependent quantum transport in the transient regime is important for understanding the intrinsic dynamic response of a nanodevice and for predicting the limit of how such a device can switch on or off a current. Theoretically, this problem becomes quite difficult to solve when the nanodevice contains disorder because the calculated transient current must be averaged over many disorder configurations. In this work, we present a theoretical formalism to calculate the configuration averaged time-dependent current flowing through a phase coherent device containing disorder sites where the transient current is driven by sharply turning on and off the external bias voltage. Our theory is based on the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism and is applicable in the far from equilibrium nonlinear response quantum transport regime. The effects of disorder scattering are dealt with by the coherent potential approximation (CPA) extended in the time domain. We show that after approximations such as CPA and vertex corrections for calculating the multiple impurity scattering in the transient regime, the derived NEGFs perfectly satisfy a Ward identity. The theory is quantitatively verified by comparing its predictions to the exact solution for a tight-binding model of a disordered two-probe transport junction.

  9. Quantum chemical calculation of the equilibrium structures of small metal atom clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    Metal atom clusters are studied based on the application of ab initio quantum mechanical approaches. Because these large 'molecular' systems pose special practical computational problems in the application of the quantum mechanical methods, there is a special need to find simplifying techniques that do not compromise the reliability of the calculations. Research is therefore directed towards various aspects of the implementation of the effective core potential technique for the removal of the metal atom core electrons from the calculations.

  10. Universality at Breakdown of Quantum Transport on Complex Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvelis, Nikolaj; Dolgushev, Maxim; Mülken, Oliver

    2015-09-18

    We consider single-particle quantum transport on parametrized complex networks. Based on general arguments regarding the spectrum of the corresponding Hamiltonian, we derive bounds for a measure of the global transport efficiency defined by the time-averaged return probability. For treelike networks, we show analytically that a transition from efficient to inefficient transport occurs depending on the (average) functionality of the nodes of the network. In the infinite system size limit, this transition can be characterized by an exponent which is universal for all treelike networks. Our findings are corroborated by analytic results for specific deterministic networks, dendrimers and Vicsek fractals, and by Monte Carlo simulations of iteratively built scale-free trees.

  11. The Calculation of Matrix Elements in Relativistic Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Ilarraza-Lomelí, A. C.; Valdés-Martínez, M. N.; Salas-Brito, A. L.; Martínez-y-Romero, R. P.; Núñez-Yépez, H. N

    2001-01-01

    Employing a relativistic version of a hypervirial result, recurrence relations for arbitrary non-diagonal radial hydrogenic matrix elements have recently been obtained in Dirac relativistic quantum mechanics. In this contribution honoring Professor L\\"owdin, we report on a new relation we have recently discovered between the matrix elements $$ and $$---where $\\beta$ is a Dirac matrix and the numbers distiguish between different radial eigenstates--- that allow for a simplification and hence f...

  12. A Calculation of Cosmological Scale from Quantum Coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindesay, J

    2004-07-23

    We use general arguments to examine the energy scales for which a quantum coherent description of gravitating quantum energy units is necessary. The cosmological dark energy density is expected to decouple from the Friedman-Lemaitre energy density when the Friedman-Robertson-Walker scale expansion becomes sub-luminal at R = c, at which time the usual microscopic interactions of relativistic quantum mechanics (QED, QCD, etc) open new degrees of freedom. We assume that these microscopic interactions cannot signal with superluminal exchanges, only superluminal quantum correlations. The expected gravitational vacuum energy density at that scale would be expected to freeze out due to the loss of gravitational coherence. We define the vacuum energy which generates this cosmological constant to be that of a zero temperature Bose condensate at this gravitational de-coherence scale. We presume a universality throughout the universe in the available degrees of freedom determined by fundamental constants during its evolution. Examining the reverse evolution of the universe from the present, long before reaching Planck scale dynamics one expects major modifications from the de-coherent thermal equations of state, suggesting that the pre-coherent phase has global coherence properties. Since the arguments presented involve primarily counting of degrees of freedom, we expect the statistical equilibrium states of causally disconnected regions of space to be independently identical. Thus, there is no horizon problem associated with the lack of causal influences between spatially separated regions in this approach. The scale of the amplitude of fluctuations produced during de-coherence of cosmological vacuum energy are found to evolve to values consistent with those observed in cosmic microwave background radiation and galactic clustering.

  13. The quantum Goldilocks effect: on the convergence of timescales in quantum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, Seth; Shabani, Alireza; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Excitonic transport in photosynthesis exhibits a wide range of time scales. Absorption and initial relaxation takes place over tens of femtoseconds. Excitonic lifetimes are on the order of a nanosecond. Hopping rates, energy differences between chromophores, reorganization energies, and decoherence rates correspond to time scales on the order of picoseconds. The functional nature of the divergence of time scales is easily understood: strong coupling to the electromagnetic field over a broad band of frequencies yields rapid absorption, while long excitonic lifetimes increase the amount of energy that makes its way to the reaction center to be converted to chemical energy. The convergence of the remaining time scales to the centerpoint of the overall temporal range is harder to understand. In this paper we argue that the convergence of timescales in photosynthesis can be understood as an example of the `quantum Goldilocks effect': natural selection tends to drive quantum systems to the degree of quantum coheren...

  14. First principles calculations of solid-state thermionic transport in layered van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zebarjadi, Mona; Esfarjani, Keivan

    2016-08-01

    This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the transport. By adding more phosphorene layers, one can switch from tunneling-dominated transport to thermionic-dominated transport, resulting in transporting more heat per charge carrier, thus, enhancing the cooling coefficient of performance. The use of layered van der Waals heterostructures has two advantages: (a) thermionic transport barriers can be tuned by changing the number of layers, and (b) thermal conductance across these non-covalent structures is very weak. The phonon thermal conductance of the present van der Waals heterostructure is found to be 4.1 MW m-2 K-1 which is one order of magnitude lower than the lowest value for that of covalently-bonded interfaces. The thermionic coefficient of performance for the proposed device is 18.5 at 600 K corresponding to an equivalent ZT of 0.13, which is significant for nanoscale devices. This study shows that layered van der Waals structures have great potential to be used as solid-state energy-conversion devices.This work aims at understanding solid-state energy conversion and transport in layered (van der Waals) heterostructures in contact with metallic electrodes via a first-principles approach. As an illustration, a graphene/phosphorene/graphene heterostructure in contact with gold electrodes is studied by using density functional theory (DFT)-based first principles calculations combined with real space Green's function (GF) formalism. We show that for a monolayer phosphorene, quantum tunneling dominates the

  15. Quantum simulation via filtered Hamiltonian engineering: application to perfect quantum transport in spin networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajoy, Ashok; Cappellaro, Paola

    2013-05-31

    We propose a method for Hamiltonian engineering that requires no local control but only relies on collective qubit rotations and field gradients. The technique achieves a spatial modulation of the coupling strengths via a dynamical construction of a weighting function combined with a Bragg grating. As an example, we demonstrate how to generate the ideal Hamiltonian for perfect quantum information transport between two separated nodes of a large spin network. We engineer a spin chain with optimal couplings starting from a large spin network, such as one naturally occurring in crystals, while decoupling all unwanted interactions. For realistic experimental parameters, our method can be used to drive almost perfect quantum information transport at room temperature. The Hamiltonian engineering method can be made more robust under decoherence and coupling disorder by a novel apodization scheme. Thus, the method is quite general and can be used to engineer the Hamiltonian of many complex spin lattices with different topologies and interactions.

  16. Nonlinear transport of graphene in the quantum Hall regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shibing; Wang, Pengjie; Liu, Xin; Zhu, Junbo; Fu, Hailong; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Chen, Jian-Hao; Lin, Xi

    2017-03-01

    We have studied the breakdown of the integer quantum Hall (QH) effect with fully broken symmetry, in an ultra-high mobility graphene device sandwiched between two single crystal hexagonal boron nitride substrates. The evolution and stabilities of the QH states are studied quantitatively through the nonlinear transport with dc Hall voltage bias. The mechanism of the QH breakdown in graphene and the movement of the Fermi energy with the electrical Hall field are discussed. This is the first study in which the stabilities of fully symmetry broken QH states are probed all together. Our results raise the possibility that the ν = ±6 states might be a better target for the quantum resistance standard.

  17. Time-dependent density functional theory for quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Chen, GuanHua; Mo, Yan; Koo, SiuKong; Tian, Heng; Yam, ChiYung; Yan, YiJing

    2010-09-21

    Based on our earlier works [X. Zheng et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 195127 (2007); J. S. Jin et al., J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234703 (2008)], we propose a rigorous and numerically convenient approach to simulate time-dependent quantum transport from first-principles. The proposed approach combines time-dependent density functional theory with quantum dissipation theory, and results in a useful tool for studying transient dynamics of electronic systems. Within the proposed exact theoretical framework, we construct a number of practical schemes for simulating realistic systems such as nanoscopic electronic devices. Computational cost of each scheme is analyzed, with the expected level of accuracy discussed. As a demonstration, a simulation based on the adiabatic wide-band limit approximation scheme is carried out to characterize the transient current response of a carbon nanotube based electronic device under time-dependent external voltages.

  18. On transport in quantum Hall systems with constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, S.

    2007-10-01

    We study edge transport in a simple model of a constricted quantum Hall system with a lowered local filling factor. The current backscattered from the constriction is explained from a matching of the properties of the edge-current excitations in the constriction (ν2) and bulk (ν1) regions. We develop a hydrodynamic theory for bosonic edge modes inspired by this model, finding that a competition between two tunneling process, related by a quasiparticle-quasihole symmetry, determines the fate of the low-bias transmission conductance. A novel generalisation of the Kane-Fisher quantum impurity model is found, describing transitions from a weak-coupling theory at partial transmission to strong-coupling theories for perfect transmission and reflection as well as a new symmetry dictated fixed point. These results provide satisfactory explanations for recent experimental results at filling factors of 1/3 and 1.

  19. Electronic transport through a quantum ring coupled to ferromagnetic leads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi Feng; Sun Lian-Liang; Huang Ling; Zhao Jia

    2011-01-01

    We study the spin-dependent transport through a one-dimensional quantum ring with taking both the Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC) and ferromagnetic leads into consideration. The linear conductance is obtained by the Green's function method. We find that due to the quantum interference effect arising from the RSOC-induced spin precession phase and the difference in travelling phase between the two arms of the ring, the conductance becomes spin-polarized even in the antiparallel magnetic configuration of the two leads, which is different from the case in single conduction channel system. The linear conductance, the spin polarization and the tunnel magnetoresistance are periodic functions of the two phases, and can be efficiently tuned by the structure parameters.

  20. Spin-dependent thermoelectric transport through double quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qiang; Xie Hai-Qing; Jiao Hu-Jun; Li Zhi-Jian; Nie Yi-Hang

    2012-01-01

    We study the thermoelectric transport through a double-quantum-dot system with spin-dependent interdot coupling and ferromagnetic electrodes by means of the non-equilibrium Green's function in the linear response regime.It is found that the thermoelectric coefficients are strongly dependent on the splitting of the interdot coupling,the relative magnetic configurations,and the spin polarization of leads.In particular,the thermoelectric efficiency can reach a considerable value in the parallel configuration when the effective interdot coupling and the tunnel coupling between the quantum dots and the leads for the spin-down electrons are small.Moreover,the thermoelectric efficiency increases with the intradot Coulomb interaction increasing and can reach very high values at appropriate temperatures.In the presence of the magnetic field,the spin accumulation in the leads strongly suppresses the thermoelectric efficiency,and a pure spin thermopower can be obtained.

  1. Recent progress in computational electronics: disorder effects in nonequilibrium quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Realistic nanoelectronic devices inevitably have some disorder which affect device operation. Unintentional impurities sit at unpredictable locations and any predicted quantum transport property should be averaged over the impurity configurations. Impurity atoms are also intentionally doped into device material where the average is also necessary. One may generate many impurity configurations, calculate all and average the results. Such a brute force approach is not practical for first principles analysis as it is computationally too costly. I shall present the theory of nonequilibrium vertex correction (NVC) where the configurational average is analytically done resulting to a NVC self-energy contributing to the nonequilibrium density matrix. NVC accounts for multiple impurity scattering at nonequilibrium. By integrating NVC with the density functional theory (DFT) and Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's functions (NEGF), nonequilibrium quantum transport in nanoelectronic systems having atomistic disorder can be carried out. By further integrating a recently proposed semi-local exchange potential that accurately determines band gaps, semiconductor nanoelectronics can now be analyzed from atomic first principles. Several examples will be presented including disorder scattering in Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junction, electronic structure of In x Ga 1-x N with varying concentrations x for solar cells, and quantum transport properties of doped Si membrane. Work in collaboration with Youqi Ke and Ke Xia.

  2. Transport across two interacting quantum dots: bulk Kondo, Kondo box and molecular regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Ribeiro, Laercio; Hamad, Ignacio; Chiappe, Guillermo; Victoriano Anda, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    We analyze the transport properties of a double quantum dot device with both dots coupled to perfect conducting leads and to a finite chain of N non-interacting sites connecting both of them. The inter-dot chain strongly influences the transport across the system and the local density of states of the dots. We study the case of small number of sites, so that Kondo box effects are present. For odd N and small coupling between the inter-dot chain and the dots, a state with two coexisting Kondo regimes develops: the bulk Kondo due to the quantum dots connected to leads and the one produced by the screening of the quantum dots spins by the spin in the finite chain. As the coupling to the inter-dot chain increases, there is a crossover to a molecular Kondo effect, due to the screening of the molecule spin by the leads. For even N the two-Kondo temperatures regime does not develop and the physics is dominated by the usual competition between Kondo and antiferromagnetism. We finally study how the transport properties are affected as N is increased. We used exact multi-configurational Lanczos calculations and finite U slave-boson mean-field theory. The results obtained with both methods describe qualitatively and also quantitatively the same physics.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo diagonalization method as a variational calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Honma, Michio

    1997-05-01

    A stochastic method for performing large-scale shell model calculations is presented, which utilizes the auxiliary field Monte Carlo technique and diagonalization method. This method overcomes the limitation of the conventional shell model diagonalization and can extremely widen the feasibility of shell model calculations with realistic interactions for spectroscopic study of nuclear structure. (author)

  4. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of Isoleucine by quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthi, P P; Gunasekaran, S; Ramkumaar, G R

    2014-04-24

    In this work, we reported a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra and NBO analysis of Isoleucine (2-Amino-3-methylpentanoic acid). The optimized molecular structure, vibrational frequencies, corresponding vibrational assignments, thermodynamics properties, NBO analyses, NMR chemical shifts and ultraviolet-visible spectral interpretation of Isoleucine have been studied by performing MP2 and DFT/cc-pVDZ level of theory. The FTIR, FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) and 3500-50 cm(-1) respectively. The UV-visible absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-800 nm. Computational calculations at MP2 and B3LYP level with basis set of cc-pVDZ is employed in complete assignments of Isoleucine molecule on the basis of the potential energy distribution (PED) of the vibrational modes, calculated using VEDA-4 program. The calculated wavenumbers are compared with the experimental values. The difference between the observed and calculated wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of the molecule were calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with experimental results. The formation of hydrogen bond was investigated in terms of the charge density by the NBO calculations. Based on the UV spectra and TD-DFT calculations, the electronic structure and the assignments of the absorption bands were carried out. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) were investigated using theoretical calculations.

  5. Spin-dependent quantum transport in nanoscaled geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heremans, Jean J.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss experiments where the spin degree of freedom leads to quantum interference phenomena in the solid-state. Under spin-orbit interactions (SOI), spin rotation modifies weak-localization to weak anti-localization (WAL). WAL's sensitivity to spin- and phase coherence leads to its use in determining the spin coherence lengths Ls in materials, of importance moreover in spintronics. Using WAL we measure the dependence of Ls on the wire width w in narrow nanolithographic ballistic InSb wires, ballistic InAs wires, and diffusive Bi wires with surface states with Rashba-like SOI. In all three systems we find that Ls increases with decreasing w. While theory predicts the increase for diffusive wires with linear (Rashba) SOI, we experimentally conclude that the increase in Ls under dimensional confinement may be more universal, with consequences for various applications. Further, in mesoscopic ring geometries on an InAs/AlGaSb 2D electron system (2DES) we observe both Aharonov-Bohm oscillations due to spatial quantum interference, and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations due to time-reversed paths. A transport formalism describing quantum coherent networks including ballistic transport and SOI allows a comparison of spin- and phase coherence lengths extracted for such spatial- and temporal-loop quantum interference phenomena. We further applied WAL to study the magnetic interactions between a 2DES at the surface of InAs and local magnetic moments on the surface from rare earth (RE) ions (Gd3+, Ho3+, and Sm3+). The magnetic spin-flip rate carries information about magnetic interactions. Results indicate that the heavy RE ions increase the SOI scattering rate and the spin-flip rate, the latter indicating magnetic interactions. Moreover Ho3+ on InAs yields a spin-flip rate with an unusual power 1/2 temperature dependence, possibly characteristic of a Kondo system. We acknowledge funding from DOE (DE-FG02-08ER46532).

  6. Quantum dot transport in soil, plants, and insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Salim, Najeh [Industrial Research Ltd, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand); Barraclough, Emma; Burgess, Elisabeth [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 92169, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Clothier, Brent, E-mail: brent.clothier@plantandfood.co.nz [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 11600, Manawatu Mail Centre, Palmerston North 4442 (New Zealand); Deurer, Markus; Green, Steve [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 11600, Manawatu Mail Centre, Palmerston North 4442 (New Zealand); Malone, Louise [New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Ltd, Private Bag 92169, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Weir, Graham [Industrial Research Ltd, P.O. Box 31310, Lower Hutt 5040 (New Zealand)

    2011-08-01

    Environmental risk assessment of nanomaterials requires information not only on their toxicity to non-target organisms, but also on their potential exposure pathways. Here we report on the transport and fate of quantum dots (QDs) in the total environment: from soils, through their uptake into plants, to their passage through insects following ingestion. Our QDs are nanoparticles with an average particle size of 6.5 nm. Breakthrough curves obtained with CdTe/mercaptopropionic acid QDs applied to columns of top soil from a New Zealand organic apple orchard, a Hastings silt loam, showed there to be preferential flow through the soil's macropores. Yet the effluent recovery of QDs was just 60%, even after several pore volumes, indicating that about 40% of the influent QDs were filtered and retained by the soil column via some unknown exchange/adsorption/sequestration mechanism. Glycine-, mercaptosuccinic acid-, cysteine-, and amine-conjugated CdSe/ZnS QDs were visibly transported to a limited extent in the vasculature of ryegrass (Lolium perenne), onion (Allium cepa) and chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum sp.) plants when cut stems were placed in aqueous QD solutions. However, they were not seen to be taken up at all by rooted whole plants of ryegrass, onion, or Arabidopsis thaliana placed in these solutions. Leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) larvae fed with these QDs for two or four days, showed fluorescence along the entire gut, in their frass (larval feces), and, at a lower intensity, in their haemolymph. Fluorescent QDs were also observed and elevated cadmium levels detected inside the bodies of adult moths that had been fed QDs as larvae. These results suggest that exposure scenarios for QDs in the total environment could be quite complex and variable in each environmental domain. - Research highlights: {yields} Quantum dots are transported rapidly through soil but half were retained. {yields} Intact roots of plants did not take up quantum dots. Excised plants

  7. Electron transport in n-doped Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, I.; Ikonic, Z.; Milanovic, V.; Kelsall, R. W.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2007-05-01

    An electron transport model in n-Si/SiGe quantum cascade or superlattice structures is described. The model uses the electronic structure calculated within the effective-mass complex-energy framework, separately for perpendicular (Xz) and in-plane (Xxy) valleys, the degeneracy of which is lifted by strain, and additionally by size quantization. The transport is then described via scattering between quantized states, using a rate equations approach and tight-binding expansion, taking the coupling with two nearest-neighbor periods. Acoustic phonon, optical phonon, alloy disorder, and interface roughness scattering are taken into account. The calculated current/voltage dependence and gain profiles are presented for two simple superlattice structures.

  8. Transport Studies of Quantum Magnetism: Physics and Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minhyea [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2017-03-30

    The main goal of this project was to understand novel ground states of spin systems probed by thermal and electrical transport measurements. They are well-suited to characterize the nature of low-energy excitations as unique property of the ground state. More specifically, it was aimed to study the transverse electrical conductivity in the presence of non-collinear and non-coplanar spin ordering and the effects of gauge field as well as novel spin excitations as a coherent heat transport channel in insulating quantum magnets. Most of works done during the grant period focused on these topics. As a natural extension of the project's initial goals, the scope was broadened to include transport studies on the spin systems with strong spin-orbit coupling. One particular focus was an exploration of systems with strong magnetic anisotropy combined with non-trivial spin configuration. Magnetic anisotropy is directly related to implement the non-collinear spin ordering to the existing common geometry of planar devices and thus poses a significant potential. Work in this direction includes the comparison of the topological Hall signal under hydrostatic pressure and chemical doping, as well as the angular dependence dependence of the non-collinear spin ordered phase and their evolution up on temperature and field strength. Another focus was centered around the experimental identification of spin-originated heat carrying excitation in quasi two dimensional honeycomb lattice, where Kitaev type of quantum spin liquid phase is expected to emerge. In fact, when its long range magnetic order is destroyed by the applied field, we discovered anomalously large enhancement of thermal conductivity, for which proximate Kitaev excitations in field-induced spin liquid state are responsible for. This work, combined with further investigations in materials in the similar class may help establish the experimental characterization of new quantum spin liquid and their unique low energy

  9. Quantum chemical calculations for polymers and organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J.; Yang, C.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic effects of the orbiting electrons on a model compound were calculated. The computational method used was based on 'Modified Neglect of Differential Overlap' (MNDO). The compound tetracyanoplatinate was used since empirical measurement and calculations along "classical" lines had yielded many known properties. The purpose was to show that for large molecules relativity effects could not be ignored and that these effects could be calculated and yield data in closer agreement to empirical measurements. Both the energy band structure and molecular orbitals are depicted.

  10. Nonlinear electron transport in normally pinched-off quantum wire

    OpenAIRE

    Novoselov, K.S.; Dubrovskii, Yu. V.; Sablikov, V. A.; Ivanov, D. Yu.; Vdovin, E. E.; Khanin, Yu N.; Tulin, V. A.; Esteve, D.; Beaumont, S.

    2000-01-01

    Nonlinear electron transport in normally pinched-off quantum wires was studied. The wires were fabricated from AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas by electron beam lithography and following wet etching. At certain critical source-drain voltage the samples exhibited a step rise of the conductance. The differential conductance of the open wires was noticeably lower than e^2/h as far as only part of the source-drain voltage dropped between source contact ...

  11. Statistical theory of designed quantum transport across disordered networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walschaers, Mattia; Mulet, Roberto; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    We explain how centrosymmetry, together with a dominant doublet of energy eigenstates in the local density of states, can guarantee interference-assisted, strongly enhanced, strictly coherent quantum excitation transport between two predefined sites of a random network of two-level systems. Starting from a generalization of the chaos-assisted tunnelling mechanism, we formulate a random matrix theoretical framework for the analytical prediction of the transfer time distribution, of lower bounds of the transfer efficiency, and of the scaling behavior of characteristic statistical properties with the size of the network. We show that these analytical predictions compare well to numerical simulations, using Hamiltonians sampled from the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble.

  12. A Statistical Theory of Designed Quantum Transport Across Disordered Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Walschaers, Mattia; Wellens, Thomas; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    We explain how centrosymmetry, together with a dominant doublet in the local density of states, can guarantee interference-assisted, strongly enhanced, strictly coherent quantum excitation transport between two predefined sites of a random network of two-level systems. Starting from a generalisation of the chaos assisted tunnelling mechanism, we formulate a random matrix theoretical framework for the analytical prediction of the transfer time distribution, of lower bounds of the transfer efficiency, and of the scaling behaviour of characteristic statistical properties with the size of the network.

  13. Interface Roughness Scattering on Electronic Transport in a Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑以松; 吕天全; 张程祥; 苏文辉

    2003-01-01

    Several theoretical models are established to simulate the interface roughness in a quantum well. The numerical result shows that the roughness correlation function always deviates from the extensively used Gaussian form to some extent, which depends on what a model is used. The influence of such a deviation on the electronic transport property is investigated by assuming several different analytical forms of the correlation function. It is found that the Fermi wavevector is crucial to determine whether the conductivity depends sensitively on the details of the correlation function.

  14. On Parallel Transport in Quantum Bundles over Robertson-Walker Spacetimes

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    A recently-developed theory of quantum general relativity provides a propagator for free-falling particles in curved spacetimes. These propagators are constructed by parallel-transporting quantum states within a quantum bundle associated to the Poincare frame bundle. We consider such parallel transport in the case that the spacetime is a classical Robertson-Walker universe. An explicit integral formula is developed which expresses the propagators for parallel transport between any two points ...

  15. Tritium transport calculations for the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Jana, E-mail: jana.freund@kit.edu; Arbeiter, Frederik; Abou-Sena, Ali; Franza, Fabrizio; Kondo, Keitaro

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Delivery of material data for the tritium balance in the IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module. • Description of the topological models in TMAP and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). • Computation of release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas. • Computation of the loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line. - Abstract: The IFMIF Tritium Release Test Module (TRTM) is projected to measure online the tritium release from breeder ceramics and beryllium pebble beds under high energy neutron irradiation. Tritium produced in the pebble bed of TRTM is swept out continuously by a purge gas flow, but can also permeate into the module's metal structures, and can be lost by permeation to the environment. According analyses on the tritium inventory are performed to support IFMIF plant safety studies, and to support the experiment planning. This paper describes the necessary elements for calculation of the tritium transport in the Tritium Release Test Module as follows: (i) applied equations for the tritium balance, (ii) material data from literature and (iii) the topological models and the computation of the five different cases; namely release of tritium from the breeder solid material into the purge gas, loss of tritium over the capsule wall, rig hull, container wall and purge gas return line in detail. The problem of tritium transport in the TRTM has been studied and analyzed by the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) and the adapted fusion-devoted Tritium Permeation Code (FUS-TPC). TMAP has been developed at INEEL and now exists in Version 7. FUS-TPC Code was written in MATLAB with the original purpose to study the tritium transport in Helium Cooled Lead Lithium (HCLL) blanket and in a later version the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) blanket by [6] (Franza, 2012). This code has been further modified to be applicable to the TRTM. Results from the

  16. Confidence and efficiency scaling in Variational Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Delyon, François; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Based on the central limit theorem, we discuss the problem of evaluation of the statistical error of Monte Carlo calculations using a time discretized diffusion process. We present a robust and practical method to determine the effective variance of general observables and show how to verify the equilibrium hypothesis by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We then derive scaling laws of the efficiency illustrated by Variational Monte Carlo calculations on the two dimensional electron gas.

  17. Confidence and efficiency scaling in variational quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delyon, F.; Bernu, B.; Holzmann, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Based on the central limit theorem, we discuss the problem of evaluation of the statistical error of Monte Carlo calculations using a time-discretized diffusion process. We present a robust and practical method to determine the effective variance of general observables and show how to verify the equilibrium hypothesis by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We then derive scaling laws of the efficiency illustrated by variational Monte Carlo calculations on the two-dimensional electron gas.

  18. Quantum transport under ac drive from the leads: A Redfield quantum master equation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Archak; Dubi, Yonatan

    2017-08-01

    Evaluating the time-dependent dynamics of driven open quantum systems is relevant for a theoretical description of many systems, including molecular junctions, quantum dots, cavity-QED experiments, cold atoms experiments, and more. Here, we formulate a rigorous microscopic theory of an out-of-equilibrium open quantum system of noninteracting particles on a lattice weakly coupled bilinearly to multiple baths and driven by periodically varying thermodynamic parameters like temperature and chemical potential of the bath. The particles can be either bosonic or fermionic and the lattice can be of any dimension and geometry. Based on the Redfield quantum master equation under Born-Markov approximation, we derive a linear differential equation for an equal time two point correlation matrix, sometimes also called a single-particle density matrix, from which various physical observables, for example, current, can be calculated. Various interesting physical effects, such as resonance, can be directly read off from the equations. Thus, our theory is quite general and gives quite transparent and easy-to-calculate results. We validate our theory by comparing with exact numerical simulations. We apply our method to a generic open quantum system, namely, a double quantum dot coupled to leads with modulating chemical potentials. The two most important experimentally relevant insights from this are as follows: (i) Time-dependent measurements of current for symmetric oscillating voltages (with zero instantaneous voltage bias) can point to the degree of asymmetry in the system-bath coupling and (ii) under certain conditions time-dependent currents can exceed time-averaged currents by several orders of magnitude, and can therefore be detected even when the average current is below the measurement threshold.

  19. Electron transport lifetimes in InSb/Al1-x In x Sb quantum well 2DEGs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, D. G.; Allford, C. P.; Smith, G. V.; McIndo, C.; Hanks, L. A.; Gilbertson, A. M.; Cohen, L. F.; Zhang, S.; Clarke, E. M.; Buckle, P. D.

    2017-08-01

    We report magnetotransport measurements of InSb/Al1-x In x Sb modulation doped quantum well (QW) structures and the extracted transport ({τ }{{t}}) and quantum ({τ }{{q}}) lifetime of carriers at low temperature (transport lifetimes over a range of samples with different doping levels and carrier densities, and deduce different transport regimes dependent on QW state filling calculated from self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson modelling. For samples where only the lowest QW subband is occupied at electron densities of 2.13× {10}11 cm-2 and 2.54× {10}11 cm-2 quantum lifetimes of {τ }{{q}}≈ 0.107 ps, and {τ }{{q}}≈ 0.103 ps are extracted from Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations below a magnetic field of 0.8 T. The extracted ratios of transport to quantum lifetimes, {τ }{{t}}/{τ }{{q}}≈ 17 and {τ }{{t}}/{τ }{{q}}≈ 20 are similar to values reported in other binary QW two-dimensional electron gas systems, but are inconsistent with predictions from transport modelling which assumes that remote ionized donors are the dominant scattering mechanism. We find the low {τ }{{t}}/{τ }{{q}} ratio and the variation in transport mobility with carrier density cannot be explained by reasonable levels of background impurities or well width fluctuations. Thus, there is at least one additional scattering mechanism unaccounted for, most likely arising from structural defects.

  20. Linear scaling calculation of an n-type GaAs quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shintaro; Iitaka, Toshiaki

    2007-09-01

    A linear scale method for calculating electronic properties of large and complex systems is introduced within a local density approximation. The method is based on the Chebyshev polynomial expansion and the time-dependent method, which is tested on the calculation of the electronic structure of a model n-type GaAs quantum dot.

  1. Conserving GW scheme for nonequilibrium quantum transport in molecular contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Rubio, Angel

    2008-01-01

    We give a detailed presentation of our recent scheme to include correlation effects in molecular transport calculations using the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism. The scheme is general and can be used with any quasiparticle self-energy, but for practical reasons, we mainly specialize to the so-c...

  2. Considerations of beta and electron transport in internal dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolch, W.E.; Poston, J.W. Sr.

    1990-12-01

    Ionizing radiation has broad uses in modern science and medicine. These uses often require the calculation of energy deposition in the irradiated media and, usually, the medium of interest is the human body. Energy deposition from radioactive sources within the human body and the effects of such deposition are considered in the field of internal dosimetry. In July of 1988, a three-year research project was initiated by the Nuclear Engineering Department at Texas A M University under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The main thrust of the research was to consider, for the first time, the detailed spatial transport of electron and beta particles in the estimation of average organ doses under the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. At the present time (December of 1990), research activities are continuing within five areas. Several are new initiatives begun within the second or third year of the current contract period. They include: (1) development of small-scale dosimetry; (2) development of a differential volume phantom; (3) development of a dosimetric bone model; (4) assessment of the new ICRP lung model; and (5) studies into the mechanisms of DNA damage. A progress report is given for each of these tasks within the Comprehensive Report. In each case, preliminary results are very encouraging and plans for further research are detailed within this document.

  3. Calculation Model for Current-voltage Relation of Silicon Quantum-dots-based Nano-memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong-guan; DAI Da-kang; YU Biao; SHANG Lin-lin; GUO You-hong

    2007-01-01

    Based on the capacitive coupling formalism, an analytic model for calculating the drain currents of the quantum-dots floating-gate memory cell is proposed. Using this model, one can calculate numerically the drain currents of linear, saturation and subthreshold regions of the device with/without charges stored on the floating dots. The read operation process of an n-channel Si quantum-dots floating-gate nano-memory cell is discussed after calculating the drain currents versus the drain to source voltages and control gate voltages in both high and low threshold states respectively.

  4. Structural influences on quantum transport in InAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frielinghaus, Robert; Sladek, Kamil; Trellenkamp, Stefan; Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Floehr, Kilian [II. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Weirich, Thomas E. [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy GFE, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany); Schaepers, Thomas [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); JARA - Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Self-assembled nanostructures such as InAs nanowires are candidates for future semiconductor nanoscale devices. However their atomic arrangement usually differs from device to device leading to fluctuations in the electrical properties as e.g. the electron phase coherence length. Using a special sample design we present quantum transport measurements together with transmission electron micrographs (TEM) taken from the same individual InAs nanowires. The as-grown nanowires are selectively placed on holes patterned in a TEM membrane. Low-temperature magnetotransport measurements of these suspended nanowires reveal universal conductance fluctuations that allow for the determination of the phase coherence length without any influence of the substrate. Variations in the transport behavior are correlated to the atomically resolved structure observed in TEM.

  5. Directed transport in classical and quantum chaotic billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, W; Dittrich, T [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and CeiBA, Complejidad, Bogota DC (Colombia)], E-mail: jwacevedov@unal.edu.co, E-mail: tdittrich@unal.edu.co

    2009-01-30

    We construct an autonomous chaotic Hamiltonian ratchet as a channel billiard subdivided by equidistant walls attached perpendicularly to one side of the channel, leaving an opening on the opposite side. A static homogeneous magnetic field penetrating the billiard breaks time-reversal invariance and renders the classical motion partially chaotic. We show that the classical dynamics exhibits directed transport, owing to the asymmetric distribution of regular regions in phase space. The billiard is quantized by a numerical method based on a finite-element algorithm combined with the Landau gauge and the Bloch formalism for periodic potentials. We discuss features of the billiard eigenstates such as node lines and vortices in the probability flow. Evidence for directed quantum transport, inherited from the corresponding features of the classical dynamics, is presented in terms of level-velocity statistics.

  6. Finger-gate manipulated quantum transport in Dirac materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleftogiannis, Ioannis; Tang, Chi-Shung; Cheng, Shun-Jen

    2015-05-27

    We investigate the quantum transport properties of multichannel nanoribbons made of materials described by the Dirac equation, under an in-plane magnetic field. In the low energy regime, positive and negative finger-gate potentials allow the electrons to make intra-subband transitions via hole-like or electron-like quasibound states (QBS), respectively, resulting in dips in the conductance. In the high energy regime, double dip structures in the conductance are found, attributed to spin-flip or spin-nonflip inter-subband transitions through the QBSs. Inverting the finger-gate polarity offers the possibility to manipulate the spin polarized electronic transport to achieve a controlled spin-switch.

  7. Geometry of quantum Hall states: Gravitational anomaly and transport coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Can, Tankut, E-mail: tcan@scgp.stonybrook.edu [Simons Center for Geometry and Physics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Laskin, Michael; Wiegmann, Paul B. [Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 929 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    We show that universal transport coefficients of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) can be understood as a response to variations of spatial geometry. Some transport properties are essentially governed by the gravitational anomaly. We develop a general method to compute correlation functions of FQH states in a curved space, where local transformation properties of these states are examined through local geometric variations. We introduce the notion of a generating functional and relate it to geometric invariant functionals recently studied in geometry. We develop two complementary methods to study the geometry of the FQHE. One method is based on iterating a Ward identity, while the other is based on a field theoretical formulation of the FQHE through a path integral formalism.

  8. Fast and accurate calculation of dilute quantum gas using Uehling-Uhlenbeck model equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2017-02-01

    The Uehling-Uhlenbeck (U-U) model equation is studied for the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas. In particular, the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to solve the U-U model equation. DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation is expected to enable the thermalization to be accurately obtained using a small number of sample particles and the dilute quantum gas dynamics to be calculated in a practical time. Finally, the applicability of DSMC analysis based on the U-U model equation to the fast and accurate calculation of a dilute quantum gas is confirmed by calculating the viscosity coefficient of a Bose gas on the basis of the Green-Kubo expression and the shock layer of a dilute Bose gas around a cylinder.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of two neutrons in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Klos, P; Tews, I; Gandolfi, S; Gezerlis, A; Hammer, H -W; Hoferichter, M; Schwenk, A

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations provide direct access to the properties of pure neutron systems that are challenging to study experimentally. In addition to their importance for fundamental physics, their properties are required as input for effective field theories of the strong interaction. In this work, we perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the ground and first excited state of two neutrons in a finite box, considering a simple contact potential as well as chiral effective field theory interactions. We compare the results against exact diagonalizations and present a detailed analysis of the finite-volume effects, whose understanding is crucial for determining observables from the calculated energies. Using the L\\"uscher formula, we extract the low-energy S-wave scattering parameters from ground- and excited-state energies for different box sizes.

  10. A self-consistent numerical method for simulation of quantum transport in high electron mobility transistor; part II: The full quantum transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Khoie

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In Part I of this paper we reported a self-consistent Boltzmann-Schrödinger-Poisson simulator for HEMT in which only electrons in the first subband were assumed to be quantized with their motion restricted to 2 dimensions. In that model, the electrons in the second and higher subbands were treated as bulk system behaving as a 3 dimensional electron gas. In Part II of this paper, we extend our simulator to a self-consistent full-quantum model in which the electrons in the second subband are also treated as quantized 2 dimensional gas. In this model, we consider the electrons in the lowest two subbands to be in the quantum well forming the 2-dimensional electron gas, and the electrons in the third and higher subbands to behave as bulk electrons with no restrictions in their motion. We have further incorporated an additional self-consistency by calculating the field-dependent, energy-dependent scattering rates due to ionized impurities and polar optical phonons. The two higher moments of Boltzmann transport equation are numerically solved for the two lowest subbands and the bulk system; six transport equations, four for the two subbands and two for the bulk system. The Schrödinger and Poisson equations are also solved self-consistently. The wavefunctions obtained are used to calculate the ionized impurity scattering and the polar optical phonon scattering rates. The rates of transfer of electrons and their energies to and from each subband are calculated from these intersubband and intrasubband scattering rates.

  11. Scattering approach to quantum transport and many body effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichard, Jean-Louis; Freyn, Axel

    2010-12-01

    We review a series of works discussing how the scattering approach to quantum transport developed by Landauer and Buttiker for one body elastic scatterers can be extended to the case where electron-electron interactions act inside the scattering region and give rise to many body scattering. Firstly, we give an exact numerical result showing that at zero temperature a many body scatterer behaves as an effective one body scatterer, with an interaction dependent transmission. Secondly, we underline that this effective scatterer depends on the presence of external scatterers put in its vicinity. The implications of this non local scattering are illustrated studying the conductance of a quantum point contact where electrons interact with a scanning gate microscope. Thirdly, using the numerical renormalization group developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem, we study a double dot spinless model with an inter-dot interaction U and inter-dot hopping td, coupled to leads by hopping terms tc. We show that the quantum conductance as a function of td is given by a universal function, independently of the values of U and tc, if one measures td in units of a characteristic scale τ(U,tc). Mapping the double dot system without spin onto a single dot Anderson model with spin and magnetic field, we show that τ(U,tc) = 2TK, where TK is the Kondo temperature of the Anderson model.

  12. Quantum transport in topological semimetals under magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2017-06-01

    Topological semimetals are three-dimensional topological states of matter, in which the conduction and valence bands touch at a finite number of points, i.e., the Weyl nodes. Topological semimetals host paired monopoles and antimonopoles of Berry curvature at the Weyl nodes and topologically protected Fermi arcs at certain surfaces. We review our recent works on quantum transport in topological semimetals, according to the strength of the magnetic field. At weak magnetic fields, there are competitions between the positive magnetoresistivity induced by the weak anti-localization effect and negative magnetoresistivity related to the nontrivial Berry curvature. We propose a fitting formula for the magnetoconductivity of the weak anti-localization. We expect that the weak localization may be induced by inter-valley effects and interaction effect, and occur in double-Weyl semimetals. For the negative magnetoresistance induced by the nontrivial Berry curvature in topological semimetals, we show the dependence of the negative magnetoresistance on the carrier density. At strong magnetic fields, specifically, in the quantum limit, the magnetoconductivity depends on the type and range of the scattering potential of disorder. The high-field positive magnetoconductivity may not be a compelling signature of the chiral anomaly. For long-range Gaussian scattering potential and half filling, the magnetoconductivity can be linear in the quantum limit. A minimal conductivity is found at the Weyl nodes although the density of states vanishes there.

  13. Vibration spectroscopic analysis and quantum chemical calculation of thymine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FU Yichen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper,Raman and IR spectra of thymine(Th were measured respectively in this paper.Molecular structure of Th was optimized and it’s Raman and IR bands were calculated using B3LYP/6-311G(contain Density functional theory,DFT method.It was found that the calculated values match well with the experimental ones.The vibratinal frequencies of Th molecules were completely assigned with the assistance of Gauss View visualization software.

  14. Quantum transport in narrow-gap semiconductor nanocolumns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueth, H.; Bloemers, C.; Richter, T.; Wensorra, J.; Estevez Hernandez, S.; Petersen, G.; Lepsa, M.; Schaepers, T.; Marso, M.; Indlekofer, M.; Calarco, R.; Demarina, N.; Gruetzmacher, D. [Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (IBN-1) and Juelich Aachen Research Alliance (JARA), Research Center Juelich (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    InN nanowires were grown by plasma-assisted MBE in a bottom-up approach, while InAs nanocolumns were prepared top-down by electron beam lithography. Both types of narrow-gap semiconductor nanocolumns exhibit a surface accumulation with a cylinder-like 2 DEG as conduction channel. In magnetoconductance measurements at low temperatures with the magnetic field parallel to the column axis the InN wires exhibit magnetoconductance oscillations with a repetition period of a magnetic flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}. For the InAs columns the observed magnetoconductance oscillations have a period of half the flux quantum {phi}{sub 0}/2. The interpretation is based on the different surface perfectness of both types of columns. The InN wires with an almost perfect crystallinity allow transport through coherent angular momentum states within the surface 2 DEG which yields a {phi}{sub 0} periodicity. The InAs column surfaces exhibit a high amount of surface defects arising from the preparation and only diffusive, phase conserving transport through the 2 DEG is possible, which allows Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak interferences with a period {phi}{sub 0}/2. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Single Molecule Analysis of Serotonin Transporter Regulation Using Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jerry; Tomlinson, Ian; Warnement, Michael; Ustione, Alessandro; Carneiro, Ana; Piston, David; Blakely, Randy; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, we implement a novel, single molecule approach to define the localization and mobility of the brain's major target of widely prescribed antidepressant medications, the serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT labeled with single quantum dot (Qdot) revealed unsuspected features of transporter mobility with cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (often referred to as ``lipid rafts'') and cytoskeleton network linked to transporter activation. We document two pools of surface SERT proteins defined by their lateral mobility, one that exhibits relatively free diffusion in the plasma membrane and a second that displays significantly restricted mobility and localizes to cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Diffusion model prediction and instantaneous velocity analysis indicated that stimuli that act through p38 MAPK-dependent signaling pathways to activate SERT trigger rapid SERT movements within membrane microdomains. Cytoskeleton disruption showed that SERT lateral mobility behaves a membrane raft-constrained, cytoskeleton-associated manner. Our results identify an unsuspected aspect of neurotransmitter transporter regulation that we propose reflects the dissociation of inhibitory, SERT-associated cytoskeletal anchors.

  16. Covariant methods for calculating the low-energy effective action in quantum field theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Avramidi, I G

    1994-01-01

    We continue the development of the effective covariant methods for calculating the heat kernel and the one-loop effective action in quantum field theory and quantum gravity. The status of the low-energy approximation in quantum gauge theories and quantum gravity is discussed in detail on the basis of analyzing the local Schwinger - De Witt expansion. It is argued that the low-energy limit, when defined in a covariant way, should be related to background fields with covariantly constant curvature, gauge field strength and potential. Some new approaches for calculating the low-energy heat kernel assuming a covariantly constant background are proposed. The one-loop low-energy effective action in Yang-Mills theory in flat space with arbitrary compact simple gauge group and arbitrary matter on a covariantly constant background is calculated. The stability problem of the chromomagnetic (Savvidy-type) vacuum is analyzed. It is shown, that this type of vacuum structure can be stable only in the case when more than on...

  17. High Electric Field Quantum Transport: Submillimeter Wave AC Stark Localization in Vertical and Lateral Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    superlattices. These experiments have opened the arena of photon assisted transport to semiconductor devices and paved the way for future teraherz: electronics based on quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures.

  18. Quantum-chemistry calculations of hydrogen adsorption in MOF-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Diego A; Combariza, Aldo F; Sastre, German

    2009-10-28

    High concentrations of molecular hydrogen adsorption on MOF-5 were evaluated at the semiempirical PM6 (periodic and cluster) and ab initio MP2 (cluster) theoretical levels. From the semiempirical calculations, an uptake of 3.9% weight on the inorganic building unit of MOF-5 was estimated, in good agreement with a recent accurate estimation of 4.5-5.2%. Although PM6 allows a correct estimation of the maximum uptake, the adsorption energy was overestimated and hence ab initio calculations, including a correlation treatment at the MP2 level as well as corrections for basis set superposition error, were performed with full optimisation, including the 6-31G basis set, which rendered an adsorption energy (per hydrogen molecule) of -0.14 kcal mol(-1). The crucial role of the quality of the basis set, as well as the importance of simulating high hydrogen loading (resembling experimental measurements), are remarked. Single point calculations (using the 6-31G geometry) with improved basis sets 6-31G(d,p) and 6-31++G(d,p) yielded adsorption energies of -0.33 and -0.57 kcal mol(-1), the latter in reasonable agreement with a recent experimental estimation of -1.0 kcal mol(-1). The role of the intermolecular hydrogen interactions is highlighted in this study, since many previous computational studies were performed at low hydrogen loadings, far from the experimental uptake conditions.

  19. Quantum Chemistry Calculation of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Angiotensin Converting-Enzyme (ACE) inhibitors are potential drugs for hypertension.There are three requirements to be necessary for successful inhibition of ACE:1) a functional group capable of binding to zine in the active site (i.e.carboxylate,phosphonate,or sulfhydryl);2) a carbonyl oxygen capable of accepting a hydryogen bond from some donor residue functional groups and 3) an ionizable C-terminal carboxylate moiety which interacts with positively charged residue〔1〕. We reported active conformers of some ACE inhibitor molecules,which were derived by Distance Comparison〔2〕.In this paper,the electronic structure of the lowest energy conformers and active conformers of the ACE inhibitor molecules (Figure 1) were calculated through ab initio calculation by using Gaussian94 package.The Density Functional Theory (DFT) method and 6-31G** basis set were used 〔3〕.The calculation results were listed in Table 1.The total energies、HOMO energies and the charges of the marked atoms of all active conformers were higher than that of the correspondent lowest energy conformers.They were useful clues for designing novel analogs to inhibit the activity of ACE.

  20. Efficient method for calculating electronic bound states in arbitrary one-dimensional quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino, V. M.; Iwamoto, H.; Dias, I. F. L.; Laureto, E.; da Silva, M. A. T.; da Silva, E. C. F.; Quivy, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In the present paper it is demonstrated that the bound electronic states of multiple quantum wells structures may be calculated very efficiently by expanding their eigenstates in terms of the eigenfunctions of a particle in a box. The bound states of single and multiple symmetric or nonsymmetric wells are calculated within the single-band effective mass approximation. A comparison is then made between the results obtained for simple cases with exact calculations. We also apply our approach to a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well structure composed of forty periods each one with seven quantum wells. The method may be very useful to design narrow band quantum cascade photodetectors to work without applied bias in a photovoltaic mode. With the presented method the effects of a electric field may also be easily included which is very important if one desires study quantum well structures for application to the development of quantum cascade lasers. The advantages of the method are also presented.

  1. Calculation of Excitonic Transitions in ZnO/MgZnO Quantum-Well Heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐天宁; 吴惠桢; 邱东江; 陈乃波

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the excitonic transition energies and exciton binding energies in ZnO/MgxZn1-xO quantum-well heterostructures with Mg composition x varied from 0.08 to 0.36. The effect of the exciton-phonon interaction on the exciton binding energies is taken into account in the model. For the ZnO/Mg0.12Zn0.88O quantum-well structure, we compare the calculated result with the available experimental data at 5 K, and a good agreement is achieved. The excitonic transition energies at room temperature in ZnO/MgxZn1-xO quantum-well heterostructures are also calculated. The results show that when the well width exceeds 50 A, the quantum size effect is neglectable and the excitonic transition energies in ZnO/MgxZn1-xO (with x varied from 0.08 to 0.36)quantum-well heterostructures are close to the value of bulk ZnO. The maximum exciton binding energy as large as 121.1 meV is obtained for the well width of 12.5 A in the ZnO/Mg0.36Zn0.64O quantum-well heterostructures.

  2. Parameter-free driven Liouville-von Neumann approach for time-dependent electronic transport simulations in open quantum systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelovich, Tamar; Hansen, Thorsten; Liu, Fulai

    2017-01-01

    A parameter-free version of the recently developed driven Liouville-von Neumann equation [T. Zelovich et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10(8), 2927-2941 (2014)] for electronic transport calculations in molecular junctions is presented. The single driving rate, appearing as a fitting parameter in th......-box" algorithms to simulate electron dynamics in open quantum systems out of equilibrium.......A parameter-free version of the recently developed driven Liouville-von Neumann equation [T. Zelovich et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10(8), 2927-2941 (2014)] for electronic transport calculations in molecular junctions is presented. The single driving rate, appearing as a fitting parameter...

  3. Dirac fermions in strong electric field and quantum transport in graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, S P; Yokomizo, N

    2012-01-01

    Our previous results on the nonperturbative calculations of the mean current and of the energy-momentum tensor in QED with the T-constant electric field are generalized to arbitrary dimensions. The renormalized mean values are found; the vacuum polarization and particle creation contributions to these mean values are isolated in the large T-limit, the vacuum polarization contributions being related to the one-loop effective Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian. Peculiarities in odd dimensions are considered in detail. We adapt general results obtained in 2+1 dimensions to the conditions which are realized in the Dirac model for graphene. We study the quantum electronic and energy transport in the graphene at low carrier density and low temperatures when quantum interference effects are important. Our description of the quantum transport in the graphene is based on the so-called generalized Furry picture in QED where the strong external field is taken into account nonperturbatively; this approach is not restricted to a...

  4. Green's functions technique for calculating the emission spectrum in a quantum dot-cavity system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Arturo Gómez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the Green's functions technique as an alternative theory to the quantum regression theorem formalism for calculating the two-time correlation functions in open quantum systems at the steady state. In order to investigate the potential of this theoretical approach, we consider a dissipative system composed of a single quantum dot inside a semiconductor cavity and the emission spectrum is computed due to the quantum dot as well as the cavity. We propose an algorithm based on the Green's functions technique for computing the emission spectrum that can easily be adapted to more complex open quantum systems. We found that the numerical results based on the Green's functions technique are in perfect agreement with the quantum regression theorem formalism. Moreover, it allows overcoming the inherent theoretical difficulties associated with the direct application of the quantum regression theorem in open quantum systems. Received: 6 September 2016, Accepted: 5 November 2016; Edited by: J. P. Paz; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4279/PIP.080008 Cite as: E A Gómez, J D Hernández-Rivero, H Vinck-Posada, Papers in Physics 8, 080008 (2016

  5. Quantum transport through a Coulomb blockaded quantum emitter coupled to a plasmonic dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goker, A; Aksu, H

    2016-01-21

    We study the electron transmission through a Coulomb blockaded quantum emitter coupled to metal nanoparticles possessing plasmon resonances by employing the time-dependent non-crossing approximation. We find that the coupling of the nanoparticle plasmons with the excitons results in a significant enhancement of the conductance through the discrete state with higher energy beyond the unitarity limit while the other discrete state with lower energy remains Coulomb blockaded. We show that boosting the plasmon-exciton coupling well below the Kondo temperature increases the enhancement adding another quantum of counductance upon saturation. Finite bias and increasing emitter resonance energy tend to reduce this enhancement. We attribute these observations to the opening of an additional transport channel via the plasmon-exciton coupling.

  6. Quantum statistical effects in the mass transport of interstitial solutes in a crystalline solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, C. H.; Wen, Haohua

    2017-09-01

    The impact of quantum statistics on the many-body dynamics of a crystalline solid at finite temperatures containing an interstitial solute atom (ISA) is investigated. The Mori-Zwanzig theory allows the many-body dynamics of the crystal to be formulated and solved analytically within a pseudo-one-particle approach using the Langevin equation with a quantum fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) based on the Debye model. At the same time, the many-body dynamics is also directly solved numerically via the molecular dynamics approach with a Langevin heat bath based on the quantum FDR. Both the analytical and numerical results consistently show that below the Debye temperature of the host lattice, quantum statistics significantly impacts the ISA transport properties, resulting in major departures from both the Arrhenius law of diffusion and the Einstein-Smoluchowski relation between the mobility and diffusivity. Indeed, we found that below one-third of the Debye temperature, effects of vibrations on the quantum mobility and diffusivity are both orders-of-magnitude larger and practically temperature independent. We have shown that both effects have their physical origin in the athermal lattice vibrations derived from the phonon ground state. The foregoing theory is tested in quantum molecular dynamics calculation of mobility and diffusivity of interstitial helium in bcc W. In this case, the Arrhenius law is only valid in a narrow range between ˜300 and ˜700 K. The diffusivity becomes temperature independent on the low-temperature side while increasing linearly with temperature on the high-temperature side.

  7. Quantum Nuclear Pasta Calculations with Twisted Angular Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetrumpf, Bastian; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear pasta, expected to be present in the inner crust of neutron stars and core collapse supernovae, can contain a wide spectrum of different exotic shapes such as nuclear rods and slabs. There are also more complicated, network-like structures, the triply periodic minimal surfaces, already known e.g. in biological systems. These shapes are studied with the Hartree-Fock method using modern Skyrme forces. Furthermore twisted angular boundary conditions are utilized to reduce finite size effects in the rectangular simulation boxes. It is shown, that this improves the accuracy of the calculations drastically and additionally more insights into the mechanism of forming minimal surfaces can be gained.

  8. Impurity-limited quantum transport variability in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jianing; Wang, Yin; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jian; Guo, Hong

    2017-08-01

    We report an extensive first-principles investigation of impurity-induced device-to-device variability of spin-polarized quantum tunneling through Fe/MgO/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ). In particular, we calculated the tunnel magnetoresistance ratio (TMR) and the average values and variances of the currents and spin transfer torque (STT) of an interfacially doped Fe/MgO/Fe MTJ. Further, we predicted that N-doped MgO can improve the performance of a doped Fe/MgO/Fe MTJ. Our firstprinciples calculations of the fluctuations of the on/off currents and STT provide vital information for future predictions of the long-term reliability of spintronic devices, which is imperative for high-volume production.

  9. Cylindric quantum wires in a threading magnetic field: A proposal of characterization based on zero bias electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, P.

    2012-12-01

    We study the quantum transport properties of cylindrical shaped wires, with submicrometric diameters and large aspect ratio. The zero bias conductance as a function of temperature, magnetic field and disorder is calculated for different kinds of nano cylinders, from semiconductor quantum wires to carbon nanotubes. A comparison between our findings and the experimental results allows the understanding of the charge carriers' localization, in the external surface or in the core of the wires, by highlighting the basic mechanism of charge transport. We discuss how we can infer that in InAs quantum wires the carriers move in the core. We examine the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the quenching that should be observed in the measured magneto conductivity of InAs nano cylinders and carbon nanotubes emphasizing the role of the angle between field and tube.

  10. Quantum transport in nanowire-based hybrid devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenel, Haci Yusuf

    2013-05-08

    We have studied the low-temperature transport properties of nanowires contacted by a normal metal as well as by superconducting electrodes. As a consequence of quantum coherence, we have demonstrated the electron interference effect in different aspects. The mesoscopic phase coherent transport properties were studied by contacting the semiconductor InAs and InSb nanowires with normal metal electrodes. Moreover, we explored the interaction of the microscopic quantum coherence of the nanowires with the macroscopic quantum coherence of the superconductors. In superconducting Nb contacted InAs nanowire junctions, we have investigated the effect of temperature, magnetic field and electric field on the supercurrent. Owing to relatively high critical temperature of superconducting Nb (T{sub c} ∝ 9 K), we have observed the supercurrent up to 4 K for highly doped nanowire-based junctions, while for low doped nanowire-based junctions a full control of the supercurrent was achieved. Due to low transversal dimension of the nanowires, we have found a monotonous decay of the critical current in magnetic field dependent measurements. The experimental results were analyzed within narrow junction model which has been developed recently. At high bias voltages, we have observed subharmonic energy gap structures as a consequence of multiple Andreev reflection. Some of the nanowires were etched, such that the superconducting Nb electrodes are connected to both ends of the nanowire rather than covering the surface of the nanowire. As a result of well defined nanowire-superconductor interfaces, we have examined quasiparticle interference effect in magnetotransport measurements. Furthermore, we have developed a new junction geometry, such that one of the superconducting Nb electrodes is replaced by a superconducting Al. Owing to the smaller critical magnetic field of superconducting Al (B{sub c} ∝ 15-50,mT), compared to superconducting Nb (B{sub c} ∝ 3 T), we were able to studied

  11. Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics calculations for the N + NH --> N(2) + H reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Hankel, M; Varandas, Antonio; Han, Keli

    2010-09-01

    Nonadiabatic quantum dynamics calculations on the two coupled potential energy surfaces (PESs) (1(2)A' and 2(2)A') and also adiabatic quantum calculations on the lowest adiabatic PES are reported for the title reaction. Reaction probabilities for total angular momenta, J, varying from 0 to 160, are calculated to obtain the integral cross section (ICS) for collision energies ranging from 0.05 to 1.0 eV. Calculations using both the close coupling and the Centrifugal Sudden (CS) approximation are carried out to evaluate the role of Coriolis coupling effects for this reaction. The results of the nonadiabatic calculations show that the nonadiabatic effects in the title reaction for the initial state of NH (v = 0, j = 0) could be neglected, at least in the collision energy range considered in this study.

  12. Equation of State of Al Based on Quantum Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakov, Dmitry V.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.

    2011-06-01

    In this work, we present quantum molecular dynamics calculations of the shock Hugoniots of solid and porous samples as well as release isentropes and values of isentropic sound velocity behind the shock front for aluminum. We use the VASP code with an ultrasoft pseudopotential and GGA exchange-correlation functional. Up to 108 particles have been used in calculations. For the Hugoniots of Al we solve the Hugoniot equation numerically. To calculate release isentropes, we use Zel'dovich's approach and integrate an ordinary differential equation for the temperature thus restoring all thermodynamic parameters. Isentropic sound velocity is calculated by differentiation along isentropes. The results of our calculations are in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, quantum molecular dynamics results can be effectively used for verification or calibration of semiempirical equations of state under conditions of lack of experimental information at high energy densities. This work is supported by RFBR, grants 09-08-01129 and 11-08-01225.

  13. Multi channel quantum defect theory calculations of the Rydberg spectra of HCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douguet, Nicolas; Orel, Ann

    2014-05-01

    We present a first-principles theoretical study of the photoionization spectra of vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg states converging to excited states of HCO+. The clamped-nuclei scattering matrix, quantum defects parameters and transition dipole moments are explicitly calculated using the complex variational Kohn technique. The multi-channel quantum defect theory and vibrational frame transformation are then used to calculate the absorption spectrum. The results are compared with experimental data on double-resonance spectroscopy of the high Rydberg states of formyl radical. This work is supported by the DOE Office of Basic Energy Science and the National Science Foundation, Grant No's PHY-10-68785 and PHY-11-60611.

  14. Analytic calculations of trial wave functions of the fractional quantum Hall effect on the sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Batista, C.L. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Dingping Li [Perugia Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1996-07-01

    We present a framework for the analytic calculations of the hierarchical wave functions and the composite fermion wave functions in the fractional quantum Hall effect on the sphere by using projective coordinates. Then we calculate the overlaps between these two wave functions at various fillings and small numbers of electrons. We find that the overlaps are most equal to one. This gives a further evidence that two theories of the fractional quantum Hall effect, the hierarchical theory, are physically equivalent. (author). 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. PDB ligand conformational energies calculated quantum-mechanically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzmann, Markus; Weidlich, Iwona E; Filippov, Igor V; Liao, Chenzhong; Peach, Megan L; Ihlenfeldt, Wolf-Dietrich; Karki, Rajeshri G; Borodina, Yulia V; Cachau, Raul E; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2012-03-26

    We present here a greatly updated version of an earlier study on the conformational energies of protein-ligand complexes in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) [Nicklaus et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. 1995, 3, 411-428], with the goal of improving on all possible aspects such as number and selection of ligand instances, energy calculations performed, and additional analyses conducted. Starting from about 357,000 ligand instances deposited in the 2008 version of the Ligand Expo database of the experimental 3D coordinates of all small-molecule instances in the PDB, we created a "high-quality" subset of ligand instances by various filtering steps including application of crystallographic quality criteria and structural unambiguousness. Submission of 640 Gaussian 03 jobs yielded a set of about 415 successfully concluded runs. We used a stepwise optimization of internal degrees of freedom at the DFT level of theory with the B3LYP/6-31G(d) basis set and a single-point energy calculation at B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) after each round of (partial) optimization to separate energy changes due to bond length stretches vs bond angle changes vs torsion changes. Even for the most "conservative" choice of all the possible conformational energies-the energy difference between the conformation in which all internal degrees of freedom except torsions have been optimized and the fully optimized conformer-significant energy values were found. The range of 0 to ~25 kcal/mol was populated quite evenly and independently of the crystallographic resolution. A smaller number of "outliers" of yet higher energies were seen only at resolutions above 1.3 Å. The energies showed some correlation with molecular size and flexibility but not with crystallographic quality metrics such as the Cruickshank diffraction-component precision index (DPI) and R(free)-R, or with the ligand instance-specific metrics such as occupancy-weighted B-factor (OWAB), real-space R factor (RSR), and real-space correlation coefficient

  16. Computer program for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braon, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer code has been developed to provide thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, and parahydrogen. Equation of state and transport coefficients are updated and other fluids added as new material becomes available.

  17. Improved transfer matrix methods for calculating quantum transmission coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Kumar, Vishal

    2014-07-01

    Methods for calculating the transmission coefficient are proposed, all of which arise from improved nonreflecting WKB boundary conditions at the edge of the computational domain in one-dimensional geometries. In the first, the Schrödinger equation is solved numerically, while the second is a transfer matrix (TM) algorithm where the potential is approximated by steps, but with the first and last matrix modified to reflect the new boundary condition. Both methods give excellent results with first-order WKB boundary conditions. The third uses the transfer matrix method with third-order WKB boundary conditions. For the parabolic potential, the average error for the modified third-order TM method reduces by factor of 4100 over the unmodified TM method.

  18. Inelastic low-temperature transport through a quantum dot with a Mn ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu Pengbin, E-mail: niupengbin123456@gmail.com [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Yao Hui; Li Zhijian [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Nie Yihang, E-mail: nieyh@sxu.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Institute of Solid State Physics, Shanxi Datong University, Datong 037009 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Using the nonequilibrium Hubbard operator Green's function technique, we study the inelastic low-temperature quantum transport through an artificial single-molecule magnet coupled to a single phonon mode. For a minimal model based on CdTe quantum dot doped with a single Mn{sup 2+} ion (S=5/2), the calculated results show that in the presence of hole-phonon coupling, in addition to main Kondo-like peaks associated with (2S+1) sublevels of spin pair states, satellite Kondo-like peaks originating from emitting phonons appear in the local density of states and differential conductance. Moreover, the number of these phonon-induced Kondo-like peaks depends on the parity of the local large spin, i.e., S=integer or half-integer. It is expected that the intrinsic properties of artificial single-molecule magnets can be obtained by detecting these transport characteristics. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study inelastic transport through an ASMM in low temperature regime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytical formula for the retarded Green's function is derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phonon-induced Kondo-like peaks depending on the parity of local spin are found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-particle and Kondo-like elastic (inelastic) tunneling processes are discussed.

  19. Quantum Size Effects in Transport Properties of Bi2Te3 Topological Insulator Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogacheva, E. I.; Budnik, A. V.; Nashchekina, O. N.; Meriuts, A. V.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2017-07-01

    Bi2Te3 compound and Bi2Te3-based solid solutions have attracted much attention as promising thermoelectric materials for refrigerating devices. The possibility of enhancing the thermoelectric efficiency in low-dimensional structures has stimulated studies of Bi2Te3 thin films. Now, interest in studying the transport properties of Bi2Te3 has grown sharply due to the observation of special properties characteristic of three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators in Bi2Te3. One of the possible manifestations of quantum size effects in two-dimensional structures is an oscillatory behavior of the dependences of transport properties on film thickness, d. The goal of this work is to summarize our earlier experimental results on the d-dependences of transport properties of Bi2Te3 thin films obtained by thermal evaporation in a vacuum on glass substrates, and to present our new results of theoretical calculations of the oscillations periods within the framework of the model of an infinitely deep potential well, which takes into account the dependence of the Fermi energy on d and the contribution of all energy subbands below the Fermi level to the conductivity. On the basis of the data obtained, some general regularities and specificity of the quantum size effects manifestation in 3D topological insulators are established.

  20. Electronic and Quantum Transport Properties of Atomically Identified Si Point Defects in Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Zhou, Wu; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos

    2014-05-15

    We report high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images displaying a range of inclusions of isolated silicon atoms at the edges and inner zones of graphene layers. Whereas the incorporation of Si atoms to a graphene armchair edge involves no reconstruction of the neighboring carbon atoms, the inclusion of a Si atom to a zigzag graphene edge entails the formation of five-membered carbon rings. In all the observed atomic edge terminations, a Si atom is found bridging two C atoms in a 2-fold coordinated configuration. The atomic-scale observations are underpinned by first-principles calculations of the electronic and quantum transport properties of the structural anomalies. Experimental estimations of Si-doped graphene band gaps realized by means of transport measurements may be affected by a low doping rate of 2-fold coordinated Si atoms at the graphene edges, and 4-fold coordinated at inner zones due to the apparition of mobility gaps.

  1. "Multiscale Capabilities for Exploring Transport Phenomena in Batteries": Ab Initio Calculations on Defective LiFePO4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai, Yosuke [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Tang, M [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Wood, B C [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-10-25

    We have began the project “Multiscale Capability for Exploring Transport Phenomena in Battery”, which is sponsored by Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in February 2012 as the subcontract was approved. We have been performing first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations to first establish the general modeling framework. It was found that it is essential to employ advanced Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations with Hubbard U correction, in order to describe the battery material, in particular, LiFePO4 (Figure 1). The presence of localized d-electrons at Fe ion sites requires the better treatment of non-local correlation beyond that of standard DFT. As our aim was to first identify and investigate key transport/reaction mechanisms affecting the performance of Lithium-ion based batteries, we have began out work by characterizing the standard structures and how the defects influence the important electronic structure.

  2. Quantum simulator of an open quantum system using superconducting qubits: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Mostame, Sarah; Tsomokos, Dimitris I; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    In the initial stage of photosynthesis, light-harvested energy is transferred with remarkably high efficiency to a reaction center, with the vibrational environment assisting the transport mechanism. It is of great interest to mimic this process with present-day technologies. Here we propose an analog quantum simulator of open system dynamics, where noise engineering of the environment has a central role. In particular, we propose the use of superconducting qubits for the simulation of exciton transport in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson protein, a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Our method allows for a single-molecule implementation and the investigation of energy transfer pathways as well as non-Markovian and spatiotemporal noise-correlation effects.

  3. Quantum simulator of an open quantum system using superconducting qubits: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostame, Sarah; Rebentrost, Patrick; Eisfeld, Alexander; Kerman, Andrew J.; Tsomokos, Dimitris I.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2012-02-01

    In the initial stage of photosynthesis, light-harvested energy is transferred with remarkably high efficiency to a reaction center, with the vibrational environment assisting the transport mechanism. It is of great interest to mimic this process with present-day technologies. Here we propose an analog quantum simulator of open system dynamics, where noise engineering of the environment has a central role. In particular, we propose the use of superconducting qubits for the simulation of exciton transport in the Fenna-Matthew-Olson protein, a prototypical photosynthetic complex. Our method allows for a single-molecule implementation and the investigation of energy transfer pathways as well as non-Markovian and spatiotemporal noise-correlation effects.

  4. Molecular docking, spectroscopic studies and quantum calculations on nootropic drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma Maheswari, J; Muthu, S; Sundius, Tom

    2014-04-05

    A systematic vibrational spectroscopic assignment and analysis of piracetam [(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide)] have been carried out using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral data. The vibrational analysis was aided by an electronic structure calculation based on the hybrid density functional method B3LYP using a 6-311G++(d,p) basis set. Molecular equilibrium geometries, electronic energies, IR and Raman intensities, and harmonic vibrational frequencies have been computed. The assignments are based on the experimental IR and Raman spectra, and a complete assignment of the observed spectra has been proposed. The UV-visible spectrum of the compound was recorded and the electronic properties, such as HOMO and LUMO energies and the maximum absorption wavelengths λmax were determined by the time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) method. The geometrical parameters, vibrational frequencies and absorption wavelengths were compared with the experimental data. The complete vibrational assignments are performed on the basis of the potential energy distributions (PED) of the vibrational modes in terms of natural internal coordinates. The simulated FT-IR, FT-Raman, and UV spectra of the title compound have been constructed. Molecular docking studies have been carried out in the active site of piracetam by using Argus Lab. In addition, the potential energy surface, HOMO and LUMO energies, first-order hyperpolarizability and the molecular electrostatic potential have been computed.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the dimerization energy of borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchia, Francesco; Bressanini, Dario; Morosi, Gabriele

    2011-09-07

    Accurate thermodynamic data are required to improve the performance of chemical hydrides that are potential hydrogen storage materials. Boron compounds are among the most interesting candidates. However, different experimental measurements of the borane dimerization energy resulted in a rather wide range (-34.3 to -39.1) ± 2 kcal/mol. Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations usually recover more than 95% of the correlation energy, so energy differences rely less on error cancellation than other methods. DMC energies of BH(3), B(2)H(6), BH(3)CO, CO, and BH(2)(+) allowed us to predict the borane dimerization energy, both via the direct process and indirect processes such as the dissociation of BH(3)CO. Our D(e) = -43.12(8) kcal/mol, corrected for the zero point energy evaluated by considering the anharmonic contributions, results in a borane dimerization energy of -36.59(8) kcal/mol. The process via the dissociation of BH(3)CO gives -34.5(2) kcal/mol. Overall, our values suggest a slightly less D(e) than the most recent W4 estimate D(e) = -44.47 kcal/mol [A. Karton and J. M. L. Martin, J. Phys. Chem. A 111, 5936 (2007)]. Our results show that reliable thermochemical data for boranes can be predicted by fixed node (FN)-DMC calculations.

  6. Quantum Transport through a Triple Quantum Dot System in the Presence of Majorana Bound States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhao-Tan; Cao, Zhi-Yuan; Zhong, Cheng-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    We study the electron transport through a special quantum-dot (QD) structure composed of three QDs and two Majorana bound states (MBSs) using the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. This QD-MBS ring structure includes two channels with the two coupled MBSs being Channel 1 and one QD being Channel 2, and three types of transport processes such as the electron transmission (ET), the Andreev reflection (AR), and the crossed Andreev reflection (CAR). By comparing the ET, AR, and CAR processes through Channels 1 and 2, we make a systematic study on the transport properties of the QD-MBS ring. It is shown that there appear two kinds of characteristic transport patterns for Channels 1 and 2, as well as the interplay between the two patterns. Of particular interest is that there exists an AR-assisted ET process in Channel 2, which is different from that in Channel 1. Thus a clear “X” pattern due to the ET and AR processes appears in the ET, AR, and CAR transmission coefficients. Moreover, we study how Channel 2 affects the three transport processes when Channel 1 is tuned in the ET and CAR regimes. It is shown that the transport properties of the ET, AR and CAR processes can be adjusted by tuning the energy level of the QD embedded in Channel 2. We believe this research should be a helpful reference for understanding the transport properties in the QD-MBS coupled systems. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11274040, and by the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University under Grant No. NCET-08-0044

  7. Spin transport properties in double quantum rings connected in series*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Jian; Wang Suxin; Pan Jianghong

    2011-01-01

    A new model of metal/semiconductor/metal double-quantum-ring connected in series is proposed and the transport properties in this model are theoretically studied. The results imply that the transmission coefficient shows periodic variations with increasing semiconductor ring size. The effects of the magnetic field and Rashba spin-orbit interaction on the transmission coefficient for two kinds of spin state electrons are different. The number of the transmission coefficient peaks is related to the length ratio between the upper ann and the half circumference of the ring. In addition, the transmission coefficient shows oscillation behavior with enhanced external magnetic field, and the corresponding average value is related to the two leads' relative position.

  8. Quantum Transport and Surface Scattering in Magnetic Metallic Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yin; DONG Zheng-Chao

    2008-01-01

    Taking into account the quantum size effect and the spin dependence of the electronic band structure,and including the spin dependence of the scattering from bulk impurities and two different sets of surface roughness,we present a theory on the electronic transport in magnetic film,in which the average autocorrelation function (ACF) for surface roughness is described by a Gaussion model.Our result shows that the conductivity is a sensitive function of surface roughness and exchange energy.It is also found that in the thin film limit and in the lower-order approximation of the surface scattering,the total conductivity is given by a sum of conductivities of all the subbands and the two spin channels,for each subband and each spin channel the scattering rates due to the impurities and two surfaces are additive.

  9. Experimental verification of reciprocity relations in quantum thermoelectric transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J.; Battista, F.; Sánchez, D.; Samuelsson, P.; Linke, H.

    2014-10-01

    Fundamental symmetries in thermoelectric quantum transport, beyond Onsagers relations, were predicted two decades ago but have to date not been observed in experiments. Recent works have predicted the symmetries to be sensitive to energy-dependent, inelastic scattering, raising the question whether they exist in practice. Here, we answer this question affirmatively by experimentally verifying the thermoelectric reciprocity relations in a four-terminal mesoscopic device where each terminal can be electrically and thermally biased individually. The linear-response thermoelectric coefficients are found to be symmetric under simultaneous reversal of magnetic field and exchange of injection and emission contacts. We also demonstrate a controllable breakdown of the reciprocity relations by increasing thermal bias, putting in prospect enhanced thermoelectric performance.

  10. Pauli-Heisenberg Oscillations in Electron Quantum Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Karl; Gabelli, Julien; Lupien, Christian; Reulet, Bertrand

    2015-06-12

    We measure the current fluctuations emitted by a normal-metal-insulator-normal-metal tunnel junction with a very wide bandwidth, from 0.3 to 13 GHz, down to very low temperature T=35  mK. This allows us to perform the spectroscopy (i.e., measure the frequency dependence) of thermal noise (no dc bias, variable temperature) and shot noise (low temperature, variable dc voltage bias). Because of the very wide bandwidth of our measurement, we deduce the current-current correlator in the time domain. We observe the thermal decay of this correlator as well as its oscillations with a period h/eV, a direct consequence of the effect of the Pauli and Heisenberg principles in quantum electron transport.

  11. The transport mechanism of the integer quantum Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    LiMing, W

    2016-01-01

    The integer quantum Hall effect is analysed using a transport mechanism with a semi-classic wave packages of electrons in this paper. A strong magnetic field perpendicular to a slab separates the electron current into two branches with opposite wave vectors $({\\it k})$ and locating at the two edges of the slab, respectively, along the current. In this case back scattering of electrons ($k\\rightarrow -k$) is prohibited by the separation of electron currents. Thus the slab exhibits zero longitudinal resistance and plateaus of Hall resistance. When the Fermi level is scanning over a Landau level when the magnetic field increases, however, the electron waves locate around the central axis of the slab and overlap each other thus back scattering of electrons takes place frequently. Then longitudinal resistance appears and the Hall resistance goes up from one plateau to a new plateau.

  12. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  13. Quantum calculations for photodetachment cross sections of H- in an inhomogeneous electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xiao-Qing; Du Meng-Li; Zhao Hai-Jun

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the photodetachment cross sections of Hˉ in a gradient electric field based on traditional quantum approach.The system provides a rare example that the formulas for the cross sections can be explicitly derived by both the quantum approach and closed-orbit theory.The quantum results are compared with those of the closed-orbit theory.The correct phase values in the closed-orbit theory are essential and necessary to produce accurate cross sections.Our quantum results remove some previous ambiguities in assigning the phase values in the closed-orbit theory (G.C.Yang and M.L.Du 2007 Phys.Rev.A 75 029904E).

  14. Effects of van Hove Singularities on Transport of Quantum Dot Systems in Kondo Regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, we study the effect of van Hove singularities of conduction electron on the transport of a single quantum dot system in the Kondo regime. By using both the equation-of-motion and the noncrossing approximation techniques, we show that the corrections caused by these singularities are actually minor. It can be explained by observing that the singularities in the equations, which determine the electronic DOS on the dot, are integrable. Furthermore, we find that, although each line width function is divergent at van Hove singular points, the total divergence is canceled out in the final formula to calculate the current through the system. Therefore, as far as the qualitative properties of the system is concerned, these singularities can be ignored and the wide-band approximation can be safely used in calculation.

  15. Quantum Mechanics Calculations, Basicity and Crystal Structure: The Route to Transition Metal Complexes of Azahelicenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Natali Sora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics density functional calculations provided gas-phase electron distributions and proton affinities for several mono- and diaza[5]helicenes; computational results, together with experimental data concerning crystal structures and propensity to methylation of the nitrogen atom(s, provide a basis for designing azahelicene complexes with transition metal ions.

  16. Monte Carlo calculation of quantum tunneling in the dilute instanton limit

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach for estimating small quantum tunneling rates by Monte Carlo calculation is proposed and demonstrated on a simple one-dimensional model. The application to many-body situations such as atomic exchange in solid 3He is discussed.

  17. Young’s modulus calculations for cellulose Iß by MM3 and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM) calculations were performed to elucidate Young’s moduli for a series of cellulose Iß models. Computations using the second generation empirical force field MM3 with a disaccharide cellulose model, 1,4'-O-dimethyl-ß-cellobioside (DMCB), and an analo...

  18. SU-E-T-489: Quantum versus Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo Simulations of Low Energy Electron Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R; Kawrakow, I

    2012-06-01

    Widely-used classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations of low energy electron transport neglect the quantum nature of electrons; however, at sub-1 keV energies quantum effects have the potential to become significant. This work compares quantum and classical simulations within a simplified model of electron transport in water. Electron transport is modeled in water droplets using quantum mechanical (QM) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Water droplets are modeled as collections of point scatterers representing water molecules from which electrons may be isotropically scattered. The role of inelastic scattering is investigated by introducing absorption. QM calculations involve numerically solving a system of coupled equations for the electron wavefield incident on each scatterer. A minimum distance between scatterers is introduced to approximate structured water. The average QM water droplet incoherent cross section is compared with the MC cross section; a relative error (RE) on the MC results is computed. RE varies with electron energy, average and minimum distances between scatterers, and scattering amplitude. The mean free path is generally the relevant length scale for estimating RE. The introduction of a minimum distance between scatterers increases RE substantially (factors of 5 to 10), suggesting that the structure of water must be modeled for accurate simulations. Inelastic scattering does not improve agreement between QM and MC simulations: for the same magnitude of elastic scattering, the introduction of inelastic scattering increases RE. Droplet cross sections are sensitive to droplet size and shape; considerable variations in RE are observed with changing droplet size and shape. At sub-1 keV energies, quantum effects may become non-negligible for electron transport in condensed media. Electron transport is strongly affected by the structure of the medium. Inelastic scatter does not improve agreement between QM and MC simulations of low

  19. Advanced boundary condition method in quantum transport and its application in nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu

    Modern semiconductor devices have reached critical dimensions in the sub-20nm range. During the last decade, quantum transport methods have become the standard approaches to model nanoscale devices. In quantum transport methods, Schrodinger equations are solved in the critical device channel with the contacts served as the open boundary conditions. Proper and efficient treatments of these boundary conditions are essential to provide accurate prediction of device performance. The open boundary conditions, which represent charge injection and extraction effects, are described by contact self-energies. All existing contact self-energy methods assume periodic and semiinfinite contacts, which are in stark contrast to realistic devices where the contacts often have complicated geometries or imperfections. On the other hand, confined structures such as quantum dots, nanowires, and ultra-thin bodies play an important role in nanodevice designs. In the tight binding models of these confined structures, the surfaces require appropriate boundary treatments to remove the dangling bonds. The existing boundary treatments fall into two categories. One is to explicitly include the passivation atoms in the device. This is limited to passivation with atoms and small molecules due to the increasing rank of the Hamiltonian. The other is to implicitly incorporate passivation by altering the orbital energies of the dangling bonds with a passivation potential. This method only works for certain crystal structures and symmetries, and fails to distinguish different passivation scenarios, such as hydrogen and oxygen passivation. In this work, an efficient self-energy method applicable for arbitrary contact structures is developed. This method is based on an iterative algorithm which considers the explicit contact segments. The method is demonstrated on a graphene nanoribbon structure with trumpet shape contacts and a Si0.5Ge0.5 nanowire transistor with alloy disorder contacts. Furthermore

  20. Topics in quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunjin

    In the thesis, we present a series of investigations for quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems. The first topic of the thesis focuses on the fundamental quantum problems which can be studied with electron transport along with the correlations of detectors to measure physical properties. We theoretically describe a generalized ``which-path'' measurement using a pair of coupled electronic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. In the second topic of thesis, we investigate an operational approach to measure the tunneling time based on the Larmor clock. To handle the cases of indirect measurement from the first and second topics, we introduce the contextual values formalism. The form of the contextual values provides direct physical insight into the measurement being performed, providing information about the correlation strength between system and detector, the measurement inefficiency, the proper background removal, and the conditioned average value of the system operator. Additionally, the weak interaction limit of these conditioned averages produces weak values of the system operator and an additional detector dependent disturbance term for both cases. In our treatment of the third topic of the thesis, we propose a three terminal heat engine based on semiconductor superlattices for energy harvesting. The periodicity of the superlattice structure creates an energy miniband, giving an energy window to allow electron transport. We find that this device delivers a large amount of power, nearly twice that produced by the heat engine based on quantum wells, with a small reduction of efficiency. This engine also works as a refrigerator in a different regime of the system's parameters. The thermoelectric performance of the refrigerator is analyzed, including the cooling power and coefficient of performance in the optimized condition. We also calculate phonon heat current through the system and explore the reduction of phonon heat current compared to the bulk

  1. Mixed quantum-classical dynamics for charge transport in organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V; Beljonne, David

    2015-05-21

    Charge transport plays a crucial role in the working principle of most opto-electronic and energy devices. This is especially true for organic materials where the first theoretical models date back to the 1950s and have continuously evolved ever since. Most of these descriptions rely on perturbation theory to treat small interactions in the Hamiltonian. In particular, applying a perturbative treatment to the electron-phonon and electron-electron coupling results in the band and hopping models, respectively, the signature of which is conveyed by a characteristic temperature dependence of mobility. This perspective describes recent progress of studying charge transport in organics using mixed quantum-classical dynamics techniques, including mean field and surface hopping theories. The studies go beyond the perturbation treatments and represent the processes explicitly in the time-domain, as they occur in real life. The challenges, advantages, and disadvantages of both approaches are systematically discussed. Special focus is dedicated to the temperature dependence of mobility, the role of local and nonlocal electron-phonon couplings, as well as the interplay between electronic and electron-phonon interactions.

  2. Quantum Transport in Gated Dangling-Bond Atomic Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohloul, S; Shi, Q; Wolkow, Robert A; Guo, Hong

    2017-01-11

    A single line of dangling bonds (DBs) on Si(100)-2 × 1:H surface forms a perfect metallic atomic-wire. In this work, we investigate quantum transport properties of such dangling bond wires (DBWs) by a state-of-the-art first-principles technique. It is found that the conductance of the DBW can be gated by electrostatic potential and orbital overlap due to only a single DB center (DBC) within a distance of ∼16 Å from the DBW. The gating effect is more pronounced for two DBCs and especially, when these two DB "gates" are within ∼3.9 Å from each other. These effective length scales are in excellent agreement with those measured in scanning tunnelling microscope experiments. By analyzing transmission spectrum and density of states of DBC-DBW systems, with or without subsurface doping, for different length of the DBW, distance between DBCs and the DBW, and distance between DB gates, we conclude that charge transport in a DBW can be regulated to have both an on-state and an off-state using only one or two DBs.

  3. Environment-assisted quantum transport and trapping in dimers

    CERN Document Server

    Muelken, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    We study the dynamics and trapping of excitations for a dimer with an energy off-set $\\Delta$ coupled to an external environment. Using a Lindblad quantum master equation approach, we calculate the survival probability $\\Pi(t)$ of the excitation and define different lifetimes $\\tau_s$ of the excitation, corresponding to the duration of the decay of $\\Pi(t)$ in between two predefined values. We show that it is not possible to always enhance the overall decay to the trap. However, it is possible, even for not too small environmental couplings and for values of $\\Delta$ of the order ${\\cal O}(1)$, to decrease certain lifetimes $\\tau_s$, leading to faster decay of $\\Pi(t)$ in these time intervals: There is an optimal environmental coupling, leading to a maximal decay for fixed $\\Delta$.

  4. Transport phenomena in correlated quantum liquids: Ultracold Fermi gases and F/N junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua

    Landau Fermi-liquid theory was first introduced by L. D. Landau in the effort of understanding the normal state of Fermi systems, where the application of the concept of elementary excitations to the Fermi systems has proved very fruitful in clarifying the physics of strongly correlated quantum systems at low temperatures. In this thesis, I use Landau Fermi-liquid theory to study the transport phenomena of two different correlated quantum liquids: the strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases and the ferromagnet/normal-metal (F/N) junctions. The detailed work is presented in chapter II and chapter III of this thesis, respectively. Chapter I holds the introductory part and the background knowledge of this thesis. In chapter II, I study the transport properties of a Fermi gas with strong attractive interactions close to the unitary limit. In particular, I compute the transport lifetimes of the Fermi gas due to superfluid fluctuations above the BCS transition temperature Tc. To calculate the transport lifetimes I need the scattering amplitudes. The scattering amplitudes are dominated by the superfluid fluctuations at temperatures just above Tc. The normal scattering amplitudes are calculated from the Landau parameters. These Landau parameters are obtained from the local version of the induced interaction model for computing Landau parameters. I also calculate the leading order finite temperature corrections to the various transport lifetimes. A calculation of the spin diffusion coefficient is presented in comparison to the experimental findings. Upon choosing a proper value of F0a, I am able to present a good match between the theoretical result and the experimental measurement, which indicates the presence of the superfluid fluctuations near Tc. Calculations of the viscosity, the viscosity/entropy ratio and the thermal conductivity are also shown in support of the appearance of the superfluid fluctuations. In chapter III, I study the spin transport in the low

  5. Modeling and Calculator Tools for State and Local Transportation Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air quality models, calculators, guidance and strategies are offered for estimating and projecting vehicle air pollution, including ozone or smog-forming pollutants, particulate matter and other emissions that pose public health and air quality concerns.

  6. Direct method for calculating temperature-dependent transport properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Yuan, Z.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Starikov, A.A.; Schilfgaarde, van M.; Kelly, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    We show how temperature-induced disorder can be combined in a direct way with first-principles scattering theory to study diffusive transport in real materials. Excellent (good) agreement with experiment is found for the resistivity of Cu, Pd, Pt (and Fe) when lattice (and spin) disorder are calcula

  7. Quantum transport through a quantum dot structure side coupled with many quantum-dot and Majorana-bound-state pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We theoretically investigate the electron transport properties of a wheel-like quantum dot (QD structure with a central QD side coupled with many pairs of QD and Majorana bound states (MBSs by using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method. For clarity, we concentrate our researches on the parameter regime where interdot couplings is much smaller than the inter-MBS and MBS-QD couplings, which ensures the conductance peaks induced by them distinguishable. In the absence of the interdot couplings among the side QDs, the increase of the MBS-QD pair number is equivalent to the increase of the interdot coupling in the QD structure including one central QD and one MBS-QD pair. It is shown that as a response the interval between two side symmetrical peaks will be enlarged, and the MBS-QD couplings will bring into being a zero-bias conductance peak which can be split into two symmetrical sub-peaks by the nonzero inter-MBS couplings. In the presence of the interdot couplings among the side QDs, they make serious influences on the conductance peaks determined by the QD energy levels, and still comes into being the zero-bias conductance peak due to the MBS-QD couplings, yet which is split into two asymmetrical sub-peaks under the influences of the nonzero inter-MBS couplings. Moreover, we conduct a detailed investigation into how the couplings among side QDs affect the transport properties, clearly exposing the underneath mechanics responsible for producing these phenomena. Finally, a generalization is made so as to discuss the geometry universality and the parameter universality of the conclusion drawn in the present work. It should be emphasized that this research will be helpful for a comprehensive understanding the quantum transport through the QD systems coupled with MBSs.

  8. Quantum calculations of H2-H2 collisions: from ultracold to thermal energies

    CERN Document Server

    Quéméner, Goulven

    2008-01-01

    We present quantum dynamics of collisions between two para-H2 molecules from low (1 mK) to high collision energies (1 eV). The calculations are carried out using a quantum scattering code that solves the time-independent Schrodinger equation in its full dimensionality without any decoupling approximations. The six-dimensional potential energy surface for the H4 system developed by Boothroyd et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 666 (2002)] is used in the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and state-to-state cross sections as well as rate coefficients from T = 1 K to 400 K obtained from our calculations are compared with available experimental and theoretical results. Overall, good agreement is obtained with previous studies.

  9. Quantum and Semiclassical Calculations of Cold Atom Collisions in Light Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Suominen, K A; Tuvi, I; Burnett, K; Julienne, P S

    1998-01-01

    We derive and apply an optical Bloch equation (OBE) model for describing collisions of ground and excited laser cooled alkali atoms in the presence of near-resonant light. Typically these collisions lead to loss of atoms from traps. We compare the results obtained with a quantum mechanical complex potential treatment, semiclassical Landau-Zener models with decay, and a quantum time-dependent Monte-Carlo wave packet (MCWP) calculation. We formulate the OBE method in both adiabatic and diabatic representations. We calculate the laser intensity dependence of collision probabilities and find that the adiabatic OBE results agree quantitatively with those of the MCWP calculation, and qualitatively with the semiclassical Landau-Zener model with delayed decay, but that the complex potential method or the traditional Landau-Zener model fail in the saturation limit.

  10. Variational Calculations of Neutral Bound Excitons in GaAs Quantum-Well Wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Jun; DI Bing; YANG Guo-Chen; LI Shu-Shen

    2004-01-01

    @@ The binding energy of an exciton bound to a neutral donor (D0, X) in GaAs quantum-well wires is calculated variationally as a function of the wire width for different positions of the impurity inside the wire by using a two-parameter wavefunction. There is no artificial parameter added in our calculation. The results we have obtained show that the binding energies are closely correlated to the sizes of the wire, the impurity position, and also that their magnitudes are greater than those in the two-dimensional quantum wells compared. In addition,we also calculate the average interparticle distance as a function of the wire width. The results are discussed in detail.

  11. Fragment quantum chemical approach to geometry optimization and vibrational spectrum calculation of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, John Z H; He, Xiao

    2016-01-21

    Geometry optimization and vibrational spectra (infrared and Raman spectra) calculations of proteins are carried out by a quantum chemical approach using the EE-GMFCC (electrostatically embedded generalized molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method (J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 7149). The first and second derivatives of the EE-GMFCC energy are derived and employed in geometry optimization and vibrational frequency calculations for several test systems, including a polypeptide ((GLY)6), an α-helix (AKA), a β-sheet (Trpzip2) and ubiquitin (76 residues with 1231 atoms). Comparison of the present results with those obtained from full system QM (quantum mechanical) calculations shows that the EE-GMFCC approach can give accurate molecular geometries, vibrational frequencies and vibrational intensities. The EE-GMFCC method is also employed to simulate the amide I vibration of proteins, which has been widely used for the analysis of peptide and protein structures, and the results are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  12. Calculation of quantum discord for qubit-qudit or N qubits

    CERN Document Server

    vinjanampathy, sai

    2011-01-01

    Quantum discord, a kind of quantum correlation, is defined as the difference between quantum mutual information and classical correlation in a bipartite system. It has been discussed so far for small systems with only a few independent parameters. We extend here to a much broader class of states when the second party is of arbitrary dimension d, so long as the first, measured, party is a qubit. We present two formulae to calculate quantum discord, the first relating to the original entropic definition and the second to a recently proposed geometric distance measure which leads to an analytical formulation. The tracing over the qubit in the entropic calculation is reduced to a very simple prescription. And, when the d-dimensional system is a so-called X state, the density matrix having non-zero elements only along the diagonal and anti-diagonal so as to appear visually like the letter X, the entropic calculation can be carried out analytically. Such states of the full bipartite qubit-qudit system may be named ...

  13. The potential, limitations, and challenges of divide and conquer quantum electronic structure calculations on energetic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jon R.; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2012-02-01

    High explosives are an important class of energetic materials used in many weapons applications. Even with modern computers, the simulation of the dynamic chemical reactions and energy release is exceedingly challenging. While the scale of the detonation process may be macroscopic, the dynamic bond breaking responsible for the explosive release of energy is fundamentally quantum mechanical. Thus, any method that does not adequately describe bonding is destined to lack predictive capability on some level. Performing quantum mechanics calculations on systems with more than dozens of atoms is a gargantuan task, and severe approximation schemes must be employed in practical calculations. We have developed and tested a divide and conquer (DnC) scheme to obtain total energies, forces, and harmonic frequencies within semi-empirical quantum mechanics. The method is intended as an approximate but faster solution to the full problem and is possible due to the sparsity of the density matrix in many applications. The resulting total energy calculation scales linearly as the number of subsystems, and the method provides a path-forward to quantum mechanical simulations of millions of atoms.

  14. Single-step propagators for calculation of time evolution in quantum systems with arbitrary interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Ivan; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-05-01

    We propose and develop a general method of numerical calculation of the wave function time evolution in a quantum system which is described by Hamiltonian of an arbitrary dimensionality and with arbitrary interactions. For this, we obtain a general n-order single-step propagator in closed-form, which could be used for the numerical solving of the problem with any prescribed accuracy. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by considering a quantum problem with non-separable time-dependent Hamiltonian: the propagation of an electron in focused electromagnetic field with vortex electric field component.

  15. Comparison of Hugoniots calculated for aluminum in the framework of three quantum-statistical models

    CERN Document Server

    Kadatskiy, Maxim A

    2015-01-01

    The results of calculations of thermodynamic properties of aluminum under shock compression in the framework of the Thomas--Fermi model, the Thomas--Fermi model with quantum and exchange corrections and the Hartree--Fock--Slater model are presented. The influences of the thermal motion and the interaction of ions are taken into account in the framework of three models: the ideal gas, the one-component plasma and the charged hard spheres. Calculations are performed in the pressure range from 1 to $10^7$ GPa. Calculated Hugoniots are compared with available experimental data.

  16. Comparison of Hugoniots calculated for aluminum in the framework of three quantum-statistical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadatskiy, M. A.; Khishchenko, K. V.

    2015-11-01

    The results of calculations of thermodynamic properties of aluminum under shock compression in the framework of the Thomas-Fermi model, the Thomas-Fermi model with quantum and exchange corrections and the Hartree-Fock-Slater model are presented. The influences of the thermal motion and the interaction of ions are taken into account in the framework of three models: the ideal gas, the one-component plasma and the charged hard spheres. Calculations are performed in the pressure range from 1 to 107 GPa. Calculated Hugoniots are compared with available experimental data.

  17. Solving the transport without transit quantum paradox of the spatial adiabatic passage technique

    CERN Document Server

    Benseny, Albert; Oriols, Xavier; Mompart, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    We discuss and solve the transport without transit quantum paradox recently introduced in the context of the adiabatic transport of a single particle or a Bose--Einstein condensate between the two extreme traps of a triple-well potential. To this aim, we address the corresponding quantum dynamics in terms of Bohmian trajectories and show that transport always implies transit through the middle well, in full agreement with the quantum continuity equation. This adiabatic quantum transport presents a very counterintuitive effect: by slowing down the total time duration of the transport process, ultra-high Bohmian velocities are achieved such that, in the limit of perfect adiabaticity, relativistic corrections are needed to properly address the transfer process while avoiding superluminal matter wave propagation.

  18. Transport properties of boron nanotubes investigated by ab initio calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Wei; Hu Yi-Bin; Zhang Yu-Yang; Du Shi-Xuan; Gao Hong-Jun

    2009-01-01

    We investigate atomic and electronic structures of boron nanotubes (BNTs) by using the density functional theory(DFT). The transport properties of BNTs with different diameters and chiralities are studied by the Keldysh nonequi-librium Green function (NEGF) method. It is found that the cohesive energies and conductances of BNTs decrease as their diameters decrease. It is more difficult to form (N, 0) tubes than (M, M) tubes when the diameters of the two kinds of tubes are comparable. However, the (N, 0) tubes have a higher conductance than the (M, M) tubes. When the BNTs are connected to gold electrodes, the coupling between the BNTs and the electrodes will affect the transport properties of tubes significantly.

  19. Molecular-dynamics calculation of the vacancy heat of transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelling, Patrick K.; Ernotte, Jacques; Shokeen, Lalit; Tucker, William C. [Advanced Material Processing and Analysis Center and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Woods Halley, J. [Department of Physics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, Minnesota 555455 (United States)

    2014-07-14

    We apply the recently developed constrained-dynamics method to elucidate the thermodiffusion of vacancies in a single-component material. The derivation and assumptions used in the method are clearly explained. Next, the method is applied to compute the reduced heat of transport Q{sub v}{sup *}−h{sub fv} for vacancies in a single-component material. Results from simulations using three different Morse potentials, with one providing an approximate description of Au, and an embedded-atom model potential for Ni are presented. It is found that the reduced heat of transport Q{sub v}{sup *}−h{sub fv} may take either positive or negative values depending on the potential parameters and exhibits some dependence on temperature. It is also found that Q{sub v}{sup *}−h{sub fv} may be correlated with the activation entropy. The results are discussed in comparison with experimental and previous simulation results.

  20. The reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001): Six-dimensional quantum calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Harrevelt, Rob; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of the reaction rate for dissociative adsorption of N-2 on stepped Ru(0001) are presented. Converged six-dimensional quantum calculations for this heavy-atom reaction have been performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree method. A potential...

  1. The calculation of transport phenomena in electromagnetically levitated metal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation has been developed for the electromagnetic force field, fluid flow field, and solute concentration field of levitation-melted metal specimens. The governing equations consist of the conventional transport equations combined with the appropriate expressions for the electromagnetic force field. The predictions obtained by solving the governing equations numerically on a digital computer are in good agreement with lifting force and average temperature measurements reported in the literature.

  2. Universal transport near a quantum critical Mott transition in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witczak-Krempa, William; Ghaemi, Pouyan; Senthil, T.; Kim, Yong Baek

    2012-12-01

    We discuss the universal-transport signatures near a zero-temperature continuous Mott transition between a Fermi liquid and a quantum spin liquid in two spatial dimensions. The correlation-driven transition occurs at fixed filling and involves fractionalization of the electron: upon entering the spin liquid, a Fermi surface of neutral spinons coupled to an internal gauge field emerges. We present a controlled calculation of the value of the zero-temperature universal resistivity jump predicted to occur at the transition. More generally, the behavior of the universal scaling function that collapses the temperature- and pressure-dependent resistivity is derived, and is shown to bear a strong imprint of the emergent gauge fluctuations. We further predict a universal jump of the thermal conductivity across the Mott transition, which derives from the breaking of conformal invariance by the damped gauge field, and leads to a violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law in the quantum critical region. A connection to the quasitriangular organic salts is made, where such a transition might occur. Finally, we present some transport results for the pure rotor O(N) conformal field theory.

  3. Theory of ballistic quantum transport in the presence of localized defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasiński, K.; Mreńca-Kolasińska, A.; Szafran, B.

    2016-09-01

    We present an efficient numerical approach for treating ballistic quantum transport across devices described by tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonians designated to systems with localized potential defects. The method is based on the wave function matching approach, Lippmann-Schwinger equation (LEQ), and the scattering matrix formalism. We show that the number of matrix elements of the Green's function to be evaluated for the unperturbed system can be essentially reduced by projection of the time reversed scattering wave functions on LEQ which radically improves the speed and lowers the memory consumption of the calculations. Our approach can be applied to quantum devices of an arbitrary geometry and any number of degrees of freedom or leads attached. We provide a couple of examples of possible applications of the theory, including current equilibration at the p -n junction in graphene and scanning gate microscopy mapping of electron trajectories in the magnetic focusing experiment on a graphene ribbon. Additionally, we provide a simple toy example of electron transport through 1D wire with added onsite perturbation and obtain a simple formula for conductance showing that Green's function of the device can be obtained from the conductance versus impurity strength characteristics.

  4. Is Density Functional Theory adequate for quantum transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kieron

    2007-03-01

    Density functional calculations for the electronic conductance of single molecules attached to leads are now common. I'll examine the methodology from a rigorous point of view, discussing where it can be expected to work, and where it should fail. When molecules are weakly coupled to leads, local and gradient-corrected approximations fail, as the Kohn-Sham levels are misaligned. In the weak bias regime, XC corrections to the current are missed by the standard methodology. Finally, I will compare and contrast several new methodologies that go beyond the present standard approach of applying the Landauer formula to ground-state DFT. Self-interaction errors in density functional calculations of electronictransport, C. Toher, A. Filippetti, S. Sanvito, and K. Burke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 146402 (2005) The Dramatic Role of the Exchange-Correlation Potential in ab initio Electron Transport Calculations, S-H. Ke, H.U. Baranger, and W. Yang, cond-mat/0609367. Zero-bias molecular electronics: Exchange-correlation corrections to Landauer's formula, M. Koentopp, K. Burke, and F. Evers, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Comm., 73, 121403 (2006). Density Functional Theory of the Electrical Conductivity of Molecular Devices, K. Burke, Roberto Car, and Ralph Gebauer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 146803 (2005). Density functional calculations of nanoscale conductance, Connie Chang, Max Koentopp, Kieron Burke, and Roberto Car, in prep.

  5. State Representation Approach for Atomistic Time-Dependent Transport Calculations in Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelovich, Tamar; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2014-08-12

    We propose a new method for simulating electron dynamics in open quantum systems out of equilibrium, using a finite atomistic model. The proposed method is motivated by the intuitive and practical nature of the driven Liouville-von-Neumann equation approach of Sánchez et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124, 214708] and Subotnik et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 2009, 130, 144105]. A key ingredient of our approach is a transformation of the Hamiltonian matrix from an atomistic to a state representation of the molecular junction. This allows us to uniquely define the bias voltage across the system while maintaining a proper thermal electronic distribution within the finite lead models. Furthermore, it allows us to investigate complex molecular junctions, including multilead configurations. A heuristic derivation of our working equation leads to explicit expressions for the damping and driving terms, which serve as appropriate electron sources and sinks that effectively "open" the finite model system. Although the method does not forbid it, in practice we find neither violation of Pauli's exclusion principles nor deviation from density matrix positivity throughout our numerical simulations of various tight-binding model systems. We believe that the new approach offers a practical and physically sound route for performing atomistic time-dependent transport calculations in realistic molecular junction models.

  6. Development of Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Satoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Kawasaki, Nobuo [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Kume, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    In the DT fusion reactor, it is critical concern to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates after the reactor shutdown exactly. In order to evaluate the decay gamma-ray biological dose rates exactly, three dimensional Monte Carlo decay gamma-ray transport calculation system have been developed by connecting the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code and the induced activity calculation code. The developed calculation system consists of the following four functions. (1) The operational neutron flux distribution is calculated by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. (2) The induced activities are calculated by the induced activity calculation code. (3) The decay gamma-ray source distribution is obtained from the induced activities. (4) The decay gamma-rays are generated by using the decay gamma-ray source distribution, and the decay gamma-ray transport calculation is conducted by the three dimensional Monte Carlo particle transport calculation code. In order to reduce the calculation time drastically, a biasing system for the decay gamma-ray source distribution has been developed, and the function is also included in the present system. In this paper, the outline and the detail of the system, and the execution example are reported. The evaluation for the effect of the biasing system is also reported. (author)

  7. Self-consistent calculations of optical properties of type I and type II quantum heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvayev, Vladimir A.

    In this Thesis the self-consistent computational methods are applied to the study of the optical properties of semiconductor nanostructures with one- and two-dimensional quantum confinements. At first, the self-consistent Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations is applied to the cylindrical core-shell structure with type II band alignment without direct Coulomb interaction between carriers. The electron and hole states and confining potential are obtained from a numerical solution of this system. The photoluminescence kinetics is theoretically analyzed, with the nanostructure size dispersion taken into account. The results are applied to the radiative recombination in the system of ZnTe/ZnSe stacked quantum dots. A good agreement with both continuous wave and time-resolved experimental observations is found. It is shown that size distribution results in the photoluminescence decay that has essentially non-exponential behavior even at the tail of the decay where the carrier lifetime is almost the same due to slowly changing overlap of the electron and hole wavefunctions. Also, a model situation applicable to colloidal core-shell nanowires is investigated and discussed. With respect to the excitons in type I quantum wells, a new computationally efficient and flexible approach of calculating the characteristics of excitons, based on a self-consistent variational treatment of the electron-hole Coulomb interaction, is developed. In this approach, a system of self-consistent equations describing the motion of an electron-hole pair is derived. The motion in the growth direction of the quantum well is separated from the in-plane motion, but each of them occurs in modified potentials found self-consistently. This approach is applied to a shallow quantum well with the delta-potential profile, for which analytical expressions for the exciton binding energy and the ground state eigenfunctions are obtained, and to the quantum well with the square potential profile with several

  8. Development of Library Processing System for Neutron Transport Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J. S.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, H. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-12-15

    A system for library generation was developed for the lattice neutron transport program for pressurized water reactor core analysis. The system extracts multi energy group nuclear data for requested nuclides from ENDF/B whose data are based on continuous energy, generates hydrogen equivalent factor and resonance integral table as functions of temperature and background cross section for resonance nuclides, generates subgroup data for the lattice program to treat resonance exactly as possible, and generates multi-group neutron library file including nuclide depletion data for use of the lattice program.

  9. An improved filtered spherical harmonic method for transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, C. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Merton, S. [Computational Physics Group, AWE Aldermaston, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by the work of R. G. McClarren, C. D. Hauck, and R. B. Lowrie on a filtered spherical harmonic method, we present a new filter for such numerical approximations to the multi-dimensional transport equation. In several test problems, we demonstrate that the new filter produces results with significantly less Gibbs phenomena than the filter used by McClarren, Hauck and Lowrie. This reduction in Gibbs phenomena translates into propagation speeds that more closely match the correct propagation speed and solutions that have fewer regions where the scalar flux is negative. (authors)

  10. Complex quantum transport in a modulation doped strained Ge quantum well heterostructure with a high mobility 2D hole gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, C.; Casteleiro, C.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.

    2016-09-01

    The complex quantum transport of a strained Ge quantum well (QW) modulation doped heterostructure with two types of mobile carriers has been observed. The two dimensional hole gas (2DHG) in the Ge QW exhibits an exceptionally high mobility of 780 000 cm2/Vs at temperatures below 10 K. Through analysis of Shubnikov de-Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance of this 2DHG below 2 K, the hole effective mass is found to be 0.065 m0. Anomalous conductance peaks are observed at higher fields which deviate from standard Shubnikov de-Haas and quantum Hall effect behaviour due to conduction via multiple carrier types. Despite this complex behaviour, analysis using a transport model with two conductive channels explains this behaviour and allows key physical parameters such as the carrier effective mass, transport, and quantum lifetimes and conductivity of the electrically active layers to be extracted. This finding is important for electronic device applications, since inclusion of highly doped interlayers which are electrically active, for enhancement of, for example, room temperature carrier mobility, does not prevent analysis of quantum transport in a QW.

  11. Time-dependent quantum transport through an interacting quantum dot beyond sequential tunneling: second-order quantum rate equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, B; Ding, G H; Lei, X L

    2015-05-27

    A general theoretical formulation for the effect of a strong on-site Coulomb interaction on the time-dependent electron transport through a quantum dot under the influence of arbitrary time-varying bias voltages and/or external fields is presented, based on slave bosons and the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (GF) techniques. To avoid the difficulties of computing double-time GFs, we generalize the propagation scheme recently developed by Croy and Saalmann to combine the auxiliary-mode expansion with the celebrated Lacroix's decoupling approximation in dealing with the second-order correlated GFs and then establish a closed set of coupled equations of motion, called second-order quantum rate equations (SOQREs), for an exact description of transient dynamics of electron correlated tunneling. We verify that the stationary solution of our SOQREs is able to correctly describe the Kondo effect on a qualitative level. Moreover, a comparison with other methods, such as the second-order von Neumann approach and Hubbard-I approximation, is performed. As illustrations, we investigate the transient current behaviors in response to a step voltage pulse and a harmonic driving voltage, and linear admittance as well, in the cotunneling regime.

  12. Quantum mechanical calculation of nanomaterial-ligand interaction energies by molecular fractionation with conjugated caps method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei

    2017-03-01

    Molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (MFCC) method is introduced for the efficient estimation of quantum mechanical (QM) interaction energies between nanomaterial (carbon nanotube, fullerene, and graphene surface) and ligand (charged and neutral). In the calculations, nanomaterials are partitioned into small fragments and conjugated caps that are properly capped, and the interaction energies can be obtained through the summation of QM calculations of the fragments from which the contribution of the conjugated caps is removed. All the calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion contributions for the attractive interactions were investigated by dispersion corrected DFT method. The predicted interaction energies by MFCC at each computational level are found to give excellent agreement with full system (FS) calculations with the mean energy deviation just a fractional kcal/mol. The accurate determination of nanomaterial-ligand interaction energies by MFCC suggests that it is an effective method for performing QM calculations on nanomaterial-ligand systems.

  13. Quantum mechanical calculation of nanomaterial-ligand interaction energies by molecular fractionation with conjugated caps method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei

    2017-01-01

    Molecular fractionation with conjugate caps (MFCC) method is introduced for the efficient estimation of quantum mechanical (QM) interaction energies between nanomaterial (carbon nanotube, fullerene, and graphene surface) and ligand (charged and neutral). In the calculations, nanomaterials are partitioned into small fragments and conjugated caps that are properly capped, and the interaction energies can be obtained through the summation of QM calculations of the fragments from which the contribution of the conjugated caps is removed. All the calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) and dispersion contributions for the attractive interactions were investigated by dispersion corrected DFT method. The predicted interaction energies by MFCC at each computational level are found to give excellent agreement with full system (FS) calculations with the mean energy deviation just a fractional kcal/mol. The accurate determination of nanomaterial-ligand interaction energies by MFCC suggests that it is an effective method for performing QM calculations on nanomaterial-ligand systems. PMID:28300179

  14. "Shut up and calculate": the available discursive positions in quantum physics courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anders; Andersson, Staffan; Salminen-Karlsson, Minna; Elmgren, Maja

    2016-08-01

    Educating new generations of physicists is often seen as a matter of attracting good students, teaching them physics and making sure that they stay at the university. Sometimes, questions are also raised about what could be done to increase diversity in recruitment. Using a discursive perspective, in this study of three introductory quantum physics courses at two Swedish universities, we instead ask what it means to become a physicist, and whether certain ways of becoming a physicist and doing physics is privileged in this process. Asking the question of what discursive positions are made accessible to students, we use observations of lectures and problem solving sessions together with interviews with students to characterize the discourse in the courses. Many students seem to have high expectations for the quantum physics course and generally express that they appreciate the course more than other courses. Nevertheless, our analysis shows that the ways of being a "good quantum physics student" are limited by the dominating focus on calculating quantum physics in the courses. We argue that this could have negative consequences both for the education of future physicists and the discipline of physics itself, in that it may reproduce an instrumental "shut up and calculate"-culture of physics, as well as an elitist physics education. Additionally, many students who take the courses are not future physicists, and the limitation of discursive positions may also affect these students significantly.

  15. Quantum phenomena in transport measurements of topological insulator nanostructures (Review Article)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Lei; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2014-04-01

    We review the recent experimental advances on quantum phenomena in transport measurements of topological insulators with emphasis on quantum oscillation, weak antilocalization and Aharonov-Bohm effect and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect. Following a brief introduction on the topic, we discuss the identification of the topological surface state based on quantum phenomena. Research prospect of topological insulators is described at the end of this article.

  16. Quantum phenomena in transport measurements of topological insulator nanostructures (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lei; Kwok, Wai-Kwong

    2014-04-01

    We review the recent experimental advances on quantum phenomena in transport measurements of topological insulators with emphasis on quantum oscillation, weak antilocalization and Aharonov-Bohm effect and Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect. Following a brief introduction on the topic, we discuss the identification of the topological surface state based on quantum phenomena. Research prospect of topological insulators is described at the end of this article.

  17. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Edward [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial an energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  18. VARIATIONAL CALCULATION ON GROUND-STATE ENERGY OF BOUND POLARONS IN PARABOLIC QUANTUM WIRES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZHUANG-BING; WU FU-LI; CHEN QING-HU; JIAO ZHENG-KUAN

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of Feynman path-integral variational theory, we calculate the ground-state energy of a polaron in parabolic quantum wires in the presence of a Coulomb potential. It is shown that the polaronic correction to the ground-state energy is more sensitive to the electron-phonon coupling constant than the Coulomb binding parameter,and it increases monotonically with decreasing effective wire radius. Moreover, compared to the results obtained by Feynman Haken variational path-integral theory, we obtain better results within the Feynman path-integral variational approach (FV approach). Applying our calculation to several polar semiconductor quantum wires, we find that the polaronic correction can be considerably large.

  19. Evaluation of dose equivalent rate distribution in JCO critical accident by radiation transport calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y

    2002-01-01

    In the prevention of nuclear disaster, there needs the information on the dose equivalent rate distribution inside and outside the site, and energy spectra. The three dimensional radiation transport calculation code is a useful tool for the site specific detailed analysis with the consideration of facility structures. It is important in the prediction of individual doses in the future countermeasure that the reliability of the evaluation methods of dose equivalent rate distribution and energy spectra by using of Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation code, and the factors which influence the dose equivalent rate distribution outside the site are confirmed. The reliability of radiation transport calculation code and the influence factors of dose equivalent rate distribution were examined through the analyses of critical accident at JCO's uranium processing plant occurred on September 30, 1999. The radiation transport calculations including the burn-up calculations were done by using of the structural info...

  20. The magnetic and quantum transport properties of benzene-vanadium-borazine mixed sandwich clusters: a new kind of spin filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Liu, Shaoding; Liu, Xuguang; Yang, Yongzhen; Li, Xiuyan; Xiong, Shijie; Xu, Bingshe

    2012-11-07

    Using density functional theory and the non-equilibrium Green's function technique, we performed theoretical investigations on the magnetic and quantum transport properties of benzene-vanadium-borazine mixed organic/inorganic ligand sandwich clusters. The calculated results show that these finite sandwich clusters coupled to Ni electrodes exhibit novel quantum transport properties such as half-metallicity, negative differential resistance and spin-reversal effect, and can be viewed as a new kind of spin filter. However, for the infinite molecular wire, the ground state was identified as a ferromagnetic semiconductor with high stability. These findings suggest that the mixed organic/inorganic ligand sandwich clusters and molecular wires are promising materials for application in molecular electronics and spintronics.

  1. Quantum spin transport through Aharonov-Bohm ring with a tangent magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-Jian

    2005-01-01

    Quantum spin transport in a mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm ring with two leads subject to a magnetic field with circular configuration is investigated by means of one-dimensional quantum waveguide theory. Within the framework magnetic flux or by the tangent magnetic field. In particular, the spin flips can be induced by hopping the AB magnetic flux or the tangent field.

  2. Giant electron-hole transport asymmetry in ultra-short quantum transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, A. C.; Tayari, V.; Porter, J. M.; Champagne, A. R.

    2017-05-01

    Making use of bipolar transport in single-wall carbon nanotube quantum transistors would permit a single device to operate as both a quantum dot and a ballistic conductor or as two quantum dots with different charging energies. Here we report ultra-clean 10 to 100 nm scale suspended nanotube transistors with a large electron-hole transport asymmetry. The devices consist of naked nanotube channels contacted with sections of tube under annealed gold. The annealed gold acts as an n-doping top gate, allowing coherent quantum transport, and can create nanometre-sharp barriers. These tunnel barriers define a single quantum dot whose charging energies to add an electron or a hole are vastly different (e-h charging energy asymmetry). We parameterize the e-h transport asymmetry by the ratio of the hole and electron charging energies ηe-h. This asymmetry is maximized for short channels and small band gap tubes. In a small band gap device, we demonstrate the fabrication of a dual functionality quantum device acting as a quantum dot for holes and a much longer quantum bus for electrons. In a 14 nm-long channel, ηe-h reaches up to 2.6 for a device with a band gap of 270 meV. The charging energies in this device exceed 100 meV.

  3. Calculation rule for Aoyama-Tamra's prescription for path integral with quantum tunneling

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, H

    1995-01-01

    We derive a simple calculation rule for Aoyama--Tamra's prescription for path integral with degenerated potential minima. Non-perturbative corrections due to the restricted functional space (fundamental region) can systematically be computed with this rule. It becomes manifest that the prescription might give Borel summable series for finite temperature (or volume) system with quantum tunneling, while the advantage is lost at zero temperature (or infinite volume) limit.

  4. STUDY OF GRAFT SITES IN EPOXY GRAFT COPOLYMERS BY QUANTUM CHEMISTRY CALCULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Chen; Xiao-yu Li

    2009-01-01

    Exploration and characterization of grafting productions by experimental methods are often cumbersome or sometimes impossible. Therefore, quantum chemistry calculations were performed to characterize the graft sites of epoxy resin. According to the Gibbs free energy criterion of the second law of thermodynamic, the reported graft sites were confirmed, and more important, some unreported graft sites were found. In addition, method of increasing the number of graft sites was studied in this article.

  5. Magnetoelectronic transport of the two-dimensional electron gas in CdSe single quantum wells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Ghosh; A Ghosal; D Chattopadhyay

    2009-02-01

    Hall mobility and magnetoresistance coefficient for the two-dimensional (2D) electron transport parallel to the heterojunction interfaces in a single quantum well of CdSe are calculated with a numerical iterative technique in the framework of Fermi–Dirac statistics. Lattice scatterings due to polar-mode longitudinal optic (LO) phonons, and acoustic phonons via deformation potential and piezoelectric couplings, are considered together with background and remote ionized impurity interactions. The parallel mode of piezoelectric scattering is found to contribute more than the perpendicular mode. We observe that the Hall mobility decreases with increasing temperature but increases with increasing channel width. The magnetoresistance coefficient is found to decrease with increasing temperature and increase with increasing magnetic field in the classical region.

  6. Quantum transport in 3D Weyl semimetals: Is there a metal-insulator transition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the transport properties of three-dimensional Weyl fermions in a disordered environment. The resulting conductivity depends only on the Fermi energy and the scattering rate. First we study the conductivity at the spectral node for a fixed scattering rate and obtain a continuous transition from an insulator at weak disorder to a metal at stronger disorder. Within the self-consistent Born approximation the scattering rate depends on the Fermi energy. Then it is crucial that the limits of the conductivity for a vanishing Fermi energy and a vanishing scattering rate do not commute. As a result, there is also metallic behavior in the phase with vanishing scattering rate and only a quantum critical point remains as an insulating phase. The latter turns out to be a critical fixed point in terms of a renormalization-group flow.

  7. A generalized quantum chemical approach for elastic and inelastic electron transports in molecular electronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun; Kula, Mathias; Luo, Yi

    2006-01-01

    A generalized quantum chemical approach for electron transport in molecular devices is developed. It allows one to treat devices where the metal electrodes and the molecule are either chemically or physically bonded on equal footing. An extension to include the vibration motions of the molecule has also been implemented which has produced the inelastic electron-tunneling spectroscopy of molecular electronics devices with unprecedented accuracy. Important information about the structure of the molecule and of metal-molecule contacts that are not accessible in the experiment are revealed. The calculated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of different molecular devices, including benzene-1,4-dithiolate, octanemonothiolate [H(CH2)8S], and octanedithiolate [S(CH2)8S] bonded to gold electrodes, are in very good agreement with experimental measurements.

  8. Theoretical investigation of the electronic structure and quantum transport in the graphene-C(111) diamond surface system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selli, Daniele; Baburin, Igor; Leoni, Stefano; Zhu, Zhen; Tománek, David; Seifert, Gotthard

    2013-10-30

    We investigate the interaction of a graphene monolayer with the C(111) diamond surface using ab initio density functional theory. To accommodate the lattice mismatch between graphene and diamond, the overlayer deforms into a wavy structure that binds strongly to the diamond substrate. The detached ridges of the wavy graphene overlayer behave electronically as free-standing polyacetylene chains with delocalized π electrons, separated by regions containing only sp(3) carbon atoms covalently bonded to the (111) diamond surface. We performed quantum transport calculations for different geometries of the system to study how the buckling of the graphene layer and the associated bonding to the diamond substrate affect the transport properties. The system displays high carrier mobility along the ridges and a wide transport gap in the direction normal to the ridges. These intriguing, strongly anisotropic transport properties qualify the hybrid graphene-diamond system as a viable candidate for electronic nanodevices.

  9. Assignment of absolute stereostructures through quantum mechanics electronic and vibrational circular dichroism calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peng; Jiang, Nan; Tan, Ren-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of absolute configuration of chiral molecules including structurally complex natural products remains a challenging problem in organic chemistry. A reliable method for assigning the absolute stereostructure is to combine the experimental circular dichroism (CD) techniques such as electronic and vibrational CD (ECD and VCD), with quantum mechanics (QM) ECD and VCD calculations. The traditional QM methods as well as their continuing developments make them more applicable with accuracy. Taking some chiral natural products with diverse conformations as examples, this review describes the basic concepts and new developments of QM approaches for ECD and VCD calculations in solution and solid states.

  10. Dynamical basis sets for algebraic variational calculations in quantum-mechanical scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Kouri, Donald J.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1990-01-01

    New basis sets are proposed for linear algebraic variational calculations of transition amplitudes in quantum-mechanical scattering problems. These basis sets are hybrids of those that yield the Kohn variational principle (KVP) and those that yield the generalized Newton variational principle (GNVP) when substituted in Schlessinger's stationary expression for the T operator. Trial calculations show that efficiencies almost as great as that of the GNVP and much greater than the KVP can be obtained, even for basis sets with the majority of the members independent of energy.

  11. Generalized nonequilibrium vertex correction method in coherent medium theory for quantum transport simulation of disordered nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiawei; Ke, Youqi

    2016-07-01

    Electron transport properties of nanoelectronics can be significantly influenced by the inevitable and randomly distributed impurities/defects. For theoretical simulation of disordered nanoscale electronics, one is interested in both the configurationally averaged transport property and its statistical fluctuation that tells device-to-device variability induced by disorder. However, due to the lack of an effective method to do disorder averaging under the nonequilibrium condition, the important effects of disorders on electron transport remain largely unexplored or poorly understood. In this work, we report a general formalism of Green's function based nonequilibrium effective medium theory to calculate the disordered nanoelectronics. In this method, based on a generalized coherent potential approximation for the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function, we developed a generalized nonequilibrium vertex correction method to calculate the average of a two-Keldysh-Green's-function correlator. We obtain nine nonequilibrium vertex correction terms, as a complete family, to express the average of any two-Green's-function correlator and find they can be solved by a set of linear equations. As an important result, the averaged nonequilibrium density matrix, averaged current, disorder-induced current fluctuation, and averaged shot noise, which involve different two-Green's-function correlators, can all be derived and computed in an effective and unified way. To test the general applicability of this method, we applied it to compute the transmission coefficient and its fluctuation with a square-lattice tight-binding model and compared with the exact results and other previously proposed approximations. Our results show very good agreement with the exact results for a wide range of disorder concentrations and energies. In addition, to incorporate with density functional theory to realize first-principles quantum transport simulation, we have also derived a general form of

  12. Calculations of Bose-Einstein correlations from Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, J.P.; Berenguer, M.; Fields, D.E.; Jacak, B.V.; Sarabura, M.; Simon-Gillo, J.; Sorge, H.; van Hecke, H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pratt, S. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Bose-Einstein correlation functions which are in good agreement with pion data can be calculated from an event generator. Here pion and (preliminary) kaon data from CERN experiment NA44 are compared to the calculations. The dynamics of 200 GeV/nucleon {sup 32}S + Pb collisions are calculated, without correlations due to interference patterns of a many-body wavefunction for identical particles, using the Relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (RQMD). The model is used to generate the phase-space coordinates of the emitted hadrons at the time they suffer their last strong interaction (freeze-out). Using the freeze-out position and momentum of pairs of randomly selected identical particles, a two-particle symmetrized wave-function is calculated and used to add two-body correlations. Details of the technique have been described previously. The method is similar to that used in the Spacer program.

  13. Renormalization-group calculations of ground-state and transport properties of ultrasmall tunnel junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frota, H.O.; Flensberg, Karsten

    1992-01-01

    We have done a numerical renormalization-group calculation for a Hamiltonian modeling charging effect in ultrasmall tunnel junctions. We find that the conductance is enhanced by the quantum charge fluctuations allowing tunneling below the charging energy gap. However, in all cases the conductance...

  14. Quantum transport in epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide (0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobst, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    Graphene - a two-dimensional allotrope of carbon - offers many opportunities for research in fundamental science, as well as for technological applications. First, for being a single layer of carbon atoms, which are bound in a honeycomb geometry, it represents a two-dimensional electron gas that is accessible for investigation and manipulation directly, in contrast to conventional semiconductor-based, two-dimensional systems. Second, it is chemically and mechanically robust and offers a high electrical and thermal conductivity, while being widely transparent for visible light. And third, charge carriers in graphene mimic massless Dirac fermions as graphene exhibits a linear energy dispersion. In the present thesis, epitaxial graphene that is grown by the thermal decomposition of silicon carbide (SiC) on its (0001) basal plane is investigated. Here, monolayer graphene (MLG) with reproducible properties is formed when silicon atoms sublime at high temperatures in a well-controlled manner. In addition to MLG, a carbon-rich interface layer is formed between graphene and the SiC surface. It is electrically insulating but has a strong impact on the properties of MLG. The buffer layer can be converted to a quasi-free-standing monolayer graphene (QFMLG) by intercalation of hydrogen between buffer layer and SiC surface. This treatment reduces the coupling between QFMLG and SiC. The graphene-substrate interaction can be further reduced when free-standing epitaxial graphene (FEG) is patterned. With this method, the SiC substrate is selectively etched away with a photo-electrochemical reaction, while suspended graphene devices remain. The main topics of the present thesis are the fabrication and the electrical characterization of these three materials MLG, QFMLG and FEG. In particular, classical and quantum corrections to resistivity and conductivity, as well as the interaction with the substrate are investigated with transport and magnetotransport measurements. We observe

  15. Applying Advanced Neutron Transport Calculations for Improving Fuel Performance Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botazzoli, P.; Luzzi, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division - CeSNEF, Milano (Italy); Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Haeck, W. [Institute de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2009-06-15

    TRANSURANUS is a computer code for the thermal and mechanical analysis of fuel rods in nuclear reactors. As part of the code, the TUBRNP model calculates the local concentration of the actinides (U, Pu, Am, Cm), the main fission products (Xe, Kr, Cs and Nd) and {sup 4}He produced during the irradiation as a function of the radial position across a fuel pellet (radial profiles). These local quantities are required for the determination of the local power density, the local burn-up, and the source term of fission products and other inert gases. In previous works the neutronic code ALEPH has been used to validate the models for the actinides and fission products concentrations in UO{sub 2} fuels. A similar approach has been adopted in the present work for verifying the Helium production. The present paper focuses on the modelling of the Helium production in PWR oxide fuels (MOX and UO{sub 2}). A reliable prediction of the Helium production and release in LWR oxide fuels is of great interest in case of increasing burn-up, linear heat generation rates and Plutonium content. The contribution of the Helium released plays a fundamental role in the gap pressure and subsequently in the mechanical behaviour of the fuel rod, in particular during the storage of the high burn-up spent fuel. Helium is produced in oxide fuels by three main paths: (i) alpha decay of the actinides (the main contribution is due to {sup 242}Cm, {sup 238}Pu and {sup 244}Cm); (ii) (n,{alpha}) reactions; and (iii) ternary fission. In the present work, the contributions due to ternary fission and the (n,{alpha}) reaction on {sup 16}O as well as some refinements in the {sup 241}Am burn-up chain have been included in TUBRNP. The VESTA neutronic code has been used for the validation of the He production model. The generic VESTA Monte Carlo depletion interface developed at IRSN allows us to couple different Monte Carlo codes with a depletion module. It currently allows for combining the ORIGEN 2.2 isotope

  16. FORTRAN 4 computer program for calculation of thermodynamic and transport properties of complex chemical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svehla, R. A.; Mcbride, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program for the calculation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of complex mixtures is described. The program has the capability of performing calculations such as:(1) chemical equilibrium for assigned thermodynamic states, (2) theoretical rocket performance for both equilibrium and frozen compositions during expansion, (3) incident and reflected shock properties, and (4) Chapman-Jouguet detonation properties. Condensed species, as well as gaseous species, are considered in the thermodynamic calculation; but only the gaseous species are considered in the transport calculations.

  17. SU-E-T-191: First Principle Calculation of Quantum Yield in Photodynamic Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolfath, R; Guo, F; Chen, Z; Nath, R [Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a first-principle method to calculate the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen induced by any photon fields especially in MeV energy range. The optical pumping is mediated through photosensitizers, e.g., porphyrin and/or ensemble of quantum dots. Methods: Under normal conditions, oxygen molecules are in the relatively non-reactive triplet state. In the presence of certain photosensitizer compounds such as porphyrins, electromagnetic radiation of specific wavelengths can excite oxygen to highly reactive singlet state. With selective uptake of photosensitizers by certain malignant cells, photon irradiation of phosensitized tumors can lead to selective killing of cancer cells. This is the basis of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Despite several attempts, PDT has not been clinically successful except in limited superficial cancers. Many parameters such as photon energy, conjugation with quantum dots etc. can be potentially combined with PDT in order to extend the role of PDT in cancer management. The key quantity for this optimization is the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen by any photon field. The first principle calculation model presented here, is an attempt to fill this need. We employ stochastic density matrix description of the quantum jumps and the rate equation methods in quantum optics based on Markov/Poisson processes and calculate time evolution of the population of the optically pumped singlet oxygen. Results: The results demonstrate the feasibility of our model in showing the dependence of the optical yield in generating spin-singlet oxygen on the experimental conditions. The adjustable variables can be tuned to maximize the population of the singlet oxygen hence the efficacy of the photodynamic therapy. Conclusion: The present model can be employed to fit and analyze the experimental data and possibly to assist researchers in optimizing the experimental conditions in photodynamic therapy.

  18. Transport through interacting quantum dots with Majorana fermions or phonons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetzen, Roland

    2013-07-04

    Recent advances in the search for Majorana fermions within condensed matter systems inspired the first part of the thesis. These hypothetical particles which are their own antiparticles are predicted to arise in the form of quasi-particle excitations called Majorana bound states at the surface of engineered condensed matter systems. An experimental detection is challenging since their defining property also implies that they possess no charge, no energy and no spin. This significantly reduces the possibilities to interact with them and get a proof of their existence from a measurement. The most promising experimental results are based on transport measurements where current-voltage-characteristics play the role of a spectroscopy signal. In this thesis, we investigate a single electron transistor setup which hosts a spatially separated pair of Majorana fermions with respect to their influence on its transport characteristics. We focus on a master equation approach including sequential and cotunneling contributions. After deducing all relevant rates we solve the system numerically over a broad parameter regime. For some limits, we also elaborate analytical solutions. In comparison with collaboratively worked out other methods we provide a broad understanding of the setup and make a proposal how our results could be used as a detection scheme for Majorana fermions. The second part of the thesis investigates the spinless Anderson-Holstein model which is the minimal model for molecular transport. It models a molecule with electronic and vibronic degrees of freedom which is placed between metallic leads at different chemical potentials to investigate again its transport properties. Also here we intended to gain access to a broad parameter regime and successfully extended the numerical ''iterative summation of path-integrals'' scheme to this model. It is based on a real-time path-integral approach in combination with the nonequilibrium Keldysh

  19. Coupled electron-phonon transport from molecular dynamics with quantum baths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Wang, J. S.

    2009-01-01

    Based on generalized quantum Langevin equations for the tight-binding wavefunction amplitudes and lattice displacements, electron and phonon quantum transport are obtained exactly using molecular dynamics (MD) in the ballistic regime. The electron-phonon interactions can be handled with a quasi......-classical approximation. Both charge and energy transport and their interplay can be studied. We compare the MD results with those of a fully quantum mechanical nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) approach for the electron currents. We find a ballistic to diffusive transition of the electron conduction in one...

  20. SymGF: a symbolic tool for quantum transport analysis and its application to a double quantum dot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zimin; Sun, Qing-feng; Wan, Langhui; Guo, Hong

    2011-10-19

    We report the development and an application of a symbolic tool, called SymGF, for analytical derivations of quantum transport properties using the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The inputs to SymGF are the device Hamiltonian in the second quantized form, the commutation relation of the operators and the truncation rules of the correlators. The outputs of SymGF are the desired NEGF that appear in the transport formula, in terms of the unperturbed Green's function of the device scattering region and its coupling to the device electrodes. For complicated transport analysis involving strong interactions and correlations, SymGF provides significant assistance in analytical derivations. Using this tool, we investigate coherent quantum transport in a double quantum dot system where strong on-site interaction exists in the side-coupled quantum dot. Results obtained by the higher-order approximation and Hartree-Fock approximation are compared. The higher-order approximation reveals Kondo resonance features in the density of states and conductances. Results are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively to the experimental data reported in the literature.

  1. Quantum computing applied to calculations of molecular energies: CH2 benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veis, Libor; Pittner, Jiří

    2010-11-21

    Quantum computers are appealing for their ability to solve some tasks much faster than their classical counterparts. It was shown in [Aspuru-Guzik et al., Science 309, 1704 (2005)] that they, if available, would be able to perform the full configuration interaction (FCI) energy calculations with a polynomial scaling. This is in contrast to conventional computers where FCI scales exponentially. We have developed a code for simulation of quantum computers and implemented our version of the quantum FCI algorithm. We provide a detailed description of this algorithm and the results of the assessment of its performance on the four lowest lying electronic states of CH(2) molecule. This molecule was chosen as a benchmark, since its two lowest lying (1)A(1) states exhibit a multireference character at the equilibrium geometry. It has been shown that with a suitably chosen initial state of the quantum register, one is able to achieve the probability amplification regime of the iterative phase estimation algorithm even in this case.

  2. Global coherence of quantum evolutions based on decoherent histories: Theory and application to photosynthetic quantum energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra, Michele; Giorda, Paolo; Lloyd, Seth

    2016-04-01

    Assessing the role of interference in natural and artificial quantum dynamical processes is a crucial task in quantum information theory. To this aim, an appropriate formalism is provided by the decoherent histories framework. While this approach has been deeply explored from different theoretical perspectives, it still lacks of a comprehensive set of tools able to concisely quantify the amount of coherence developed by a given dynamics. In this paper, we introduce and test different measures of the (average) coherence present in dissipative (Markovian) quantum evolutions, at various time scales and for different levels of environmentally induced decoherence. In order to show the effectiveness of the introduced tools, we apply them to a paradigmatic quantum process where the role of coherence is being hotly debated: exciton transport in photosynthetic complexes. To spot out the essential features that may determine the performance of the transport, we focus on a relevant trimeric subunit of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex and we use a simplified (Haken-Strobl) model for the system-bath interaction. Our analysis illustrates how the high efficiency of environmentally assisted transport can be traced back to a quantum recoil avoiding effect on the exciton dynamics, that preserves and sustains the benefits of the initial fast quantum delocalization of the exciton over the network. Indeed, for intermediate levels of decoherence, the bath is seen to selectively kill the negative interference between different exciton pathways, while retaining the initial positive one. The concepts and tools here developed show how the decoherent histories approach can be used to quantify the relation between coherence and efficiency in quantum dynamical processes.

  3. ON THE ACCELERATION OF SHORTEST PATH CALCULATIONS IN TRANSPORTATION NETWORKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAKER, ZACHARY K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; GOKHALE, MAYA B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-08

    Shortest path algorithms are a key element of many graph problems. They are used in such applications as online direction finding and navigation, as well as modeling of traffic for large scale simulations of major metropolitan areas. As the shortest path algorithms are an execution bottleneck, it is beneficial to move their execution to parallel hardware such as Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). Hardware implementation is accomplished through the use of a small A core replicated on the order of 20 times on an FPGA device. The objective is to maximize the use of on-board random-access memory bandwidth through the use of multi-threaded latency tolerance. Each shortest path core is responsible for one shortest path calculation, and when it is finished it outputs its result and requests the next source from a queue. One of the innovations of this approach is the use of a small bubble sort core to produce the extract-min function. While bubble sort is not usually considered an appropriate algorithm for any non-trivial usage, it is appropriate in this case as it can produce a single minimum out of the list in O(n) cycles, whwere n is the number of elements in the vertext list. The cost of this min operation does not impact the running time of the architecture, because the queue depth for fetching the next set of edges from memory is roughly equivalent to the number of cores in the system. Additionally, this work provides a collection of simulation results that model the behavior of the node queue in hardware. The results show that a hardware queue, implementing a small bubble-type minimum function, need only be on the order of 16 elements to provide both correct and optimal paths. Because the graph database size is measured in the hundreds of megabytes, the Cray SRAM memory is insufficient. In addition to the A* cores, they have developed a memory management system allowing round-robin servicing of the nodes as well as virtual memory managed over the Hypertransport

  4. Development of a database system for the calculation of indicators of environmental pressure caused by transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannouli, Myrsini; Samaras, Zissis; Keller, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The scope of this paper is to summarise a methodology developed for TRENDS (TRansport and ENvironment Database System-TRENDS). The main objective of TRENDS was the calculation of environmental pressure indicators caused by transport. The environmental pressures considered are associated with air...

  5. Numerical study of the effect of disorder and magnetic field on the quantum transport of two-dimensional nanostructures modeled by tight-binding approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Taghizdehsiskht

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  In recent years, semiconductor nanostructures have become the model systems of choice for investigation of electrical conduction on short length scales. Quantum transport is studied in a two dimensional electron gas because of the combination of a large Fermi wavelength and large mean free path. In the present work, a numerical method is implemented in order to contribute to the understanding of quantum transport in narrow channels in different conditions of disorder and magnetic fields. We have used an approach that has proved to be very useful in describing mesoscopic transport. We have assumed zero temperature and phase coherent transport. By using the trick that a conductor connected to infinite leads can be replaced by a finite conductor with the effect of the leads incorporated through a 'self-energy' function, a convenient method was provided for evaluating the Green's function of the whole device numerically. Then, Fisher-Lee relations was used for calculating the transmission coefficients through coherent mesoscopic conductors. Our calculations were done in a model system with Hard-wall boundary conditions in the transverse direction, and the Anderson model of disorder was used in disordered samples. We have presented the results of quantum transport for different strengths of disorder and introduced magnetic fields. Our results confirmed the Landauer formalism for calculation of electronic transport. We observed that weak localization effect can be removed by application of a weak perpendicular magnetic field. Finally, we numerically showed the transition to the integral quantum Hall effect regime through the suppression of backscattering on a disordered model system by calculating the two­ terminal conductance of a quasi-one-dimensional quantum conductor as a strong magnetic field is applied. Our results showed that this regime is entered when there is a negligible overlap between electron edge states localized at opposite sides of

  6. Structure and vibrational spectrum of 2-methylallyl radical. Nonempirical quantum chemical calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, V.G.; Volkova, V.V.; Gusel' nikov, L.E.; Ziegler, U.; Zimmermann, G.; Ondurshka, B.; Nametkin, N.S.

    1987-04-01

    In the study of the role of allyl type radicals in the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons it is of interest to investigate the conditions of formation, structure, and reactivity of 2-methylallyl radical (C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./). The authors performed theoretical assignment of the bands, which were observed in the lattice spectra of the pyrolysis products, to the vibrations of the C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ radical by means of calculation of the frequencies and shapes of the normal vibrations. Since the necessary geometrical parameters and force coefficients of C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ are not known, they determined them by means of nonempirical quantum chemical calculation. The quantum chemical calculation of C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ was performed by means of the unrestricted Hartree-Fock method using STO-4G (geometry optimization taking into account the characteristics of calculation of radicals in minimal bases and calculation of the force coefficients by means of numerical differentiation) and 4-31G bases (electron density distribution) by means of GAUSSIAN-70 program. For comparison of the energy and electron density distribution they performed calculations also for the 2-methylallyl cation C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./. From the calculation of the difference of the total energies of C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ and C/sub 4/H/sub 7//sup ./ in the 4-31G basis was 7.4 eV, which is comparable to the ionization energy of the 2-methylallyl radical, 7.95 eV.

  7. Cavity-photon-switched coherent transient transport in a double quantum waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf, E-mail: nra1@hi.is; Gudmundsson, Vidar, E-mail: vidar@raunvis.hi.is [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Tang, Chi-Shung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, 1, Lienda, 36003 Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University, Menntavegur 1, IS-101 Reykjavik (Iceland)

    2014-12-21

    We study a cavity-photon-switched coherent electron transport in a symmetric double quantum waveguide. The waveguide system is weakly connected to two electron reservoirs, but strongly coupled to a single quantized photon cavity mode. A coupling window is placed between the waveguides to allow electron interference or inter-waveguide transport. The transient electron transport in the system is investigated using a quantum master equation. We present a cavity-photon tunable semiconductor quantum waveguide implementation of an inverter quantum gate, in which the output of the waveguide system may be selected via the selection of an appropriate photon number or “photon frequency” of the cavity. In addition, the importance of the photon polarization in the cavity, that is, either parallel or perpendicular to the direction of electron propagation in the waveguide system is demonstrated.

  8. Reducing Projection Calculation in Quantum Teleportation by Virtue of the IWOP Technique and Schmidt Decomposition of |η〉 State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; FAN Yue

    2002-01-01

    By virtue of the technique of integration within an ordered product of operators and the Schmidt decomposition of the entangled state |η〉, we reduce the general projection calculation in the theory of quantum teleportation to a as simple as possible form and present a general formalism for teleportating quantum states of continuous variable.

  9. Low-Mode Conformational Search Method with Semiempirical Quantum Mechanical Calculations: Application to Enantioselective Organocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamachi, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2016-02-22

    A conformational search program for finding low-energy conformations of large noncovalent complexes has been developed. A quantitatively reliable semiempirical quantum mechanical PM6-DH+ method, which is able to accurately describe noncovalent interactions at a low computational cost, was employed in contrast to conventional conformational search programs in which molecular mechanical methods are usually adopted. Our approach is based on the low-mode method whereby an initial structure is perturbed along one of its low-mode eigenvectors to generate new conformations. This method was applied to determine the most stable conformation of transition state for enantioselective alkylation by the Maruoka and cinchona alkaloid catalysts and Hantzsch ester hydrogenation of imines by chiral phosphoric acid. Besides successfully reproducing the previously reported most stable DFT conformations, the conformational search with the semiempirical quantum mechanical calculations newly discovered a more stable conformation at a low computational cost.

  10. An optimized initialization algorithm to ensure accuracy in quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Daniel R; Kent, David R; Feldmann, Michael T; Goddard, William A

    2008-11-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations require the generation of random electronic configurations with respect to a desired probability density, usually the square of the magnitude of the wavefunction. In most cases, the Metropolis algorithm is used to generate a sequence of configurations in a Markov chain. This method has an inherent equilibration phase, during which the configurations are not representative of the desired density and must be discarded. If statistics are gathered before the walkers have equilibrated, contamination by nonequilibrated configurations can greatly reduce the accuracy of the results. Because separate Markov chains must be equilibrated for the walkers on each processor, the use of a long equilibration phase has a profoundly detrimental effect on the efficiency of large parallel calculations. The stratified atomic walker initialization (STRAW) shortens the equilibration phase of QMC calculations by generating statistically independent electronic configurations in regions of high probability density. This ensures the accuracy of calculations by avoiding contamination by nonequilibrated configurations. Shortening the length of the equilibration phase also results in significant improvements in the efficiency of parallel calculations, which reduces the total computational run time. For example, using STRAW rather than a standard initialization method in 512 processor calculations reduces the amount of time needed to calculate the energy expectation value of a trial function for a molecule of the energetic material RDX to within 0.01 au by 33%.

  11. Inelastic Quantum Transport in Superlattices: Success and Failure of the Boltzmann Equation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Rott, Stephan;

    1999-01-01

    Electrical transport in semiconductor superlattices is studied within a fully self-consistent quantum transport model based on nonequilibrium Green functions, including phonon and impurity scattering. We compute both the drift-velocity-held relation and the momentum distribution function covering...

  12. Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Calculation for Electron Transport through Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nobakht

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper non-equilibrium Green's function method –dependent electron transport through non magnetic layer (insulator has been studied in one dimension .electron transport in multi-layer (magnetic/non magnetic/ magneticlayers is studied as quantum .the result show increasing the binding strength of the electrical insulator transition probability density case , the electron density , broad levels of disruption increases. Broad band connection increases the levels of disruption to electrical insulation and show non- conductive insulating state to semiconductor stat and even conductor

  13. FragIt: A Tool to Prepare Input Files for Fragment Based Quantum Chemical Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Steinmann, Casper; Hansen, Anne S; Jensen, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    Near linear scaling fragment based quantum chemical calculations are becoming increasingly popular for treating large systems with high accuracy and is an active field of research. However, it remains difficult to set up these calculations without expert knowledge. To facilitate the use of such methods, software tools need to be available for support, setup and lower the barrier of entry for usage by non-experts. We present a fragmentation methodology and accompanying tools called FragIt to help setup these calculations. It uses the SMARTS language to find chemically appropriate substructures in structures and is used to prepare input files for the fragment molecular orbital method in the GAMESS program package. We present patterns of fragmentation for proteins and polysaccharides, specifically D-galactopyranose for use in cyclodextrins.

  14. Anionic microsolvation in helium droplets: OH- (He)N structures from classical and quantum calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, E; Marinetti, F; Bodo, E; Gianturco, F A

    2008-04-07

    Diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are carried out for clusters of OH- (1Sigma+) with N 4He atoms, N varying up to 15, while classical configurations from a genetic algorithm optimization are obtained up to N=20. The overall interaction potential is assembled from ab initio data for the partners using the sum-of-potentials scheme. In contrast with the cationic dopants' behavior, the results indicate a very marked spatial delocalization and quantum features of the solvent adatoms surrounding the anionic impurity, thus making classical calculations of solvent's spatial locations of only limited use. In spite of the generally known repulsive interaction of negative charges in He droplets, the calculations show that this polar molecular anion is solvated by a liquidlike solvent layer, reminiscent of what happens in pure helium droplets.

  15. Semiempirical Quantum Chemical Calculations Accelerated on a Hybrid Multicore CPU-GPU Computing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Koslowski, Axel; Thiel, Walter

    2012-07-10

    In this work, we demonstrate that semiempirical quantum chemical calculations can be accelerated significantly by leveraging the graphics processing unit (GPU) as a coprocessor on a hybrid multicore CPU-GPU computing platform. Semiempirical calculations using the MNDO, AM1, PM3, OM1, OM2, and OM3 model Hamiltonians were systematically profiled for three types of test systems (fullerenes, water clusters, and solvated crambin) to identify the most time-consuming sections of the code. The corresponding routines were ported to the GPU and optimized employing both existing library functions and a GPU kernel that carries out a sequence of noniterative Jacobi transformations during pseudodiagonalization. The overall computation times for single-point energy calculations and geometry optimizations of large molecules were reduced by one order of magnitude for all methods, as compared to runs on a single CPU core.

  16. Many-body effects on graphene conductivity: Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyda, D. L.; Braguta, V. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Ulybyshev, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Optical conductivity of graphene is studied using quantum Monte Carlo calculations. We start from a Euclidean current-current correlator and extract σ (ω ) from Green-Kubo relations using the Backus-Gilbert method. Calculations were performed both for long-range interactions and taking into account only the contact term. In both cases we vary interaction strength and study its influence on optical conductivity. We compare our results with previous theoretical calculations choosing ω ≈κ , thus working in the region of the plateau in σ (ω ) which corresponds to optical conductivity of Dirac quasiparticles. No dependence of optical conductivity on interaction strength is observed unless we approach the antiferromagnetic phase transition in the case of an artificially enhanced contact term. Our results strongly support previous theoretical studies that claimed very weak regularization of graphene conductivity.

  17. Time-dependent diffusion and transport calculations using a finite-element-spherical harmonics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, E. D.; Katsimichas, S.; de Oliveira, C. R. E.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, the finite-element-spherical harmonics (FE-PN) method is applied to the solution of transient Boltzmann transport equation. Firstly, transport and diffusion calculations are obtained for homogeneous and inhomogeneous circular regions. Results are compared in order to show the effects of different absorption coefficient values on the propagation of photons. Significant differences between two theories are shown to occur especially in cases when the absorption is increased. Secondly, to validate the FE-PN method, results from this method are compared with Monte Carlo calculations for different cases. Comparisons show good agreements between FE-transport and Monte Carlo solutions and demonstrate the correctness of the results obtained.

  18. Continuous Energy, Multi-Dimensional Transport Calculations for Problem Dependent Resonance Self-Shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Downar

    2009-03-31

    The overall objective of the work here has been to eliminate the approximations used in current resonance treatments by developing continuous energy multi-dimensional transport calculations for problem dependent self-shielding calculations. The work here builds on the existing resonance treatment capabilities in the ORNL SCALE code system.

  19. Nonlinear transport in coupled quantum dots:A stationary probability approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The stationary tunneling current and differential conductance of the coupled quantum dots system with split-gates are calculated by generalizing the Beenaker’s linear response theory for the description of the Coulomb-blockade oscillations of the conductance in the single quantum dot.The calculation of the charging diagram in parallel through the double dot as function of the two side-gate voltages shows a remarkable agreement with the recent experimental results by Hatano et al.

  20. Optimizing electronic structure and quantum transport at the graphene-Si(111) interface: an ab initio density-functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayran, Ceren; Zhu, Zhen; Baldoni, Matteo; Selli, Daniele; Seifert, Gotthard; Tománek, David

    2013-04-26

    We use ab initio density-functional calculations to determine the interaction of a graphene monolayer with the Si(111) surface. We find that graphene forms strong bonds to the bare substrate and accommodates the 12% lattice mismatch by forming a wavy structure consisting of free-standing conductive ridges that are connected by ribbon-shaped regions of graphene, which bond covalently to the substrate. We perform quantum transport calculations for different geometries to study changes in the transport properties of graphene introduced by the wavy structure and bonding to the Si substrate. Our results suggest that wavy graphene combines high mobility along the ridges with efficient carrier injection into Si in the contact regions.

  1. Calculation of transport coefficient profiles in modulation experiments as an inverse problem

    CERN Document Server

    Escande, D F

    2011-01-01

    The calculation of transport profiles from experimental measurements belongs in the category of inverse problems which are known to come with issues of ill-conditioning or singularity. A reformulation of the calculation, the matricial approach, is proposed for periodically modulated experiments, within the context of the standard advection-diffusion model where these issues are related to the vanishing of the determinant of a 2x2 matrix. This sheds light on the accuracy of calculations with transport codes, and provides a path for a more precise assessment of the profiles and of the related uncertainty.

  2. On the prediction of thermal stability of nitroaromatic compounds using quantum chemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayet, Guillaume [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique, CNRS UMR-7575, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Rotureau, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.rotureau@ineris.fr [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques (INERIS), Parc Technologique Alata, BP2, 60550 Verneuil-en-Halatte (France); Joubert, Laurent; Adamo, Carlo [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique, CNRS UMR-7575, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11 rue P. et M. Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2009-11-15

    This work presents a new approach to predict thermal stability of nitroaromatic compounds based on quantum chemical calculations and on quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) methods. The data set consists of 22 nitroaromatic compounds of known decomposition enthalpy (taken as a macroscopic property related to explosibility) obtained from differential scanning calorimetry. Geometric, electronic and energetic descriptors have been selected and computed using density functional theory (DFT) calculation to describe the 22 molecules. First approach consisted in looking at their linear correlations with the experimental decomposition enthalpy. Molecular weight, electrophilicity index, electron affinity and oxygen balance appeared as the most correlated descriptors (respectively R{sup 2} = 0.76, 0.75, 0.71 and 0.64). Then multilinear regression was computed with these descriptors. The obtained model is a six-parameter equation containing descriptors all issued from quantum chemical calculations. The prediction is satisfactory with a correlation coefficient R{sup 2} of 0.91 and a predictivity coefficient R{sub cv}{sup 2} of 0.84 using a cross validation method.

  3. Calculating Floquet states of large quantum systems: A parallelization strategy and its cluster implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptyeva, T. V.; Kozinov, E. A.; Meyerov, I. B.; Ivanchenko, M. V.; Denisov, S. V.; Hänggi, P.

    2016-04-01

    We present a numerical approach to calculate non-equilibrium eigenstates of a periodically time-modulated quantum system. The approach is based on the use of a chain of single-step propagating operators. Each operator is time-specific and constructed by combining the Magnus expansion of the time-dependent system Hamiltonian with the Chebyshev expansion of an operator exponent. The construction of the unitary Floquet operator, which evolves a system state over the full modulation period, is performed by propagating the identity matrix over the period. The independence of the evolution of basis vectors makes the propagation stage suitable for realization on a parallel cluster. Once the propagation stage is completed, a routine diagonalization of the Floquet matrix is performed. Finally, an additional propagation round, now involving the eigenvectors as the initial states, allows to resolve the time-dependence of the Floquet states and calculate their characteristics. We demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of the algorithm by applying it to calculate the Floquet states of two quantum models, namely (i) a synthesized random-matrix Hamiltonian and (ii) a many-body Bose-Hubbard dimer, both of the size up to 104 states.

  4. A theoretical model for calculation of the detective quantum efficiency in granular scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavouras, D. E-mail: cavouras@hol.gr; Kandarakis, I.; Tsoukos, S.; Kateris, A.; Nomicos, C.D.; Panayiotakis, G.S

    2001-11-01

    A theoretical model has been developed for calculating the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of scintillators, by taking into account the internal structure of granular scintillators often used in medical imaging detectors. Scintillators were considered to consist of N elementary thin layers containing spherical scintillating grains of equal size. Grains were assumed to be regularly distributed within each thin layer, the thickness of the latter being equal to the grain diameter. Values of the X-ray absorption and X-ray attenuation coefficients, of the intrinsic X-ray to light conversion efficiency and of the optical scattering and absorption coefficients were used as input data to the model. Optical scattering and optical absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the model to experimental luminescence data. The model was employed to calculate the detective quantum efficiency of La{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb, Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb, Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Eu, ZnSCdS:Ag, ZnSCdS:Au,Cu scintillators. Results of the calculations were found close to values published in previous studies.

  5. Consequences of light absorptance in calculating electron transport rate of desert and succulent plants

    OpenAIRE

    Stemke, JA; Santiago, LS

    2011-01-01

    The proportional light absorptance by photosynthetic tissue (α) is used with chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence methods to calculate electron transport rate (ETR). Although a value of α of 0.84 is often used as a standard for calculating ETR, many succulent plant species and species with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) have photosynthetic tissues that vary greatly in color or are highly reflective, and could have values of α that differ from 0.84, thus affecting the calculation of ETR. We meas...

  6. Performing three-dimensional neutral particle transport calculations on tera scale computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, C S; Brown, P N; Chang, B; Dorr, M R; Hanebutte, U R

    1999-01-12

    A scalable, parallel code system to perform neutral particle transport calculations in three dimensions is presented. To utilize the hyper-cluster architecture of emerging tera scale computers, the parallel code successfully combines the MPI message passing and paradigms. The code's capabilities are demonstrated by a shielding calculation containing over 14 billion unknowns. This calculation was accomplished on the IBM SP ''ASCI-Blue-Pacific computer located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  7. Shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis of spent fuel transportation cask in research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A; Hassanzadeh, M; Gharib, M

    2016-02-01

    In this study, shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis were carried out for general material testing reactor (MTR) research reactors interim storage and relevant transportation cask. During these processes, three major terms were considered: source term, shielding, and criticality calculations. The Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5 was used for shielding calculation and criticality safety analysis and ORIGEN2.1 code for source term calculation. According to the results obtained, a cylindrical cask with body, top, and bottom thicknesses of 18, 13, and 13 cm, respectively, was accepted as the dual-purpose cask. Furthermore, it is shown that the total dose rates are below the normal transport criteria that meet the standards specified.

  8. COMET-PE: an incident fluence response expansion transport method for radiotherapy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Robert M.; Rahnema, Farzad

    2013-05-01

    Accurate dose calculation is a central component of radiotherapy treatment planning. A new method of dose calculation has been developed based on transport theory and validated by comparison to Monte Carlo methods. The coarse mesh transport method has been extended to allow coupled photon-electron transport in 3D. The method combines stochastic pre-computation with a deterministic solver to achieve high accuracy and precision. To enhance the method for radiotherapy calculations, a new angular basis was derived, and an analytical source treatment was developed. Validation was performed by comparison to DOSXYZnrc using a heterogeneous interface phantom composed of water, aluminum, and lung. Calculations of both kinetic energy released per unit mass and dose were compared. Good agreement was found with a maximum error and root mean square relative error of less than 1.5% for all cases. The results show that the new method achieves an accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo.

  9. Calculation of transport coefficients of air-water vapor mixtures thermal plasmas used in circuit breakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOHIO Niéssan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we calculate the transport coefficients of plasmas formed by air and water vapor mixtures. The calculation, which assume local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE are performed in the temperature range from 500 to 12000 K. We use the Gibbs free energy minimization method to determine the equilibrium composition of the plasmas, which is necessary to calculate the transport coefficients. We use the Chapman-Enskog method to calculate the transport coefficients. The results are presented and discussed according to the rate of water vapor. The results of the total thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity show in particular that the increasing of the rate of water vapor in air can be interesting for power cut. This could be improve the performance of plasma during current breaking in air contaminate by the water vapor.

  10. PbBr-Based Layered Perovskite Organic-Inorganic Superlattice Having Carbazole Chromophore; Hole-Mobility and Quantum Mechanical Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Era, Masanao; Yasuda, Takeshi; Mori, Kento; Tomotsu, Norio; Kawano, Naoki; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-04-01

    We have successfully evaluated hole mobility in a spin-coated film of a lead-bromide based layered perovskite having carbazole chromophore-linked ammonium molecules as organic layer by using FET measurement. The values of hole mobility, threshold voltage and on/off ratio at room temperature were evaluated.to.be 1.7 x 10(-6) cm2 V-1 s-1, 27 V and 28 V, respectively. However, the spin-coated films on Si substrates were not so uniform compared with those on fused quartz substrates. To improve the film uniformity, we examined the relationship between substrate temperature during spin-coating and film morphology in the layered perovskite spin-coated films. The mean roughness of the spin-coated films on Si substrates was dependent on the substrate temperature. At 353 K, the mean roughness was minimized and the carrier mobility was enhanced by one order of magnitude; the values of hole mobility and threshold voltage were .estimated to be 3.4 x 10(-5) cm2 V-1 s-1, and 22 V at room temperature in a preliminary FET evaluation, respectively. In addition, we determined a crystal structure of the layered perovskite by X-ray diffraction analysis. To gain a better understanding of the observed hole transports, we conducted quantum mechanical calculations using the obtained crystal structure information. The calculated band structure of the layered organic perovskite showed that the valence band is composed of the organic carbazole layer, which confirms that.the measured hole mobility is mainly derived from the organic part of the layered perovskite. Band and hopping transport mechanisms were discussed by calculating the effective masses and transfer integrals for the 2D periodic system of the organic layer in isolation.

  11. Trail-Needs pseudopotentials in quantum Monte Carlo calculations with plane-wave/blip basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, N. D.; Trail, J. R.; Needs, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    We report a systematic analysis of the performance of a widely used set of Dirac-Fock pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations. We study each atom in the periodic table from hydrogen (Z =1 ) to mercury (Z =80 ), with the exception of the 4 f elements (57 ≤Z ≤70 ). We demonstrate that ghost states are a potentially serious problem when plane-wave basis sets are used in density functional theory (DFT) orbital-generation calculations, but that this problem can be almost entirely eliminated by choosing the s channel to be local in the DFT calculation; the d channel can then be chosen to be local in subsequent QMC calculations, which generally leads to more accurate results. We investigate the achievable energy variance per electron with different levels of trial wave function and we determine appropriate plane-wave cutoff energies for DFT calculations for each pseudopotential. We demonstrate that the so-called "T-move" scheme in diffusion Monte Carlo is essential for many elements. We investigate the optimal choice of spherical integration rule for pseudopotential projectors in QMC calculations. The information reported here will prove crucial in the planning and execution of QMC projects involving beyond-first-row elements.

  12. Transmission line model for strained quantum well lasers including carrier transport and carrier heating effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingjun; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports a new model for strained quantum well lasers, which are based on the quantum well transmission line modeling method where effects of both carrier transport and carrier heating have been included. We have applied this new model and studied the effect of carrier transport on the output waveform of a strained quantum well laser both in time and frequency domains. It has been found that the carrier transport increases the turn-on, turn-off delay times and damping of the quantum well laser transient response. Also, analysis in the frequency domain indicates that the carrier transport causes the output spectrum of the quantum well laser in steady state to exhibit a redshift which has a narrower bandwidth and lower magnitude. The simulation results of turning-on transients obtained by the proposed model are compared with those obtained by the rate equation laser model. The new model has also been used to study the effects of pump current spikes on the laser output waveforms properties, and it was found that the presence of current spikes causes (i) wavelength blueshift, (ii) larger bandwidth, and (iii) reduces the magnitude and decreases the side-lobe suppression ratio of the laser output spectrum. Analysis in both frequency and time domains confirms that the new proposed model can accurately predict the temporal and spectral behaviors of strained quantum well lasers.

  13. Theory of Finite Size Effects for Electronic Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Liquids and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Holzmann, Markus; Morales, Miguel A; Tubmann, Norm M; Ceperley, David M; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one and two-body correlation functions. We introduce new effective procedures, such as using the potential and wavefunction split-up into long and short range functions to simplify the method and we discuss how to treat backflow wavefunctions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  14. Calculation of Visible Absorption Maxima of Phthalocyanine Compounds by Quantum Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Feng YUAN; Zhi Rong CHEN; Huai Xun CAI

    2003-01-01

    Based on HYPERCHEM, the structures of five phthalocyanie compounds were optimized with PM3 and their visible absorption maxima were calculated with ZINDO/S method by selecting appropriate π-π overlap weighting factor (OWFπ-π), the agreement with experiment was excellent. The relationship between OWFπ-π and molecular structure parameters was obtained by the method of stepwise regression and was explained in terms of quantum theory. OWFπ-π=0.58126+0.04562ANC1+0.03839X. Where, ANC1 and X are the symbols of average net charges on coordinated bonded nitrogens and electronegativity of central atom, respectively.

  15. New Regularization-Renormalization Method in Quantum Electrodynamics and Qualitative Calculation on Lamb Shift

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, G; Ni, Guang-jiong; Wang, Haibin

    1997-01-01

    A simple but effective method for regularization-renormalization (R-R) is proposed for handling the Feynman diagram integral (FDI) at one loop level in quantum electrodynamics (QED). The divergence is substituted by some constants to be fixed via experiments. So no counter term, no bare parameter and no arbitrary running mass scale is involved. Then the Lamb Shift in Hydrogen atom can be calculated qualitatively and simply as $\\Delta E(2S_{1/2})- \\Delta E(2P_{1/2})=996.7 MHz$ versus the experimental value $1057.85 MHz$.

  16. Quantum dynamics calculation of reaction probability for H+Cl2→HCl+Cl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We present in this paper a time-dependent quantum wave packet calculation of the initial state selected reaction probability for H + Cl2 based on the GHNS potential energy surface with total angular momentum J = 0. The effects of the translational, vibrational and rotational excitation of Cl2 on the reaction probability have been investigated. In a broad region of the translational energy, the rotational excitation enhances the reaction probability while the vibrational excitation depresses the reaction probability. The theoretical results agree well with the fact that it is an early down-hill reaction.

  17. Quantum dynamics calculation of reaction probability for H+Cl2→HC1+Cl

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王胜龙; 赵新生

    2001-01-01

    We present in this paper a time-dependent quantum wave packet calculation of the initial state selected reaction probability for H + CI2 based on the GHNS potential energy surface with total angular momentum J= 0. The effects of the translational, vibrational and rotational excitation of CI2 on the reaction probability have been investigated. In a broad region of the translational energy, the rotational excitation enhances the reaction probability while the vibrational excitation depresses the reaction probability. The theoretical results agree well with the fact that it is an early down-hill reaction.

  18. Use of photoelectron laser phase determination method for attosecond measurements with quantum-mechanical calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge Yu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper calculates quantum-mechanically the photoelectron energy spectra excited by attosecond x-rays in the presence of a few-cycle laser. A photoelectron laser phase determination method is used for precise measurements of the pulse natural properties of x-ray intensity and the instantaneous frequency profiles. As a direct procedure without any previous pulse profile assumptions and time-resolved measurements as well as data fitting analysis, this method can be used to improve the time resolutions of attosecond timing and measurements with metrological precision. The measurement range is half of a laser optical cycle.

  19. Quantum transport equations for low-dimensional multiband electronic systems: I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupčić, I; Rukelj, Z; Barišić, S

    2013-04-10

    A systematic method of calculating the dynamical conductivity tensor in a general multiband electronic model with strong boson-mediated electron-electron interactions is described. The theory is based on the exact semiclassical expression for the coupling between valence electrons and electromagnetic fields and on the self-consistent Bethe-Salpeter equations for the electron-hole propagators. The general diagrammatic perturbation expressions for the intraband and interband single-particle conductivity are determined. The relations between the intraband Bethe-Salpeter equation, the quantum transport equation and the ordinary transport equation are briefly discussed within the memory-function approximation. The effects of the Lorentz dipole-dipole interactions on the dynamical conductivity of low-dimensional spα models are described in the same approximation. Such formalism proves useful in studies of different (pseudo)gapped states of quasi-one-dimensional systems with the metal-to-insulator phase transitions and can be easily extended to underdoped two-dimensional high-Tc superconductors.

  20. The complete quantum collapse scenario of 2+1 dust shell: Preliminary Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, L

    2007-01-01

    If we consider the gravitational collapse of a material object to a black hole, we would expect, for ranges of mass where a black hole would form, the following scenario. A large enough object would collapse classically until an event horizon forms, and to an external observer the object would be lost fom view. However, once the horizon has formed the black hole will begin to emit Hawking radiation and the hole will lose mass and the horizon will shrink. The final state of this process could be either a zero-mass "black hole" with consequent information loss, or some sort of "quantum remnant. A complete investigation of this process would require: 1) A complete and consistent theory of quantum gravity coupled to some kind of field that would provide the Hawking radiation (which could be the gravitational field itself --gravitons); 2) Some kind of definition of a "horizon" in this quantum gravity, and; 3) The calculational tools to achieve a description of the scenario. Lacking these, one may resort to toy mod...

  1. Coherent Transport Through a Quantum Dot Embedded in a Double-Slit-Like Aharonov-Bohm Ring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽; 游建强; 颜晓红; 韦世豪

    2002-01-01

    Coherent transport through a quantum dot embedded in one arm ora double-slit-like Aharonov-Bohm (AB) ringis studied using the Green's function approach. We obtain experimental observations such as continuous phaseshift along a single resonance peak and sharp inter-resonance phase drop. The AB oscillations of the differentialconductance of the whole device are calculated by using the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism. It is shown thatthe oscillating conductance has a continuous bias-voltage-dependent phase shift and is asymmetric in both linearand nonlinear response regimes.

  2. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  3. Spin Selective Charge Transport through Cysteine Capped CdSe Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Brian P; Kiran, Vankayala; Varade, Vaibhav; Naaman, Ron; Waldeck, David H

    2016-07-13

    This work demonstrates that chiral imprinted CdSe quantum dots (QDs) can act as spin selective filters for charge transport. The spin filtering properties of chiral nanoparticles were investigated by magnetic conductive-probe atomic force microscopy (mCP-AFM) measurements and magnetoresistance measurements. The mCP-AFM measurements show that the chirality of the quantum dots and the magnetic orientation of the tip affect the current-voltage curves. Similarly, magnetoresistance measurements demonstrate that the electrical transport through films of chiral quantum dots correlates with the chiroptical properties of the QD. The spin filtering properties of chiral quantum dots may prove useful in future applications, for example, photovoltaics, spintronics, and other spin-driven devices.

  4. Quantum thermal transport through anharmonic systems: A self-consistent approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dahai; Thingna, Juzar; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2016-10-01

    We propose a feasible and effective approach to study quantum thermal transport through anharmonic systems. The main idea is to obtain an effective harmonic Hamiltonian for the anharmonic system by applying the self-consistent phonon theory. By using the effective harmonic Hamiltonian, we study thermal transport within the framework of the nonequilibrium Green's function method using the celebrated Caroli formula. We corroborate our quantum self-consistent approach by using the quantum master equation that can deal with anharmonicity exactly, but is limited to the weak system-bath coupling regime. Finally, in order to demonstrate its strength, we apply the quantum self-consistent approach to study thermal rectification in a weakly coupled two-segment anharmonic system.

  5. Calculation of the axion mass based on high-temperature lattice quantum chromodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsanyi, S.; Fodor, Z.; Guenther, J.; Kampert, K.-H.; Katz, S. D.; Kawanai, T.; Kovacs, T. G.; Mages, S. W.; Pasztor, A.; Pittler, F.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Szabo, K. K.

    2016-11-01

    Unlike the electroweak sector of the standard model of particle physics, quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is surprisingly symmetric under time reversal. As there is no obvious reason for QCD being so symmetric, this phenomenon poses a theoretical problem, often referred to as the strong CP problem. The most attractive solution for this requires the existence of a new particle, the axion—a promising dark-matter candidate. Here we determine the axion mass using lattice QCD, assuming that these particles are the dominant component of dark matter. The key quantities of the calculation are the equation of state of the Universe and the temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility of QCD, a quantity that is notoriously difficult to calculate, especially in the most relevant high-temperature region (up to several gigaelectronvolts). But by splitting the vacuum into different sectors and re-defining the fermionic determinants, its controlled calculation becomes feasible. Thus, our twofold prediction helps most cosmological calculations to describe the evolution of the early Universe by using the equation of state, and may be decisive for guiding experiments looking for dark-matter axions. In the next couple of years, it should be possible to confirm or rule out post-inflation axions experimentally, depending on whether the axion mass is found to be as predicted here. Alternatively, in a pre-inflation scenario, our calculation determines the universal axionic angle that corresponds to the initial condition of our Universe.

  6. A new method to calculate Berry phase in one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Based on the residue theorem and degenerate perturbation theory, we derive a new, simple and general formula for Berry phase calculation in a two-level system for which the Hamiltonian is a real symmetric matrix. The special torus topology possessed by the first Brillouin zone (1 BZ) of this kind of systems ensures the existence of a nonzero Berry phase. We verify the correctness of our formula on the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model. Then the Berry phase of one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall insulator (1DQAHI) is calculated analytically by applying our method, the result being -π/2 -π/4 sgn (B) [ sgn (Δ - 4 B) + sgn (Δ) ]. Finally, illuminated by this idea, we investigate the Chern number in the two-dimensional case, and find a very simple way to determine the parameter range of the non-trivial Chern number in the phase diagram.

  7. Parallelizing the QUDA Library for Multi-GPU Calculations in Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Babich, Michael Clark, Balint Joo

    2010-11-01

    Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) are having a transformational effect on numerical lattice quantum chromodynamics (LQCD) calculations of importance in nuclear and particle physics. The QUDA library provides a package of mixed precision sparse matrix linear solvers for LQCD applications, supporting single GPUs based on NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA). This library, interfaced to the QDP++/Chroma framework for LQCD calculations, is currently in production use on the "9g" cluster at the Jefferson Laboratory, enabling unprecedented price/performance for a range of problems in LQCD. Nevertheless, memory constraints on current GPU devices limit the problem sizes that can be tackled. In this contribution we describe the parallelization of the QUDA library onto multiple GPUs using MPI, including strategies for the overlapping of communication and computation. We report on both weak and strong scaling for up to 32 GPUs interconnected by InfiniBand, on which we sustain in excess of 4 Tflops.

  8. Complementing high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction data with quantum-chemical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naelapaa, Kaisa; van de Streek, Jacco; Rantanen, Jukka

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput crystallisation and characterisation platforms provide an efficient means to carry out solid-form screening during the pre-formulation phase. To determine the crystal structures of identified new solid phases, however, usually requires independent crystallisation trials to produce...... single crystals or bulk samples of sufficient quantity to carry out high-quality X-ray diffraction measurements. This process could be made more efficient by a robust procedure for crystal structure determination directly from high-throughput X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) data. Quantum......-chemical calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D) have now become feasible for typical small organic molecules used as active pharmaceutical ingredients. We demonstrate how these calculations can be applied to complement high-throughput XRPD data by determining the crystal structure...

  9. Quantum ballistic transport by interacting two-electron states in quasi-one-dimensional channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Danhong [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Gumbs, Godfrey [Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, 1313 Goddard St SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Abranyos, Yonatan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hunter College of the City University of New York, 695 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Pepper, Michael; Kumar, Sanjeev [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17-19 Gordon Street, London, WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    For quantum ballistic transport of electrons through a short conduction channel, the role of Coulomb interaction may significantly modify the energy levels of two-electron states at low temperatures as the channel becomes wide. In this regime, the Coulomb effect on the two-electron states is calculated and found to lead to four split energy levels, including two anticrossing-level and two crossing-level states. Moreover, due to the interplay of anticrossing and crossing effects, our calculations reveal that the ground two-electron state will switch from one anticrossing state (strong confinement) to a crossing state (intermediate confinement) as the channel width gradually increases and then back to the original anticrossing state (weak confinement) as the channel width becomes larger than a threshold value. This switching behavior leaves a footprint in the ballistic conductance as well as in the diffusion thermoelectric power of electrons. Such a switching is related to the triple spin degeneracy as well as to the Coulomb repulsion in the central region of the channel, which separates two electrons away and pushes them to different channel edges. The conductance reoccurrence region expands from the weak to the intermediate confinement regime with increasing electron density.

  10. Equations of state and transport properties of warm dense beryllium: a quantum molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Long, Yao; Tian, Ming-Feng; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Ping

    2013-04-01

    We have calculated the equations of state, the viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients, and electronic transport coefficients of beryllium in the warm dense regime for densities from 4.0 to 6.0 g/cm(3) and temperatures from 1.0 to 10.0 eV by using quantum molecular dynamics simulations. The principal Hugoniot curve is in agreement with underground nuclear explosive and high-power laser experimental results up to ~20 Mbar. The calculated viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients are compared with the one-component plasma model, using effective charges given by the average-atom model. The Stokes-Einstein relationship, which connects viscosity and self-diffusion coefficients, is found to hold fairly well in the strong coupling regime. The Lorenz number, which is the ratio between thermal and electrical conductivities, is computed via Kubo-Greenwood formula and compared to the well-known Wiedemann-Franz law in the warm dense region.

  11. VVER-440 Ex-Core Neutron Transport Calculations by MCNP-5 Code and Comparison with Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Khrennikov, Nikolay [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SEC NRS) Malaya Krasnoselskaya ul., 2/8, bld. 5, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Ex-core neutron transport calculations are needed to evaluate radiation loading parameters (neutron fluence, fluence rate and spectra) on the in-vessel equipment, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and support constructions of VVER type reactors. Due to these parameters are used for reactor equipment life-time assessment, neutron transport calculations should be carried out by precise and reliable calculation methods. In case of RPVs, especially, of first generation VVER-440s, the neutron fluence plays a key role in the prediction of RPV lifetime. Main part of VVER ex-core neutron transport calculations are performed by deterministic and Monte-Carlo methods. This paper deals with precise calculations of the Russian first generation VVER-440 by MCNP-5 code. The purpose of this work was an application of this code for expert calculations, verification of results by comparison with deterministic calculations and validation by neutron activation measured data. Deterministic discrete ordinates DORT code, widely used for RPV neutron dosimetry and many times tested by experiments, was used for comparison analyses. Ex-vessel neutron activation measurements at the VVER-440 NPP have provided space (in azimuth and height directions) and neutron energy (different activation reactions) distributions data for experimental (E) validation of calculated results. Calculational intercomparison (DORT vs. MCNP-5) and comparison with measured values (MCNP-5 and DORT vs. E) have shown agreement within 10-15% for different space points and reaction rates. The paper submits a discussion of results and makes conclusions about practice use of MCNP-5 code for ex-core neutron transport calculations in expert analysis. (authors)

  12. Electron transport across a quantum wire embedding a saw-tooth superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yuan-Ping; Yan Xiao-Hong; Lu Mao-Wang; Deng Yu-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    By developing the recursive Green function method, the transport properties through a quantum wire embedding a finite-length saw-tooth superlattice are studied in the presence of magnetic field. The effects of magnetic modulation and the geometric structures of the superlattice on transmission coefficient are discussed. It is shown that resonant electron gas. The transmission spectrum can be tailored to match requirements through adjusting the size of saw-tooth quantum dot and field strength.

  13. Quantum transport in III-V-semiconductor nanocolumns; Quantentransport in III-V-Halbleiternanosaeulen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensorra, Jakob

    2009-03-20

    The goal of this work has been to investigate und understand the electronic transport properties of vertical GaAs/AlAs nanocolumn resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) and field effect transistors (RTTs) as well as of vertical InAs nanocolumn phase interference diodes. Besides the fabrication and electrical characterization of the devices, numerical calculations, simulations and quantum transport models represent the second important part of the work. GaAs/AlAs and InAs nanocolumns with lateral dimensions down to 30 nm have been processed by top-down approach. Room temperature DC electrical measurements on the nano-RTDs show a distinct negative differential resistance in the I-V characteristics for devices down to 30 nm lateral dimension. The miniaturization of the RTDs leads to the degradation of the transport properties, especially of the peak to valley current ratio (PVR), due to the increased surface scattering. Apart from the main current peak, new substructures can be observed in the I-V characteristics. These are shoulder like features for columns with diameters between 80 nm and 100 nm but become clear peaks when the column diameters are in the 55-75 nm range. For sub-65 nm column lateral dimensions, a strong increase of the PVR and a sharp single peak is observed. A local maximum of the PVR of 3 is reached for columns with 50 nm diameter. The sub-40 nm devices show only space charge limited currents in the I-V characteristics. This behavior can be shifted to smaller or larger diameters by increasing or reduction of the channel doping. For the smallest nanocolumns the lateral quantum confinement, caused by the low dimensionality of the system, leads to the formation of a 3D quantum-point-contact (QPC) in front of the DBQW structure. The quantization in this QPC depends on the column diameter and for a 50 nm column it exceeds the room temperature thermal broadening of the Fermi distribution function of about 25 meV. The measurements of the nano-RTTs indicate a

  14. Nonequilibrium density-matrix description of steady-state quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Abhishek; Saito, Keiji; Hänggi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    With this work we investigate the stationary nonequilibrium density matrix of current carrying nonequilibrium steady states of in-between quantum systems that are connected to reservoirs. We describe the analytical procedure to obtain the explicit result for the reduced density matrix of quantum transport when the system, the connecting reservoirs, and the system-reservoir interactions are described by quadratic Hamiltonians. Our procedure is detailed for both electronic transport described by the tight-binding Hamiltonian and for phonon transport described by harmonic Hamiltonians. For the special case of weak system-reservoir couplings, a more detailed description of the steady-state density matrix is obtained. Several paradigm transport setups for interelectrode electron transport and low-dimensional phonon heat flux are elucidated.

  15. Open Quantum Dynamics Calculations with the Hierarchy Equations of Motion on Parallel Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-14

    Calculating the evolution of an open quantum system, i.e., a system in contact with a thermal environment, has presented a theoretical and computational challenge for many years. With the advent of supercomputers containing large amounts of memory and many processors, the computational challenge posed by the previously intractable theoretical models can now be addressed. The hierarchy equations of motion present one such model and offer a powerful method that remained under-utilized so far due to its considerable computational expense. By exploiting concurrent processing on parallel computers the hierarchy equations of motion can be applied to biological-scale systems. Herein we introduce the quantum dynamics software PHI, that solves the hierarchical equations of motion. We describe the integrator employed by PHI and demonstrate PHI's scaling and efficiency running on large parallel computers by applying the software to the calculation of inter-complex excitation transfer between the light harvesting complexes 1 and 2 of purple photosynthetic bacteria, a 50 pigment system.

  16. Transport signatures of quantum critically in Cr at high pressure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaramillo, R.; Feng, Y.; Wang, J.; Rosenbaum, T. F. (X-Ray Science Division); ( PSC-USR); (Harvard Univ.); (Univ. of Chicago)

    2010-08-03

    The elemental antiferromagnet Cr at high pressure presents a new type of naked quantum critical point that is free of disorder and symmetry-breaking fields. Here we measure magnetotransport in fine detail around the critical pressure, P{sub c} {approx} 10 GPa, in a diamond anvil cell and reveal the role of quantum critical fluctuations at the phase transition. As the magnetism disappears and T {yields} 0, the magntotransport scaling converges to a non-mean-field form that illustrates the reconstruction of the magnetic Fermi surface, and is distinct from the critical scaling measured in chemically disordered Cr:V under pressure. The breakdown of itinerant antiferromagnetism only comes clearly into view in the clean limit, establishing disorder as a relevant variable at a quantum phase transition.

  17. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jingtian, E-mail: jingtian.fang@utdallas.edu; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ∼66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ∼2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  18. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingtian; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2016-01-01

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ˜66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ˜2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  19. Spin Dependent Transport in Si/SiGe Few-Electron Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Christie

    2008-03-01

    Si/SiGe quantum dots are of interest for quantum information processing due in large part to the existence of spin zero isotopes of both Si and Ge. We present the results of transport measurements and integrated charge sensing in silicon double and single quantum dots.[1,2] We observe two effects arising from spin dependent transport in a double quantum dot. First, and as expected, for one direction of current flow we observe spin blockade -- the canonical example of spin-to-charge conversion in transport. In addition, when current flow is reversed, we observe a second effect: strong tails of current extend from the sharp triangular regions in which current conventionally is observed. The presence of these tails is explained by a combination of long spin relaxation times and preferential loading of an excited spin state. We also present charge-sensing measurements of single and double quantum dots using an integrated quantum point contact. The charge sensor signal from single electron tunneling is well correlated with conventional transport through the system. When the tunnel barriers are large and transport through the dot is not measurable, charge sensing remains a viable means to track charge transitions and is used to confirm individual-electron occupation in a single quantum dot. Work performed in collaboration with Nakul Shaji, Madhu Thalakulam, Levente J. Klein, H. Luo, Hua Qin, R. H. Blick, D. E. Savage, M. G. Lagally, A. J. Rimberg, R. Joynt, M. Friesen, S. N. Coppersmith, M. A. Eriksson. Work supported by ARO, LPS, NSF and DOE. (1) Shaji, N. et al. e-print arXiv:0708.0794 (2) Simmons, C. B. et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 213103 (2007).

  20. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  1. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  2. Quantum Thermal Transport through Extremely Cold Dielectric Chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-Ping; YI Lin

    2006-01-01

    In the framework of Green's function theory out of equilibrium, a Landauer-Buttiker (LB) formula for thermal conductance is derived. A simplified model for describing extremely cold dielectric chains is proposed for the first time. Fhrther we apply the present LB formula for studying thermal conductance at low-lying modes, emerging in dielectric atom chains. We find that quantum thermal conductance undergoes an anomalous transition due to new quasiparticle excitations, resulting from nonlinear atom-atom interactions. This theoretical prediction is in excellent agreement with a high-accuracy measurement to thermal conductance quantum.

  3. Spin-related transport phenomena in HgTe-based quantum well structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Markus

    2007-12-15

    Within the scope of this thesis, spin related transport phenomena have been investigated in HgTe/Hg{sub 0.3}Cd{sub 0.7}Te quantum well structures. In our experiments, the existence of the quantum spin Hall (QSH) state was successfully demonstrated for the first time and the presented results provide clear evidence for the charge transport properties of the QSH state. Our experiments provide the first direct observation of the Aharonov-Casher (AC) effect in semiconductor structures. In conclusion, HgTe quantum well structures have proven to be an excellent template for studying spin-related transport phenomena: The QSH relies on the peculiar band structure of the material and the existence of both the spin Hall effect and the AC effect is a consequence of the substantial spin-orbit interaction. (orig.)

  4. Quantum transport in networks and photosynthetic complexes at the steady state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Manzano

    Full Text Available Recently, several works have analysed the efficiency of photosynthetic complexes in a transient scenario and how that efficiency is affected by environmental noise. Here, following a quantum master equation approach, we study the energy and excitation transport in fully connected networks both in general and in the particular case of the Fenna-Matthew-Olson complex. The analysis is carried out for the steady state of the system where the excitation energy is constantly "flowing" through the system. Steady state transport scenarios are particularly relevant if the evolution of the quantum system is not conditioned on the arrival of individual excitations. By adding dephasing to the system, we analyse the possibility of noise-enhancement of the quantum transport.

  5. Quantum transport in networks and photosynthetic complexes at the steady state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several works have analysed the efficiency of photosynthetic complexes in a transient scenario and how that efficiency is affected by environmental noise. Here, following a quantum master equation approach, we study the energy and excitation transport in fully connected networks both in general and in the particular case of the Fenna-Matthew-Olson complex. The analysis is carried out for the steady state of the system where the excitation energy is constantly "flowing" through the system. Steady state transport scenarios are particularly relevant if the evolution of the quantum system is not conditioned on the arrival of individual excitations. By adding dephasing to the system, we analyse the possibility of noise-enhancement of the quantum transport.

  6. Parity effect of bipolar quantum Hall edge transport around graphene antidots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Sadashige; Nakaharai, Shu; Komatsu, Katsuyoshi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Moriyama, Takahiro; Ono, Teruo; Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2015-06-30

    Parity effect, which means that even-odd property of an integer physical parameter results in an essential difference, ubiquitously appears and enables us to grasp its physical essence as the microscopic mechanism is less significant in coarse graining. Here we report a new parity effect of quantum Hall edge transport in graphene antidot devices with pn junctions (PNJs). We found and experimentally verified that the bipolar quantum Hall edge transport is drastically affected by the parity of the number of PNJs. This parity effect is universal in bipolar quantum Hall edge transport of not only graphene but also massless Dirac electron systems. These results offer a promising way to design electron interferometers in graphene.

  7. Temperature and Magnetic Field Effects on the Transport Controlled Charge State of a Single Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskalenko ES

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individual InAs/GaAs quantum dots are studied by micro-photoluminescence. By varying the strength of an applied external magnetic field and/or the temperature, it is demonstrated that the charge state of a single quantum dot can be tuned. This tuning effect is shown to be related to the in-plane electron and hole transport, prior to capture into the quantum dot, since the photo-excited carriers are primarily generated in the barrier.

  8. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. V.; Sanders, M. M.; Saraceno, M.; Sundaram, B.

    1989-01-01

    A new quantum mechanism for the suppression of chaotic ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms explains the appearance of anomalously stable states in the microwave ionization experiments of Koch et al. A novel phase-space representation of the perturbed wave functions reveals that the inhibition of quantum transport is due to the selective excitation of wave functions that are highly localized near unstable periodic orbits in the chaotic classical phase space. The 'scarred' wave functions provide a new basis for the quantum description of a variety of classically chaotic systems.

  9. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  10. Boundary-projection acceleration: A new approach to synthetic acceleration of transport calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.L.; Martin, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    We present a new class of synthetic acceleration methods which can be applied to transport calculations regardless of geometry, discretization scheme, or mesh shape. Unlike other synthetic acceleration methods which base their acceleration on P1 equations, these methods use acceleration equations obtained by projecting the transport solution onto a coarse angular mesh only on cell boundaries. We demonstrate, via Fourier analysis of a simple model problem as well as numerical calculations of various problems, that the simplest of these methods are unconditionally stable with spectral radius less than or equal toc/3 (c being the scattering ratio), for several different discretization schemes in slab geometry. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Metallic impurities induced electronic transport in WSe2: First-principle calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongping; Liu, Shuai; Huang, Songlei; Zhang, Quan; Li, Changsheng; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian; Tian, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we have systematically explored the effect of V, Nb and Ta impurities on the electronic transport properties of 2H-WSe2. The formation energies elucidate dopants are preferred to substitute W atoms, and the incorporation of Nb into WSe2 is most thermodynamically favorable. The crystal structures almost hold the pristine WSe2 structure-type in spite of with slightly bond relaxation. More importantly, a pronounced electronic transport behavior has realized in all doped systems, which is mainly triggered by metal impurities. Our calculation suggests chemical doping is an effective way to precisely modulate WSe2 performance for target technological applications.

  12. Nonequilibrium Transport through a Spinful Quantum Dot with Superconducting Leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Brian Møller; Flensberg, Karsten; Koerting, Verena

    2011-01-01

    We study the nonlinear cotunneling current through a spinful quantum dot contacted by two superconducting leads. Applying a general nonequilibrium Green function formalism to an effective Kondo model, we study the rich variation in the IV characteristics with varying asymmetry in the tunnel...

  13. Observation of quantum interference in molecular charge transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guedon, Constant M.; Valkenier, Hennie; Markussen, Troels

    2012-01-01

    , phenomena such as giant magnetoresistance(5), Kondo effects(6) and conductance switching(7-11) have been observed in single molecules, and theorists have predicted that it should also be possible to observe quantum interference in molecular conductors(12-18), but until now all the evidence...

  14. Calculations of Solvation Free Energy through Energy Reweighting from Molecular Mechanics to Quantum Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiangyu; Wang, Meiting; Shao, Yihan; König, Gerhard; Brooks, Bernard R; Zhang, John Z H; Mei, Ye

    2016-02-09

    In this work, the solvation free energies of 20 organic molecules from the 4th Statistical Assessment of the Modeling of Proteins and Ligands (SAMPL4) have been calculated. The sampling of phase space is carried out at a molecular mechanical level, and the associated free energy changes are estimated using the Bennett Acceptance Ratio (BAR). Then the quantum mechanical (QM) corrections are computed through the indirect Non-Boltzmann Bennett's acceptance ratio (NBB) or the thermodynamics perturbation (TP) method. We show that BAR+TP gives a minimum analytic variance for the calculated solvation free energy at the Gaussian limit and performs slightly better than NBB in practice. Furthermore, the expense of the QM calculations in TP is only half of that in NBB. We also show that defining the biasing potential as the difference of the solute-solvent interaction energy, instead of the total energy, can converge the calculated solvation free energies much faster but possibly to different values. Based on the experimental solvation free energies which have been published before, it is discovered in this study that BLYP yields better results than MP2 and some other later functionals such as B3LYP, M06-2X, and ωB97X-D.

  15. Synthesis and quantum transport properties of Bi₂Se₃ topological insulator nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuan; Liao, Zhi-Min; Zhou, Yang-Bo; Wu, Han-Chun; Bie, Ya-Qing; Chen, Jing-Jing; Meng, Jie; Wu, Xiao-Song; Yu, Da-Peng

    2013-01-01

    Bi₂Se₃ nanocrystals with various morphologies, including nanotower, nanoplate, nanoflake, nanobeam and nanowire, have been synthesized. Well-distinguished Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations were observed in Bi₂Se₃ nanoplates and nanobeams. Careful analysis of the SdH oscillations suggests the existence of Berry's phase π, which confirms the quantum transport of the surface Dirac fermions in both Bi₂Se₃ nanoplates and nanobeams without intended doping. The observation of the singular quantum transport of the topological surface states implies that the high-quality Bi₂Se₃ nanostructures have superiorities for investigating the novel physical properties and developing the potential applications.

  16. Coherent quantum transport in normal-metal/d-wave superconductor/normal-metal double tunnel junctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Zhengchao; FU; Hao

    2004-01-01

    Taking into account the effects of quantum interference and interface scattering, combining the electron current with hole current contribution to tunnel current,we study the coherent quantum transport in normal-metal/d-wave superconductor/normal-metal (NM/d-wave SC/NM) double tunnel junctions by using extended Blonder-Tinkham-Klapwijk (BTK) approach. It is shown that all quasiparticle transport coefficients and conductance spectrum exhibit oscillating behavior with the energy, in which periodic vanishing of Andreev reflection (AR) above superconducting gap is found.In tunnel limit for the interface scattering strength taken very large, there are a series of bound states of quasiparticles formed in SC.

  17. Quasiballistic quantum transport through Ge/Si core/shell nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotekar-Patil, D; Nguyen, B-M; Yoo, J; Dayeh, S A; Frolov, S M

    2017-09-20

    We study signatures of ballistic quantum transport of holes through Ge/Si core/shell nanowires at low temperatures. We observe Fabry-Pérot interference patterns as well as conductance plateaus at integer multiples of 2e (2)/h at zero magnetic field. Magnetic field evolution of these plateaus reveals relatively large effective Landé g-factors. Ballistic effects are observed in nanowires with silicon shell thickness of 1-3 nm, but not in bare germanium wires. These findings inform the future development of spin and topological quantum devices which rely on ballistic sub-band-resolved transport.

  18. Inter-dot coupling effects on transport through correlated parallel coupled quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shyam Chand; G Rajput; K C Sharma; P K Ahluwalia

    2009-05-01

    Transport through symmetric parallel coupled quantum dot system has been studied, using non-equilibrium Green function formalism. The inter-dot tunnelling with on-dot and inter-dot Coulomb repulsion is included. The transmission coefficient and Landaur–Buttiker like current formula are shown in terms of internal states of quantum dots. The effect of inter-dot tunnelling on transport properties has been explored. Results, in intermediate inter-dot coupling regime show signatures of merger of two dots to form a single composite dot and in strong coupling regime the behaviour of the system resembles the two decoupled dots.

  19. THE CALCULATION OF THE ENERGY RECOVERY ELECTRIFIED URBAN TRANSPORT DURING THE INSTALLATION DRIVE FOR TRACTION SUBSTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sulim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At present a great attention is paid to increasing of energy efficiency at operated electrified urban transport. Perspective direction for increasing energy efficiency at that type of transport is the application of regenerative braking. For additional increasing of energy efficiency there were suggested the use of capacitive drive on tires of traction substation. One of the main task is the analysis of energy recovery application  with drive and without it.These analysis demonstrated that the calculation algorithms don’t allow in the full volume to carry out calculations of amount and cost of energy recovery without drive and with it. That is why we see the current interest to this topic. The purpose of work is to create methods of algorithms calculation for definite amount and cost of consumed, redundant and recovery energy of electrified urban transport due to definite regime of motion on wayside. There is algorithm developed, which allow to calculate amount and cost of consumed, redundant and recovery energy of electrified urban transport on wayside during the installation capacitive drive at traction substation. On the basis of developed algorithm for the definite regime of wagon motion of subway there were fulfilled the example of energy recovery amount and its cost calculation, among them with limited energy intensity drive, when there are 4 trains on wayside simultaneously.

  20. Improved method for calculating neoclassical transport coefficients in the banana regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, M., E-mail: taguchi.masayoshi@nihon-u.ac.jp [College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Narashino 275-8576 (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    The conventional neoclassical moment method in the banana regime is improved by increasing the accuracy of approximation to the linearized Fokker-Planck collision operator. This improved method is formulated for a multiple ion plasma in general tokamak equilibria. The explicit computation in a model magnetic field shows that the neoclassical transport coefficients can be accurately calculated in the full range of aspect ratio by the improved method. The some neoclassical transport coefficients for the intermediate aspect ratio are found to appreciably deviate from those obtained by the conventional moment method. The differences between the transport coefficients with these two methods are up to about 20%.