WorldWideScience

Sample records for quantum solids

  1. Quantum Computing in Solid State Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, B; Granata, C

    2006-01-01

    The aim of Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems is to report on recent theoretical and experimental results on the macroscopic quantum coherence of mesoscopic systems, as well as on solid state realization of qubits and quantum gates. Particular attention has been given to coherence effects in Josephson devices. Other solid state systems, including quantum dots, optical, ion, and spin devices which exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence are also discussed. Quantum Computation in Solid State Systems discusses experimental implementation of quantum computing and information processing devices, and in particular observations of quantum behavior in several solid state systems. On the theoretical side, the complementary expertise of the contributors provides models of the various structures in connection with the problem of minimizing decoherence.

  2. Elasticity of a quantum monolayer solid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruch, Ludwig Walter

    1992-01-01

    A perturbation-theory formulation of the zero-temperature elastic constants is used to verify symmetry relations for a (monolayer) triangluar lattice. A generalization of the Cauchy relation between the two elastic constants of the triangular lattice with central-pair-potential interactions is gi...... is given for the quantum solid. The first-order quantum corrections are rederived in this formalism, and previous calculations are reanalyzed....

  3. Solid-State Quantum Refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    determine the tilt angle of the ridge waveguide with respect to the cleavage plane. MQW Design: The designs which demonstrate the blueshift of...Photoluminescence (PL) by the photogenerated carriers are introduced. In this section the mechanisms which lead to the blueshift are explained. The...subject of this report. We propose the use of quantum confined stark shift as a method to blueshift the spectra of Matrix element of transition by

  4. Efficient Luminescence from Perovskite Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Younghoon

    2015-11-18

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Nanocrystals of CsPbX3 perovskites are promising materials for light-emitting optoelectronics because of their colloidal stability, optically tunable bandgap, bright photoluminescence, and excellent photoluminescence quantum yield. Despite their promise, nanocrystal-only films of CsPbX3 perovskites have not yet been fabricated; instead, highly insulating polymers have been relied upon to compensate for nanocrystals\\' unstable surfaces. We develop solution chemistry that enables single-step casting of perovskite nanocrystal films and overcomes problems in both perovskite quantum dot purification and film fabrication. Centrifugally cast films retain bright photoluminescence and achieve dense and homogeneous morphologies. The new materials offer a platform for optoelectronic applications of perovskite quantum dot solids.

  5. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Alexander H.; Thon, Susanna M.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Zhitomirsky, David; Debnath, Ratan; Levina, Larissa; Rollny, Lisa R.; Carey, Graham H.; Fischer, Armin; Kemp, Kyle W.; Kramer, Illan J.; Ning, Zhijun; Labelle, André J.; Chou, Kang Wei; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H.

    2012-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electron-hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device.

  6. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alex

    2012-07-29

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  7. Witnessing Quantum Coherence: from solid-state to biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Chen, Guang-Yin; Nori, Franco; 10.1038/srep00885

    2012-01-01

    Quantum coherence is one of the primary non-classical features of quantum systems. While protocols such as the Leggett-Garg inequality (LGI) and quantum tomography can be used to test for the existence of quantum coherence and dynamics in a given system, unambiguously detecting inherent "quantumness" still faces serious obstacles in terms of experimental feasibility and efficiency, particularly in complex systems. Here we introduce two "quantum witnesses" to efficiently verify quantum coherence and dynamics in the time domain, without the expense and burden of non-invasive measurements or full tomographic processes. Using several physical examples, including quantum transport in solid-state nanostructures and in biological organisms, we show that these quantum witnesses are robust and have a much finer resolution in their detection window than the LGI has. These robust quantum indicators may assist in reducing the experimental overhead in unambiguously verifying quantum coherence in complex systems.

  8. Coherent manipulation of single quantum systems in the solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Lilian Isabel

    2007-12-01

    The controlled, coherent manipulation of quantum-mechanical systems is an important challenge in modern science and engineering, with significant applications in quantum information science. Solid-state quantum systems such as electronic spins, nuclear spins, and superconducting islands are among the most promising candidates for realization of quantum bits (qubits). However, in contrast to isolated atomic systems, these solid-state qubits couple to a complex environment which often results in rapid loss of coherence, and, in general, is difficult to understand. Additionally, the strong interactions which make solid-state quantum systems attractive can typically only occur between neighboring systems, leading to difficulties in coupling arbitrary pairs of quantum bits. This thesis presents experimental progress in understanding and controlling the complex environment of a solid-state quantum bit, and theoretical techniques for extending the distance over which certain quantum bits can interact coherently. Coherent manipulation of an individual electron spin associated with a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond is used to gain insight into its mesoscopic environment. Furthermore, techniques for exploiting coherent interactions between the electron spin and a subset of the environment are developed and demonstrated, leading to controlled interactions with single isolated nuclear spins. The quantum register thus formed by a coupled electron and nuclear spin provides the basis for a theoretical proposal for fault-tolerant long-distance quantum communication with minimal physical resource requirements. Finally, we consider a mechanism for long-distance coupling between quantum dots based on chip-scale cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  9. Quantum Discord for Investigating Quantum Correlations without Entanglement in Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Rong, Xing; Jin, Fangzhou; Geng, Jianpei; Feng, Pengbo; Xu, Nanyang; Wang, Ya; Ju, Chenyong; Shi, Mingjun; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-01-01

    Quantum systems unfold diversified correlations which have no classical counterparts. These quantum correlations have various different facets. Quantum entanglement, as the most well known measure of quantum correlations, plays essential roles in quantum information processing. However, it has recently been pointed out that quantum entanglement cannot describe all the nonclassicality in the correlations. Thus the study of quantum correlations in separable states attracts widely attentions. Herein, we experimentally investigate the quantum correlations of separable thermal states in terms of quantum discord. The sudden change of quantum discord is observed, which captures ambiguously the critical point associated with the behavior of Hamiltonian. Our results display the potential applications of quantum correlations in studying the fundamental properties of quantum system, such as quantum criticality of non-zero temperature.

  10. Hybrid quantum processors: molecular ensembles as quantum memory for solid state circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabl, P; DeMille, D; Doyle, J M; Lukin, M D; Schoelkopf, R J; Zoller, P

    2006-07-21

    We investigate a hybrid quantum circuit where ensembles of cold polar molecules serve as long-lived quantum memories and optical interfaces for solid state quantum processors. The quantum memory realized by collective spin states (ensemble qubit) is coupled to a high-Q stripline cavity via microwave Raman processes. We show that, for convenient trap-surface distances of a few microm, strong coupling between the cavity and ensemble qubit can be achieved. We discuss basic quantum information protocols, including a swap from the cavity photon bus to the molecular quantum memory, and a deterministic two qubit gate. Finally, we investigate coherence properties of molecular ensemble quantum bits.

  11. Hybrid Quantum Processors: molecular ensembles as quantum memory for solid state circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Rabl, P; Doyle, J M; Lukin, M D; Schölkopf, R J; Zoller, P

    2006-01-01

    We investigate a hybrid quantum circuit where ensembles of cold polar molecules serve as long-lived quantum memories and optical interfaces for solid state quantum processors. The quantum memory realized by collective spin states (ensemble qubit) is coupled to a high-Q stripline cavity via microwave Raman processes. We show that for convenient trap-surface distances of a few $\\mu$m, strong coupling between the cavity and ensemble qubit can be achieved. We discuss basic quantum information protocols, including a swap from the cavity photon bus to the molecular quantum memory, and a deterministic two qubit gate. Finally, we investigate coherence properties of molecular ensemble quantum bits.

  12. Quantum theory of space charge limited current in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Gabriel, E-mail: gabriel.gonzalez@uaslp.mx [Cátedras Conacyt, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí 78000, Mexico and Coordinación para la Innovación y la Aplicación de la Ciencia y la Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí 78000 (Mexico)

    2015-02-28

    We present a quantum model of space charge limited current transport inside trap-free solids with planar geometry in the mean field approximation. We use a simple transformation which allows us to find the exact analytical solution for the steady state current case. We use our approach to find a Mott-Gurney like behavior and the mobility for single charge carriers in the quantum regime in solids.

  13. Quantum diffusion of muon and muonium in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadono, Ryosuke [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    The quantum tunneling diffusion of muon and muonium in crystalline solids is discussed with emphasis on the effects of disorder and superconductivity. The complex effect of disorder on muonium diffusion in inhomogeneous crystal is scrutinized. The enhanced muon diffusion in the superconducting state of high-purity tantalum establishes the predominant influence of conduction electrons on the quantum diffusion in metals. (author)

  14. Quantum Transport in Solids: Two-Electron Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The central objective of this research program has been to study theoretically the underlying principles of quantum transport in solids. The area of...research investigated has emphasized the understanding of two electron processes in quantum transport . The problems have been treated analytically to...the extent possible through the use of dynamical localized Wannier functions. These results have been and are being incorporated in a full quantum

  15. Phonons in quantum solids with defects. [lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, N.; Zmuidzinas, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    A formalism was developed for temperature-dependent, self-consistent phonons in quantum solids with defects. Lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen, as well as electronic excitations in solid helium, were treated as defects that modify properties of these systems. The information to be gained from the modified phonon spectrum is discussed.

  16. A quantum logic gate between a solid-state quantum bit and a photon

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyochul; Shen, Thomas C; Solomon, Glenn S; Waks, Edo; 10.1038/nphoton.2013.48

    2013-01-01

    Integrated quantum photonics provides a promising route towards scalable solid-state implementations of quantum networks, quantum computers, and ultra-low power opto-electronic devices. A key component for many of these applications is the photonic quantum logic gate, where the quantum state of a solid-state quantum bit (qubit) conditionally controls the state of a photonic qubit. These gates are crucial for development of robust quantum networks, non-destructive quantum measurements, and strong photon-photon interactions. Here we experimentally realize a quantum logic gate between an optical photon and a solid-state qubit. The qubit is composed of a quantum dot (QD) strongly coupled to a nano-cavity, which acts as a coherently controllable qubit system that conditionally flips the polarization of a photon on picosecond timescales, implementing a controlled-NOT (cNOT) gate. Our results represent an important step towards solid-state quantum networks and provide a versatile approach for probing QD-photon inter...

  17. A modern course in the quantum theory of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Fuxiang

    2013-01-01

    This book contains advanced subjects in solid state physics with emphasis on the theoretical exposition of various physical phenomena in solids using quantum theory, hence entitled "A modern course in the quantum theory of solids". The use of the adjective "modern" in the title is to reflect the fact that some of the new developments in condensed matter physics have been included in the book. The new developments contained in the book are mainly in experimental methods (inelastic neutron scattering and photoemission spectroscopy), in magnetic properties of solids (the itinerant magnetism, the superexchange, the Hubbard model, and giant and colossal magnetoresistance), and in optical properties of solids (Raman scattering). Besides the new developments, the Green's function method used in many-body physics and the strong-coupling theory of superconductivity are also expounded in great details.

  18. Robust Solid State Quantum System Operating at 800 K

    CERN Document Server

    Kianinia, Mehran; Regan, Blake; Tran, Toan Trong; Ford, Michael J; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2016-01-01

    Realization of Quantum information and communications technologies requires robust, stable solid state single photon sources. However, most existing sources cease to function above cryogenic or room temperature due to thermal ionization or strong phonon coupling which impede their emissive and quantum properties. Here we present an efficient single photon source based on a defect in a van der Waals crystal that is optically stable and operates at elevated temperatures of up to 800 K. The quantum nature of the source and the photon purity are maintained upon heating to 800 K and cooling back to room temperature. Our report of a robust high temperature solid state single photon source constitutes a significant step to-wards practical, integrated quantum technologies for real-world environments.

  19. Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2015-07-15

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Heteroepitaxy - atomically aligned growth of a crystalline film atop a different crystalline substrate - is the basis of electrically driven lasers, multijunction solar cells, and blue-light-emitting diodes. Crystalline coherence is preserved even when atomic identity is modulated, a fact that is the critical enabler of quantum wells, wires, and dots. The interfacial quality achieved as a result of heteroepitaxial growth allows new combinations of materials with complementary properties, which enables the design and realization of functionalities that are not available in the single-phase constituents. Here we show that organohalide perovskites and preformed colloidal quantum dots, combined in the solution phase, produce epitaxially aligned \\'dots-in-a-matrix\\' crystals. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, we reveal heterocrystals as large as about 60 nanometres and containing at least 20 mutually aligned dots that inherit the crystalline orientation of the perovskite matrix. The heterocrystals exhibit remarkable optoelectronic properties that are traceable to their atom-scale crystalline coherence: photoelectrons and holes generated in the larger-bandgap perovskites are transferred with 80% efficiency to become excitons in the quantum dot nanocrystals, which exploit the excellent photocarrier diffusion of perovskites to produce bright-light emission from infrared-bandgap quantum-tuned materials. By combining the electrical transport properties of the perovskite matrix with the high radiative efficiency of the quantum dots, we engineer a new platform to advance solution-processed infrared optoelectronics.

  20. Quantum theory of the solid state part B

    CERN Document Server

    Callaway, Joseph

    1974-01-01

    Quantum Theory of the Solid State, Part B describes the concepts and methods of the central problems of the quantum theory of solids. This book discusses the developed machinery applied to impurities, disordered systems, effects of external fields, transport phenomena, and superconductivity. The representation theory, low field diamagnetic susceptibility, electron-phonon interaction, and Landau theory of fermi liquids are also deliberated. This text concludes with an introduction to many-body theory and some applications. This publication is a suitable textbook for students who have completed

  1. Optoelectronic Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dot Solids for Photovoltaic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistyakov, A A; Zvaigzne, M A; Nikitenko, V R; Tameev, A R; Martynov, I L; Prezhdo, O V

    2017-09-07

    Quantum dot (QD) solids represent a new type of condensed matter drawing high fundamental and applied interest. Quantum confinement in individual QDs, combined with macroscopic scale whole materials, leads to novel exciton and charge transfer features that are particularly relevant to optoelectronic applications. This Perspective discusses the structure of semiconductor QD solids, optical and spectral properties, charge carrier transport, and photovoltaic applications. The distance between adjacent nanoparticles and surface ligands influences greatly electrostatic interactions between QDs and, hence, charge and energy transfer. It is almost inevitable that QD solids exhibit energetic disorder that bears many similarities to disordered organic semiconductors, with charge and exciton transport described by the multiple trapping model. QD solids are synthesized at low cost from colloidal solutions by casting, spraying, and printing. A judicious selection of a layer sequence involving QDs with different size, composition, and ligands can be used to harvest sunlight over a wide spectral range, leading to inexpensive and efficient photovoltaic devices.

  2. Perspectives on a Solid State NMR Quantum Computer

    OpenAIRE

    Fel'dman, Edward B.; Lacelle, Serge

    2001-01-01

    A quantum information processing device, based on bulk solid state NMR of the quasi-one dimensional material hydroxyapatite, is proposed following the magnetic resonance force microscopy work of Yamamoto et al (quant-ph/0009122). In a macroscopic sample of hydroxyapatite, our solid state NMR model yields a limit of 10^8 qubits imposed by physics, while development of current technological considerations should allow an upper bound in the range of hundreds to thousands of qubits.

  3. Quantum teleportation from a telecom-wavelength photon to a solid-state quantum memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussieres, Felix [Group of Applied Physics, University of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Quantum teleportation is a cornerstone of quantum information science due to its essential role in several important tasks such as the long-distance transmission of quantum information using quantum repeaters. In this context, a challenge of paramount importance is the distribution of entanglement between remote nodes, and to use this entanglement as a resource for long-distance light-to-matter quantum teleportation. In this talk I will report on the demonstration of quantum teleportation of the polarization state of a telecom-wavelength photon onto the state of a solid-state quantum memory. Entanglement is established between a rare-earth-ion doped crystal storing a single photon that is polarization-entangled with a flying telecom-wavelength photon. The latter is jointly measured with another flying qubit carrying the polarization state to be teleported, which heralds the teleportation. The fidelity of the polarization state of the photon retrieved from the memory is shown to be greater than the maximum fidelity achievable without entanglement, even when the combined distances travelled by the two flying qubits is 25 km of standard optical fibre. This light-to-matter teleportation channel paves the way towards long-distance implementations of quantum networks with solid-state quantum memories.

  4. 1D quantum simulation using a solid state platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkendall, Megan; Irvin, Patrick; Huang, Mengchen; Levy, Jeremy; Lee, Hyungwoo; Eom, Chang-Beom

    Understanding the properties of large quantum systems can be challenging both theoretically and numerically. One experimental approach-quantum simulation-involves mapping a quantum system of interest onto a physical system that is programmable and experimentally accessible. A tremendous amount of work has been performed with quantum simulators formed from optical lattices; by contrast, solid-state platforms have had only limited success. Our experimental approach to quantum simulation takes advantage of nanoscale control of a metal-insulator transition at the interface between two insulating complex oxide materials. This system naturally exhibits a wide variety of ground states (e.g., ferromagnetic, superconducting) and can be configured into a variety of complex geometries. We will describe initial experiments that explore the magnetotransport properties of one-dimensional superlattices with spatial periods as small as 4 nm, comparable to the Fermi wavelength. The results demonstrate the potential of this solid-state quantum simulation approach, and also provide empirical constraints for physical models that describe the underlying oxide material properties. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from AFOSR (FA9550-12-1- 0057 (JL), FA9550-10-1-0524 (JL) and FA9550-12-1-0342 (CBE)), ONR N00014-15-1-2847 (JL), and NSF DMR-1234096 (CBE).

  5. Artificial Quantum Solids: Physics, Fabrication and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    example, J. M. Hvam in Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Solids; Ad- vances and Applications, edited by B. Di Bartolo and B. Bowlby (Plenum, New York, 1994), pp...vances and Applications, edited by B. Di Bartolo and B. Bowlby (Plenum, New York, 1994), pp. 91-149. ’This lack of symmetry is due to the transfer of a

  6. Progress of solid-state quantum computers at NRIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, G.; Shinagawa, H.; Terai, K.; Hashi, K.; Goto, A.; Yakabe, T.; Takamasu, T.; Uji, S.; Shimizu, T.; Kitazawa, H.

    2001-04-01

    In the last five years, we have investigated quantum phenomena of low-dimensional materials and strongly correlated electron systems at high-magnetic fields under the Center of Excellence Development Program (COE project) at the National Research Institute for Metal. The second stage towards the realization of the solid-state quantum devices and measurement of the quantum properties began in April of this year. NMR spectra have been studied in CeP and various lithium fluoride crystals in anticipation of the crystal lattice quantum computer. The magneto-transport effect on tiny aluminum devices fabricated on semiconductors has been studied, and negative magnetoresistance has clearly been observed. An SPM which can be operated at various temperatures in the presence of high-magnetic fields has been developed to construct a magnetic resonance force microscope. The magnetic field effect on the magnetic recording pattern of an HDD was clearly measured up to 7 T.

  7. Confined-but-Connected Quantum Solids via Controlled Ligand Displacement

    KAUST Repository

    Baumgardner, William J.

    2013-07-10

    Confined-but-connected quantum dot solids (QDS) combine the advantages of tunable, quantum-confined energy levels with efficient charge transport through enhanced electronic interdot coupling. We report the fabrication of QDS by treating self-assembled films of colloidal PbSe quantum dots with polar nonsolvents. Treatment with dimethylformamide balances the rates of self-assembly and ligand displacement to yield confined-but-connected QDS structures with cubic ordering and quasi-epitaxial interdot connections through facets of neighboring dots. The QDS structure was analyzed by a combination of transmission electron microscopy and wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering. Excitonic absorption signatures in optical spectroscopy confirm that quantum confinement is preserved. Transport measurements show significantly enhanced conductivity in treated films. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. Quantum theory of the solid state

    CERN Document Server

    Callaway, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    This new edition presents a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of the concepts and methods in contemporary condensed matter physics, emphasizing topics that can be treated by quantum mechanical methods. The book features tutorial discussions of a number of current research topics.Also included are updated treatments of topics that have developed significantly within the past several years, such as superconductivity, magnetic impurities in metals, methods for electronic structure calculations, magnetic ordering in insulators and metals, and linear response theory. Advanced level graduate students

  9. Air-stable n-type colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2014-06-08

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer promise in flexible electronics, light sensing and energy conversion. These applications rely on rectifying junctions that require the creation of high-quality CQD solids that are controllably n-type (electron-rich) or p-type (hole-rich). Unfortunately, n-type semiconductors made using soft matter are notoriously prone to oxidation within minutes of air exposure. Here we report high-performance, air-stable n-type CQD solids. Using density functional theory we identify inorganic passivants that bind strongly to the CQD surface and repel oxidative attack. A materials processing strategy that wards off strong protic attack by polar solvents enabled the synthesis of an air-stable n-type PbS CQD solid. This material was used to build an air-processed inverted quantum junction device, which shows the highest current density from any CQD solar cell and a solar power conversion efficiency as high as 8%. We also feature the n-type CQD solid in the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of atmospheric NO2. This work paves the way for new families of electronic devices that leverage air-stable quantum-tuned materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantum teleportation from a telecom-wavelength photon to a solid-state quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, Félix; Clausen, Christoph; Tiranov, Alexey; Korzh, Boris; Verma, Varun B.; Nam, Sae Woo; Marsili, Francesco; Ferrier, Alban; Goldner, Philippe; Herrmann, Harald; Silberhorn, Christine; Sohler, Wolfgang; Afzelius, Mikael; Gisin, Nicolas

    2014-10-01

    Quantum teleportation is a cornerstone of quantum information science due to its essential role in important tasks such as the long-distance transmission of quantum information using quantum repeaters. This requires the efficient distribution of entanglement between remote nodes of a network. Here, we demonstrate quantum teleportation of the polarization state of a telecom-wavelength photon onto the state of a solid-state quantum memory. Entanglement is established between a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal storing a single photon that is polarization-entangled with a flying telecom-wavelength photon. The latter is jointly measured with another flying polarization qubit to be teleported, which heralds the teleportation. The fidelity of the qubit retrieved from the memory is shown to be greater than the maximum fidelity achievable without entanglement, even when the combined distances travelled by the two flying qubits is 25 km of standard optical fibre. Our results demonstrate the possibility of long-distance quantum networks with solid-state resources.

  11. Graphene quantum dots as the electrolyte for solid state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su; Li, Yutong; Song, Huaihe; Chen, Xiaohong; Zhou, Jisheng; Hong, Song; Huang, Minglu

    2016-01-01

    We propose that graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with a sufficient number of acidic oxygen-bearing functional groups such as -COOH and -OH can serve as solution- and solid- type electrolytes for supercapacitors. Moreover, we found that the ionic conductivity and ion-donating ability of the GQDs could be markedly improved by simply neutralizing their acidic functional groups by using KOH. These neutralized GQDs as the solution- or solid-type electrolytes greatly enhanced the capacitive performance and rate capability of the supercapacitors. The reason for the enhancement can be ascribed to the fully ionization of the weak acidic oxygen-bearing functional groups after neutralization.

  12. Quantum Chemistry of Solids LCAO Treatment of Crystals and Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Evarestov, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Chemistry of Solids delivers a comprehensive account of the main features and possibilities of LCAO methods for the first principles calculations of electronic structure of periodic systems. The first part describes the basic theory underlying the LCAO methods  applied to periodic systems and the use of Hartree-Fock(HF), Density Function theory(DFT) and hybrid Hamiltonians. The translation and site symmetry consideration is included to establish connection between k-space solid –state physics and real-space quantum chemistry. The inclusion of electron correlation effects for periodic systems is considered on the basis of localized crystalline orbitals. The possibilities of LCAO methods for chemical bonding analysis in periodic systems are discussed. The second part deals with the applications of LCAO methods  for calculations of bulk crystal properties, including magnetic ordering and crystal structure optimization.  In the second edition two new chapters are added in the application part II of t...

  13. Recent Progress and New Challenges in Quantum Fluids and Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Halperin, W. P.

    2017-10-01

    Quantum fluids and solids have been a primary topic in low temperature physics. While many physical concepts and experimental techniques developed in this field have made impacts on other related areas in the last century, recent research activities demonstrate active infusion of techniques and physical ideas developed in other fields. In this paper, we present a short review of the recent progress and new challenges in this field, focusing on the superfluid phases of 3He and 4He.

  14. Measuring Charge Carrier Diffusion in Coupled Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2013-06-25

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are attractive materials for inexpensive, room-temperature-, and solution-processed optoelectronic devices. A high carrier diffusion length is desirable for many CQD device applications. In this work we develop two new experimental methods to investigate charge carrier diffusion in coupled CQD solids under charge-neutral, i.e., undepleted, conditions. The methods take advantage of the quantum-size-effect tunability of our materials, utilizing a smaller-bandgap population of quantum dots as a reporter system. We develop analytical models of diffusion in 1D and 3D structures that allow direct extraction of diffusion length from convenient parametric plots and purely optical measurements. We measure several CQD solids fabricated using a number of distinct methods and having significantly different doping and surface ligand treatments. We find that CQD materials recently reported to achieve a certified power conversion efficiency of 7% with hybrid organic-inorganic passivation have a diffusion length of 80 ± 10 nm. The model further allows us to extract the lifetime, trap density, mobility, and diffusion coefficient independently in each material system. This work will facilitate further progress in extending the diffusion length, ultimately leading to high-quality CQD solid semiconducting materials and improved CQD optoelectronic devices, including CQD solar cells. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Towards room temperature solid state quantum devices at the edge of quantum chaos for long-living quantum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, Enrico

    2015-07-01

    Long living coherent quantum states have been observed in biological systems up to room temperature. Light harvesting in chromophoresis realized by excitonic systems living at the edge of quantum chaos, where energy level distribution becomes semi-Poissonian. On the other hand, artificial materials suffer the loss of coherence of quantum states in quantum information processing, but semiconductor materials are known to exhibit quantum chaotic conditions, so the exploitation of similar conditions are to be considered. The advancements of nanofabrication, together with the control of implantation of individual atoms at nanometric precision, may open the experimental study of such special regime at the edge of the phase transitions for the electronic systems obtained by implanting impurity atoms in a silicon transistor. Here I review the recent advancements made in the field of theoretical description of the light harvesting in biological system in its connection with phase transitions at the few atoms scale and how it would be possible to achieve transition point to quantum chaotic regime. Such mechanism may thus preserve quantum coherent states at room temperature in solid state devices, to be exploited for quantum information processing as well as dissipation-free quantum electronics.

  16. All-optical quantum computing with a hybrid solid-state processing unit

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, Pei; Li, Chong

    2011-01-01

    We develop an architecture of hybrid quantum solid-state processing unit for universal quantum computing. The architecture allows distant and nonidentical solid-state qubits in distinct physical systems to interact and work collaboratively. All the quantum computing procedures are controlled by optical methods using classical fields and cavity QED. Our methods have prominent advantage of the insensitivity to dissipation process due to the virtual excitation of subsystems. Moreover, the QND measurements and state transfer for the solid-state qubits are proposed. The architecture opens promising perspectives for implementing scalable quantum computation in a broader sense that different solid systems can merge and be integrated into one quantum processor afterwards.

  17. Solid-State Source of Nonclassical Photon Pairs with Embedded Multimode Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluer, Kutlu; Mazzera, Margherita; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2017-05-01

    The generation and distribution of quantum correlations between photonic qubits is a key resource in quantum information science. For applications in quantum networks and quantum repeaters, it is required that these quantum correlations be stored in a quantum memory. In 2001, Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) proposed a scheme combining a correlated photon-pair source and a quantum memory in atomic gases, which has enabled fast progress towards elementary quantum networks. In this Letter, we demonstrate a solid-state source of correlated photon pairs with embedded spin-wave quantum memory, using a rare-earth-ion-doped crystal. We show strong quantum correlations between the photons, high enough for performing quantum communication. Unlike the original DLCZ proposal, our scheme is inherently multimode thanks to a built-in rephasing mechanism, allowing us to demonstrate storage of 11 temporal modes. These results represent an important step towards the realization of complex quantum networks architectures using solid-state resources.

  18. Quantum entanglement between an optical photon and a solid-state spin qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togan, E; Chu, Y; Trifonov, A S; Jiang, L; Maze, J; Childress, L; Dutt, M V G; Sørensen, A S; Hemmer, P R; Zibrov, A S; Lukin, M D

    2010-08-01

    Quantum entanglement is among the most fascinating aspects of quantum theory. Entangled optical photons are now widely used for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and applications such as quantum cryptography. Several recent experiments demonstrated entanglement of optical photons with trapped ions, atoms and atomic ensembles, which are then used to connect remote long-term memory nodes in distributed quantum networks. Here we realize quantum entanglement between the polarization of a single optical photon and a solid-state qubit associated with the single electronic spin of a nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. Our experimental entanglement verification uses the quantum eraser technique, and demonstrates that a high degree of control over interactions between a solid-state qubit and the quantum light field can be achieved. The reported entanglement source can be used in studies of fundamental quantum phenomena and provides a key building block for the solid-state realization of quantum optical networks.

  19. Ultrafast Quantum Control and Quantum Processing in the Vibronic States of Molecules and Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Benjamin; Bustard, Philip; England, Duncan; Lausten, Rune

    2014-05-01

    The unusual features of quantum mechanics are enabling the development of technologies not possible with classical physics, including applications in secure communications, quantum processing, and enhanced measurement. Efforts to build these devices utilize nonclassical states in numerous quantum systems, including cavity quantum electrodynamics, trap ions, nuclear spins, etc. as the basis for many prototypes. Here we investigate vibronic states in both molecules and bulk solids as distinct alternatives. We demonstrate a memory for light based on storing photons in the vibrations of hydrogen molecules and the optical phonons of diamond. Both classical and nonclassical photon states are used. These THz-bandwidth memories can be used to store femtosecond pulses for many operational time bins before the states decohere, making them viable for local photonic processing. We investigate decoherence and major sources of competing noise. While sustaining quantum coherence is critical for most quantum processing, rapid dephasing can also be used as a resource in these systems for rapid quantum random number generation, suitable for high-performance cryptography. NSERC

  20. Electronically Active Impurities in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Carey, Graham H.

    2014-11-25

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Colloidal quantum dot films have seen rapid progress as active materials in photodetection, light emission, and photovoltaics. Their processing from the solution phase makes them an attractive option for these applications due to the expected cost reductions associated with liquid-phase material deposition. Colloidally stable nanoparticles capped using long, insulating aliphatic ligands are used to form semiconducting, insoluble films via a solid-state ligand exchange in which the original ligands are replaced with short bifunctional ligands. Here we show that this ligand exchange can have unintended and undesired side effects: a high molecular weight complex can form, containing both lead oleate and the shorter conductive ligand, and this poorly soluble complex can end up embedded within the colloidal quantum dot (CQD) active layer. We further show that, by adding an acidic treatment during film processing, we can break up and wash away these complexes, producing a higher quality CQD solid. The improved material leads to photovoltaic devices with reduced series resistance and enhanced fill factor relative to controls employing previously reported CQD solids. (Figure Presented).

  1. Quantum Correlations between Single Telecom Photons and a Multimode On-Demand Solid-State Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seri, Alessandro; Lenhard, Andreas; Rieländer, Daniel; Gündoǧan, Mustafa; Ledingham, Patrick M.; Mazzera, Margherita; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2017-04-01

    Quantum correlations between long-lived quantum memories and telecom photons that can propagate with low loss in optical fibers are an essential resource for the realization of large-scale quantum information networks. Significant progress has been realized in this direction with atomic and solid-state systems. Here, we demonstrate quantum correlations between a telecom photon and a multimode on-demand solid state quantum memory. This is achieved by mapping a correlated single photon onto a spin collective excitation in a Pr3 +:Y2SiO5 crystal for a controllable time. The stored single photons are generated by cavity-enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion and heralded by their partner photons at telecom wavelength. These results represent the first demonstration of a multimode on-demand solid state quantum memory for external quantum states of light. They provide an important resource for quantum repeaters and pave the way for the implementation of quantum information networks with distant solid state quantum nodes.

  2. Tunable quantum beam splitters for coherent manipulation of a solid-state tripartite qubit system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guozhu; Wen, Xueda; Mao, Bo; Chen, Jian; Yu, Yang; Wu, Peiheng; Han, Siyuan

    2010-01-01

    Coherent control of quantum states is at the heart of implementing solid-state quantum processors and testing quantum mechanics at the macroscopic level. Despite significant progress made in recent years in controlling single- and bi-partite quantum systems, coherent control of quantum wave function in multipartite systems involving artificial solid-state qubits has been hampered due to the relatively short decoherence time and lack of precise control methods. Here we report the creation and coherent manipulation of quantum states in a tripartite quantum system, which is formed by a superconducting qubit coupled to two microscopic two-level systems (TLSs). The avoided crossings in the system's energy-level spectrum due to the qubit–TLS interaction act as tunable quantum beam splitters of wave functions. Our result shows that the Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference has great potential in precise control of the quantum states in the tripartite system. PMID:20975719

  3. Microwave spectroscopic observation of distinct electron solid phases in wide quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatke, A T; Liu, Yang; Magill, B A; Moon, B H; Engel, L W; Shayegan, M; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Baldwin, K W

    2014-06-20

    In high magnetic fields, two-dimensional electron systems can form a number of phases in which interelectron repulsion plays the central role, since the kinetic energy is frozen out by Landau quantization. These phases include the well-known liquids of the fractional quantum Hall effect, as well as solid phases with broken spatial symmetry and crystalline order. Solids can occur at the low Landau-filling termination of the fractional quantum Hall effect series but also within integer quantum Hall effects. Here we present microwave spectroscopy studies of wide quantum wells that clearly reveal two distinct solid phases, hidden within what in d.c. transport would be the zero diagonal conductivity of an integer quantum-Hall-effect state. Explanation of these solids is not possible with the simple picture of a Wigner solid of ordinary (quasi) electrons or holes.

  4. Quantum Error Correction and the Future of Solid State Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divincenzo, David

    Quantum error correction (QEC) theory has provided a very challenging but well defined goal for the further development of solid state qubit systems: achieve high enough fidelity so that fault-tolerant, error-corrected quantum computation in networks of these qubits becomes possible. I will begin by touching on some historical points: initial work on QEC is actually more than 20 years old, and the landmark work of Kitaev in 1996 which established 2D lattice structures as a suitable host for effective error correction, has its roots in theoretical work in many-body theory from Wegner in the 1970s. I will give some perspective on current developments in the implementation of small fragments of the surface code. The surface-code concept has driven a number of distinct requirements, beyond the reduction of error rates below the 1% range, that are actively considered as experiments are scaled beyond the 10-qubit level. Support of JARA FIT is acknolwedged.

  5. Demonstration of sufficient control for two rounds of quantum error correction in a solid state ensemble quantum information processor

    CERN Document Server

    Moussa, Osama; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    We report the implementation of a 3-qubit quantum error correction code (QECC) on a quantum information processor realized by the magnetic resonance of Carbon nuclei in a single crystal of Malonic Acid. The code corrects for phase errors induced on the qubits due to imperfect decoupling of the magnetic environment represented by nearby spins, as well as unwanted evolution under the internal Hamiltonian. We also experimentally demonstrate sufficiently high fidelity control to implement two rounds of quantum error correction. This is a demonstration of state-of-the-art control in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, a leading test-bed for the implementation of quantum algorithms.

  6. Demonstration of sufficient control for two rounds of quantum error correction in a solid state ensemble quantum information processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Osama; Baugh, Jonathan; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-10-14

    We report the implementation of a 3-qubit quantum error-correction code on a quantum information processor realized by the magnetic resonance of carbon nuclei in a single crystal of malonic acid. The code corrects for phase errors induced on the qubits due to imperfect decoupling of the magnetic environment represented by nearby spins, as well as unwanted evolution under the internal Hamiltonian. We also experimentally demonstrate sufficiently high-fidelity control to implement two rounds of quantum error correction. This is a demonstration of state-of-the-art control in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, a leading test bed for the implementation of quantum algorithms.

  7. Experimental realization of universal geometric quantum gates with solid-state spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, C; Wang, W-B; He, L; Zhang, W-G; Dai, C-Y; Wang, F; Duan, L-M

    2014-10-02

    Experimental realization of a universal set of quantum logic gates is the central requirement for the implementation of a quantum computer. In an 'all-geometric' approach to quantum computation, the quantum gates are implemented using Berry phases and their non-Abelian extensions, holonomies, from geometric transformation of quantum states in the Hilbert space. Apart from its fundamental interest and rich mathematical structure, the geometric approach has some built-in noise-resilience features. On the experimental side, geometric phases and holonomies have been observed in thermal ensembles of liquid molecules using nuclear magnetic resonance; however, such systems are known to be non-scalable for the purposes of quantum computing. There are proposals to implement geometric quantum computation in scalable experimental platforms such as trapped ions, superconducting quantum bits and quantum dots, and a recent experiment has realized geometric single-bit gates in a superconducting system. Here we report the experimental realization of a universal set of geometric quantum gates using the solid-state spins of diamond nitrogen-vacancy centres. These diamond defects provide a scalable experimental platform with the potential for room-temperature quantum computing, which has attracted strong interest in recent years. Our experiment shows that all-geometric and potentially robust quantum computation can be realized with solid-state spin quantum bits, making use of recent advances in the coherent control of this system.

  8. Ultranarrow-band photon-pair source compatible with solid state quantum memories and telecommunication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Julia; Rieländer, Daniel; Cristiani, Matteo; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2013-05-31

    We report on a source of ultranarrow-band photon pairs generated by widely nondegenerate cavity-enhanced spontaneous down-conversion. The source is designed to be compatible with Pr(3+) solid state quantum memories and telecommunication optical fibers, with signal and idler photons close to 606 nm and 1436 nm, respectively. Both photons have a spectral bandwidth around 2 MHz, matching the bandwidth of Pr(3+) doped quantum memories. This source is ideally suited for long distance quantum communication architectures involving solid state quantum memories.

  9. Quantum dots enabled LCD displays and solid-state lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wengang; Xu, Shu; Geng, Chong; Zhao, Fei; Jiang, Xiaofang

    2016-09-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) with unique properties have evolved to be a key player in the next generation display and lighting applications. Followed by studies on the optimization of QD nanomaterials with low self-absorption properties, we analyze and identify the key parameters of the QDs that impact the color gamut and energy efficiency features of LCD displays using QD-enabled LED backlights, which consist of red and green QDs as well as blue LEDs that act as pumping sources. It is found that both the full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the emission peak positions of the green and the red QDs affect the color gamut. A narrower FWHM for both color QDs is preferred to achieve a wider color gamut while a combination of green QDs with shorter wavelength and red QDs with longer wavelength within the studied wavelength range (520 nm to 540 nm for the green and 610 nm to 635 nm for the red) is also desired. Nevertheless, QD-enabled LED backlight with a combination of longer-wavelength green QDs and shorter-wavelength red QDs is more energy efficient than the reverse case. Therefore, one needs balance these two key factors based on the targeted display performance requirements. On the solid-state lighting application side with QDs, we propose and show a QD-enabled LED light engine architecture that is more energy efficient with high light quality.

  10. Experimental Adiabatic Quantum Factorization under Ambient Conditions Based on a Solid-State Single Spin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kebiao; Xie, Tianyu; Li, Zhaokai; Xu, Xiangkun; Wang, Mengqi; Ye, Xiangyu; Kong, Fei; Geng, Jianpei; Duan, Changkui; Shi, Fazhan; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-03-31

    The adiabatic quantum computation is a universal and robust method of quantum computing. In this architecture, the problem can be solved by adiabatically evolving the quantum processor from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to that of a final one, which encodes the solution of the problem. Adiabatic quantum computation has been proved to be a compatible candidate for scalable quantum computation. In this Letter, we report on the experimental realization of an adiabatic quantum algorithm on a single solid spin system under ambient conditions. All elements of adiabatic quantum computation, including initial state preparation, adiabatic evolution (simulated by optimal control), and final state read-out, are realized experimentally. As an example, we found the ground state of the problem Hamiltonian S_{z}I_{z} on our adiabatic quantum processor, which can be mapped to the factorization of 35 into its prime factors 5 and 7.

  11. Reducing charge trapping in PbS colloidal quantum dot solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balazs, D. M.; Nugraha, M. I.; Bisri, S. Z.; Sytnyk, M.; Heiss, W.; Loi, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and improving charge transport in colloidal quantum dot solids is crucial for the development of efficient solar cells based on these materials. In this paper, we report high performance field-effect transistors based on lead-sulfide colloidal quantum dots (PbS CQDs) crosslinked with 3

  12. Decoherence-protected quantum gates for a hybrid solid-state spin register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sar, T; Wang, Z H; Blok, M S; Bernien, H; Taminiau, T H; Toyli, D M; Lidar, D A; Awschalom, D D; Hanson, R; Dobrovitski, V V

    2012-04-04

    Protecting the dynamics of coupled quantum systems from decoherence by the environment is a key challenge for solid-state quantum information processing. An idle quantum bit (qubit) can be efficiently insulated from the outside world by dynamical decoupling, as has recently been demonstrated for individual solid-state qubits. However, protecting qubit coherence during a multi-qubit gate is a non-trivial problem: in general, the decoupling disrupts the interqubit dynamics and hence conflicts with gate operation. This problem is particularly salient for hybrid systems, in which different types of qubit evolve and decohere at very different rates. Here we present the integration of dynamical decoupling into quantum gates for a standard hybrid system, the electron-nuclear spin register. Our design harnesses the internal resonance in the coupled-spin system to resolve the conflict between gate operation and decoupling. We experimentally demonstrate these gates using a two-qubit register in diamond operating at room temperature. Quantum tomography reveals that the qubits involved in the gate operation are protected as accurately as idle qubits. We also perform Grover's quantum search algorithm, and achieve fidelities of more than 90% even though the algorithm run-time exceeds the electron spin dephasing time by two orders of magnitude. Our results directly allow decoherence-protected interface gates between different types of solid-state qubit. Ultimately, quantum gates with integrated decoupling may reach the accuracy threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing with solid-state devices.

  13. Impact of Different Surface Ligands on the Optical Properties of PbS Quantum Dot Solids

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Xu; Luis Felipe Gerlein; Xin Ma; Chelsea R. Haughn; Doty, Matthew F.; Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    The engineering of quantum dot solids with low defect concentrations and efficient carrier transport through a ligand strategy is crucial to achieve efficient quantum dot (QD) optoelectronic devices. Here, we study the consequences of various surface ligand treatments on the light emission properties of PbS quantum dot films using 1,3-benzenedithiol (1,3-BDT), 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT), mercaptocarboxylic acids (MPA) and ammonium sulfide ((NH4)2S). We first investigate the influence of differen...

  14. Optimized multiple quantum MAS lineshape simulations in solid state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, William J.; Davis, Michael C.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2009-10-01

    The majority of nuclei available for study in solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance have half-integer spin I>1/2, with corresponding electric quadrupole moment. As such, they may couple with a surrounding electric field gradient. This effect introduces anisotropic line broadening to spectra, arising from distinct chemical species within polycrystalline solids. In Multiple Quantum Magic Angle Spinning (MQMAS) experiments, a second frequency dimension is created, devoid of quadrupolar anisotropy. As a result, the center of gravity of peaks in the high resolution dimension is a function of isotropic second order quadrupole and chemical shift alone. However, for complex materials, these parameters take on a stochastic nature due in turn to structural and chemical disorder. Lineshapes may still overlap in the isotropic dimension, complicating the task of assignment and interpretation. A distributed computational approach is presented here which permits simulation of the two-dimensional MQMAS spectrum, generated by random variates from model distributions of isotropic chemical and quadrupole shifts. Owing to the non-convex nature of the residual sum of squares (RSS) function between experimental and simulated spectra, simulated annealing is used to optimize the simulation parameters. In this manner, local chemical environments for disordered materials may be characterized, and via a re-sampling approach, error estimates for parameters produced. Program summaryProgram title: mqmasOPT Catalogue identifier: AEEC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3650 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 73 853 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C, OCTAVE Computer: UNIX

  15. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in quantum optical and solid state systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Florentin

    Quantum mechanics is an immensely successful theory which is essential for the explanation of numerous phenomena in atomic physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and elementary particle physics. Quantum theory also involves effects which have no analogy in the classical world. In particular...... superconducting qubits in a circuit QED setup. Combining resonator photon loss, a dissipative process already present in the setup, with an effective two-photon microwave drive, we engineer an effective decay mechanism which prepares a maximally entangled state of two qubits. We find that high fidelities......, quantum entanglement is a correlation predicted by quantum mechanics, but not by classical physics. As an observable property it is indispensable for our understanding of nature. In addition, entangled states are important in quantum computation, quantum communication and quantum measurement protocols...

  16. Solid state multi-ensemble quantum computer in waveguide circuit model

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, Sergey A; Gubaidullin, Firdus F

    2010-01-01

    The first realization of solid state quantum computer was demonstrated recently by using artificial atoms -- transmons in superconducting resonator. Here, we propose a novel architecture of flexible and scalable quantum computer based on a waveguide circuit coupling many quantum nodes of controlled atomic ensembles. For the first time, we found the optimal practically attainable parameters of the atoms and circuit for 100{%} efficiency of quantum memory for multi qubit photon fields and confirmed experimentally the predicted perfect storage. Then we revealed self modes for reversible transfer of qubits between the quantum memory node and arbitrary other nodes. We found a realization of iSWAP gate via direct coupling of two arbitrary nodes with a processing rate accelerated proportionally to number of atoms in the node. A large number of the two-qubit gates can be simultaneously realized in the circuit for implementation of parallel quantum processing. Dynamic coherent elimination procedure of excess quantum s...

  17. Photogeneration Diffusion and Decay of Charge Carriers in Quantum-Dot Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), which can have a variety of sizes, shapes and chemical compositions, will be a large and important family of future advanced materials.This thesis focuses on colloidal semiconductor NC solids, also called quantum-dot (QD) solids, which are promising materials for

  18. Emulating weak localization using a solid-state quantum circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Neill, C; Lucero, Erik; Mariantoni, Matteo; Barends, R; Chiaro, B; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; O'Malley, P J J; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Yin, Yi; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2014-10-14

    Quantum interference is one of the most fundamental physical effects found in nature. Recent advances in quantum computing now employ interference as a fundamental resource for computation and control. Quantum interference also lies at the heart of sophisticated condensed matter phenomena such as Anderson localization, phenomena that are difficult to reproduce in numerical simulations. Here, employing a multiple-element superconducting quantum circuit, with which we manipulate a single microwave photon, we demonstrate that we can emulate the basic effects of weak localization. By engineering the control sequence, we are able to reproduce the well-known negative magnetoresistance of weak localization as well as its temperature dependence. Furthermore, we can use our circuit to continuously tune the level of disorder, a parameter that is not readily accessible in mesoscopic systems. Demonstrating a high level of control, our experiment shows the potential for employing superconducting quantum circuits as emulators for complex quantum phenomena.

  19. A quantum phase switch between a single solid-state spin and a photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuo; Kim, Hyochul; Solomon, Glenn S.; Waks, Edo

    2016-06-01

    Interactions between single spins and photons are essential for quantum networks and distributed quantum computation. Achieving spin-photon interactions in a solid-state device could enable compact chip-integrated quantum circuits operating at gigahertz bandwidths. Many theoretical works have suggested using spins embedded in nanophotonic structures to attain this high-speed interface. These proposals implement a quantum switch where the spin flips the state of the photon and a photon flips the spin state. However, such a switch has not yet been realized using a solid-state spin system. Here, we report an experimental realization of a spin-photon quantum switch using a single solid-state spin embedded in a nanophotonic cavity. We show that the spin state strongly modulates the polarization of a reflected photon, and a single reflected photon coherently rotates the spin state. These strong spin-photon interactions open up a promising direction for solid-state implementations of high-speed quantum networks and on-chip quantum information processors using nanophotonic devices.

  20. A quantum phase switch between a single solid-state spin and a photon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuo; Kim, Hyochul; Solomon, Glenn S; Waks, Edo

    2016-06-01

    Interactions between single spins and photons are essential for quantum networks and distributed quantum computation. Achieving spin-photon interactions in a solid-state device could enable compact chip-integrated quantum circuits operating at gigahertz bandwidths. Many theoretical works have suggested using spins embedded in nanophotonic structures to attain this high-speed interface. These proposals implement a quantum switch where the spin flips the state of the photon and a photon flips the spin state. However, such a switch has not yet been realized using a solid-state spin system. Here, we report an experimental realization of a spin-photon quantum switch using a single solid-state spin embedded in a nanophotonic cavity. We show that the spin state strongly modulates the polarization of a reflected photon, and a single reflected photon coherently rotates the spin state. These strong spin-photon interactions open up a promising direction for solid-state implementations of high-speed quantum networks and on-chip quantum information processors using nanophotonic devices.

  1. Scalable quantum register based on coupled electron spins in a room temperature solid

    CERN Document Server

    Neumann, P; Naydenov, B; Beck, J; Rempp, F; Steiner, M; Jacques, V; Balasubramanian, G; Markham, M L; Twitchen, D J; Pezzagna, S; Meijer, J; Twamley, J; Jelezko, F; Wrachtrup, J; 10.1038/nphys1536

    2010-01-01

    Realization of devices based on quantum laws might lead to building processors that outperform their classical analogues and establishing unconditionally secure communication protocols. Solids do usually present a serious challenge to quantum coherence. However, owing to their spin-free lattice and low spin orbit coupling, carbon materials and particularly diamond are suitable for hosting robust solid state quantum registers. We show that scalable quantum logic elements can be realized by exploring long range magnetic dipolar coupling between individually addressable single electron spins associated with separate color centers in diamond. Strong distance dependence of coupling was used to characterize the separation of single qubits 98 A with unprecedented accuracy (3 A) close to a crystal lattice spacing. Our demonstration of coherent control over both electron spins, conditional dynamics, selective readout as well as switchable interaction, opens the way towards a room temperature solid state scalable quant...

  2. Storage of multiple single-photon pulses emitted from a quantum dot in a solid-state quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Jian-Shun; Wang, Yi-Tao; Li, Yu-Long; Liu, Xiao; Hua, Yi-Lin; Zou, Yang; Wang, Shuang; He, De-Yong; Chen, Geng; Sun, Yong-Nan; Yu, Ying; Li, Mi-Feng; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeaters are critical components for distributing entanglement over long distances in presence of unavoidable optical losses during transmission. Stimulated by Duan-Lukin-Cirac-Zoller protocol, many improved quantum-repeater protocols based on quantum memories have been proposed, which commonly focus on the entanglement-distribution rate. Among these protocols, the elimination of multi-photons (multi-photon-pairs) and the use of multimode quantum memory are demonstrated to have the ability to greatly improve the entanglement-distribution rate. Here, we demonstrate the storage of deterministic single photons emitted from a quantum dot in a polarization-maintaining solid-state quantum memory; in addition, multi-temporal-mode memory with $1$, $20$ and $100$ narrow single-photon pulses is also demonstrated. Multi-photons are eliminated, and only one photon at most is contained in each pulse. Moreover, the solid-state properties of both sub-systems make this configuration more stable and easier to be scal...

  3. Quantum error correction in a solid-state hybrid spin register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldherr, G; Wang, Y; Zaiser, S; Jamali, M; Schulte-Herbrüggen, T; Abe, H; Ohshima, T; Isoya, J; Du, J F; Neumann, P; Wrachtrup, J

    2014-02-13

    Error correction is important in classical and quantum computation. Decoherence caused by the inevitable interaction of quantum bits with their environment leads to dephasing or even relaxation. Correction of the concomitant errors is therefore a fundamental requirement for scalable quantum computation. Although algorithms for error correction have been known for some time, experimental realizations are scarce. Here we show quantum error correction in a heterogeneous, solid-state spin system. We demonstrate that joint initialization, projective readout and fast local and non-local gate operations can all be achieved in diamond spin systems, even under ambient conditions. High-fidelity initialization of a whole spin register (99 per cent) and single-shot readout of multiple individual nuclear spins are achieved by using the ancillary electron spin of a nitrogen-vacancy defect. Implementation of a novel non-local gate generic to our electron-nuclear quantum register allows the preparation of entangled states of three nuclear spins, with fidelities exceeding 85 per cent. With these techniques, we demonstrate three-qubit phase-flip error correction. Using optimal control, all of the above operations achieve fidelities approaching those needed for fault-tolerant quantum operation, thus paving the way to large-scale quantum computation. Besides their use with diamond spin systems, our techniques can be used to improve scaling of quantum networks relying on phosphorus in silicon, quantum dots, silicon carbide or rare-earth ions in solids.

  4. Entanglement distillation between solid-state quantum network nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalb, N.; Reiserer, A. A.; Humphreys, P. C.; Bakermans, J. J. W.; Kamerling, S. J.; Nickerson, N. H.; Benjamin, S. C.; Twitchen, D. J.; Markham, M.; Hanson, R.

    2017-06-01

    The impact of future quantum networks hinges on high-quality quantum entanglement shared between network nodes. Unavoidable imperfections necessitate a means to improve remote entanglement by local quantum operations. We realize entanglement distillation on a quantum network primitive of distant electron-nuclear two-qubit nodes. The heralded generation of two copies of a remote entangled state is demonstrated through single-photon-mediated entangling of the electrons and robust storage in the nuclear spins. After applying local two-qubit gates, single-shot measurements herald the distillation of an entangled state with increased fidelity that is available for further use. The key combination of generating, storing, and processing entangled states should enable the exploration of multiparticle entanglement on an extended quantum network.

  5. Spin-orbit coupled molecular quantum magnetism realized in inorganic solid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Youn; Do, S-H; Choi, K-Y; Kang, J-H; Jang, Dongjin; Schmidt, B; Brando, Manuel; Kim, B-H; Kim, D-H; Butch, N P; Lee, Seongsu; Park, J-H; Ji, Sungdae

    2016-09-21

    Molecular quantum magnetism involving an isolated spin state is of particular interest due to the characteristic quantum phenomena underlying spin qubits or molecular spintronics for quantum information devices, as demonstrated in magnetic metal-organic molecular systems, the so-called molecular magnets. Here we report the molecular quantum magnetism realized in an inorganic solid Ba3Yb2Zn5O11 with spin-orbit coupled pseudospin-½ Yb(3+) ions. The magnetization represents the magnetic quantum values of an isolated Yb4 tetrahedron with a total (pseudo)spin 0, 1 and 2. Inelastic neutron scattering results reveal that a large Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction originating from strong spin-orbit coupling of Yb 4f is a key ingredient to explain magnetic excitations of the molecular magnet states. The Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction allows a non-adiabatic quantum transition between avoided crossing energy levels, and also results in unexpected magnetic behaviours in conventional molecular magnets.

  6. Spin–orbit coupled molecular quantum magnetism realized in inorganic solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Youn; Do, S.-H.; Choi, K.-Y.; Kang, J.-H.; Jang, Dongjin; Schmidt, B.; Brando, Manuel; Kim, B.-H.; Kim, D.-H.; Butch, N. P.; Lee, Seongsu; Park, J.-H.; Ji, Sungdae

    2016-01-01

    Molecular quantum magnetism involving an isolated spin state is of particular interest due to the characteristic quantum phenomena underlying spin qubits or molecular spintronics for quantum information devices, as demonstrated in magnetic metal–organic molecular systems, the so-called molecular magnets. Here we report the molecular quantum magnetism realized in an inorganic solid Ba3Yb2Zn5O11 with spin–orbit coupled pseudospin-½ Yb3+ ions. The magnetization represents the magnetic quantum values of an isolated Yb4 tetrahedron with a total (pseudo)spin 0, 1 and 2. Inelastic neutron scattering results reveal that a large Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction originating from strong spin–orbit coupling of Yb 4f is a key ingredient to explain magnetic excitations of the molecular magnet states. The Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction allows a non-adiabatic quantum transition between avoided crossing energy levels, and also results in unexpected magnetic behaviours in conventional molecular magnets. PMID:27650796

  7. Quantum dot doped solid polymer electrolyte for device application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Pramod K.; Kim, Kang Wook; Rhee, Hee-Woo [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Sogang University, Mapo-Gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea)

    2009-06-15

    ZnS capped CdSe quantum dots embedded in PEO:KI:I{sub 2} polymer electrolyte matrix have been synthesized and characterized for dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) application. The complex impedance spectroscopy shows enhance in ionic conductivity ({sigma}) due to charges provide by quantum dots (QD) while AFM affirm the uniform distribution of QD into polymer electrolyte matrix. Cyclic voltammetry revealed the possible interaction between polymer electrolyte, QD and iodide/iodine. The photovoltaic performances of the DSSC containing quantum dots doped polymer electrolyte was also found to improve. (author)

  8. Microwave spectroscopic observation of a Wigner solid within the ν =1 /2 fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatke, A. T.; Liu, Yang; Engel, L. W.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the microwave spectra of a wide quantum well for Landau level fillings, ν , just below 1/2, under conditions where the ν =1 /2 fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) is present. One resonance in the spectra exhibits intensity variations with ν in striking agreement with that expected for a pinning mode of a Wigner solid of quasiholes of this FQHE state. This resonance is also quite sensitive to asymmetrization of the growth-direction charge distribution in the quantum well by gate bias. Another resonance in the spectra is associated with a different bilayer Wigner solid that also exists at much lower ν than the 1/2 FQHE, and that appears to coexist with the 1/2 quasihole solid.

  9. Field-emission from quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Gong, Xiwen; Sabatini, Randy P.; Liu, Min; Kim, Gi-Hwan; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Xu, Jixian; Pang, Yuangjie; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sinton, David; Sargent, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Quantum dot and well architectures are attractive for infrared optoelectronics, and have led to the realization of compelling light sensors. However, they require well-defined passivated interfaces and rapid charge transport, and this has restricted their efficient implementation to costly vacuum-epitaxially grown semiconductors. Here we report solution-processed, sensitive infrared field-emission photodetectors. Using quantum-dots-in-perovskite, we demonstrate the extraction of photocarriers via field emission, followed by the recirculation of photogenerated carriers. We use in operando ultrafast transient spectroscopy to sense bias-dependent photoemission and recapture in field-emission devices. The resultant photodiodes exploit the superior electronic transport properties of organometal halide perovskites, the quantum-size-tuned absorption of the colloidal quantum dots and their matched interface. These field-emission quantum-dot-in-perovskite photodiodes extend the perovskite response into the short-wavelength infrared and achieve measured specific detectivities that exceed 1012 Jones. The results pave the way towards novel functional photonic devices with applications in photovoltaics and light emission.

  10. Joint Mapping of Mobility and Trap Density in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Stadler, Philipp

    2013-07-23

    Field-effect transistors have been widely used to study electronic transport and doping in colloidal quantum dot solids to great effect. However, the full power of these devices to elucidate the electronic structure of materials has yet to be harnessed. Here, we deploy nanodielectric field-effect transistors to map the energy landscape within the band gap of a colloidal quantum dot solid. We exploit the self-limiting nature of the potentiostatic anodization growth mode to produce the thinnest usable gate dielectric, subject to our voltage breakdown requirements defined by the Fermi sweep range of interest. Lead sulfide colloidal quantum dots are applied as the active region and are treated with varying solvents and ligands. In an analysis complementary to the mobility trends commonly extracted from field-effect transistor studies, we focus instead on the subthreshold regime and map out the density of trap states in these nanocrystal films. The findings point to the importance of comprehensively mapping the electronic band- and gap-structure within real quantum solids, and they suggest a new focus in investigating quantum dot solids with an aim toward improving optoelectronic device performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  11. A Surface Chemistry Approach to Enhancing Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Graham Hamilton

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices have improved rapidly over the past decade of research. By taking advantage of the quantum confinement effect, solar cells constructed using films of infrared-bandgap nanoparticles are able to capture previously untapped ranges of the solar energy spectrum. Additionally, films are fabricated using simple, cheap, reproducible solution processing techniques, enabling the creation of low-cost, flexible photovoltaic devices. A key factor limiting the creation of high efficiency CQD solar cells is the short charge carrier diffusion length in films. Driven by a combination of limited carrier mobility, poor nanoparticle surface passivation, and the presence of unexamined electrically active impurities throughout the film, the poor diffusion length limits the active layer thickness in CQD solar cells, leading to lower-than-desired light absorption, and curtailing the photocurrent generated by such devices. This thesis seeks to address poor diffusion length by addressing each of the limiting factors in turn. Electrical transport in quantum dot solids is examined in the context of improved quantum dot packing; methods are developed to improve packing by using actively densifying components, or by dramatically lowering the volume change required between quantum dots in solution and in solid state. Quantum dot surface passivation is improved by introducing a crucial secondary, small halide ligand source, and by surveying the impact of the processing environment on the final quality of the quantum dot surface. A heretofore unidentified impurity present in quantum dot solids is identified, characterized, and chemically eliminated. Finally, lessons learned through these experiments are combined into a single, novel materials system, leading to quantum dot devices with a significantly improved diffusion length (enhanced from 70 to 230 nm). This enabled thick, high current density (30 mA cm -2, compared to typical values in the 20

  12. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Mingjian

    2016-02-29

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  13. Colloidal quantum dot solids for solution-processed solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mingjian; Liu, Mengxia; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-03-01

    Solution-processed photovoltaic technologies represent a promising way to reduce the cost and increase the efficiency of solar energy harvesting. Among these, colloidal semiconductor quantum dot photovoltaics have the advantage of a spectrally tuneable infrared bandgap, which enables use in multi-junction cells, as well as the benefit of generating and harvesting multiple charge carrier pairs per absorbed photon. Here we review recent progress in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics, focusing on three fronts. First, we examine strategies to manage the abundant surfaces of quantum dots, strategies that have led to progress in the removal of electronic trap states. Second, we consider new device architectures that have improved device performance to certified efficiencies of 10.6%. Third, we focus on progress in solution-phase chemical processing, such as spray-coating and centrifugal casting, which has led to the demonstration of manufacturing-ready process technologies.

  14. Charge transport and localization in atomically coherent quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Savitzky, Benjamin H.; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias

    2016-05-01

    Epitaxial attachment of quantum dots into ordered superlattices enables the synthesis of quasi-two-dimensional materials that theoretically exhibit features such as Dirac cones and topological states, and have major potential for unprecedented optoelectronic devices. Initial studies found that disorder in these structures causes localization of electrons within a few lattice constants, and highlight the critical need for precise structural characterization and systematic assessment of the effects of disorder on transport. Here we fabricated superlattices with the quantum dots registered to within a single atomic bond length (limited by the polydispersity of the quantum dot building blocks), but missing a fraction (20%) of the epitaxial connections. Calculations of the electronic structure including the measured disorder account for the electron localization inferred from transport measurements. The calculations also show that improvement of the epitaxial connections will lead to completely delocalized electrons and may enable the observation of the remarkable properties predicted for these materials.

  15. Scalable architecture for a room temperature solid-state quantum information processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N Y; Jiang, L; Gorshkov, A V; Maurer, P C; Giedke, G; Cirac, J I; Lukin, M D

    2012-04-24

    The realization of a scalable quantum information processor has emerged over the past decade as one of the central challenges at the interface of fundamental science and engineering. Here we propose and analyse an architecture for a scalable, solid-state quantum information processor capable of operating at room temperature. Our approach is based on recent experimental advances involving nitrogen-vacancy colour centres in diamond. In particular, we demonstrate that the multiple challenges associated with operation at ambient temperature, individual addressing at the nanoscale, strong qubit coupling, robustness against disorder and low decoherence rates can be simultaneously achieved under realistic, experimentally relevant conditions. The architecture uses a novel approach to quantum information transfer and includes a hierarchy of control at successive length scales. Moreover, it alleviates the stringent constraints currently limiting the realization of scalable quantum processors and will provide fundamental insights into the physics of non-equilibrium many-body quantum systems.

  16. Charge Carrier Hopping Dynamics in Homogeneously Broadened PbS Quantum Dot Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Rachel H; Lee, Elizabeth M Y; Weidman, Mark C; Willard, Adam P; Tisdale, William A

    2017-02-08

    Energetic disorder in quantum dot solids adversely impacts charge carrier transport in quantum dot solar cells and electronic devices. Here, we use ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy to show that homogeneously broadened PbS quantum dot arrays (σhom(2):σinh(2) > 19:1, σinh/kBT quantum dot batches are sufficiently monodisperse (δ ≲ 3.3%). The homogeneous line width is found to be an inverse function of quantum dot size, monotonically increasing from ∼25 meV for the largest quantum dots (5.8 nm diameter/0.92 eV energy) to ∼55 meV for the smallest (4.1 nm/1.3 eV energy). Furthermore, we show that intrinsic charge carrier hopping rates are faster for smaller quantum dots. This finding is the opposite of the mobility trend commonly observed in device measurements but is consistent with theoretical predictions. Fitting our data to a kinetic Monte Carlo model, we extract charge carrier hopping times ranging from 80 ps for the smallest quantum dots to over 1 ns for the largest, with the same ethanethiol ligand treatment. Additionally, we make the surprising observation that, in slightly polydisperse (δ ≲ 4%) quantum dot solids, structural disorder has a greater impact than energetic disorder in inhibiting charge carrier transport. These findings emphasize how small improvements in batch size dispersity can have a dramatic impact on intrinsic charge carrier hopping behavior and will stimulate further improvements in quantum dot device performance.

  17. Third emission mechanism in solid-state nanocavity quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Makoto; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2012-09-01

    Photonic crystal (PC) nanocavities have been receiving a great deal of attention recently because of their ability to strongly confine photons in a tiny space with a high quality factor. According to cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED), such confined photons can achieve efficient interactions with excitons in semiconductors, leading to the Purcell effect in the weak coupling regime and vacuum Rabi splitting (VRS) in the strong coupling regime. These features are promising for applications such as quantum information processing, highly efficient single photon sources and ultra-low threshold lasers. In this context, the coupled system of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) and a PC nanocavity has been intensively investigated in recent years.Although experimental reports have demonstrated such fundamental features, two anomalous phenomena have also been observed. First, photon emission from the cavity occurs even when it is significantly detuned from the QD. Second, spectral triplets are formed by additional bare-cavity lines between the VRS lines. These features cannot be explained by standard cavity QED theories and have prompted controversy regarding their physical mechanisms. In this review we describe the recent experimental and theoretical progress made in the investigation of these phenomena. Similar mechanisms will also occur in many other coupled quantum systems, and thus the findings are applicable to a wide range of fields.

  18. Some double resonance and multiple quantum NMR studies in solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemmer, D.E.

    1978-08-01

    The first section of this work presents the theory and experimental applications to analysis of molecular motion of chemical shielding lineshapes obtained with high resolution double resonance NMR techniques. Analysis of /sup 13/C powder lineshapes in hexamethylbenzene (HMB) and decamethylferrocene (DMFe) show that these molecules reorient in a jumping manner about the symmetry axis. Analysis of proton chemical shielding lineshapes of residual protons in heavy ice (D/sub 2/O) show that protons are exchanged among the tetrahedral positions of neighboring oxygen atoms, consistent with motion expected from defect migration. The second section describes the application of Fourier Transform Double Quantum NMR to measurement of chemical shielding of deuterium in powder samples. Studies of partially deuterated benzene and ferrocene give equal shielding anisotropies, ..delta..sigma = -6.5 ppM. Theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of dipolar couplings between deuterons using FTDQ NMR are presented. Crystals of BaClO/sub 3/.D/sub 2/O, ..cap alpha..,..beta.. d-2 HMB and ..cap alpha..,..beta..,..gamma.. d-3 HMB were studied, as were powders of d-2 HMB and anisic acid. The third section discusses general multiple quantum spectroscopy in dipolar coupled spin systems. Theoretical description is made for creation and detection of coherences between states without quantum number selection rules ..delta..m = +-1. Descriptions of techniques for partial selectivity of order in preparation and detection of multiple quantum coherences are made. The effects on selectivity and resolution of echo pulses during multiple quantum experiments are discussed. Experimental observation of coherences up to order 6 have been made in a sample of benzene dissolved in a liquid crystal. Experimental verifications of order selection and echo generation have been made.

  19. Engineering the quantum-classical interface of solid-state qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, David J.

    2015-10-01

    Spanning a range of hardware platforms, the building-blocks of quantum processors are today sufficiently advanced to begin work on scaling-up these systems into complex quantum machines. A key subsystem of all quantum machinery is the interface between the isolated qubits that encode quantum information and the classical control and readout technology needed to operate them. As few-qubit devices are combined to construct larger, fault-tolerant quantum systems in the near future, the quantum-classical interface will pose new challenges that increasingly require approaches from the engineering disciplines in combination with continued fundamental advances in physics, materials and mathematics. This review describes the subsystems comprising the quantum-classical interface from the viewpoint of an engineer, experimental physicist or student wanting to enter the field of solid-state quantum information technology. The fundamental signalling operations of readout and control are reviewed for a variety of qubit platforms, including spin systems, superconducting implementations and future devices based on topological degrees-of-freedom. New engineering opportunities for technology development at the boundary between qubits and their control hardware are identified, transversing electronics to cryogenics.

  20. Fully tuneable, Purcell-enhanced solid-state quantum emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzella, M., E-mail: m.petruzzella@tue.nl; Xia, T.; Pagliano, F.; Birindelli, S.; Zobenica, Z.; Fiore, A. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Midolo, L. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    We report the full energy control over a semiconductor cavity-emitter system, consisting of single Stark-tunable quantum dots embedded in mechanically reconfigurable photonic crystal membranes. A reversible wavelength tuning of the emitter over 7.5 nm as well as an 8.5 nm mode shift are realized on the same device. Harnessing these two electrical tuning mechanisms, a single exciton transition is brought on resonance with the cavity mode at several wavelengths, demonstrating a ten-fold enhancement of its spontaneous emission. These results open the way to bring several cavity-enhanced emitters mutually into resonance and therefore represent a key step towards scalable quantum photonic circuits featuring multiple sources of indistinguishable single photons.

  1. Theoretical Study of Solid State Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    Physical Review A, (02 2013): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.022332 08/28/2013 30.00 Peihao Huang, Xuedong Hu. Spin qubit relaxation in a moving quantum dot, Physical Review B, (08 2013): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.075301 08/28/2013 29.00 Lukasz Cywinski, Xuedong Hu, S. Das Sarma, Jo-Tzu Hung. Hyperfine interaction induced dephasing of coupled spin qubits in semiconductor double quantum dots, Physical Review B, (08 2013): 0. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevB.88.085314 08/28/2013 28.00 Ting Yu, WenXian Zhang, XueDong Hu,

  2. Engineering colloidal quantum dot solids within and beyond the mobility-invariant regime

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2014-05-06

    © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. Colloidal quantum dots are attractive materials for efficient, low-cost and facile implementation of solution-processed optoelectronic devices. Despite impressive mobilities (1-30 cm2V-1 s-1) reported for new classes of quantum dot solids, it is-surprisingly-the much lower-mobility (10-3-10-2 cm2V-1 s-1) solids that have produced the best photovoltaic performance. Here we show that it is not mobility, but instead the average spacing among recombination centres that governs the diffusion length of charges in today\\'s quantum dot solids. In this regime, colloidal quantum dot films do not benefit from further improvements in charge carrier mobility. We develop a device model that accurately predicts the thickness dependence and diffusion length dependence of devices. Direct diffusion length measurements suggest the solid-state ligand exchange procedure as a potential origin of the detrimental recombination centres. We then present a novel avenue for in-solution passivation with tightly bound chlorothiols that retain passivation from solution to film, achieving an 8.5% power conversion efficiency.

  3. Charge Injection, Charge Trapping and Charge Transfer in Quantum-Dot Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehme, S.C.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on fundamental processes in Quantum-Dot Solids, after light absorption. Transient Absorption and Time-resolved Photoluminescence spectrocopy reveal the dynamics of charge transfer and charge trapping processes. Typically, both occur on a picosecond time scale and compete with each

  4. Scalable Architecture for a Room Temperature Solid-State Quantum Information Processor

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Norman Y; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Maurer, Peter C; Giedke, Geza; Cirac, J Ignacio; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2010-01-01

    The realization of a scalable quantum information processor has emerged over the past decade as one of the central challenges at the interface of fundamental science and engineering. Much progress has been made towards this goal. Indeed, quantum operations have been demonstrated on several trapped ion qubits, and other solid-state systems are approaching similar levels of control. Extending these techniques to achieve fault-tolerant operations in larger systems with more qubits remains an extremely challenging goal, in part, due to the substantial technical complexity of current implementations. Here, we propose and analyze an architecture for a scalable, solid-state quantum information processor capable of operating at or near room temperature. The architecture is applicable to realistic conditions, which include disorder and relevant decoherence mechanisms, and includes a hierarchy of control at successive length scales. Our approach is based upon recent experimental advances involving Nitrogen-Vacancy colo...

  5. Tunable Quantum Dot Solids: Impact of Interparticle Interactions on Bulk Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Michael B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fan, Hongyou [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brener, Igal [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liu, Sheng [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Luk, Ting S. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Li, Binsong [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    QD-solids comprising self-assembled semiconductor nanocrystals such as CdSe are currently under investigation for use in a wide array of applications including light emitting diodes, solar cells, field effect transistors, photodetectors, and biosensors. The goal of this LDRD project was develop a fundamental understanding of the relationship between nanoparticle interactions and the different regimes of charge and energy transport in semiconductor quantum dot (QD) solids. Interparticle spacing was tuned through the application of hydrostatic pressure in a diamond anvil cell, and the impact on interparticle interactions was probed using x-ray scattering and a variety of static and transient optical spectroscopies. During the course of this LDRD, we discovered a new, previously unknown, route to synthesize semiconductor quantum wires using high pressure sintering of self-assembled quantum dot crystals. We believe that this new, pressure driven synthesis approach holds great potential as a new tool for nanomaterials synthesis and engineering.

  6. Quantum entanglement at ambient conditions in a macroscopic solid-state spin ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Paul V; Falk, Abram L; Christle, David J; Dobrovitski, Viatcheslav V; Awschalom, David D

    2015-11-01

    Entanglement is a key resource for quantum computers, quantum-communication networks, and high-precision sensors. Macroscopic spin ensembles have been historically important in the development of quantum algorithms for these prospective technologies and remain strong candidates for implementing them today. This strength derives from their long-lived quantum coherence, strong signal, and ability to couple collectively to external degrees of freedom. Nonetheless, preparing ensembles of genuinely entangled spin states has required high magnetic fields and cryogenic temperatures or photochemical reactions. We demonstrate that entanglement can be realized in solid-state spin ensembles at ambient conditions. We use hybrid registers comprising of electron-nuclear spin pairs that are localized at color-center defects in a commercial SiC wafer. We optically initialize 10(3) identical registers in a 40-μm(3) volume (with [Formula: see text] fidelity) and deterministically prepare them into the maximally entangled Bell states (with 0.88 ± 0.07 fidelity). To verify entanglement, we develop a register-specific quantum-state tomography protocol. The entanglement of a macroscopic solid-state spin ensemble at ambient conditions represents an important step toward practical quantum technology.

  7. Quantum Dynamics of One-Dimensional Nanocrystalline Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁建文; 颜晓红; 曹觉先; 王登龙

    2002-01-01

    A novel ballistic-nonballistic dynamic transition in one-dimensional nanocrystalline solids is found upon varyingthe strength of the composition modulation and the grain-boundary effect. This can contribute to the under-standing of the strange electronic transport properties of nanostructured systems.

  8. Quantum dynamics of one-dimensional nanocrystalline solids

    CERN Document Server

    Ding Jian Wen; Cao Jue Xian; Wang Deng Long

    2002-01-01

    A novel ballistic-non-ballistic dynamic transition in one-dimensional nanocrystalline solids is found upon varying the strength of the composition modulation and the grain-boundary effect. This can contribute to the understanding of the strange electronic transport properties of nano-structured systems

  9. Hard-Core Bosons on the Kagome Lattice: Valence-Bond Solids and Their Quantum Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, S. V.; Wessel, S.; Melko, R. G.; Sengupta, K.; Kim, Yong Baek

    2006-10-01

    Using large scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations and dual vortex theory, we analyze the ground state phase diagram of hard-core bosons on the kagome lattice with nearest-neighbor repulsion. In contrast with the case of a triangular lattice, no supersolid emerges for strong interactions. While a uniform superfluid prevails at half filling, two novel solid phases emerge at densities ρ=1/3 and ρ=2/3. These solids exhibit an only partial ordering of the bosonic density, allowing for local resonances on a subset of hexagons of the kagome lattice. We provide evidence for a weakly first-order phase transition at the quantum melting point between these solid phases and the superfluid.

  10. Epitaxial lift-off for solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greuter, Lukas; Najer, Daniel; Kuhlmann, Andreas V.; Starosielec, Sebastian; Warburton, Richard J. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel 4056 (Switzerland); Valentin, Sascha R.; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-08-21

    We demonstrate an approach to incorporate self-assembled quantum dots into a Fabry-Pérot-like microcavity. Thereby, a 3λ/4 GaAs layer containing quantum dots is epitaxially removed and attached by van der Waals bonding to one of the microcavity mirrors. We reach a finesse as high as 4100 with this configuration limited by the reflectivity of the dielectric mirrors and not by scattering at the semiconductor-mirror interface, demonstrating that the epitaxial lift-off procedure is a promising procedure for cavity quantum electrodynamics in the solid state. As a first step in this direction, we demonstrate a clear cavity-quantum dot interaction in the weak coupling regime with a Purcell factor in the order of 3. Estimations of the coupling strength via the Purcell factor suggest that we are close to the strong coupling regime.

  11. Epitaxial lift-off for solid-state cavity quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Greuter, Lukas; Kuhlmann, Andreas V; Valentin, Sascha; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Starosielec, Sebastian; Warburton, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to incorporate self-assembled quantum dots into a Fabry-P\\'{e}rot-like microcavity. Thereby a 3$\\lambda$/4 GaAs layer containing quantum dots is epitaxially removed and attached by van der Waals bonding to one of the microcavity mirrors. We reach a finesse as high as 4,100 with this configuration limited by the reflectivity of the dielectric mirrors and not by scattering at the semiconductor - mirror interface, demonstrating that the epitaxial lift-off procedure is a promising procedure for cavity quantum electrodynamics in the solid state. As a first step in this direction, we demonstrate a clear cavity-quantum dot interaction in the weak coupling regime with a Purcell factor in the order of 3. Estimations of the coupling strength via the Purcell factor suggests that we are close to the strong coupling regime.

  12. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in quantum optical and solid state systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Florentin

    Quantum mechanics is an immensely successful theory which is essential for the explanation of numerous phenomena in atomic physics, solid state physics, nuclear physics and elementary particle physics. Quantum theory also involves effects which have no analogy in the classical world. In particular....... Entangled states are, however, sensitive to interactions with the environment, which are present in any open system. Here, in particular decoherence, i.e. loss of coherence, and dissipation, i.e. loss of energy, destroy the desired correlations. The novel approach of “dissipative quantum computing......-particle entangled states in several concrete physical systems such as optical cavities, trapped ions, and superconducting qubits. To study the dynamics of open quantum systems, we first develop an operator formalism which allows us to identify the effective interactions. Eliminating the decaying states from...

  13. Impact of Different Surface Ligands on the Optical Properties of PbS Quantum Dot Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Xu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of quantum dot solids with low defect concentrations and efficient carrier transport through a ligand strategy is crucial to achieve efficient quantum dot (QD optoelectronic devices. Here, we study the consequences of various surface ligand treatments on the light emission properties of PbS quantum dot films using 1,3-benzenedithiol (1,3-BDT, 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT, mercaptocarboxylic acids (MPA and ammonium sulfide ((NH42S. We first investigate the influence of different ligand treatments on the inter-dot separation, which mainly determines the conductivity of the QD films. Then, through a combination of photoluminescence and transient photoluminescence characterization, we demonstrate that the radiative and non-radiative recombination mechanisms in the quantum dot films depend critically on the length and chemical structure of the surface ligands.

  14. N-Type Colloidal-Quantum-Dot Solids for Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2012-09-12

    N-type PbS colloidal-quantum-dot (CQD) films are fabricated using a controlled halide chemical treatment, applied in an inert processing ambient environment. The new materials exhibit a mobility of 0.1 cm2 V -1 s-1. The halogen ions serve both as a passivating agent and n-dope the films via substitution at surface chalcogen sites. The majority electron concentration across the range 1016 to 1018 cm-3 is varied systematically. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Basic Aspects of the Quantum Theory of Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomskii, Daniel I.

    2010-09-01

    1. Some basic notions of the classical and quantum statistical physics; 2. General theory of phase transitions; 3. Bose- and Fermi-statistics; 4. Phonons in crystals; 5. General Bose-systems: Bose-condensation; 6. Magnetism; 7. Electrons in metals; 8. Interacting electrons: Green functions and Feynman diagrams (methods of the field theory in many-particle physics); 9. Electrons with Coulomb interaction; 10. Fermi-liquid theory and its possible generalizations; 11. Instabilities and phase transitions in electronic systems; 12. Strongly correlated electrons; 13. Magnetic impurities in metals, Kondo effect, heavy fermions and mixed valence; References; Index.

  16. Unified quantum theory of elastic and inelastic atomic scattering from a physisorbed monolayer solid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruch, L. W.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Dammann, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    A unified quantum theory of the elastic and inelastic scattering of low energy He atoms by a physisorbed monolayer solid in the one-phonon approximation is given. It uses a time-dependent wave packet with phonon creation and annihilation components and has a self-consistent feedback between...... the wave functions for elastic and inelastic scattered atoms. An attenuation of diffraction scattering by inelastic processes thus is inherent in the theory. The atomic motion and monolayer vibrations in the harmonic approximation are treated quantum mechanically and unitarity is preserved. The evaluation...

  17. Tunable Solid-State Quantum Memory Using Rare-Earth-Ion-Doped Crystal, Nd3(+):GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Research Initiative was to work on developing solid-state quantum memory using cryogenically cooled rare- earth -ion-doped crystal, Nd3+:GaN. The samples...Initiative (DRI) was to work on developing solid-state quantum memory using cryogenically cooled rare- earth -ion- doped crystal, Nd3+:GaN. The samples were...Caltech group has been working in the area of quantum information of rare- earth doped solids for a number of years and is well equipped to perform

  18. Z3-order theory of quantum inelastic scattering of charges by solids

    OpenAIRE

    Nazarov, V. U.; Nishigaki, Satoshi

    2002-01-01

    Although the nonlinear response of solids in such phenomena as ion slowing and second harmonic generation has been studied since long ago, to our knowledge there has not existed a quantum theory of the inelastic scattering of charges by solids beyond the first Born approximation. In this paper we relate the inelastic cross section in the second Born approximation to the order Z3 to the quadratic retarded density-response function in the same (but far less trivial) fashion it has been known fo...

  19. Quantum Chemistry of Solids The LCAO First Principles Treatment of Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Evarestov, Robert A

    2007-01-01

    Quantum Chemistry of Solids delivers a comprehensive account of the main features and possibilities of LCAO methods for the first principles calculations of electronic structure of periodic systems. The first part describes the basic theory underlying the LCAO methods applied to periodic systems and the use of wave-function-based (Hartree-Fock), density-based (DFT) and hybrid hamiltonians. The translation and site symmetry consideration is included to establish connection between k-space solid-state physics and real-space quantum chemistry methods in the framework of cyclic model of an infinite crystal. The inclusion of electron correlation effects for periodic systems is considered on the basis of localized crystalline orbitals. The possibilities of LCAO methods for chemical bonding analysis in periodic systems are discussed. The second part deals with the applications of LCAO methods for calculations of bulk crystal properties, including magnetic ordering and crystal structure optimization. The discussion o...

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell anode image segmentation based on a novel quantum-inspired fuzzy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Yuhan; Chen, Li; Xu, Xin; Li, Xi

    2015-12-01

    High quality microstructure modeling can optimize the design of fuel cells. For three-phase accurate identification of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) microstructure, this paper proposes a novel image segmentation method on YSZ/Ni anode Optical Microscopic (OM) images. According to Quantum Signal Processing (QSP), the proposed approach exploits a quantum-inspired adaptive fuzziness factor to adaptively estimate the energy function in the fuzzy system based on Markov Random Filed (MRF). Before defuzzification, a quantum-inspired probability distribution based on distance and gray correction is proposed, which can adaptively adjust the inaccurate probability estimation of uncertain points caused by noises and edge points. In this study, the proposed method improves accuracy and effectiveness of three-phase identification on the micro-investigation. It provides firm foundation to investigate the microstructural evolution and its related properties.

  1. Solid Solution Quantum Dots with Tunable Dual or Ultrabroadband Emission for LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugula, Krzysztof; Entrup, Michael; Stegemann, Linda; Seidel, Stefan; Pöttgen, Rainer; Strassert, Cristian A; Bredol, Michael

    2017-01-11

    Quantum dots that efficiently emit white light directly or feature a "candle-like" orange photoluminescence with a high Stokes shift are presented. The key to obtaining these unique emission properties is through controlled annealing of the core Cu-In-Ga-S quantum dots in the presence of zinc ions, thus forming Zn-Cu-In-Ga-S solid solutions with different distributions of the substitution and dopant elements. The as-obtained nanocrystals feature excellent quantum yields of up to 82% with limited or even eliminated reabsorption and a color rendering index of bare particles of up to 88, enabling the production of high-quality white LEDs using a single color converter layer. Furthermore, the color properties can be tuned by changing the experimental conditions as well as by varying the excitation wavelength. The multicomponent luminescence mechanism is discussed in detail based on similar literature reports. White LEDs with unparalleled color quality and competitive luminous efficacies are presented herein.

  2. Direct observation of large quantum interference effect in anthraquinone solid-state junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabache, Vincent; Chaste, Julien; Petit, Philippe; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe; McCreery, Richard L; Lafarge, Philippe

    2013-07-17

    Quantum interference in cross-conjugated molecules embedded in solid-state devices was investigated by direct current-voltage and differential conductance transport measurements of anthraquinone (AQ)-based large area planar junctions. A thin film of AQ was grafted covalently on the junction base electrode by diazonium electroreduction, while the counter electrode was directly evaporated on top of the molecular layer. Our technique provides direct evidence of a large quantum interference effect in multiple CMOS compatible planar junctions. The quantum interference is manifested by a pronounced dip in the differential conductance close to zero voltage bias. The experimental signature is well developed at low temperature (4 K), showing a large amplitude dip with a minimum >2 orders of magnitude lower than the conductance at higher bias and is still clearly evident at room temperature. A temperature analysis of the conductance curves revealed that electron-phonon coupling is the principal decoherence mechanism causing large conductance oscillations at low temperature.

  3. Recombination barrier layers in solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2012-06-01

    By replacing the dye in the dye-sensitized solar cell design with semiconductor quantum dots as the light-absorbing material, solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (ss-QDSSCs) were fabricated. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) were grown in situ by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Aluminum oxide recombination barrier layers were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at the TiO2/hole-conductor interface. For low numbers of ALD cycles, the Al2O3 barrier layer increased open circuit voltage, causing an increase in device efficiency. For thicker Al2O3 barrier layers, photocurrent decreased substantially, leading to a decrease in device efficiency. © 2012 IEEE.

  4. Scalable solid-state quantum processor using subradiant two-atom states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, David; Kurizki, Gershon

    2002-11-11

    We propose a realization of a scalable, high-performance quantum processor whose qubits are represented by the ground and subradiant states of effective dimers formed by pairs of two-level systems coupled by resonant dipole-dipole interaction. The dimers are implanted in low-temperature solid host material at controllable nanoscale separations. The two-qubit entanglement either relies on the coherent excitation exchange between the dimers or is mediated by external laser fields.

  5. Atomic Layer Deposition of CdS Quantum Dots for Solid-State Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2011-10-04

    Functioning quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells have been fabricated using the vacuum deposition technique atomic layer deposition (ALD). Utilizing the incubation period of CdS growth by ALD on TiO 2, we are able to grow QDs of adjustable size which act as sensitizers for solid-state QDsensitized solar cells (ssQDSSC). The size of QDs, studied with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), varied with the number of ALD cycles from 1-10 nm. Photovoltaic devices with the QDs were fabricated and characterized using a ssQDSSC device architecture with 2,2\\',7,7\\'-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p methoxyphenylamine) 9,9\\'-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) as the solid-state hole conductor. The ALD approach described here can be applied to fabrication of quantum-confined structures for a variety of applications, including solar electricity and solar fuels. Because ALD provides the ability to deposit many materials in very high aspect ratio substrates, this work introduces a strategy by which material and optical properties of QD sensitizers may be adjusted not only by the size of the particles but also in the future by the composition. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Quantum Diffusion-Controlled Chemistry: Reactions of Atomic Hydrogen with Nitric Oxide in Solid Parahydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2015-12-17

    Our group has been working to develop parahydrogen (pH2) matrix isolation spectroscopy as a method to study low-temperature condensed-phase reactions of atomic hydrogen with various reaction partners. Guided by the well-defined studies of cold atom chemistry in rare-gas solids, the special properties of quantum hosts such as solid pH2 afford new opportunities to study the analogous chemical reactions under quantum diffusion conditions in hopes of discovering new types of chemical reaction mechanisms. In this study, we present Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the 193 nm photoinduced chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) isolated in solid pH2 over the 1.8 to 4.3 K temperature range. Upon short-term in situ irradiation the NO readily undergoes photolysis to yield HNO, NOH, NH, NH3, H2O, and H atoms. We map the postphotolysis reactions of mobile H atoms with NO and document first-order growth in HNO and NOH reaction products for up to 5 h after photolysis. We perform three experiments at 4.3 K and one at 1.8 K to permit the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics to be quantified. We observe Arrhenius-type behavior with a pre-exponential factor of A = 0.036(2) min(-1) and Ea = 2.39(1) cm(-1). This is in sharp contrast to previous H atom reactions we have studied in solid pH2 that display definitively non-Arrhenius behavior. The contrasting temperature dependence measured for the H + NO reaction is likely related to the details of H atom quantum diffusion in solid pH2 and deserves further study.

  7. Classical and quantum ordering of protons in cold solid hydrogen under megabar pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Zheng; Walker, Brent; Probert, Matthew I J; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, Richard J; Michaelides, Angelos

    2013-02-27

    A combination of state-of-the-art theoretical methods has been used to obtain an atomic-level picture of classical and quantum ordering of protons in cold high-pressure solid hydrogen. We focus mostly on phases II and III of hydrogen, exploring the effects of quantum nuclear motion on certain features of these phases (through a number of ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations at particular points on the phase diagram). We also examine the importance of van der Waals forces in this system by performing calculations using the optB88-vdW density functional, which accounts for non-local correlations. Our calculations reveal that the transition between phases I and II is strongly quantum in nature, resulting from a competition between anisotropic inter-molecular interactions that restrict molecular rotation and thermal plus quantum fluctuations of the nuclear positions that facilitate it. The transition from phase II to III is more classical because quantum nuclear motion plays only a secondary role and the transition is determined primarily by the underlying potential energy surface. A structure of P2(1)/c symmetry with 24 atoms in the primitive unit cell is found to be stable when anharmonic quantum nuclear vibrational motion is included at finite temperatures using the PIMD method. This structure gives a good account of the infra-red and Raman vibron frequencies of phase II. We find additional support for a C2/c structure as a strong candidate for phase III, since it remains transparent up to 300 GPa, even when quantum nuclear effects are included. Finally, we find that accounting for van der Waals forces improves the agreement between experiment and theory for the parts of the phase diagram considered, when compared to previous work which employed the widely-used Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation functional.

  8. Error-rejecting quantum computing with solid-state spins assisted by low-Q optical microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2016-12-01

    We present an efficient proposal for error-rejecting quantum computing with quantum dots (QDs) embedded in single-sided optical microcavities based on the interface between the circularly polarized photon and QDs. An almost unity fidelity of the quantum entangling gate (EG) can be implemented with a detectable error that leads to a recycling EG procedure, which improves further the efficiency of our proposal along with the robustness to the errors involved in imperfect input-output processes. Meanwhile, we discuss the performance of our proposal for the EG on two solid-state spins with currently achieved experiment parameters, showing that it is feasible with current experimental technology. It provides a promising building block for solid-state quantum computing and quantum networks.

  9. Collective dynamics of solid-state spin chains and ensembles in quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yuting

    This thesis is concerned with the collective dynamics in different spin chains and spin ensembles in solid-state materials. The focus is on the manipulation of electron spins, through spin-spin and spin-photon couplings controlled by voltage potentials or electromagnetic fields. A brief review of various systems is provided to describe the possible physical implementation of the ideas, and also outlines the basis of the adopted effective interaction models. The first two ideas presented explore the collective behaviour of non-interacting spin chains with external couplings. One focuses on mapping the identical state of spin-singlet pairs in two currents onto two distant, static spins downstream, creating distributed entanglement that may be accessed. The other studies a quantum memory consisting of an array of non-interacting, static spins, which may encode and decode multiple flying spins. Both chains could effectively `enhance' weak couplings in a cumulative fashion, and neither scheme requires active quantum control. Moreover, the distributed entanglement generated can offer larger separation between the qubits than more conventional protocols that only exploit the tunnelling effects between quantum dots. The quantum memory can also `smooth' the statistical fluctuations in the effects of local errors when the stored information is spread. Next, an interacting chain of static spins with nearest-neighbour interactions is introduced to connect distant end spins. Previously, it has been shown that this approach provides a cubic speed-up when compared with the direct coupling between the target spins. The practicality of this scheme is investigated by analysing realistic error effects via numerical simulations, and from that perspective relaxation of the nearest-neighbour assumption is proposed. Finally, a non-interacting electron spin ensemble is reviewed as a quantum memory to store single photons from an on-chip stripline cavity. It is then promoted to a full

  10. Quantum statistical effects in the mass transport of interstitial solutes in a crystalline solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, C. H.; Wen, Haohua

    2017-09-01

    The impact of quantum statistics on the many-body dynamics of a crystalline solid at finite temperatures containing an interstitial solute atom (ISA) is investigated. The Mori-Zwanzig theory allows the many-body dynamics of the crystal to be formulated and solved analytically within a pseudo-one-particle approach using the Langevin equation with a quantum fluctuation-dissipation relation (FDR) based on the Debye model. At the same time, the many-body dynamics is also directly solved numerically via the molecular dynamics approach with a Langevin heat bath based on the quantum FDR. Both the analytical and numerical results consistently show that below the Debye temperature of the host lattice, quantum statistics significantly impacts the ISA transport properties, resulting in major departures from both the Arrhenius law of diffusion and the Einstein-Smoluchowski relation between the mobility and diffusivity. Indeed, we found that below one-third of the Debye temperature, effects of vibrations on the quantum mobility and diffusivity are both orders-of-magnitude larger and practically temperature independent. We have shown that both effects have their physical origin in the athermal lattice vibrations derived from the phonon ground state. The foregoing theory is tested in quantum molecular dynamics calculation of mobility and diffusivity of interstitial helium in bcc W. In this case, the Arrhenius law is only valid in a narrow range between ˜300 and ˜700 K. The diffusivity becomes temperature independent on the low-temperature side while increasing linearly with temperature on the high-temperature side.

  11. Ultrafast control of nuclear spins using only microwave pulses: towards switchable solid-state quantum gates

    CERN Document Server

    Mitrikas, George; Papavassiliou, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    Since the idea of quantum information processing (QIP) fascinated the scientific community, electron and nuclear spins have been regarded as promising candidates for quantum bits (qubits). A fundamental challenge in the realization of a solid-state quantum computer is the construction of fast and reliable two-qubit quantum gates. Of particular interest in this direction are hybrid systems of electron and nuclear spins, where the two qubits are coupled through the hyperfine interaction. However, the significantly different gyromagnetic ratios of electron and nuclear spins do not allow for their coherent manipulation at the same time scale. Here we demonstrate the control of the alpha-proton nuclear spin, I=1/2, coupled to the stable radical CH(COOH)2, S=1/2, in a gamma-irradiated malonic acid single crystal using only microwave pulses. We show that, depending on the state of the electron spin (mS=+1/2 or -1/2), the nuclear spin can be locked in a desired state or oscillate between mI=+1/2 and mI=-1/2 on the na...

  12. Determining the Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Photoswitchable Molecules in Solution and in the Solid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranius, K.; Börjesson, K.

    2017-01-01

    Photoswitchable molecules are able to isomerize between two metastable forms through light stimuli. Originally being studied by photochemists, this type of molecule has now found a wide range of applications within physics, chemistry and biology. The extensive usage of photochromic molecules is due to the two isomers having fundamentally different physical and chemical properties. The most important attribute of a photoswitch is the photoisomerization quantum yield, which defines the efficiency of the photoisomerization event. Here we show how to determine the photoisomerization quantum yield in the solid state and in solution when taking thermal processes into account. The described method together with provided software allows for rapid and accurate determination of the isomerization process for this important class of molecules.

  13. Reducing charge trapping in PbS colloidal quantum dot solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, D. M.; Nugraha, M. I.; Bisri, S. Z.; Loi, M. A., E-mail: m.a.loi@rug.nl [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, Groningen 9747AG (Netherlands); Sytnyk, M.; Heiss, W. [Institute for Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, Linz 4040 (Austria)

    2014-03-17

    Understanding and improving charge transport in colloidal quantum dot solids is crucial for the development of efficient solar cells based on these materials. In this paper, we report high performance field-effect transistors based on lead-sulfide colloidal quantum dots (PbS CQDs) crosslinked with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Electron mobility up to 0.03 cm{sup 2}/Vs and on/off ratio above 10{sup 5} was measured; the later value is the highest in the literature for CQD Field effect transistors with silicon-oxide gating. This was achieved by using high quality material and preventing trap generation during fabrication and measurement. We show that air exposure has a reversible p-type doping effect on the devices, and that intrinsically MPA is an n-type dopant for PbS CQDs.

  14. Reducing charge trapping in PbS colloidal quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, D. M.; Nugraha, M. I.; Bisri, S. Z.; Sytnyk, M.; Heiss, W.; Loi, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding and improving charge transport in colloidal quantum dot solids is crucial for the development of efficient solar cells based on these materials. In this paper, we report high performance field-effect transistors based on lead-sulfide colloidal quantum dots (PbS CQDs) crosslinked with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA). Electron mobility up to 0.03 cm2/Vs and on/off ratio above 105 was measured; the later value is the highest in the literature for CQD Field effect transistors with silicon-oxide gating. This was achieved by using high quality material and preventing trap generation during fabrication and measurement. We show that air exposure has a reversible p-type doping effect on the devices, and that intrinsically MPA is an n-type dopant for PbS CQDs.

  15. Valence-bond-solid domain walls in a 2D quantum magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hui; Guo, Wenan; Sandvik, Anders

    sing quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we study properties of domain walls in a square-lattice S=1/2 Heisenberg model with additional interactions which can drive the system from an antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground state to a valence-bond solid (VBS). We study the finite-size scaling of the domain-wall energy at the putative ''deconfined'' critical AFM-VBS point, which gives access to the critical exponent governing the domain-wall width. This length-scale diverges faster than the correlation length and also is related to the scale of spinon deconfinement. Our results show additional evidence of deconfied quantum criticality and are compatible with critical exponents extracted from finite-size scaling of other quantities. NSFC Grant No. 11175018, NSF Grant No. DMR-1410126.

  16. An Electron-Nucleon Double Spin Solid-State Quantum Computer

    CERN Document Server

    Long, G L; Chen, H M; Long, Gui Lu; Ma, Ying-Jun; Chen, Hao-Ming

    2003-01-01

    An electron-nucleon double spin(ENDOS) solid-state quantum computer scheme is proposed. In this scheme, the qubits are the nuclear spins of phosphorus ion implanted on the (111) surface of $^{28}$Si substrate. An $^{13}$C atom on a scanning tunnelling probe tip is used both to complete single qubit and two-qubit control-not operation, and single qubit measurement. The scheme does not require interactions between qubits, and can accomplish two qubits without the use of SWAP gate. This scheme is scalable, and can be implemented with present-day or near-future technologies.

  17. Entanglement degradation in the solid state: Interplay of adiabatic and quantum noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellomo, B.; Compagno, G.; D'Arrigo, A.; Falci, G.; Lo Franco, R.; Paladino, E.

    2010-06-01

    We study entanglement degradation of two noninteracting qubits subject to independent baths with broadband spectra typical of solid-state nanodevices. We obtain the analytic form of the concurrence in the presence of adiabatic noise for classes of entangled initial states presently achievable in experiments. We find that adiabatic (low-frequency) noise affects entanglement reduction analogously to pure dephasing noise. Due to quantum (high-frequency) noise, entanglement is totally lost in a state-dependent finite time. The possibility of implementing on-chip local and entangling operations is briefly discussed.

  18. Entanglement degradation in the solid state: interplay of adiabatic and quantum noise

    CERN Document Server

    Bellomo, B; D'Arrigo, A; Falci, G; Franco, R Lo; Paladino, E

    2010-01-01

    We study entanglement degradation of two non-interacting qubits subject to independent baths with broadband spectra typical of solid state nanodevices. We obtain the analytic form of the concurrence in the presence of adiabatic noise for classes of entangled initial states presently achievable in experiments. We find that adiabatic (low frequency) noise affects entanglement reduction analogously to pure dephasing noise. Due to quantum (high frequency) noise, entanglement is totally lost in a state-dependent finite time. The possibility to implement on-chip both local and entangling operations is briefly discussed.

  19. A tunable waveguide-coupled cavity design for scalable interfaces to solid-state quantum emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Mouradian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic nanocavities in diamond have emerged as useful structures for interfacing photons and embedded atomic color centers, such as the nitrogen vacancy center. Here, we present a hybrid nanocavity design that enables (i a loaded quality factor exceeding 50 000 (unloaded Q>106 with 75% of the enhanced emission collected into an underlying waveguide circuit, (ii MEMS-based cavity spectral tuning without straining the diamond, and (iii the use of a diamond waveguide with straight sidewalls to minimize surface defects and charge traps. This system addresses the need for scalable on-chip photonic interfaces to solid-state quantum emitters.

  20. Design and optimisation of quantum logic circuits for a three-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm implemented with optically-controlled, solid-state quantum logic gates

    CERN Document Server

    Del Duce, A; Bayvel, P

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the design and optimisation of quantum logic circuits suitable for the experimental demonstration of a three-qubit quantum computation prototype based on optically-controlled, solid-state quantum logic gates. In these gates, the interaction between two qubits carried by the electron-spin of donors is mediated by the optical excitation of a control particle placed in their proximity. First, we use a geometrical approach for analysing the entangling characteristics of these quantum gates. Then, using a genetic programming algorithm, we develop circuits for the refined Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm investigating different strategies for obtaining short total computational times. We test two separate approaches based on using different sets of entangling gates with the shortest possible gate computation time which, however, does not introduce leakage of quantum information to the control particles. The first set exploits fast approximations of controlled-phase gates as entangling gates, while the other one a...

  1. Relation of Certain Quantum Chemical Parameters to Lubrication Behavior of Solid Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuansheng Jin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: It is well-documented that certain oxides (such as Re2O7, B2O3, MoO3, V2O5, etc. can provide friction coefficients of 0.1-0.3 to sliding surfaces at elevated temperatures and thus they are often referred to as lubricious oxides in the tribology literature. In a recently proposed crystal chemical model, Erdemir was able to establish a close correlation between the reported friction coefficients of such oxides and their ionic potentials [1]. In the present paper, we expand on this original concept and explore the relevance of two other quantum chemical parameters, electronegativity and chemical hardness, to the lubricity of solid oxides. These parameters have already been used by scientists to explain the nature of tribochemical interactions between various oil additives and sliding surfaces. It is conceivable that electronegativity and chemical hardness may also be strongly related to the extent of adhesive interactions and shear rheology of solid oxides and hence to their lubricity. The new results have confirmed that electronegativity, like ionic potential, is indeed a valid quantum chemistry parameter that can be used in predicting the lubrication behavior of solid oxides. Generally, the higher the electronegativity of the solid oxides is, the lower the friction coefficients will be. However, chemical hardness did not yield a similar trend. In light of these new findings, we propose some guidelines for the formulation of novel oxide or alloy systems that can lead to the formation of lubricious oxides at elevated temperatures. The findings of this study may pave the way for designer-based tribosystems in general and smart tribochemical systems in particular in future tribological applications such as dry machining.

  2. Bacteria-mediated in vivo delivery of quantum dots into solid tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Zhou, Mei [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Luo, Dan; Wang, Lijun; Hong, Yuankai [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Yang, Yepeng, E-mail: yangyepeng@bjmu.edu.cn [Dept. of Radiation Medicine, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Sha, Yinlin, E-mail: shyl@hsc.pku.edu.cn [Single-molecule and Nanobiology Lab., Dept. of Biophysics, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Biomed-X Center, Peking University, Peking University, No. 38 Xue Yuan Road, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New approach using the probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum as a vehicle to deliver QDs into the deep tissue of solid tumors in vivo was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bifidobacterium bifidum delivery system has intrinsic biocompatibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The targeting efficacy was improved by folic acids. -- Abstract: Semiconductor nanocrystals, so-called quantum dots (QDs), promise potential application in bioimaging and diagnosis in vitro and in vivo owing to their high-quality photoluminescence and excellent photostability as well as size-tunable spectra. Here, we describe a biocompatible, comparatively safe bacteria-based system that can deliver QDs specifically into solid tumor of living animals. In our strategy, anaerobic bacterium Bifidobacterium bifidum (B. bifidum) that colonizes selectively in hypoxic regions of animal body was successfully used as a vehicle to load with QDs and transported into the deep tissue of solid tumors. The internalization of lipid-encapsuled QDs into B. bifidum was conveniently carried by electroporation. To improve the efficacy and specificity of tumor targeting, the QDs-carrying bacterium surface was further conjugated with folic acids (FAs) that can bind to the folic acid receptor overexpressed tumor cells. This new approach opens a pathway for delivering different types of functional cargos such as nanoparticles and drugs into solid tumor of live animals for imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Efficiency enhancement of solid-state PbS quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with Al2O3 barrier layer

    KAUST Repository

    Brennan, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to grow both PbS quantum dots and Al2O3 barrier layers in a solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). Barrier layers grown prior to quantum dots resulted in a near-doubling of device efficiency (0.30% to 0.57%) whereas barrier layers grown after quantum dots did not improve efficiency, indicating the importance of quantum dots in recombination processes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Cavity enhanced telecom heralded single photons for spin-wave solid state quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieländer, Daniel; Lenhard, Andreas; Mazzera, Margherita; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2016-12-01

    We report on a source of heralded narrowband (≈ 3 MHz) single photons compatible with solid-state spin-wave quantum memories based on praseodymium doped crystals. Widely non-degenerate narrow-band photon pairs are generated using cavity enhanced down conversion. One photon from the pair is at telecom wavelengths and serves as heralding signal, while the heralded single photon is at 606 nm, resonant with an optical transition of Pr3+:Y2SiO5. The source offers a heralding efficiency of 28% and a generation rate exceeding 2000 pairs mW-1 in a single-mode. The single photon nature of the heralded field is confirmed by a direct antibunching measurement, with a measured antibunching parameter down to 0.010(4). Moreover, we investigate in detail photon cross- and autocorrelation functions proving non-classical correlations between the two photons. The results presented in this paper offer prospects for the demonstration of single photon spin-wave storage in an on-demand solid state quantum memory, heralded by a telecom photon.

  5. A long-lived and solid-state quantum memory for photons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Mikael

    2016-04-01

    A major challenge in quantum technologies is to build an efficient and long-lived quantum memory, particularly using solid-state devices. I will here report on an experiment where we combine the AFC optical memory with spin-echo techniques to extend the memory time from a few microseconds to about 1 ms, using an Europium-doped crystal. In general the spin-echo technique allows one to control the inhomogeneous spin dephasing which often sets the storage-time limit both in solid-state systems and laser-cooled gases. However, theoretically it is has been argued that spin-echo techniques would be extremely difficult to apply without creating noise in the case of a single quanta stored in a large spin ensemble. We here show how this noise can be limited and demonstrate high signal-to-noise ratio in the output mode when storing pulses at the single-photon level. Furthermore we stored polarization qubits encoded onto weak coherent , with fidelities surpassing a classical storage scheme.

  6. Quantum Monte-Carlo programming for atoms, molecules, clusters, and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schattke, Wolfgang [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics; Ikerbasque Foundation/Donostia International Physics Center, San Sebastian (Spain); Diez Muino, Ricardo [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    This is a book that initiates the reader into the basic concepts and practical applications of Quantum Monte Carlo. Because of the simplicity of its theoretical concept, the authors focus on the variational Quantum Monte Carlo scheme. The reader is enabled to proceed from simple examples as the hydrogen atom to advanced ones as the Lithium solid. In between, several intermediate steps are introduced, including the Hydrogen molecule (2 electrons), the Lithium atom (3 electrons) and expanding to an arbitrary number of electrons to finally treat the three-dimensional periodic array of Lithium atoms in a crystal. The book is unique, because it provides both theory and numerical programs. It pedagogically explains how to transfer into computational tools what is usually described in a theoretical textbook. It also includes the detailed physical understanding of methodology that cannot be found in a code manual. The combination of both aspects allows the reader to assimilate the fundamentals of Quantum Monte Carlo not only by reading but also by practice.

  7. Recent progress in all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingyao, E-mail: wangqingyao0532@163.com [Ludong University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Chen, Chao; Liu, Wei [Tongji University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Gao, Shanmin [Ludong University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Yang, Xiuchun, E-mail: yangxc@tongji.edu.cn [Tongji University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-01-15

    All-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells have been drawing great attention to solar energy conversion, which break through restrictions in traditional solar cells, such as the high recombination at interfaces of porous TiO{sub 2} films/sensitizers/hole conductors/counter electrodes, instability of dyes, and leakage of solution electrolyte, and so the novel solar cells exhibit promising applications in the future. In this Minireview article, the assembling of solar cells including the preparation of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dot preparation and sensitization on photoanodes, filling of hole conductors in TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, and selection of counter electrodes are overviewed, and the development course of all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells in recent years are summarized in detail. Moreover, the influences of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dots, solid electrolyte, and counter electrodes on photon-to-current efficiencies of solar cells are summarized. In addition, current problems of solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells are analyzed, and the corresponding improvements, such as multisensitizers and passivation layers, are proposed to improve the photoelectric conversion efficiency. Finally, this Minireview provides a perspective for the future development of this novel solar cell.

  8. Combined encoding, recoupling, and decoupling solution to problems of decoherence and design in solid-state quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, M S; Byrd, Mark S.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    Proposals for physical systems to act as quantum computers are inevitably plagued by the unavoidable coupling with the environment (bath) that causes decoherence, and by technological difficulties connected with the controllability of quantum states. Several techniques exist for achieving reliable quantum computation by countering the effects of decoherence. At this time, however, not one, by itself, will serve as a panacea for error correction. In this paper, we introduce a method that combines system-bath decoupling operations with error avoidance or active error correction to address these major concerns. By using an empirical approach to error correction based on experimental data, and an efficient set of decoupling operations that will serve to protect encoded quantum information, we are able to propose a comprehensive method for reducing the adverse effects of decoherence, in particular in scalable solid state quantum computing devices. Our method has the added benefit of significantly reducing design c...

  9. Two-photon interference of weak coherent laser pulses recalled from separate solid-state quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jeongwan; Slater, Joshua A.; Saglamyurek, Erhan; Sinclair, Neil; George, Mathew; Ricken, Raimund; Oblak, Daniel; Sohler, Wolfgang; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Quantum memories allowing reversible transfer of quantum states between light and matter are central to quantum repeaters, quantum networks and linear optics quantum computing. Significant progress regarding the faithful transfer of quantum information has been reported in recent years. However, none of these demonstrations confirm that the re-emitted photons remain suitable for two-photon interference measurements, such as C-NOT gates and Bell-state measurements, which constitute another key ingredient for all aforementioned applications. Here, using pairs of laser pulses at the single-photon level, we demonstrate two-photon interference and Bell-state measurements after either none, one or both pulses have been reversibly mapped to separate thulium-doped lithium niobate waveguides. As the interference is always near the theoretical maximum, we conclude that our solid-state quantum memories, in addition to faithfully mapping quantum information, also preserve the entire photonic wavefunction. Hence, our memories are generally suitable for future applications of quantum information processing that require two-photon interference.

  10. Density of Trap States and Auger-mediated Electron Trapping in CdTe Quantum-Dot Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehme, Simon C; Azpiroz, Jon Mikel; Aulin, Yaroslav V; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Infante, Ivan; Houtepen, Arjan J

    2015-05-13

    Charge trapping is an ubiquitous process in colloidal quantum-dot solids and a major limitation to the efficiency of quantum dot based devices such as solar cells, LEDs, and thermoelectrics. Although empirical approaches led to a reduction of trapping and thereby efficiency enhancements, the exact chemical nature of the trapping mechanism remains largely unidentified. In this study, we determine the density of trap states in CdTe quantum-dot solids both experimentally, using a combination of electrochemical control of the Fermi level with ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, and theoretically, via density functional theory calculations. We find a high density of very efficient electron traps centered ∼0.42 eV above the valence band. Electrochemical filling of these traps increases the electron lifetime and the photoluminescence quantum yield by more than an order of magnitude. The trapping rate constant for holes is an order of magnitude lower that for electrons. These observations can be explained by Auger-mediated electron trapping. From density functional theory calculations we infer that the traps are formed by dicoordinated Te atoms at the quantum dot surface. The combination of our unique experimental determination of the density of trap states with the theoretical modeling of the quantum dot surface allows us to identify the trapping mechanism and chemical reaction at play during charge trapping in these quantum dots.

  11. Anomalous birefringence in andradite-grossular solid solutions: a quantum-mechanical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacivita, Valentina; D'Arco, Philippe; Orlando, Roberto; Dovesi, Roberto; Meyer, Alessio

    2013-11-01

    The static linear optical properties (refractive indices, birefringence and axial angle) of andradite-grossular (Ca3Fe2Si3O12-Ca3Al2Si3O12) solid solutions have been computed at the ab initio quantum-mechanical level through the Coupled Perturbed Kohn-Sham scheme, using an all-electron Gaussian-type basis set. Geometry relaxation after substitution of 1-8 Al for Fe atoms in the primitive cell of andradite yields 23 non-equivalent configurations ranging from cubic to triclinic symmetry. Refractive indices vary quite regularly between the andradite (1.860) and grossular (1.671) end-members; the birefringence δ and the axial angle 2 V at intermediate compositions can be as large as 0.02° and 89°, respectively. Comparison with experiments suffers from inhomogeneities and impurities of natural samples; however, semi-quantitative agreement is observed.

  12. Nanoimprint-Transfer-Patterned Solids Enhance Light Absorption in Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghoon; Bicanic, Kristopher; Tan, Hairen; Ouellette, Olivier; Sutherland, Brandon R; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Jo, Jea Woong; Liu, Mengxia; Sun, Bin; Liu, Min; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Sargent, Edward H

    2017-03-16

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) materials are of interest in thin-film solar cells due to their size-tunable bandgap and low-cost solution-processing. However, CQD solar cells suffer from inefficient charge extraction over the film thicknesses required for complete absorption of solar light. Here we show a new strategy to enhance light absorption in CQD solar cells by nanostructuring the CQD film itself at the back interface. We use two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations to study quantitatively the light absorption enhancement in nanostructured back interfaces in CQD solar cells. We implement this experimentally by demonstrating a nanoimprint-transfer-patterning (NTP) process for the fabrication of nanostructured CQD solids with highly ordered patterns. We show that this approach enables a boost in the power conversion efficiency in CQD solar cells primarily due to an increase in short-circuit current density as a result of enhanced absorption through light-trapping.

  13. Emergence of a Metallic Quantum Solid Phase in a Rydberg-Dressed Fermi Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Han; Hsieh, Tzu-Chi; Mou, Chung-Yu; Wang, Daw-Wei

    2016-07-15

    We examine possible low-temperature phases of a repulsively Rydberg-dressed Fermi gas in a three-dimensional free space. It is shown that the collective density excitations develop a roton minimum, which is softened at a wave vector smaller than the Fermi wave vector when the particle density is above a critical value. The mean field calculation shows that, unlike the insulating density wave states often observed in conventional condensed matters, a self-assembled metallic density wave state emerges at low temperatures. In particular, the density wave state supports a Fermi surface and a body-centered-cubic crystal order at the same time with the estimated critical temperature being about one tenth of the noninteracting Fermi energy. Our results suggest the emergence of a fermionic quantum solid that should be observable in the current experimental setup.

  14. A General Solid-State Synthesis of Chemically-Doped Fluorescent Graphene Quantum Dots for Bioimaging and Optoelectronic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Chong-Bo

    2015-05-05

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted increasing interest because of their excellent properties such as strong photoluminescence, excellent biocompatibility and low cost. Herein, we develop a general method for the synthesis of doped and undoped GQDs, which relies on direct carbonization of organic precursors at solid state.

  15. Zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Wei; Tycko, Robert

    2012-09-14

    We present the theoretical description and experimental demonstration of a zero-quantum stochastic dipolar recoupling (ZQ-SDR) technique for solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of (13)C-labeled molecules, including proteins, under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The ZQ-SDR technique combines zero-quantum recoupling pulse sequence blocks with randomly varying chemical shift precession periods to create randomly amplitude- and phase-modulated effective homonuclear magnetic dipole-dipole couplings. To a good approximation, couplings between different (13)C spin pairs become uncorrelated under ZQ-SDR, leading to spin dynamics (averaged over many repetitions of the ZQ-SDR sequence) that are fully described by an orientation-dependent N × N polarization transfer rate matrix for an N-spin system, with rates that are inversely proportional to the sixth power of internuclear distances. Suppression of polarization transfers due to non-commutivity of pairwise couplings (i.e., dipolar truncation) does not occur under ZQ-SDR, as we show both analytically and numerically. Experimental demonstrations are reported for uniformly (13)C-labeled L-valine powder (at 14.1 T and 28.00 kHz MAS), uniformly (13)C-labeled protein GB1 in microcrystalline form (at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS), and partially labeled (13)C-labeled protein GB1 (at 14.1 T and 40.00 kHz MAS). The experimental results verify that spin dynamics under ZQ-SDR are described accurately by rate matrices and suggest the utility of ZQ-SDR in structural studies of (13)C-labeled solids.

  16. Nonmonotonic size dependence in the hole mobility of methoxide-stabilized PbSe quantum dot solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Marcus; Engel, Jesse H; Ferry, Vivian E; Hanifi, David; Liu, Yi; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2013-08-27

    We present a facile procedure to fabricate p-type PbSe-based quantum dot solids with mobilities as large as 0.3 cm(2) V(-1)s(-1). Upon partial ligand exchange of oleate-capped PbSe quantum dots with the methoxide ion, we observe a pronounced red shift in the excitonic transition in conjunction with a large increase in conductivity. We show that there is little correlation between these two phenomena and that the electronic coupling energy in PbSe quantum dot solids is much smaller than often assumed. However, we observe for the first time a nonmonotonic size dependence of the hole mobility, illustrating that coupling can nonetheless be dominant in determining the transport characteristics. We attribute these effects to a decrease in charging energy and interparticle spacing, leading to enhanced electronic coupling on one hand and enhanced dipole interactions on the other hand, which is held responsible for the majority of the red shift.

  17. Role of bond adaptability in the passivation of colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Thon, Susanna

    2013-09-24

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solids are attractive materials for photovoltaic devices due to their low-cost solution-phase processing, high absorption cross sections, and their band gap tunability via the quantum size effect. Recent advances in CQD solar cell performance have relied on new surface passivation strategies. Specifically, cadmium cation passivation of surface chalcogen sites in PbS CQDs has been shown to contribute to lowered trap state densities and improved photovoltaic performance. Here we deploy a generalized solution-phase passivation strategy as a means to improving CQD surface management. We connect the effects of the choice of metal cation on solution-phase surface passivation, film-phase trap density of states, minority carrier mobility, and photovoltaic power conversion efficiency. We show that trap passivation and midgap density of states determine photovoltaic device performance and are strongly influenced by the choice of metal cation. Supported by density functional theory simulations, we propose a model for the role of cations, a picture wherein metals offering the shallowest electron affinities and the greatest adaptability in surface bonding configurations eliminate both deep and shallow traps effectively even in submonolayer amounts. This work illustrates the importance of materials choice in designing a flexible passivation strategy for optimum CQD device performance. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. STRUCTURAL STUDIES OF BIOMATERIALS USING DOUBLE-QUANTUM SOLID-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobny, Gary P.; Long, J. R.; Karlsson, T.; Shaw, Wendy J.; Popham, Jennifer M.; Oyler, N.; Bower, Paula M.; Stringer, J.; Gregory, D.; Mehta, M.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2004-10-31

    Proteins directly control the nucleation and growth of biominerals, but the details of molecular recognition at the protein-biomineral interface remain poorly understood. The elucidation of recognition mechanisms at this interface may provide design principles for advanced materials development in medical and ceramic composites technologies. Here, we describe both the theory and practice of double-quantum solid-stateNMR(ssNMR) structure-determination techniques, as they are used to determine the secondary structures of surface-adsorbed peptides and proteins. In particular, we have used ssNMR dipolar techniques to provide the first high-resolution structural and dynamic characterization of a hydrated biomineralization protein, salivary statherin, adsorbed to its biologically relevant hydroxyapatite (HAP) surface. Here, we also review NMR data on peptides designed to adsorb from aqueous solutions onto highly porous hydrophobic surfaces with specific helical secondary structures. The adsorption or covalent attachment of biological macromolecules onto polymer materials to improve their biocompatibility has been pursued using a variety of approaches, but key to understanding their efficacy is the verification of the structure and dynamics of the immobilized biomolecules using double-quantum ssNMR spectroscopy.

  19. Topics in quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yunjin

    In the thesis, we present a series of investigations for quantum transport of charge and heat in solid state systems. The first topic of the thesis focuses on the fundamental quantum problems which can be studied with electron transport along with the correlations of detectors to measure physical properties. We theoretically describe a generalized ``which-path'' measurement using a pair of coupled electronic Mach-Zehnder Interferometers. In the second topic of thesis, we investigate an operational approach to measure the tunneling time based on the Larmor clock. To handle the cases of indirect measurement from the first and second topics, we introduce the contextual values formalism. The form of the contextual values provides direct physical insight into the measurement being performed, providing information about the correlation strength between system and detector, the measurement inefficiency, the proper background removal, and the conditioned average value of the system operator. Additionally, the weak interaction limit of these conditioned averages produces weak values of the system operator and an additional detector dependent disturbance term for both cases. In our treatment of the third topic of the thesis, we propose a three terminal heat engine based on semiconductor superlattices for energy harvesting. The periodicity of the superlattice structure creates an energy miniband, giving an energy window to allow electron transport. We find that this device delivers a large amount of power, nearly twice that produced by the heat engine based on quantum wells, with a small reduction of efficiency. This engine also works as a refrigerator in a different regime of the system's parameters. The thermoelectric performance of the refrigerator is analyzed, including the cooling power and coefficient of performance in the optimized condition. We also calculate phonon heat current through the system and explore the reduction of phonon heat current compared to the bulk

  20. CRITIC2: A program for real-space analysis of quantum chemical interactions in solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Johnson, Erin R.; Luaña, Víctor

    2014-03-01

    We present CRITIC2, a program for the analysis of quantum-mechanical atomic and molecular interactions in periodic solids. This code, a greatly improved version of the previous CRITIC program (Otero-de-la Roza et al., 2009), can: (i) find critical points of the electron density and related scalar fields such as the electron localization function (ELF), Laplacian, … (ii) integrate atomic properties in the framework of Bader’s Atoms-in-Molecules theory (QTAIM), (iii) visualize non-covalent interactions in crystals using the non-covalent interactions (NCI) index, (iv) generate relevant graphical representations including lines, planes, gradient paths, contour plots, atomic basins, … and (v) perform transformations between file formats describing scalar fields and crystal structures. CRITIC2 can interface with the output produced by a variety of electronic structure programs including WIEN2k, elk, PI, abinit, Quantum ESPRESSO, VASP, Gaussian, and, in general, any other code capable of writing the scalar field under study to a three-dimensional grid. CRITIC2 is parallelized, completely documented (including illustrative test cases) and publicly available under the GNU General Public License. Catalogue identifier: AECB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: yes No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11686949 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 337020731 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 and 90. Computer: Workstations. Operating system: Unix, GNU/Linux. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Shared-memory parallelization can be used for most tasks. Classification: 7.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 157 Nature of problem: Analysis of quantum

  1. Improved color metrics in solid-state lighting via utilization of on-chip quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangum, Benjamin D.; Landes, Tiemo S.; Theobald, Brian R.; Kurtin, Juanita N.

    2017-02-01

    While Quantum Dots (QDs) have found commercial success in display applications, there are currently no widely available solid state lighting products making use of QD nanotechnology. In order to have real-world success in today's lighting market, QDs must be capable of being placed in on-chip configurations, as remote phosphor configurations are typically much more expensive. Here we demonstrate solid-state lighting devices made with on-chip QDs. These devices show robust reliability under both dry and wet high stress conditions. High color quality lighting metrics can easily be achieved using these narrow, tunable QD downconverters: CRI values of Ra > 90 as well as R9 values > 80 are readily available when combining QDs with green phosphors. Furthermore, we show that QDs afford a 15% increase in overall efficiency compared to traditional phosphor downconverted SSL devices. The fundamental limit of QD linewidth is examined through single particle QD emission studies. Using standard Cd-based QD synthesis, it is found that single particle linewidths of 20 nm FWHM represent a lower limit to the narrowness of QD emission in the near term.

  2. Z3-order theory of quantum inelastic scattering of charges by solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, V. U.; Nishigaki, S.

    2002-03-01

    Although the nonlinear response of solids in such phenomena as ion slowing and second harmonic generation has been studied since long ago, to our knowledge there has not existed a quantum theory of the inelastic scattering of charges by solids beyond the first Born approximation. In this paper we relate the inelastic cross section in the second Born approximation to the order Z3 to the quadratic retarded density-response function in the same (but far less trivial) fashion it has been known for the first Born approximation, deriving by this a formula applicable to describe the electron and positron energy-loss spectroscopy. The complete account of recoil is preserved. Our general formalism neither relies on a specific approximation to the dielectric response (such as the random phase approximation) nor is it restricted to scattering by a homogeneous electron gas: it is ``exact'' in the sense of inclusion of exchange and correlation and is applicable to targets of arbitrary symmetry. Based on this formalism, we perform explicit calculations of the Z3 contribution to plasmon excitation by electrons and positrons in a simple hydrodynamic model of electron gas and discuss the results, which prove to be instructive in the general case too.

  3. Solid-phase single molecule biosensing using dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbo; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to the QD560-TBA I substrate. Thus, the presence of the target thrombin can be determined based on fluorescent colocalization measurements of the nanoassemblies, without target amplification or probe separation. The detection limit of this assay reached 0.8 pM. This fluorescent colocalization assay has enabled single molecule recognition in a separation-free detection format, and can serve as a sensitive biosensing platform that greatly suppresses the nonspecific adsorption false-positive signal. This method can be extended to other areas such as multiplexed immunoassay, single cell analysis, and real time biomolecule interaction studies.The development of solid-phase surface-based single molecule imaging technology has attracted significant interest during the past decades. Here we demonstrate a sandwich hybridization method for highly sensitive detection of a single thrombin protein at a solid-phase surface based on the use of dual-color colocalization of fluorescent quantum dot (QD) nanoprobes. Green QD560-modified thrombin binding aptamer I (QD560-TBA I) were deposited on a positive poly(l-lysine) assembled layer, followed by bovine serum albumin blocking. It allowed the thrombin protein to mediate the binding of the easily detectable red QD650-modified thrombin binding aptamer II (QD650-TBA II) to

  4. Growth and characterization of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevasuwan, Wipakorn; Boonpeng, Poonyasiri; Panyakeow, Somsak; Ratanathammaphan, Somchai

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we have studied the fabrication of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules on GaAs(001) substrate grown by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy using droplet epitaxy technique and the effect of In deposition rate on the physical and optical properties of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules. The In deposition rate is varied from 0.2 ML/s to 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 ML/s. The surface morphology and cross-section were examined by ex-situ atomic force microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The increasing of In deposition rate results in the decreasing of outer and inner diameters of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules and height of InP quantum dots but increases the InP quantum dot and ringlike quantum-dot molecule densities. The photoluminescence peaks of InP ringlike quantum-dot molecules are blue-shifted and FWHM is narrower when In deposition rate is bigger.

  5. Solid Confinement of Quantum Dots in ZIF-8 for Efficient and Stable Color-Conversion White LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Wen; Mao, Yiyin; Wang, Xiaobing; Guo, Yi; He, Haiping; Ye, Zhizhen; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Peng, Xinsheng

    2017-03-13

    The powder form and low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of fluorescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) present a serious obstacle to fabricating high-efficiency film-like lighting devices. Here, we present a facile way to produce thin films of CdSex S1-x /ZnS quantum dots (QDs)@ZIF-8 with high PLQY by encapsulating red, green, and blue CdSex S1-x /ZnS QDs in ZIF-8 through a one-pot solid-confinement conversion process. The QDs@ZIF-8 thin film emits warm white light with good color quality and presents good thermal stability and long-term durability.

  6. Influence of high-pressure treatment on charge carrier transport in PbS colloidal quantum dot solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Seung Jin; Yoon, Seokhyun; Oh, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Doo Hyun; Kim, Hyun Jae

    2014-01-21

    We investigated the effects of high-pressure treatment on charge carrier transport in PbS colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solids. We applied high pressure to PbS CQD solids using nitrogen gas to reduce the inter-dot distance. Using this simple process, we obtained conductive PbS CQD solids. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy was used to study charge carrier transport as a function of pressure. We found that the minimum pressure needed to increase the dielectric constant, conductivity, and carrier mobility was 4 MPa. All properties dramatically improved at 5 MPa; for example, the mobility increased from 0.13 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 0.1 MPa to 0.91 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 5 MPa. We propose this simple process as a nondestructive approach for making conductive PbS CQD solids that are free of chemical and physical defects.

  7. Design of defect spins in piezoelectric aluminum nitride for solid-state hybrid quantum technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hosung; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    2016-02-01

    Spin defects in wide-band gap semiconductors are promising systems for the realization of quantum bits, or qubits, in solid-state environments. To date, defect qubits have only been realized in materials with strong covalent bonds. Here, we introduce a strain-driven scheme to rationally design defect spins in functional ionic crystals, which may operate as potential qubits. In particular, using a combination of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations based on hybrid density functional and many-body perturbation theory, we predicted that the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy center in piezoelectric aluminum nitride exhibits spin-triplet ground states under realistic uni- and bi-axial strain conditions; such states may be harnessed for the realization of qubits. The strain-driven strategy adopted here can be readily extended to a wide range of point defects in other wide-band gap semiconductors, paving the way to controlling the spin properties of defects in ionic systems for potential spintronic technologies.

  8. Efficient orbital storage and evaluation for quantum Monte Carlo simulations of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Researchers have applied continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods to solids with great success, but thus far applications have been largely limited to crystals with simple geometry. In these simulations, three-dimensional cubic B-splines have proven to be a fast and accurate means of storing and evaluating electron orbitals. While B-splines require less memory than other spline interpolation schemes, modern cluster nodes often have insufficient memory to store the orbitals for more complex systems. We introduce three techniques, appropriate in different circumstances, to dramatically reduce the memory required for orbital storage, while retaining high accuracy: the generalized tiling of primitive-cell orbitals into a supercell of arbitrary shape, the use of nonuniform grids for localized orbitals, and the periodic replication of localized orbitals. We give examples for cubic boron nitride and wüstite (FeO), and show that these methods can reduce the memory used for orbital storage by more than two orders of magnitude. Finally, we introduce an open-source B-spline library to facilitate the incorporation of these methods into QMC simulation codes.

  9. Hybrid organic–inorganic inks flatten the energy landscape in colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Mengxia

    2016-11-14

    Bandtail states in disordered semiconductor materials result in losses in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and inhibit carrier transport in photovoltaics. For colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films that promise low-cost, large-area, air-stable photovoltaics, bandtails are determined by CQD synthetic polydispersity and inhomogeneous aggregation during the ligand-exchange process. Here we introduce a new method for the synthesis of solution-phase ligand-exchanged CQD inks that enable a flat energy landscape and an advantageously high packing density. In the solid state, these materials exhibit a sharper bandtail and reduced energy funnelling compared with the previous best CQD thin films for photovoltaics. Consequently, we demonstrate solar cells with higher Voc and more efficient charge injection into the electron acceptor, allowing the use of a closer-to-optimum bandgap to absorb more light. These enable the fabrication of CQD solar cells made via a solution-phase ligand exchange, with a certified power conversion efficiency of 11.28%. The devices are stable when stored in air, unencapsulated, for over 1,000 h.

  10. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-01

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]·2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ∼90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance ((19)F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8](2-) anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2(6+) unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8](2-) and [Re2Br8](2-) analogues.

  11. Hybrid organic-inorganic inks flatten the energy landscape in colloidal quantum dot solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxia; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sabatini, Randy; García de Arquer, F Pelayo; Munir, Rahim; Balawi, Ahmed Hesham; Lan, Xinzheng; Fan, Fengjia; Walters, Grant; Kirmani, Ahmad R; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Laquai, Frédéric; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H

    2017-02-01

    Bandtail states in disordered semiconductor materials result in losses in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and inhibit carrier transport in photovoltaics. For colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films that promise low-cost, large-area, air-stable photovoltaics, bandtails are determined by CQD synthetic polydispersity and inhomogeneous aggregation during the ligand-exchange process. Here we introduce a new method for the synthesis of solution-phase ligand-exchanged CQD inks that enable a flat energy landscape and an advantageously high packing density. In the solid state, these materials exhibit a sharper bandtail and reduced energy funnelling compared with the previous best CQD thin films for photovoltaics. Consequently, we demonstrate solar cells with higher Voc and more efficient charge injection into the electron acceptor, allowing the use of a closer-to-optimum bandgap to absorb more light. These enable the fabrication of CQD solar cells made via a solution-phase ligand exchange, with a certified power conversion efficiency of 11.28%. The devices are stable when stored in air, unencapsulated, for over 1,000 h.

  12. Design of defect spins in piezoelectric aluminum nitride for solid-state hybrid quantum technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hosung; Govoni, Marco; Galli, Giulia

    2016-02-15

    Spin defects in wide-band gap semiconductors are promising systems for the realization of quantum bits, or qubits, in solid-state environments. To date, defect qubits have only been realized in materials with strong covalent bonds. Here, we introduce a strain-driven scheme to rationally design defect spins in functional ionic crystals, which may operate as potential qubits. In particular, using a combination of state-of-the-art ab-initio calculations based on hybrid density functional and many-body perturbation theory, we predicted that the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy center in piezoelectric aluminum nitride exhibits spin-triplet ground states under realistic uni- and bi-axial strain conditions; such states may be harnessed for the realization of qubits. The strain-driven strategy adopted here can be readily extended to a wide range of point defects in other wide-band gap semiconductors, paving the way to controlling the spin properties of defects in ionic systems for potential spintronic technologies.

  13. Hybrid organic-inorganic inks flatten the energy landscape in colloidal quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxia; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sabatini, Randy; García de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Munir, Rahim; Balawi, Ahmed Hesham; Lan, Xinzheng; Fan, Fengjia; Walters, Grant; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Laquai, Frédéric; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-11-01

    Bandtail states in disordered semiconductor materials result in losses in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and inhibit carrier transport in photovoltaics. For colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films that promise low-cost, large-area, air-stable photovoltaics, bandtails are determined by CQD synthetic polydispersity and inhomogeneous aggregation during the ligand-exchange process. Here we introduce a new method for the synthesis of solution-phase ligand-exchanged CQD inks that enable a flat energy landscape and an advantageously high packing density. In the solid state, these materials exhibit a sharper bandtail and reduced energy funnelling compared with the previous best CQD thin films for photovoltaics. Consequently, we demonstrate solar cells with higher Voc and more efficient charge injection into the electron acceptor, allowing the use of a closer-to-optimum bandgap to absorb more light. These enable the fabrication of CQD solar cells made via a solution-phase ligand exchange, with a certified power conversion efficiency of 11.28%. The devices are stable when stored in air, unencapsulated, for over 1,000 h.

  14. Hybrid organic-inorganic inks flatten the energy landscape in colloidal quantum dot solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxia; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sabatini, Randy; García de Arquer, F. Pelayo; Munir, Rahim; Balawi, Ahmed Hesham; Lan, Xinzheng; Fan, Fengjia; Walters, Grant; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Laquai, Frédéric; Amassian, Aram; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-02-01

    Bandtail states in disordered semiconductor materials result in losses in open-circuit voltage (Voc) and inhibit carrier transport in photovoltaics. For colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films that promise low-cost, large-area, air-stable photovoltaics, bandtails are determined by CQD synthetic polydispersity and inhomogeneous aggregation during the ligand-exchange process. Here we introduce a new method for the synthesis of solution-phase ligand-exchanged CQD inks that enable a flat energy landscape and an advantageously high packing density. In the solid state, these materials exhibit a sharper bandtail and reduced energy funnelling compared with the previous best CQD thin films for photovoltaics. Consequently, we demonstrate solar cells with higher Voc and more efficient charge injection into the electron acceptor, allowing the use of a closer-to-optimum bandgap to absorb more light. These enable the fabrication of CQD solar cells made via a solution-phase ligand exchange, with a certified power conversion efficiency of 11.28%. The devices are stable when stored in air, unencapsulated, for over 1,000 h.

  15. Characterization of quantum algorithms by quantum process tomography using quadrupolar spins in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampermann, H; Veeman, W S

    2005-06-01

    NMR quantum computing with qubit systems represented by nuclear spins (I=12) in small molecules in liquids has led to the most successful experimental quantum information processors so far. We use the quadrupolar spin-32 sodium nuclei of a NaNO3 single crystal as a virtual two-qubit system. The large quadrupolar coupling in comparison with the environmental interactions and the usage of strongly modulating pulses allow us to manipulate the system fast enough and at the same time keeping the decoherence reasonably slow. The experimental challenge is to characterize the "calculation" behavior of the quantum processor by process tomography which is here adapted to the quadrupolar spin system. The results of a selection of quantum gates and algorithms are presented as well as a detailed analysis of experimental results.

  16. Energy-Tunable Sources of Entangled Photons: A Viable Concept for Solid-State-Based Quantum Relays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Daruka, Istvan; Ortix, Carmine; Rastelli, Armando

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method of generating triggered entangled photon pairs with wavelength on demand. The method uses a microstructured semiconductor-piezoelectric device capable of dynamically reshaping the electronic properties of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs) via anisotropic strain engineering. Theoretical models based on k .p theory in combination with finite-element calculations show that the energy of the polarization-entangled photons emitted by QDs can be tuned in a range larger than 100 meV without affecting the degree of entanglement of the quantum source. These results pave the way towards the deterministic implementation of QD entanglement resources in all-electrically-controlled solid-state-based quantum relays.

  17. Endo-Fullerene and Doped Diamond Nanocrystallite Based Models of Qubits for Solid-State Quantum Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seongjun; Srivastava, Deepak; Cho, Kyeongjae; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Models of encapsulated 1/2 nuclear spin H-1 and P-31 atoms in fullerene and diamond nanocrystallite, respectively, are proposed and examined with ab-initio local density functional method for possible applications as single quantum bits (qubits) in solid-state quantum computers. A H-1 atom encapsulated in a fully deuterated fullerene, C(sub 20)D(sub 20), forms the first model system and ab-initio calculation shows that H-1 atom is stable in atomic state at the center of the fullerene with a barrier of about 1 eV to escape. A P-31 atom positioned at the center of a diamond nanocrystallite is the second model system, and 3 1P atom is found to be stable at the substitutional site relative to interstitial sites by 15 eV, Vacancy formation energy is 6 eV in diamond so that substitutional P-31 atom will be stable against diffusion during the formation mechanisms within the nanocrystallite. The coupling between the nuclear spin and weakly bound (valance) donor electron coupling in both systems is found to be suitable for single qubit applications, where as the spatial distributions of (valance) donor electron wave functions are found to be preferentially spread along certain lattice directions facilitating two or more qubit applications. The feasibility of the fabrication pathways for both model solid-state qubit systems within practical quantum computers is discussed with in the context of our proposed solid-state qubits.

  18. Observation of the Quantum Zeno Effect on a Single Solid State Spin

    CERN Document Server

    Wolters, Janik; Schoenfeld, Rolf Simon; Benson, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The quantum Zeno effect, i.e. the inhibition of coherent quantum dynamics by projective measurements is one of the most intriguing predictions of quantum mechanics. Here we experimentally demonstrate the quantum Zeno effect by inhibiting the microwave driven coherent spin dynamics between two ground state spin levels of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond nano-crystals. Our experiments are supported by a detailed analysis of the population dynamics via a semi-classical model.

  19. Controlling Atomic, Solid-State and Hybrid Systems for Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullans, Michael John

    Quantum information science involves the use of precise control over quantum systems to explore new technologies. However, as quantum systems are scaled up they require an ever deeper understanding of many-body physics to achieve the required degree of control. Current experiments are entering a regime which requires active control of a mesoscopic number of coupled quantum systems or quantum bits (qubits). This thesis describes several approaches to this goal and shows how mesoscopic quantum systems can be controlled and utilized for quantum information tasks. The first system we consider is the nuclear spin environment of GaAs double quantum dots containing two electrons. We show that the through appropriate control of dynamic nuclear polarization one can prepare the nuclear spin environment in three distinct collective quantum states which are useful for quantum information processing with electron spin qubits. We then investigate a hybrid system in which an optical lattice is formed in the near field scattering off an array of metallic nanoparticles by utilizing the plasmonic resonance of the nanoparticles. We show that such a system would realize new regimes of dense, ultra-cold quantum matter and can be used to create a quantum network of atoms and plasmons. Finally we investigate quantum nonlinear optical systems. We show that the intrinsic nonlinearity for plasmons in graphene can be large enough to make a quantum gate for single photons. We also consider two nonlinear optical systems based on ultracold gases of atoms. In one case, we demonstrate an all-optical single photon switch using cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) and slow light. In the second case, we study few photon physics in strongly interacting Rydberg polariton systems, where we demonstrate the existence of two and three photon bound states and study their properties.

  20. Hilbert space structure of a solid state quantum computer two-electron states of a double quantum dot artificial molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, X; Hu, Xuedong

    2000-01-01

    We study theoretically a double quantum dot hydrogen molecule in the GaAs conduction band as the basic elementary gate for a quantum computer with the electron spins in the dots serving as qubits. Such a two-dot system provides the necessary two-qubit entanglement required for quantum computation. We determine the excitation spectrum of two horizontally coupled quantum dots with two confined electrons, and study its dependence on an external magnetic field. In particular, we focus on the splitting of the lowest singlet and triplet states, the double occupation probability of the lowest states, and the relative energy scales of these states. We point out that at zero magnetic field it is difficult to have both a vanishing double occupation probability for a small error rate and a sizable exchange coupling for fast gating. On the other hand, finite magnetic fields may provide finite exchange coupling for quantum computer operations with small errors. We critically discuss the applicability of the envelope funct...

  1. Quantum mechanics and experimental solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of strained molecular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, Merrill David

    In this work 13C solid-state NMR and quantum mechanical studies of strained molecular systems are discussed. The chemical shift tensor values reported in this document were obtained using the FIREMAT method. Theoretical analyses of chemical shielding tensors were performed through the computer nodes operated by the Utah Center for High Performance Computing. Analyses were performed on sumanene, indenofluoranthene, tetrathiafulvalene, tetrathiafulvalene dimer, [2,2]paracyclophane, and 1,8-dioxa[8](2,7)pyrenophane. The FIREMAT data were fit using the TIGER data processing technique. TIGER provides a means to fit the FIREMAT data, accommodating its unique phase and relaxation characteristics. The details of the FIREMAT experiment are discussed in Chapter 1. The experimentally obtained chemical shift data were compared with calculated chemical shielding data. For these molecular systems, density functional theory was used along with the B3LYP exchange and correlation functionals. Multiple basis sets were used and relatively low errors are reported, between 2.0 ppm and 4.2 ppm. The errors reflect the difference between experimental and theoretical results. The relatively small errors are consistent with those of other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and similar molecular systems. Chapter 2 discusses the three-dimensional aspect of tensor error analysis and how it is used in determining the errors associated with comparing two chemical shift tensors, i.e., theoretically derived and experimentally determined tensors. All error values reported and discussed in this dissertation are determined using this error analysis method. Molecular conformation may be explored by variation in chemical shift tensor principal values. The ring strain in curved polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can be associated with downfield shifts in the delta33 component of the chemical shift tensor. This is discussed in Chapters 3 and 5, as it relates to sumanene, indenofluoranthene, [2

  2. Octafluorodirhenate(III) Revisited: Solid-State Preparation, Characterization, and Multiconfigurational Quantum Chemical Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariappan Balasekaran, Samundeeswari; Todorova, Tanya K.; Pham, Chien Thang; Hartmann, Thomas; Abram, Ulrich; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-06-06

    A simple method for the high-yield preparation of (NH4)2[Re2F8]· 2H2O has been developed that involves the reaction of (n-Bu4N)2[Re2Cl8] with molten ammonium bifluoride (NH4HF2). Using this method, the new salt [NH4]2[Re2F8]·2H2O was prepared in ~90% yield. The product was characterized in solution by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) and 19F nuclear magnetic resonance (19F NMR) spectroscopies and in the solid-state by elemental analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Multiconfigurational CASSCF/CASPT2 quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the molecular and electronic structure, as well as the electronic absorption spectrum of the [Re2F8] 2- anion. The metal-metal bonding in the Re2 6+ unit was quantified in terms of effective bond order (EBO) and compared to that of its [Re2Cl8] 2- and [Re2Br8] 2- analogues.

  3. Effects of Self-Assembled Monolayers on Solid-State CdS Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ardalan, Pendar

    2011-02-22

    Quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are of interest for solar energy conversion because of their tunable band gap and promise of stable, low-cost performance. We have investigated the effects of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with phosphonic acid headgroups on the bonding and performance of cadmium sulfide (CdS) solid-state QDSSCs. CdS quantum dots ∼2 to ∼6 nm in diameter were grown on SAM-passivated planar or nanostructured TiO 2 surfaces by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), and photovoltaic devices were fabricated with spiro-OMeTAD as the solid-state hole conductor. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, water contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and electrical measurements were employed to characterize the materials and the resulting device performance. The data indicate that the nature of the SAM tailgroup does not significantly affect the uptake of CdS quantum dots on TiO2 nor their optical properties, but the presence of the SAM does have a significant effect on the photovoltaic device performance. Interestingly, we observe up to ∼3 times higher power conversion efficiencies in devices with a SAM compared to those without the SAM. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Solid-state ZnS quantum dot-sensitized solar cell fabricated by the Dip-SILAR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, M.; Mirabbaszadeh, K.; Afarideh, H.

    2014-08-01

    Solid-state quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) were fabricated with zinc sulfide quantum dots (ZnS QDs), which served as the light absorber and the recombination blocking layer simultaneously. ZnS QDs were prepared successfully by a novel successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction technique based on dip-coating (Dip-SILAR). The dependences of the photovoltaic parameters on the number of SILAR cycles (n) were investigated. The cell with n = 6 (particle average size ˜9 nm) showed an energy conversion efficiency of 2.72% under the illumination of one sun (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm-2). Here we investigate also the cohesion between ZnS QDs and ZnO film to obtain a well-covering QD layer.

  5. Fundamental Limits to Coherent Scattering and Photon Coalescence from Solid-State Quantum Emitters [arXiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iles-Smith, Jake; McCutcheon, Dara; Mørk, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The desire to produce high-quality single photons for applications in quantum information science has lead to renewed interest in exploring solid-state emitters in the weak excitation regime. Under these conditions it is expected that photons are coherently scattered, and so benefit from...... find that the sideband resulting from non-Markovian relaxation of the phonon environment leads to a fundamental limit to the fraction of coherently scattered light and to the visibility of two-photon coalescence at weak driving, both of which are absent for atomic systems or within simpler Markovian...

  6. Proton-driven spin diffusion in rotating solids via reversible and irreversible quantum dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veshtort, Mikhail; Griffin, Robert G

    2011-10-07

    Proton-driven spin diffusion (PDSD) experiments in rotating solids have received a great deal of attention as a potential source of distance constraints in large biomolecules. However, the quantitative relationship between the molecular structure and observed spin diffusion has remained obscure due to the lack of an accurate theoretical description of the spin dynamics in these experiments. We start with presenting a detailed relaxation theory of PDSD in rotating solids that provides such a description. The theory applies to both conventional and radio-frequency-assisted PDSD experiments and extends to the non-Markovian regime to include such phenomena as rotational resonance (R(2)). The basic kinetic equation of the theory in the non-Markovian regime has the form of a memory function equation, with the role of the memory function played by the correlation function. The key assumption used in the derivation of this equation expresses the intuitive notion of the irreversible dissipation of coherences in macroscopic systems. Accurate expressions for the correlation functions and for the spin diffusion constants are given. The theory predicts that the spin diffusion constants governing the multi-site PDSD can be approximated by the constants observed in the two-site diffusion. Direct numerical simulations of PDSD dynamics via reversible Liouville-von Neumann equation are presented to support and compliment the theory. Remarkably, an exponential decay of the difference magnetization can be observed in such simulations in systems consisting of only 12 spins. This is a unique example of a real physical system whose typically macroscopic and apparently irreversible behavior can be traced via reversible microscopic dynamics. An accurate value for the spin diffusion constant can be usually obtained through direct simulations of PDSD in systems consisting of two (13)C nuclei and about ten (1)H nuclei from their nearest environment. Spin diffusion constants computed by this

  7. Directly deposited quantum dot solids using a colloidally stable nanoparticle ink

    KAUST Repository

    Fischer, Armin H.

    2013-08-12

    We develop a photovoltaic colloidal quantum dot ink that allows for lossless, single-step coating of large areas in a manufacturing-compatible process. Our materials strategy involves a solution-phase ligand exchange to transport compatible linkers that yield 1-thioglycerol-capped PbS quantum dots in dimethyl sulfoxide with a photoluminescence quantum yield of 24%. A proof-of-principle solar cell made from the ink exhibits 2.1% power conversion efficiency. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Deterministic quantum teleportation with feed-forward in a solid state system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, L; Salathe, Y; Oppliger, M; Kurpiers, P; Baur, M; Lang, C; Eichler, C; Puebla-Hellmann, G; Fedorov, A; Wallraff, A

    2013-08-15

    Engineered macroscopic quantum systems based on superconducting electronic circuits are attractive for experimentally exploring diverse questions in quantum information science. At the current state of the art, quantum bits (qubits) are fabricated, initialized, controlled, read out and coupled to each other in simple circuits. This enables the realization of basic logic gates, the creation of complex entangled states and the demonstration of algorithms or error correction. Using different variants of low-noise parametric amplifiers, dispersive quantum non-demolition single-shot readout of single-qubit states with high fidelity has enabled continuous and discrete feedback control of single qubits. Here we realize full deterministic quantum teleportation with feed-forward in a chip-based superconducting circuit architecture. We use a set of two parametric amplifiers for both joint two-qubit and individual qubit single-shot readout, combined with flexible real-time digital electronics. Our device uses a crossed quantum bus technology that allows us to create complex networks with arbitrary connecting topology in a planar architecture. The deterministic teleportation process succeeds with order unit probability for any input state, as we prepare maximally entangled two-qubit states as a resource and distinguish all Bell states in a single two-qubit measurement with high efficiency and high fidelity. We teleport quantum states between two macroscopic systems separated by 6 mm at a rate of 10(4) s(-1), exceeding other reported implementations. The low transmission loss of superconducting waveguides is likely to enable the range of this and other schemes to be extended to significantly larger distances, enabling tests of non-locality and the realization of elements for quantum communication at microwave frequencies. The demonstrated feed-forward may also find application in error correction schemes.

  9. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  10. Electron Capture and Electron Transport by Fast Ions Penetrating Solids: An open Quantum System Approach with Sources and Sinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, M. [Institute of Physics, Karl-Franzens Universitat Graz

    2007-03-01

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study of the time evolution of electronic states of highly charged hydrogenic ions formed by capture during transmission through solids as they undergo multiple collisions and radiative decay. For this transport problem we have developed an inhomogeneous nonunitary Lindblad master equation that allows for a description of open quantum systems with both sinks (electron loss) and source (capture) present. We apply this theoretical framework to study transient coherences created in electron capture by 13.6 MeV/amu Ar18+ ions transmitted through amorphous carbon foils and decoherence during subsequent interaction with the foil. In the limit of thin targets we can directly probe electron capture cross sections under single collision conditions, while for thicker targets we follow the partially coherent dynamics of the open quantum system in interaction with the solid as a function of interaction time. The calculated results are in close agreement with experimental data obtained at the LISE facility in GANIL. Photon intensities from excited argon ions were determined through high resolution x-ray spectroscopy in which individual fine structure components were resolved. Measurements were performed for a wide range of carbon foil thickness to study the time development of the excited state populations.

  11. Combining in-situ lithography with 3D printed solid immersion lenses for single quantum dot spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartison, Marc; Portalupi, Simone Luca; Gissibl, Timo; Jetter, Michael; Giessen, Harald; Michler, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, we report on the deterministic fabrication of solid immersion lenses (SILs) on lithographically pre-selected semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). We demonstrate the combination of state-of-the-art low-temperature in-situ photolithography and femtosecond 3D direct laser writing. Several QDs are pre-selected with a localization accuracy of less than 2 nm with low-temperature lithography and three-dimensional laser writing is then used to deterministically fabricate hemispherical lenses on top of the quantum emitter with a submicrometric precision. Due to the printed lenses, the QD light extraction efficiency is enhanced by a factor of 2, the pumping laser is focused more, and the signal-to-noise ratio is increased, leading to an improved localization accuracy of the QD to well below 1 nm. Furthermore, modifications of the QD properties, i.e. strain and variation of internal quantum efficiency induced by the printed lenses, are also reported. PMID:28057941

  12. Combining in-situ lithography with 3D printed solid immersion lenses for single quantum dot spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartison, Marc; Portalupi, Simone Luca; Gissibl, Timo; Jetter, Michael; Giessen, Harald; Michler, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In the current study, we report on the deterministic fabrication of solid immersion lenses (SILs) on lithographically pre-selected semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). We demonstrate the combination of state-of-the-art low-temperature in-situ photolithography and femtosecond 3D direct laser writing. Several QDs are pre-selected with a localization accuracy of less than 2 nm with low-temperature lithography and three-dimensional laser writing is then used to deterministically fabricate hemispherical lenses on top of the quantum emitter with a submicrometric precision. Due to the printed lenses, the QD light extraction efficiency is enhanced by a factor of 2, the pumping laser is focused more, and the signal-to-noise ratio is increased, leading to an improved localization accuracy of the QD to well below 1 nm. Furthermore, modifications of the QD properties, i.e. strain and variation of internal quantum efficiency induced by the printed lenses, are also reported.

  13. Selective contacts drive charge extraction in quantum dot solids via asymmetry in carrier transfer kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2013-08-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solar cells achieve spectrally selective optical absorption in a thin layer of solution-processed, size-effect tuned, nanoparticles. The best devices built to date have relied heavily on drift-based transport due to the action of an electric field in a depletion region that extends throughout the thickness of the quantum dot layer. Here we study for the first time the behaviour of the best-performing class of colloidal quantum dot films in the absence of an electric field, by screening using an electrolyte. We find that the action of selective contacts on photovoltage sign and amplitude can be retained, implying that the contacts operate by kinetic preferences of charge transfer for either electrons or holes. We develop a theoretical model to explain these experimental findings. The work is the first to present a switch in the photovoltage in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by purposefully formed selective contacts, opening the way to new strategies in the engineering of colloidal quantum dot solar cells. © 2013 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective contacts drive charge extraction in quantum dot solids via asymmetry in carrier transfer kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Sero, Ivan; Bertoluzzi, Luca; Gonzalez-Pedro, Victoria; Gimenez, Sixto; Fabregat-Santiago, Francisco; Kemp, Kyle W.; Sargent, Edward H.; Bisquert, Juan

    2013-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dot solar cells achieve spectrally selective optical absorption in a thin layer of solution-processed, size-effect tuned, nanoparticles. The best devices built to date have relied heavily on drift-based transport due to the action of an electric field in a depletion region that extends throughout the thickness of the quantum dot layer. Here we study for the first time the behaviour of the best-performing class of colloidal quantum dot films in the absence of an electric field, by screening using an electrolyte. We find that the action of selective contacts on photovoltage sign and amplitude can be retained, implying that the contacts operate by kinetic preferences of charge transfer for either electrons or holes. We develop a theoretical model to explain these experimental findings. The work is the first to present a switch in the photovoltage in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by purposefully formed selective contacts, opening the way to new strategies in the engineering of colloidal quantum dot solar cells.

  15. Effect of Environment on the Fidelity of Control and Measurements of Solid-State Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd, 1998. [24] Y. Liu, L. F. Wei, and F. Nori , “Generation of nonclassical photon states using a superconducting qubit in... Nori , “Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits,” Nature, vol. 474, p. 589, 2011. 120 [86] J. Q. You and F. Nori , “Quantum...information processing with superconducting qubits in a microwave field,” Phys. Rev. B, vol. 68, p. 064509, 2003. [87] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, and F. Nori

  16. Reducing Phonon-Induced Decoherence in Solid-State Single-Photon Sources with Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, T.; Somaschi, N.; Antón, C.; De Santis, L.; Coppola, G.; Giesz, V.; Lemaître, A.; Sagnes, I.; Auffèves, A.; Senellart, P.

    2017-06-01

    Solid-state emitters are excellent candidates for developing integrated sources of single photons. Yet, phonons degrade the photon indistinguishability both through pure dephasing of the zero-phonon line and through phonon-assisted emission. Here, we study theoretically and experimentally the indistinguishability of photons emitted by a semiconductor quantum dot in a microcavity as a function of temperature. We show that a large coupling to a high quality factor cavity can simultaneously reduce the effect of both phonon-induced sources of decoherence. It first limits the effect of pure dephasing on the zero-phonon line with indistinguishabilities above 97% up to 18 K. Moreover, it efficiently redirects the phonon sidebands into the zero-phonon line and brings the indistinguishability of the full emission spectrum from 87% (24%) without cavity effect to more than 99% (76%) at 0K (20K). We provide guidelines for optimal cavity designs that further minimize the phonon-induced decoherence.

  17. Improved Performance of Solid-State Gr(a)tzel Solar Cell by Cosensitization of Quantum Dot and Dye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; WANG Li-Duo; LI Jiang-Wei; QIU Yong

    2004-01-01

    We report a new cosensitization utilizing quantum dot (QD) PbS and Cis-(SCN)2Bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate)ruthenium (N3) dye on the nanoporous TiO2 film. Solid-state Gratzel solar cells with the cosensitized films show an improved overall efficiency by 200% relative to the cells assembled with only N3 sensitization and an extremely high open-circuit voltage of 840mV, and a fill factor of 70.5%. Back reaction characteristics of the above cells are also investigated, demonstrating a great suppression of recombination due to cosensitization. It seems that the cosensitization also facilitates the electron injection into the conduction band of TiO2.

  18. Design for an efficient single photon source based on a single quantum dot embedded in a parabolic solid immersion lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaraj, Vasanthan; Baek, Jongseo; Jang, Yudong; Jeong, Hyuk; Lee, Donghan

    2016-04-18

    We have designed a single photon emitter based on a single quantum dot embedded within a single mode parabolic solid immersion lens (pSIL) and a capping low-index pSIL. Numerical simulations predicted that the emitter performance should exhibit a high photon collection efficiency with excellent far-field emission properties, broadband operation, and good tolerance in its geometric (spatial configuration) parameters. Good geometric tolerance in a single-mode pSIL without yielding significant losses in the photon collection efficiency is advantageous for device fabrication. The low-index top pSIL layer provided this structure with a high photon collection efficiency, even in the case of a small numerical aperture (NA). Photon collection efficiencies of 64% and 78% were expected for NA values of 0.41 and 0.5, respectively. In addition to the benefits listed above, our combined pSIL design provided excellent broadband performance in a 100 nm range.

  19. Estimating the Coherence of Noise in Quantum Control of a Solid-State Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guanru; Wallman, Joel J.; Buonacorsi, Brandon; Cho, Franklin H.; Park, Daniel K.; Xin, Tao; Lu, Dawei; Baugh, Jonathan; Laflamme, Raymond

    2016-12-01

    To exploit a given physical system for quantum information processing, it is critical to understand the different types of noise affecting quantum control. Distinguishing coherent and incoherent errors is extremely useful as they can be reduced in different ways. Coherent errors are generally easier to reduce at the hardware level, e.g., by improving calibration, whereas some sources of incoherent errors, e.g., T2* processes, can be reduced by engineering robust pulses. In this work, we illustrate how purity benchmarking and randomized benchmarking can be used together to distinguish between coherent and incoherent errors and to quantify the reduction in both of them due to using optimal control pulses and accounting for the transfer function in an electron spin resonance system. We also prove that purity benchmarking provides bounds on the optimal fidelity and diamond norm that can be achieved by correcting the coherent errors through improving calibration.

  20. Nanoscale science and engineering forum (706c) design of solid lipid particles with iron oxide quantum dots for the delivery of therapeutic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solid lipid particles provide a method to encapsulate and control the release of drugs in vivo but lack the imaging capability provided by CdS quantum dots. This shortcoming was addressed by combining these two technologies into a model system that uses iron oxide as a non-toxic imaging component in...

  1. Two-Photon Photoemission Study of Competing Auger and Surface-Mediated Relaxation of Hot Electrons in CdSe Quantum Dot Solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sippel, P.; Albrecht, W.; Mitoraj, D.; Eichberger, R.; Hannappel, T.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Solids composed of colloidal quantum dots hold promise for third generation highly efficient thin-film photovoltaic cells. The presence of well-separated conduction electron states opens the possibility for an energy-selective collection of hot and equilibrated carriers, pushing the efficiency above

  2. Perturbation approach for nuclear magnetic resonance solid-state quantum computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Berman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamics of a nuclear-spin quantum computer with a large number (L=1000 of qubits is considered using a perturbation approach. Small parameters are introduced and used to compute the error in an implementation of an entanglement between remote qubits, using a sequence of radio-frequency pulses. The error is computed up to the different orders of the perturbation theory and tested using exact numerical solution.

  3. Quantum State-Resolved Reactive and Inelastic Scattering at Gas-Liquid and Gas-Solid Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grütter, Monika; Nelson, Daniel J.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum state-resolved reactive and inelastic scattering at gas-liquid and gas-solid interfaces has become a research field of considerable interest in recent years. The collision and reaction dynamics of internally cold gas beams from liquid or solid surfaces is governed by two main processes, impulsive scattering (IS), where the incident particles scatter in a few-collisions environment from the surface, and trapping-desorption (TD), where full equilibration to the surface temperature (T{TD}≈ T{s}) occurs prior to the particles' return to the gas phase. Impulsive scattering events, on the other hand, result in significant rotational, and to a lesser extent vibrational, excitation of the scattered molecules, which can be well-described by a Boltzmann-distribution at a temperature (T{IS}>>T{s}). The quantum-state resolved detection used here allows the disentanglement of the rotational, vibrational, and translational degrees of freedom of the scattered molecules. The two examples discussed are (i) reactive scattering of monoatomic fluorine from room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and (ii) inelastic scattering of benzene from a heated (˜500 K) gold surface. In the former experiment, rovibrational states of the nascent HF beam are detected using direct infrared absorption spectroscopy, and in the latter, a resonace-enhanced multi-photon-ionization (REMPI) scheme is employed in combination with a velocity-map imaging (VMI) device, which allows the detection of different vibrational states of benzene excited during the scattering process. M. E. Saecker, S. T. Govoni, D. V. Kowalski, M. E. King and G. M. Nathanson Science 252, 1421, 1991. A. M. Zolot, W. W. Harper, B. G. Perkins, P. J. Dagdigian and D. J. Nesbitt J. Chem. Phys 125, 021101, 2006. J. R. Roscioli and D. J. Nesbitt Faraday Disc. 150, 471, 2011.

  4. Generation of Light with Multimode Time-Delayed Entanglement Using Storage in a Solid-State Spin-Wave Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kate R.; Beavan, Sarah E.; Longdell, Jevon J.; Sellars, Matthew J.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we demonstrate generating and storing entanglement in a solid-state spin-wave quantum memory with on-demand readout using the process of rephased amplified spontaneous emission (RASE). Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), resulting from an inverted ensemble of Pr3 + ions doped into a Y2 SiO5 crystal, generates entanglement between collective states of the praseodymium ensemble and the output light. The ensemble is then rephased using a four-level photon echo technique. Entanglement between the ASE and its echo is confirmed and the inseparability violation preserved when the RASE is stored as a spin wave for up to 5 μ s . RASE is shown to be temporally multimode with almost perfect distinguishability between two temporal modes demonstrated. These results pave the way for the use of multimode solid-state quantum memories in scalable quantum networks.

  5. Generation of Light with Multimode Time-Delayed Entanglement Using Storage in a Solid-State Spin-Wave Quantum Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kate R; Beavan, Sarah E; Longdell, Jevon J; Sellars, Matthew J

    2016-07-01

    Here, we demonstrate generating and storing entanglement in a solid-state spin-wave quantum memory with on-demand readout using the process of rephased amplified spontaneous emission (RASE). Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), resulting from an inverted ensemble of Pr^{3+} ions doped into a Y_{2}SiO_{5} crystal, generates entanglement between collective states of the praseodymium ensemble and the output light. The ensemble is then rephased using a four-level photon echo technique. Entanglement between the ASE and its echo is confirmed and the inseparability violation preserved when the RASE is stored as a spin wave for up to 5  μs. RASE is shown to be temporally multimode with almost perfect distinguishability between two temporal modes demonstrated. These results pave the way for the use of multimode solid-state quantum memories in scalable quantum networks.

  6. Effects of QD surface coverage in solid-state PbS quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2013-06-01

    Lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) were grown in situ on nanoporous TiO 2 by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) and by atomic layer deposition (ALD), to fabricate solid-state quantum-dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). With the ultimate goal of increasing QD surface coverage, this work compares the impact of these two synthetic routes on the light absorption and electrical properties of devices. A higher current density was observed in the SILAR-grown QD devices under reverse bias, as compared to ALD-grown QD devices, attributed to injection problems of the lower-band-gap QDs present in the SILAR-grown QD device. To understand the effects of QD surface coverage on device performance, particularly interfacial recombination, electron lifetimes were measured for varying QD deposition cycles. Electron lifetimes were found to decrease with increasing SILAR cycles, indicating that the expected decrease in recombination between electrons in the TiO2 and holes in the hole-transport material, due to increased QD surface coverage, is not the dominant effect of increased deposition cycles. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. Phosphonate self-assembled monolayers as organic linkers in solid-state quantum dot sensetized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ardalan, Pendar

    2010-06-01

    We have employed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, water contact angle (WCA) measurements, ellipsometry, and electrical measurements to study the effects of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) with phosphonic acid headgroups on the bonding and performance of cadmium sulfide (CdS) solid-state quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). ∼2 to ∼6 nm size CdS quantum dots (QDs) were grown on the SAM-passivated TiO2 surfaces by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Our results show differences in the bonding of the CdS QDs at the TiO2 surfaces with a SAM linker. Moreover, our data indicate that presence of a SAM increases the CdS uptake on TiO2 as well as the performance of the resulting devices. Importantly, we observe ∼2 times higher power conversion efficiencies in the devices with a SAM compared to those that lack a SAM. © 2010 IEEE.

  8. Concept of Quantum Geometry in Optoelectronic Processes in Solids: Application to Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Morimoto, Takahiro

    2017-03-20

    The concept of topology is becoming more and more relevant to the properties and functions of electronic materials including various transport phenomena and optical responses. A pedagogical introduction is given here to the basic ideas and their applications to optoelectronic processes in solids.

  9. Evaluation of low-cadmium ZnCdSeS alloyed quantum dots for remote phosphor solid-state lighting technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siffalovic, Peter; Badanova, Dominika; Vojtko, Andrej; Jergel, Matej; Hodas, Martin; Pelletta, Marco; Sabol, Dusan; Macha, Marek; Majkova, Eva

    2015-08-10

    We report on the possibility to enhance color rendering of commercially available remote phosphor light-emitting diode modules by using low-cadmium content ZnCdSeS alloyed quantum dots. The employed numerical simulations showed that the color-rendering index of 90+ at the color-correlated temperature of 3200 K can be achieved by application of a single layer of quantum dots onto a neutral-white remote phosphor substrate. The experimental results fully support the numerical calculations, thus revealing the only limiting factor in achieving a higher photometric performance: the self-absorption effect in quantum dots. The presented low-cadmium content quantum dots allow a price-effective upgrade of already existing remote phosphor solid-state lighting technology toward a higher color-rendering capability.

  10. Theory of Finite Size Effects for Electronic Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Liquids and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Holzmann, Markus; Morales, Miguel A; Tubmann, Norm M; Ceperley, David M; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one and two-body correlation functions. We introduce new effective procedures, such as using the potential and wavefunction split-up into long and short range functions to simplify the method and we discuss how to treat backflow wavefunctions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  11. Superfluid--Solid Quantum Phase Transitions and Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklov, A. B.; Prokof'ev, N. V.

    2005-03-01

    We study superfluid (SF)--solid zero-temperature transitions in 2d lattice boson/spin models by Worm-Algorithm Monte Carlo simulations. The SF -- Valence Bond Solid (VBS) transition was recently argued to be generically of II order in violation of the Ginzburg-Landau- Wilson (GLW) paradigm [1]. We simulate the J-current model on lattices up to 64x64x64, and observe that SF- columnar VBS and SF-checkerboard solid transitions are typically weak I-order ones and in small systems they may be confused with the continuous or high-symmetry points [2]. Thus, in the simulated model, the SF-VBS transition proceeds in agreement with the GLW paradigm. We explain this by dominance of standard particle and hole excitations, as opposed to fractionalized (spinon) excitations [1]. We developed a technique based on tunneling events (instantons) in the insulating phase which reveals charges of the revelant long-wave modes. While in 1d systems spinons are clearly seen in tunneling events, in two spatial dimensions tunneling is solely controlled by particles and holes in our system. This work is supported by NSF grant ITR-405460001 and PSC-CUNY- 665560035. [1] T. Senthil, A. Vishwanath, L. Balents, S. Sachdev, and M.P.A. Fisher, Science 303, 1490 (2004); [2] A.B. Kuklov, N.V. Prokof'ev, B.V. Svistunov, condmat/0406061; PRL, to be published.

  12. Conformal Fabrication of Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids for Optically Enhanced Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Labelle, André J.

    2015-05-26

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Colloidal quantum dots (CQD) are an attractive thin-film material for photovoltaic applications due to low material costs, ease of fabrication, and size-tunable band gap. Unfortunately, today they suffer from a compromise between light absorption and photocarrier extraction, a fact that currently prevents the complete harvest of incoming above-band-gap solar photons. We have investigated the use of structured substrates and/or electrodes to increase the effective light path through the active material and found that these designs require highly conformal application of the light-absorbing films to achieve the greatest enhancement. This conformality requirement derives from the need for maximal absorption enhancement combined with shortest-distance charge transport. Here we report on a means of processing highly conformal layer-by-layer deposited CQD absorber films onto microstructured, light-recycling electrodes. Specifically, we engineer surface hydrophilicity to achieve conformal deposition of upper layers atop underlying ones. We show that only with the application of conformal coating can we achieve optimal quantum efficiency and enhanced power conversion efficiency in structured-electrode CQD cells.

  13. Conformal fabrication of colloidal quantum dot solids for optically enhanced photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, André J; Thon, Susanna M; Kim, Jin Young; Lan, Xinzheng; Zhitomirsky, David; Kemp, Kyle W; Sargent, Edward H

    2015-05-26

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQD) are an attractive thin-film material for photovoltaic applications due to low material costs, ease of fabrication, and size-tunable band gap. Unfortunately, today they suffer from a compromise between light absorption and photocarrier extraction, a fact that currently prevents the complete harvest of incoming above-band-gap solar photons. We have investigated the use of structured substrates and/or electrodes to increase the effective light path through the active material and found that these designs require highly conformal application of the light-absorbing films to achieve the greatest enhancement. This conformality requirement derives from the need for maximal absorption enhancement combined with shortest-distance charge transport. Here we report on a means of processing highly conformal layer-by-layer deposited CQD absorber films onto microstructured, light-recycling electrodes. Specifically, we engineer surface hydrophilicity to achieve conformal deposition of upper layers atop underlying ones. We show that only with the application of conformal coating can we achieve optimal quantum efficiency and enhanced power conversion efficiency in structured-electrode CQD cells.

  14. Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of Strongly-Correlated Molecules and Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morales, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We propose a method of implementing projected wave functions for second-quantized auxiliary- field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) techniques. The method is based on expressing the two-body projector as one-body terms coupled to binary Ising fields. To benchmark the method, we choose to study the two-dimensional (2D) one-band Hubbard model with repulsive interactions using the constrained-path MC (CPMC). The CPMC uses a trial wave function to guide the random walks so that the so-called fermion sign problem can be eliminated. The trial wave function also serves as the importance function in Monte Carlo sampling. AS such, the quality of the trial wave function has a direct impact to the efficiency and accuracy of the simulations.

  15. Quantum Nanomechanics

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Nanomechanics is the emerging field which pertains to the mechanical behavior of nanoscale systems in the quantum domain. Unlike the conventional studies of vibration of molecules and phonons in solids, quantum nanomechanics is defined as the quantum behavior of the entire mechanical structure, including all of its constituents--the atoms, the molecules, the ions, the electrons as well as other excitations. The relevant degrees of freedom of the system are described by macroscopic var...

  16. Towards hybrid quantum systems: Trapping a single atom near a nanoscale solid-state structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiecke T.G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We describe and demonstrate a method to deterministically trap single atoms near nanoscale solid-state objects. The trap is formed by the interference of an optical tweezer and its reflection from the nano object, creating a one-dimensional optical lattice where the first lattice site is at z0 ∼ λ/4 from the surface. Using a tapered optical fiber as the nanoscopic object, we characterize the loading into different lattice sites by means of the AC-Stark shift induced by a guided fiber mode. We demonstrate a loading efficiency of 94(6% into the first lattice site, and measure the cooperativity for the emission of the atom into the guided mode of the nanofiber. We show that by tailoring the dimensions of the nanofiber the distance of the trap to the surface can be adjusted. This method is applicable to a large variety of nanostructures and represents a promising starting point for interfacing single atoms with arbitrary nanoscale solid-state systems.

  17. Efficient inorganic solid solar cells composed of perovskite and PbS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Jun; Huang, Yang; Wei, Junfeng; Liu, Feng; Shao, Zhipeng; Hu, Linhua; Chen, Shuanghong; Yang, Shangfeng; Tang, Junwang; Yao, Jianxi; Dai, Songyuan

    2015-05-01

    Lead halide perovskite solar cells have attracted great interest due to their high efficiency and simple fabrication process. However, the high efficiency heavily relies on expensive organic hole-transporting materials (OHTMs) such as 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD), it is preferable to replace these expensive OHTMs by inorganic and low cost materials. Here, we report colloidal PbS quantum dots synthesized by a facile method and used as the inorganic hole-transporting material in a hybrid perovskite solar cell. By controlling the crystalline morphology of the perovskite capping layer, the recombination process is significantly retarded. Furthermore, a pure inorganic solar cell prepared by a two-step process demonstrated a nearly 8% power conversion efficiency due to efficient charge separation by a cascade of junctions and retarding charge recombination by a void-free capping layer. The stability of the inorganic solar cell was also tested with a little decay observed within ca. 100 h.Lead halide perovskite solar cells have attracted great interest due to their high efficiency and simple fabrication process. However, the high efficiency heavily relies on expensive organic hole-transporting materials (OHTMs) such as 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9'-spirobifluorene (spiro-MeOTAD), it is preferable to replace these expensive OHTMs by inorganic and low cost materials. Here, we report colloidal PbS quantum dots synthesized by a facile method and used as the inorganic hole-transporting material in a hybrid perovskite solar cell. By controlling the crystalline morphology of the perovskite capping layer, the recombination process is significantly retarded. Furthermore, a pure inorganic solar cell prepared by a two-step process demonstrated a nearly 8% power conversion efficiency due to efficient charge separation by a cascade of junctions and retarding charge recombination by a void-free capping layer

  18. Experimental study of two-dimensional quantum Wigner solid in zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    At temperatures T → 0, strongly interacting two-dimensional (2D) electron systems manifest characteristic insulating behaviors that are key for understanding the nature of the ground state in light of the interplay between disorder and electron-electron interaction. In contrast to the hopping conductance demonstrated in the insulating side of the metal-to-insulator transition, the ultra-high quality 2D systems exhibit nonactivated T-dependence of the conductivity even for dilute carrier concentrations down to 7×10{sup 8} cm{sup −2}. The apparent metal-to-insulator transition (MIT) occurs for a large r{sub s} value around 40 for which a Wigner Crystalllization is expected. The magnetoresistance for a series of carrier densities in the vicinity of the transition exhibits a characteristic sign change in weak perpendicular magnetic field. Within the Wigner Crystallization regime (with r{sub s} > 40), we report an experimental observation of a characteristic nonlinear threshold behavior from a high-resolution dc dynamical response as an evidence for aWigner crystallization in high-purity GaAs 2D hole systems in zero magnetic field. The system under an increasing current drive exhibits voltage oscillations with negative differential resistance. They confirm the coexistence of a moving crystal along with striped edge states as observed for electrons on helium surfaces. Moreover, the threshold is well below the typical classical levels due to a different pinning and depinning mechanism that is possibly related to quantum processes.

  19. Experimental study of two-dimensional quantum Wigner solid in zero magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    At temperatures T → 0, strongly interacting two-dimensional (2D) electron systems manifest characteristic insulating behaviors that are key for understanding the nature of the ground state in light of the interplay between disorder and electron-electron interaction. In contrast to the hopping conductance demonstrated in the insulating side of the metal-to-insulator transition, the ultra-high quality 2D systems exhibit nonactivated T-dependence of the conductivity even for dilute carrier concentrations down to 7×108 cm-2. The apparent metal-to-insulator transition (MIT) occurs for a large rs value around 40 for which a Wigner Crystalllization is expected. The magnetoresistance for a series of carrier densities in the vicinity of the transition exhibits a characteristic sign change in weak perpendicular magnetic field. Within the Wigner Crystallization regime (with rs > 40), we report an experimental observation of a characteristic nonlinear threshold behavior from a high-resolution dc dynamical response as an evidence for aWigner crystallization in high-purity GaAs 2D hole systems in zero magnetic field. The system under an increasing current drive exhibits voltage oscillations with negative differential resistance. They confirm the coexistence of a moving crystal along with striped edge states as observed for electrons on helium surfaces. Moreover, the threshold is well below the typical classical levels due to a different pinning and depinning mechanism that is possibly related to quantum processes.

  20. Propagation of Structural Disorder in Epitaxially Connected Quantum Dot Solids from Atomic to Micron Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitzky, Benjamin H; Hovden, Robert; Whitham, Kevin; Yang, Jun; Wise, Frank; Hanrath, Tobias; Kourkoutis, Lena F

    2016-09-14

    Epitaxially connected superlattices of self-assembled colloidal quantum dots present a promising route toward exquisite control of electronic structure through precise hierarchical structuring across multiple length scales. Here, we uncover propagation of disorder as an essential feature in these systems, which intimately connects order at the atomic, superlattice, and grain scales. Accessing theoretically predicted exotic electronic states and highly tunable minibands will therefore require detailed understanding of the subtle interplay between local and long-range structure. To that end, we developed analytical methods to quantitatively characterize the propagating disorder in terms of a real paracrystal model and directly observe the dramatic impact of angstrom scale translational disorder on structural correlations at hundreds of nanometers. Using this framework, we discover improved order accompanies increasing sample thickness and identify the substantial effect of small fractions of missing epitaxial bonds on statistical disorder. These results have significant experimental and theoretical implications for the elusive goals of long-range carrier delocalization and true miniband formation.

  1. The formation of the angular dependences of the inelastically scattered electrons by their quantum transport near the surface of a solid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim V. Korablev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of the formation of angular dependences of electrons emitted from a disordered solid and experiencing inelastic scattering have been considered. Such fine details of the dependences are formed by the processes of quantum transport of emitted particles. We took the cases of two-particle and multi-particle inelastic processes. Qualitative and quantitative assessments of the relative contributions of different groups of particles were carried out. The effects related to quantum electron transport were shown to be generally more pronounced in the case of registration of electrons generated inside the solid in the inelastic scattering of particles of the primary beam. This is true both for the electrons generated by ionization processes and Auger electrons. The obtained results point to the possibility of using this effect in applied electron spectroscopy.

  2. Probing organometallic reactions by time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in solution and in the solid state using quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calladine, James A; Horvath, Raphael; Davies, Andrew J; Wriglesworth, Alisdair; Sun, Xue-Zhong; George, Michael W

    2015-05-01

    The photochemistry and photophysics of metal carbonyl compounds (W(CO)6, Cp*Rh(CO)2 (Cp* = η(5)-C5Me5), and fac-[Re(CO)3(4,4'-bpy)2Br] [bpy = bipyridine]) have been examined on the nanosecond timescale using a time-resolved infrared spectrometer with an external cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) as the infrared source. We show the photochemistry of W(CO)6 in alkane solution is easily monitored, and very sensitive measurements are possible with this approach, meaning it can monitor small transients with absorbance changes less than 10(-6) ΔOD. The C-H activation of Cp*Rh(CO)(C6H12) to form Cp*Rh(CO)(C6H11)H occurs within the first few tens of nanoseconds following photolysis, and we demonstrate that kinetics obtained following deconvolution are in excellent agreement with those measured using an ultrafast laser-based spectrometer. We also show that the high flux and tunability of QCLs makes them suited for solid-state and time-resolved measurements.

  3. Interfacial Chemistry and the Design of Solid-Phase Nucleic Acid Hybridization Assays Using Immobilized Quantum Dots as Donors in Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Krull, Ulrich J.; W. Russ Algar

    2011-01-01

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) offer several advantages for the development of multiplexed solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays. Designs for multiplexing have been demonstrated, but important challenges remain in the optimization of these systems. In this work, we identify several strategies based on the design of interfacial chemistry for improving sensitivity, obtaining lower limits of detection (LOD) and enabling th...

  4. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good.

  5. Quantum mechanical alternative to Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-10-01

    Theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups has recently been given a consistently quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate, i.e., coherence-damping processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broad temperature range than is commonly thought.

  6. A quantum mechanical alternative to the Arrhenius equation in the interpretation of proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatowicz, Piotr; Shkurenko, Aleksander; Osior, Agnieszka; Kamieński, Bohdan; Szymański, Sławomir

    2015-11-21

    The theory of nuclear spin-lattice relaxation in methyl groups in solids has been a recurring problem in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The current view is that, except for extreme cases of low torsional barriers where special quantum effects are at stake, the relaxation behaviour of the nuclear spins in methyl groups is controlled by thermally activated classical jumps of the methyl group between its three orientations. The temperature effects on the relaxation rates can be modelled by Arrhenius behaviour of the correlation time of the jump process. The entire variety of relaxation effects in protonated methyl groups have recently been given a consistent quantum mechanical explanation not invoking the jump model regardless of the temperature range. It exploits the damped quantum rotation (DQR) theory originally developed to describe NMR line shape effects for hindered methyl groups. In the DQR model, the incoherent dynamics of the methyl group include two quantum rate (i.e., coherence-damping) processes. For proton relaxation only one of these processes is relevant. In this paper, temperature-dependent proton spin-lattice relaxation data for the methyl groups in polycrystalline methyltriphenyl silane and methyltriphenyl germanium, both deuterated in aromatic positions, are reported and interpreted in terms of the DQR model. A comparison with the conventional approach exploiting the phenomenological Arrhenius equation is made. The present observations provide further indications that incoherent motions of molecular moieties in the condensed phase can retain quantum character over much broader temperature range than is commonly thought.

  7. Quantum mechanical simulation of solid effect dynamic nuclear polarisation using Krylov-Bogolyubov time averaging and a restricted state-space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabanov, Alexander; van der Drift, Anniek; Edwards, Luke J; Kuprov, Ilya; Köckenberger, Walter

    2012-02-28

    A strategy is described for simulations of solid effect dynamic nuclear polarisation that reduces substantially the dimension of the quantum mechanical problem. Averaging the Hamiltonian in the doubly rotating frame is used to confine the active space to the zero quantum coherence subspace. A further restriction of the Liouville space is made by truncating higher spin order states, which are weakly populated due to the presence of relaxation processes. Based on a dissipative transport equation, which is used to estimate the transport of the magnetisation starting from single spin order to higher spin order states, a minimal spin order for the states is calculated that needs to be taken into account for the spin dynamics simulation. The strategy accelerates individual spin calculations by orders of magnitude, thus making it possible to simulate the polarisation dynamics of systems with up to 25 nuclear spins.

  8. Quantum Optics with Quantum Dots in Photonic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gérard, J. M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.;

    2012-01-01

    We review recent experimental and theoretical results, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for solid-state quantum optics and quantum optoelectronic devices.......We review recent experimental and theoretical results, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for solid-state quantum optics and quantum optoelectronic devices....

  9. Quantum Electronic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    Schuller, UCSD MURI Supersearch New Superconductors Discovered  Service to Others Phase Spread Alloys Bulk Synthesis • High-Pressure • High...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A – Unclassified, Unlimited Distribution 13 Questions: Stress, Performance, Fabrication • Back gate (gold-palladium alloy ), PEN...substrate • Hafnium -oxide gate dielectric • CVD graphene transferred over gates 20 μm Source Gate Drain Drain x y Graphene Yields High

  10. Quantum Electronic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    M ic ro w a ve A b so rp tio n , a .u Temperature, K Nb Stripe on Sapphire Substrate V Nb ~ 6.10 -8 cm 3 Sensitive & Selective Mag. Field...process for epitaxial LaAlO3 films on SrTiO3 substrates. XRD and TEM verify epitaxy. Electrical characterization shows conductivity, similar to

  11. Quantum magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Johannes; Farnell, Damian; Bishop, Raymod

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of magnetic systems where quantum effects play a dominant role has become a very active branch of solid-state-physics research in its own right. The first three chapters of the "Quantum Magnetism" survey conceptual problems and provide insights into the classes of systems considered, namely one-dimensional, two-dimensional and molecular magnets. The following chapters introduce the methods used in the field of quantum magnetism, including spin wave analysis, exact diagonalization, quantum field theory, coupled cluster methods and the Bethe ansatz. The book closes with a chapter on quantum phase transitions and a contribution that puts the wealth of phenomena into the context of experimental solid-state physics. Closing a gap in the literature, this volume is intended both as an introductory text at postgraduate level and as a modern, comprehensive reference for researchers in the field.

  12. Quantum engineering: Diamond envy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Nitrogen atoms trapped tens of nanometres apart in diamond can now be linked by quantum entanglement. This ability to produce and control entanglement in solid systems could enable powerful quantum computers.

  13. PPLN-based photon-pair source compatible with solid state quantum memories and telecom optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latypov, I. Z.; Shkalikov, A. V.; Akat'ev, D. O.; Kalachev, A. A.

    2017-06-01

    We report on the realization of a tunable source of correlated photon pairs compatible with telecommunication networks and quantum memories involving dielectric crystals doped by Nd3+ ions. The source is based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a 25 mm periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped by 532 nm cw laser. Spectral and correlation characteristics of the corresponding heralded single-photon source compatible with quantum memories are presented.

  14. Air-Stable, Near- to Mid-Infrared Emitting Solids of PbTe/CdTe Core-Shell Colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protesescu, Loredana; Zünd, Tanja; Bodnarchuk, Maryna I; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2016-03-03

    Light emitters and detectors operating in the near- and mid-infrared spectral regions are important to many applications, such as telecommunications, high-resolution gas analysis, atmospheric pollution monitoring, medical diagnostics, and night vision. Various lead chalcogenides (binary, ternary, and quaternary alloys) in the form of quantum dots (QDs) or quantum wells provide narrow bandgap energies that cover the broad infrared region corresponding to wavelengths of 1-30 μm. Here, we report an inexpensive, all-solution-based synthesis strategy to thin-film solids consisting of 5-16 nm PbTe QDs encapsulated by CdTe shells. Colloidally synthesized PbTe QDs were first converted into core-shell PbTe/CdTe QDs, and then deposited as thin films. The subsequent fusion of the CdTe shells is achieved by ligand removal and annealing in the presence of CdCl2 . Contrary to highly unstable bare PbTe QDs, PbTe/CdTe QD solids exhibit bright and stable near- to mid-infrared emission at wavelengths of 1-3 μm, which is also retained upon prolonged storage at ambient conditions for one year.

  15. Quantum model of a solid-state spin qubit: Ni cluster on a silicon surface by the generalized spin Hamiltonian and X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farberovich, Oleg V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Beverly and Raymond Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Zorge 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Voronezh State University, Voronezh 394000 (Russian Federation); Mazalova, Victoria L., E-mail: mazalova@sfedu.ru [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Zorge 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Soldatov, Alexander V. [Research Center for Nanoscale Structure of Matter, Southern Federal University, Zorge 5, 344090 Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    We present here the quantum model of a Ni solid-state electron spin qubit on a silicon surface with the use of a density-functional scheme for the calculation of the exchange integrals in the non-collinear spin configurations in the generalized spin Hamiltonian (GSH) with the anisotropic exchange coupling parameters linking the nickel ions with a silicon substrate. In this model the interaction of a spin qubit with substrate is considered in GSH at the calculation of exchange integrals J{sub ij} of the nanosystem Ni{sub 7}–Si in the one-electron approach taking into account chemical bonds of all Si-atoms of a substrate (environment) with atoms of the Ni{sub 7}-cluster. The energy pattern was found from the effective GSH Hamiltonian acting in the restricted spin space of the Ni ions by the application of the irreducible tensor operators (ITO) technique. In this paper we offer the model of the quantum solid-state N-spin qubit based on the studying of the spin structure and the spin-dynamics simulations of the 3d-metal Ni clusters on the silicon surface. The solution of the problem of the entanglement between spin states in the N-spin systems is becoming more interesting when considering clusters or molecules with a spectral gap in their density of states. For quantifying the distribution of the entanglement between the individual spin eigenvalues (modes) in the spin structure of the N-spin system we use the density of entanglement (DOE). In this study we have developed and used the advanced high-precision numerical techniques to accurately assess the details of the decoherence process governing the dynamics of the N-spin qubits interacting with a silicon surface. We have studied the Rabi oscillations to evaluate the N-spin qubits system as a function of the time and the magnetic field. We have observed the stabilized Rabi oscillations and have stabilized the quantum dynamical qubit state and Rabi driving after a fixed time (0.327 μs). The comparison of the energy

  16. A solid-state CdSe quantum dot sensitized solar cell based on a quaterthiophene as a hole transporting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barceló, Irene; Campiña, José M; Lana-Villarreal, Teresa; Gómez, Roberto

    2012-04-28

    A hybrid quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSC) composed of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as light harvesters and TiO(2) and 3,3'''-didodecyl-quaterthiophene (QT12) as electron and hole conductors, respectively, has been fully processed in air. The sensitizer has been introduced into the TiO(2) nanoporous layer either by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method or by attaching colloidal QDs either directly or through molecular cables (linkers). As previously observed for QDSCs based on liquid electrolytes, the efficiency depends on the way of QD attachment, the direct adsorption of QDs being the procedure yielding the best results. Thermal annealing was applied in order to enhance the device response under illumination. Remarkable open circuit potentials are attained (close to 1 V), leading to an efficiency of 0.34% (AM 1.5G) in initial tests. Although low, it ranks as one of the highest values reported for solid state QDSCs based on titanium dioxide and colloidal quantum dots. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  17. Assessing the Detection Limit of a Minority Solid-State Form of a Pharmaceutical by (1)H Double-Quantum Magic-Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyoshi, Keisuke; Iuga, Dinu; Watts, Abigail E; Hughes, Colan E; Harris, Kenneth D M; Brown, Steven P

    2017-07-25

    The lower detection limit for 2 distinct crystalline phases by (1)H magic-angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is investigated for a minority amount of cimetidine (anhydrous polymorph A) in a physical mixture with the anhydrous HCl salt of cimetidine. Specifically, 2-dimensional (1)H double-quantum (DQ) MAS NMR spectra of polymorph A and the anhydrous HCl salt constitute fingerprints for the presence of each of these solid forms. For solid-state NMR data recorded at a (1)H Larmor frequency of 850 MHz and a MAS frequency of 30 kHz on ∼10 mg of sample, it is shown that, by following the pair of cross-peaks at a (1)H DQ frequency of 7.4 + 11.6 = 19.0 ppm that are unique to polymorph A, the level of detection for polymorph A in a physical mixture with the anhydrous HCl salt is a concentration of 1% w/w. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrochemical control over photoinduced electron transfer and trapping in CdSe-CdTe quantum-dot solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehme, Simon C.; Walvis, T. Ardaan; Infante, Ivan; Grozema, Ferdinand C.; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Houtepen, Arjan J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and controlling charge transfer between different kinds of colloidal quantum dots (QDs) is important for devices such as light-emitting diodes and solar cells and for thermoelectric applications. Here we study photoinduced electron transfer between CdTe and CdSe QDs in a QD film. We

  19. Quantum model of a solid-state spin qubit: Ni cluster on a silicon surface by the generalized spin Hamiltonian and X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farberovich, Oleg V.; Mazalova, Victoria L.; Soldatov, Alexander V.

    2015-11-01

    We present here the quantum model of a Ni solid-state electron spin qubit on a silicon surface with the use of a density-functional scheme for the calculation of the exchange integrals in the non-collinear spin configurations in the generalized spin Hamiltonian (GSH) with the anisotropic exchange coupling parameters linking the nickel ions with a silicon substrate. In this model the interaction of a spin qubit with substrate is considered in GSH at the calculation of exchange integrals Jij of the nanosystem Ni7-Si in the one-electron approach taking into account chemical bonds of all Si-atoms of a substrate (environment) with atoms of the Ni7-cluster. The energy pattern was found from the effective GSH Hamiltonian acting in the restricted spin space of the Ni ions by the application of the irreducible tensor operators (ITO) technique. In this paper we offer the model of the quantum solid-state N-spin qubit based on the studying of the spin structure and the spin-dynamics simulations of the 3d-metal Ni clusters on the silicon surface. The solution of the problem of the entanglement between spin states in the N-spin systems is becoming more interesting when considering clusters or molecules with a spectral gap in their density of states. For quantifying the distribution of the entanglement between the individual spin eigenvalues (modes) in the spin structure of the N-spin system we use the density of entanglement (DOE). In this study we have developed and used the advanced high-precision numerical techniques to accurately assess the details of the decoherence process governing the dynamics of the N-spin qubits interacting with a silicon surface. We have studied the Rabi oscillations to evaluate the N-spin qubits system as a function of the time and the magnetic field. We have observed the stabilized Rabi oscillations and have stabilized the quantum dynamical qubit state and Rabi driving after a fixed time (0.327 μs). The comparison of the energy pattern with the

  20. Quantum walks: a comprehensive review

    CERN Document Server

    Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E

    2012-01-01

    Quantum walks, the quantum mechanical counterpart of classical random walks, is an advanced tool for building quantum algorithms that has been recently shown to constitute a universal model of quantum computation. Quantum walks is now a solid field of research of quantum computation full of exciting open problems for physicists, computer scientists, mathematicians and engineers. In this paper we review theoretical advances on the foundations of both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks, together with the role that randomness plays in quantum walks, the connections between the mathematical models of coined discrete quantum walks and continuous quantum walks, the quantumness of quantum walks, a summary of papers published on discrete quantum walks and entanglement as well as a succinct review of experimental proposals and realizations of discrete-time quantum walks. Furthermore, we have reviewed several algorithms based on both discrete- and continuous-time quantum walks as well as a most important resul...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots immobilized on solid substrates through laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyoergy, E. [Centre d' Investigacions en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CIN2, ICN-CSIC), Bellaterra (Spain); National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Perez del Pino, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (ICMAB, CSIC), Bellaterra (Spain); Roqueta, J.; Ballesteros, B. [Centre d' Investigacions en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia, Institut Catala de Nanotecnologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CIN2, ICN-CSIC), Bellaterra (Spain); Miguel, A.S.; Maycock, C.; Oliva, A.G. [Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (ITQB-UNL), Oeiras (Portugal)

    2012-11-15

    CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) have been immobilized onto solid substrates by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). An UV KrF* ({lambda} = 248 nm, {tau}{sub FWHM} {approx_equal} 25 ns) excimer laser source was used for irradiations of the composite MAPLE targets. The targets were prepared by the dispersion of the CdSe/ZnS QDs in a solvent with high absorption at the incident laser radiation. The dependence of the surface morphology, crystalline structure, chemical composition, and functional properties of the laser transferred CdSe/ZnS QDs on the processing conditions as incident laser fluence value and ambient atmosphere inside the irradiation chamber was investigated. The possible physical mechanisms implied in the laser ablation process were identified. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. CdSe Quantum Dots Sensitized Mesoporous TiO2 Solar Cells with CuSCN as Solid-State Electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanbi Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous TiO2 is functionalized by 3-mercaptopropyl trimethyoxysilane (MPTMS to anchor CdSe quantum dots (QDs. The resulting TiO2/CdSe is combined with solid-state electrolyte (CuSCN to form solar cells. It is found that the efficiency of electron injection from QDs to TiO2 can be improved owing to the substitution of the long chains of organic capping agents at the surface of QDs with MPTMS. The hydrolyzate of MPTMS forms an insulating barrier layer to reduce the recombination at the TiO2/CdSe interface, leading to the increase of open-circuit voltage (Voc.

  3. Exploring Dephasing of a Solid-State Quantum Emitter via Time- and Temperature-Dependent Hong-Ou-Mandel Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, A.; Schnauber, P.; Gschrey, M.; Seifried, M.; Wolters, J.; Schulze, J.-H.; Strittmatter, A.; Rodt, S.; Carmele, A.; Knorr, A.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2016-01-01

    We probe the indistinguishability of photons emitted by a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) via time- and temperature-dependent two-photon interference (TPI) experiments. An increase in temporal separation between consecutive photon emission events reveals a decrease in TPI visibility on a nanosecond time scale, theoretically described by a non-Markovian noise process in agreement with fluctuating charge traps in the QD's vicinity. Phonon-induced pure dephasing results in a decrease in TPI visibility from (96 ±4 )% at 10 K to a vanishing visibility at 40 K. In contrast to Michelson-type measurements, our experiments provide direct access to the time-dependent coherence of a quantum emitter on a nanosecond time scale.

  4. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodgers, P

    1998-03-01

    There is more to information than a string of ones and zeroes the ability of ''quantum bits'' to be in two states at the same time could revolutionize information technology. In the mid-1930s two influential but seemingly unrelated papers were published. In 1935 Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen proposed the famous EPR paradox that has come to symbolize the mysteries of quantum mechanics. Two years later, Alan Turing introduced the universal Turing machine in an enigmatically titled paper, On computable numbers, and laid the foundations of the computer industry one of the biggest industries in the world today. Although quantum physics is essential to understand the operation of transistors and other solid-state devices in computers, computation itself has remained a resolutely classical process. Indeed it seems only natural that computation and quantum theory should be kept as far apart as possible surely the uncertainty associated with quantum theory is anathema to the reliability expected from computers? Wrong. In 1985 David Deutsch introduced the universal quantum computer and showed that quantum theory can actually allow computers to do more rather than less. The ability of particles to be in a superposition of more than one quantum state naturally introduces a form of parallelism that can, in principle, perform some traditional computing tasks faster than is possible with classical computers. Moreover, quantum computers are capable of other tasks that are not conceivable with their classical counterparts. Similar breakthroughs in cryptography and communication followed. (author)

  6. Distribution and mobility of phosphates and sodium ions in cheese by solid-state 31P and double-quantum filtered 23Na NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobet, Mallory; Rondeau-Mouro, Corinne; Buchin, Solange; Le Quéré, Jean-Luc; Guichard, Elisabeth; Foucat, Loïc; Moreau, Céline

    2010-04-01

    The feasibility of solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and (23)Na NMR spectroscopy to investigate both phosphates and Na(+) ions distribution in semi-hard cheeses in a non-destructive way was studied. Two semi-hard cheeses of known composition were made with two different salt contents. (31)P Single-pulse excitation and cross-polarization MAS experiments allowed, for the first time, the identification and quantification of soluble and insoluble phosphates in the cheeses. The presence of a relatively 'mobile' fraction of colloidal phosphates was evidenced. The detection by (23)Na single-quantum NMR experiments of all the sodium ions in the cheeses was validated. The presence of a fraction of 'bound' sodium ions was evidenced by (23)Na double-quantum filtered NMR experiments. We demonstrated that NMR is a suitable tool to investigate both phosphates and Na(+) ions distributions in cheeses. The impact of the sodium content on the various phosphorus forms distribution was discussed and results demonstrated that NMR would be an important tool for the cheese industry for the processes controls.

  7. Effect of Al 2 O 3 Recombination Barrier Layers Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition in Solid-State CdS Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2013-03-21

    Despite the promise of quantum dots (QDs) as a light-absorbing material to replace the dye in dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) efficiencies remain low, due in part to high rates of recombination. In this article, we demonstrate that ultrathin recombination barrier layers of Al2O3 deposited by atomic layer deposition can improve the performance of cadmium sulfide (CdS) quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with spiro-OMeTAD as the solid-state hole transport material. We explored depositing the Al2O3 barrier layers either before or after the QDs, resulting in TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO 2/QD/Al2O3 configurations. The effects of barrier layer configuration and thickness were tracked through current-voltage measurements of device performance and transient photovoltage measurements of electron lifetimes. The Al2O3 layers were found to suppress dark current and increase electron lifetimes with increasing Al 2O3 thickness in both configurations. For thin barrier layers, gains in open-circuit voltage and concomitant increases in efficiency were observed, although at greater thicknesses, losses in photocurrent caused net decreases in efficiency. A close comparison of the electron lifetimes in TiO2 in the TiO2/Al2O3/QD and TiO2/QD/Al2O3 configurations suggests that electron transfer from TiO2 to spiro-OMeTAD is a major source of recombination in ss-QDSSCs, though recombination of TiO2 electrons with oxidized QDs can also limit electron lifetimes, particularly if the regeneration of oxidized QDs is hindered by a too-thick coating of the barrier layer. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  8. A novel polysulfide hydrogel electrolyte based on low molecular mass organogelator for quasi-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Zhipeng; Tao, Li; Wang, Shimao; Wei, Junfeng; Zhu, Jun; Dong, Weiwei; Liu, Feng; Chen, Shuanghong; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Songyuan

    2015-06-01

    A quasi-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) is fabricated by using 12-hydroxystearic acid as a low molecular mass organogelator to gelate the polysulfide electrolyte. Noticeably, the gel to liquid transition temperature of this polysulfide hydrogel electrolyte is 96 °C, which contributes to the long-term stability of the quasi-solid-state QDSSC (QS-QDSSC). The influences of gelation on the charge transport, electron recombination and photovoltaic performance of the QS-QDSSC are investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Moreover, the network of the hydrogel is investigated by the Field emission scanning electron microscopy and polarized optical light microscopy. It is found that the charge transport is influenced by the network in the hydrogel electrolyte, and the accelerated electron recombination at the photoanode/electrolyte interface leads to the decreased open-circuit voltage. The QS-QDSSC exhibits an energy conversion efficiency of 2.40% at AM 1.5 (100 mW cm-2) which is slightly lower than that of liquid electrolyte based cell (2.88%). However, the QS-QDSSC exhibits significantly improved stability during the accelerated thermal test. Especially, during the accelerated aging test, the short-circuit current density (Jsc) of the liquid electrolyte based QDSSC sharply decreased to nearly 35% of its initial value, while there is relatively less change in the Jsc for the QS-QDSSC.

  9. Interfacial chemistry and the design of solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assays using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2011-01-01

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) offer several advantages for the development of multiplexed solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays. Designs for multiplexing have been demonstrated, but important challenges remain in the optimization of these systems. In this work, we identify several strategies based on the design of interfacial chemistry for improving sensitivity, obtaining lower limits of detection (LOD) and enabling the regeneration and reuse of solid-phase QD-FRET hybridization assays. FRET-sensitized emission from acceptor dyes associated with hybridization events at immobilized QD donors provides the analytical signal in these assays. The minimization of active sensing area reduces background from QD donor PL and allows the resolution of smaller amounts of acceptor emission, thus lowering the LOD. The association of multiple acceptor dyes with each hybridization event can enhance FRET efficiency, thereby improving sensitivity. Many previous studies have used interfacial protein layers to generate selectivity; however, transient destabilization of these layers is shown to prevent efficient regeneration. To this end, we report a protein-free interfacial chemistry and demonstrate the specific detection of as little as 2 pmol of target, as well as an improved capacity for regeneration.

  10. Hydrido-ruthenium cluster complexes as models for reactive surface hydrogen species of ruthenium nanoparticles. Solid-state 2H NMR and quantum chemical calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Torsten; Walaszek, Bernadeta; Yeping, Xu; Wächtler, Maria; del Rosal, Iker; Grünberg, Anna; Poteau, Romuald; Axet, Rosa; Lavigne, Guy; Chaudret, Bruno; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Buntkowsky, Gerd

    2010-08-25

    The (2)H quadrupolar interaction is a sensitive tool for the characterization of deuterium-metal binding states. In the present study, experimental solid-state (2)H MAS NMR techniques are used in the investigations of two ruthenium clusters, D(4)Ru(4)(CO)(12) (1) and D(2)Ru(6)(CO)(18) (2), which serve as model compounds for typical two-fold, three-fold, and octahedral coordination sites on metal surfaces. By line-shape analysis of the (2)H MAS NMR measurements of sample 1, a quadrupolar coupling constant of 67 +/- 1 kHz, an asymmetry parameter of 0.67 +/- 0.1, and an isotropic chemical shift of -17.4 ppm are obtained. In addition to the neutral complex, sample 2 includes two ionic clusters, identified as anionic [DRu(6)(CO)(18)](-) (2(-)) and cationic [D(3)Ru(6)(CO)(18)](+) (2(+)). By virtue of the very weak quadrupolar interaction (Quantum chemical DFT calculations at different model structures for these ruthenium clusters were arranged in order to help in the interpretation of the experimental results. It is shown that the (2)H nuclear quadrupolar interaction is a sensitive tool for distinguishing the binding state of the deuterons to the transition metal. Combining the data from the polynuclear complexes with the data from mononuclear complexes, a molecular ruler for quadrupolar interactions is created. This ruler now permits the solid-state NMR spectroscopic characterization of deuterium adsorbed on the surfaces of catalytically active metal nanoparticles.

  11. Multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning: high-resolution solid state NMR spectroscopy of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbourt, A

    2002-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of the multiple-quantum magic-angle spinning experiment (MQMAS) are discussed in this review. The significance of this experiment, introduced by Frydman and Harwood, is in its ability to provide high-resolution NMR spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei (I /geq 3/2). This technique has proved to be useful in various systems ranging from inorganic materials to biological samples. This review addresses the development of various pulse schemes aimed at improving the signal-to-noise ratio and anisotropic lineshapes. Representative spectra are shown to underscore the importance and applications of the MQMAS experiment. Refs. 97 (author)

  12. Quantum measurement and entanglement of spin quantum bits in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfaff, W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a set of experiments that explore the possible realisation of a macroscopic quantum network based on solid-state quantum bits. Such a quantum network would allow for studying quantum mechanics on large scales (meters, or even kilometers), and can open new possibilities for

  13. Quantum measurement and entanglement of spin quantum bits in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfaff, W.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a set of experiments that explore the possible realisation of a macroscopic quantum network based on solid-state quantum bits. Such a quantum network would allow for studying quantum mechanics on large scales (meters, or even kilometers), and can open new possibilities for appli

  14. Zero-quantum frequency-selective recoupling of homonuclear dipole-dipole interactions in solid state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kan-Nian; Tycko, Robert

    2009-07-28

    We describe a method for measuring magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, and hence distances, between pairs of like nuclear spins in a many-spin system under magic-angle spinning (MAS). This method employs a homonuclear dipolar recoupling sequence that creates an average dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian under MAS with full zero-quantum symmetry, including both secular and flip-flop terms. Flip-flop terms are then attenuated by inserting rotor-synchronized periods of chemical shift evolution between recoupling blocks, leaving an effective Hamiltonian that contains only secular terms to a good approximation. Couplings between specific pairs of nuclear spins can then be selected with frequency-selective pi pulses. We demonstrate this technique, which we call zero-quantum shift evolution assisted homonuclear recoupling, in a series of one-dimensional and two-dimensional (13)C NMR experiments at 17.6 T and 40.00 kHz MAS frequency on uniformly (13)C-labeled L-threonine powder and on the helix-forming peptide MB(i+4)EK, synthesized with a pair of uniformly (13)C-labeled L-alanine residues. Experimental demonstrations include measurements of distances between (13)C sites that are separated by three bonds, placing quantitative constraints on both sidechain and backbone torsion angles in polypeptides.

  15. Technology of Quantum Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Razeghi, Manijeh

    2010-01-01

    Technology of Quantum Devices offers a multi-disciplinary overview of solid state physics, photonics and semiconductor growth and fabrication. Readers will find up-to-date coverage of compound semiconductors, crystal growth techniques, silicon and compound semiconductor device technology, in addition to intersubband and semiconductor lasers. Recent findings in quantum tunneling transport, quantum well intersubband photodetectors (QWIP) and quantum dot photodetectors (QWDIP) are described, along with a thorough set of sample problems.

  16. All-solid-state continuous-wave laser systems for ionization, cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, H -Y; Kienzler, D; Keitch, B C; de Clercq, L E; Negnevitsky, V; Home, J P

    2013-01-01

    We describe laser systems for photoionization, Doppler cooling and quantum state manipulation of beryllium ions. For photoionization of neutral beryllium, we have developed a continuous-wave 235 nm source obtained by two stages of frequency doubling from a diode laser at 940 nm. The system delivers up to 400 mW at 470 nm and 28 mW at 235 nm. For control of the beryllium ion, three laser wavelengths at 313 nm are produced by sum-frequency generation and second-harmonic generation from four infrared fiber lasers. Up to 7.2 W at 626 nm and 1.9 W at 313 nm are obtained using two pump beams at 1051 and 1551 nm. Intensity fluctuations below 0.5 % per hour (during 8 hours of operation) have been measured at a 313 nm power of 1 W. These systems are used to load beryllium ions into a segmented ion trap.

  17. Scalable synthesis of organic-soluble carbon quantum dots: superior optical properties in solvents, solids, and LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minghong; Zhan, Jing; Geng, Bijiang; He, Piaopiao; Wu, Kuan; Wang, Liang; Xu, Gang; Li, Zhen; Yin, Luqiao; Pan, Dengyu

    2017-09-14

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted much attention owing to their unique optical properties and a wide range of applications. The fabrication and control of CQDs with organic solubility and long-wavelength emission are still urgent issues to be addressed for their practical use in LEDs. Here, organic-soluble CQDs were produced at a high yield of ∼90% by a facile solvent engineering treatment of 1,3,6-trinitropyrene, which were simultaneously used as the nitrogen and carbon sources. The optical properties of the organic-soluble CQDs (o-CQDs) were investigated in nonpolar and polar solvents, films, and LED devices. The CQDs have a narrow size distribution around 2.66 nm, and can be dispersed in different organic solvents. Significantly, the as-prepared CQDs present an excitation-independent emission at 607 nm with fluorescence quantum yields (QYs) up to 65.93% in toluene solution. A pronounced solvent effect was observed and their strong absorption bands can be tuned in the whole visible region (400-750 nm) by changing the solvent. The CQDs in various solvents can emit bright, excitation-independent, long-wavelength fluorescence (orange to red). Furthermore, benefiting from the unique oil-solution properties, the as-prepared CQDs can be processed in thin film and device forms to meet the requirements of various applications, such as phosphor-based white-light LEDs. The color coordinate for these CQD modified LEDs is realized at (0.32, 0.31), which is close to pure white light (0.33, 0.33).

  18. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra. Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dot states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  19. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra.Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dots states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used...

  20. The fabrication of quantum wires in silicon utilising the characteristics of solid phase epitaxial regrowth of crystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.C.Y.; McCallum, J.C. [Melbourne Univ. Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics, Microanalytical Research Centre

    1998-06-01

    The process of solid phase epitaxy (SPE) in semiconductor materials is one which has been intensively researched due to possible applications in the semiconductor industry. SPE is a solid phase transformation, in which an amorphous layer can be recrystallized either through heating or a combination of heating and ion bombardment. The transformation is believed to occur exclusively at the interface between the amorphous and crystalline layers, with individual atoms from the amorphous phase being incorporated into the crystalline phase by some point defect mechanism. The process has been observed to follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence. A wafer silicon was subjected to a multi-energy silicon implant through a fine nickel grid to amorphise region to a depth of 5{mu}m creating an array of amorphous wells. Metal impurity atoms were then implanted in this region at energy of 500 keV. Samples were examined using an optical microscope and the Alphastep profiler at RMIT. It was confirmed that burgeoning wells were about 2 {mu}m wide and rose about 0.01 {mu}m above the silicon substrate. Extended abstract. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Steady state and time resolved photoluminescence properties of CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS quantum dots in solutions and in solid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droseros, Nikolaos; Seintis, Kostas [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Patras (Greece); Fakis, Mihalis, E-mail: fakis@upatras.gr [Department of Physics, University of Patras, 26500 Patras (Greece); Gardelis, Spiros; Nassiopoulou, Androula G. [NCSR Demokritos INN, Terma Patriarchou Grigoriou, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2015-11-15

    The photoluminescence properties of CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) dispersed in solutions of different concentrations and solvent polarity and deposited as solid films on quartz substrates by drop-casting and spin-coating are studied. Both steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy have been used. The CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS QDs in solutions exhibit a red-shift of their absorption and photoluminescence spectra by increasing concentration and solvent polarity. In addition, they exhibit a three-exponential decay with time constants 1–3, 20–40 and 200–300 ns, depending on solvent, concentration and detection wavelength. In films, a red-shifted photoluminescence spectrum is observed for films made by drop-casting compared to those prepared by spin-coating. The time-resolved photoluminescence decays in films, apart from the three mechanisms observed in solutions, also exhibit a fast decay component of <1 ns, which is more pronounced in the spin coated films and especially at long emission wavelengths. The time resolved photoluminescence spectra in the drop-casted films experience a larger transient red-shift than in the spin-coated ones, indicative of a possible energy transfer among adjacent QDs. In general, it is shown that the chemical environment and the presence of defects play a central role in the recombination processes. - Highlights: • The photoluminescence (PL) properties CuInS2/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) are studied. • A red-shifted PL spectrum is observed in concentrated QD solutions and thick films. • Three-decay times of 1–3, 20–40 and 200–300 ns are observed in QD solutions. • An additional fast decay time of <1 ns is observed in QD films.

  2. Lead antimony sulfide (Pb5Sb8S17) solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with an efficiency of over 4%

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Cheng; Suriyawong, Nipapon; Aragaw, Belete Asefa; Shi, Jen-Bin; Chen, Peter; Lee, Ming-Way

    2016-04-01

    Lead antimony sulfides are rare in nature and relatively unexplored ternary semiconductors. This work investigates the photovoltaic performance of Pb-Sb-S quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles are grown on mesoporous TiO2 electrodes using the successive ionic layer adsorption reaction process. The synthesized Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles exhibit two attractive features for a good solar absorber material: a high optical absorption coefficient and a near optimal energy gap. Solid-state QDSCs are fabricated from the synthesized Pb5Sb8S17 nanoparticles using Spiro-OMeTAD as the hole-transporting material. The best cell yields a short-circuit current density Jsc of 11.92 mA cm-2, an open-circuit voltage Voc of 0.48 V, a fill factor FF of 30.7% and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 1.76% under 1sun. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) spectrum covers a spectral range of 350-800 nm with a maximal EQE = 65% at λ = 450 nm. At the reduced light intensity of 10% sun, the PCE increases to 4.14% with Jsc = 2.0 mA cm-2 (which could be normalized to 20 mA cm-2 under 1 sun). This PCE is 65% higher than the best previous result. The respectable PCE and Jsc indicate that Pb5Sb8S17 could be a potential candidate for a solar absorber material.

  3. Pump and Probe Spectroscopy of CH_3F-({ortho}-H_2){n} Clusters in Solid Parahydrogen by Using Two Cw-Ir Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Hiroyuki; Mizoguchi, Asao; Kanamori, Hideto

    2016-06-01

    The absorption spectrum of the ν3 (C-F stretching) mode of CH_3F in solid {para}-H_2 by FTIR showed a series of equal interval peaks Their interpretation was that the {n}-th peak of this series was due to CH_3F-({ortho}-H_2){n} clusters which were formed CH_3F and {n}'s {ortho}-H_2 in first nearest neighbor sites of the {para}-H_2 crystal with {hcp} structure. In order to understand this system in more detail, we have studied these peaks, especially {n} = 0 - 3 corresponding to 1037 - 1041 wn, by using high-resolution and high-sensitive infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy. Before now, we have observed photochromic phenomena of these peaks by taking an advantage of the high brightness of the laser. However, it has not been revealed what kind of mechanism is undergoing in these processes. In order to solve this problem we introduced two cw-IR QCLs for pump and prove experiment. While the pumping laser is breaching a certain peak with high power, the probing laser is monitoring the increase of other peaks by rapid scan method. The time resolution of this spectroscopy is 5 msec. The new precise kinetic information will help us to understand the molecular interaction in solid {para}-H_2. K. Yoshioka and D. T. Anderson, J. Chem. Phys. 119 (2003) 4731-4742 A. R. W. McKellar, A. Mizoguchi, and H. Kanamori, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13 (2011) 11587-11589

  4. Paper-based solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, M Omair; Shahmuradyan, Anna; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-02-05

    A paper-based solid-phase assay is presented for transduction of nucleic acid hybridization using immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to immobilize QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates that were assembled in solution. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) were FRET-paired with Cy3 acceptor. Hybridization of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotide targets provided the proximity required for FRET-sensitized emission from Cy3, which served as an analytical signal. The assay exhibited rapid transduction of nucleic acid hybridization within minutes. Without any amplification steps, the limit of detection of the assay was found to be 300 fmol with the upper limit of the dynamic range at 5 pmol. The implementation of glutathione-coated QDs for the development of nucleic acid hybridization assay integrated on a paper-based platform exhibited excellent resistance to nonspecific adsorption of oligonucleotides and showed no reduction in the performance of the assay in the presence of large quantities of noncomplementary DNA. The selectivity of nucleic acid hybridization was demonstrated by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection at a contrast ratio of 19 to 1. The reuse of paper over multiple cycles of hybridization and dehybridization was possible, with less than 20% reduction in the performance of the assay in five cycles. This work provides an important framework for the development of paper-based solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays that make use of a ratiometric approach for detection and analysis.

  5. Molecular quantum magnetism with strong spin-orbit coupling in inorganic solid Ba3Yb2Zn5O11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Youn; Ji, Sungdae; Park, Jae-Hoon; Do, Seunghwan; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Jang, Dongjin; Schmidt, Burkhard; Brando, Manuel; Butch, Nicholas

    The molecular magnet, assembly of finite number of spins which are isolated from environment, is a model system to study the quantum information process such as the qubit or spintronic devices. In past decades, the molecular magnet has been mostly realized in organic material, however, it has difficulty synthesizing materials or controlling their properties, meanwhile tremendous endeavors to search inorganic molecular magnet are continuing. Here, we propose Ba3Yb2Zn5O11 as a candidate of inorganic molecular magnet. This material consists of an alternating 3D-array of small and large tetrahedron containing antiferromagnetically coupled four pseudospin-1/2 Yb ions, and magnetic properties are described by an isolated tetrahedron without long-range magnetic ordering. Inelastic neutron scattering measurement with external magnetic field reveals that extraordinarily huge Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) interaction originating from strong spin-orbit coupling in Yb isospin is the key to explain energy level of tetrahedron in addition to Heisenberg exchange interaction and Zeeman effect. Magnetization measurement shows the Landau-Zener transition between avoided crossing levels caused by DM interaction.

  6. On the local relaxation of solid neon upon Rydberg excitation of a NO impurity: the role of the NO(A)-Ne interaction potential and zero-point quantum delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajón-Suárez, Pedro; Rojas-Lorenzo, Germán A; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesús; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón; Larrégaray, Pascal

    2009-12-31

    The local relaxation of solid neon subsequent to the impulsive excitation of the NO chromophore to its A(3s sigma) Ryberg state is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. This study makes use of empirical NO(X,A)-Ne isotropic pair potentials as well as a recently developed ab initio triatomic potential energy surface for the excited state. The role of these interaction potentials is analyzed, including many-body effects. In particular, empirical potentials, designed to reproduce correctly both the NO X-A steady-state absorption and emission bands, are shown to lead to a good description of the subpicosecond relaxation dynamics. The 600 fs expansion of the electronic bubble fairly agrees with experimental data. This relatively long time scale with respect to solid Argon, which was previously attributed to the range of the NO(A)-Ne interaction, is presumably related to the quantum nature of the medium. The time-resolved local relaxation of the Ne solid is understandably intermediate between that of classical solids (e.g., Ar) and that of quantum solids (e.g., H(2)).

  7. Quantum information processing in nanostructures Quantum optics; Quantum computing

    CERN Document Server

    Reina-Estupinan, J H

    2002-01-01

    Since information has been regarded os a physical entity, the field of quantum information theory has blossomed. This brings novel applications, such as quantum computation. This field has attracted the attention of numerous researchers with backgrounds ranging from computer science, mathematics and engineering, to the physical sciences. Thus, we now have an interdisciplinary field where great efforts are being made in order to build devices that should allow for the processing of information at a quantum level, and also in the understanding of the complex structure of some physical processes at a more basic level. This thesis is devoted to the theoretical study of structures at the nanometer-scale, 'nanostructures', through physical processes that mainly involve the solid-state and quantum optics, in order to propose reliable schemes for the processing of quantum information. Initially, the main results of quantum information theory and quantum computation are briefly reviewed. Next, the state-of-the-art of ...

  8. On the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 pyrochlore solid solution: Quantum ab initio and classic calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Mora, Pablo; Cosio-Castañeda, Carlos; Martinez-Anaya, Oliver; Morales, Francisco; Tavizon, Gustavo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a theoretical study of the electrical properties of the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 (Bi2-ySryIr2O16O2) α-pyrochlore-type solid solution is presented. Quantum ab initio DFT(WIEN2k) calculations were performed in order to understand the electrical resistivity changes associated to the Bi substitution by Sr in this system. The main crystallographic modification associated to this substitution is the x position of the 48f oxygen (x, 1/8 , 1/8 ) (O1); this substitution substantially modifies the Bi/Sr-O1 and Ir-O1 atomic distances, increasing the former and diminishing the latter. Experimentally, the Bi2-ySryIr2O7 samples are metallic and the electrical resistivity increases with the Sr content. Electronic structure calculations for Bi2Ir2O7 and BiSrIr2O7 show that, regardless of structural changes, there is only a small change of electrical conductivity with the Sr substitution, and the experimentally observed increase of the resistivity can be explained in terms of a larger impact on the electronic structure of both; the Sr 'impurities' as well as of the thermal Sr oscillations.

  9. Characterization of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As/GaAs heterostructures for single quantum wells grown by a solid arsenic MOCVD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo-Ojeda, R. [Universidad Politecnica de Pachuca, Km. 20, Rancho Luna, Ex-Hacienda de Santa Barbara, Municipio de Zempoala, Hidalgo 43830 (Mexico); Diaz-Reyes, J., E-mail: jdiazr2001@yahoo.co [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion en Biotecnologia Aplicada, CIBA-IPN, Ex Hacienda de San Juan Molino, Km. 1.5. Tepetitla, Tlaxcala 90700 (Mexico); Galvan-Arellano, M.; Pena-Sierra, R. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Depto. de Ing. Electrica, SEES. Apdo. 14-740, Mexico, D.F. 07000 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    This work presents the results of the growth and characterization of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As/GaAs multilayer structures obtained in a metallic-arsenic-based-MOCVD system. The main goal is to explore the ability of the growth system to grow high quality multilayer structures like quantum wells. The use of metallic arsenic could introduce important differences in the growth process due to the absence of the hydride group V precursor (AsH{sub 3}), which manifests in the electrical and optical characteristics of both GaAs and Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As layers. The characterization of these epilayers and structures was performed using low-temperature photoluminescence, Hall effect measurements, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). - Research highlights: {yields} This work is reported the growth of AlxGa1-xAs/GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructures by a solid arsenic based MOCVD system. {yields} The results obtained with this system are comparable with those obtained with the traditional arsine based growth system. {yields} The main limitation of the alternative MOCVD system is related to the lack of monoatomic hydrogen on the growth surface that acts modifying the surface kinetics and enhancing the carbon incorporation. {yields} The experimental results indicate that it can be grown AlxGa1-xAs using elemental arsenic by MOCVD, which can be used to optoelectronic devices.

  10. Self-assembled GaInNAs/GaAsN quantum dot lasers: solid source molecular beam epitaxy growth and high-temperature operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon SF

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSelf-assembled GaInNAs quantum dots (QDs were grown on GaAs (001 substrate using solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy (SSMBE equipped with a radio-frequency nitrogen plasma source. The GaInNAs QD growth characteristics were extensively investigated using atomic-force microscopy (AFM, photoluminescence (PL, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM measurements. Self-assembled GaInNAs/GaAsN single layer QD lasers grown using SSMBE have been fabricated and characterized. The laser worked under continuous wave (CW operation at room temperature (RT with emission wavelength of 1175.86 nm. Temperature-dependent measurements have been carried out on the GaInNAs QD lasers. The lowest obtained threshold current density in this work is ∼1.05 kA/cm2from a GaInNAs QD laser (50 × 1,700 µm2 at 10 °C. High-temperature operation up to 65 °C was demonstrated from an unbonded GaInNAs QD laser (50 × 1,060 µm2, with high characteristic temperature of 79.4 K in the temperature range of 10–60 °C.

  11. Cryocoil magic-angle-spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance probe system utilized for sensitivity enhancement in multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning spectroscopy for a low-γ quadrupolar nucleus of 85Rb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Toshihito; Toda, Mitsuru; Ashida, Jun; Hobo, Fumio; Endo, Yuki; Utsumi, Hiroaki; Nemoto, Takahiro; Mizuno, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    Sensitivity enhancement in solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance using a cryocoil magic-angle-spinning system was investigated, by comparing, at room temperature and at cryogenic temperature, the signal-to-noise ratios of the multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning spectra as well as the conventional spectra for a low-γ nucleus 85Rb in RbNO3. The increase of the sample-coil quality-factor and the thermal noise reduction were found to enhance the sensitivities by approximately 4.5 times; the former yielded the further doubled signal increase in the multiple-quantum spectroscopy via the increase of the radio-frequency field strengths. Eventually, 20-30 times of the sensitivity enhancement were realized in the two-dimensional multiple-quantum magic-angle-spinning spectra.

  12. Long-term frequency and amplitude stability of a solid-nitrogen-cooled, continuous wave THz quantum cascade laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Andriy A.; Waldman, Jerry; Light, Alexander R.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.; Qian, Xifeng; Chandrayan, Neelima; Goodhue, William D.; Nixon, William E.

    2012-02-01

    Operational temperature increase of CW THz QCLs to 77 K has enabled us to employ solid nitrogen (SN2) as the cryogen. A roughing pump was used to solidify liquid nitrogen and when the residual vapor pressure in the nitrogen reservoir reached the pumping system's minimum pressure the temperature equilibrated and remained constant until all the nitrogen sublimated. The hold time compared to liquid helium has thereby increased approximately 70-fold, and at a greatly reduced cost. The milliwatt CW QCL was at a temperature of approximately 60 K, dissipating 5 W of electrical power. To measure the long-term frequency, current, and temperature stability, we heterodyned the free-running 2.31 THz QCL with a CO2 pumped far-infrared gas laser line in methanol (2.314 THz) in a corner-cube Schottky diode and recorded the IF frequency, current and temperature. Under these conditions the performance characteristics of the QCL, which will be reported, exceeded that of a device mounted in a mechanical cryocooler.

  13. Quantum Computation and Spin Electronics

    OpenAIRE

    DiVincenzo, David P.; Burkard, Guido; Loss, Daniel; Sukhorukov, Eugene V.

    1999-01-01

    In this chapter we explore the connection between mesoscopic physics and quantum computing. After giving a bibliography providing a general introduction to the subject of quantum information processing, we review the various approaches that are being considered for the experimental implementation of quantum computing and quantum communication in atomic physics, quantum optics, nuclear magnetic resonance, superconductivity, and, especially, normal-electron solid state physics. We discuss five ...

  14. Introduction to topological quantum matter & quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Stanescu, Tudor D

    2017-01-01

    What is -topological- about topological quantum states? How many types of topological quantum phases are there? What is a zero-energy Majorana mode, how can it be realized in a solid state system, and how can it be used as a platform for topological quantum computation? What is quantum computation and what makes it different from classical computation? Addressing these and other related questions, Introduction to Topological Quantum Matter & Quantum Computation provides an introduction to and a synthesis of a fascinating and rapidly expanding research field emerging at the crossroads of condensed matter physics, mathematics, and computer science. Providing the big picture, this book is ideal for graduate students and researchers entering this field as it allows for the fruitful transfer of paradigms and ideas amongst different areas, and includes many specific examples to help the reader understand abstract and sometimes challenging concepts. It explores the topological quantum world beyond the well-know...

  15. On-chip multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay using spatial profiles of immobilized quantum dots and fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor, M. Omair; Tavares, Anthony J.; Krull, Ulrich J., E-mail: ulrich.krull@utoronto.ca

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Solid-phase multiplexed QD-FRET nucleic acid assay in electrokinetic fluidic chip. •Concurrent detection of two oligonucleotides based on channel length coverage. •Selection of “turn-on” and “turn-off” signals from two acceptor dyes and two colors of immobilized QDs, respectively. •No loss in assay sensitivity when implementing multiplexed assay format. -- Abstract: A microfluidic based solid-phase assay for the multiplexed detection of nucleic acid hybridization using quantum dot (QD) mediated fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is described herein. The glass surface of hybrid glass-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels was chemically modified to assemble the biorecognition interface. Multiplexing was demonstrated using a detection system that was comprised of two colors of immobilized semi-conductor QDs and two different oligonucleotide probe sequences. Green-emitting and red-emitting QDs were paired with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) labeled oligonucleotides, respectively. The QDs served as energy donors for the transduction of dye labeled oligonucleotide targets. The in-channel assembly of the biorecognition interface and the subsequent introduction of oligonucleotide targets was accomplished within minutes using a combination of electroosmotic flow and electrophoretic force. The concurrent quantification of femtomole quantities of two target sequences was possible by measuring the spatial coverage of FRET sensitized emission along the length of the channel. In previous reports, multiplexed QD-FRET hybridization assays that employed a ratiometric method for quantification had challenges associated with lower analytical sensitivity arising from both donor and acceptor dilution that resulted in reduced energy transfer pathways as compared to single-color hybridization assays. Herein, a spatial method for quantification that is based on in-channel QD-FRET profiles provided higher analytical

  16. Paper-based solid-phase multiplexed nucleic acid hybridization assay with tunable dynamic range using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-08-06

    A multiplexed solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assay on a paper-based platform is presented using multicolor immobilized quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The surface of paper was modified with imidazole groups to immobilize two types of QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates that were assembled in solution. Green-emitting QDs (gQDs) and red-emitting QDs (rQDs) served as donors with Cy3 and Alexa Fluor 647 (A647) acceptors. The gQD/Cy3 FRET pair served as an internal standard, while the rQD/A647 FRET pair served as a detection channel, combining the control and analytical test zones in one physical location. Hybridization of dye-labeled oligonucleotide targets provided the proximity for FRET sensitized emission from the acceptor dyes, which served as an analytical signal. Hybridization assays in the multicolor format provided a limit of detection of 90 fmol and an upper limit of dynamic range of 3.5 pmol. The use of an array of detection zones was designed to provide improved analytical figures of merit compared to that which could be achieved on one type of array design in terms of relative concentration of multicolor QDs. The hybridization assays showed excellent resistance to nonspecific adsorption of oligonucleotides. Selectivity of the two-plex hybridization assay was demonstrated by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection at a contrast ratio of 50:1. Additionally, it is shown that the use of preformed QD-probe oligonucleotide conjugates and consideration of the relative number density of the two types of QD-probe conjugates in the two-color assay format is advantageous to maximize assay sensitivity and the upper limit of dynamic range.

  17. Triaxial Ellipsoidal Quantum Billiards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens, Holger; Wiersig, Jan; Dullin, Holger R.

    1999-01-01

    The classical mechanics, exact quantum mechanics and semiclassical quantum mechanics of the billiard in the triaxial ellipsoid are investigated. The system is separable in ellipsoidal coordinates. A smooth description of the motion is given in terms of a geodesic flow on a solid torus, which is a fo

  18. Quantum Spin Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Progress Report (ONR Award No. N00014-14-1-0804) Quantum Spin Gyroscope August 2014-July 2015 Report Type: Annual Report Primary Contact E-mail... Quantum Spin Gyroscope Grant/Contract Number: N00014-14-1-0804 Principal Investigator Name: Paola Cappellaro Program Manager: Richard Tommy Willis...required large volumes. Our project aims at overcoming these drawbacks by developing a novel solid-state quantum spin gyro- scope associated with the

  19. Quantum Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, F.

    1992-07-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scientists R. J. Barlow and A. R. Barnett Quantum Mechanics aims to teach those parts of the subject which every physicist should know. The object is to display the inherent structure of quantum mechanics, concentrating on general principles and on methods of wide applicability without taking them to their full generality. This book will equip students to follow quantum-mechanical arguments in books and scientific papers, and to cope with simple cases. To bring the subject to life, the theory is applied to the all-important field of atomic physics. No prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is assumed. However, it would help most readers to have met some elementary wave mechanics before. Primarily written for students, it should also be of interest to experimental research workers who require a good grasp of quantum mechanics without the full formalism needed by the professional theorist. Quantum Mechanics features: A flow diagram allowing topics to be studied in different orders or omitted altogether. Optional "starred" and highlighted sections containing more advanced and specialized material for the more ambitious reader. Sets of problems at the end of each chapter to help student understanding. Hints and solutions to the problems are given at the end of the book.

  20. Solid-state chemiluminescence assay for ultrasensitive detection of antimony using on-vial immobilization of CdSe quantum dots combined with liquid–liquid–liquid microextraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costas-Mora, Isabel; Romero, Vanesa; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos, E-mail: bendicho@uvigo.es

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Solid-state chemiluminescence based on CdSe QDs was developed. •QDs immobilization in a vial was achieved in a simple and fast way. •Antimony detection was achieved by inhibition of the CdSe QDs/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} CL reaction. •LLLME allowed improving the selectivity and sensitivity of the CL assay. •The capping ligand played a critical role in the selectivity of the CL system. -- Abstract: On-vial immobilized CdSe quantum dots (QDs) are applied for the first time as chemiluminescent probes for the detection of trace metal ions. Among 17 metal ions tested, inhibition of the chemiluminescence when CdSe QDs are oxidized by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was observed for Sb, Se and Cu. Liquid–liquid–liquid microextraction was implemented in order to improve the selectivity and sensitivity of the chemiluminescent assay. Factors influencing both the CdSe QDs/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} chemiluminescent system and microextraction process were optimized for ultrasensitive detection of Sb(III) and total Sb. In order to investigate the mechanism by which Sb ions inhibit the chemiluminescence of the CdSe QDs/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis absorption and fluorescence measurements were performed. The selection of the appropriate CdSe QDs capping ligand was found to be a critical issue. Immobilization of QDs caused the chemiluminescence signal to be enhanced by a factor of 100 as compared to experiments carried out with QDs dispersed in the bulk aqueous phase. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit was 6 ng L{sup −1} Sb and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation (N = 7) was about 1.3%. An enrichment factor of 95 was achieved within only 3 min of microextraction. Several water samples including drinking, spring, and river waters were analyzed. The proposed method was validated against CRM NWTM-27.2 fortified lake water, and a recovery study was

  1. ZnO@Ag2S core-shell nanowire arrays for environmentally friendly solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells with panchromatic light capture and enhanced electron collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Jianhua; Zhang, Jindan; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Johansson, Erik M J

    2015-05-21

    A solid-state environmentally friendly Ag2S quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) is demonstrated. The photovoltaic device is fabricated by applying ZnO@Ag2S core-shell nanowire arrays (NWAs) as light absorbers and electron conductors, and poly-3-hexylthiophene (P3HT) as a solid-state hole conductor. Ag2S quantum dots (QDs) were directly grown on the ZnO nanowires by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method to obtain the core-shell nanostructure. The number of SILAR cycles for QD formation and the length of the core-shell NWs significantly affect the photocurrent. The device with a core-shell NWAs photoanode shows a power conversion efficiency increase by 32% compared with the device based on a typical nanoparticle-based photoanode with Ag2S QDs. The enhanced performance is attributed to enhanced collection of the photogenerated electrons utilizing the ZnO nanowire as an efficient pathway for transporting the photogenerated electrons from the QD to the contact.

  2. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra.Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dots states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used......Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... to probe coherence times of exciton states and relaxation processes, both of which are important for future applications....

  3. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    of quantum dots, however, results in a large inhomogeneous broadening of quantum dot spectra. Work on self-assembled InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots will be presented. Properties of atom-like single-dot states are investigated optically using high spatial and spectral resolution. Single-dot spectra can be used......Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...... to probe coherence times of exciton states and relaxation processes, both of which are important for future applications....

  4. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mandl, Franz

    1992-01-01

    The Manchester Physics Series General Editors: D. J. Sandiford; F. Mandl; A. C. Phillips Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester Properties of Matter B. H. Flowers and E. Mendoza Optics Second Edition F. G. Smith and J. H. Thomson Statistical Physics Second Edition F. Mandl Electromagnetism Second Edition I. S. Grant and W. R. Phillips Statistics R. J. Barlow Solid State Physics Second Edition J. R. Hook and H. E. Hall Quantum Mechanics F. Mandl Particle Physics Second Edition B. R. Martin and G. Shaw The Physics of Stars Second Edition A. C. Phillips Computing for Scient

  5. Physics of Nanostructured Solid State Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Physics of Nanostructured Solid State Devices introduces readers to theories and concepts such as semi-classical and quantum mechanical descriptions of electron transport, methods for calculations of band structures in solids with applications in calculation of optical constants, and other advanced concepts.  The information presented here will equip readers with the necessary tools to carry out cutting edge research in modern solid state nanodevices. This book also: Covers sophisticated models of charge transport including the drift-diffusion model, Boltzmann transport model and various quantum transport models Discusses the essential elements of quantum mechanics necessary for an understanding of nanostructured solid state devices Presents band structure calculation methods based on time-independent perturbation theory Discusses theory of optical transitions and optical devices employing quantum-confined structures such as quantum wells,wires and dots Elucidates quantum mechanics of electrons in a magneti...

  6. Amplified solid-state electrochemiluminescence detection of cholesterol in near-infrared range based on CdTe quantum dots decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes@reduced graphene oxide nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Juan; Liu, Qian; Fei, Airong; Qian, Jing; Dong, Xiaoya; Qiu, Baijing; Mao, Hanping; Wang, Kun

    2015-11-15

    An amplified solid-state electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for detection of cholesterol in near-infrared (NIR) range was constructed based on CdTe quantum dots (QDs) decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes@reduced graphene nanoribbons (CdTe-MWCNTs@rGONRs), which were prepared by electrostatic interactions. The CdTe QDs decorated on the MWCNTs@rGONRs resulted in the amplified ECL intensity by ~4.5 fold and decreased onset potential by ~100 mV. By immobilization of the cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) and NIR CdTe-MWCNTs@rGONRs on the electrode surface, a solid-state ECL biosensor for cholesterol detection was constructed. When cholesterol was added to the detection solution, the immobilized ChOx catalyzed the oxidation of cholesterol to generate H2O2, which could be used as the co-reactant in the ECL system of CdTe-MWCNTs@rGONRs. The as-prepared biosensor exhibited good performance for cholesterol detection including good reproducibility, selectivity, and acceptable linear range from 1 μM to 1mM with a relative low detection limit of 0.33 μM (S/N=3). The biosensor was successfully applied to the determination of cholesterol in biological fluid and food sample, which would open a new possibility for development of solid-state ECL biosensors with NIR emitters.

  7. Molecular Structures of N,N'-Dimethylbenzimidazoline-2-germylene and -stannylene in Solution and in Solid State by Means of Optical (Raman and UV-vis) Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysin, R R; Leites, L A; Bukalov, S S; Zabula, A V; West, R

    2016-05-16

    X-ray data obtained for germylene 1 evidence its monomeric structure, unlike that of stannylene 2, which had been shown previously to form a coordination dimer. Raman spectra of solid and liquid 1 are identical, whereas the Raman spectra of solid 2 and its solution 2a differ significantly. The spectrum of 2 is complicated and contains the lines corresponding to N → Sn coordination bonds forming a dimer. The spectrum of 2a is simpler and close to that of monomeric 1, thus pointing to the rupture of the dimer in solution. The UV-vis spectrum of solid 2 exhibits a band corresponding to a transition involving the N → Sn coordination bonds. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules data estimate the energy of this bond as ∼19 kcal/mol. The aromaticity of 1 and 2 with their 10 π-electron systems including divalent Ge or Sn atoms is confirmed by negative nucleus-independent chemical shift values.

  8. Quantum Plasmas An Hydrodynamic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the basic concepts and new methods in the emerging scientific area known as quantum plasmas. In the near future, quantum effects in plasmas will be unavoidable, particularly in high density scenarios such as those in the next-generation intense laser-solid density plasma experiment or in compact astrophysics objects. Currently, plasmas are in the forefront of many intriguing questions around the transition from microscopic to macroscopic modeling of charged particle systems. Quantum Plasmas: an Hydrodynamic Approach is devoted to the quantum hydrodynamic model paradigm, which, unlike straight quantum kinetic theory, is much more amenable to investigate the nonlinear realm of quantum plasmas. The reader will have a step-by-step construction of the quantum hydrodynamic method applied to plasmas. The book is intended for specialists in classical plasma physics interested in methods of quantum plasma theory, as well as scientists interested in common aspects of two major areas of...

  9. Quantum Coherence as a Resource

    CERN Document Server

    Streltsov, Alexander; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-01-01

    The coherent superposition of states, in combination with energy quantization, represents one of the most fundamental features that mark the departure of quantum mechanics from the classical realm. Quantum coherence in many-body systems embodies the essence of entanglement and is an essential ingredient for a plethora of physical phenomena in quantum optics, quantum information, solid state physics, and nanoscale thermodynamics. In recent years, research on the presence and functional role of quantum coherence in biological systems has also attracted a considerable interest. Despite the fundamental importance of quantum coherence, the development of a rigorous theory of quantum coherence as a physical resource has only been initiated recently. In this Colloquium we discuss and review the development of this rapidly growing research field that encompasses the characterization, quantification, manipulation, dynamical evolution, and operational application of quantum coherence.

  10. Quantum computing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization.

  11. Position sensitive solid state detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnatterly, S.E.; Husk, D.

    1986-05-15

    Solid state detectors have been used for years as high quantum efficiency detectors for visible light. In this paper the use of PDA and CCD, solid state detectors, in the X-ray region will be discussed. In particular examples of data in the soft X-ray region are presented. Finally the use of phosphor coatings to enhance the sensitivity of solid state detectors is described.

  12. Quantum computing and the entanglement frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Preskill, John

    2012-01-01

    Quantum information science explores the frontier of highly complex quantum states, the "entanglement frontier." This study is motivated by the observation (widely believed but unproven) that classical systems cannot simulate highly entangled quantum systems efficiently, and we hope to hasten the day when well controlled quantum systems can perform tasks surpassing what can be done in the classical world. One way to achieve such "quantum supremacy" would be to run an algorithm on a quantum computer which solves a problem with a super-polynomial speedup relative to classical computers, but there may be other ways that can be achieved sooner, such as simulating exotic quantum states of strongly correlated matter. To operate a large scale quantum computer reliably we will need to overcome the debilitating effects of decoherence, which might be done using "standard" quantum hardware protected by quantum error-correcting codes, or by exploiting the nonabelian quantum statistics of anyons realized in solid state sy...

  13. Quantum enhanced optical sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfermeier, Clemens

    The work in this thesis is embedded in the framework of quantum metrology and explores quantum effects in solid state emitters and optical sensing. Specifically, the thesis comprises studies on silicon vacancy centres in nanodiamonds, phase measurements and cavity optomechanics utilising optical...... squeezed states, and a theoretical study on quantum amplifiers. Due to its similarity to single atoms, colour centres in diamond are ideal objects for exploring and exploiting quantum effects, because they are comparably easy to produce, probe and maintain. While nitrogen vacancy centres are the most...... identified spectral diffusion as the main hindrance in extending spin coherence times. Overcoming this issue will provide a promising candidate as an emitter for quantum information. Next, the question of how squeezed states of light can improve optical sensing was addressed. For this purpose, a squeezed...

  14. Final Report for DE-FG36-08GO18007 "All-Inorganic, Efficient Photovoltaic Solid State Devices Utilizing Semiconducting Colloidal Nanocrystal Quantum Dots"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Bulovic and Moungi Bawendi

    2011-09-30

    We demonstrated robust colloidal quantum dot (QD) photovoltaics with high internal quantum efficiencies. In our structures, device durability is derived from use of all-inorganic atmospherically-stable semiconducting metal-oxide films together with QD photoreceptors. We have shown that both QD and metal-oxide semiconducting films and contacts are amenable to room temperature processing under minimal vacuum conditions, enabling large area processing of PV structures of high internal efficiency. We generated the state of the art devices with power conversion efficiency of more than 4%, and have shown that efficiencies as high as 9% are achievable in the near-term, and as high as 17% in the long-term.

  15. Feedback control of superconducting quantum circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ristè, D.

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting circuits have recently risen to the forefront of the solid-state prototypes for quantum computing. Reaching the stage of robust quantum computing requires closing the loop between measurement and control of quantum bits (qubits). This thesis presents the realization of feedback contr

  16. Quantum Distinction: Quantum Distinctiones!

    OpenAIRE

    Zeps, Dainis

    2009-01-01

    10 pages; How many distinctions, in Latin, quantum distinctiones. We suggest approach of anthropic principle based on anthropic reference system which should be applied equally both in theoretical physics and in mathematics. We come to principle that within reference system of life subject of mathematics (that of thinking) should be equated with subject of physics (that of nature). For this reason we enter notions of series of distinctions, quantum distinction, and argue that quantum distinct...

  17. Solid state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Grosso, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Solid State Physics is a textbook for students of physics, material science, chemistry, and engineering. It is the state-of-the-art presentation of the theoretical foundations and application of the quantum structure of matter and materials. This second edition provides timely coverage of the most important scientific breakthroughs of the last decade (especially in low-dimensional systems and quantum transport). It helps build readers' understanding of the newest advances in condensed matter physics with rigorous yet clear mathematics. Examples are an integral part of the text, carefully de

  18. The complete in-gap electronic structure of colloidal quantum dot solids and its correlation with electronic transport and photovoltaic performance

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2013-11-15

    The direct observation of the complete electronic band structure of a family of PbS CQD solids via photoelectron spectroscopy is reported. We investigate how materials processing strategies, such as the latest passivation methods that produce record-performance photovoltaics, achieve their performance advances. Halide passivated films show a drastic reduction in states in the midgap, contributing to a marked improvement in the device performance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Quantum control and coherence of interacting spins in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, G.

    2012-01-01

    The field of quantum science and technology has generated many ideas for new revolutionary devices that exploit the quantum mechanical properties of small-scale systems. Isolated solid state spins play a large role in quantum technologies. They can be used as basic building blocks for a quantum comp

  20. Quantum control and coherence of interacting spins in diamond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lange, G.

    2012-01-01

    The field of quantum science and technology has generated many ideas for new revolutionary devices that exploit the quantum mechanical properties of small-scale systems. Isolated solid state spins play a large role in quantum technologies. They can be used as basic building blocks for a quantum comp

  1. Surface Passivation of CdSe Quantum Dots in All Inorganic Amorphous Solid by Forming Cd1‑xZnxSe Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mengling; Liu, Chao; Zhao, Zhiyong; Wang, Jing; Lin, Changgui; Xu, Yinsheng; Heo, Jong; Dai, Shixun; Han, Jianjun; Zhao, Xiujian

    2017-02-01

    CdSe quantum dots (QDs) doped glasses have been widely investigated for optical filters, LED color converter and other optical emitters. Unlike CdSe QDs in solution, it is difficult to passivate the surface defects of CdSe QDs in glass matrix, which strongly suppress its intrinsic emission. In this study, surface passivation of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) by Cd1‑xZnxSe shell in silicate glass was reported. An increase in the Se/Cd ratio can lead to the partial passivation of the surface states and appearance of the intrinsic emission of CdSe QDs. Optimizing the heat-treatment condition promotes the incorporation of Zn into CdSe QDs and results in the quenching of the defect emission. Formation of CdSe/Cd1‑xZnxSe core/graded shell QDs is evidenced by the experimental results of TEM and Raman spectroscopy. Realization of the surface passivation and intrinsic emission of II-VI QDs may facilitate the wide applications of QDs doped all inorganic amorphous materials.

  2. Quantum mechanics with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, David B

    2014-01-01

    This introductory text emphasizes Feynman's development of path integrals and its application to wave theory for particles. Suitable for undergraduate and graduate students of physics, the well-written, clear, and rigorous text was written by two of the nation's leading authorities on quantum physics. A solid foundation in quantum mechanics and atomic physics is assumed. Early chapters provide background in the mathematical treatment and particular properties of ordinary wave motion that also apply to particle motion. The close relation of quantum theory to physical optics is stressed. Subsequent sections emphasize the physical consequences of a wave theory of material properties, and they offer extensive applications in atomic physics, nuclear physics, solid state physics, and diatomic molecules. Four helpful Appendixes supplement the text.

  3. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  4. Optical properties of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Wooten, Frederick

    1972-01-01

    Optical Properties of Solids covers the important concepts of intrinsic optical properties and photoelectric emission. The book starts by providing an introduction to the fundamental optical spectra of solids. The text then discusses Maxwell's equations and the dielectric function; absorption and dispersion; and the theory of free-electron metals. The quantum mechanical theory of direct and indirect transitions between bands; the applications of dispersion relations; and the derivation of an expression for the dielectric function in the self-consistent field approximation are also encompassed.

  5. Solid state theory

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Walter A

    2011-01-01

    ""A well-written text . . . should find a wide readership, especially among graduate students."" - Dr. J. I. Pankove, RCA.The field of solid state theory, including crystallography, semi-conductor physics, and various applications in chemistry and electrical engineering, is highly relevant to many areas of modern science and industry. Professor Harrison's well-known text offers an excellent one-year graduate course in this active and important area of research. While presenting a broad overview of the fundamental concepts and methods of solid state physics, including the basic quantum theory o

  6. Quantum Logic between Remote Quantum Registers

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Norman Y; Laumann, Chris R; Bennett, Steven D; Duan, L -M; Lukin, Mikhail D; Jiang, Liang; Gorshkov, Alexey V

    2012-01-01

    We analyze two approaches to quantum state transfer in solid-state spin systems. First, we consider unpolarized spin-chains and extend previous analysis to various experimentally relevant imperfections, including quenched disorder, dynamical decoherence, and uncompensated long range coupling. In finite-length chains, the interplay between disorder-induced localization and decoherence yields a natural optimal channel fidelity, which we calculate. Long-range dipolar couplings induce a finite intrinsic lifetime for the mediating eigenmode; extensive numerical simulations of dipolar chains of lengths up to L=12 show remarkably high fidelity despite these decay processes. We further consider the extension of the protocol to bosonic systems of coupled oscillators. Second, we introduce a quantum mirror based architecture for universal quantum computing which exploits all of the spins in the system as potential qubits. While this dramatically increases the number of qubits available, the composite operations required...

  7. Quantum stochastics

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Mou-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    The classical probability theory initiated by Kolmogorov and its quantum counterpart, pioneered by von Neumann, were created at about the same time in the 1930s, but development of the quantum theory has trailed far behind. Although highly appealing, the quantum theory has a steep learning curve, requiring tools from both probability and analysis and a facility for combining the two viewpoints. This book is a systematic, self-contained account of the core of quantum probability and quantum stochastic processes for graduate students and researchers. The only assumed background is knowledge of the basic theory of Hilbert spaces, bounded linear operators, and classical Markov processes. From there, the book introduces additional tools from analysis, and then builds the quantum probability framework needed to support applications to quantum control and quantum information and communication. These include quantum noise, quantum stochastic calculus, stochastic quantum differential equations, quantum Markov semigrou...

  8. Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, A M

    1998-01-01

    The subject of quantum computing brings together ideas from classical information theory, computer science, and quantum physics. This review aims to summarise not just quantum computing, but the whole subject of quantum information theory. It turns out that information theory and quantum mechanics fit together very well. In order to explain their relationship, the review begins with an introduction to classical information theory and computer science, including Shannon's theorem, error correcting codes, Turing machines and computational complexity. The principles of quantum mechanics are then outlined, and the EPR experiment described. The EPR-Bell correlations, and quantum entanglement in general, form the essential new ingredient which distinguishes quantum from classical information theory, and, arguably, quantum from classical physics. Basic quantum information ideas are described, including key distribution, teleportation, data compression, quantum error correction, the universal quantum computer and qua...

  9. Simulation and understanding of quantum crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Cazorla, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Quantum crystals abound in the whole range of solid-state species. Below a certain threshold temperature the physical behavior of rare gases (4He and Ne), molecular solids (H2 and CH4), and some ionic (LiH), covalent (graphite), and metallic (Li) crystals can be only explained in terms of quantum nuclear effects (QNE). A detailed comprehension of the nature of quantum solids is critical for achieving progress in a number of fundamental and applied scientific fields like, for instance, planetary sciences, hydrogen storage, nuclear energy, quantum computing, and nanoelectronics. This review describes the current physical understanding of quantum crystals and the wide variety of simulation techniques that are used to investigate them. Relevant aspects in these materials such as phase transformations, energy and structural properties, elasticity, and the effects of crystalline defects and dimensionality, are discussed thoroughly. An introduction to quantum Monte Carlo techniques, which in the present context are ...

  10. Quantum Blobs

    OpenAIRE

    Gosson, Maurice A. de

    2012-01-01

    Quantum blobs are the smallest phase space units of phase space compatible with the uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics and having the symplectic group as group of symmetries. Quantum blobs are in a bijective correspondence with the squeezed coherent states from standard quantum mechanics, of which they are a phase space picture. This allows us to propose a substitute for phase space in quantum mechanics. We study the relationship between quantum blobs with a certain class of level set...

  11. Sputtering of Surfaces of the Solid Hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Winnie Edith;

    1998-01-01

    Sputtering of the solid hydrogens by electrons and ions exhibits features that may be related to quantum properties of these solids, i.e. a drastic enhancement of the yield for electron–bombarded thick deuterium films and a thermal peak at low ejection energies in the energy distribution of the s......Sputtering of the solid hydrogens by electrons and ions exhibits features that may be related to quantum properties of these solids, i.e. a drastic enhancement of the yield for electron–bombarded thick deuterium films and a thermal peak at low ejection energies in the energy distribution...... of the sputtered particles....

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  13. Nonlinear Dynamics In Quantum Physics -- Quantum Chaos and Quantum Instantons

    OpenAIRE

    Kröger, H.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the recently proposed quantum action - its interpretation, its motivation, its mathematical properties and its use in physics: quantum mechanical tunneling, quantum instantons and quantum chaos.

  14. Broadband waveguide quantum memory for entangled photons

    CERN Document Server

    Saglamyurek, Erhan; Jin, Jeongwan; Slater, Joshua A; Oblak, Daniel; Bussieres, Felix; George, Mathew; Ricken, Raimund; Sohler, Wolfgang; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The reversible transfer of quantum states of light in and out of matter constitutes an important building block for future applications of quantum communication: it allows synchronizing quantum information, and enables one to build quantum repeaters and quantum networks. Much effort has been devoted worldwide over the past years to develop memories suitable for the storage of quantum states. Of central importance to this task is the preservation of entanglement, a quantum mechanical phenomenon whose counter intuitive properties have occupied philosophers, physicists and computer scientists since the early days of quantum physics. Here we report, for the first time, the reversible transfer of photon-photon entanglement into entanglement between a photon and collective atomic excitation in a solid-state device. Towards this end, we employ a thulium-doped lithium niobate waveguide in conjunction with a photon-echo quantum memory protocol, and increase the spectral acceptance from the current maximum of 100 MHz t...

  15. Complex vibrational analysis of an antiferroelectric liquid crystal based on solid-state oriented quantum chemical calculations and experimental molecular spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drużbicki, Kacper; Mikuli, Edward; Kocot, Antoni; Ossowska-Chruściel, Mirosława Danuta; Chruściel, Janusz; Zalewski, Sławomir

    2012-08-02

    The experimental and theoretical vibrational spectroscopic study of one of a novel antiferroelectric liquid crystals (AFLC), known under the MHPSBO10 acronym, have been undertaken. The interpretation of both FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra was focused mainly on the solid-state data. To analyze the experimental results along with the molecular properties, density functional theory (DFT) computations were performed using several modern theoretical approaches. The presented calculations were performed within the isolated molecule model, probing the performance of modern exchange-correlations functionals, as well as going beyond, i.e., within hybrid (ONIOM) and periodic boundary conditions (PBC) methodologies. A detailed band assignment was supported by the normal-mode analysis with SQM ab initio force field scaling. The results are supplemented by the noncovalent interactions analysis (NCI). The relatively noticeable spectral differences observed upon Crystal to AFLC phase transition have also been reported. For the most prominent vibrational modes, the geometries of the transition dipole moments along with the main components of vibrational polarizability were analyzed in terms of the molecular frame. One of the goals of the paper was to optimize the procedure of solid-state calculations to obtain the results comparable with the all electron calculations, performed routinely for isolated molecules, and to test their performance. The presented study delivers a complex insight into the vibrational spectrum with a noticeable improvement of the theoretical results obtained for significantly attracting mesogens using modern molecular modeling approaches. The presented modeling conditions are very promising for further description of similar large molecular crystals.

  16. The Quantum Socket: Three-Dimensional Wiring for Extensible Quantum Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Béjanin, J H; Rinehart, J R; Earnest, C T; McRae, C R H; Shiri, D; Bateman, J D; Rohanizadegan, Y; Penava, B; Breul, P; Royak, S; Zapatka, M; Fowler, A G; Mariantoni, M

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computing architectures are on the verge of scalability, a key requirement for the implementation of a universal quantum computer. The next stage in this quest is the realization of quantum error correction codes, which will mitigate the impact of faulty quantum information on a quantum computer. Architectures with ten or more quantum bits (qubits) have been realized using trapped ions and superconducting circuits. While these implementations are potentially scalable, true scalability will require systems engineering to combine quantum and classical hardware. One technology demanding imminent efforts is the realization of a suitable wiring method for the control and measurement of a large number of qubits. In this work, we introduce an interconnect solution for solid-state qubits: The quantum socket. The quantum socket fully exploits the third dimension to connect classical electronics to qubits with higher density and better performance than two-dimensional methods based on wire bonding. The quantum ...

  17. In vivo monitoring of quantum dots in the extracellular space using push-pull perfusion sampling, online in-tube solid phase extraction, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, C K; Huang, C W; Yang, C S; Wang, Y J; Sun, Y C

    2010-09-01

    To monitor the dynamic changes of extracellular quantum dots (QDs) in vivo in the livers of anesthetized rats, we developed an automatic online analytical system comprising push-pull perfusion (PPP) sampling, the established in-tube solid phase extraction (SPE) procedure, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The method takes advantage of the retention of QDs onto the interior surface of a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tube as a means of extracting the QDs from complicated push-pull perfusates. For the injected QDs present in the liver extracellular fluid (ECF) at low picomolar levels, a temporal resolution of 10 min was required to collect sufficient amounts of QDs to meet the sensitivity requirements of the ICPMS system. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to exploit the PPP technique for the collection of QDs from living animals and PTFE tubing as a SPE adsorbent for the online extraction of QDs and the removal of biological matrix prior to ICPMS analysis of cadmium-containing inorganic nanocrystal. We confirmed the analytical reliability of this method from measurements of the spike recoveries of saline samples; in addition, we demonstrated the systems' applicability through in vivo monitoring of the time-dependent concentration profile of liver extracellular QDs in living rats after intravenous administration.

  18. Quantum Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    The universe, ultimately, is to be described by quantum theory. Quantum aspects of all there is, including space and time, may not be significant for many purposes, but are crucial for some. And so a quantum description of cosmology is required for a complete and consistent worldview. At any rate, even if we were not directly interested in regimes where quantum cosmology plays a role, a complete physical description could not stop at a stage before the whole universe is reached. Quantum theory is essential in the microphysics of particles, atoms, molecules, solids, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Why should one expect this ladder of scales to end at a certain size? If regimes are sufficiently violent and energetic, quantum effects are non-negligible even on scales of the whole cosmos; this is realized at least once in the history of the universe: at the big bang where the classical theory of general relativity would make energy densities diverge. 1.Lachieze-Rey, M., Luminet, J.P.: Phys. Rept. 254,135 (1995), gr-qc/9605010 2.BSDeWitt1967Phys. Rev.160511131967PhRv..160.1113D0158.4650410.1103/PhysRev.160.1113DeWitt, B.S.: Phys. Rev. 160(5), 1113 (1967) 3.Wiltshire, D.L.: In: Robson B., Visvanathan N., Woolcock W.S. (eds.) Cosmology: The Physics of the Universe, pp. 473-531. World Scientific, Singapore (1996). gr-qc/0101003 4.Isham C.J.: In: DeWitt, B.S., Stora, R. (eds.) Relativity, Groups and Topology II. Lectures Given at the 1983 Les Houches Summer School on Relativity, Groups and Topology, Elsevier Science Publishing Company (1986) 5.Klauder, J.: Int. J. Mod. Phys. D 12, 1769 (2003), gr-qc/0305067 6.Klauder, J.: Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 3, 81 (2006), gr-qc/0507113 7.DGiulini1995Phys. Rev. D5110563013381161995PhRvD..51.5630G10.1103/PhysRevD.51.5630Giulini, D.: Phys. Rev. D 51(10), 5630 (1995) 8.Kiefer, C., Zeh, H.D.: Phys. Rev. D 51, 4145 (1995), gr-qc/9402036 9.WFBlythCJIsham1975Phys. Rev. D117684086991975PhRvD..11..768B10.1103/PhysRevD.11.768Blyth, W

  19. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  20. Quantum Blobs

    CERN Document Server

    de Gosson, Maurice A

    2011-01-01

    Quantum blobs are the smallest phase space units of phase space compatible with the uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics and having the symplectic group as group of symmetries. Quantum blobs are in a bijective correspondence with the squeezed coherent states from standard quantum mechanics, of which they are a phase space picture. This allows us to propose a substitute for phase space in quantum mechanics. We study the relationship between quantum blobs with a certain class of level sets defined by Fermi for the purpose of representing geometrically quantum states.

  1. Quantum Malware

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, L A; Wu, Lian-Ao; Lidar, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Quantum computation and communication offer unprecedented advantages compared to classical information processing. Currently, quantum communication is moving from laboratory prototypes into real-life applications. When quantum communication networks become more widespread it is likely that they will be subject to attacks by hackers, virus makers, and other malicious intruders. Here we introduce the concept of "quantum malware" to describe such human-made intrusions. We offer a simple solution for storage of quantum information in a manner which protects quantum networks from quantum malware.

  2. Quantum cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Scarani, Valerio; Iblisdir, Sofyan; Gisin, Nicolas; Acin, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The impossibility of perfectly copying (or cloning) an arbitrary quantum state is one of the basic rules governing the physics of quantum systems. The processes that perform the optimal approximate cloning have been found in many cases. These "quantum cloning machines" are important tools for studying a wide variety of tasks, e.g. state estimation and eavesdropping on quantum cryptography. This paper provides a comprehensive review of quantum cloning machines (both for discrete-dimensional an...

  3. Quantum CPU and Quantum Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, An Min

    1999-01-01

    Making use of an universal quantum network -- QCPU proposed by me\\upcite{My1}, it is obtained that the whole quantum network which can implement some the known quantum algorithms including Deutsch algorithm, quantum Fourier transformation, Shor's algorithm and Grover's algorithm.

  4. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  5. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  6. Quantum Simulation of Pairing Hamiltonians with Nearest-Neighbor Interacting Qubits

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhixin; Gu, Xiu; Wu, Lian-Ao; Liu, Yu-xi

    2014-01-01

    Although a universal quantum computer is still far from reach, the tremendous advances in controllable quantum devices, in particular with solid-state systems, make it possible to physically implement "quantum simulators". Quantum simulators are physical setups able to simulate other quantum systems efficiently that are intractable on classical computers. Based on solid-state qubit systems with various types of nearest-neighbor interactions, we propose a complete set of algorithms for simulat...

  7. Quantum mechanics for applied physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fromhold, Albert T

    2011-01-01

    This excellent text, directed to upper-level undergraduates and graduate students in engineering and applied physics, introduces the fundamentals of quantum mechanics, emphasizing those aspects of quantum mechanics and quantum statistics essential to an understanding of solid-state theory. A heavy background in mathematics and physics is not required beyond basic courses in calculus, differential equations, and calculus-based elementary physics.The first three chapters introduce quantum mechanics (using the Schrödinger equations), quantum statistics, and the free-electron theory of metals. Ch

  8. Efficient quantum circuits for one-way quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Liu, Yu-Xi; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco

    2009-03-13

    While Ising-type interactions are ideal for implementing controlled phase flip gates in one-way quantum computing, natural interactions between solid-state qubits are most often described by either the XY or the Heisenberg models. We show an efficient way of generating cluster states directly using either the imaginary SWAP (iSWAP) gate for the XY model, or the sqrt[SWAP] gate for the Heisenberg model. Our approach thus makes one-way quantum computing more feasible for solid-state devices.

  9. The Oxford solid state basics

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Steven H

    2013-01-01

    The study of solids is one of the richest, most exciting, and most successful branches of physics. While the subject of solid state physics is often viewed as dry and tedious this new book presents the topic instead as an exciting exposition of fundamental principles and great intellectual breakthroughs. Beginning with a discussion of how the study of heat capacity of solids ushered in the quantum revolution, the author presents the key ideas of the field while emphasizing the deepunderlying concepts. The book begins with a discussion of the Einstein/Debye model of specific heat, and the Drude

  10. Quantum memristors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  11. Sputtering of Surfaces of the Solid Hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    1998-01-01

    Sputtering of the solid hydrogens by electrons and ions exhibits features that may be related to quantum properties of these solids, i.e. a drastic enhancement of the yield for electron–bombarded thick deuterium films and a thermal peak at low ejection energies in the energy distribution...

  12. Robust dynamical decoupling for quantum computing and quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Alexandre M; Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-06-17

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a popular technique for protecting qubits from the environment. However, unless special care is taken, experimental errors in the control pulses used in this technique can destroy the quantum information instead of preserving it. Here, we investigate techniques for making DD sequences robust against different types of experimental errors while retaining good decoupling efficiency in a fluctuating environment. We present experimental data from solid-state nuclear spin qubits and introduce a new DD sequence that is suitable for quantum computing and quantum memory.

  13. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, A.A. 4976, Bogotá (Colombia); Johnson, N. F. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Miami, FL 33124 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  14. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system's quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  15. Fundamentals of quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    House, J E

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Quantum Mechanics, Third Edition is a clear and detailed introduction to quantum mechanics and its applications in chemistry and physics. All required math is clearly explained, including intermediate steps in derivations, and concise review of the math is included in the text at appropriate points. Most of the elementary quantum mechanical models-including particles in boxes, rigid rotor, harmonic oscillator, barrier penetration, hydrogen atom-are clearly and completely presented. Applications of these models to selected “real world” topics are also included. This new edition includes many new topics such as band theory and heat capacity of solids, spectroscopy of molecules and complexes (including applications to ligand field theory), and small molecules of astrophysical interest.

  16. Quantum trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Chattaraj, Pratim Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to many-particle systems has been an active area of research in recent years as researchers have looked for ways to tackle difficult problems in this area. The quantum trajectory method provides an efficient computational technique for solving both stationary and time-evolving states, encompassing a large area of quantum mechanics. Quantum Trajectories brings the expertise of an international panel of experts who focus on the epistemological significance of quantum mechanics through the quantum theory of motion.Emphasizing a classical interpretation of quan

  17. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  18. Coherent control of quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lodahl, Peter; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the use of semiconductor quantum dotsystems as building blocks for solid-state-based quantum logic devices. One importantparameter for such devices is the coherence time, which determines the number ofpossible quantum operations. From earlier...... measurements the coherence time of the selfassembledquantum dots (QDs) has been reported to be limited by the spontaneousemission rate at cryogenic temperatures1.In this project we propose to alter the coherence time of QDs by taking advantage of arecent technique on modifying spontaneous emission rates...

  19. Linear operators for quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jordan, Thomas F

    2006-01-01

    This compact treatment highlights the logic and simplicity of the mathematical structure of quantum mechanics. Suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, it treats the language of quantum mechanics as expressed in the mathematics of linear operators.Originally oriented toward atomic physics, quantum mechanics became a basic language for solid-state, nuclear, and particle physics. Its grammar consists of the mathematics of linear operators, and with this text, students will find it easier to understand and use the language of physics. Topics include linear spaces and linear fun

  20. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  1. Quantum Darwinism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, Wojciech H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  2. Quantum music

    CERN Document Server

    Putz, Volkmar

    2015-01-01

    We consider ways of conceptualizing, rendering and perceiving quantum music, and quantum art in general. Thereby we give particular emphasis to its non-classical aspects, such as coherent superposition and entanglement.

  3. Solid propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Hutchison, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The basic principles underlying propulsion by rocket motor are examined together with the configuration of a solid propellant motor. Solid propellants and their preparation are discussed, giving attention to homogeneous propellants, composite propellants, energetic considerations in choosing a solid propellant, the processing of composite propellants, and some examples of new developments. The performance of solid propellants is investigated, taking into account characteristics velocity, the specific impulse, and performance calculations. Aspects of propellant development considered include nonperformance requirements for solid propellants, the approach to development, propellant mechanical properties, and future trends.

  4. Quantum Abacus

    CERN Document Server

    Cheon, T

    2004-01-01

    We show that the U(2) family of point interactions on a line can be utilized to provide the U(2) family of qubit operations for quantum information processing. Qubits are realized as localized states in either side of the point interaction which represents a controllable gate. The manipulation of qubits proceeds in a manner analogous to the operation of an abacus. Keywords: quantum computation, quantum contact interaction, quantum wire

  5. Quantum Econophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Esteban Guevara

    2006-01-01

    The relationships between game theory and quantum mechanics let us propose certain quantization relationships through which we could describe and understand not only quantum but also classical, evolutionary and the biological systems that were described before through the replicator dynamics. Quantum mechanics could be used to explain more correctly biological and economical processes and even it could encloses theories like games and evolutionary dynamics. This could make quantum mechanics a...

  6. Quantum cryptography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehr, S.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum cryptography makes use of the quantum-mechanical behavior of nature for the design and analysis of cryptographic schemes. Optimally (but not always), quantum cryptography allows for the design of cryptographic schemes whose security is guaranteed solely by the laws of nature. This is in shar

  7. Quantum mechanics of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.L.; Heine, V.; Phillips, J.C.

    1982-06-01

    In the past 25 years, new quantum-mechanical methods have been developed for predicting the configuration of the valence electrons in an atom or an aggregate of many atoms, within the range of energy excitations in which the atoms form interatomic bonds. A theory specifying the configuration of the valence electrons has much to say about the bulk properties of matter that depends on the nature of the interatomic bonds. The new method regards the core electrons and the atomic nucleus as if they constituted a single particle without internal structure. The method is called the pseudopotential theory. A general quantum-mechanical prediction of the properties of a substance in terms of the additive properties of separate chemical bonds is not yet feasible for molecules. However, there is one realm where prediction is now practical: crystalline solids. The regularity of the lattice into which the atoms are organized in a crystal makes it possible to calculate the properties of a macroscopic solid. In other words, many properties of an elemental solid such as lead or a simple binary solid such as gallium arsenide can not be deduced from energy considerations alone. (SC)

  8. Quantum Computing for Quantum Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This three-year project consisted on the development and application of quantum computer algorithms for chemical applications. In particular, we developed algorithms for chemical reaction dynamics, electronic structure and protein folding. The first quantum computing for

  9. Quantum Operations as Quantum States

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, P; Arrighi, Pablo; Patricot, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    In this article we formalize the correspondence between quantum states and quantum operations, and harness its consequences. This correspondence was already implicit in Choi's proof of the operator sum representation of Completely Positive-preserving linear maps; we go further and show that all of the important theorems concerning quantum operations can be derived as simple corollaries of those concerning quantum states. As we do so the discussion first provides an elegant and original review of the main features of quantum operations. Next (in the second half of the paper) we search for more results to arise from the correspondence. Thus we propose a factorizability condition and an extremal trace-preservedness condition for quantum operations, give two novel Schmidt-type decompositions of bipartite pure states and two interesting composition laws for which the set of quantum operations and quantum states remain stable. The latter enables us to define a group structure upon the set of totally entangled state...

  10. Quantum memory in quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Mor, T

    1999-01-01

    [Shortened abstract:] This thesis investigates the importance of quantum memory in quantum cryptography, concentrating on quantum key distribution schemes. In the hands of an eavesdropper -- a quantum memory is a powerful tool, putting in question the security of quantum cryptography; Classical privacy amplification techniques, used to prove security against less powerful eavesdroppers, might not be effective when the eavesdropper can keep quantum states for a long time. In this work we suggest a possible direction for approaching this problem. We define strong attacks of this type, and show security against them, suggesting that quantum cryptography is secure. We start with a complete analysis regarding the information about a parity bit (since parity bits are used for privacy amplification). We use the results regarding the information on parity bits to prove security against very strong eavesdropping attacks, which uses quantum memories and all classical data (including error correction codes) to attack th...

  11. Physics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterson, John B

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive text covers the basic physics of the solid state starting at an elementary level suitable for undergraduates but then advancing, in stages, to a graduate and advanced graduate level. In addition to treating the fundamental elastic, electrical, thermal, magnetic, structural, electronic, transport, optical, mechanical and compositional properties, we also discuss topics like superfluidity and superconductivity along with special topics such as strongly correlated systems, high-temperature superconductors, the quantum Hall effects, and graphene. Particular emphasis is given to so-called first principles calculations utilizing modern density functional theory which for many systems now allow accurate calculations of the electronic, magnetic, and thermal properties.

  12. Quantum Darwinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  13. Quantum Effects in Higher-Order Correlators of a Quantum-Dot Spin Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, A.; Li, F.; Müller, K.; Simmet, T.; Ardelt, P.-L.; Finley, J. J.; Sinitsyn, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    We measure time correlators of a spin qubit in an optically active quantum dot beyond the second order. Such higher-order correlators are shown to be directly sensitive to pure quantum effects that cannot be explained within the classical framework. They allow direct determination of ensemble and quantum dephasing times, T2* and T2, using only repeated projective measurements and without the need for coherent spin control. Our method enables studies of purely quantum behavior in solid state systems, including tests of the Leggett-Garg type of inequalities that rule out local hidden variable interpretation of the quantum-dot spin dynamics.

  14. Quantum entanglement and quantum operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is a simple introduction to quantum entanglement and quantum operations. The authors focus on some applications of quantum entanglement and relations between two-qubit entangled states and unitary operations. It includes remote state preparation by using any pure entangled states, nonlocal operation implementation using entangled states, entanglement capacity of two-qubit gates and two-qubit gates construction.

  15. Quantum entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Horodecki, R; Horodecki, M; Horodecki, K; Horodecki, Ryszard; Horodecki, Pawel; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Karol

    2007-01-01

    All our former experience with application of quantum theory seems to say: {\\it what is predicted by quantum formalism must occur in laboratory}. But the essence of quantum formalism - entanglement, recognized by Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen and Schr\\"odinger - waited over 70 years to enter to laboratories as a new resource as real as energy. This holistic property of compound quantum systems, which involves nonclassical correlations between subsystems, is a potential for many quantum processes, including ``canonical'' ones: quantum cryptography, quantum teleportation and dense coding. However, it appeared that this new resource is very complex and difficult to detect. Being usually fragile to environment, it is robust against conceptual and mathematical tools, the task of which is to decipher its rich structure. This article reviews basic aspects of entanglement including its characterization, detection, distillation and quantifying. In particular, the authors discuss various manifestations of entanglement via ...

  16. Quantum relations

    CERN Document Server

    Weaver, Nik

    2010-01-01

    We define a "quantum relation" on a von Neumann algebra M \\subset B(H) to be a weak* closed operator bimodule over its commutant M'. Although this definition is framed in terms of a particular representation of M, it is effectively representation independent. Quantum relations on l^\\infty(X) exactly correspond to subsets of X^2, i.e., relations on X. There is also a good definition of a "measurable relation" on a measure space, to which quantum relations partially reduce in the general abelian case. By analogy with the classical setting, we can identify structures such as quantum equivalence relations, quantum partial orders, and quantum graphs, and we can generalize Arveson's fundamental work on weak* closed operator algebras containing a masa to these cases. We are also able to intrinsically characterize the quantum relations on M in terms of families of projections in M \\otimes B(l^2).

  17. The quantum theory of nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Playing a prominent role in communications, quantum science and laser physics, quantum nonlinear optics is an increasingly important field. This book presents a self-contained treatment of field quantization and covers topics such as the canonical formalism for fields, phase-space representations and the encompassing problem of quantization of electrodynamics in linear and nonlinear media. Starting with a summary of classical nonlinear optics, it then explains in detail the calculation techniques for quantum nonlinear optical systems and their applications, quantum and classical noise sources in optical fibers and applications of nonlinear optics to quantum information science. Supplemented by end-of-chapter exercises and detailed examples of calculation techniques in different systems, this book is a valuable resource for graduate students and researchers in nonlinear optics, condensed matter physics, quantum information and atomic physics. A solid foundation in quantum mechanics and classical electrodynamic...

  18. Heralded quantum entanglement between two crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Usmani, Imam; Bussieres, Felix; Sangouard, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; Gisin, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    Quantum networks require the crucial ability to entangle quantum nodes. A prominent example is the quantum repeater which allows overcoming the distance barrier of direct transmission of single photons, provided remote quantum memories can be entangled in a heralded fashion. Here we report the observation of heralded entanglement between two ensembles of rare-earth-ions doped into separate crystals. A heralded single photon is sent through a 50/50 beamsplitter, creating a single-photon entangled state delocalized between two spatial modes. The quantum state of each mode is subsequently mapped onto a crystal, leading to an entangled state consisting of a single collective excitation delocalized between two crystals. This entanglement is revealed by mapping it back to optical modes and by estimating the concurrence of the retrieved light state. Our results highlight the potential of rare-earth-ions doped crystals for entangled quantum nodes and bring quantum networks based on solid-state resources one step clos...

  19. Bright Solid State Source of Photon Triplets

    CERN Document Server

    Khoshnegar, Milad; Predojević, Ana; Dalacu, Dan; Prilmüller, Maximilian; Lapointe, Jean; Wu, Xiaohua; Tamarat, Philippe; Lounis, Brahim; Poole, Philip; Weihs, Gregor; Majedi, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Producing advanced quantum states of light is a priority in quantum information technologies. While remarkable progress has been made on single photons and photon pairs, multipartite correlated photon states are usually produced in purely optical systems by post-selection or cascading, with extremely low efficiency and exponentially poor scaling. Multipartite states enable improved tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics as well as implementations of complex quantum optical networks and protocols. It would be favorable to directly generate these states using solid state systems, for better scaling, simpler handling, and the promise of reversible transfer of quantum information between stationary and flying qubits. Here we use the ground states of two optically active coupled quantum dots to directly produce photon triplets. The wavefunctions of photogenerated excitons localized in these ground states are correlated via molecular hybridization and Coulomb interactions. The formation of a triexciton leads...

  20. Solid lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  1. A reconfigurable spintronic device for quantum and classical logic

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmik, Debanjan; Sarkar, Angik; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2010-01-01

    Quantum superposition and entanglement of physical states can be harnessed to solve some problems which are intractable on a classical computer implementing binary logic. Several algorithms have been proposed to utilize the quantum nature of physical states and solve important problems. For example, Shor's quantum algorithm is extremely important in the field of cryptography since it factors large numbers exponentially faster than any known classical algorithm. Another celebrated example is the Grovers quantum algorithm. These algorithms can only be implemented on a quantum computer which operates on quantum bits (qubits). Rudimentary implementations of quantum processor have already been achieved through linear optical components, ion traps, NMR etc. However demonstration of a solid state quantum processor had been elusive till DiCarlo et al demonstrated two qubit algorithms in superconducting quantum processor. Though this has been a significant step, scalable semiconductor based room temperature quantum co...

  2. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  3. Quantum Games and Quantum Discord

    CERN Document Server

    Nawaz, Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    We quantize prisoners dilemma and chicken game by our generalized quantization scheme to explore the role of quantum discord in quantum games. In order to establish this connection we use Werner-like state as an initial state of the game. In this quantization scheme measurement can be performed in entangled as well as in product basis. For the measurement in entangled basis the dilemma in both the games can be resolved by separable states with non-zero quantum discord. Similarly for product basis measurement the payoffs are quantum mechanical only for nonzero values of quantum discord.

  4. Solid State Quantum Computer in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-30

    details of the aluminium oxide interfacial regions surrounding each finger. These provide electrical isolation between the various levels of...aluminium gate fingers showing details of the aluminium oxide interfacial regions surrounding each finger which provide electrical isolation

  5. Microstructure and intrinsic stress evolution during epitaxial film growth of an Ag0.93Al0.07 solid solution on Si(111); excessive planar faulting due to quantum confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flötotto, D.; Wang, Z. M.; Markel, I. J.; Kurz, S. J. B.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    The correlation of microstructural development and the kinetics of film growth has been investigated during the epitaxial film growth of an ultrathin binary Ag0.93Al0.07 solid solution on a Si(111)-7×7 surface at 300 K by the combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and real-time in-situ stress measurements. Up to a film thickness of 6 ± 2 nm, epitaxial Ag0.93Al0.07 film growth is characterized by the strikingly extensive formation of planar faults parallel to the film/substrate interface, while at larger thickness the film grows practically defect-free. As revealed by real-time in-situ stress measurements, the extensive formation of planar faults at the very initial stage of growth is not driven by the reduction of the system's elastic strain energy but is rather caused by a striking thickness-dependence of the stacking-fault energy owing to a quantum size effect of the ultrathin metal alloy film, resulting in a frequent succession of fcc and hcp stackings of close-packed layers during the initial stage of film growth. The extensive development of planar faults at the initial stage of film growth (<6 ± 2 nm) is associated with the occurrence of a high density of kinks and corners at thereby atomically rough surface ledges, which strongly enhances the downward transport of adatoms from higher to lower terraces (interlayer mass transport) by a reduction of the effective diffusion barrier at the edge of surface steps and by increasing the driving force for adatoms to attach to the surface ledges. As a result, the epitaxial Ag0.93Al0.07 film initially grows in a 2D layer-by-layer type of growth and thus establishes atomically smooth film surfaces. For the practically planar-fault-free growth at thicknesses beyond 6 ± 2 nm, interlayer mass transport becomes distinctively limited, thereby inducing a transition from 2D to 3D type of film growth.

  6. Quantum Dot-Photonic Crystal Cavity QED Based Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Physical Review A, 2012] 3. Study of the off-resonant quantum dot-cavity coupling in solid-state cavity QED system, and the phonon mediated off...resonant interaction between two quantum dots [Majumdar et al., Physical Review B , 2012] 4. Coherent optical spectroscopy of a single quantum dot via an off...Resonant cavity - much simpler than in conventional approaches [Majumdar et al, Physical Review B, 2011; Papageorge et al., New. Journal of Physics

  7. Complexity of the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hen, Itay

    2013-01-01

    The Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm (QAA) has been proposed as a mechanism for efficiently solving optimization problems on a quantum computer. Since adiabatic computation is analog in nature and does not require the design and use of quantum gates, it can be thought of as a simpler and perhaps more profound method for performing quantum computations that might also be easier to implement experimentally. While these features have generated substantial research in QAA, to date there is still a lack of solid evidence that the algorithm can outperform classical optimization algorithms.

  8. Entangled Systems New Directions in Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Audretsch, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    An introductory textbook for advanced students of physics, chemistry and computer science, covering an area of physics that has lately witnessed rapid expansion. The topics treated here include quantum information, quantum communication, quantum computing, teleportation and hidden parameters, thus imparting not only a well-founded understanding of quantum theory as such, but also a solid basis of knowledge from which readers can follow the rapid development of the topic or delve deeper into a more specialized branch of research. Commented recommendations for further reading as well as end-of-chapter problems help the reader to quickly access the theoretical basics of future key technologies

  9. Quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, Gerald; Hamrick, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a detailed account of the theory and practice of quantum cryptography. Suitable as the basis for a course in the subject at the graduate level, it crosses the disciplines of physics, mathematics, computer science and engineering. The theoretical and experimental aspects of the subject are derived from first principles, and attention is devoted to the practical development of realistic quantum communications systems. The book also includes a comprehensive analysis of practical quantum cryptography systems implemented in actual physical environments via either free-space or fiber-optic cable quantum channels. This book will be a valuable resource for graduate students, as well as professional scientists and engineers, who desire an introduction to the field that will enable them to undertake research in quantum cryptography. It will also be a useful reference for researchers who are already active in the field, and for academic faculty members who are teaching courses in quantum information s...

  10. Quantum Decoys

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, P

    2003-01-01

    Alice communicates with words drawn uniformly amongst $\\{\\ket{j}\\}_{j=1..n}$, the canonical orthonormal basis. Sometimes however Alice interleaves quantum decoys $\\{\\frac{\\ket{j}+i\\ket{k}}{\\sqrt{2}}\\}$ between her messages. Such pairwise superpositions of possible words cannot be distinguished from the message words. Thus as malevolent Eve observes the quantum channel, she runs the risk of damaging the superpositions (by causing a collapse). At the receiving end honest Bob, whom we assume is warned of the quantum decoys' distribution, checks upon their integrity with a measurement. The present work establishes, in the case of individual attacks, the tradeoff between Eve's information gain (her chances, if a message word was sent, of guessing which) and the disturbance she induces (Bob's chances, if a quantum decoy was sent, to detect tampering). Besides secure channel protocols, quantum decoys seem a powerful primitive for constructing n-dimensional quantum cryptographic applications. Moreover the methods emp...

  11. Quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Paul; Pellonpää, Juha-Pekka; Ylinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This is a book about the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and its measurement theory. It contains a synopsis of what became of the Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics since von Neumann’s classic treatise with this title. Fundamental non-classical features of quantum mechanics—indeterminacy and incompatibility of observables, unavoidable measurement disturbance, entanglement, nonlocality—are explicated and analysed using the tools of operational quantum theory. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Mathematics provides a systematic exposition of the Hilbert space and operator theoretic tools and relevant measure and integration theory leading to the Naimark and Stinespring dilation theorems; 2. Elements develops the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and measurement theory with a focus on the notion of approximate joint measurability; 3. Realisations offers in-depth studies of the fundamental observables of quantum mechanics and some of their measurement implementations; and 4....

  12. Quantum Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    efficient or less costly than their classical counterparts. A large-scale quantum computer is certainly an extremely ambi- tious goal, appearing to us...outperform the largest classical supercomputers in solving some specific problems important for data encryption. In the long term, another application...which the quantum computer depends, causing the quantum mechanically destructive process known as decoherence . Decoherence comes in several forms

  13. Quantum cryptography

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, R J; Dyer, P L; Luther, G G; Morgan, G L; Schauer, M M; Hughes, Richard J; Dyer, P; Luther, G G; Morgan, G L; Schauer, M

    1995-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is a new method for secret communications offering the ultimate security assurance of the inviolability of a Law of Nature. In this paper we shall describe the theory of quantum cryptography, its potential relevance and the development of a prototype system at Los Alamos, which utilises the phenomenon of single-photon interference to perform quantum cryptography over an optical fiber communications link.

  14. Quantum mechanics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Mahan, Gerald D

    2009-01-01

    Covering the fundamentals as well as many special topics of current interest, this is the most concise, up-to-date, and accessible graduate-level textbook on quantum mechanics available. Written by Gerald Mahan, a distinguished research physicist and author of an acclaimed textbook on many-particle physics, Quantum Mechanics in a Nutshell is the distillation of many years' teaching experience. Emphasizing the use of quantum mechanics to describe actual quantum systems such as atoms and solids, and rich with interesting applications, the book proceeds from solving for the properties of a single particle in potential; to solving for two particles (the helium atom); to addressing many-particle systems. Applications include electron gas, magnetism, and Bose-Einstein Condensation; examples are carefully chosen and worked; and each chapter has numerous homework problems, many of them original

  15. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  16. Introduction to solid state electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1989-01-01

    This textbook is specifically tailored for undergraduate engineering courses offered in the junior year, providing a thorough understanding of solid state electronics without relying on the prerequisites of quantum mechanics. In contrast to most solid state electronics texts currently available, with their generalized treatments of the same topics, this is the first text to focus exclusively and in meaningful detail on introductory material. The original text has already been in use for 10 years. In this new edition, additional problems have been added at the end of most chapters. These proble

  17. Quantum Networks for Generating Arbitrary Quantum States

    OpenAIRE

    Kaye, Phillip; Mosca, Michele

    2004-01-01

    Quantum protocols often require the generation of specific quantum states. We describe a quantum algorithm for generating any prescribed quantum state. For an important subclass of states, including pure symmetric states, this algorithm is efficient.

  18. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    1. Entanglement in solid states. Orbital entanglement and violation of bell inequalities in mesoscopic conductors / M. Büttiker, P. Samuelsson and E. V. Sukhoruk. Teleportation of electron spins with normal and superconducting dots / O. Sauret, D. Feinberg and T. Martin. Entangled state analysis for one-dimensional quantum spin system: singularity at critical point / A. Kawaguchi and K. Shimizu. Detecting crossed Andreev reflection by cross-current correlations / G. Bignon et al. Current correlations and transmission probabilities for a Y-shaped diffusive conductor / S. K. Yip -- 2. Mesoscopic electronics. Quantum bistability, structural transformation, and spontaneous persistent currents in mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm loops / I. O. Kulik. Many-body effects on tunneling of electrons in magnetic-field-induced quasi one-dimensional systems in quantum wells / T. Kubo and Y. Tokura. Electron transport in 2DEG narrow channel under gradient magnetic field / M. Hara et al. Transport properties of a quantum wire with a side-coupled quantum dot / M. Yamaguchi et al. Photoconductivity- and magneto-transport studies of single InAs quantum wires / A. Wirthmann et al. Thermoelectric transports in charge-density-wave systems / H. Yoshimoto and S. Kurihara -- 3. Mesoscopic superconductivity. Parity-restricted persistent currents in SNS nanorings / A. D. Zaikin and S. V. Sharov. Large energy dependence of current noise in superconductingh/normal metal junctions / F. Pistolesi and M. Houzet. Generation of photon number states and their superpositions using a superconducting qubit in a microcavity / Yu-Xi Liu, L. F. Wei and F. Nori. Andreev interferometry for pumped currents / F. Taddei, M. Governale and R. Fazio. Suppression of Cooper-pair breaking against high magnetic fields in carbon nanotubes / J. Haruyama et al. Impact of the transport supercurrent on the Josephson effect / S. N. Shevchenko. Josephson current through spin-polarized Luttinger liquid / N. Yokoshi and S. Kurihara

  19. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  20. Quantum physics without quantum philosophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerr, Detlef [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Mathematisches Inst.; Goldstein, Sheldon [Rutgers State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Zanghi, Nino [Genova Univ. (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare, Genova (Italy)

    2013-02-01

    Integrates and comments on the authors' seminal papers in the field. Emphasizes the natural way in which quantum phenomena emerge from the Bohmian picture. Helps to answer many of the objections raised to Bohmian quantum mechanics. Useful overview and summary for newcomers and students. It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schroedinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  1. Basics of quantum plasmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-01-01

    The present work is a topical review of the theoretical research on the quantum theory of plasmons and plasmon-photon interaction. The plasmons are defined as the quanta of the quantized plasmonic field. The corresponding classical plasmonic field was constructed on the basis of the study of collective oscillations of the electron gas in the solid. The electron-electron Coulomb interaction is taken into account. The explicit forms of the plasmon-photon interaction Lagrangian in canonical quantum mechanics and the plasmon-photon interaction action functional in the functional integral approach are derived. They all show that the interaction processes are nonlocal ones. The physical origin of the nonlocality is the complex structure of plasmons as composite quasiparticles: they cannot be considered as point particles, as was assumed in all phenomenological theories.

  2. Solid consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Lorenzo; Creminelli, Paolo; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Noreña, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    We argue that isotropic scalar fluctuations in solid inflation are adiabatic in the super-horizon limit. During the solid phase this adiabatic mode has peculiar features: constant energy-density slices and comoving slices do not coincide, and their curvatures, parameterized respectively by ζ and Script R, both evolve in time. The existence of this adiabatic mode implies that Maldacena's squeezed limit consistency relation holds after angular average over the long mode. The correlation functions of a long-wavelength spherical scalar mode with several short scalar or tensor modes is fixed by the scaling behavior of the correlators of short modes, independently of the solid inflation action or dynamics of reheating.

  3. Quantum entanglement and quantum operation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is a simple introduction to quantum entanglement and quantum operations.The authors focus on some applications of quantum entanglement and relations between two-qubit entangled states and unitary operations.It includes remote state preparation by using any pure entangled states,nonlocal operation implementation using entangled states,entanglement capacity of two-qubit gates and two-qubit gates construction.

  4. Quantum Physics Without Quantum Philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Dürr, Detlef; Zanghì, Nino

    2013-01-01

    It has often been claimed that without drastic conceptual innovations a genuine explanation of quantum interference effects and quantum randomness is impossible. This book concerns Bohmian mechanics, a simple particle theory that is a counterexample to such claims. The gentle introduction and other contributions collected here show how the phenomena of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, from Heisenberg's uncertainty principle to non-commuting observables, emerge from the Bohmian motion of particles, the natural particle motion associated with Schrödinger's equation. This book will be of value to all students and researchers in physics with an interest in the meaning of quantum theory as well as to philosophers of science.

  5. Quantum Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, D.; Williams, C.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes several new quantum algorithms. These include a polynomial time algorithm that uses a quantum fast Fourier transform to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Hamiltonian operator, and that can be applied in cases for which all know classical algorithms require exponential time.

  6. Quantum Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    The study of quantum theory allowed twentieth-century scientists to examine the world in a new way, one that was filled with uncertainties and probabilities. Further study also led to the development of lasers, the atomic bomb, and the computer. This exciting new book clearly explains quantum theory and its everyday uses in our world.

  7. Quantum Gravitodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sastry, R R

    1999-01-01

    The infinite dimensional generalization of the quantum mechanics of extended objects, namely, the quantum field theory of extended objects is employed to address the hitherto nonrenormalizable gravitational interaction following which the cosmological constant problem is addressed. The response of an electron to a weak gravitational field (linear approximation) is studied and the order $\\alpha$ correction to the magnetic gravitational moment is computed.

  8. Interatomic bonding in solids fundamentals, simulation, applications

    CERN Document Server

    Levitin , Valim

    2013-01-01

    The connection between the quantum behavior of the structure elements of a substance and the parameters that determine the macroscopic behavior of materials has a major influence on the properties exhibited by different solids. Although quantum engineering and theory should complement each other, this is not always the case. This book aims to demonstrate how the properties of materials can be derived and predicted from the features of their structural elements, generally electrons. In a sense, electronic structure forms the glue holding solids together and it is central to determining struct

  9. Quantum computer of wire circuit architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseev, S A; Andrianov, S N

    2010-01-01

    First solid state quantum computer was built using transmons (cooper pair boxes). The operation of the computer is limited because of using a number of the rigit cooper boxes working with fixed frequency at temperatures of superconducting material. Here, we propose a novel architecture of quantum computer based on a flexible wire circuit of many coupled quantum nodes containing controlled atomic (molecular) ensembles. We demonstrate wide opportunities of the proposed computer. Firstly, we reveal a perfect storage of external photon qubits to multi-mode quantum memory node and demonstrate a reversible exchange of the qubits between any arbitrary nodes. We found optimal parameters of atoms in the circuit and self quantum modes for quantum processing. The predicted perfect storage has been observed experimentally for microwave radiation on the lithium phthalocyaninate molecule ensemble. Then also, for the first time we show a realization of the efficient basic two-qubit gate with direct coupling of two arbitrary...

  10. Conference on Mathematical Results in Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Exner, Pavel; Tater, Miloš; QMath-7

    1999-01-01

    At the age of almost three quarters of a century, quantum mechanics is by all accounts a mature theory. There were times when it seemed that it had borne its best fruit already and would give way to investigation of deeper levels of matter. Today this sounds like rash thinking. Modern experimental techniques have led to discoveries of numerous new quantum effects in solid state, optics and elsewhere. Quantum mechanics is thus gradually becoming a basis for many branches of applied physics, in this way entering our everyday life. While the dynamic laws of quantum mechanics are well known, a proper theoretical understanding requires methods which would allow us to de­ rive the abundance of observed quantum effects from the first principles. In many cases the rich structure hidden in the Schr6dinger equation can be revealed only using sophisticated tools. This constitutes a motivation to investigate rigorous methods which yield mathematically well-founded properties of quantum systems.

  11. Quantum entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjiivanov, Ludmil

    2015-01-01

    Expository paper providing a historical survey of the gradual transformation of the "philosophical discussions" between Bohr, Einstein and Schr\\"odinger on foundational issues in quantum mechanics into a quantitative prediction of a new quantum effect, its experimental verification and its proposed (and loudly advertised) applications. The basic idea of the 1935 paper of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) was reformulated by David Bohm for a finite dimensional spin system. This allowed John Bell to derive his inequalities that separate the prediction of quantum entanglement from its possible classical interpretation. We reproduce here their later (1971) version, reviewing on the way the generalization (and mathematical derivation) of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations (due to Weyl and Schr\\"odinger) needed for the passage from EPR to Bell. We also provide an improved derivation of the quantum theoretic violation of Bell's inequalities. Soon after the experimental confirmation of the quantum entanglement (culminati...

  12. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  13. Quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The search for a quantum theory of the gravitational field is one of the great open problems in theoretical physics. This book presents a self-contained discussion of the concepts, methods and applications that can be expected in such a theory. The two main approaches to its construction - the direct quantisation of Einstein's general theory of relativity and string theory - are covered. Whereas the first attempts to construct a viable theory for the gravitational field alone, string theory assumes that a quantum theory of gravity will be achieved only through a unification of all the interactions. However, both employ the general method of quantization of constrained systems, which is described together with illustrative examples relevant for quantum gravity. There is a detailed presentation of the main approaches employed in quantum general relativity: path-integral quantization, the background-field method and canonical quantum gravity in the metric, connection and loop formulations. The discussion of stri...

  14. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2016-01-01

    A Thorough Update of One of the Most Highly Regarded Textbooks on Quantum Mechanics Continuing to offer an exceptionally clear, up-to-date treatment of the subject, Quantum Mechanics, Sixth Edition explains the concepts of quantum mechanics for undergraduate students in physics and related disciplines and provides the foundation necessary for other specialized courses. This sixth edition builds on its highly praised predecessors to make the text even more accessible to a wider audience. It is now divided into five parts that separately cover broad topics suitable for any general course on quantum mechanics. New to the Sixth Edition * Three chapters that review prerequisite physics and mathematics, laying out the notation, formalism, and physical basis necessary for the rest of the book * Short descriptions of numerous applications relevant to the physics discussed, giving students a brief look at what quantum mechanics has made possible industrially and scientifically * Additional end-of-chapter problems with...

  15. Interstellar Solid Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ching Yeh; Walker, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We consider the possibility that solid molecular hydrogen is present in interstellar space. If so cosmic-rays and energetic photons cause ionisation in the solid leading to the formation of H6+. This ion is not produced by gas-phase reactions and its radiative transitions therefore provide a signature of solid H2 in the astrophysical context. The vibrational transitions of H6+ are yet to be observed in the laboratory, but we have characterised them in a quantum-theoretical treatment of the molecule; our calculations include anharmonic corrections, which are large. Here we report on those calculations and compare our results with astronomical data. In addition to the H6+ isotopomer, we focus on the deuterated species (HD)3+ which is expected to dominate at low ionisation rates as a result of isotopic condensation reactions. We can reliably predict the frequencies of the fundamental bands for five modes of vibration. For (HD)3+ all of these are found to lie close to some of the strongest of the pervasive mid-in...

  16. Quantum Computation Toward Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzi, P. A.

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to enlighten the emerging relevance of Quantum Information Theory in the field of Quantum Gravity. As it was suggested by J. A. Wheeler, information theory must play a relevant role in understanding the foundations of Quantum Mechanics (the "It from bit" proposal). Here we suggest that quantum information must play a relevant role in Quantum Gravity (the "It from qubit" proposal). The conjecture is that Quantum Gravity, the theory which will reconcile Quantum Mechanics with General Relativity, can be formulated in terms of quantum bits of information (qubits) stored in space at the Planck scale. This conjecture is based on the following arguments: a) The holographic principle, b) The loop quantum gravity approach and spin networks, c) Quantum geometry and black hole entropy. From the above arguments, as they stand in the literature, it follows that the edges of spin networks pierce the black hole horizon and excite curvature degrees of freedom on the surface. These excitations are micro-states of Chern-Simons theory and account of the black hole entropy which turns out to be a quarter of the area of the horizon, (in units of Planck area), in accordance with the holographic principle. Moreover, the states which dominate the counting correspond to punctures of spin j = 1/2 and one can in fact visualize each micro-state as a bit of information. The obvious generalization of this result is to consider open spin networks with edges labeled by the spin -1/ 2 representation of SU(2) in a superposed state of spin "on" and spin "down." The micro-state corresponding to such a puncture will be a pixel of area which is "on" and "off" at the same time, and it will encode a qubit of information. This picture, when applied to quantum cosmology, describes an early inflationary universe which is a discrete version of the de Sitter universe.

  17. Solution-processed colloidal lead sulfide quantum dots for near-infrared quantum information processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Ranojoy

    In this thesis, we study solution-processed lead sulfide quantum dots for near-infrared quantum information and communication applications. Quantum dots processed through synthetic routes and colloidally suspended in solution offer far-reaching device application possibilities that are unparalelled in traditional self-assembled quantum dots. Lead sulfide quantum dots are especially promising for near-infrared quantum optics due to their optical emission at the wavelengths of fiber-optic communications (1.3--1.5 microm). The broad absorption spectrum of these quantum dots can be used for solar light-harvesting applications, to which end the results of Chapter 2---where we study Forster resonance energy transfer in quantum dot solids---provide remarkable insights into photon emission from quantum-dot based solar cells. In subsequent chapters, we explore quantum-dot photonic crystal applications, where exciton-photon interactions in the cavity environment remarkably allow for the emission of indistinguishable single photons that are important for distribution of high-security quantum keys---being highly sensitive to 'eavesdropping'. Particularly, the suggestion of the solution-processed QED system is novel compared to traditional self-assembled systems, and as we will discuss, offer integration and processing capabilities that are unprecedented, and perform well at wavelength ranges where standard QED systems scale poorly. The results of chapters 3--6 are therefore significant in the general field of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  18. Quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Cariolaro, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates that a quantum communication system using the coherent light of a laser can achieve performance orders of magnitude superior to classical optical communications Quantum Communications provides the Masters and PhD signals or communications student with a complete basics-to-applications course in using the principles of quantum mechanics to provide cutting-edge telecommunications. Assuming only knowledge of elementary probability, complex analysis and optics, the book guides its reader through the fundamentals of vector and Hilbert spaces and the necessary quantum-mechanical ideas, simply formulated in four postulates. A turn to practical matters begins with and is then developed by: ·         development of the concept of quantum decision, emphasizing the optimization of measurements to extract useful information from a quantum system; ·         general formulation of a transmitter–receiver system ·         particular treatment of the most popular quantum co...

  19. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C Language

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  20. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  1. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  2. Quantum Computers and Quantum Computer Languages: Quantum Assembly Language and Quantum C Language

    OpenAIRE

    Blaha, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We show a representation of Quantum Computers defines Quantum Turing Machines with associated Quantum Grammars. We then create examples of Quantum Grammars. Lastly we develop an algebraic approach to high level Quantum Languages using Quantum Assembly language and Quantum C language as examples.

  3. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  4. Quantum probability

    CERN Document Server

    Gudder, Stanley P

    2014-01-01

    Quantum probability is a subtle blend of quantum mechanics and classical probability theory. Its important ideas can be traced to the pioneering work of Richard Feynman in his path integral formalism.Only recently have the concept and ideas of quantum probability been presented in a rigorous axiomatic framework, and this book provides a coherent and comprehensive exposition of this approach. It gives a unified treatment of operational statistics, generalized measure theory and the path integral formalism that can only be found in scattered research articles.The first two chapters survey the ne

  5. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, John L

    2015-01-01

    Suitable for advanced undergraduates, this thorough text focuses on the role of symmetry operations and the essentially algebraic structure of quantum-mechanical theory. Based on courses in quantum mechanics taught by the authors, the treatment provides numerous problems that require applications of theory and serve to supplement the textual material.Starting with a historical introduction to the origins of quantum theory, the book advances to discussions of the foundations of wave mechanics, wave packets and the uncertainty principle, and an examination of the Schrödinger equation that includ

  6. Quantum Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Garrison, J C

    2008-01-01

    Quantum optics, i.e. the interaction of individual photons with matter, began with the discoveries of Planck and Einstein, but in recent years it has expanded beyond pure physics to become an important driving force for technological innovation. This book serves the broader readership growing out of this development by starting with an elementary description of the underlying physics and then building up a more advanced treatment. The reader is led from the quantum theory of thesimple harmonic oscillator to the application of entangled states to quantum information processing. An equally impor

  7. Quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Lowe, John P

    1993-01-01

    Praised for its appealing writing style and clear pedagogy, Lowe's Quantum Chemistry is now available in its Second Edition as a text for senior undergraduate- and graduate-level chemistry students. The book assumes little mathematical or physical sophistication and emphasizes an understanding of the techniques and results of quantum chemistry, thus enabling students to comprehend much of the current chemical literature in which quantum chemical methods or concepts are used as tools. The book begins with a six-chapter introduction of standard one-dimensional systems, the hydrogen atom,

  8. Quantum algorithmic information theory

    OpenAIRE

    Svozil, Karl

    1995-01-01

    The agenda of quantum algorithmic information theory, ordered `top-down,' is the quantum halting amplitude, followed by the quantum algorithmic information content, which in turn requires the theory of quantum computation. The fundamental atoms processed by quantum computation are the quantum bits which are dealt with in quantum information theory. The theory of quantum computation will be based upon a model of universal quantum computer whose elementary unit is a two-port interferometer capa...

  9. Quantum fingerprinting

    CERN Document Server

    Buhrman, H; Watrous, J; De Wolf, R; Buhrman, Harry; Cleve, Richard; Watrous, John; Wolf, Ronald de

    2001-01-01

    Classical fingerprinting associates with each string a shorter string (its fingerprint), such that, with high probability, any two distinct strings can be distinguished by comparing their fingerprints alone. The fingerprints can be exponentially smaller than the original strings if the parties preparing the fingerprints share a random key, but not if they only have access to uncorrelated random sources. In this paper we show that fingerprints consisting of quantum information can be made exponentially smaller than the original strings without any correlations or entanglement between the parties: we give a scheme where the quantum fingerprints are exponentially shorter than the original strings and we give a test that distinguishes any two unknown quantum fingerprints with high probability. Our scheme implies an exponential quantum/classical gap for the equality problem in the simultaneous message passing model of communication complexity. We optimize several aspects of our scheme.

  10. Quantum computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

    2010-03-04

    Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future.

  11. Quantum Rotatability

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    In arXiv:0807.0677, K\\"ostler and Speicher observed that de Finetti's theorem on exchangeable sequences has a free analogue if one replaces exchangeability by the stronger condition of invariance under quantum permutations. In this paper we study sequences of noncommutative random variables whose joint distribution is invariant under quantum orthogonal transformations. We prove a free analogue of Freedman's characterization of conditionally independent Gaussian families, namely an infinite sequence of self-adjoint random variables is quantum orthogonally invariant if and only if they form an operator-valued free centered equivariant semicircular family. Similarly, we show that an infinite sequence of noncommutative random variables is quantum unitarily invariant if and only if they form an operator-valued free centered equivariant circular family. We provide an example to show that, as in the classical case, these results fail for finite sequences. We then give an approximation to how far the distribution of ...

  12. Quantum Brain?

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Skoulakis, E M C

    2000-01-01

    In order to create a novel model of memory and brain function, we focus our approach on the sub-molecular (electron), molecular (tubulin) and macromolecular (microtubule) components of the neural cytoskeleton. Due to their size and geometry, these systems may be approached using the principles of quantum physics. We identify quantum-physics derived mechanisms conceivably underlying the integrated yet differentiated aspects of memory encoding/recall as well as the molecular basis of the engram. We treat the tubulin molecule as the fundamental computation unit (qubit) in a quantum-computational network that consists of microtubules (MTs), networks of MTs and ultimately entire neurons and neural networks. We derive experimentally testable predictions of our quantum brain hypothesis and perform experiments on these.

  13. Quantum lottery

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    On April Fools' Day, CERN Quantum Diaries blogger Pauline Gagnon held a giveaway of microscopic proportion. Up for grabs? Ten Higgs bosons, courtesy of CERN. Pauline announced the winners last week; let's see what they'll really be getting in the mail...   Custom-made Particle Zoo Higgs bosons were sent out to the winners. Read more about the prize in the Quantum Diaries post "Higgs boson lottery: when CERN plays April Fools' jokes".

  14. Quantum Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Haroche, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Mr Administrator,Dear colleagues,Ladies and gentlemen, “I think I can safely say that nobody understands quantum mechanics”. This statement, made by physicist Richard Feynman, expresses a paradoxical truth about the scientific theory that revolutionised our understanding of Nature and made an extraordinary contribution to our means of acting on and gaining information about the world. In this lecture, I will discuss quantum physics with you by attempting to resolve this paradox. And if I don’...

  15. Quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves.......Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves....

  16. Quantum Plasmonics

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Martin-Cano, Paloma A. Huidobro, Esteban Moreno; Diego Martin-Cano; Huidobro, Paloma A.; Esteban Moreno; Garcia-Vidal, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum plasmonics is a rapidly growing field of research that involves the study of the quantum properties of light and its interaction with matter at the nanoscale. Here, surface plasmons - electromagnetic excitations coupled to electron charge density waves on metal-dielectric interfaces or localized on metallic nanostructures - enable the confinement of light to scales far below that of conventional optics. In this article we review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical inve...

  17. Quantum optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2013-01-01

    Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves.......Further sensitivity improvements are required before advanced optical interferometers will be able to measure gravitational waves. A team has now shown that introducing quantum squeezing of light may help to detect these elusive waves....

  18. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-07-01

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  19. Quantum information storage and state transfer based on spin systems

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Z

    2004-01-01

    The idea of quantum state storage is generalized to describe the coherent transfer of quantum information through a coherent data bus. In this universal framework, we comprehensively review our recent systematical investigations to explore the possibility of implementing the physical processes of quantum information storage and state transfer by using quantum spin systems, which may be an isotropic antiferromagnetic spin ladder system or a ferromagnetic Heisenberg spin chain. Our studies emphasize the physical mechanisms and the fundamental problems behind the various protocols for the storage and transfer of quantum information in solid state systems.

  20. Edge states of periodically kicked quantum rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Floß, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantum localization phenomenon that exists in periodically kicked 3D rotors, but is absent in the commonly studied 2D ones: edge localization. We show that under the condition of a fractional quantum resonance there are states of the kicked rotor that are strongly localized near the edge of the angular momentum space at $J=0$. These states are analogs of surface states in crystalline solids, and they significantly affect resonant excitation of molecular rotation by laser pulse trains.

  1. Delirium Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, Christopher A

    2009-01-01

    This pseudo-paper consists of excerpts drawn from two of my quantum-email samizdats. Section 1 draws a picture of a physical world whose essence is ``Darwinism all the way down.'' Section 2 outlines how quantum theory should be viewed in light of this, i.e., as being an expression of probabilism (in Bruno de Finetti or Richard Jeffrey's sense) all the way back up. Section 3 describes how the idea of ``identical'' quantum measurement outcomes, though sounding atomistic in character, nonetheless meshes well with a Jamesian style ``radical pluralism.'' Sections 4 and 5 further detail how quantum theory should not be viewed so much as a ``theory of the world,'' but rather as a theory of decision-making for agents immersed within a world of a particular character--the quantum world. Finally, Sections 6 and 7 attempt to sketch the very positive sense in which quantum theory is incomplete, but still just as complete is it can be. In total, I hope these heady speculations convey some of the excitement and potential I...

  2. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  3. Quantum Central Processing Unit and Quantum Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王安民

    2002-01-01

    Based on a scalable and universal quantum network, quantum central processing unit, proposed in our previous paper [Chin. Phys. Left. 18 (2001)166], the whole quantum network for the known quantum algorithms,including quantum Fourier transformation, Shor's algorithm and Grover's algorithm, is obtained in a unitied way.

  4. Quantum Computation and Quantum Spin Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Michielsen, Kristel; Hams, Anthony; Miyashita, Seiji; Saito, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    We analyze the stability of quantum computations on physically realizable quantum computers by simulating quantum spin models representing quantum computer hardware. Examples of logically identical implementations of the controlled-NOT operation are used to demonstrate that the results of a quantum

  5. The quantum mechanics of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M. L.; Heine, V.; Phillips, J. C.

    1982-06-01

    The prediction of the properties of materials from fundamental principles, i.e., quantum mechanics, by the use of pseudopotential theory is discussed. Following a review of previous difficulties encountered in the application of quantum theory to complex aggregates of matter, and the failures of early theories to resolve differences corresponding to important phase transitions in solids, the idea first proposed by Herring concerning the energy cancellation of valence electrons and the possibility of neglecting core electron effects is examined as the basis of pseudopotential theory. The application of the electron pseudopotential, representing the scattering strength of one atomic core with respect to a single Fourier component of one valence-electron wave, to the calculation of the scattering of an electron wave in crystalline solids is examined, and the derivation of structural properties from the pseudopotentials is discussed. Recent advances in pseudopotential theory explaining the properties of surface and interface structures, and the total energy of semiconducting materials are indicated.

  6. Colloidal Quantum-Dot Photodetectors Exploiting Multiexciton Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vlad Sukhovatkin; Sean Hinds; Lukasz Brzozowski; Edward H. Sargent

    2009-01-01

    Multiexciton generation (MEG) has been indirectly observed in colloidal quantum dots, both in solution and the solid state, but has not yet been shown to enhance photocurrent in an optoelectronic device...

  7. Water's quantum structures and life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses several clues pointing to the spontaneous quantum origin of the recently discovered dissipative structures induced in liquid water by low-energy physical perturbations. These structures show an astonishing permanence, so much that large ponderal quantities of supramolecular aggregates of water - at ambient pressure and temperature - subsist even in the solid phase, strongly suggesting the possibility that these structures are the matrix itself of life.

  8. Quantum gates with topological phases

    CERN Document Server

    Ionicioiu, R

    2003-01-01

    We investigate two models for performing topological quantum gates with the Aharonov-Bohm (AB) and Aharonov-Casher (AC) effects. Topological one- and two-qubit Abelian phases can be enacted with the AB effect using charge qubits, whereas the AC effect can be used to perform all single-qubit gates (Abelian and non-Abelian) for spin qubits. Possible experimental setups suitable for a solid state implementation are briefly discussed.

  9. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-18

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  10. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  11. Solid State Physics Principles and Modern Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, John J

    2009-01-01

    Intended for a two semester advanced undergraduate or graduate course in Solid State Physics, this treatment offers modern coverage of the theory and related experiments, including the group theoretical approach to band structures, Moessbauer recoil free fraction, semi-classical electron theory, magnetoconductivity, electron self-energy and Landau theory of Fermi liquid, and both quantum and fractional quantum Hall effects. Integrated throughout are developments from the newest semiconductor devices, e.g. space charge layers, quantum wells and superlattices. The first half includes all material usually covered in the introductory course, but in greater depth than most introductory textbooks. The second half includes most of the important developments in solid-state researches of the past half century, addressing e.g. optical and electronic properties such as collective bulk and surface modes and spectral function of a quasiparticle, which is a basic concept for understanding LEED intensities, X ray fine struc...

  12. Charge-extraction strategies for colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Xinzheng

    2014-02-20

    The solar-power conversion efficiencies of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have advanced from sub-1% reported in 2005 to a record value of 8.5% in 2013. Much focus has deservedly been placed on densifying, passivating and crosslinking the colloidal quantum dot solid. Here we review progress in improving charge extraction, achieved by engineering the composition and structure of the electrode materials that contact the colloidal quantum dot film. New classes of structured electrodes have been developed and integrated to form bulk heterojunction devices that enhance photocharge extraction. Control over band offsets, doping and interfacial trap state densities have been essential for achieving improved electrical communication with colloidal quantum dot solids. Quantum junction devices that not only tune the optical absorption spectrum, but also provide inherently matched bands across the interface between p-and n-materials, have proven that charge separation can occur efficiently across an all-quantum-tuned rectifying junction. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  13. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  14. Quantum Transmemetic Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * A Quantum Model of Free Will * Quantum Acquisition of Knowledge * Thinking as a Quantum Algorithm * Counterfactual Measurement as a Model of Intuition * Quantum Modification of Freud's Model of Consciousness * Conclusion * Acknowledgements * References

  15. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  16. Quantum emission from hexagonal boron nitride monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Toan Trong; Bray, Kerem; Ford, Michael J.; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Artificial atomic systems in solids are widely considered the leading physical system for a variety of quantum technologies, including quantum communications, computing and metrology. To date, however, room-temperature quantum emitters have only been observed in wide-bandgap semiconductors such as diamond and silicon carbide, nanocrystal quantum dots, and most recently in carbon nanotubes. Single-photon emission from two-dimensional materials has been reported, but only at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate room-temperature, polarized and ultrabright single-photon emission from a colour centre in two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride. Density functional theory calculations indicate that vacancy-related defects are a probable source of the emission. Our results demonstrate the unprecedented potential of van der Waals crystals for large-scale nanophotonics and quantum information processing.

  17. Fermion-induced quantum critical points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Xiang; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Jian, Shao-Kai; Yao, Hong

    2017-08-22

    A unified theory of quantum critical points beyond the conventional Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson paradigm remains unknown. According to Landau cubic criterion, phase transitions should be first-order when cubic terms of order parameters are allowed by symmetry in the Landau-Ginzburg free energy. Here, from renormalization group analysis, we show that second-order quantum phase transitions can occur at such putatively first-order transitions in interacting two-dimensional Dirac semimetals. As such type of Landau-forbidden quantum critical points are induced by gapless fermions, we call them fermion-induced quantum critical points. We further introduce a microscopic model of SU(N) fermions on the honeycomb lattice featuring a transition between Dirac semimetals and Kekule valence bond solids. Remarkably, our large-scale sign-problem-free Majorana quantum Monte Carlo simulations show convincing evidences of a fermion-induced quantum critical points for N = 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, consistent with the renormalization group analysis. We finally discuss possible experimental realizations of the fermion-induced quantum critical points in graphene and graphene-like materials.Quantum phase transitions are governed by Landau-Ginzburg theory and the exceptions are rare. Here, Li et al. propose a type of Landau-forbidden quantum critical points induced by gapless fermions in two-dimensional Dirac semimetals.

  18. QWalk: A Quantum Monte Carlo Program for Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Lucas K; Mitas, Lubos

    2007-01-01

    We describe QWalk, a new computational package capable of performing Quantum Monte Carlo electronic structure calculations for molecules and solids with many electrons. We describe the structure of the program and its implementation of Quantum Monte Carlo methods. It is open-source, licensed under the GPL, and available at the web site http://www.qwalk.org

  19. Controlling light-matter interaction with mesoscopic quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Lodahl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) enable efficient coupling between light and matter, which is useful in applications such as light-harvesting and all-solid-state quantum information processing. This coupling can be increased by placing QDs in nanostructured optical environments such as photonic...

  20. Manipulating the quantum state of an electrical circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vion, D; Aassime, A; Cottet, A; Joyez, P; Pothier, H; Urbina, C; Esteve, D; Devoret, M H

    2002-05-03

    We have designed and operated a superconducting tunnel junction circuit that behaves as a two-level atom: the "quantronium." An arbitrary evolution of its quantum state can be programmed with a series of microwave pulses, and a projective measurement of the state can be performed by a pulsed readout subcircuit. The measured quality factor of quantum coherence Qphi approximately 25,000 is sufficiently high that a solid-state quantum processor based on this type of circuit can be envisioned.

  1. Quantum Chaos in Physical Systems: from Super Conductors to Quarks

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, Elmar; Markum, Harald; Pullirsch, Rainer

    2001-01-01

    This article is the written version of a talk delivered at the Bexbach Colloquium of Science 2000 and starts with an introduction into quantum chaos and its relationship to classical chaos. The Bohigas-Giannoni-Schmit conjecture is formulated and evaluated within random-matrix theory. Several examples of physical systems exhibiting quantum chaos ranging from nuclear to solid state physics are presented. The presentation concludes with recent research work on quantum chromodynamics and the qua...

  2. Photoemission of switchable mirrors and quantum wells

    OpenAIRE

    Koitzsch, Christian; Aebi, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the electronic properties of materials, which were explored with Angle Resolved Photoemission (ARPES) and Density Functional Theory (DFT). The natural fingerprint of electronic phenomena in crystalline solids, e.g. in this thesis the hydrogen-induced metal-insulator transition and the formation of standing electron waves in quantum wells, is the k-resolved band structure or in short the E(k) relation in the solid. The experimental technique to explore the occupied band ...

  3. Advances in Solid State Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The present volume 47 of the Advances in Solid State Physics contains the written version of a large number of the invited talks of the 2007 Spring Meeting of the Arbeitskreis Festkörperphysik which was held in Regensburg, Germany, from March 26 to 30, 2007 in conjunction with the 71st Annual Meeting of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.It gives an overview of the present status of solid state physics where low-dimensional systems such as quantum dots and quantum wires are dominating. The importance of magnetic materials is reflected by the large number of contributions in the part dealing with ferromagnetic films and particles. One of the most exciting achievements of the last couple of years is the successful application of electrical contacts to and the investigation of single layers of graphene. This exciting physics is covered in Part IV of this book. Terahertz physics is another rapidly moving field which is presented here by five contributions. Achievements in solid state physics are only rarely...

  4. Quantum weirdness

    CERN Document Server

    Mullin, William J

    2017-01-01

    Quantum mechanics allows a remarkably accurate description of nature and powerful predictive capabilities. The analyses of quantum systems and their interpretation lead to many surprises, for example, the ability to detect the characteristics of an object without ever touching it in any way, via "interaction-free measurement," or the teleportation of an atomic state over large distances. The results can become downright bizarre. Quantum mechanics is a subtle subject that usually involves complicated mathematics -- calculus, partial differential equations, etc., for complete understanding. Most texts for general audiences avoid all mathematics. The result is that the reader misses almost all deep understanding of the subject, much of which can be probed with just high-school level algebra and trigonometry. Thus, readers with that level of mathematics can learn so much more about this fundamental science. The book starts with a discussion of the basic physics of waves (an appendix reviews some necessary class...

  5. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Quantum mechanics was developed during the first few decades of the twentieth century via a series of inspired guesses made by various physicists, including Planck, Einstein, Bohr, Schroedinger, Heisenberg, Pauli, and Dirac. All these scientists were trying to construct a self-consistent theory of microscopic dynamics that was compatible with experimental observations. The purpose of this book is to present quantum mechanics in a clear, concise, and systematic fashion, starting from the fundamental postulates, and developing the theory in as logical manner as possible. Topics covered in the book include the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics, angular momentum, time-dependent and time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, identical particles, and relativistic electron theory.

  6. Quantum spirals

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Z

    2016-01-01

    Quantum systems often exhibit fundamental incapability to entertain vortex. The Meissner effect, a complete expulsion of the magnetic field (the electromagnetic vorticity), for instance, is taken to be the defining attribute of the superconducting state. Superfluidity is another, close-parallel example; fluid vorticity can reside only on topological defects with a limited (quantized) amount. Recent developments in the Bose-Einstein condensates produced by particle traps further emphasize this characteristic. We show that the challenge of imparting vorticity to a quantum fluid can be met through a nonlinear mechanism operating in a hot fluid corresponding to a thermally modified Pauli-Schroedinger spinor field. In a simple field-free model, we show that the thermal effect, represented by a nonlinear, non-Hermitian Hamiltonian, in conjunction with spin vorticity, leads to new interesting quantum states; a spiral solution is explicitly worked out.

  7. Quantum waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Exner, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    This monograph explains the theory of quantum waveguides, that is, dynamics of quantum particles confined to regions in the form of tubes, layers, networks, etc. The focus is on relations between the confinement geometry on the one hand and the spectral and scattering properties of the corresponding quantum Hamiltonians on the other. Perturbations of such operators, in particular, by external fields are also considered. The volume provides a unique summary of twenty five years of research activity in this area and indicates ways in which the theory can develop further. The book is fairly self-contained. While it requires some broader mathematical physics background, all the basic concepts are properly explained and proofs of most theorems are given in detail, so there is no need for additional sources. Without a parallel in the literature, the monograph by Exner and Kovarik guides the reader through this new and exciting field.

  8. Quantum Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    In this paper, we will give a short review on quantum spring, which is a Casimir effect from the helix boundary condition that proposed in our earlier works. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  9. Quantum Go

    CERN Document Server

    Ranchin, André

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new board game based on the ancient Chinese game of Go (Weiqi, Igo, Baduk). The key difference from the original game is that players no longer alternatively play single stones on the board but instead they take turns placing pairs of entangled go stones. A phenomenon of quantum-like collapse occurs when a stone is placed in an intersection directly adjacent to one or more other stones. For each neighboring stone in an entangled pair, each player then chooses which stone of the pair is kept on the board and which stone is removed. The aim of the game is still to surround more territory than the opponent and as the number of stones increases, all the entangled pairs of stones eventually reduce to single stones. Quantum Go provides an interesting and tangible illustration of quantum concepts such as superposition, entanglement and collapse.

  10. Quantum Magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Barbara, Bernard; Sawatzky, G; Stamp, P. C. E

    2008-01-01

    This book is based on some of the lectures during the Pacific Institute of Theoretical Physics (PITP) summer school on "Quantum Magnetism", held during June 2006 in Les Houches, in the French Alps. The school was funded jointly by NATO, the CNRS, and PITP, and entirely organized by PITP. Magnetism is a somewhat peculiar research field. It clearly has a quantum-mechanical basis – the microsopic exchange interactions arise entirely from the exclusion principle, in conjunction with respulsive interactions between electrons. And yet until recently the vast majority of magnetism researchers and users of magnetic phenomena around the world paid no attention to these quantum-mechanical roots. Thus, eg., the huge ($400 billion per annum) industry which manufactures hard discs, and other components in the information technology sector, depends entirely on room-temperature properties of magnets - yet at the macroscopic or mesoscopic scales of interest to this industry, room-temperature magnets behave entirely classic...

  11. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, P K

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanics, designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of physics, mathematics and chemistry, provides a concise yet self-contained introduction to the formal framework of quantum mechanics, its application to physical problems and the interpretation of the theory. Starting with a review of some of the necessary mathematics, the basic concepts are carefully developed in the text. After building a general formalism, detailed treatment of the standard material - the harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum theory, symmetry transformations, approximation methods, identical particle and many-particle systems, and scattering theory - is presented. The concluding chapter discusses the interpretation of quantum mechanics. Some of the important topics discussed in the book are the rigged Hilbert space, deformation quantization, path integrals, coherent states, geometric phases, decoherene, etc. This book is characterized by clarity and coherence of presentation.

  12. Quantum Yields of Decomposition and Homo-Dimerization of Solid L-Alanine Induced by 7.2 eV Vacuum Ultraviolet Light Irradiation: An Estimate of the Half-Life of L-Alanine on the Surface of Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yudai; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2011-08-01

    One of the leading hypotheses regarding the origin of prebiotic molecules on primitive Earth is that they formed from inorganic molecules in extraterrestrial environments and were delivered by meteorites, space dust and comets. To evaluate the availability of extraterrestrial amino acids, it is necessary to examine their decomposition and oligomerization rates as induced by extraterrestrial energy sources, such as vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and X-ray photons and high energy particles. This paper reports the quantum yields of decomposition ((8.2 ± 0.7) × 10-2 photon-1) and homo-dimerization ((1.2 ± 0.3) × 10-3 photon-1) and decomposition of the dimer (0.24 ± 0.06 photon-1) of solid l-alanine (Ala) induced by VUV light with an energy of 7.2 eV. Using these quantum yields, the half-life of l-Ala on the surface of a space object in the present earth orbit was estimated to be about 52 days, even when only photons with an energy of 7.2 eV emitted from the present Sun were considered. The actual half-life of solid l-Ala on the surface of a space object orbit around the present day Earth would certainly be much shorter than our estimate, because of the added effect of photons and particles of other energies. Thus, we propose that l-Ala needs to be shielded from solar VUV in protected environments, such as the interior of a meteorite, within a time scale of days after synthesis to ensure its arrival on the primitive Earth.

  13. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Rae, Alastair I M

    2007-01-01

    PREFACESINTRODUCTION The Photoelectric Effect The Compton Effect Line Spectra and Atomic Structure De Broglie Waves Wave-Particle Duality The Rest of This Book THE ONE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Time-Dependent Schrödinger Equation The Time-Independent Schrödinger Equation Boundary ConditionsThe Infinite Square Well The Finite Square Well Quantum Mechanical Tunneling The Harmonic Oscillator THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCHRÖDINGER EQUATIONS The Wave Equations Separation in Cartesian Coordinates Separation in Spherical Polar Coordinates The Hydrogenic Atom THE BASIC POSTULATES OF QUANTUM MEC

  14. Quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zagoskin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Written by Dr Alexandre Zagoskin, who is a Reader at Loughborough University, Quantum Mechanics: A Complete Introduction is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers the key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear jargon-free English, and then providing added-value features like summaries of key ideas, and even lists of questions you might be asked in your exam. The book uses a structure that is designed to make quantum physics as accessible as possible - by starting with its similarities to Newtonian physics, ra

  15. Quantum dice

    OpenAIRE

    de Bianchi, Massimiliano Sassoli

    2013-01-01

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote: "Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the old one. I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice." In this paper we take seriously Einstein's famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how...

  16. Quantum Cosmology

    OpenAIRE

    Bojowald, Martin

    1999-01-01

    A complete model of the universe needs at least three parts: (1) a complete set of physical variables and dynamical laws for them, (2) the correct solution of the dynamical laws, and (3) the connection with conscious experience. In quantum cosmology, item (2) is the quantum state of the cosmos. Hartle and Hawking have made the `no-boundary' proposal, that the wavefunction of the universe is given by a path integral over all compact Euclidean 4-dimensional geometries and matter fields that hav...

  17. Quantum protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Buhrman, Harry

    2006-01-01

    École thématique; Quantum Information, Computation and Complexity * Programme at the Institut Henri Poincaré, January 4th – April 7th, 2006 * Organizers: Ph.Grangier, M.Santha and D.L.Shepelyansky * Lectures have been filmed by Peter Rapcan and Michal Sedlak from Bratislava with the support of the Marie Curie RTN "CONQUEST" A trimester at the Centre Emile Borel - Institut Henri Poincaré is devoted to modern developments in a rapidly growing field of quantum information and communication, quan...

  18. Quantum Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2007-09-01

    Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Synopsis; Part I. Fundamental Concepts of Finance: 2. Introduction to finance; 3. Derivative securities; Part II. Systems with Finite Number of Degrees of Freedom: 4. Hamiltonians and stock options; 5. Path integrals and stock options; 6. Stochastic interest rates' Hamiltonians and path integrals; Part III. Quantum Field Theory of Interest Rates Models: 7. Quantum field theory of forward interest rates; 8. Empirical forward interest rates and field theory models; 9. Field theory of Treasury Bonds' derivatives and hedging; 10. Field theory Hamiltonian of forward interest rates; 11. Conclusions; Appendix A: mathematical background; Brief glossary of financial terms; Brief glossary of physics terms; List of main symbols; References; Index.

  19. Quantum profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, Jeremy

    1991-01-01

    For the prominent science writer Jeremy Bernstein, the profile is the most congenial way of communicating science. Here, in what he labels a "series of conversations carried on in the reader's behalf and my own," he evokes the tremendous intellectual excitement of the world of modern physics, especially the quantum revolution. Drawing on his well-known talent for explaining the most complex scientific ideas for the layperson, Bernstein gives us a lively sense of what the issues of quantum mechanics are and of various ways in which individual physicists approached them.The author begins this se

  20. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  1. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  2. Investigating albendazole desmotropes by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattah, Ana K; Zhang, Rongchun; Mroue, Kamal H; Pfund, Laura Y; Longhi, Marcela R; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Garnero, Claudia

    2015-03-02

    Characterization of the molecular structure and physicochemical solid-state properties of the solid forms of pharmaceutical compounds is a key requirement for successful commercialization as potential active ingredients in drug products. These properties can ultimately have a critical effect on the solubility and bioavailability of the final drug product. Here, the desmotropy of Albendazole forms I and II was investigated at the atomic level. Ultrafast magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, together with powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, were performed on polycrystalline samples of the two solids in order to fully characterize and distinguish the two forms. High-resolution one-dimensional (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N together with two-dimensional (1)H/(1)H single quantum-single quantum, (1)H/(1)H single quantum-double quantum, and (1)H/(13)C chemical shift correlation solid-state NMR experiments under MAS conditions were extensively used to decipher the intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions present in both solid forms. These experiments enabled the unequivocal identification of the tautomers of each desmotrope. Our results also revealed that both solid forms may be described as dimeric structures, with different intermolecular hydrogen bonds connecting the tautomers in each dimer.

  3. Quantum Time

    CERN Document Server

    Ashmead, John

    2010-01-01

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  4. Quantum Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-14

    Barbara , California, March 1993. I Carrier Dynamics in Quantum Wires Investigators: Wolfgang Porod I I Using the Monte Carlo technique, we have...8217.ubtle correlations between impunty scanenng events tin the "res;ence oft a ma.’neuc fle!dlp which are beyond Fermi’s Golden Rule. In this caper . we

  5. Quantum Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Binder, K; Ciccotti, G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this set of lectures is to introduce the general concepts that are at the basis of the computer simulation algorithms that are used to study the behavior of condensed matter quantum systems. The emphasis is on the underlying concepts rather than on specific applications. Topics treate

  6. Quantum rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzagorta, Marco O.; Gomez, Richard B.; Uhlmann, Jeffrey K.

    2003-08-01

    In recent years, computer graphics has emerged as a critical component of the scientific and engineering process, and it is recognized as an important computer science research area. Computer graphics are extensively used for a variety of aerospace and defense training systems and by Hollywood's special effects companies. All these applications require the computer graphics systems to produce high quality renderings of extremely large data sets in short periods of time. Much research has been done in "classical computing" toward the development of efficient methods and techniques to reduce the rendering time required for large datasets. Quantum Computing's unique algorithmic features offer the possibility of speeding up some of the known rendering algorithms currently used in computer graphics. In this paper we discuss possible implementations of quantum rendering algorithms. In particular, we concentrate on the implementation of Grover's quantum search algorithm for Z-buffering, ray-tracing, radiosity, and scene management techniques. We also compare the theoretical performance between the classical and quantum versions of the algorithms.

  7. Quantum dice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano, E-mail: autoricerca@gmail.com

    2013-09-15

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote [42]: “Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the ‘old one.’ I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice.” In this paper we take seriously Einstein’s famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how to perform measurements on a single die, to create typical quantum interference effects, and how to connect (entangle) two identical dice, to maximally violate Bell’s inequality. -- Highlights: •Rolling a die is a quantum process admitting a Hilbert space representation. •Rolling experiments with a single die can produce interference effects. •Two connected dice can violate Bell’s inequality. •Correlations need to be created by the measurement, to violate Bell’s inequality.

  8. Quantum abacus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Taksu; Tsutsui, Izumi; Fülöp, Tamás

    2004-09-01

    We show that the point interactions on a line can be utilized to provide U(2) family of qubit operations for quantum information processing. Qubits are realized as states localized in either side of the point interaction which represents a controllable gate. The qubit manipulation proceeds in a manner analogous to the operation of an abacus.

  9. Quantum Criticality

    OpenAIRE

    Keimer, Bernhard; Sachdev, Subir

    2011-01-01

    This is a review of the basic theoretical ideas of quantum criticality, and of their connection to numerous experiments on correlated electron compounds. A shortened, modified, and edited version appeared in Physics Today. This arxiv version has additional citations to the literature.

  10. Quantum fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1993-01-01

    Phenomenological and theoretical aspects of fragmentation for elementary particles (resp. nuclei) are discussed. It is shown that some concepts of classical fragmentation remain relevant in a microscopic framework, exhibiting non-trivial properties of quantum relativistic field theory (resp. lattice percolation). Email contact: pesch@amoco.saclay.cea.fr

  11. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  12. Quantum biological information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-01-01

    This book is a self-contained, tutorial-based introduction to quantum information theory and quantum biology. It serves as a single-source reference to the topic for researchers in bioengineering, communications engineering, electrical engineering, applied mathematics, biology, computer science, and physics. The book provides all the essential principles of the quantum biological information theory required to describe the quantum information transfer from DNA to proteins, the sources of genetic noise and genetic errors as well as their effects. Integrates quantum information and quantum biology concepts; Assumes only knowledge of basic concepts of vector algebra at undergraduate level; Provides a thorough introduction to basic concepts of quantum information processing, quantum information theory, and quantum biology; Includes in-depth discussion of the quantum biological channel modelling, quantum biological channel capacity calculation, quantum models of aging, quantum models of evolution, quantum models o...

  13. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Broadbent (Anne); C. Schaffner (Christian)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractQuantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness

  14. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation,

  15. Quantum cryptography beyond quantum key distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadbent, A.; Schaffner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum cryptography is the art and science of exploiting quantum mechanical effects in order to perform cryptographic tasks. While the most well-known example of this discipline is quantum key distribution (QKD), there exist many other applications such as quantum money, randomness generation, secu

  16. Demonstration of Light-Matter Micro-Macro Quantum Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranov, Alexey; Lavoie, Jonathan; Strassmann, Peter C.; Sangouard, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; Bussières, Félix; Gisin, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts microscopic phenomena with undeniable success. Nevertheless, current theoretical and experimental efforts still do not yield conclusive evidence that there is or is not a fundamental limitation on the possibility to observe quantum phenomena at the macroscopic scale. This question prompted several experimental efforts producing quantum superpositions of large quantum states in light or matter. We report on the observation of quantum correlations, revealed using an entanglement witness, between a single photon and an atomic ensemble of billions of ions frozen in a crystal. The matter part of the state involves the superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable solid-state components composed of several tens of atomic excitations. Assuming the insignificance of the time ordering our experiment indirectly shows light-matter micro-macro entanglement. Our approach leverages from quantum memory techniques and could be used in other systems to expand the size of quantum superpositions in matter.

  17. Coherence-Driven Topological Transition in Quantum Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pankaj K; Mrejen, Michael; Kim, Jeongmin; Wu, Chihhui; Wang, Yuan; Rostovtsev, Yuri V; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-04-22

    We introduce and theoretically demonstrate a quantum metamaterial made of dense ultracold neutral atoms loaded into an inherently defect-free artificial crystal of light, immune to well-known critical challenges inevitable in conventional solid-state platforms. We demonstrate an all-optical control, on ultrafast time scales, over the photonic topological transition of the isofrequency contour from an open to closed topology at the same frequency. This atomic lattice quantum metamaterial enables a dynamic manipulation of the decay rate branching ratio of a probe quantum emitter by more than an order of magnitude. Our proposal may lead to practically lossless, tunable, and topologically reconfigurable quantum metamaterials, for single or few-photon-level applications as varied as quantum sensing, quantum information processing, and quantum simulations using metamaterials.

  18. Demonstration of Light-Matter Micro-Macro Quantum Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranov, Alexey; Lavoie, Jonathan; Strassmann, Peter C; Sangouard, Nicolas; Afzelius, Mikael; Bussières, Félix; Gisin, Nicolas

    2016-05-13

    Quantum mechanics predicts microscopic phenomena with undeniable success. Nevertheless, current theoretical and experimental efforts still do not yield conclusive evidence that there is or is not a fundamental limitation on the possibility to observe quantum phenomena at the macroscopic scale. This question prompted several experimental efforts producing quantum superpositions of large quantum states in light or matter. We report on the observation of quantum correlations, revealed using an entanglement witness, between a single photon and an atomic ensemble of billions of ions frozen in a crystal. The matter part of the state involves the superposition of two macroscopically distinguishable solid-state components composed of several tens of atomic excitations. Assuming the insignificance of the time ordering our experiment indirectly shows light-matter micro-macro entanglement. Our approach leverages from quantum memory techniques and could be used in other systems to expand the size of quantum superpositions in matter.

  19. Coupling of individual quantum emitters to channel plasmons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bermúdez-Ureña, Esteban; Gonzalez-Ballestero, Carlos; Geiselmann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Efficient light-matter interaction lies at the heart of many emerging technologies that seek on-chip integration of solid-state photonic systems. Plasmonic waveguides, which guide the radiation in the form of strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, represent a promising solution...... of efficient and long distance transfer of energy for integrated solid-state quantum systems...

  20. Intracity Quantum Communication via Thermal Microwave Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Liang Xiang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Communication over proven-secure quantum channels is potentially one of the most wide-ranging applications of currently developed quantum technologies. It is generally envisioned that in future quantum networks, separated nodes containing stationary solid-state or atomic qubits are connected via the exchange of optical photons over large distances. In this work, we explore an intriguing alternative for quantum communication via all-microwave networks. To make this possible, we describe a general protocol for sending quantum states through thermal channels, even when the number of thermal photons in the channel is much larger than 1. The protocol can be implemented with state-of-the-art superconducting circuits and enables the transfer of quantum states over distances of about 100 m via microwave transmission lines cooled to only T=4  K. This opens up new possibilities for quantum communication within and across buildings and, consequently, for the implementation of intracity quantum networks based on microwave technology only.

  1. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  2. Quantum Secure Dialogue with Quantum Encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tian-Yu

    2014-09-01

    How to solve the information leakage problem has become the research focus of quantum dialogue. In this paper, in order to overcome the information leakage problem in quantum dialogue, a novel approach for sharing the initial quantum state privately between communicators, i.e., quantum encryption sharing, is proposed by utilizing the idea of quantum encryption. The proposed protocol uses EPR pairs as the private quantum key to encrypt and decrypt the traveling photons, which can be repeatedly used after rotation. Due to quantum encryption sharing, the public announcement on the state of the initial quantum state is omitted, thus the information leakage problem is overcome. The information-theoretical efficiency of the proposed protocol is nearly 100%, much higher than previous information leakage resistant quantum dialogue protocols. Moreover, the proposed protocol only needs single-photon measurements and nearly uses single photons as quantum resource so that it is convenient to implement in practice.

  3. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  4. Quantum Computing with an Electron Spin Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesenberg, Janus; Ardavan, A.; Briggs, G.A.D.

    2009-01-01

    We propose to encode a register of quantum bits in different collective electron spin wave excitations in a solid medium. Coupling to spins is enabled by locating them in the vicinity of a superconducting transmission line cavity, and making use of their strong collective coupling to the quantized...

  5. Thermal rectification in nonlinear quantum circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruokola, T.; Ojanen, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of radiative heat transport in nonlinear solid-state quantum circuits. We give a detailed account of heat rectification effects, i.e., the asymmetry of heat current with respect to a reversal of the thermal gradient, in a system consisting of two reservoirs at finite...

  6. Advances in Solid State Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    The present volume 46 of Advances in Solid State Physics contains the written versions of selected invited lectures from the spring meeting of the Arbeitskreis Festkörperphysik of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft which was held from 27 to 31 March 2006 in Dresden, Germany. Many topical talks given at the numerous symposia are included. Most of these were organized collaboratively by several of the divisions of the Arbeitskreis. The topis range from zero-dimensional physics in quantum dots, molecules and nanoparticles over one-dimensional physics in nanowires and 1d systems to more applied subjects like optoelectronics and materials science in thin films. The contributions span the whole width of solid-state physics from truly basic science to applications.

  7. Advances in Solid State Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, B

    2006-01-01

    The present volume 45 of Advances in Solid-State Physics contains the written versions of selected invited lectures from the spring meeting of the Arbeitskreis Festkörperphysik of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft in the World Year of Physics 2005, the Einstein Year, which was held from 4 - 11 March 2005 in Berlin, Germany. Many topical talks given at the numerous symposia are included. Most of these were organized collaboratively by several of the divisions of the Arbeitskreis. The book presents, to some extent, the status of the field of solid-state physics in 2005 not only in Germany but also internationally. It is ''nanoscience'', namely the physics of quantum dots and wires, electrical transport, optical properties, spin transport in nanostructures, and magnetism on the nanoscale, that is of central interest to the physics community. Also, soft matter and biological systems are covered.

  8. Three-Dimensional Wiring for Extensible Quantum Computing: The Quantum Socket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béjanin, J. H.; McConkey, T. G.; Rinehart, J. R.; Earnest, C. T.; McRae, C. R. H.; Shiri, D.; Bateman, J. D.; Rohanizadegan, Y.; Penava, B.; Breul, P.; Royak, S.; Zapatka, M.; Fowler, A. G.; Mariantoni, M.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum computing architectures are on the verge of scalability, a key requirement for the implementation of a universal quantum computer. The next stage in this quest is the realization of quantum error-correction codes, which will mitigate the impact of faulty quantum information on a quantum computer. Architectures with ten or more quantum bits (qubits) have been realized using trapped ions and superconducting circuits. While these implementations are potentially scalable, true scalability will require systems engineering to combine quantum and classical hardware. One technology demanding imminent efforts is the realization of a suitable wiring method for the control and the measurement of a large number of qubits. In this work, we introduce an interconnect solution for solid-state qubits: the quantum socket. The quantum socket fully exploits the third dimension to connect classical electronics to qubits with higher density and better performance than two-dimensional methods based on wire bonding. The quantum socket is based on spring-mounted microwires—the three-dimensional wires—that push directly on a microfabricated chip, making electrical contact. A small wire cross section (approximately 1 mm), nearly nonmagnetic components, and functionality at low temperatures make the quantum socket ideal for operating solid-state qubits. The wires have a coaxial geometry and operate over a frequency range from dc to 8 GHz, with a contact resistance of approximately 150 m Ω , an impedance mismatch of approximately 10 Ω , and minimal cross talk. As a proof of principle, we fabricate and use a quantum socket to measure high-quality superconducting resonators at a temperature of approximately 10 mK. Quantum error-correction codes such as the surface code will largely benefit from the quantum socket, which will make it possible to address qubits located on a two-dimensional lattice. The present implementation of the socket could be readily extended to accommodate a

  9. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; O'Brien, Jeremy; Wang, Jingbo; Matthews, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise quantum walks have shown much potential as a frame- work for developing new quantum algorithms. In this paper, we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs ef...

  10. Interpreting Quantum Discord in Quantum Metrology

    OpenAIRE

    Girolami, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Multipartite quantum systems show properties which do not admit a classical explanation. In particular, even nonentangled states can enjoy a kind of quantum correlations called quantum discord. I discuss some recent results on the role of quantum discord in metrology. Given an interferometric phase estimation protocol where the Hamiltonian is initially unknown to the experimentalist, the quantum discord of the probe state quantifies the minimum precision of the estimation. This provides a phy...

  11. Quantum Mechanics interpreted in Quantum Real Numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Corbett, J V; Corbett, John V; Durt, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    The concept of number is fundamental to the formulation of any physical theory. We give a heuristic motivation for the reformulation of Quantum Mechanics in terms of non-standard real numbers called Quantum Real Numbers. The standard axioms of quantum mechanics are re-interpreted. Our aim is to show that, when formulated in the language of quantum real numbers, the laws of quantum mechanics appear more natural, less counterintuitive than when they are presented in terms of standard numbers.

  12. Stark echo modulation for quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, A.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, Ph.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum memories for optical and microwave photons provide key functionalities in quantum processing and communications. Here we propose a protocol well adapted to solid-state ensemble-based memories coupled to cavities. It is called Stark echo modulation memory (SEMM) and allows large storage bandwidths and low noise. This is achieved in an echo-like sequence combined with phase shifts induced by small electric fields through the linear Stark effect. We investigated the protocol for rare-earth nuclear spins and found a high suppression of unwanted collective emissions that is compatible with single-photon-level operation. Broadband storage together with high fidelity for the Stark retrieval process is also demonstrated. SEMM could be used to store optical or microwave photons in ions and/or spins. This includes nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond and rare-earth-doped crystals, which are among the most promising solid-state quantum memories.

  13. Entanglement and Quantum Error Correction with Superconducting Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Quantum information science seeks to take advantage of the properties of quantum mechanics to manipulate information in ways that are not otherwise possible. Quantum computation, for example, promises to solve certain problems in days that would take a conventional supercomputer the age of the universe to decipher. This power does not come without a cost however, as quantum bits are inherently more susceptible to errors than their classical counterparts. Fortunately, it is possible to redundantly encode information in several entangled qubits, making it robust to decoherence and control imprecision with quantum error correction. I studied one possible physical implementation for quantum computing, employing the ground and first excited quantum states of a superconducting electrical circuit as a quantum bit. These ``transmon'' qubits are dispersively coupled to a superconducting resonator used for readout, control, and qubit-qubit coupling in the cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture. In this talk I will give an general introduction to quantum computation and the superconducting technology that seeks to achieve it before explaining some of the specific results reported in my thesis. One major component is that of the first realization of three-qubit quantum error correction in a solid state device, where we encode one logical quantum bit in three entangled physical qubits and detect and correct phase- or bit-flip errors using a three-qubit Toffoli gate. My thesis is available at arXiv:1311.6759.

  14. Room temperature coherent control of coupled single spins in solid

    CERN Document Server

    Gaebel, T; Popa, I; Wittmann, C; Neumann, P; Jelezko, F; Rabeau, J R; Stavrias, N; Greentree, A D; Prawer, S; Meijer, J; Twamley, J; Hemmer, P R; Wrachtrup, J

    2006-01-01

    Coherent coupling between single quantum objects is at the heart of modern quantum physics. When coupling is strong enough to prevail over decoherence, it can be used for the engineering of correlated quantum states. Especially for solid-state systems, control of quantum correlations has attracted widespread attention because of applications in quantum computing. Such coherent coupling has been demonstrated in a variety of systems at low temperature1, 2. Of all quantum systems, spins are potentially the most important, because they offer very long phase memories, sometimes even at room temperature. Although precise control of spins is well established in conventional magnetic resonance3, 4, existing techniques usually do not allow the readout of single spins because of limited sensitivity. In this paper, we explore dipolar magnetic coupling between two single defects in diamond (nitrogen-vacancy and nitrogen) using optical readout of the single nitrogen-vacancy spin states. Long phase memory combined with a d...

  15. Measuring the effective phonon density of states of a quantum dot in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Kreiner-Møller, Asger

    2013-01-01

    We employ detuning-dependent decay-rate measurements of a quantum dot in a photonic-crystal cavity to study the influence of phonon dephasing in a solid-state quantum-electrodynamics experiment. The experimental data agree with a microscopic non-Markovian model accounting for dephasing from...... longitudinal acoustic phonons, and the analysis explains the difference between nonresonant cavity feeding in different nanocavities. From the comparison between experiment and theory we extract the effective phonon density of states experienced by the quantum dot in the nanocavity. This quantity determines...

  16. SPECTRAL-LUMINESCENT CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES ACTIVATED WITH MANGANESE AND CADMIUM SULPHIDE QUANTUM DOTS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhanna O. Lipatova; Vladimir A. Aseev; Elena V. Kolobkova

    2014-01-01

    Research and development of phosphors based on quantum dots (QD) is a perspective problem of photonics. The main advantages of fluorophosphate glass with quantum dots are: high absorption coefficient, solid matrix and a broad band luminescence with high quantum efficiency of QD. Manganese ions have an intense band luminescence in the red region of the spectrum. Thus, the addition of manganese ions in the glass with quantum dots leads to a broadening of the spectrum in the long wav...

  17. Dynamical moments reveal a topological quantum transition in a photonic quantum walk

    CERN Document Server

    Cardano, Filippo; Massa, Francesco; Piccirillo, Bruno; de Lisio, Corrado; De Filippis, Giulio; Cataudella, Vittorio; Santamato, Enrico; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Many phenomena in solid-state physics can be understood in terms of their topological properties. Recently, controlled protocols of quantum walks are proving to be effective simulators of such phenomena. Here we report the realization of a photonic quantum walk showing both the trivial and the non-trivial topologies associated with chiral symmetry in one-dimensional periodic systems, as in the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model of polyacetylene. We find that the probability distribution moments of the walker position after many steps behave differently in the two topological phases and can be used as direct indicators of the quantum transition: while varying a control parameter, these moments exhibit a slope discontinuity at the transition point, and remain constant in the non-trivial phase. Extending this approach to higher dimensions, different topological classes, and other typologies of quantum phases may offer new general instruments for investigating quantum transitions in such complex systems.

  18. Simulation and understanding of atomic and molecular quantum crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazorla, Claudio; Boronat, Jordi

    2017-07-01

    Quantum crystals abound in the whole range of solid-state species. Below a certain threshold temperature the physical behavior of rare gases (He 4 and Ne), molecular solids (H2 and CH4 ), and some ionic (LiH), covalent (graphite), and metallic (Li) crystals can be explained only in terms of quantum nuclear effects (QNE). A detailed comprehension of the nature of quantum solids is critical for achieving progress in a number of fundamental and applied scientific fields such as planetary sciences, hydrogen storage, nuclear energy, quantum computing, and nanoelectronics. This review describes the current physical understanding of quantum crystals formed by atoms and small molecules, as well as the wide palette of simulation techniques that are used to investigate them. Relevant aspects in these materials such as phase transformations, structural properties, elasticity, crystalline defects, and the effects of reduced dimensionality are discussed thoroughly. An introduction to quantum Monte Carlo techniques, which in the present context are the simulation methods of choice, and other quantum simulation approaches (e.g., path-integral molecular dynamics and quantum thermal baths) is provided. The overarching objective of this article is twofold: first, to clarify in which crystals and physical situations the disregard of QNE may incur in important bias and erroneous interpretations. And second, to promote the study and appreciation of QNE, a topic that traditionally has been treated in the context of condensed matter physics, within the broad and interdisciplinary areas of materials science.

  19. Spin network quantum simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzuoli, Annalisa; Rasetti, Mario

    2002-12-30

    We propose a general setting for a universal representation of the quantum structure on which quantum information stands, whose dynamical evolution (information manipulation) is based on angular momentum recoupling theory. Such scheme complies with the notion of 'quantum simulator' in the sense of Feynman, and is shown to be related with the topological quantum field theoretical approach to quantum computation.

  20. Quantum simulation of a Fermi-Hubbard model using a semiconductor quantum dot array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgens, T.; Fujita, T.; Janssen, L.; Li, Xiao; van Diepen, C. J.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Das Sarma, S.; Vandersypen, L. M. K.

    2017-08-01

    Interacting fermions on a lattice can develop strong quantum correlations, which are the cause of the classical intractability of many exotic phases of matter. Current efforts are directed towards the control of artificial quantum systems that can be made to emulate the underlying Fermi-Hubbard models. Electrostatically confined conduction-band electrons define interacting quantum coherent spin and charge degrees of freedom that allow all-electrical initialization of low-entropy states and readily adhere to the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Until now, however, the substantial electrostatic disorder of the solid state has meant that only a few attempts at emulating Fermi-Hubbard physics on solid-state platforms have been made. Here we show that for gate-defined quantum dots this disorder can be suppressed in a controlled manner. Using a semi-automated and scalable set of experimental tools, we homogeneously and independently set up the electron filling and nearest-neighbour tunnel coupling in a semiconductor quantum dot array so as to simulate a Fermi-Hubbard system. With this set-up, we realize a detailed characterization of the collective Coulomb blockade transition, which is the finite-size analogue of the interaction-driven Mott metal-to-insulator transition. As automation and device fabrication of semiconductor quantum dots continue to improve, the ideas presented here will enable the investigation of the physics of ever more complex many-body states using quantum dots.

  1. Quantum simulation of a Fermi-Hubbard model using a semiconductor quantum dot array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensgens, T; Fujita, T; Janssen, L; Li, Xiao; Van Diepen, C J; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Das Sarma, S; Vandersypen, L M K

    2017-08-02

    Interacting fermions on a lattice can develop strong quantum correlations, which are the cause of the classical intractability of many exotic phases of matter. Current efforts are directed towards the control of artificial quantum systems that can be made to emulate the underlying Fermi-Hubbard models. Electrostatically confined conduction-band electrons define interacting quantum coherent spin and charge degrees of freedom that allow all-electrical initialization of low-entropy states and readily adhere to the Fermi-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Until now, however, the substantial electrostatic disorder of the solid state has meant that only a few attempts at emulating Fermi-Hubbard physics on solid-state platforms have been made. Here we show that for gate-defined quantum dots this disorder can be suppressed in a controlled manner. Using a semi-automated and scalable set of experimental tools, we homogeneously and independently set up the electron filling and nearest-neighbour tunnel coupling in a semiconductor quantum dot array so as to simulate a Fermi-Hubbard system. With this set-up, we realize a detailed characterization of the collective Coulomb blockade transition, which is the finite-size analogue of the interaction-driven Mott metal-to-insulator transition. As automation and device fabrication of semiconductor quantum dots continue to improve, the ideas presented here will enable the investigation of the physics of ever more complex many-body states using quantum dots.

  2. Quantum Steganography

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Bilal A

    2010-01-01

    Steganography is the process of hiding secret information by embedding it in an "innocent" message. We present protocols for hiding quantum information in a codeword of a quantum error-correcting code passing through a channel. Using either a shared classical secret key or shared entanglement the sender (Alice) disguises her information as errors in the channel. The receiver (Bob) can retrieve the hidden information, but an eavesdropper (Eve) with the power to monitor the channel, but without the secret key, cannot distinguish the message from channel noise. We analyze how difficult it is for Eve to detect the presence of secret messages, and estimate rates of steganographic communication and secret key consumption for certain protocols.

  3. Quantum interpretations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goernitz, T.; Weizsaecker, C.F.V.

    1987-10-01

    Four interpretations of quantum theory are compared: the Copenhagen interpretation (C.I.) with the additional assumption that the quantum description also applies to the mental states of the observer, and three recent ones, by Kochen, Deutsch, and Cramer. Since they interpret the same mathematical structure with the same empirical predictions, it is assumed that they formulate only different linguistic expressions of one identical theory. C.I. as a theory on human knowledge rests on a phenomenological description of time. It can be reconstructed from simple assumptions on predictions. Kochen shows that mathematically every composite system can be split into an object and an observer. Deutsch, with the same decomposition, describes futuric possibilities under the Everett term worlds. Cramer, using four-dimensional action at a distance (Wheeler-Feynman), describes all future events like past facts. All three can be described in the C.I. frame. The role of abstract nonlocality is discussed.

  4. Quantum Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Häring, Reto Andreas

    1993-01-01

    The representations of the observable algebra of a low dimensional quantum field theory form the objects of a braided tensor category. The search for gauge symmetry in the theory amounts to finding an algebra which has the same representation category. In this paper we try to establish that every quantum field theory satisfying some basic axioms posseses a weak quasi Hopf algebra as gauge symmetry. The first step is to construct a functor from the representation category to the category of finite dimensional vector spaces. Given such a functor we can use a generalized reconstruction theorem to find the symmetry algebra. It is shown how this symmetry algebra is used to build a gauge covariant field algebra and we investigate the question why this generality is necessary.

  5. Quantum psyche

    CERN Document Server

    Baaquie, Belal E; Demongeot, J; Galli-Carminati, Giuliana; Martin, F; Teodorani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century Sigmund Freud discovered that our acts and choices are not only decisions of our consciousness, but that they are also deeply determined by our unconscious (the so-called "Freudian unconscious"). During a long correspondence between them (1932-1958) Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Gustav Jung speculated that the unconscious could be a quantum system. This book is addressed both to all those interested in the new developments of the age-old enquiry in the relations between mind and matter, and also to the experts in quantum physics that are interested in a formalisation of this new approach. The description of the "Bilbao experiment" adds a very interesting experimental inquiry into the synchronicity effect in a group situation, linking theory to a quantifiable verification of these subtle effects. Cover design: "Entangled Minds". Riccardo Carminati Galli, 2014.

  6. Quantum teleportation from light beams to vibrational states of a macroscopic diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, P.-Y.; Huang, Y.-Y.; Yuan, X.-X.; Chang, X.-Y.; Zu, C.; He, L.; Duan, L.-M.

    2016-05-01

    With the recent development of optomechanics, the vibration in solids, involving collective motion of trillions of atoms, gradually enters into the realm of quantum control. Here, building on the recent remarkable progress in optical control of motional states of diamonds, we report an experimental demonstration of quantum teleportation from light beams to vibrational states of a macroscopic diamond under ambient conditions. Through quantum process tomography, we demonstrate average teleportation fidelity (90.6+/-1.0)%, clearly exceeding the classical limit of 2/3. The experiment pushes the target of quantum teleportation to the biggest object so far, with interesting implications for optomechanical quantum control and quantum information science.

  7. Quantum memories. A review based on the European integrated project ``Qubit Applications (QAP)''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, C.; Afzelius, M.; Appel, J.; Boyer de La Giroday, A.; Dewhurst, S. J.; Gisin, N.; Hu, C. Y.; Jelezko, F.; Kröll, S.; Müller, J. H.; Nunn, J.; Polzik, E. S.; Rarity, J. G.; de Riedmatten, H.; Rosenfeld, W.; Shields, A. J.; Sköld, N.; Stevenson, R. M.; Thew, R.; Walmsley, I. A.; Weber, M. C.; Weinfurter, H.; Wrachtrup, J.; Young, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    We perform a review of various approaches to the implementation of quantum memories, with an emphasis on activities within the quantum memory sub-project of the EU integrated project “Qubit Applications”. We begin with a brief overview over different applications for quantum memories and different types of quantum memories. We discuss the most important criteria for assessing quantum memory performance and the most important physical requirements. Then we review the different approaches represented in “Qubit Applications” in some detail. They include solid-state atomic ensembles, NV centers, quantum dots, single atoms, atomic gases and optical phonons in diamond. We compare the different approaches using the discussed criteria.

  8. Quantum Memories. A Review based on the European Integrated Project "Qubit Applications (QAP)"

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, C; Appel, J; de la Giroday, A Boyer; Dewhurst, S J; Gisin, N; Hu, C Y; Jelezko, F; Kroll, S; Muller, J H; Nunn, J; Polzik, E; Rarity, J; de Riedmatten, H; Rosenfeld, W; Shields, A J; Skold, N; Stevenson, R M; Thew, R; Walmsley, I; Weber, M; Weinfurter, H; Wrachtrup, J; Young, R J

    2010-01-01

    We perform a review of various approaches to the implementation of quantum memories, with an emphasis on activities within the quantum memory sub-project of the EU Integrated Project "Qubit Applications". We begin with a brief overview over different applications for quantum memories and different types of quantum memories. We discuss the most important criteria for assessing quantum memory performance and the most important physical requirements. Then we review the different approaches represented in "Qubit Applications" in some detail. They include solid-state atomic ensembles, NV centers, quantum dots, single atoms, atomic gases and optical phonons in diamond. We compare the different approaches using the discussed criteria.

  9. Quantum Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Mould, Richard A

    1999-01-01

    In a previous paper, the author proposed a quantum mechanical interaction that would insure that the evolution of subjective states would parallel the evolution of biological states, as required by von Neumann's theory of measurement. The particular model for this interaction suggested an experiment that the author has now performed wih negative results. A modified model is outlined in this paper that preserves the desirable features of the original model, and is consistent with the experimen...

  10. Quantum Chromodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ecker, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    After a brief historical review of the emergence of QCD as the quantum field theory of strong interactions, the basic notions of colour and gauge invariance are introduced leading to the QCD Lagrangian. The second lecture is devoted to perturbative QCD, from tree-level processes to higher-order corrections in renormalized perturbation theory, including jet production in e+ e- annihilation, hadronic tau decays and deep inelastic scattering. The final two lectures treat various aspects of QCD b...

  11. Experimental quantum forgery of quantum optical money

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkiewicz, Karol; Černoch, Antonín; Chimczak, Grzegorz; Lemr, Karel; Miranowicz, Adam; Nori, Franco

    2017-03-01

    Unknown quantum information cannot be perfectly copied (cloned). This statement is the bedrock of quantum technologies and quantum cryptography, including the seminal scheme of Wiesner's quantum money, which was the first quantum-cryptographic proposal. Surprisingly, to our knowledge, quantum money has not been tested experimentally yet. Here, we experimentally revisit the Wiesner idea, assuming a banknote to be an image encoded in the polarization states of single photons. We demonstrate that it is possible to use quantum states to prepare a banknote that cannot be ideally copied without making the owner aware of only unauthorized actions. We provide the security conditions for quantum money by investigating the physically-achievable limits on the fidelity of 1-to-2 copying of arbitrary sequences of qubits. These results can be applied as a security measure in quantum digital right management.

  12. Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Quantum Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-06-01

    Quantum communication provides an absolute security advantage, and it has been widely developed over the past 30 years. As an important branch of quantum communication, quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) promotes high security and instantaneousness in communication through directly transmitting messages over a quantum channel. The full implementation of a quantum protocol always requires the ability to control the transfer of a message effectively in the time domain; thus, it is essential to combine QSDC with quantum memory to accomplish the communication task. In this Letter, we report the experimental demonstration of QSDC with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory for the first time in principle. We use the polarization degrees of freedom of photons as the information carrier, and the fidelity of entanglement decoding is verified as approximately 90%. Our work completes a fundamental step toward practical QSDC and demonstrates a potential application for long-distance quantum communication in a quantum network.

  13. Quantum Secure Direct Communication with Quantum Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Sheng, Yu-Bo; Zhou, Lan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-06-02

    Quantum communication provides an absolute security advantage, and it has been widely developed over the past 30 years. As an important branch of quantum communication, quantum secure direct communication (QSDC) promotes high security and instantaneousness in communication through directly transmitting messages over a quantum channel. The full implementation of a quantum protocol always requires the ability to control the transfer of a message effectively in the time domain; thus, it is essential to combine QSDC with quantum memory to accomplish the communication task. In this Letter, we report the experimental demonstration of QSDC with state-of-the-art atomic quantum memory for the first time in principle. We use the polarization degrees of freedom of photons as the information carrier, and the fidelity of entanglement decoding is verified as approximately 90%. Our work completes a fundamental step toward practical QSDC and demonstrates a potential application for long-distance quantum communication in a quantum network.

  14. Quantum chance nonlocality, teleportation and other quantum marvels

    CERN Document Server

    Gisin, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Quantum physics, which offers an explanation of the world on the smallest scale, has fundamental implications that pose a serious challenge to ordinary logic. Particularly counterintuitive is the notion of entanglement, which has been explored for the past 30 years and posits an ubiquitous randomness capable of manifesting itself simultaneously in more than one place. This amazing 'non-locality' is more than just an abstract curiosity or paradox: it has entirely down-to-earth applications in cryptography, serving for example to protect financial information; it also has enabled the demonstration of 'quantum teleportation', whose infinite possibilities even science-fiction writers can scarcely imagine. This delightful and concise exposition does not avoid the deep logical difficulties of quantum physics, but gives the reader the insights needed to appreciate them . From 'Bell's Theorem' to experiments in quantum entanglement, the reader will gain a solid understanding of one of the most fascinating ar...

  15. New Mathematical Tools for Quantum Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bracher, C; Kramer, T; Bracher, Christian; Kleber, Manfred; Kramer, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Progress in manufacturing technology has allowed us to probe the behavior of devices on a smaller and faster scale than ever before. With increasing miniaturization, quantum effects come to dominate the transport properties of these devices, between collisions, carriers undergo ballistic motion under the influence of local electric and magnetic fields. The often surprising propertiesof quantum ballistic transport are currently elucidated in clean atomic physics experiments. From a theoretical viewpoint, theelectron dynamics is governed by ballistic propagators and Green functions, intriguing quantities at the crossroads of classical and quantum mechanics. Here, we briefly describe the propagator method, some ballistic Green functions, and their application in a diverse range of problems in atomic and solid state physics, such as photodetachment, atom lasers, scanning tunneling microscopy, and the quantum Hall effect.

  16. A reversible optical to microwave quantum interface

    CERN Document Server

    Barzanjeh, Sh; Milburn, G J; Tombesi, P; Vitali, D

    2011-01-01

    Quantum technology, like many mature classical technologies, will ultimately integrate distinct modules to achieve a function that transcends the capability of any one of them. We describe a reversible quantum interface between an optical and a microwave photon using a hybrid device based on the common interaction of microwave and optical fields with a nano-mechanical resonator in a superconducting circuit, which is one of the major challenges in the field. The scheme provides a path for generating a traveling microwave field strongly entangled with an optical mode, thus bridging the gap between quantum optical and solid state implementations of quantum information. This is an effective source of (bright) two-mode squeezing with an optical idler (signal) and a microwave signal (idler) and as such enables a continuous variable teleportation protocol.

  17. Quantum Locality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a ‘consistent quantum theory’ (CQT) that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues, on the basis of his examination of certain arguments that claim to demonstrate the existence of such nonlocal influences, that such influences do not exist. However, his examination was restricted mainly to hidden-variable-based arguments that include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are fundamentally incompatible with the precepts of quantum physics. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by attributing to the system properties alien to that system. Hence Griffiths’ rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his ‘consistent quantum theory’ shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive framework. This necessary existence, within the ‘consistent’ framework, of long range essentially instantaneous influences refutes the claim made by Griffiths that his ‘consistent’ framework is superior to the orthodox quantum theory of von Neumann because it does not entail instantaneous influences. An added section responds to Griffiths’ reply, which cites a litany of ambiguities that seem to restrict, devastatingly, the scope of his CQT formalism, apparently to buttress his claim that my use of that formalism to validate the nonlocality theorem is flawed. But the

  18. Solid-matrix luminescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1993-01-15

    Several interactions with lumiphors adsorbed on filter paper were elucidated from experiments with moisture, modulus and heavy-atom salts. The data were interpreted using static and dynamic quenching models, heavy-atom theory, and a theory related to the modulus of paper. With cyclodextrin-salt matrices, it was shown that 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl was very effective for obtaining strong room-temperature fluorescence and moderate room-temperature phosphorescence from adsorbed stereoisomeric tetrols. Extensive photophysical information was obtained for the four tetrols on 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl. The photophysical information acquired was used to develop a method for characterizing two of the tetrols. Work with model compounds adsorbed on deuterated sodium acetate showed that C-H vibrations in the undeuterated sodium acetate were not responsible for the deactivation of the excited triplet state in the model phosphors investigated. A considerable amount of solution luminescence and solid-matrix luminescence data were compared. The most important finding was that in several cases the room-temperature solid-matrix luminescence quantum yields were greater than the solution low-temperature quantum yield values.

  19. Advances in Solid State Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The present volume 48 of the Advances in Solid State Physics contains the written version of a large number of the invited talks of the 2008 Spring Meeting of the DPG section Condensed Matter Physics (Sektion kondensierte Materie der DPG) which was held in Berlin, Germany, and gives a nice overview of the present status of condensed matter physics. Low-dimensional systems are dominating the field and especially nanowires and quantum dots. In recent years one learned how to produce nanowires directly during a growth process. Therefore, a number of articles is related to such nanowires. In nanoparticles and quantum dots, the dimensionality is further reduced and we learn more and more how to produce such systems in a defined way and what effects result from the confinement in all three dimensions. Spin effects and magnetism is another important field of present-day research in solid state physics. The third chapter covers this physics. The growing interest into organic materials and biological systems is reflec...

  20. Elementary quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Pilar, Frank L

    2003-01-01

    Useful introductory course and reference covers origins of quantum theory, Schrödinger wave equation, quantum mechanics of simple systems, electron spin, quantum states of atoms, Hartree-Fock self-consistent field method, more. 1990 edition.