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Sample records for quantum monte carlo

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yazhen

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary scientific studies often rely on the understanding of complex quantum systems via computer simulation. This paper initiates the statistical study of quantum simulation and proposes a Monte Carlo method for estimating analytically intractable quantities. We derive the bias and variance for the proposed Monte Carlo quantum simulation estimator and establish the asymptotic theory for the estimator. The theory is used to design a computational scheme for minimizing the mean square er...

  2. Metropolis Methods for Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ceperley, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Since its first description fifty years ago, the Metropolis Monte Carlo method has been used in a variety of different ways for the simulation of continuum quantum many-body systems. This paper will consider some of the generalizations of the Metropolis algorithm employed in quantum Monte Carlo: Variational Monte Carlo, dynamical methods for projector monte carlo ({\\it i.e.} diffusion Monte Carlo with rejection), multilevel sampling in path integral Monte Carlo, the sampling of permutations, ...

  3. Density matrix quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Blunt, N S; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a quantum Monte Carlo method capable of sampling the full density matrix of a many-particle system, thus granting access to arbitrary reduced density matrices and allowing expectation values of complicated non-local operators to be evaluated easily. The direct sampling of the density matrix also raises the possibility of calculating previously inaccessible entanglement measures. The algorithm closely resembles the recently introduced full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method, but works all the way from infinite to zero temperature. We explain the theory underlying the method, describe the algorithm, and introduce an importance-sampling procedure to improve the stochastic efficiency. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, the energy and staggered magnetization of the isotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on small lattices and the concurrence of one-dimensional spin rings are compared to exact or well-established results. Finally, the nature of the sign problem...

  4. Approaching Chemical Accuracy with Quantum Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Petruzielo, Frank R.; Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreem...

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Pieper, Steven C

    2007-01-01

    During the last 15 years, there has been much progress in defining the nuclear Hamiltonian and applying quantum Monte Carlo methods to the calculation of light nuclei. I describe both aspects of this work and some recent results.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo for minimum energy structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Lucas K

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient method to find minimum energy structures using energy estimates from accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations. This method involves a stochastic process formed from the stochastic energy estimates from Monte Carlo that can be averaged to find precise structural minima while using inexpensive calculations with moderate statistical uncertainty. We demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm by minimizing the energy of the H2O-OH- complex and showing that the structural minima from quantum Monte Carlo calculations affect the qualitative behavior of the potential energy surface substantially.

  7. Quantum speedup of Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2015-09-08

    Monte Carlo methods use random sampling to estimate numerical quantities which are hard to compute deterministically. One important example is the use in statistical physics of rapidly mixing Markov chains to approximately compute partition functions. In this work, we describe a quantum algorithm which can accelerate Monte Carlo methods in a very general setting. The algorithm estimates the expected output value of an arbitrary randomized or quantum subroutine with bounded variance, achieving a near-quadratic speedup over the best possible classical algorithm. Combining the algorithm with the use of quantum walks gives a quantum speedup of the fastest known classical algorithms with rigorous performance bounds for computing partition functions, which use multiple-stage Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The quantum algorithm can also be used to estimate the total variation distance between probability distributions efficiently.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo approaches for correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Becca, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Over the past several decades, computational approaches to studying strongly-interacting systems have become increasingly varied and sophisticated. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo techniques relevant for applications in correlated systems. Providing a clear overview of variational wave functions, and featuring a detailed presentation of stochastic samplings including Markov chains and Langevin dynamics, which are developed into a discussion of Monte Carlo methods. The variational technique is described, from foundations to a detailed description of its algorithms. Further topics discussed include optimisation techniques, real-time dynamics and projection methods, including Green's function, reptation and auxiliary-field Monte Carlo, from basic definitions to advanced algorithms for efficient codes, and the book concludes with recent developments on the continuum space. Quantum Monte Carlo Approaches for Correlated Systems provides an extensive reference ...

  9. Fast quantum Monte Carlo on a GPU

    CERN Document Server

    Lutsyshyn, Y

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme for the parallelization of quantum Monte Carlo on graphical processing units, focusing on bosonic systems and variational Monte Carlo. We use asynchronous execution schemes with shared memory persistence, and obtain an excellent acceleration. Comparing with single core execution, GPU-accelerated code runs over x100 faster. The CUDA code is provided along with the package that is necessary to execute variational Monte Carlo for a system representing liquid helium-4. The program was benchmarked on several models of Nvidia GPU, including Fermi GTX560 and M2090, and the latest Kepler architecture K20 GPU. Kepler-specific optimization is discussed.

  10. Monte Carlo methods in AB initio quantum chemistry quantum Monte Carlo for molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lester, William A; Reynolds, PJ

    1994-01-01

    This book presents the basic theory and application of the Monte Carlo method to the electronic structure of atoms and molecules. It assumes no previous knowledge of the subject, only a knowledge of molecular quantum mechanics at the first-year graduate level. A working knowledge of traditional ab initio quantum chemistry is helpful, but not essential.Some distinguishing features of this book are: Clear exposition of the basic theory at a level to facilitate independent study. Discussion of the various versions of the theory: diffusion Monte Carlo, Green's function Monte Carlo, and release n

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo with variable spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Cody A; Bennett, M Chandler; Mitas, Lubos

    2016-06-28

    We investigate the inclusion of variable spins in electronic structure quantum Monte Carlo, with a focus on diffusion Monte Carlo with Hamiltonians that include spin-orbit interactions. Following our previous introduction of fixed-phase spin-orbit diffusion Monte Carlo, we thoroughly discuss the details of the method and elaborate upon its technicalities. We present a proof for an upper-bound property for complex nonlocal operators, which allows for the implementation of T-moves to ensure the variational property. We discuss the time step biases associated with our particular choice of spin representation. Applications of the method are also presented for atomic and molecular systems. We calculate the binding energies and geometry of the PbH and Sn2 molecules, as well as the electron affinities of the 6p row elements in close agreement with experiments.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo with Variable Spins

    CERN Document Server

    Melton, Cody A; Mitas, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the inclusion of variable spins in electronic structure quantum Monte Carlo, with a focus on diffusion Monte Carlo with Hamiltonians that include spin-orbit interactions. Following our previous introduction of fixed-phase spin-orbit diffusion Monte Carlo (FPSODMC), we thoroughly discuss the details of the method and elaborate upon its technicalities. We present a proof for an upper-bound property for complex nonlocal operators, which allows for the implementation of T-moves to ensure the variational property. We discuss the time step biases associated with our particular choice of spin representation. Applications of the method are also presented for atomic and molecular systems. We calculate the binding energies and geometry of the PbH and Sn$_2$ molecules, as well as the electron affinities of the 6$p$ row elements in close agreement with experiments.

  13. Approaching Chemical Accuracy with Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Petruzielo, F R; Umrigar, C J

    2012-01-01

    A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreement between diffusion Monte Carlo and experiment, reducing the mean absolute deviation to 2.1 kcal/mol. Moving beyond a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction, diffusion Monte Carlo with a small complete active space Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction results in near chemical accuracy. In this case, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies is 1.2 kcal/mol. It is shown from calculations on systems containing phosphorus that the accuracy can be further improved by employing a larger active space.

  14. Experimental Monte Carlo Quantum Process Certification

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, L; Fedorov, A; Baur, M; Wallraff, A

    2012-01-01

    Experimental implementations of quantum information processing have now reached a level of sophistication where quantum process tomography is impractical. The number of experimental settings as well as the computational cost of the data post-processing now translates to days of effort to characterize even experiments with as few as 8 qubits. Recently a more practical approach to determine the fidelity of an experimental quantum process has been proposed, where the experimental data is compared directly to an ideal process using Monte Carlo sampling. Here we present an experimental implementation of this scheme in a circuit quantum electrodynamics setup to determine the fidelity of two qubit gates, such as the cphase and the cnot gate, and three qubit gates, such as the Toffoli gate and two sequential cphase gates.

  15. Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo for molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1986-07-01

    A quantum mechanical Monte Carlo method has been used for the treatment of molecular problems. The imaginary-time Schroedinger equation written with a shift in zero energy (E/sub T/ - V(R)) can be interpreted as a generalized diffusion equation with a position-dependent rate or branching term. Since diffusion is the continuum limit of a random walk, one may simulate the Schroedinger equation with a function psi (note, not psi/sup 2/) as a density of ''walks.'' The walks undergo an exponential birth and death as given by the rate term. 16 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. QUANTUM MONTE-CARLO SIMULATIONS - ALGORITHMS, LIMITATIONS AND APPLICATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DERAEDT, H

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of Quantum Monte Carlo methods currently used to simulate quantum lattice models. The formalisms employed to construct the simulation algorithms are sketched. The origin of fundamental (minus sign) problems which limit the applicability of the Quantum Monte Carlo approach is shown

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations : Algorithms, Limitations and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, H. De

    1992-01-01

    A survey is given of Quantum Monte Carlo methods currently used to simulate quantum lattice models. The formalisms employed to construct the simulation algorithms are sketched. The origin of fundamental (minus sign) problems which limit the applicability of the Quantum Monte Carlo approach is shown

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo for vibrating molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, W.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemistry Dept.]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1996-08-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) has successfully computed the total electronic energies of atoms and molecules. The main goal of this work is to use correlation function quantum Monte Carlo (CFQMC) to compute the vibrational state energies of molecules given a potential energy surface (PES). In CFQMC, an ensemble of random walkers simulate the diffusion and branching processes of the imaginary-time time dependent Schroedinger equation in order to evaluate the matrix elements. The program QMCVIB was written to perform multi-state VMC and CFQMC calculations and employed for several calculations of the H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3} vibrational states, using 7 PES`s, 3 trial wavefunction forms, two methods of non-linear basis function parameter optimization, and on both serial and parallel computers. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions different wavefunctions forms were required for H{sub 2}O and C{sub 3}. In order to construct accurate trial wavefunctions for C{sub 3}, the non-linear parameters were optimized with respect to the sum of the energies of several low-lying vibrational states. In order to stabilize the statistical error estimates for C{sub 3} the Monte Carlo data was collected into blocks. Accurate vibrational state energies were computed using both serial and parallel QMCVIB programs. Comparison of vibrational state energies computed from the three C{sub 3} PES`s suggested that a non-linear equilibrium geometry PES is the most accurate and that discrete potential representations may be used to conveniently determine vibrational state energies.

  19. Chemical application of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, P. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.

    1983-10-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method gives a stochastic solution to the Schroedinger equation. As an example the singlet-triplet splitting of the energy of the methylene molecule CH2 is given. The QMC algorithm was implemented on the CYBER 205, first as a direct transcription of the algorithm running on our VAX 11/780, and second by explicitly writing vector code for all loops longer than a crossover length C. The speed of the codes relative to one another as a function of C, and relative to the VAX is discussed. Since CH2 has only eight electrons, most of the loops in this application are fairly short. The longest inner loops run over the set of atomic basis functions. The CPU time dependence obtained versus the number of basis functions is discussed and compared with that obtained from traditional quantum chemistry codes and that obtained from traditional computer architectures. Finally, preliminary work on restructuring the algorithm to compute the separate Monte Carlo realizations in parallel is discussed.

  20. Novel Quantum Monte Carlo Approaches for Quantum Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Brenda M.

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are a powerful suite of techniques for solving the quantum many-body problem. By using random numbers to stochastically sample quantum properties, QMC methods are capable of studying low-temperature quantum systems well beyond the reach of conventional deterministic techniques. QMC techniques have likewise been indispensible tools for augmenting our current knowledge of superfluidity and superconductivity. In this thesis, I present two new quantum Monte Carlo techniques, the Monte Carlo Power Method and Bose-Fermi Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo, and apply previously developed Path Integral Monte Carlo methods to explore two new phases of quantum hard spheres and hydrogen. I lay the foundation for a subsequent description of my research by first reviewing the physics of quantum liquids in Chapter One and the mathematics behind Quantum Monte Carlo algorithms in Chapter Two. I then discuss the Monte Carlo Power Method, a stochastic way of computing the first several extremal eigenvalues of a matrix too memory-intensive to be stored and therefore diagonalized. As an illustration of the technique, I demonstrate how it can be used to determine the second eigenvalues of the transition matrices of several popular Monte Carlo algorithms. This information may be used to quantify how rapidly a Monte Carlo algorithm is converging to the equilibrium probability distribution it is sampling. I next present the Bose-Fermi Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo algorithm. This algorithm generalizes the well-known Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo algorithm for fermions to bosons and Bose-Fermi mixtures. Despite some shortcomings, the Bose-Fermi Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo algorithm represents the first exact technique capable of studying Bose-Fermi mixtures of any size in any dimension. In Chapter Six, I describe a new Constant Stress Path Integral Monte Carlo algorithm for the study of quantum mechanical systems under high pressures. While

  1. QWalk: A Quantum Monte Carlo Program for Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Lucas K; Mitas, Lubos

    2007-01-01

    We describe QWalk, a new computational package capable of performing Quantum Monte Carlo electronic structure calculations for molecules and solids with many electrons. We describe the structure of the program and its implementation of Quantum Monte Carlo methods. It is open-source, licensed under the GPL, and available at the web site http://www.qwalk.org

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo Endstation for Petascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubos Mitas

    2011-01-26

    NCSU research group has been focused on accomplising the key goals of this initiative: establishing new generation of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) computational tools as a part of Endstation petaflop initiative for use at the DOE ORNL computational facilities and for use by computational electronic structure community at large; carrying out high accuracy quantum Monte Carlo demonstration projects in application of these tools to the forefront electronic structure problems in molecular and solid systems; expanding the impact of QMC methods and approaches; explaining and enhancing the impact of these advanced computational approaches. In particular, we have developed quantum Monte Carlo code (QWalk, www.qwalk.org) which was significantly expanded and optimized using funds from this support and at present became an actively used tool in the petascale regime by ORNL researchers and beyond. These developments have been built upon efforts undertaken by the PI's group and collaborators over the period of the last decade. The code was optimized and tested extensively on a number of parallel architectures including petaflop ORNL Jaguar machine. We have developed and redesigned a number of code modules such as evaluation of wave functions and orbitals, calculations of pfaffians and introduction of backflow coordinates together with overall organization of the code and random walker distribution over multicore architectures. We have addressed several bottlenecks such as load balancing and verified efficiency and accuracy of the calculations with the other groups of the Endstation team. The QWalk package contains about 50,000 lines of high quality object-oriented C++ and includes also interfaces to data files from other conventional electronic structure codes such as Gamess, Gaussian, Crystal and others. This grant supported PI for one month during summers, a full-time postdoc and partially three graduate students over the period of the grant duration, it has resulted in 13

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Neutron Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, J; Ravenhall, D G

    2003-01-01

    Uniform neutron matter is approximated by a cubic box containing a finite number of neutrons, with periodic boundary conditions. We report variational and Green's function Monte Carlo calculations of the ground state of fourteen neutrons in a periodic box using the Argonne $\\vep $ two-nucleon interaction at densities up to one and half times the nuclear matter density. The effects of the finite box size are estimated using variational wave functions together with cluster expansion and chain summation techniques. They are small at subnuclear densities. We discuss the expansion of the energy of low-density neutron gas in powers of its Fermi momentum. This expansion is strongly modified by the large nn scattering length, and does not begin with the Fermi-gas kinetic energy as assumed in both Skyrme and relativistic mean field theories. The leading term of neutron gas energy is ~ half the Fermi-gas kinetic energy. The quantum Monte Carlo results are also used to calibrate the accuracy of variational calculations ...

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo methods algorithms for lattice models

    CERN Document Server

    Gubernatis, James; Werner, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Featuring detailed explanations of the major algorithms used in quantum Monte Carlo simulations, this is the first textbook of its kind to provide a pedagogical overview of the field and its applications. The book provides a comprehensive introduction to the Monte Carlo method, its use, and its foundations, and examines algorithms for the simulation of quantum many-body lattice problems at finite and zero temperature. These algorithms include continuous-time loop and cluster algorithms for quantum spins, determinant methods for simulating fermions, power methods for computing ground and excited states, and the variational Monte Carlo method. Also discussed are continuous-time algorithms for quantum impurity models and their use within dynamical mean-field theory, along with algorithms for analytically continuing imaginary-time quantum Monte Carlo data. The parallelization of Monte Carlo simulations is also addressed. This is an essential resource for graduate students, teachers, and researchers interested in ...

  5. Measuring Berry curvature with quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodrubetz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Berry curvature and its descendant, the Berry phase, play an important role in quantum mechanics. They can be used to understand the Aharonov-Bohm effect, define topological Chern numbers, and generally to investigate the geometric properties of a quantum ground state manifold. While Berry curvature has been well-studied in the regimes of few-body physics and non-interacting particles, its use in the regime of strong interactions is hindered by the lack of numerical methods to solve it. In this paper we fill this gap by implementing a quantum Monte Carlo method to solve for the Berry curvature, based on interpreting Berry curvature as a leading correction to imaginary time ramps. We demonstrate our algorithm using the transverse-field Ising model in one and two dimensions, the latter of which is non-integrable. Despite the fact that the Berry curvature gives information about the phase of the wave function, we show that our algorithm has no sign or phase problem for standard sign-problem-free Hamiltonians...

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo using a Stochastic Poisson Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D; Martin, R M; Kalos, M H

    2005-05-06

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is an extremely powerful method to treat many-body systems. Usually quantum Monte Carlo has been applied in cases where the interaction potential has a simple analytic form, like the 1/r Coulomb potential. However, in a complicated environment as in a semiconductor heterostructure, the evaluation of the interaction itself becomes a non-trivial problem. Obtaining the potential from any grid-based finite-difference method, for every walker and every step is unfeasible. We demonstrate an alternative approach of solving the Poisson equation by a classical Monte Carlo within the overall quantum Monte Carlo scheme. We have developed a modified ''Walk On Spheres'' algorithm using Green's function techniques, which can efficiently account for the interaction energy of walker configurations, typical of quantum Monte Carlo algorithms. This stochastically obtained potential can be easily incorporated within popular quantum Monte Carlo techniques like variational Monte Carlo (VMC) or diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). We demonstrate the validity of this method by studying a simple problem, the polarization of a helium atom in the electric field of an infinite capacitor.

  7. Recent Developments in Quantum Monte Carlo: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Austin, Brian; Domin, Dominik; Galek, Peter T. A.; Handy, Nicholas; Prasad, Rajendra; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Umezawa, Naoto; Lester, William A.

    2007-12-01

    The quantum Monte Carlo method in the diffusion Monte Carlo form has become recognized for its capability of describing the electronic structure of atomic, molecular and condensed matter systems to high accuracy. This talk will briefly outline the method with emphasis on recent developments connected with trial function construction, linear scaling, and applications to selected systems.

  8. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the Benzene Dimer

    OpenAIRE

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R. E

    2015-01-01

    We report an accurate study of interactions between Benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory (DFT) using different van der Waals (vdW) functionals. In our QMC calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors, and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced (PD) geometry, and fin...

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo with directed loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syljuåsen, Olav F; Sandvik, Anders W

    2002-10-01

    We introduce the concept of directed loops in stochastic series expansion and path-integral quantum Monte Carlo methods. Using the detailed balance rules for directed loops, we show that it is possible to smoothly connect generally applicable simulation schemes (in which it is necessary to include backtracking processes in the loop construction) to more restricted loop algorithms that can be constructed only for a limited range of Hamiltonians (where backtracking can be avoided). The "algorithmic discontinuities" between general and special points (or regions) in parameter space can hence be eliminated. As a specific example, we consider the anisotropic S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet in an external magnetic field. We show that directed-loop simulations are very efficient for the full range of magnetic fields (zero to the saturation point) and anisotropies. In particular, for weak fields and anisotropies, the autocorrelations are significantly reduced relative to those of previous approaches. The back-tracking probability vanishes continuously as the isotropic Heisenberg point is approached. For the XY model, we show that back tracking can be avoided for all fields extending up to the saturation field. The method is hence particularly efficient in this case. We use directed-loop simulations to study the magnetization process in the two-dimensional Heisenberg model at very low temperatures. For LxL lattices with L up to 64, we utilize the step structure in the magnetization curve to extract gaps between different spin sectors. Finite-size scaling of the gaps gives an accurate estimate of the transverse susceptibility in the thermodynamic limit: chi( perpendicular )=0.0659+/-0.0002.

  10. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo methods in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Alhassid, Y

    2016-01-01

    Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo methods enable the calculation of thermal and ground state properties of correlated quantum many-body systems in model spaces that are many orders of magnitude larger than those that can be treated by conventional diagonalization methods. We review recent developments and applications of these methods in nuclei using the framework of the configuration-interaction shell model.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum Zeno effect in the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Danko

    2014-01-01

    Environmental decoherence appears to be the biggest obstacle for successful construction of quantum mind theories. Nevertheless, the quantum physicist Henry Stapp promoted the view that the mind could utilize quantum Zeno effect to influence brain dynamics and that the efficacy of such mental efforts would not be undermined by environmental decoherence of the brain. To address the physical plausibility of Stapp's claim, we modeled the brain using quantum tunneling of an electron in a multiple-well structure such as the voltage sensor in neuronal ion channels and performed Monte Carlo simulations of quantum Zeno effect exerted by the mind upon the brain in the presence or absence of environmental decoherence. The simulations unambiguously showed that the quantum Zeno effect breaks down for timescales greater than the brain decoherence time. To generalize the Monte Carlo simulation results for any n-level quantum system, we further analyzed the change of brain entropy due to the mind probing actions and proved ...

  12. The Monte Carlo method in quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Morningstar, C

    2007-01-01

    This series of six lectures is an introduction to using the Monte Carlo method to carry out nonperturbative studies in quantum field theories. Path integrals in quantum field theory are reviewed, and their evaluation by the Monte Carlo method with Markov-chain based importance sampling is presented. Properties of Markov chains are discussed in detail and several proofs are presented, culminating in the fundamental limit theorem for irreducible Markov chains. The example of a real scalar field theory is used to illustrate the Metropolis-Hastings method and to demonstrate the effectiveness of an action-preserving (microcanonical) local updating algorithm in reducing autocorrelations. The goal of these lectures is to provide the beginner with the basic skills needed to start carrying out Monte Carlo studies in quantum field theories, as well as to present the underlying theoretical foundations of the method.

  13. Properties of Reactive Oxygen Species by Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of Chemistry, Biology and Atmospheric Science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab-initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal ...

  14. Monte Carlo studies of nuclei and quantum liquid drops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandharipande, V.R.; Pieper, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The progress in application of variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods to nuclei is reviewed. The nature of single-particle orbitals in correlated quantum liquid drops is discussed, and it is suggested that the difference between quasi-particle and mean-field orbitals may be of importance in nuclear structure physics. 27 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum statistical lattice models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raedt, Hans De; Lagendijk, Ad

    1985-01-01

    In this article we review recent developments in computational methods for quantum statistical lattice problems. We begin by giving the necessary mathematical basis, the generalized Trotter formula, and discuss the computational tools, exact summations and Monte Carlo simulation, that will be used t

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of topological phase transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Arata; Kimura, Taro

    2016-12-01

    We study the electron-electron interaction effects on topological phase transitions by the ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulation. We analyze two-dimensional class A topological insulators and three-dimensional Weyl semimetals with the long-range Coulomb interaction. The direct computation of the Chern number shows the electron-electron interaction modifies or extinguishes topological phase transitions.

  17. Monte-carlo calculations for some problems of quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselov, A. A., E-mail: novoselov@goa.bog.msu.ru; Pavlovsky, O. V.; Ulybyshev, M. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    The Monte-Carlo technique for the calculations of functional integral in two one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems had been applied. The energies of the bound states in some potential wells were obtained using this method. Also some peculiarities in the calculation of the kinetic energy in the ground state had been studied.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of topological phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Arata

    2016-01-01

    We study the electron-electron interaction effects on topological phase transitions by the ab-initio quantum Monte Carlo simulation. We analyze two-dimensional class A topological insulators and three-dimensional Weyl semimetals with the long-range Coulomb interaction. The direct computation of the Chern number shows the electron-electron interaction modifies or extinguishes topological phase transitions.

  19. On a full Monte Carlo approach to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, J. M.; Dimov, I.

    2016-12-01

    The Monte Carlo approach to numerical problems has shown to be remarkably efficient in performing very large computational tasks since it is an embarrassingly parallel technique. Additionally, Monte Carlo methods are well known to keep performance and accuracy with the increase of dimensionality of a given problem, a rather counterintuitive peculiarity not shared by any known deterministic method. Motivated by these very peculiar and desirable computational features, in this work we depict a full Monte Carlo approach to the problem of simulating single- and many-body quantum systems by means of signed particles. In particular we introduce a stochastic technique, based on the strategy known as importance sampling, for the computation of the Wigner kernel which, so far, has represented the main bottleneck of this method (it is equivalent to the calculation of a multi-dimensional integral, a problem in which complexity is known to grow exponentially with the dimensions of the problem). The introduction of this stochastic technique for the kernel is twofold: firstly it reduces the complexity of a quantum many-body simulation from non-linear to linear, secondly it introduces an embarassingly parallel approach to this very demanding problem. To conclude, we perform concise but indicative numerical experiments which clearly illustrate how a full Monte Carlo approach to many-body quantum systems is not only possible but also advantageous. This paves the way towards practical time-dependent, first-principle simulations of relatively large quantum systems by means of affordable computational resources.

  20. Instantons in Quantum Annealing: Thermally Assisted Tunneling Vs Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhang; Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V.; Neven, Hartmut; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recent numerical result (arXiv:1512.02206) from Google suggested that the D-Wave quantum annealer may have an asymptotic speed-up than simulated annealing, however, the asymptotic advantage disappears when it is compared to quantum Monte Carlo (a classical algorithm despite its name). We show analytically that the asymptotic scaling of quantum tunneling is exactly the same as the escape rate in quantum Monte Carlo for a class of problems. Thus, the Google result might be explained in our framework. We also found that the transition state in quantum Monte Carlo corresponds to the instanton solution in quantum tunneling problems, which is observed in numerical simulations.

  1. Applications of quantum Monte Carlo methods in condensed systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kolorenc, Jindrich

    2010-01-01

    The quantum Monte Carlo methods represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solutions of the stationary Schroedinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. The algorithms are intrinsically parallel and are able to take full advantage of the present-day high-performance computing systems. This review article concentrates on the fixed-node/fixed-phase diffusion Monte Carlo method with emphasis on its applications to electronic structure of solids and other extended many-particle systems.

  2. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the benzene dimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadi, Sam, E-mail: s.azadi@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Earth Science and Thomas Young Centre, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Cohen, R. E. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, United Kingdom and Extreme Materials Initiative, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, D.C. 20015 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    We report an accurate study of interactions between benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory using different van der Waals functionals. In our quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of −2.3(4) and −2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the coupled-cluster theory through perturbative triplets/complete basis set limit is −2.65(2) kcal/mol [Miliordos et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, comparable to results from the best quantum chemistry methods.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum Zeno effect in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Danko

    2015-12-01

    Environmental decoherence appears to be the biggest obstacle for successful construction of quantum mind theories. Nevertheless, the quantum physicist Henry Stapp promoted the view that the mind could utilize quantum Zeno effect to influence brain dynamics and that the efficacy of such mental efforts would not be undermined by environmental decoherence of the brain. To address the physical plausibility of Stapp's claim, we modeled the brain using quantum tunneling of an electron in a multiple-well structure such as the voltage sensor in neuronal ion channels and performed Monte Carlo simulations of quantum Zeno effect exerted by the mind upon the brain in the presence or absence of environmental decoherence. The simulations unambiguously showed that the quantum Zeno effect breaks down for timescales greater than the brain decoherence time. To generalize the Monte Carlo simulation results for any n-level quantum system, we further analyzed the change of brain entropy due to the mind probing actions and proved a theorem according to which local projections cannot decrease the von Neumann entropy of the unconditional brain density matrix. The latter theorem establishes that Stapp's model is physically implausible but leaves a door open for future development of quantum mind theories provided the brain has a decoherence-free subspace.

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo Study of Random Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Todo, Synge; Kato, Kiyoshi; Takayama, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    Effects of randomness on the spin-1/2 and 1 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chains are studied using the quantum Monte Carlo method with the continuous-time loop algorithm. We precisely calculated the uniform susceptibility, string order parameter, spatial and temporal correlation length, and the dynamical exponent, and obtained a phase diagram. The generalization of the continuous-time loop algorithm for the systems with higher-S spins is also presented.

  5. Continuous Time Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of Kondo shuttling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Assaad, Fakher; Jarrell, Mark

    2010-03-01

    The Kondo shuttling problem is investigated by using the Continuous Time Quantum Monte Carlo method in both the anti-adiabatic limit φTK and the intermediate regime φ˜TK, where φ is the phonon modulation frequency and TK is the Kondo temperature. We investigate the potential emergence of Kondo effect or Kondo breakdown as a function of the phonon modulation frequency and electron-phonon coupling. This research is supported by grant OISE-0952300.

  6. Valence-bond quantum Monte Carlo algorithms defined on trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschner, Andreas; Sørensen, Erik S

    2014-09-01

    We present a class of algorithms for performing valence-bond quantum Monte Carlo of quantum spin models. Valence-bond quantum Monte Carlo is a projective T=0 Monte Carlo method based on sampling of a set of operator strings that can be viewed as forming a treelike structure. The algorithms presented here utilize the notion of a worm that moves up and down this tree and changes the associated operator string. In quite general terms, we derive a set of equations whose solutions correspond to a whole class of algorithms. As specific examples of this class of algorithms, we focus on two cases. The bouncing worm algorithm, for which updates are always accepted by allowing the worm to bounce up and down the tree, and the driven worm algorithm, where a single parameter controls how far up the tree the worm reaches before turning around. The latter algorithm involves only a single bounce where the worm turns from going up the tree to going down. The presence of the control parameter necessitates the introduction of an acceptance probability for the update.

  7. Minimising biases in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigor, W. A.; Spencer, J. S.; Bearpark, M. J.; Thom, A. J. W.

    2015-03-01

    We show that Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) is a Markov chain in its present form. We construct the Markov matrix of FCIQMC for a two determinant system and hence compute the stationary distribution. These solutions are used to quantify the dependence of the population dynamics on the parameters defining the Markov chain. Despite the simplicity of a system with only two determinants, it still reveals a population control bias inherent to the FCIQMC algorithm. We investigate the effect of simulation parameters on the population control bias for the neon atom and suggest simulation setups to, in general, minimise the bias. We show a reweight ing scheme to remove the bias caused by population control commonly used in diffusion Monte Carlo [Umrigar et al., J. Chem. Phys. 99, 2865 (1993)] is effective and recommend its use as a post processing step.

  8. Minimising biases in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigor, W A; Spencer, J S; Bearpark, M J; Thom, A J W

    2015-03-14

    We show that Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) is a Markov chain in its present form. We construct the Markov matrix of FCIQMC for a two determinant system and hence compute the stationary distribution. These solutions are used to quantify the dependence of the population dynamics on the parameters defining the Markov chain. Despite the simplicity of a system with only two determinants, it still reveals a population control bias inherent to the FCIQMC algorithm. We investigate the effect of simulation parameters on the population control bias for the neon atom and suggest simulation setups to, in general, minimise the bias. We show a reweight ing scheme to remove the bias caused by population control commonly used in diffusion Monte Carlo [Umrigar et al., J. Chem. Phys. 99, 2865 (1993)] is effective and recommend its use as a post processing step.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezerlis, A; Tews, I; Epelbaum, E; Gandolfi, S; Hebeler, K; Nogga, A; Schwenk, A

    2013-07-19

    We present the first quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations with chiral effective field theory (EFT) interactions. To achieve this, we remove all sources of nonlocality, which hamper the inclusion in QMC calculations, in nuclear forces to next-to-next-to-leading order. We perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for the neutron matter energy up to saturation density based on local leading-order, next-to-leading order, and next-to-next-to-leading order nucleon-nucleon interactions. Our results exhibit a systematic order-by-order convergence in chiral EFT and provide nonperturbative benchmarks with theoretical uncertainties. For the softer interactions, perturbative calculations are in excellent agreement with the AFDMC results. This work paves the way for QMC calculations with systematic chiral EFT interactions for nuclei and nuclear matter, for testing the perturbativeness of different orders, and allows for matching to lattice QCD results by varying the pion mass.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the protonated water dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Dagrada, Mario; Saitta, Antonino M; Sorella, Sandro; Mauri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We report an extensive theoretical study of the protonated water dimer (Zundel ion) by means of the highly correlated variational Monte Carlo and lattice regularized Monte Carlo approaches. This system represents the simplest model for proton transfer (PT) and a correct description of its properties is essential in order to understand the PT mechanism in more complex acqueous systems. Our Jastrow correlated AGP wave function ensures an accurate treatment of electron correlations. Exploiting the advantages of contracting the primitive basis set over atomic hybrid orbitals, we are able to limit dramatically the number of variational parameters with a systematic control on the numerical precision, crucial in order to simulate larger systems. We investigate energetics and geometrical properties of the Zundel ion as a function of the oxygen-oxygen distance, taken as reaction coordinate. In both cases, our QMC results are found in excellent agreement with coupled cluster CCSD(T) technique, the quantum chemistry "go...

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo: Faster, More Reliable, And More Accurate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Amos Gerald

    2010-06-01

    The Schrodinger Equation has been available for about 83 years, but today, we still strain to apply it accurately to molecules of interest. The difficulty is not theoretical in nature, but practical, since we're held back by lack of sufficient computing power. Consequently, effort is applied to find acceptable approximations to facilitate real time solutions. In the meantime, computer technology has begun rapidly advancing and changing the way we think about efficient algorithms. For those who can reorganize their formulas to take advantage of these changes and thereby lift some approximations, incredible new opportunities await. Over the last decade, we've seen the emergence of a new kind of computer processor, the graphics card. Designed to accelerate computer games by optimizing quantity instead of quality in processor, they have become of sufficient quality to be useful to some scientists. In this thesis, we explore the first known use of a graphics card to computational chemistry by rewriting our Quantum Monte Carlo software into the requisite "data parallel" formalism. We find that notwithstanding precision considerations, we are able to speed up our software by about a factor of 6. The success of a Quantum Monte Carlo calculation depends on more than just processing power. It also requires the scientist to carefully design the trial wavefunction used to guide simulated electrons. We have studied the use of Generalized Valence Bond wavefunctions to simply, and yet effectively, captured the essential static correlation in atoms and molecules. Furthermore, we have developed significantly improved two particle correlation functions, designed with both flexibility and simplicity considerations, representing an effective and reliable way to add the necessary dynamic correlation. Lastly, we present our method for stabilizing the statistical nature of the calculation, by manipulating configuration weights, thus facilitating efficient and robust calculations. Our

  12. Infinite variance in fermion quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, and lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied on to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple subareas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calculation unreliable or meaningless. We discuss how to identify the infinite variance problem. An approach is then proposed to solve the problem. The solution does not require major modifications to standard algorithms, adding a "bridge link" to the imaginary-time path integral. The general idea is applicable to a variety of situations where the infinite variance problem may be present. Illustrative results are presented for the ground state of the Hubbard model at half-filling.

  13. Infinite variance in fermion quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-03-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, and lattice quantum chromodynamics calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied on to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple subareas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calculation unreliable or meaningless. We discuss how to identify the infinite variance problem. An approach is then proposed to solve the problem. The solution does not require major modifications to standard algorithms, adding a "bridge link" to the imaginary-time path integral. The general idea is applicable to a variety of situations where the infinite variance problem may be present. Illustrative results are presented for the ground state of the Hubbard model at half-filling.

  14. Multi-Determinant Wave-functions in Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Morales, M A; Clark, B K; Kim, J; Scuseria, G; 10.1021/ct3003404

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have received considerable attention over the last decades due to their great promise for providing a direct solution to the many-body Schrodinger equation in electronic systems. Thanks to their low scaling with number of particles, QMC methods present a compelling competitive alternative for the accurate study of large molecular systems and solid state calculations. In spite of such promise, the method has not permeated the quantum chemistry community broadly, mainly because of the fixed-node error, which can be large and whose control is difficult. In this Perspective, we present a systematic application of large scale multi-determinant expansions in QMC, and report on its impressive performance with first row dimers and the 55 molecules of the G1 test set. We demonstrate the potential of this strategy for systematically reducing the fixed-node error in the wave function and for achieving chemical accuracy in energy predictions. When compared to traditional quantum chemistr...

  15. A pure-sampling quantum Monte Carlo algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospadov, Egor; Rothstein, Stuart M

    2015-01-14

    The objective of pure-sampling quantum Monte Carlo is to calculate physical properties that are independent of the importance sampling function being employed in the calculation, save for the mismatch of its nodal hypersurface with that of the exact wave function. To achieve this objective, we report a pure-sampling algorithm that combines features of forward walking methods of pure-sampling and reptation quantum Monte Carlo (RQMC). The new algorithm accurately samples properties from the mixed and pure distributions simultaneously in runs performed at a single set of time-steps, over which extrapolation to zero time-step is performed. In a detailed comparison, we found RQMC to be less efficient. It requires different sets of time-steps to accurately determine the energy and other properties, such as the dipole moment. We implement our algorithm by systematically increasing an algorithmic parameter until the properties converge to statistically equivalent values. As a proof in principle, we calculated the fixed-node energy, static α polarizability, and other one-electron expectation values for the ground-states of LiH and water molecules. These quantities are free from importance sampling bias, population control bias, time-step bias, extrapolation-model bias, and the finite-field approximation. We found excellent agreement with the accepted values for the energy and a variety of other properties for those systems.

  16. Chemical accuracy from quantum Monte Carlo for the Benzene Dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Azadi, Sam

    2015-01-01

    We report an accurate study of interactions between Benzene molecules using variational quantum Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. We compare these results with density functional theory (DFT) using different van der Waals (vdW) functionals. In our QMC calculations, we use accurate correlated trial wave functions including three-body Jastrow factors, and backflow transformations. We consider two benzene molecules in the parallel displaced (PD) geometry, and find that by highly optimizing the wave function and introducing more dynamical correlation into the wave function, we compute the weak chemical binding energy between aromatic rings accurately. We find optimal VMC and DMC binding energies of -2.3(4) and -2.7(3) kcal/mol, respectively. The best estimate of the CCSD(T)/CBS limit is -2.65(2) kcal/mol [E. Miliordos et al, J. Phys. Chem. A 118, 7568 (2014)]. Our results indicate that QMC methods give chemical accuracy for weakly bound van der Waals molecular interactions, compar...

  17. Infinite Variance in Fermion Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Hao

    2015-01-01

    For important classes of many-fermion problems, quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods allow exact calculations of ground-state and finite-temperature properties, without the sign problem. The list spans condensed matter, nuclear physics, and high-energy physics, including the half-filled repulsive Hubbard model, the spin-balanced atomic Fermi gas, lattice QCD calculations at zero density with Wilson Fermions, and is growing rapidly as a number of problems have been discovered recently to be free of the sign problem. In these situations, QMC calculations are relied upon to provide definitive answers. Their results are instrumental to our ability to understand and compute properties in fundamental models important to multiple sub-areas in quantum physics. It is shown, however, that the most commonly employed algorithms in such situations turn out to have an infinite variance problem. A diverging variance causes the estimated Monte Carlo statistical error bar to be incorrect, which can render the results of the calc...

  18. Pseudopotentials for quantum-Monte-Carlo-calculations; Pseudopotentiale fuer Quanten-Monte-Carlo-Rechnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkatzki, Mark Thomas

    2008-07-01

    The author presents scalar-relativistic energy-consistent Hartree-Fock pseudopotentials for the main-group and 3d-transition-metal elements. The pseudopotentials do not exhibit a singularity at the nucleus and are therefore suitable for quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations. The author demonstrates their transferability through extensive benchmark calculations of atomic excitation spectra as well as molecular properties. In particular, the author computes the vibrational frequencies and binding energies of 26 first- and second-row diatomic molecules using post Hartree-Fock methods, finding excellent agreement with the corresponding all-electron values. The author shows that the presented pseudopotentials give superior accuracy than other existing pseudopotentials constructed specifically for QMC. The localization error and the efficiency in QMC are discussed. The author also presents QMC calculations for selected atomic and diatomic 3d-transitionmetal systems. Finally, valence basis sets of different sizes (VnZ with n=D,T,Q,5 for 1st and 2nd row; with n=D,T for 3rd to 5th row; with n=D,T,Q for the 3d transition metals) optimized for the pseudopotentials are presented. (orig.)

  19. Practical schemes for accurate forces in quantum Monte Carlo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moroni, S.; Saccani, S.; Filippi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    While the computation of interatomic forces has become a well-established practice within variational Monte Carlo (VMC), the use of the more accurate Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method is still largely limited to the computation of total energies on structures obtained at a lower level of

  20. Practical schemes for accurate forces in quantum Monte Carlo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moroni, S.; Saccani, S.; Filippi, C.

    2014-01-01

    While the computation of interatomic forces has become a well-established practice within variational Monte Carlo (VMC), the use of the more accurate Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method is still largely limited to the computation of total energies on structures obtained at a lower level of

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo of ThO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuming; Mitas, Lubos

    2012-02-01

    Thorium dioxide solid is a unique optical and heat-resistant actinide material with large gap and cohesion. It is a diamagnet, unlike a number of other similar actinide oxides. We investigate the electronic structure of ThO2 using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. We adopt Stuttgart RLC and RSC effective core potentials (pseudopotentials) for the Th atom. In the DFT calculations, some of the properties are verified in all-electron calculations using the FLAPW techniques. Using the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo we calculate the ground state and several excited states from which we estimate the cohesion and the band gap. Simulation cells of several sizes are used to estimate/reduce the finite size effects. We compare the QMC results with recent DFT calculations with several types of functionals which include hybrids such as PBE0 and HSE. Insights from QMC calculations give us understanding of the correlations beyond the DFT approaches and pave the way for accurate electronic structure calculations of other actinide materials.

  2. Measuring Renyi entanglement entropy in quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Matthew B; González, Iván; Kallin, Ann B; Melko, Roger G

    2010-04-16

    We develop a quantum Monte Carlo procedure, in the valence bond basis, to measure the Renyi entanglement entropy of a many-body ground state as the expectation value of a unitary Swap operator acting on two copies of the system. An improved estimator involving the ratio of Swap operators for different subregions enables convergence of the entropy in a simulation time polynomial in the system size. We demonstrate convergence of the Renyi entropy to exact results for a Heisenberg chain. Finally, we calculate the scaling of the Renyi entropy in the two-dimensional Heisenberg model and confirm that the Néel ground state obeys the expected area law for systems up to linear size L=32.

  3. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo using worm sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunacker, P.; Wallerberger, M.; Gull, E.; Hausoel, A.; Sangiovanni, G.; Held, K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a worm sampling method for calculating one- and two-particle Green's functions using continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulations in the hybridization expansion (CT-HYB). Instead of measuring Green's functions by removing hybridization lines from partition function configurations, as in conventional CT-HYB, the worm algorithm directly samples the Green's function. We show that worm sampling is necessary to obtain general two-particle Green's functions which are not of density-density type and that it improves the sampling efficiency when approaching the atomic limit. Such two-particle Green's functions are needed to compute off-diagonal elements of susceptibilities and occur in diagrammatic extensions of the dynamical mean-field theory and in efficient estimators for the single-particle self-energy.

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiringa, R. B.; Nollett, Kenneth M.; Pieper, Steven C.; Brida, I.

    2009-10-01

    We report recent quantum Monte Carlo (variational and Green's function) calculations of elastic nucleon-nucleus scattering. We are adding the cases of proton-^4He, neutron-^3H and proton-^3He scattering to a previous GFMC study of neutron-^4He scattering [1]. To do this requires generalizing our methods to include long-range Coulomb forces and to treat coupled channels. The two four-body cases can be compared to other accurate four-body calculational methods such as the AGS equations and hyperspherical harmonic expansions. We will present results for the Argonne v18 interaction alone and with Urbana and Illinois three-nucleon potentials. [4pt] [1] K.M. Nollett, S. C. Pieper, R.B. Wiringa, J. Carlson, and G.M. Hale, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 022502 (2007)

  5. Neutron monitor generated data distributions in quantum variational Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussainov, A. S.; Pya, N.

    2016-08-01

    We have assessed the potential applications of the neutron monitor hardware as random number generator for normal and uniform distributions. The data tables from the acquisition channels with no extreme changes in the signal level were chosen as the retrospective model. The stochastic component was extracted by fitting the raw data with splines and then subtracting the fit. Scaling the extracted data to zero mean and variance of one is sufficient to obtain a stable standard normal random variate. Distributions under consideration pass all available normality tests. Inverse transform sampling is suggested to use as a source of the uniform random numbers. Variational Monte Carlo method for quantum harmonic oscillator was used to test the quality of our random numbers. If the data delivery rate is of importance and the conventional one minute resolution neutron count is insufficient, we could always settle for an efficient seed generator to feed into the faster algorithmic random number generator or create a buffer.

  6. High-Pressure Hydrogen Sulfide by Diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Azadi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We use the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo to revisit the enthalpy-pressure phase diagram of the various products from the different proposed decompositions of H$_2$S at pressures above 150~GPa. Our results entails a revision of the ground-state enthalpy-pressure phase diagram. Specifically, we find that the C2/c HS$_2$ structure is persistent up to 440~GPa before undergoing a phase transition into the C2/m phase. Contrary to density functional theory, our calculations suggest that the C2/m phase of HS is more stable than the I4$_1$/amd HS structure over the whole pressure range from 150 to 400 GPa. Moreover, we predict that the Im-3m phase is the most likely candidate for H$_3$S, which is consistent with recent experimental x-ray diffraction measurements.

  7. Confidence and efficiency scaling in Variational Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Delyon, François; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Based on the central limit theorem, we discuss the problem of evaluation of the statistical error of Monte Carlo calculations using a time discretized diffusion process. We present a robust and practical method to determine the effective variance of general observables and show how to verify the equilibrium hypothesis by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We then derive scaling laws of the efficiency illustrated by Variational Monte Carlo calculations on the two dimensional electron gas.

  8. Confidence and efficiency scaling in variational quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delyon, F.; Bernu, B.; Holzmann, Markus

    2017-02-01

    Based on the central limit theorem, we discuss the problem of evaluation of the statistical error of Monte Carlo calculations using a time-discretized diffusion process. We present a robust and practical method to determine the effective variance of general observables and show how to verify the equilibrium hypothesis by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We then derive scaling laws of the efficiency illustrated by variational Monte Carlo calculations on the two-dimensional electron gas.

  9. (3+1)-Dimensional Quantum Mechanics from Monte Carlo Hamiltonian: Harmonic Oscillator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiang-Qian; XU Hao; YANG Jie-Chao; WANG Yu-Li; CHANG Di; LIN Yin; Helmut Kroger

    2001-01-01

    In Lagrangian formulation, it is extremely difficult to compute the excited spectrum and wavefunctions ora quantum theory via Monte Carlo methods. Recently, we developed a Monte Carlo Hamiltonian method for investigating this hard problem and tested the algorithm in quantum-mechanical systems in 1+1 and 2t1 dimensions. In this paper we apply it to the study of thelow-energy quantum physics of the (3+1)-dimensional harmonic oscillator.``

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations Applied to Magnetic Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Larry [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We have calculated the equilibrium thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg spin systems using a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method. We have used some of these systems as models to describe recently synthesized magnetic molecules, and-upon comparing the results of these calculations with experimental data-have obtained accurate estimates for the basic parameters of these models. We have also performed calculations for other systems that are of more general interest, being relevant both for existing experimental data and for future experiments. Utilizing the concept of importance sampling, these calculations can be carried out in an arbitrarily large quantum Hilbert space, while still avoiding any approximations that would introduce systematic errors. The only errors are statistical in nature, and as such, their magnitudes are accurately estimated during the course of a simulation. Frustrated spin systems present a major challenge to the QMC method, nevertheless, in many instances progress can be made. In this chapter, the field of magnetic molecules is introduced, paying particular attention to the characteristics that distinguish magnetic molecules from other systems that are studied in condensed matter physics. We briefly outline the typical path by which we learn about magnetic molecules, which requires a close relationship between experiments and theoretical calculations. The typical experiments are introduced here, while the theoretical methods are discussed in the next chapter. Each of these theoretical methods has a considerable limitation, also described in Chapter 2, which together serve to motivate the present work. As is shown throughout the later chapters, the present QMC method is often able to provide useful information where other methods fail. In Chapter 3, the use of Monte Carlo methods in statistical physics is reviewed, building up the fundamental ideas that are necessary in order to understand the method that has been used in this work. With these

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations with chiral effective field theory interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tews, Ingo

    2015-10-12

    The neutron-matter equation of state connects several physical systems over a wide density range, from cold atomic gases in the unitary limit at low densities, to neutron-rich nuclei at intermediate densities, up to neutron stars which reach supranuclear densities in their core. An accurate description of the neutron-matter equation of state is therefore crucial to describe these systems. To calculate the neutron-matter equation of state reliably, precise many-body methods in combination with a systematic theory for nuclear forces are needed. Chiral effective field theory (EFT) is such a theory. It provides a systematic framework for the description of low-energy hadronic interactions and enables calculations with controlled theoretical uncertainties. Chiral EFT makes use of a momentum-space expansion of nuclear forces based on the symmetries of Quantum Chromodynamics, which is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. In chiral EFT, the description of nuclear forces can be systematically improved by going to higher orders in the chiral expansion. On the other hand, continuum Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are among the most precise many-body methods available to study strongly interacting systems at finite densities. They treat the Schroedinger equation as a diffusion equation in imaginary time and project out the ground-state wave function of the system starting from a trial wave function by propagating the system in imaginary time. To perform this propagation, continuum QMC methods require as input local interactions. However, chiral EFT, which is naturally formulated in momentum space, contains several sources of nonlocality. In this Thesis, we show how to construct local chiral two-nucleon (NN) and three-nucleon (3N) interactions and discuss results of first QMC calculations for pure neutron systems. We have performed systematic auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo (AFDMC) calculations for neutron matter using local chiral NN interactions. By

  12. A Novel Exact Fixed-node Quantum Monte Carlo Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xin HUANG

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we proposed a novel exact fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo (EFNQMC) algorithm, which is a self-optimizing and self-improving procedure. In contrast to the previous EFNQMC method, the trial function is optimized synchronistically in the diffusion procedure, but not before the beginning of EFNQMC computation. In order to optimize the trial function, the improved steepest descent technique is used, in which the step size is automatically adjustable. The procedure is quasi-Newton and converges super linearly. We also use a novel trial function, which has correct electron-electron and electron-nucleus cusp conditions. The novel EFNQMC algorithm and the novel trial function are employed to calculate the energies of 11A1 state of CH2, 1Ag state of C8 and the ground-states of H2, LiH, Li2, H2O, respectively. The test results show that both the novel algorithm and the trial function proposed in the present paper are very excellent.

  13. Cohesion energetics of carbon allotropes: Quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeondeok; Kang, Sinabro; Koo, Jahyun; Lee, Hoonkyung; Kwon, Yongkyung, E-mail: ykwon@konkuk.ac.kr [Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeongnim, E-mail: jnkim@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division and Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-03-21

    We have performed quantum Monte Carlo calculations to study the cohesion energetics of carbon allotropes, including sp{sup 3}-bonded diamond, sp{sup 2}-bonded graphene, sp–sp{sup 2} hybridized graphynes, and sp-bonded carbyne. The computed cohesive energies of diamond and graphene are found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding values determined experimentally for diamond and graphite, respectively, when the zero-point energies, along with the interlayer binding in the case of graphite, are included. We have also found that the cohesive energy of graphyne decreases systematically as the ratio of sp-bonded carbon atoms increases. The cohesive energy of γ-graphyne, the most energetically stable graphyne, turns out to be 6.766(6) eV/atom, which is smaller than that of graphene by 0.698(12) eV/atom. Experimental difficulty in synthesizing graphynes could be explained by their significantly smaller cohesive energies. Finally, we conclude that the cohesive energy of a newly proposed graphyne can be accurately estimated with the carbon–carbon bond energies determined from the cohesive energies of graphene and three different graphynes considered here.

  14. Cohesion Energetics of Carbon Allotropes: Quantum Monte Carlo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyeondeok [Konkuk University, South Korea; Kang, Sinabro [Konkuk University, South Korea; Koo, Jahyun [Konkuk University, South Korea; Lee, Hoonkyung [Konkuk University, South Korea; Kim, Jeongnim [ORNL; Kwon, Yongkyung [Konkuk University, South Korea

    2014-01-01

    We have performed quantum Monte Carlo calculations to study the cohesion energetics of carbon allotropes, including sp3-bonded diamond, sp2-bonded graphene, sp-sp2 hybridized graphynes, and sp-bonded carbyne. The comput- ed cohesive energies of diamond and graphene are found to be in excellent agreement with the corresponding values de- termined experimentally for diamond and graphite, respectively, when the zero-point energies, along with the interlayer binding in the case of graphite, are included. We have also found that the cohesive energy of graphyne decreases system- atically as the ratio of sp-bonded carbon atoms increases. The cohesive energy of -graphyne, the most energetically- stable graphyne, turns out to be 6.766(6) eV/atom, which is smaller than that of graphene by 0.698(12) eV/atom. Experi- mental difficulty in synthesizing graphynes could be explained by their significantly smaller cohesive energies. Finally we conclude that the cohesive energy of a newly-proposed two-dimensional carbon network can be accurately estimated with the carbon-carbon bond energies determined from the cohesive energies of graphene and three different graphynes.

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo for electronic structure: Recent developments and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriquez, Maria Milagos Soto [Lawrence Berkeley Lab. and Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-04-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods have been found to give excellent results when applied to chemical systems. The main goal of the present work is to use QMC to perform electronic structure calculations. In QMC, a Monte Carlo simulation is used to solve the Schroedinger equation, taking advantage of its analogy to a classical diffusion process with branching. In the present work the author focuses on how to extend the usefulness of QMC to more meaningful molecular systems. This study is aimed at questions concerning polyatomic and large atomic number systems. The accuracy of the solution obtained is determined by the accuracy of the trial wave function`s nodal structure. Efforts in the group have given great emphasis to finding optimized wave functions for the QMC calculations. Little work had been done by systematically looking at a family of systems to see how the best wave functions evolve with system size. In this work the author presents a study of trial wave functions for C, CH, C2H and C2H2. The goal is to study how to build wave functions for larger systems by accumulating knowledge from the wave functions of its fragments as well as gaining some knowledge on the usefulness of multi-reference wave functions. In a MC calculation of a heavy atom, for reasonable time steps most moves for core electrons are rejected. For this reason true equilibration is rarely achieved. A method proposed by Batrouni and Reynolds modifies the way the simulation is performed without altering the final steady-state solution. It introduces an acceleration matrix chosen so that all coordinates (i.e., of core and valence electrons) propagate at comparable speeds. A study of the results obtained using their proposed matrix suggests that it may not be the optimum choice. In this work the author has found that the desired mixing of coordinates between core and valence electrons is not achieved when using this matrix. A bibliography of 175 references is

  16. Effective quantum Monte Carlo algorithm for modeling strongly correlated systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kashurnikov, V. A.; Krasavin, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    A new effective Monte Carlo algorithm based on principles of continuous time is presented. It allows calculating, in an arbitrary discrete basis, thermodynamic quantities and linear response of mixed boson-fermion, spin-boson, and other strongly correlated systems which admit no analytic description

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo diagonalization method as a variational calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Honma, Michio

    1997-05-01

    A stochastic method for performing large-scale shell model calculations is presented, which utilizes the auxiliary field Monte Carlo technique and diagonalization method. This method overcomes the limitation of the conventional shell model diagonalization and can extremely widen the feasibility of shell model calculations with realistic interactions for spectroscopic study of nuclear structure. (author)

  18. A diffusion quantum Monte Carlo study of geometries and harmonic frequencies of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an approach in determination of equilibrium geometries and harmonic frequencies of molecules by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method based on the floating spherical Gaussians. In conjunction with a projected and renormalized Hellmann-Feynman gradient and an electronic energy at variational Monte Carlo and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo, respectively, the quasi-Newton algorithm implemented with the Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno updated Hessian was used to find the optimized molecular geometry. We applied this approach to N2 and H2O molecules. The geometry and harmonic frequencies calculated were consistent with some sophisticated ab initio calculated values within reasonable statistical uncertainty.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of bosons with complex interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Valery

    2015-03-01

    Many of the most exciting materials and phenomena being studied today, from oxide heterostructures to topological insulators or iron-based superconductors, are the ones in which an understanding of how quantum particles interact with each other is essential. In the last decade, the development and the improvement of quantum Monte Carlo algorithms combined with the increased power of computers has opened the way to the exact simulation of Hamiltonians that include various types of interactions, such as inter-species conversion terms or ring-exchange terms. Simultaneously, developments made in the field of optical lattices, laser cooling and magneto/optical trapping techniques have led to ideal realizations of such Hamiltonians. A wide variety of phases can be present, including Mott insulators and superfluids, as well as more exotic phases such as Haldane insulators, supersolids, counter-superfluids, or the recently proposed Feshbach insulator. These experimental realizations of the various forms of the Hubbard model can have interesting applications, in particular they provide a possible way of performing quantum computing, and have also given rise to a new field known as Atomtronics, the equivalent of Electronics where the carriers are replaced by atoms. I will illustrate these ideas with examples of Hamiltonians that have been studied and some results. In order to study these systems, it is crucial to identify the various phases that are present, which can be characterized by a set of order parameters. Of particular importance in this task is the superfluid density. It is well known that the superfluid density can be related to the response of the free energy to a boundary phase twist, or to the fluctuations of the winding number. However, these relationships break down when complex interactions are involved. To address this problem, I will propose a general expression of the superfluid density, derived from real and thought experiments. I will discuss two

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of fidelity at magnetic quantum phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, David; Alet, Fabien; Capponi, Sylvain

    2009-10-23

    When a system undergoes a quantum phase transition, the ground-state wave function shows a change of nature, which can be monitored using the fidelity concept. We introduce two quantum Monte Carlo schemes that allow the computation of fidelity and its susceptibility for large interacting many-body systems. These methods are illustrated on a two-dimensional Heisenberg model, where fidelity estimators show marked behavior at two successive quantum phase transitions. We also develop a scaling theory which relates the divergence of the fidelity susceptibility to the critical exponent of the correlation length. A good agreement is found with the numerical results.

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) [0.1981], 0.1895(9) [0.1874(4)], 0.1530(34) [0.1599(73)], 0.1664(37) [0.1724(110)], 0.1613(43) [0.1675(110)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) [0.0203(12)], 0.0188(10) [0.0220(21)], 0.0247(8) [0.0310(12)], 0.0253(8) [0.0351(8)] Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  3. Exact special twist method for quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagrada, Mario; Karakuzu, Seher; Vildosola, Verónica Laura; Casula, Michele; Sorella, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    We present a systematic investigation of the special twist method introduced by Rajagopal et al. [Phys. Rev. B 51, 10591 (1995), 10.1103/PhysRevB.51.10591] for reducing finite-size effects in correlated calculations of periodic extended systems with Coulomb interactions and Fermi statistics. We propose a procedure for finding special twist values which, at variance with previous applications of this method, reproduce the energy of the mean-field infinite-size limit solution within an adjustable (arbitrarily small) numerical error. This choice of the special twist is shown to be the most accurate single-twist solution for curing one-body finite-size effects in correlated calculations. For these reasons we dubbed our procedure "exact special twist" (EST). EST only needs a fully converged independent-particles or mean-field calculation within the primitive cell and a simple fit to find the special twist along a specific direction in the Brillouin zone. We first assess the performances of EST in a simple correlated model such as the three-dimensional electron gas. Afterwards, we test its efficiency within ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulations of metallic elements of increasing complexity. We show that EST displays an overall good performance in reducing finite-size errors comparable to the widely used twist average technique but at a much lower computational cost since it involves the evaluation of just one wave function. We also demonstrate that the EST method shows similar performances in the calculation of correlation functions, such as the ionic forces for structural relaxation and the pair radial distribution function in liquid hydrogen. Our conclusions point to the usefulness of EST for correlated supercell calculations; our method will be particularly relevant when the physical problem under consideration requires large periodic cells.

  4. Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo for equilibrium structures and harmonic frequencies of ethane and ozone molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2004-06-01

    Application of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method in combination with a trial wave function constructed from the floating spherical Gaussian orbitals and spherical Gaussian geminals to studies on the equilibrium structures and harmonic frequencies of ethane and ozone is presented. These Monte Carlo computed results are compared with those of experiments as well as the coupled cluster methods with the correlation consistent basis sets for the two molecules. For ozone, we also compare the Monte Carlo results with the results from multireference calculations.

  5. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the first-row atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Seth, P; Needs, R J

    2010-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the first-row atoms Li-Ne and their singly-positively-charged ions are reported. Multi-determinant-Jastrow-backflow trial wave functions are used which recover more than 98% of the correlation energy at the Variational Monte Carlo (VMC) level and more than 99% of the correlation energy at the Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) level for both the atoms and ions. We obtain the first ionization potentials to chemical accuracy. We also report scalar relativistic corrections to the energies, mass-polarization terms, and one- and two-electron expectation values.

  6. Communication: Variation after response in quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuscamman, Eric

    2016-08-01

    We present a new method for modeling electronically excited states that overcomes a key failing of linear response theory by allowing the underlying ground state ansatz to relax in the presence of an excitation. The method is variational, has a cost similar to ground state variational Monte Carlo, and admits both open and periodic boundary conditions. We present preliminary numerical results showing that, when paired with the Jastrow antisymmetric geminal power ansatz, the variation-after-response formalism delivers accuracies for valence and charge transfer single excitations on par with equation of motion coupled cluster, while surpassing coupled cluster's accuracy for excitations with significant doubly excited character.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo Methods for First Principles Simulation of Liquid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, John Robert

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate microscopic description of water structure and dynamics is of great interest to molecular biology researchers and in the physics and quantum chemistry simulation communities. This dissertation describes efforts to apply quantum Monte Carlo methods to this problem with the goal of making progress toward a fully "ab initio"…

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of a particular class of non-stoquastic Hamiltonians in quantum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Quantum annealing is a generic solver of the optimization problem that uses fictitious quantum fluctuation. Its simulation in classical computing is often performed using the quantum Monte Carlo simulation via the Suzuki–Trotter decomposition. However, the negative sign problem sometimes emerges in the simulation of quantum annealing with an elaborate driver Hamiltonian, since it belongs to a class of non-stoquastic Hamiltonians. In the present study, we propose an alternative way to avoid the negative sign problem involved in a particular class of the non-stoquastic Hamiltonians. To check the validity of the method, we demonstrate our method by applying it to a simple problem that includes the anti-ferromagnetic XX interaction, which is a typical instance of the non-stoquastic Hamiltonians. PMID:28112244

  9. Communication: Excited states, dynamic correlation functions and spectral properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, George H; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2012-11-21

    In this communication, we propose a method for obtaining isolated excited states within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo framework. This method allows for stable sampling with respect to collapse to lower energy states and requires no uncontrolled approximations. In contrast with most previous methods to extract excited state information from quantum Monte Carlo methods, this results from a modification to the underlying propagator, and does not require explicit orthogonalization, analytic continuation, transient estimators, or restriction of the Hilbert space via a trial wavefunction. Furthermore, we show that the propagator can directly yield frequency-domain correlation functions and spectral functions such as the density of states which are difficult to obtain within a traditional quantum Monte Carlo framework. We demonstrate this approach with pilot applications to the neon atom and beryllium dimer.

  10. Evidence for Stable Square Ice from Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ji; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments on ice formed by water under nanoconfinement provide evidence for a two-dimensional (2D) `square ice' phase. However, the interpretation of the experiments has been questioned and the stability of square ice has become a matter of debate. Partially this is because the simulation approaches employed so far (force fields and density functional theory) struggle to accurately describe the very small energy differences between the relevant phases. Here we report a study of 2D ice using an accurate wave-function based electronic structure approach, namely Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). We find that at relatively high pressure square ice is indeed the lowest enthalpy phase examined, supporting the initial experimental claim. Moreover, at lower pressures a `pentagonal ice' phase (not yet observed experimentally) has the lowest enthalpy, and at ambient pressure the `pentagonal ice' phase is degenerate with a `hexagonal ice' phase. Our DMC results also allow us to evaluate the accuracy of various densi...

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of two neutrons in finite volume

    CERN Document Server

    Klos, P; Tews, I; Gandolfi, S; Gezerlis, A; Hammer, H -W; Hoferichter, M; Schwenk, A

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations provide direct access to the properties of pure neutron systems that are challenging to study experimentally. In addition to their importance for fundamental physics, their properties are required as input for effective field theories of the strong interaction. In this work, we perform auxiliary-field diffusion Monte Carlo calculations of the ground and first excited state of two neutrons in a finite box, considering a simple contact potential as well as chiral effective field theory interactions. We compare the results against exact diagonalizations and present a detailed analysis of the finite-volume effects, whose understanding is crucial for determining observables from the calculated energies. Using the L\\"uscher formula, we extract the low-energy S-wave scattering parameters from ground- and excited-state energies for different box sizes.

  12. Random number generators tested on quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo; Miura, Kenichi

    2010-08-01

    We have tested and compared several (pseudo) random number generators (RNGs) applied to a practical application, ground state energy calculations of molecules using variational and diffusion Monte Carlo metheds. A new multiple recursive generator with 8th-order recursion (MRG8) and the Mersenne twister generator (MT19937) are tested and compared with the RANLUX generator with five luxury levels (RANLUX-[0-4]). Both MRG8 and MT19937 are proven to give the same total energy as that evaluated with RANLUX-4 (highest luxury level) within the statistical error bars with less computational cost to generate the sequence. We also tested the notorious implementation of linear congruential generator (LCG), RANDU, for comparison.

  13. STRONG CORRELATIONS AND ELECTRON-PHONON COUPLING IN HIGH-TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS - A QUANTUM MONTE-CARLO STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MORGENSTERN, [No Value; FRICK, M; VONDERLINDEN, W

    1992-01-01

    We present quantum simulation studies for a system of strongly correlated fermions coupled to local anharmonic phonons. The Monte Carlo calculations are based on a generalized version of the Projector Quantum Monte Carlo Method allowing a simultaneous treatment of fermions and dynamical phonons. The

  14. Inclusion of Quantum Confinement Effects in Self-Consistent Monte Carlo Device Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Kelsall

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of Monte Carlo FET simulations is discussed, with specific attention to the methods used to describe quantum confinement effects. A new model is presented, which employs self-consistent coupling of Schrodinger, Poisson and Monte Carlo algorithms, and explicit calculation of the scattering rates between confined and unconfined states. Comparisons between the new model and a standard semi-classical Monte Carlo model are presented for a 0.1 μm gate-length In0.52Al0.48As/In0.53 Ga0.47As/InP MODFET. Whilst the quantum model yields minor corrections in the predicted output characteristics, it is found that these results can be achieved without repeated iterations of the Schrodinger equation.

  15. An introduction to applied quantum mechanics in the Wigner Monte Carlo formalism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellier, J.M., E-mail: jeanmichel.sellier@parallel.bas.bg [IICT, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str. 25A, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nedjalkov, M. [IICT, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str. 25A, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Institute for Microelectronics, TU Wien, Gußhausstraße 27-29/E360, 1040 Wien (Austria); Dimov, I. [IICT, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev str. 25A, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-05-12

    The Wigner formulation of quantum mechanics is a very intuitive approach which allows the comprehension and prediction of quantum mechanical phenomena in terms of quasi-distribution functions. In this review, our aim is to provide a detailed introduction to this theory along with a Monte Carlo method for the simulation of time-dependent quantum systems evolving in a phase-space. This work consists of three main parts. First, we introduce the Wigner formalism, then we discuss in detail the Wigner Monte Carlo method and, finally, we present practical applications. In particular, the Wigner model is first derived from the Schrödinger equation. Then a generalization of the formalism due to Moyal is provided, which allows to recover important mathematical properties of the model. Next, the Wigner equation is further generalized to the case of many-body quantum systems. Finally, a physical interpretation of the negative part of a quasi-distribution function is suggested. In the second part, the Wigner Monte Carlo method, based on the concept of signed (virtual) particles, is introduced in detail for the single-body problem. Two extensions of the Wigner Monte Carlo method to quantum many-body problems are introduced, in the frameworks of time-dependent density functional theory and ab-initio methods. Finally, in the third and last part of this paper, applications to single- and many-body problems are performed in the context of quantum physics and quantum chemistry, specifically focusing on the hydrogen, lithium and boron atoms, the H{sub 2} molecule and a system of two identical Fermions. We conclude this work with a discussion on the still unexplored directions the Wigner Monte Carlo method could take in the next future.

  16. Evidence for stable square ice from quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Zen, Andrea; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Alfè, Dario; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-12-01

    Recent experiments on ice formed by water under nanoconfinement provide evidence for a two-dimensional (2D) "square ice" phase. However, the interpretation of the experiments has been questioned and the stability of square ice has become a matter of debate. Partially this is because the simulation approaches employed so far (force fields and density functional theory) struggle to accurately describe the very small energy differences between the relevant phases. Here we report a study of 2D ice using an accurate wave-function based electronic structure approach, namely diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). We find that at relatively high pressure, square ice is indeed the lowest enthalpy phase examined, supporting the initial experimental claim. Moreover, at lower pressures, a "pentagonal ice" phase (not yet observed experimentally) has the lowest enthalpy, and at ambient pressure, the "pentagonal ice" phase is degenerate with a "hexagonal ice" phase. Our DMC results also allow us to evaluate the accuracy of various density functional theory exchange-correlation functionals and force field models, and in doing so we extend the understanding of how such methodologies perform to challenging 2D structures presenting dangling hydrogen bonds.

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo Studies of Relativistic Effects in Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, J L; Arriaga, A

    1999-01-01

    Relativistic Hamiltonians are defined as the sum of relativistic one-body kinetic energy, two- and three-body potentials and their boost corrections. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo method to study two kinds of relativistic effects in the binding energy of 3H and 4He. The first is due to the nonlocalities in the relativistic kinetic energy and relativistic one-pion exchange potential (OPEP), and the second is from boost interaction. The OPEP contribution is reduced by about 15% by the relativistic nonlocality, which may also have significant effects on pion exchange currents. However, almost all of this reduction is canceled by changes in the kinetic energy and other interaction terms, and the total effect of the nonlocalities on the binding energy is very small. The boost interactions, on the other hand, give repulsive contributions of 0.4 (1.9) MeV in 3H (4He) and account for 37% of the phenomenological part of the three-nucleon interaction needed in the nonrelativistic Hamiltonians.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo studies of relativistic effects in light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, J. L.; Pandharipande, V. R.; Arriaga, A.

    1999-07-01

    Relativistic Hamiltonians are defined as the sum of relativistic one-body kinetic energy, two- and three-body potentials, and their boost corrections. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo method to study two kinds of relativistic effects in 3H and 4He, using relativistic Hamiltonians. The first is due to the nonlocalities in the relativistic kinetic energy and relativistic one-pion exchange potential (OPEP), and the second is from boost interaction. The OPEP contribution is reduced by ~15% by the relativistic nonlocality, which may also have significant effects on pion exchange currents. However, almost all of this reduction is canceled by changes in the kinetic energy and other interaction terms, and the total effect of the nonlocalities on the binding energy is very small. The boost interactions, on the other hand, give repulsive contributions of ~0.4 (1.9) MeV in 3H (4He) and account for ~37% of the phenomenological part of the three-nucleon interaction needed in the nonrelativistic Hamiltonians. The wave functions of nuclei are not significantly changed by these effects.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the dimerization energy of borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchia, Francesco; Bressanini, Dario; Morosi, Gabriele

    2011-09-07

    Accurate thermodynamic data are required to improve the performance of chemical hydrides that are potential hydrogen storage materials. Boron compounds are among the most interesting candidates. However, different experimental measurements of the borane dimerization energy resulted in a rather wide range (-34.3 to -39.1) ± 2 kcal/mol. Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations usually recover more than 95% of the correlation energy, so energy differences rely less on error cancellation than other methods. DMC energies of BH(3), B(2)H(6), BH(3)CO, CO, and BH(2)(+) allowed us to predict the borane dimerization energy, both via the direct process and indirect processes such as the dissociation of BH(3)CO. Our D(e) = -43.12(8) kcal/mol, corrected for the zero point energy evaluated by considering the anharmonic contributions, results in a borane dimerization energy of -36.59(8) kcal/mol. The process via the dissociation of BH(3)CO gives -34.5(2) kcal/mol. Overall, our values suggest a slightly less D(e) than the most recent W4 estimate D(e) = -44.47 kcal/mol [A. Karton and J. M. L. Martin, J. Phys. Chem. A 111, 5936 (2007)]. Our results show that reliable thermochemical data for boranes can be predicted by fixed node (FN)-DMC calculations.

  20. Multiple-resonance local wave functions for accurate excited states in quantum Monte Carlo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zulfikri, Habiburrahman; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel class of local multideterminant Jastrow–Slater wave functions for the efficient and accurate treatment of excited states in quantum Monte Carlo. The wave function is expanded as a linear combination of excitations built from multiple sets of localized orbitals that correspond to

  1. Simple formalism for efficient derivatives and multi-determinant expansions in quantum Monte Carlo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filippi, C.; Assaraf, R.; Moroni, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present a simple and general formalism to compute efficiently the derivatives of a multi-determinant Jastrow-Slater wave function, the local energy, the interatomic forces, and similar quantities needed in quantum Monte Carlo. Through a straightforward manipulation of matrices evaluated on the oc

  2. Monte Carlo calculation of quantum tunneling in the dilute instanton limit

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    A new approach for estimating small quantum tunneling rates by Monte Carlo calculation is proposed and demonstrated on a simple one-dimensional model. The application to many-body situations such as atomic exchange in solid 3He is discussed.

  3. Quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo method for study of electron-crystal interaction in STEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Z; Zeng, R G; Ming, Y; Zhang, M; Da, B; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2015-07-21

    In this paper, a novel quantum-trajectory Monte Carlo simulation method is developed to study electron beam interaction with a crystalline solid for application to electron microscopy and spectroscopy. The method combines the Bohmian quantum trajectory method, which treats electron elastic scattering and diffraction in a crystal, with a Monte Carlo sampling of electron inelastic scattering events along quantum trajectory paths. We study in this work the electron scattering and secondary electron generation process in crystals for a focused incident electron beam, leading to understanding of the imaging mechanism behind the atomic resolution secondary electron image that has been recently achieved in experiment with a scanning transmission electron microscope. According to this method, the Bohmian quantum trajectories have been calculated at first through a wave function obtained via a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation with a multislice method. The impact parameter-dependent inner-shell excitation cross section then enables the Monte Carlo sampling of ionization events produced by incident electron trajectories travelling along atom columns for excitation of high energy knock-on secondary electrons. Following cascade production, transportation and emission processes of true secondary electrons of very low energies are traced by a conventional Monte Carlo simulation method to present image signals. Comparison of the simulated image for a Si(110) crystal with the experimental image indicates that the dominant mechanism of atomic resolution of secondary electron image is the inner-shell ionization events generated by a high-energy electron beam.

  4. Size-extensive wave functions for quantum Monte Carlo: A linear scaling generalized valence bond approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracchia, F.; Filippi, C.; Amovilli, C.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new class of multideterminantal Jastrow–Slater wave functions constructed with localized orbitals and designed to describe complex potential energy surfaces of molecular systems for use in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). Inspired by the generalized valence bond formalism, we elaborate a coup

  5. Quantum dynamics at finite temperature: Time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christov, Ivan P., E-mail: ivan.christov@phys.uni-sofia.bg

    2016-08-15

    In this work we investigate the ground state and the dissipative quantum dynamics of interacting charged particles in an external potential at finite temperature. The recently devised time-dependent quantum Monte Carlo (TDQMC) method allows a self-consistent treatment of the system of particles together with bath oscillators first for imaginary-time propagation of Schrödinger type of equations where both the system and the bath converge to their finite temperature ground state, and next for real time calculation where the dissipative dynamics is demonstrated. In that context the application of TDQMC appears as promising alternative to the path-integral related techniques where the real time propagation can be a challenge.

  6. Fully Quantum Description of the Zundel Ion: Combining Variational Quantum Monte Carlo with Path Integral Langevin Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhat, Félix; Sorella, Sandro; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Saitta, Antonino Marco; Casula, Michele

    2017-06-13

    We introduce a novel approach for a fully quantum description of coupled electron-ion systems from first principles. It combines the variational quantum Monte Carlo solution of the electronic part with the path integral formalism for the quantum nuclear dynamics. On the one hand, the path integral molecular dynamics includes nuclear quantum effects by adding a set of fictitious classical particles (beads) aimed at reproducing nuclear quantum fluctuations via a harmonic kinetic term. On the other hand, variational quantum Monte Carlo can provide Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surfaces with a precision comparable to the most-advanced post-Hartree-Fock approaches, and with a favorable scaling with the system size. In order to cope with the intrinsic noise due to the stochastic nature of quantum Monte Carlo methods, we generalize the path integral molecular dynamics using a Langevin thermostat correlated according to the covariance matrix of quantum Monte Carlo nuclear forces. The variational parameters of the quantum Monte Carlo wave function are evolved during the nuclear dynamics, such that the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface is unbiased. Statistical errors on the wave function parameters are reduced by resorting to bead grouping average, which we show to be accurate and well-controlled. Our general algorithm relies on a Trotter breakup between the dynamics driven by ionic forces and the one set by the harmonic interbead couplings. The latter is exactly integrated, even in the presence of the Langevin thermostat, thanks to the mapping onto an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. This framework turns out to be also very efficient in the case of noiseless (deterministic) ionic forces. The new implementation is validated on the Zundel ion (H5O2(+)) by direct comparison with standard path integral Langevin dynamics calculations made with a coupled cluster potential energy surface. Nuclear quantum effects are confirmed to be dominant over thermal effects well beyond

  7. High-order Path Integral Monte Carlo methods for solving quantum dot problems

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, Siu A

    2014-01-01

    The conventional second-order Path Integral Monte Carlo method is plagued with the sign problem in solving many-fermion systems. This is due to the large number of anti-symmetric free fermion propagators that are needed to extract the ground state wave function at large imaginary time. In this work, we show that optimized fourth-order Path Integral Monte Carlo methods, which use no more than 5 free-fermion propagators, can yield accurate quantum dot energies for up to 20 polarized electrons with the use of the Hamiltonian energy estimator.

  8. A Projector Quantum Monte Carlo Method for non-linear wavefunctions

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Lauretta R; Booth, George H

    2016-01-01

    We reformulate the projected imaginary-time evolution of Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo in terms of a Lagrangian minimization. This naturally leads to the admission of polynomial complex wavefunction parameterizations, circumventing the exponential scaling of the approach. While previously these functions have traditionally inhabited the domain of Variational Monte Carlo, we consider recently developments for the identification of deep-learning neural networks to optimize this Lagrangian, which can be written as a modification of the propagator for the wavefunction dynamics. We demonstrate this approach with a form of Tensor Network State, and use it to find solutions to the strongly-correlated Hubbard model, as well as its application to a fully periodic ab-initio Graphene sheet. The number of variables which can be simultaneously optimized greatly exceeds alternative formulations of Variational Monte Carlo, allowing for systematic improvability of the wavefunction flexibility towards exa...

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo with reoptimized perturbatively selected configuration-interaction wave functions

    CERN Document Server

    Giner, Emmanuel; Toulouse, Julien

    2016-01-01

    We explore the use in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) of trial wave functions consisting of a Jastrow factor multiplied by a truncated configuration-interaction (CI) expansion in Slater determinants obtained from a CI perturbatively selected iteratively (CIPSI) calculation. In the CIPSI algorithm, the CI expansion is iteratively enlarged by selecting the best determinants using perturbation theory, which provides an optimal and automatic way of constructing truncated CI expansions approaching the full CI limit. We perform a systematic study of variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) total energies of first-row atoms from B to Ne with different levels of optimization of the parameters (Jastrow parameters, coefficients of the determinants, and orbital parameters) in these trial wave functions. The results show that the reoptimization of the coefficients of the determinants in VMC (together with the Jastrow factor) leads to an important lowering of both VMC and DMC total energies, and ...

  10. Study of dipole moments of LiSr and KRb molecules by quantum Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Shi; Mitas, Lubos; Reynolds, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Heteronuclear dimers are of significant interest to experiments seeking to exploit ultracold polar molecules in a number of novel ways including precision measurement, quantum computing, and quantum simulation. We calculate highly accurate Born-Oppenheimer total energies and electric dipole moments as a function of internuclear separation for two such dimers, LiSr and KRb. We apply fully-correlated, high-accuracy quantum Monte Carlo methods for evaluating these molecular properties in a many-body framework. We use small-core effective potentials combined with multi-reference Slater-Jastrow trial wave functions to provide accurate nodes for the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo method. For reference and comparison, we calculate the same properties with Hartree-Fock and with restricted Configuration Interaction methods, and carefully assess the impact of the recovered many-body correlations on the calculated quantities.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo method applied to non-Markovian barrier transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupin, Guillaume; Lacroix, Denis

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear fusion and fission, fluctuation and dissipation arise because of the coupling of collective degrees of freedom with internal excitations. Close to the barrier, quantum, statistical, and non-Markovian effects are expected to be important. In this work, a new approach based on quantum Monte Carlo addressing this problem is presented. The exact dynamics of a system coupled to an environment is replaced by a set of stochastic evolutions of the system density. The quantum Monte Carlo method is applied to systems with quadratic potentials. In all ranges of temperature and coupling, the stochastic method matches the exact evolution, showing that non-Markovian effects can be simulated accurately. A comparison with other theories, such as Nakajima-Zwanzig or time-convolutionless, shows that only the latter can be competitive if the expansion in terms of coupling constant is made at least to fourth order. A systematic study of the inverted parabola case is made at different temperatures and coupling constants. The asymptotic passing probability is estimated by different approaches including the Markovian limit. Large differences with an exact result are seen in the latter case or when only second order in the coupling strength is considered, as is generally assumed in nuclear transport models. In contrast, if fourth order in the coupling or quantum Monte Carlo method is used, a perfect agreement is obtained.

  12. Coupled carrier-phonon nonequilibrium dynamics in terahertz quantum cascade lasers: a Monte Carlo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotti, Rita C.; Rossi, Fausto

    2013-07-01

    The operation of state-of-the-art optoelectronic quantum devices may be significantly affected by the presence of a nonequilibrium quasiparticle population to which the carrier subsystem is unavoidably coupled. This situation is particularly evident in new-generation semiconductor-heterostructure-based quantum emitters, operating both in the mid-infrared as well as in the terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we present a Monte Carlo-based global kinetic approach, suitable for the investigation of a combined carrier-phonon nonequilibrium dynamics in realistic devices, and discuss its application with a prototypical resonant-phonon THz emitting quantum cascade laser design.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and strongly correlated electrons on honeycomb structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Thomas C.

    2010-12-16

    In this thesis we apply recently developed, as well as sophisticated quantum Monte Carlo methods to numerically investigate models of strongly correlated electron systems on honeycomb structures. The latter are of particular interest owing to their unique properties when simulating electrons on them, like the relativistic dispersion, strong quantum fluctuations and their resistance against instabilities. This work covers several projects including the advancement of the weak-coupling continuous time quantum Monte Carlo and its application to zero temperature and phonons, quantum phase transitions of valence bond solids in spin-1/2 Heisenberg systems using projector quantum Monte Carlo in the valence bond basis, and the magnetic field induced transition to a canted antiferromagnet of the Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice. The emphasis lies on two projects investigating the phase diagram of the SU(2) and the SU(N)-symmetric Hubbard model on the hexagonal lattice. At sufficiently low temperatures, condensed-matter systems tend to develop order. An exception are quantum spin-liquids, where fluctuations prevent a transition to an ordered state down to the lowest temperatures. Previously elusive in experimentally relevant microscopic two-dimensional models, we show by means of large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the SU(2) Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice, that a quantum spin-liquid emerges between the state described by massless Dirac fermions and an antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator. This unexpected quantum-disordered state is found to be a short-range resonating valence bond liquid, akin to the one proposed for high temperature superconductors. Inspired by the rich phase diagrams of SU(N) models we study the SU(N)-symmetric Hubbard Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice to investigate the reliability of 1/N corrections to large-N results by means of numerically exact QMC simulations. We study the melting of phases

  14. Low-pressure phase diagram of crystalline benzene from quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Sam; Cohen, R. E.

    2016-08-01

    We studied the low-pressure (0-10 GPa) phase diagram of crystalline benzene using quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods. We performed diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations to obtain accurate static phase diagrams as benchmarks for modern van der Waals density functionals. Using density functional perturbation theory, we computed the phonon contributions to the free energies. Our DFT enthalpy-pressure phase diagrams indicate that the Pbca and P21/c structures are the most stable phases within the studied pressure range. The DMC Gibbs free-energy calculations predict that the room temperature Pbca to P21/c phase transition occurs at 2.1(1) GPa. This prediction is consistent with available experimental results at room temperature. Our DMC calculations give 50.6 ± 0.5 kJ/mol for crystalline benzene lattice energy.

  15. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokár, K; Derian, R; Mitas, L; Štich, I

    2016-02-14

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances.

  16. Charged vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters: DFT and quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokár, K.; Derian, R. [Institute of Physics, CCMS, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mitas, L. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Štich, I., E-mail: ivan.stich@savba.sk [Institute of Physics, CCMS, Slovak Academy of Sciences, 84511 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ruprecht A. Institute of Technology, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-02-14

    Using explicitly correlated fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo and density functional theory (DFT) methods, we study electronic properties, ground-state multiplets, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and low-energy fragmentation channels of charged half-sandwich and multidecker vanadium-benzene systems with up to 3 vanadium atoms, including both anions and cations. It is shown that, particularly in anions, electronic correlations play a crucial role; these effects are not systematically captured with any commonly used DFT functionals such as gradient corrected, hybrids, and range-separated hybrids. On the other hand, tightly bound cations can be described qualitatively by DFT. A comparison of DFT and quantum Monte Carlo provides an in-depth understanding of the electronic structure and properties of these correlated systems. The calculations also serve as a benchmark study of 3d molecular anions that require a balanced many-body description of correlations at both short- and long-range distances.

  17. Pair correlations in iron-based superconductors: Quantum Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashurnikov, V.A.; Krasavin, A.V., E-mail: avkrasavin@gmail.com

    2014-08-01

    The new generalized quantum continuous time world line Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to calculate pair correlation functions for two-dimensional FeAs-clusters modeling of iron-based superconductors using a two-orbital model. The data obtained for clusters with sizes up to 10×10 FeAs-cells favor the possibility of an effective charge carrier's attraction that is corresponding the A{sub 1g}-symmetry, at some parameters of interaction. The analysis of pair correlations depending on the cluster size, temperature, interaction, and the type of symmetry of the order parameter is carried out. - Highlights: • New generalized quantum continuous time world line Monte Carlo algorithm is developed. • Pair correlation functions for two-dimensional FeAs-clusters are calculated. • Parameters of two-orbital model corresponding to attraction of carriers are defined.

  18. Communication: Fixed-node errors in quantum Monte Carlo: Interplay of electron density and node nonlinearities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasch, Kevin M.; Hu, Shuming; Mitas, Lubos [Center for High Performance Simulation and Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    We elucidate the origin of large differences (two-fold or more) in the fixed-node errors between the first- vs second-row systems for single-configuration trial wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo calculations. This significant difference in the valence fixed-node biases is studied across a set of atoms, molecules, and also Si, C solid crystals. We show that the key features which affect the fixed-node errors are the differences in electron density and the degree of node nonlinearity. The findings reveal how the accuracy of the quantum Monte Carlo varies across a variety of systems, provide new perspectives on the origins of the fixed-node biases in calculations of molecular and condensed systems, and carry implications for pseudopotential constructions for heavy elements.

  19. Communication: Fixed-node errors in quantum Monte Carlo: Interplay of electron density and node nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Kevin M.; Hu, Shuming; Mitas, Lubos

    2014-01-01

    We elucidate the origin of large differences (two-fold or more) in the fixed-node errors between the first- vs second-row systems for single-configuration trial wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo calculations. This significant difference in the valence fixed-node biases is studied across a set of atoms, molecules, and also Si, C solid crystals. We show that the key features which affect the fixed-node errors are the differences in electron density and the degree of node nonlinearity. The findings reveal how the accuracy of the quantum Monte Carlo varies across a variety of systems, provide new perspectives on the origins of the fixed-node biases in calculations of molecular and condensed systems, and carry implications for pseudopotential constructions for heavy elements.

  20. Extended Ensemble Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Iba, Yukito

    2000-01-01

    ``Extended Ensemble Monte Carlo''is a generic term that indicates a set of algorithms which are now popular in a variety of fields in physics and statistical information processing. Exchange Monte Carlo (Metropolis-Coupled Chain, Parallel Tempering), Simulated Tempering (Expanded Ensemble Monte Carlo), and Multicanonical Monte Carlo (Adaptive Umbrella Sampling) are typical members of this family. Here we give a cross-disciplinary survey of these algorithms with special emphasis on the great f...

  1. Correlated adatom trimer on a metal surface: a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savkin, V V; Rubtsov, A N; Katsnelson, M I; Lichtenstein, A I

    2005-01-21

    The problem of three interacting Kondo impurities is solved within a numerically exact continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo scheme. A suppression of the Kondo resonance by interatomic exchange interactions for different cluster geometries is investigated. It is shown that a drastic difference between the Heisenberg and Ising cases appears for antiferromagnetically coupled adatoms. The effects of magnetic frustrations in the adatom trimer are investigated, and possible connections with available experimental data are discussed.

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of a two-dimensional Majorana lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayata, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Arata

    2017-07-01

    We study interacting Majorana fermions in two dimensions as a low-energy effective model of a vortex lattice in two-dimensional time-reversal-invariant topological superconductors. For that purpose, we implement ab initio quantum Monte Carlo simulation to the Majorana fermion system in which the path-integral measure is given by a semipositive Pfaffian. We discuss spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry at finite temperatures.

  3. Quantum Monte-Carlo programming for atoms, molecules, clusters, and solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schattke, Wolfgang [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics; Ikerbasque Foundation/Donostia International Physics Center, San Sebastian (Spain); Diez Muino, Ricardo [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CSIC-UPV/EHU (Spain); Donostia International Physics Center, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2013-11-01

    This is a book that initiates the reader into the basic concepts and practical applications of Quantum Monte Carlo. Because of the simplicity of its theoretical concept, the authors focus on the variational Quantum Monte Carlo scheme. The reader is enabled to proceed from simple examples as the hydrogen atom to advanced ones as the Lithium solid. In between, several intermediate steps are introduced, including the Hydrogen molecule (2 electrons), the Lithium atom (3 electrons) and expanding to an arbitrary number of electrons to finally treat the three-dimensional periodic array of Lithium atoms in a crystal. The book is unique, because it provides both theory and numerical programs. It pedagogically explains how to transfer into computational tools what is usually described in a theoretical textbook. It also includes the detailed physical understanding of methodology that cannot be found in a code manual. The combination of both aspects allows the reader to assimilate the fundamentals of Quantum Monte Carlo not only by reading but also by practice.

  4. Open-Source Development Experiences in Scientific Software: The HANDE Quantum Monte Carlo Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Spencer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The HANDE quantum Monte Carlo project offers accessible stochastic algorithms for general use for scientists in the field of quantum chemistry. HANDE is an ambitious and general high-performance code developed by a geographically-dispersed team with a variety of backgrounds in computational science. In the course of preparing a public, open-source release, we have taken this opportunity to step back and look at what we have done and what we hope to do in the future. We pay particular attention to development processes, the approach taken to train students joining the project, and how a flat hierarchical structure aids communication.

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of hole dynamics in SiGe/Si terahertz quantum-cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.; Harrison, P.

    2004-06-01

    A detailed analysis of hole transport in cascaded p - Si/SiGe quantum well structures is performed using ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. The hole subband structure is calculated using the 6×6 k·p model, and then used to find carrier relaxation rates due to the alloy disorder, acoustic and optical phonon scattering. The simulation accounts for the in-plane k -space anisotropy of both the hole subband structure and the scattering rates. Results are presented for prototype terahertz Si/SiGe quantum cascade structures.

  6. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground-state properties of manganese's oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinit; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, P. R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    One of the critical scientific challenges of contemporary research is to obtain an accurate theoretical description of the electronic properties of strongly correlated systems such as transition metal oxides and rare-earth compounds, since state-of-art ab-initio methods based on approximate density functionals are not always sufficiently accurate. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods, which use statistical sampling to evaluate many-body wave functions, have the potential to answer this challenge. Owing to the few fundamental approximations made and the direct treatment of electron correlation, QMC methods are among the most accurate electronic structure methods available to date. We assess the accuracy of the diffusion Monte Carlo method in the case of rocksalt manganese oxide (MnO). We study the electronic properties of this strongly-correlated oxide, which has been identified as a suitable candidate for many applications ranging from catalysts to electronic devices. ``This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.'' Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations of ground-state properties of manganese's oxides.

  7. Diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo Study of Martensitic Phase Transition: The Case of Phosphorene

    CERN Document Server

    Reeves, Kyle G; Kanai, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Recent technical advances in dealing with finite-size errors make quantum Monte Carlo methods quite appealing for treating extended systems in electronic structure calculations, especially when commonly-used density functional theory (DFT) methods might not be satisfactory. We present a theoretical study of martensitic phase transition of a two-dimensional phosphorene by employing diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) approach to investigate the energetics of this phase transition. The DMC calculation supports DFT prediction of having a rather diffusive barrier that is characterized by having two transition states, in addition to confirming that the so-called black and blue phases of phosphorene are essentially degenerate. At the same time, the calculation shows the importance of treating correlation energy accurately for describing the energy changes in the martensitic phase transition, as is already widely appreciated for chemical bond formation/dissociation. Building on the atomistic characterization of the phase tr...

  8. Electron density of states of Fe-based superconductors: Quantum trajectory Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashurnikov, V. A.; Krasavin, A. V.; Zhumagulov, Ya. V.

    2016-03-01

    The spectral and total electron densities of states in two-dimensional FeAs clusters, which simulate iron-based superconductors, have been calculated using the generalized quantum Monte Carlo algorithm within the full two-orbital model. Spectra have been reconstructed by solving the integral equation relating the Matsubara Green's function and spectral density by the method combining the gradient descent and Monte Carlo algorithms. The calculations have been performed for clusters with dimensions up to 10 × 10 FeAs cells. The profiles of the Fermi surface for the entire Brillouin zone have been presented in the quasiparticle approximation. Data for the total density of states near the Fermi level have been obtained. The effect of the interaction parameter, size of the cluster, and temperature on the spectrum of excitations has been studied.

  9. Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of Strongly-Correlated Molecules and Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Morales, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We propose a method of implementing projected wave functions for second-quantized auxiliary- field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) techniques. The method is based on expressing the two-body projector as one-body terms coupled to binary Ising fields. To benchmark the method, we choose to study the two-dimensional (2D) one-band Hubbard model with repulsive interactions using the constrained-path MC (CPMC). The CPMC uses a trial wave function to guide the random walks so that the so-called fermion sign problem can be eliminated. The trial wave function also serves as the importance function in Monte Carlo sampling. AS such, the quality of the trial wave function has a direct impact to the efficiency and accuracy of the simulations.

  10. Overcoming Critical Slowing Down in Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd; Marcu, Mihai

    The classical d+1-dimensional spin systems used for the simulation of quantum spin systems in d dimensions are, quite generally, vertex models. Standard simulation methods for such models strongly suffer from critical slowing down. Recently, we developed the loop algorithm, a new type of cluster algorithm that to a large extent overcomes critical slowing down for vertex models. We present the basic ideas on the example of the F model, a special case of the 6-vertex model. Numerical results clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of the loop algorithm. Then, using the framework for cluster algorithms developed by Kandel and Domany, we explain how to adapt our algorithm to the cases of the 6-vertex model and the 8-vertex model, which are relevant for spin 1/2 systems. The techniqes presented here can be applied without modification to 2-dimensional spin 1/2 systems, provided that in the Suzuki-Trotter formula the Hamiltonian is broken up into 4 sums of link terms. Generalizations to more complicated situations (higher spins, different uses of the Suzuki-Trotter formula) are, at least in principle, straightforward.

  11. Quantum Boltzmann equation solved by Monte Carlo method for nano-scale semiconductor devices simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Gang; Liu Xiao-Yan; Han Ru-Qi

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) full band self-consistent ensemble Monte Carlo (MC) method for solving the quantum Boltzmann equation, including collision broadening and quantum potential corrections, is developed to extend the MC method to the study of nano-scale semiconductor devices with obvious quantum mechanical (QM) effects. The quantum effects both in real space and momentum space in nano-scale semiconductor devices can be simulated. The effective mobility in the inversion layer of n and p channel MOSFET is simulated and compared with experimental data to verify this method. With this method 50nm ultra thin body silicon on insulator MOSFET are simulated. Results indicate that this method can be used to simulate the 2D QM effects in semiconductor devices including tunnelling effect.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo algorithms for electronic structure at the petascale; the endstation project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J; Ceperley, D M; Purwanto, W; Walter, E J; Krakauer, H; Zhang, S W; Kent, P.R. C; Hennig, R G; Umrigar, C; Bajdich, M; Kolorenc, J; Mitas, L

    2008-10-01

    Over the past two decades, continuum quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) has proved to be an invaluable tool for predicting of the properties of matter from fundamental principles. By solving the Schrodinger equation through a stochastic projection, it achieves the greatest accuracy and reliability of methods available for physical systems containing more than a few quantum particles. QMC enjoys scaling favorable to quantum chemical methods, with a computational effort which grows with the second or third power of system size. This accuracy and scalability has enabled scientific discovery across a broad spectrum of disciplines. The current methods perform very efficiently at the terascale. The quantum Monte Carlo Endstation project is a collaborative effort among researchers in the field to develop a new generation of algorithms, and their efficient implementations, which will take advantage of the upcoming petaflop architectures. Some aspects of these developments are discussed here. These tools will expand the accuracy, efficiency and range of QMC applicability and enable us to tackle challenges which are currently out of reach. The methods will be applied to several important problems including electronic and structural properties of water, transition metal oxides, nanosystems and ultracold atoms.

  13. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  14. Monte Carlo methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bardenet, R.

    2012-01-01

    ISBN:978-2-7598-1032-1; International audience; Bayesian inference often requires integrating some function with respect to a posterior distribution. Monte Carlo methods are sampling algorithms that allow to compute these integrals numerically when they are not analytically tractable. We review here the basic principles and the most common Monte Carlo algorithms, among which rejection sampling, importance sampling and Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods. We give intuition on the theoretic...

  15. Exploring Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, William L

    2012-01-01

    Exploring Monte Carlo Methods is a basic text that describes the numerical methods that have come to be known as "Monte Carlo." The book treats the subject generically through the first eight chapters and, thus, should be of use to anyone who wants to learn to use Monte Carlo. The next two chapters focus on applications in nuclear engineering, which are illustrative of uses in other fields. Five appendices are included, which provide useful information on probability distributions, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes for radiation transport, and other matters. The famous "Buffon's needle proble

  16. Quantum Monte-Carlo method applied to Non-Markovian barrier transmission

    CERN Document Server

    Hupin, G

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear fusion and fission, fluctuation and dissipation arise due to the coupling of collective degrees of freedom with internal excitations. Close to the barrier, both quantum, statistical and non-Markovian effects are expected to be important. In this work, a new approach based on quantum Monte-Carlo addressing this problem is presented. The exact dynamics of a system coupled to an environment is replaced by a set of stochastic evolutions of the system density. The quantum Monte-Carlo method is applied to systems with quadratic potentials. In all range of temperature and coupling, the stochastic method matches the exact evolution showing that non-Markovian effects can be simulated accurately. A comparison with other theories like Nakajima-Zwanzig or Time-ConvolutionLess ones shows that only the latter can be competitive if the expansion in terms of coupling constant is made at least to fourth order. A systematic study of the inverted parabola case is made at different temperatures and coupling constants....

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of the disordered three-color quantum Ashkin-Teller chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed K.; Vojta, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the zero-temperature quantum phase transitions of the disordered three-color quantum Ashkin-Teller spin chain by means of large-scale Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the first-order phase transitions of the clean system are rounded by the quenched disorder. For weak intercolor coupling, the resulting emergent quantum critical point between the paramagnetic phase and the magnetically ordered Baxter phase is of infinite-randomness type and belongs to the universality class of the random transverse-field Ising model, as predicted by recent strong-disorder renormalization group calculations. We also find evidence for unconventional critical behavior in the case of strong intercolor coupling, even though an unequivocal determination of the universality class is beyond our numerical capabilities. We compare our results to earlier simulations, and we discuss implications for the classification of phase transitions in the presence of disorder.

  18. Reptation quantum Monte Carlo algorithm for lattice Hamiltonians with a directed-update scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carleo, Giuseppe; Becca, Federico; Moroni, Saverio; Baroni, Stefano

    2010-10-01

    We provide an extension to lattice systems of the reptation quantum Monte Carlo algorithm, originally devised for continuous Hamiltonians. For systems affected by the sign problem, a method to systematically improve upon the so-called fixed-node approximation is also proposed. The generality of the method, which also takes advantage of a canonical worm algorithm scheme to measure off-diagonal observables, makes it applicable to a vast variety of quantum systems and eases the study of their ground-state and excited-state properties. As a case study, we investigate the quantum dynamics of the one-dimensional Heisenberg model and we provide accurate estimates of the ground-state energy of the two-dimensional fermionic Hubbard model.

  19. Sign learning kink-based (SiLK) quantum Monte Carlo for molecular systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiaoyao; Loffler, Frank; Kowalski, Karol; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana

    2015-01-01

    The Sign Learning Kink (SiLK) based Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method is used to calculate the ab initio ground state energies for multiple geometries of the H$_{2}$O, N$_2$, and F$_2$ molecules. The method is based on Feynman's path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and has two stages. The first stage is called the learning stage and reduces the well-known QMC minus sign problem by optimizing the linear combinations of Slater determinants which are used in the second stage, a conventional QMC simulation. The method is tested using different vector spaces and compared to the results of other quantum chemical methods and to exact diagonalization. Our findings demonstrate that the SiLK method is accurate and reduces or eliminates the minus sign problem.

  20. Sign Learning Kink-based (SiLK) Quantum Monte Carlo for molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoyao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Hall, Randall W. [Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Dominican University of California, San Rafael, California 94901 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Löffler, Frank [Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Kowalski, Karol [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran; Jarrell, Mark; Moreno, Juana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2016-01-07

    The Sign Learning Kink (SiLK) based Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method is used to calculate the ab initio ground state energies for multiple geometries of the H{sub 2}O, N{sub 2}, and F{sub 2} molecules. The method is based on Feynman’s path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and has two stages. The first stage is called the learning stage and reduces the well-known QMC minus sign problem by optimizing the linear combinations of Slater determinants which are used in the second stage, a conventional QMC simulation. The method is tested using different vector spaces and compared to the results of other quantum chemical methods and to exact diagonalization. Our findings demonstrate that the SiLK method is accurate and reduces or eliminates the minus sign problem.

  1. Sign Learning Kink-based (SiLK) Quantum Monte Carlo for molecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoyao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Hall, Randall W. [Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Dominican University of California, San Rafael, California 94901, USA; Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Löffler, Frank [Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Kowalski, Karol [William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, USA; Bhaskaran-Nair, Kiran [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Jarrell, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Moreno, Juana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA; Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803, USA

    2016-01-07

    The Sign Learning Kink (SiLK) based Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method is used to calculate the ab initio ground state energies for multiple geometries of the H2O, N2, and F2 molecules. The method is based on Feynman’s path integral formulation of quantum mechanics and has two stages. The first stage is called the learning stage and reduces the well-known QMC minus sign problem by optimizing the linear combinations of Slater determinants which are used in the second stage, a conventional QMC simulation. The method is tested using different vector spaces and compared to the results of other quantum chemical methods and to exact diagonalization. Our findings demonstrate that the SiLK method is accurate and reduces or eliminates the minus sign problem.

  2. Theory of Finite Size Effects for Electronic Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Liquids and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Holzmann, Markus; Morales, Miguel A; Tubmann, Norm M; Ceperley, David M; Pierleoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Concentrating on zero temperature Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic systems, we give a general description of the theory of finite size extrapolations of energies to the thermodynamic limit based on one and two-body correlation functions. We introduce new effective procedures, such as using the potential and wavefunction split-up into long and short range functions to simplify the method and we discuss how to treat backflow wavefunctions. Then we explicitly test the accuracy of our method to correct finite size errors on example hydrogen and helium many-body systems and show that the finite size bias can be drastically reduced for even small systems.

  3. Pair correlation functions of FeAs-based superconductors: Quantum Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashurnikov, V. A.; Krasavin, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The new generalized quantum continuous time world line Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to calculate pair correlation functions for two-dimensional FeAs-clusters modeling of iron-based superconductors within the framework of the two-orbital model. The analysis of pair correlations depending on the cluster size, temperature, interaction, and the type of symmetry of the order parameter is carried out. The data obtained for clusters with sizes up to 1 0x1 0 FeAs-cells favor the possibility of an effective charge carrier's attraction that is corresponding the A1g-symmetry, at some parameters of interaction.

  4. Fixed-node errors in quantum Monte Carlo: interplay of electron density and node nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Rasch, Kevin M; Mitas, Lubos

    2013-01-01

    We elucidate the origin of large differences (twofold or more) in valence fixed-node errors between the first- vs second-row atom systems for single-configuration trial wave functions. The differences are studied on a set of atoms, molecules, and Si, C solids. These systems are valence isoelectronic and have similar correlation energies, bond patterns, geometries, ground states, and symmetries. We show that the key reasons are the differences between the electron densities combined with the degree of node nonlinearities. The findings reveal how the accuracy of the quantum Monte Carlo varies across a variety of systems and provide new perspectives on the origins of the fixed-node biases.

  5. Emergence of Critical Phenomena in Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, James J; Thomas, Robert E; Booth, George H; Frenkel, Daan; Alavi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    There has been recent literature discussion on the origin and severity of the `sign problem' in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) and its `initiator' adaptation (i-FCIQMC), methods of interest and potential because they allow for exact (FCI) ground-state solutions to be obtained often at a much reduced computational cost. In this study we aim to use a simple order parameter, describing the `sign structure' of the stochastic wavefunction representation, to empirically characterise the fundamentally different collective behaviour of the walker population in both methods.

  6. A study of potential energy curves from the model space quantum Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Yuhki; Ten-no, Seiichiro, E-mail: tenno@cs.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Computational Sciences, Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-12-07

    We report on the first application of the model space quantum Monte Carlo (MSQMC) to potential energy curves (PECs) for the excited states of C{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} to validate the applicability of the method. A parallel MSQMC code is implemented with the initiator approximation to enable efficient sampling. The PECs of MSQMC for various excited and ionized states are compared with those from the Rydberg-Klein-Rees and full configuration interaction methods. The results indicate the usefulness of MSQMC for precise PECs in a wide range obviating problems concerning quasi-degeneracy.

  7. A new algorithm for the fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄宏新; 曹泽星

    1997-01-01

    A novel algorithm is proposed for the fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo (FNQMC) method.In contrast to previous procedures,its "guiding function" is not optimized prior to diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) computation but synchronistically in the diffusion process The new algorithm can not only save CPU time,but also make both of the optimization and diffusion carried out according to the same sampling fashion,reaching the goal to improve each other This new optimizing procedure converges super-linearly,and thus can accelerate the particle diffusion During the diffusion process,the node of the "guiding function" changes incessantly,which is conducible to reducing the "fixed-node error" The new algorithm has been used to calculate the total energies of states X3B1 and a1A1 of CH2 as well as π-X2B1 and λ-2A1 of NH2 The singlet-triplet energy splitting (λEsT) in CH2 and π energy splitting in NH2 obtained with this present method are (45 542±1.840) and (141.644±1.589) kJ/mol,respectively The calculated

  8. Low-pressure phase diagram of crystalline benzene from quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Azadi, Sam

    2016-01-01

    We study the low-pressure (0 to 10 GPa) phase diagram of crystalline benzene using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) and density functional theory (DFT) methods. We consider the $Pbca$, $P4_32_12$, and $P2_1/c$ structures as the best candidates for phase I and phase II. We perform diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations to obtain accurate static phase diagrams as benchmarks for modern van der Waals density functionals. We use density functional perturbation theory to compute phonon contribution in the free-energy calculations. Our DFT enthalpy-pressure phase diagram indicates that the $Pbca$ and $P2_1/c$ structures are the most stable phases within the studied pressure range. The DMC Gibbs free-energy calculations predict that the room temperature $Pbca$ to $P2_1/c$ phase transition occurs at 2.1(1) GPa. This prediction is consistent with available experimental results at room temperature. Our DMC calculations show an estimate of 50.6$\\pm$0.5 kJ/mol for crystalline benzene lattice energy.

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo Assessment of the Relevance of Electronic Correlations in Defects and EOS in Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, R Q; Williamson, A J; Dubois, J L; Reboredo, F A

    2008-02-07

    We have developed a highly accurate computational capability to calculate the equation of state (EOS) and defect formation energies of metallic systems. We are using a newly developed algorithm that enables the study of metallic systems with quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. To date, technical limitations have restricted the application of QMC methods to semiconductors, insulators and the homogeneous electron gas. Using this new 'QMC for metals' we can determine, for the first time, the significance of correlation effects in the EOS and in the formation energies of point defects, impurities, surfaces and interfaces in metallic systems. These calculations go beyond the state-of-the-art accuracy which is currently obtained with Density Functional Theory approaches. Such benchmark calculations can provide more accurate predictions for the EOS and the formation energies of vacancies and interstitials in simple metals. These are important parameters in determining the mechanical properties as well as the micro-structural evolution of metals in irradiated materials or under extreme conditions. We describe the development of our 'QMC for metals' code, which has been adapted to run efficiently on a variety of computer architectures including BG/L. We present results of the first accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculation of an EOS of a realistic metallic system that goes beyond the homogeneous electron gas.

  10. Excited states from quantum Monte Carlo in the basis of Slater determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland, E-mail: roland.mitric@uni-wuerzburg.de [Institut für Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Julius-Maximilians Universität Würzburg, Emil-Fischer-Straße 42, 97074 Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-11-21

    Building on the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) algorithm introduced recently by Booth et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 131, 054106 (2009)] to compute the ground state of correlated many-electron systems, an extension to the computation of excited states (exFCIQMC) is presented. The Hilbert space is divided into a large part consisting of pure Slater determinants and a much smaller orthogonal part (the size of which is controlled by a cut-off threshold), from which the lowest eigenstates can be removed efficiently. In this way, the quantum Monte Carlo algorithm is restricted to the orthogonal complement of the lower excited states and projects out the next highest excited state. Starting from the ground state, higher excited states can be found one after the other. The Schrödinger equation in imaginary time is solved by the same population dynamics as in the ground state algorithm with modified probabilities and matrix elements, for which working formulae are provided. As a proof of principle, the method is applied to lithium hydride in the 3-21G basis set and to the helium dimer in the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. It is shown to give the correct electronic structure for all bond lengths. Much more testing will be required before the applicability of this method to electron correlation problems of interesting size can be assessed.

  11. \\emph{Ab initio} Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the warm dense electron gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dornheim, Tobias; Malone, Fionn; Schoof, Tim; Sjostrom, Travis; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Warm dense matter is one of the most active frontiers in plasma physics due to its relevance for dense astrophysical objects as well as for novel laboratory experiments in which matter is being strongly compressed e.g. by high-power lasers. Its description is theoretically very challenging as it contains correlated quantum electrons at finite temperature---a system that cannot be accurately modeled by standard analytical or ground state approaches. Recently several breakthroughs have been achieved in the field of fermionic quantum Monte Carlo simulations. First, it was shown that exact simulations of a finite model system ($30 \\dots 100$ electrons) is possible that avoid any simplifying approximations such as fixed nodes [Schoof {\\em et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 115}, 130402 (2015)]. Second, a novel way to accurately extrapolate these results to the thermodynamic limit was reported by Dornheim {\\em et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 117}, 156403 (2016)]. As a result, now thermodynamic results for the warm dense...

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by quantum Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Andrea, E-mail: a.zen@ucl.ac.uk [Dipartimento di Fisica, “La Sapienza” - Università di Roma, piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Luo, Ye, E-mail: xw111luoye@gmail.com; Mazzola, Guglielmo, E-mail: gmazzola@phys.ethz.ch; Sorella, Sandro, E-mail: sorella@sissa.it [SISSA–International School for Advanced Studies, Via Bonomea 26, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Democritos Simulation Center CNR–IOM Istituto Officina dei Materiali, 34151 Trieste (Italy); Guidoni, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardo.guidoni@univaq.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, “La Sapienza” - Università di Roma, piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche e Chimiche, Università degli Studi dell’ Aquila, via Vetoio, 67100 L’ Aquila (Italy)

    2015-04-14

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article, we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous density functional theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  13. Investigation of Confinement Induced Resonance in Atomic Waveguides with Different Geometries by Quantum Monte Carlo Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Azizi, Sajad

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the quantum dynamics of two ultracold bosons inside an atomic waveguide for two different confinement geometries (cigar-shaped and toroidal waveguides) by quantum Monte Carlo methods. For quasi-1D gases, the confining potential of the waveguide leads to the so-called confinement induced resonance (CIR), results in the phase transition of the gas to the impenetrable bosonic regime (known as TG gas). In this regime the bosons repel each other strongly and behave like fermions. We reproduce CIR for a cigar-shaped waveguide and analyze the behavior of the system for different conditions. Moreover, our analysis demonstrates appearance of CIR for a toroidal waveguide. Particularly, we show that the resonance position is dependent on the size of the waveguide, which is in contrast to the cigar shaped waveguides for which it is universal.

  14. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Mazzola, Guglielmo; Guidoni, Leonardo; Sorella, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Despite liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in excellent agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous Density Functional Theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab-initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  15. Monte Carlo study of GaN versus GaAs terahertz quantum cascade structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, Enrico; Driscoll, Kristina; Moustakas, Theodore D.; Paiella, Roberto

    2008-03-01

    Due to their large optical phonon energies, nitride semiconductors are promising for the development of terahertz quantum cascade lasers with dramatically improved high-temperature performance relative to existing GaAs devices. Here, we present a rigorous Monte Carlo study of carrier dynamics in two structures based on the same design scheme for emission at 2THz, consisting of GaN /AlGaN or GaAs /AlGaAs quantum wells. The population inversion and hence the gain coefficient of the nitride device are found to exhibit a much weaker (by a factor of over 3) temperature dependence and to remain large enough for laser action even without cryogenic cooling.

  16. Determination of the detective quantum efficiency of gamma camera systems: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ida; Starck, Sven-Ake; Båth, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the validity of using the Monte Carlo technique for determining the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of a gamma camera system and to use this technique in investigating the DQE behaviour of a gamma camera system and its dependency on a number of relevant parameters. The Monte Carlo-based software SIMIND, simulating a complete gamma camera system, was used in the present study. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system was determined from simulated images of a point source of (99m)Tc, positioned at different depths in a water phantom. Simulations were performed using different collimators and energy windows. The MTF of the system was combined with the photon yield and the sensitivity, obtained from the simulations, to form the frequency-dependent DQE of the system. As figure-of-merit (FOM), the integral of the 2D DQE was used. The simulated DQE curves agreed well with published data. As expected, there was a strong dependency of the shape and magnitude of the DQE curve on the collimator, energy window and imaging position. The highest FOM was obtained for a lower energy threshold of 127 keV for objects close to the detector and 131 keV for objects deeper in the phantom, supporting an asymmetric window setting to reduce scatter. The Monte Carlo software SIMIND can be used to determine the DQE of a gamma camera system from a simulated point source alone. The optimal DQE results in the present study were obtained for parameter settings close to the clinically used settings.

  17. Feature Article: Understanding strongly correlated many-body systems with quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavalle, Catia; Rigol, Marcos; Muramatsu, Alejandro

    2005-08-01

    The cover picture of the current issue, taken from the Feature Article [1], depicts the evolution of local density (a) and its quantum fluctuations (b) in trapped fermions on one-dimensional optical lattices. As the number of fermions in the trap is increased, figure (a) shows the formation of a Mott-insulating plateau (local density equal to one) whereas the quantum fluctuations - see figure (b) - are strongly suppressed, but nonzero. For a larger number of fermions new insulating plateaus appear (this time with local density equal to two), but no density fluctuations. Regions with non-constant density are metallic and exhibit large quantum fluctuations of the density.The first author Catia Lavalle is a Postdoc at the University of Stuttgart. She works in the field of strongly correlated quantum systems by means of Quantum Monte Carlo methods (QMC). While working on her PhD thesis at the University of Stuttgart, she developed a new QMC technique that allows to study dynamical properties of the t-J model.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo studies of a metallic spin-density wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlach, Max Henner

    2017-01-20

    Plenty experimental evidence indicates that quantum critical phenomena give rise to much of the rich physics observed in strongly correlated itinerant electron systems such as the high temperature superconductors. A quantum critical point of particular interest is found at the zero-temperature onset of spin-density wave order in two-dimensional metals. The appropriate low-energy theory poses an exceptionally hard problem to analytic theory, therefore the unbiased and controlled numerical approach pursued in this thesis provides important contributions on the road to comprehensive understanding. After discussing the phenomenology of quantum criticality, a sign-problem-free determinantal quantum Monte Carlo approach is introduced and an extensive toolbox of numerical methods is described in a self-contained way. By the means of large-scale computer simulations we have solved a lattice realization of the universal effective theory of interest. The finite-temperature phase diagram, showing both a quasi-long-range spin-density wave ordered phase and a d-wave superconducting dome, is discussed in its entirety. Close to the quantum phase transition we find evidence for unusual scaling of the order parameter correlations and for non-Fermi liquid behavior at isolated hot spots on the Fermi surface.

  19. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  20. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of neutron matter in chiral effective field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlazłowski, G; Holt, J W; Moroz, S; Bulgac, A; Roche, K J

    2014-10-31

    We present variational Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron matter equation of state using chiral nuclear forces. The ground-state wave function of neutron matter, containing nonperturbative many-body correlations, is obtained from auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of up to about 340 neutrons interacting on a 10(3) discretized lattice. The evolution Hamiltonian is chosen to be attractive and spin independent in order to avoid the fermion sign problem and is constructed to best reproduce broad features of the chiral nuclear force. This is facilitated by choosing a lattice spacing of 1.5 fm, corresponding to a momentum-space cutoff of Λ=414  MeV/c, a resolution scale at which strongly repulsive features of nuclear two-body forces are suppressed. Differences between the evolution potential and the full chiral nuclear interaction (Entem and Machleidt Λ=414  MeV [L. Coraggio et al., Phys. Rev. C 87, 014322 (2013).

  1. Study of dispersion forces with quantum Monte Carlo: toward a continuum model for solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amovilli, Claudio; Floris, Franca Maria

    2015-05-28

    We present a general method to compute dispersion interaction energy that, starting from London's interpretation, is based on the measure of the electronic electric field fluctuations, evaluated on electronic sampled configurations generated by quantum Monte Carlo. A damped electric field was considered in order to avoid divergence in the variance. Dispersion atom-atom C6 van der Waals coefficients were computed by coupling electric field fluctuations with static dipole polarizabilities. The dipole polarizability was evaluated at the diffusion Monte Carlo level by studying the response of the system to a constant external electric field. We extended the method to the calculation of the dispersion contribution to the free energy of solvation in the framework of the polarizable continuum model. We performed test calculations on pairs of some atomic systems. We considered He in ground and low lying excited states and Ne in the ground state and obtained a good agreement with literature data. We also made calculations on He, Ne, and F(-) in water as the solvent. Resulting dispersion contribution to the free energy of solvation shows the reliability of the method illustrated here.

  2. Trail-Needs pseudopotentials in quantum Monte Carlo calculations with plane-wave/blip basis sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, N. D.; Trail, J. R.; Needs, R. J.

    2016-10-01

    We report a systematic analysis of the performance of a widely used set of Dirac-Fock pseudopotentials for quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations. We study each atom in the periodic table from hydrogen (Z =1 ) to mercury (Z =80 ), with the exception of the 4 f elements (57 ≤Z ≤70 ). We demonstrate that ghost states are a potentially serious problem when plane-wave basis sets are used in density functional theory (DFT) orbital-generation calculations, but that this problem can be almost entirely eliminated by choosing the s channel to be local in the DFT calculation; the d channel can then be chosen to be local in subsequent QMC calculations, which generally leads to more accurate results. We investigate the achievable energy variance per electron with different levels of trial wave function and we determine appropriate plane-wave cutoff energies for DFT calculations for each pseudopotential. We demonstrate that the so-called "T-move" scheme in diffusion Monte Carlo is essential for many elements. We investigate the optimal choice of spherical integration rule for pseudopotential projectors in QMC calculations. The information reported here will prove crucial in the planning and execution of QMC projects involving beyond-first-row elements.

  3. TRIQS/CTHYB: A continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo hybridisation expansion solver for quantum impurity problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Priyanka; Krivenko, Igor; Ferrero, Michel; Parcollet, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    We present TRIQS/CTHYB, a state-of-the art open-source implementation of the continuous-time hybridisation expansion quantum impurity solver of the TRIQS package. This code is mainly designed to be used with the TRIQS library in order to solve the self-consistent quantum impurity problem in a multi-orbital dynamical mean field theory approach to strongly-correlated electrons, in particular in the context of realistic electronic structure calculations. It is implemented in C++ for efficiency and is provided with a high-level Python interface. The code ships with a new partitioning algorithm that divides the local Hilbert space without any user knowledge of the symmetries and quantum numbers of the Hamiltonian. Furthermore, we implement higher-order configuration moves and show that such moves are necessary to ensure ergodicity of the Monte Carlo in common Hamiltonians even without symmetry-breaking.

  4. Monte Carlo transition probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy, L. B.

    2001-01-01

    Transition probabilities governing the interaction of energy packets and matter are derived that allow Monte Carlo NLTE transfer codes to be constructed without simplifying the treatment of line formation. These probabilities are such that the Monte Carlo calculation asymptotically recovers the local emissivity of a gas in statistical equilibrium. Numerical experiments with one-point statistical equilibrium problems for Fe II and Hydrogen confirm this asymptotic behaviour. In addition, the re...

  5. A fast and efficient algorithm for Slater determinant updates in quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Phani K V V; Kent, P R C

    2009-05-28

    We present an efficient low-rank updating algorithm for updating the trial wave functions used in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations. The algorithm is based on low-rank updating of the Slater determinants. In particular, the computational complexity of the algorithm is O(kN) during the kth step compared to traditional algorithms that require O(N(2)) computations, where N is the system size. For single determinant trial wave functions the new algorithm is faster than the traditional O(N(2)) Sherman-Morrison algorithm for up to O(N) updates. For multideterminant configuration-interaction-type trial wave functions of M+1 determinants, the new algorithm is significantly more efficient, saving both O(MN(2)) work and O(MN(2)) storage. The algorithm enables more accurate and significantly more efficient QMC calculations using configuration-interaction-type wave functions.

  6. Boosting the accuracy and speed of quantum Monte Carlo: size-consistency and time-step

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Gillan, Michael J; Michaelides, Angelos; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations for fermions are becoming the standard to provide high quality reference data in systems that are too large to be investigated via quantum chemical approaches. DMC with the fixed-node approximation relies on modifications of the Green function to avoid singularities near the nodal surface of the trial wavefunction. We show that these modifications affect the DMC energies in a way that is not size-consistent, resulting in large time-step errors. Building on the modifications of Umrigar {\\em et al.} and of DePasquale {\\em et al.} we propose a simple Green function modification that restores size-consistency to large values of time-step; substantially reducing the time-step errors. The new algorithm also yields remarkable speedups of up to two orders of magnitude in the calculation of molecule-molecule binding energies and crystal cohesive energies, thus extending the horizons of what is possible with DMC.

  7. Note: A pure-sampling quantum Monte Carlo algorithm with independent Metropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbik, Jan; Ospadov, Egor; Rothstein, Stuart M

    2016-07-14

    Recently, Ospadov and Rothstein published a pure-sampling quantum Monte Carlo algorithm (PSQMC) that features an auxiliary Path Z that connects the midpoints of the current and proposed Paths X and Y, respectively. When sufficiently long, Path Z provides statistical independence of Paths X and Y. Under those conditions, the Metropolis decision used in PSQMC is done without any approximation, i.e., not requiring microscopic reversibility and without having to introduce any G(x → x'; τ) factors into its decision function. This is a unique feature that contrasts with all competing reptation algorithms in the literature. An example illustrates that dependence of Paths X and Y has adverse consequences for pure sampling.

  8. Analytic nuclear forces and molecular properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, Robert E; Overy, Catherine; Knowles, Peter J; Alavi, Ali; Booth, George H

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased stochastic sampling of the one- and two-body reduced density matrices is achieved in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo with the introduction of a second, "replica" ensemble of walkers, whose population evolves in imaginary time independently from the first, and which entails only modest additional computational overheads. The matrices obtained from this approach are shown to be representative of full configuration-interaction quality, and hence provide a realistic opportunity to achieve high-quality results for a range of properties whose operators do not necessarily commute with the hamiltonian. A density-matrix formulated quasi-variational energy estimator having been already proposed and investigated, the present work extends the scope of the theory to take in studies of analytic nuclear forces, molecular dipole moments and polarisabilities, with extensive comparison to exact results where possible. These new results confirm the suitability of the sampling technique and, where suf...

  9. A quantum Monte Carlo study of mono(benzene) TM and bis(benzene) TM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M. Chandler; Kulahlioglu, A. H.; Mitas, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a study of mono(benzene) TM and bis(benzene) TM systems, where TM = {Mo, W}. We calculate the binding energies by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approaches and compare the results with other methods and available experiments. The orbitals for the determinantal part of each trial wave function were generated from several types of DFT functionals in order to optimize for fixed-node errors. We estimate and compare the size of the fixed-node errors for both the Mo and W systems with regard to the electron density and degree of localization in these systems. For the W systems we provide benchmarking results of the binding energies, given that experimental data is not available.

  10. An excited-state approach within full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, N. S.; Smart, Simon D.; Booth, George H.; Alavi, Ali

    2015-10-01

    We present a new approach to calculate excited states with the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method. The approach uses a Gram-Schmidt procedure, instantaneously applied to the stochastically evolving distributions of walkers, to orthogonalize higher energy states against lower energy ones. It can thus be used to study several of the lowest-energy states of a system within the same symmetry. This additional step is particularly simple and computationally inexpensive, requiring only a small change to the underlying FCIQMC algorithm. No trial wave functions or partitioning of the space is needed. The approach should allow excited states to be studied for systems similar to those accessible to the ground-state method due to a comparable computational cost. As a first application, we consider the carbon dimer in basis sets up to quadruple-zeta quality and compare to existing results where available.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Nanoscale MgH2 Cluster Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhigang; Allendorf, Mark; Grossman, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    We calculated the desorption energy of MgH2 clusters using the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, which can provide desorption energies with chemical accuracy (within 1 kcal/mol) and therefore a valuable benchmark for such hydrogen-storage simulations. Compared with these QMC results, the widely used density-functional-theory (DFT) computations cannot reach a consistent and suitable level of accuracy across the thermodynamically tunable range for MgH2 clusters, for a wide range of exchange-correlation functionals. Furthermore, our QMC calculations show that the DFT error depends substantially on cluster size. These results suggest that in simulating metal-hydride systems it is crucial to apply accurate methods that go beyond traditional mean-field approaches as a benchmark of their performance for a given material, and QMC is an appealing method for such a benchmark due to its high level of accuracy and favorable scaling (N^3) with number of electrons.

  12. Linear-scaling evaluation of the local energy in quantum MonteCarlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, Brian; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Lester Jr., William A.

    2006-02-11

    For atomic and molecular quantum Monte Carlo calculations, most of the computational effort is spent in the evaluation of the local energy. We describe a scheme for reducing the computational cost of the evaluation of the Slater determinants and correlation function for the correlated molecular orbital (CMO) ansatz. A sparse representation of the Slater determinants makes possible efficient evaluation of molecular orbitals. A modification to the scaled distance function facilitates a linear scaling implementation of the Schmidt-Moskowitz-Boys-Handy (SMBH) correlation function that preserves the efficient matrix multiplication structure of the SMBH function. For the evaluation of the local energy, these two methods lead to asymptotic linear scaling with respect to the molecule size.

  13. Vibrational spectrum of the H5+ molecule using quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, W B; Roncaratti, L; Silva, G M; Acioli, Paulo Hora; Roncaratti, Luiz; Silva, Geraldo Magela e; Silva, Washington Barbosa da

    2006-01-01

    In this article we present a caracterization of the vibrational spectrum of the H5+ molecule using the correlation function quantum Monte Carlo (CFQMC) method and a genetic algorithm study of the topology of the potential energy surface used in this work. The vibrational modes associated with the H3+ - H2 torsion and stretching posses very flat minima. As a consequence the fundamental frequencies corresponding to these modes are poorly described in the harmonic approximation. The vibrational frequencies obtained in this work are in good agreement with the available experimental data as well as other computational methods found in literature. In our genetic algorithm study of the potential energy surface using cartesian coordinates we have found some unexpected minima. A careful analysis shows that some of these minima are described by the same curviliniar coordinates in which the potential is described. However, they represent nonequivalent molecular geometries.

  14. Simple formalism for efficient derivatives and multi-determinant expansions in quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Claudia; Assaraf, Roland; Moroni, Saverio

    2016-05-01

    We present a simple and general formalism to compute efficiently the derivatives of a multi-determinant Jastrow-Slater wave function, the local energy, the interatomic forces, and similar quantities needed in quantum Monte Carlo. Through a straightforward manipulation of matrices evaluated on the occupied and virtual orbitals, we obtain an efficiency equivalent to algorithmic differentiation in the computation of the interatomic forces and the optimization of the orbital parameters. Furthermore, for a large multi-determinant expansion, the significant computational gain afforded by a recently introduced table method is here extended to the local value of any one-body operator and to its derivatives, in both all-electron and pseudopotential calculations.

  15. Auxiliary-field based trial wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Rubenstein, Brenda; Morales, Miguel

    We propose a simple scheme for generating correlated multi-determinant trial wave functions for quantum Monte Carlo algorithms. The method is based on the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation which decouples a two-body Jastrow-type correlator into one-body projectors coupled to auxiliary fields. We apply the technique to generate stochastic representations of the Gutzwiller wave function, and present benchmark resuts for the ground state energy of the Hubbard model in one dimension. Extensions of the proposed scheme to chemical systems will also be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, 15-ERD-013.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo for Noncovalent Interactions: Analysis of Protocols and Simplified Scheme Attaining Benchmark Accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Dubecký, Matúš; Jurečka, Petr; Mitas, Lubos; Hobza, Pavel; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Reliable theoretical predictions of noncovalent interaction energies, which are important e.g. in drug-design and hydrogen-storage applications, belong to longstanding challenges of contemporary quantum chemistry. In this respect, the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) is a promising alternative to the commonly used ``gold standard'' coupled-cluster CCSD(T)/CBS method for its benchmark accuracy and favourable scaling, in contrast to other correlated wave function approaches. This work is focused on the analysis of protocols and possible tradeoffs for FN-DMC estimations of noncovalent interaction energies and proposes a significantly more efficient yet accurate computational protocol using simplified explicit correlation terms. Its performance is illustrated on a number of weakly bound complexes, including water dimer, benzene/hydrogen, T-shape benzene dimer and stacked adenine-thymine DNA base pair complex. The proposed protocol achieves excellent agreement ($\\sim$0.2 kcal/mol) with respect to the reli...

  17. An Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Study of the Chromium Dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Krakauer, Henry

    2014-01-01

    The chromium dimer (Cr2) presents an outstanding challenge for many-body electronic structure methods. Its complicated nature of binding, with a formal sextuple bond and an unusual potential energy curve, is emblematic of the competing tendencies and delicate balance found in many strongly correlated materials. We present a near-exact calculation of the potential energy curve (PEC) and ground state properties of Cr2, using the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method. Unconstrained, exact AFQMC calculations are first carried out for a medium-sized but realistic basis set. Elimination of the remaining finite-basis errors and extrapolation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit is then achieved with a combination of phaseless and exact AFQMC calculations. Final results for the PEC and spectroscopic constants are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  18. Phase Stability of TiO$_2$ Polymorphs from Diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Ye; Shulenburger, Luke; Krogel, Jaron T; Heinonen, Olle; Kent, Paul R C

    2016-01-01

    Titanium dioxide, TiO$_2$, has multiple applications in catalysis, energy conversion and memristive devices because of its electronic structure. Most of these applications utilize the naturally existing phases: rutile, anatase and brookite. Despite the simple form of TiO$_2$ and its wide uses, there is long-standing disagreement between theory and experiment on the energetic ordering of these phases that has never been resolved. We present the first analysis of phase stability at zero temperature using the highly accurate many-body fixed node diffusion Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method. We also include the effects of temperature by calculating the Helmholtz free energy including both internal energy and vibrational contributions from density functional perturbation theory based quasi harmonic phonon calculations. Our QMC calculations find that anatase is the most stable phase at zero temperature, consistent with many previous mean-field calculations. However, at elevated temperatures, rutile becomes the most s...

  19. Resonating Valence Bond Quantum Monte Carlo: Application to the ozone molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Azadi, Sam; Kühne, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    We study the potential energy surface of the ozone molecule by means of Quantum Monte Carlo simulations based on the resonating valence bond concept. The trial wave function consists of an antisymmetrized geminal power arranged in a single-determinant that is multiplied by a Jastrow correlation factor. Whereas the determinantal part incorporates static correlation effects, the augmented real-space correlation factor accounts for the dynamics electron correlation. The accuracy of this approach is demonstrated by computing the potential energy surface for the ozone molecule in three vibrational states: symmetric, asymmetric and scissoring. We find that the employed wave function provides a detailed description of rather strongly-correlated multi-reference systems, which is in quantitative agreement with experiment.

  20. Worm-improved estimators in continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunacker, P.; Wallerberger, M.; Ribic, T.; Hausoel, A.; Sangiovanni, G.; Held, K.

    2016-09-01

    We derive the improved estimators for general interactions and employ these for the continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo method. Using a worm algorithm we show how measuring higher-ordered correlators leads to an improved high-frequency behavior in irreducible quantities such as the one-particle self-energy or the irreducible two-particle vertex for non-density-density interactions. A good knowledge of the asymptotics of the two-particle vertex is essential for calculating nonlocal electronic correlations using diagrammatic extensions to the dynamical mean field theory as well as for calculating susceptibilities. We test our algorithm against analytic results for the multiorbital atomic limit and the Falicov-Kimball model.

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo of atomic and molecular systems with heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitas, Lubos; Kulahlioglu, Adem; Melton, Cody; Bennett, Chandler

    2015-03-01

    We carry out quantum Monte Carlo calculations of atomic and molecular systems with several heavy atoms such as Mo, W and Bi. In particular, we compare the correlation energies vs their lighter counterparts in the same column of the periodic table in order to reveal trends with regard to the atomic number Z. One of the observations is that the correlation energy for the isoelectronic valence space/states is mildly decreasing with increasing Z. Similar observation applies also to the fixed-node errors, supporting thus our recent observation that the fixed-node error increases with electronic density for the same (or similar) complexity of the wave function and bonding. In addition, for Bi systems we study the impact of the spin-orbit on the electronic structure, in particular, on binding, correlation and excitation energies.

  2. Assessment of Multireference Approaches to Explicitly Correlated Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Kersten, Jennifer; Alavi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method has proved able to provide near-exact solutions to the electronic Schr\\"odinger equation within a finite orbital basis set, without relying on an expansion about a reference state. However, a drawback to the approach is that being based on an expansion of Slater determinants, the FCIQMC method suffers from a basis set incompleteness error that decays very slowly with the size of the employed single particle basis. The FCIQMC results obtained in a small basis set can be improved significantly with explicitly correlated techniques. Here, we present a study that assesses and compares two contrasting `universal' explicitly correlated approaches that fit into the FCIQMC framework; the $[2]_{R12}$ method of Valeev {\\em et al.}, and the explicitly correlated canonical transcorrelation approach of Yanai {\\em et al}. The former is an {\\em a posteriori} internally-contracted perturbative approach, while the latter transforms the Hamiltonian prior to...

  3. Frozen-orbital and downfolding calculations with auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Krakauer, Henry

    2013-01-01

    We describe the implementation of the frozen-orbital and downfolding approximations in the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method. These approaches can provide significant computational savings compared to fully correlating all the electrons. While the many-body wave function is never explicit in AFQMC, its random walkers are Slater determinants, whose orbitals may be expressed in terms of any one-particle orbital basis. It is therefore straightforward to partition the full N-particle Hilbert space into active and inactive parts to implement the frozen-orbital method. In the frozen-core approximation, for example, the core electrons can be eliminated in the correlated part of the calculations, greatly increasing the computational efficiency, especially for heavy atoms. Scalar relativistic effects are easily included using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess theory. Using this method, we obtain a way to effectively eliminate the error due to single-projector, norm-conserving pseudopotentials in AFQMC. We also i...

  4. A Quantum Monte Carlo Study of mono(benzene)TM and bis(benzene)TM Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, M Chandler; Mitas, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of mono(benzene)TM and bis(benzene)TM systems, where TM={Mo,W}. We calculate the binding energies by quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approaches and compare the results with other methods and available experiments. The orbitals for the determinantal part of each trial wave function were generated from several types of DFT in order to optimize for fixed-node errors. We estimate and compare the size of the fixed-node errors for both the Mo and W systems with regard to the electron density and degree of localization in these systems. For the W systems we provide benchmarking results of the binding energies, given that experimental data is not available.

  5. Many-body effects on graphene conductivity: Quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyda, D. L.; Braguta, V. V.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Ulybyshev, M. V.

    2016-08-01

    Optical conductivity of graphene is studied using quantum Monte Carlo calculations. We start from a Euclidean current-current correlator and extract σ (ω ) from Green-Kubo relations using the Backus-Gilbert method. Calculations were performed both for long-range interactions and taking into account only the contact term. In both cases we vary interaction strength and study its influence on optical conductivity. We compare our results with previous theoretical calculations choosing ω ≈κ , thus working in the region of the plateau in σ (ω ) which corresponds to optical conductivity of Dirac quasiparticles. No dependence of optical conductivity on interaction strength is observed unless we approach the antiferromagnetic phase transition in the case of an artificially enhanced contact term. Our results strongly support previous theoretical studies that claimed very weak regularization of graphene conductivity.

  6. Simple formalism for efficient derivatives and multi-determinant expansions in quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Claudia; Assaraf, Roland; Moroni, Saverio

    2016-05-21

    We present a simple and general formalism to compute efficiently the derivatives of a multi-determinant Jastrow-Slater wave function, the local energy, the interatomic forces, and similar quantities needed in quantum Monte Carlo. Through a straightforward manipulation of matrices evaluated on the occupied and virtual orbitals, we obtain an efficiency equivalent to algorithmic differentiation in the computation of the interatomic forces and the optimization of the orbital parameters. Furthermore, for a large multi-determinant expansion, the significant computational gain afforded by a recently introduced table method is here extended to the local value of any one-body operator and to its derivatives, in both all-electron and pseudopotential calculations.

  7. Benchmarking exchange-correlation functionals for hydrogen at high pressures using quantum Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Raymond C. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Mcminis, Jeremy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McMahon, Jeffrey M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Pierleoni, Carlo [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), L' aquila (Italy). Lab. Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN-LNGS); Ceperley, David M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Morales, Miguel A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The ab initio phase diagram of dense hydrogen is very sensitive to errors in the treatment of electronic correlation. Recently, it has been shown that the choice of the density functional has a large effect on the predicted location of both the liquid-liquid phase transition and the solid insulator-to-metal transition in dense hydrogen. To identify the most accurate functional for dense hydrogen applications, we systematically benchmark some of the most commonly used functionals using quantum Monte Carlo. By considering several measures of functional accuracy, we conclude that the van der Waals and hybrid functionals significantly outperform local density approximation and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof. We support these conclusions by analyzing the impact of functional choice on structural optimization in the molecular solid, and on the location of the liquid-liquid phase transition.

  8. World-line quantum Monte Carlo algorithm for a one-dimensional Bose model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batrouni, G.G. (Thinking Machines Corporation, 245 First Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 (United States)); Scalettar, R.T. (Physics Department, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States))

    1992-10-01

    In this paper we provide a detailed description of the ground-state phase diagram of interacting, disordered bosons on a lattice. We describe a quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that incorporates in an efficient manner the required bosonic wave-function symmetry. We consider the ordered case, where we evaluate the compressibility gap and show the lowest three Mott insulating lobes. We obtain the critical ratio of interaction strength to hopping at which the onset of superfluidity occurs for the first lobe, and the critical exponents {nu} and {ital z}. For the disordered model we show the effect of randomness on the phase diagram and the superfluid correlations. We also measure the response of the superfluid density, {rho}{sub {ital s}}, to external perturbations. This provides an unambiguous characterization of the recently observed Bose and Anderson glass phases.

  9. Constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo approach for non-yrast states within the shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnard, J. [INFN, Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Juillet, O. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France)

    2016-04-15

    The present paper intends to present an extension of the constrained-path quantum Monte Carlo approach allowing to reconstruct non-yrast states in order to reach the complete spectroscopy of nuclei within the interacting shell model. As in the yrast case studied in a previous work, the formalism involves a variational symmetry-restored wave function assuming two central roles. First, it guides the underlying Brownian motion to improve the efficiency of the sampling. Second, it constrains the stochastic paths according to the phaseless approximation to control sign or phase problems that usually plague fermionic QMC simulations. Proof-of-principle results in the sd valence space are reported. They prove the ability of the scheme to offer remarkably accurate binding energies for both even- and odd-mass nuclei irrespective of the considered interaction. (orig.)

  10. Ab Initio Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of the Warm Dense Electron Gas in the Thermodynamic Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornheim, Tobias; Groth, Simon; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D.; Foulkes, W. M. C.; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We perform ab initio quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with the linear response theory, we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the substantial parts of the warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to N =1000 electrons enable us to compute the potential energy V and the exchange-correlation free energy Fxc of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of |Δ V |/|V |,|Δ Fxc|/|F |xc˜10-3 . A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of Fxc by Karasiev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant deviations to the latter.

  11. Semi-stochastic full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo: developments and application

    CERN Document Server

    Blunt, N S; Kersten, J A F; Spencer, J S; Booth, George H; Alavi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    We expand upon the recent semi-stochastic adaptation to full configuration quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC). We present an alternate method for generating the deterministic space without a priori knowledge of the wave function and demonstrate the resulting gains in stochastic efficiency for a variety of both molecular and lattice systems. The algorithmic details of an efficient semi-stochastic implementation are presented, with particular consideration given to the effect that the adaptation has on parallel performance in FCIQMC. We further demonstrate the benefit for calculation of reduced density matrices in FCIQMC through replica sampling, where the semi-stochastic adaptation seems to have even larger efficiency gains. We then combine these ideas to produce explicitly correlated corrected FCIQMC energies for the Beryllium dimer, for which stochastic errors on the order of wavenumber accuracy are achievable.

  12. An explicitly correlated approach to basis set incompleteness in Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, George H; Alavi, Ali; Tew, David P

    2012-01-01

    By performing a stochastic dynamic in a space of Slater determinants, the Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method has been able to obtain energies which are essentially free from systematic error to the basis set correlation energy, within small and systematically improvable errorbars. However, the weakly exponential scaling with basis size makes converging the energy with respect to basis set costly and in larger systems, impossible. To ameliorate these basis set issues, here we use perturbation theory to couple the FCIQMC wave function to an explicitly correlated strongly orthogonal basis of geminals, following the [2]_{\\textrm{R12}} approach of Valeev {\\em et al.}. The required one- and two-particle density matrices are computed on-the-fly during the FCIQMC dynamic, using a sampling procedure which incurs relatively little additional computation expense. The F12 energy corrections are shown to converge rapidly as a function of sampling, both in imaginary time, and number of walke...

  13. Monte Carlo Hamiltonian: Linear Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiang-Qian; LIU Jin-Jiang; HUANG Chun-Qing; JIANG Jun-Qin; Helmut KROGER

    2002-01-01

    We further study the validity of the Monte Carlo Hamiltonian method. The advantage of the method,in comparison with the standard Monte Carlo Lagrangian approach, is its capability to study the excited states. Weconsider two quantum mechanical models: a symmetric one V(x) = |x|/2; and an asymmetric one V(x) = ∞, forx < 0 and V(x) = x, for x ≥ 0. The results for the spectrum, wave functions and thermodynamical observables are inagreement with the analytical or Runge-Kutta calculations.

  14. A new quantum Monte Carlo algorithm in the momentum representation : The sign problem and the Hess-Fairbank effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartsev, PF

    2003-01-01

    An exact numerical algorithm based on the diagrammatic quantum Monte Carlo method in the momentum representation is proposed; in many cases, this algorithm is free of the sign problem and extends the class of models that can be analyzed by cluster methods. The weakening of the sign problem is demons

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the itinerant-localized model of strongly correlated electrons: Spin-spin correlation functions

    OpenAIRE

    Ivantsov, Ilya; Ferraz, Alvaro; Kochetov, Evgenii

    2016-01-01

    We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the itinerant-localized periodic Kondo-Heisenberg model for the underdoped cuprates to calculate the associated spin correlation functions. The strong electron correlations are shown to play a key role in the abrupt destruction of the quasi long-range antiferromagnetic order in the lightly doped regime.

  16. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the itinerant-localized model of strongly correlated electrons: Spin-spin correlation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivantsov, Ilya; Ferraz, Alvaro; Kochetov, Evgenii

    2016-12-01

    We perform quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the itinerant-localized periodic Kondo-Heisenberg model for the underdoped cuprates to calculate the associated spin correlation functions. The strong electron correlations are shown to play a key role in the abrupt destruction of the quasi-long-range antiferromagnetic order in the lightly doped regime.

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the cooperative binding of NO2 to fragment models of carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawson, John W.; Bauschlicher Jr., Charles W.; Toulouse, Julien; Filippi, Claudia; Umrigar, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous calculations on model systems for the cooperative binding of two NO2 molecules to carbon nanotubes using density functional theory and second order Moller–Plesset perturbation theory gave results differing by 30 kcal/mol. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations are performed to study the role of e

  18. A density functional and quantum Monte Carlo study of glutamic acid in vacuo and in a dielectric continuum medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floris, F.; Filippi, C.; Amovilli, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present density functional theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of the glutamic acid and glutamate ion in vacuo and in various dielectric continuum media within the polarizable continuum model (PCM). In DFT, we employ the integral equation formalism variant of PCM while, in QMC

  19. Multi-level quantum monte Carlo wave functions for complex reactions: The decomposition of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracchia, F.; Filippi, C.; Amovilli, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present here several novel features of our recently proposed Jastrow linear generalized valence bond (J-LGVB) wave functions, which allow a consistently accurate description of complex potential energy surfaces (PES) of medium-large systems within quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). In particular, we deve

  20. A density functional and quantum Monte Carlo study of glutamic acid in vacuo and in a dielectric continuum medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floris, F.; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present density functional theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of the glutamic acid and glutamate ion in vacuo and in various dielectric continuum media within the polarizable continuum model (PCM). In DFT, we employ the integral equation formalism variant of PCM while, in QMC

  1. Energy-consistent small-core pseudopotentials for 3d-transition metals adapted to quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burkatzki, M.; Filippi, Claudia; Dolg, M.

    2008-01-01

    We extend our recently published set of energy-consistent scalar-relativistic Hartree–Fock pseudopotentials by the 3d-transition metal elements, scandium through zinc. The pseudopotentials do not exhibit a singularity at the nucleus and are therefore suitable for quantum Monte Carlo (QMC)

  2. Barrier heights of hydrogen-transfer reactions with diffusion quantum monte carlo method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Wang, Fan

    2017-04-30

    Hydrogen-transfer reactions are an important class of reactions in many chemical and biological processes. Barrier heights of H-transfer reactions are underestimated significantly by popular exchange-correlation functional with density functional theory (DFT), while coupled-cluster (CC) method is quite expensive and can be applied only to rather small systems. Quantum Monte-Carlo method can usually provide reliable results for large systems. Performance of fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte-Carlo method (FN-DMC) on barrier heights of the 19 H-transfer reactions in the HTBH38/08 database is investigated in this study with the trial wavefunctions of the single-Slater-Jastrow form and orbitals from DFT using local density approximation. Our results show that barrier heights of these reactions can be calculated rather accurately using FN-DMC and the mean absolute error is 1.0 kcal/mol in all-electron calculations. Introduction of pseudopotentials (PP) in FN-DMC calculations improves efficiency pronouncedly. According to our results, error of the employed PPs is smaller than that of the present CCSD(T) and FN-DMC calculations. FN-DMC using PPs can thus be applied to investigate H-transfer reactions involving larger molecules reliably. In addition, bond dissociation energies of the involved molecules using FN-DMC are in excellent agreement with reference values and they are even better than results of the employed CCSD(T) calculations using the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the Fermi-polaron problem and bosons with Gaussian interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroiss, Peter Michael

    2017-02-01

    This thesis deals with the application of current Quantum Monte Carlo algorithms to many-body systems of fermionic and bosonic species. The first part applies the diagrammatic Monte Carlo method to the Fermi polaron problem, a system of an impurity interacting resonantly with a homogeneous Fermi bath. It is numerically shown that the three particle-hole diagrams do not contribute significantly to the final answer in a quasi-two-dimensional setup, thus demonstrating a nearly perfect destructive interference of contributions in subspaces with higher-order particle-hole lines. Consequently, for strong-enough confinement in the third direction, the transition between the polaron and the molecule ground state is found to be in good agreement with the pure two-dimensional case and agrees very well with the one found by the wave-function approach in the two-particle-hole subspace. In three-dimensional Fermi-polaron systems with mass imbalance of impurity and bath atoms, polaron energy and quasiparticle residue can be accurately determined over a broad range of impurity masses. Furthermore, the spectral function of an imbalanced polaron demonstrates the stability of the quasiparticle and also allows us to locate the repulsive polaron as an excited state. The quantitative exactness of two-particle-hole wave functions is investigated, resulting in a relative lowering of polaronic energies in the mass-imbalance phase diagram. Tan's contact coefficient for the mass-balanced polaron system is found to be in good agreement with variational methods. Mass-imbalanced systems can be studied experimentally by ultracold atom mixtures such as {sup 6}Li-{sup 40}K. In the second part of the thesis, the ground state of a two-dimensional system of Bose particles of spin zero, interacting via a repulsive Gaussian-Core potential, is investigated by means of path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The quantum phase diagram is qualitatively identical to that of two-dimensional Yukawa

  4. Mean field simulation for Monte Carlo integration

    CERN Document Server

    Del Moral, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In the last three decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of interacting particle methods as a powerful tool in real-world applications of Monte Carlo simulation in computational physics, population biology, computer sciences, and statistical machine learning. Ideally suited to parallel and distributed computation, these advanced particle algorithms include nonlinear interacting jump diffusions; quantum, diffusion, and resampled Monte Carlo methods; Feynman-Kac particle models; genetic and evolutionary algorithms; sequential Monte Carlo methods; adaptive and interacting Marko

  5. Uma abordagem simplificada do método Monte Carlo Quântico: da solução de integrais ao problema da distribuição eletrônica A simplified approach to the Quantum Monte Carlo method: from the solution of integrals to the electronic distribution problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Fernando Delfino Angelotti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an introductory and general discussion on the quantum Monte Carlo methods, some fundamental algorithms, concepts and applicability. In order to introduce the quantum Monte Carlo method, preliminary concepts associated with Monte Carlo techniques are discussed.

  6. Influence of single particle orbital sets and configuration selection on multideterminant wavefunctions in quantum Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Raymond C. [University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61821 (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Morales, Miguel A., E-mail: moralessilva2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-06-21

    Multideterminant wavefunctions, while having a long history in quantum chemistry, are increasingly being used in highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations. Since the accuracy of QMC is ultimately limited by the quality of the trial wavefunction, multi-Slater determinants wavefunctions offer an attractive alternative to Slater-Jastrow and more sophisticated wavefunction ansatz for several reasons. They can be efficiently calculated, straightforwardly optimized, and systematically improved by increasing the number of included determinants. In spite of their potential, however, the convergence properties of multi-Slater determinant wavefunctions with respect to orbital set choice and excited determinant selection are poorly understood, which hinders the application of these wavefunctions to large systems and solids. In this paper, by performing QMC calculations on the equilibrium and stretched carbon dimer, we find that convergence of the recovered correlation energy with respect to number of determinants can depend quite strongly on basis set and determinant selection methods, especially where there is strong correlation. We demonstrate that properly chosen orbital sets and determinant selection techniques from quantum chemistry methods can dramatically reduce the required number of determinants (and thus the computational cost) to reach a given accuracy, which we argue shows clear need for an automatic QMC-only method for selecting determinants and generating optimal orbital sets.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo study of strange correlator in interacting topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han-Qing; He, Yuan-Yao; You, Yi-Zhuang; Xu, Cenke; Meng, Zi Yang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    Distinguishing the nontrivial symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phase from the trivial insulator phase in the presence of electron-electron interaction is an urgent question to the study of topological insulators. In this work, we demonstrate that the strange correlator is a sensitive diagnosis to detect SPT states in interacting systems. Employing large-scale quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations, we investigate the interaction-driven quantum phase transition in the Kane-Mele-Hubbard model. The transition from the quantum spin Hall insulator at weak interaction to an antiferromagnetic Mott insulator at strong interaction can be readily detected by the momentum space behavior of the strange correlator in single-particle, spin, and pairing sectors. The interaction e?ects on the symmetry-protected edge states in various sectors are well captured in the QMC measurements of strange correlators. Moreover, we demonstrate that the strange correlator is technically easier to implement in QMC and more robust in performance than other proposed numerical diagnoses for interacting topological states, as only static correlations are needed. The attempt in this work paves the way for using the strange correlator to study interaction-driven topological phase transitions.

  8. Monte Carlo modeling of the dual-mode regime in quantum-well and quantum-dot semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusseau, Laurent; Philippe, Fabrice; Disanto, Filippo

    2014-03-10

    Monte Carlo markovian models of a dual-mode semiconductor laser with quantum well (QW) or quantum dot (QD) active regions are proposed. Accounting for carriers and photons as particles that may exchange energy in the course of time allows an ab initio description of laser dynamics such as the mode competition and intrinsic laser noise. We used these models to evaluate the stability of the dual-mode regime when laser characteristics are varied: mode gains and losses, non-radiative recombination rates, intraband relaxation time, capture time in QD, transfer of excitation between QD via the wetting layer... As a major result, a possible steady-state dual-mode regime is predicted for specially designed QD semiconductor lasers thereby acting as a CW microwave or terahertz-beating source whereas it does not occur for QW lasers.

  9. A Monte Carlo Resampling Approach for the Calculation of Hybrid Classical and Quantum Free Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cave-Ayland, Christopher; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton; Essex, Jonathan W

    2017-02-14

    Hybrid free energy methods allow estimation of free energy differences at the quantum mechanics (QM) level with high efficiency by performing sampling at the classical mechanics (MM) level. Various approaches to allow the calculation of QM corrections to classical free energies have been proposed. The single step free energy perturbation approach starts with a classically generated ensemble, a subset of structures of which are postprocessed to obtain QM energies for use with the Zwanzig equation. This gives an estimate of the free energy difference associated with the change from an MM to a QM Hamiltonian. Owing to the poor numerical properties of the Zwanzig equation, however, recent developments have produced alternative methods which aim to provide access to the properties of the true QM ensemble. Here we propose an approach based on the resampling of MM structural ensembles and application of a Monte Carlo acceptance test which in principle, can generate the exact QM ensemble or intermediate ensembles between the MM and QM states. We carry out a detailed comparison against the Zwanzig equation and recently proposed non-Boltzmann methods. As a test system we use a set of small molecule hydration free energies for which hybrid free energy calculations are performed at the semiempirical Density Functional Tight Binding level. Equivalent ensembles at this level of theory have also been generated allowing the reverse QM to MM perturbations to be performed along with a detailed analysis of the results. Additionally, a previously published nucleotide base pair data set simulated at the QM level using ab initio molecular dynamics is also considered. We provide a strong rationale for the use of the Monte Carlo Resampling and non-Boltzmann approaches by showing that configuration space overlaps can be estimated which provide useful diagnostic information regarding the accuracy of these hybrid approaches.

  10. Thermochemistry and Charge Delocalization in Cyclization Reactions Using Accurate Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saritas, Kayahan; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    Molecules that undergo pericyclic isomerization reactions find interesting optical and energy storage applications, because of their usually high quantum yields, large spectral shifts and small structural changes upon light absorption. These reactions induce a drastic change in the conjugated structure such that substituents that become a part of the conjugated system upon isomerization can play an important role in determining properties such as enthalpy of isomerization and HOMO-LUMO gap. Therefore, theoretical investigations dealing with such systems should be capable of accurately capturing the interplay between electron correlation and exchange effects. In this work, we examine the dihydroazulene isomerization as an example conjugated system. We employ the highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method to predict thermochemical properties and to benchmark results from density functional theory (DFT) methods. Although DFT provides sufficient accuracy for similar systems, in this particular system, DFT predictions of ground state and reaction paths are inconsistent and non-systematic errors arise. We present a comparison between QMC and DFT results for enthalpy of isomerization, HOMO-LUMO gap and charge densities with a range of DFT functionals.

  11. Monte carlo simulation study of the square lattice S=1/2 quantum heisenberg antiferromagnet

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J K

    1999-01-01

    For the two dimensional S= 1/2 isotopic quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice, we report our results of an extensive quantum Monte Carlo simulation for various physical observables such as the correlation length xi, the staggered magnetic susceptibility chi sub S sub T , the structure factor peak value S(Q), the internal energy epsilon, and the uniform susceptibility chi sub u. We find that chi sub S sub T approx chi sup 2 T and S(Q) approx xi sup 2 T sup 2 , in agreement with the predictions of the conventional theory but in disagreement with recent experiments. Our estimate of the spin stiffness constant rho sub s and spin wave velocity c, from the low temperature behavior of the chi sub u is shown to be consistent with the theoretical prediction of the low temperature behavior of the epsilon, and of the xi provided an additional correction up to T sup 2. However, our data are definitely inconsistent with the scenario of the crossover for the xi.

  12. The Virtual Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Hrivnacova, I; Berejnov, V V; Brun, R; Carminati, F; Fassò, A; Futo, E; Gheata, A; Caballero, I G; Morsch, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The concept of Virtual Monte Carlo (VMC) has been developed by the ALICE Software Project to allow different Monte Carlo simulation programs to run without changing the user code, such as the geometry definition, the detector response simulation or input and output formats. Recently, the VMC classes have been integrated into the ROOT framework, and the other relevant packages have been separated from the AliRoot framework and can be used individually by any other HEP project. The general concept of the VMC and its set of base classes provided in ROOT will be presented. Existing implementations for Geant3, Geant4 and FLUKA and simple examples of usage will be described.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Treatment of the Charge Transfer and Diradical Electronic Character in a Retinal Chromophore Minimal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Andrea; Coccia, Emanuele; Gozem, Samer; Olivucci, Massimo; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2015-03-10

    The penta-2,4-dieniminium cation (PSB3) displays similar ground state and first excited state potential energy features as those of the retinal protonated Schiff base (RPSB) chromophore in rhodopsin. Recently, PSB3 has been used to benchmark several electronic structure methods, including highly correlated multireference wave function approaches, highlighting the necessity to accurately describe the electronic correlation in order to obtain reliable properties even along the ground state (thermal) isomerization paths. In this work, we apply two quantum Monte Carlo approaches, the variational Monte Carlo and the lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo, to study the energetics and electronic properties of PSB3 along representative minimum energy paths and scans related to its thermal cis–trans isomerization. Quantum Monte Carlo is used in combination with the Jastrow antisymmetrized geminal power ansatz, which guarantees an accurate and balanced description of the static electronic correlation thanks to the multiconfigurational nature of the antisymmetrized geminal power term, and of the dynamical correlation, due to the presence of the Jastrow factor explicitly depending on electron–electron distances. Along the two ground state isomerization minimum energy paths of PSB3, CASSCF calculations yield wave functions having either charge transfer or diradical character in proximity of the two transition state configurations. Here, we observe that at the quantum Monte Carlo level of theory, only the transition state with charge transfer character can be located. The conical intersection, which becomes highly sloped, is observed only if the path connecting the two original CASSCF transition states is extended beyond the diradical one, namely by increasing the bond-length-alternation (BLA). These findings are in good agreement with the results obtained by MRCISD+Q calculations, and they demonstrate the importance of having an accurate description of the static and

  14. The Feynman Path Goes Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Tilman

    2001-01-01

    Path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations have become an important tool for the investigation of the statistical mechanics of quantum systems. I discuss some of the history of applying the Monte Carlo method to non-relativistic quantum systems in path-integral representation. The principle feasibility of the method was well established by the early eighties, a number of algorithmic improvements have been introduced in the last two decades.

  15. Auxiliary-field-based trial wave functions in quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Rubenstein, Brenda M.; Morales, Miguel A.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithms have long relied on Jastrow factors to incorporate dynamic correlation into trial wave functions. While Jastrow-type wave functions have been widely employed in real-space algorithms, they have seen limited use in second-quantized QMC methods, particularly in projection methods that involve a stochastic evolution of the wave function in imaginary time. Here we propose a scheme for generating Jastrow-type correlated trial wave functions for auxiliary-field QMC methods. The method is based on decoupling the two-body Jastrow into one-body projectors coupled to auxiliary fields, which then operate on a single determinant to produce a multideterminant trial wave function. We demonstrate that intelligent sampling of the most significant determinants in this expansion can produce compact trial wave functions that reduce errors in the calculated energies. Our technique may be readily generalized to accommodate a wide range of two-body Jastrow factors and applied to a variety of model and chemical systems.

  16. An excited-state approach within full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Blunt, N S; Booth, George H; Alavi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to calculate excited states with the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC) method. The approach uses a Gram-Schmidt procedure, instantaneously applied to the stochastically evolving distributions of walkers, to orthogonalize higher energy states against lower energy ones. It can thus be used to study several of the lowest-energy states of a system within the same symmetry. This additional step is particularly simple and computationally inexpensive, requiring only a small change to the underlying FCIQMC algorithm. No trial wave functions or partitioning of the space is needed. The approach should allow excited states to be studied for systems similar to those accessible to the ground-state method, due to a comparable computational cost, while the excited states follow a similar sub-linear scaling of computational effort with system size to converge. As a first application we consider the carbon dimer in basis sets up to quadruple-zeta quality, and compare to exis...

  17. Efficient orbital storage and evaluation for quantum Monte Carlo simulations of solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Researchers have applied continuum quantum Monte Carlo methods to solids with great success, but thus far applications have been largely limited to crystals with simple geometry. In these simulations, three-dimensional cubic B-splines have proven to be a fast and accurate means of storing and evaluating electron orbitals. While B-splines require less memory than other spline interpolation schemes, modern cluster nodes often have insufficient memory to store the orbitals for more complex systems. We introduce three techniques, appropriate in different circumstances, to dramatically reduce the memory required for orbital storage, while retaining high accuracy: the generalized tiling of primitive-cell orbitals into a supercell of arbitrary shape, the use of nonuniform grids for localized orbitals, and the periodic replication of localized orbitals. We give examples for cubic boron nitride and wüstite (FeO), and show that these methods can reduce the memory used for orbital storage by more than two orders of magnitude. Finally, we introduce an open-source B-spline library to facilitate the incorporation of these methods into QMC simulation codes.

  18. Comparison of polynomial approximations to speed up planewave-based quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, William D; Alfè, Dario; Hennig, Richard G; Wilkins, John W

    2013-01-01

    The computational cost of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of realistic periodic systems depends strongly on the method of storing and evaluating the many-particle wave function. Previous work [A. J. Williamson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 246406 (2001); D. Alf\\`e and M. J. Gillan, Phys. Rev. B 70, 161101 (2004)] has demonstrated the reduction of the O(N^3) cost of evaluating the Slater determinant with planewaves to O(N^2) using localized basis functions. We compare four polynomial approximations as basis functions -- interpolating Lagrange polynomials, interpolating piecewise-polynomial-form (pp-) splines, and basis-form (B-) splines (interpolating and smoothing). All these basis functions provide a similar speedup relative to the planewave basis. The pp-splines have eight times the memory requirement of the other methods. To test the accuracy of the basis functions, we apply them to the ground state structures of Si, Al, and MgO. The polynomial approximations differ in accuracy most strongly for MgO ...

  19. A quantum Monte Carlo study of the ground state chromium dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Hongo, Kenta

    2011-01-01

    We report variational and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (VMC and DMC) studies of the binding curve of the ground-state chromium dimer. We employed various single determinant (SD) or multi-determinant (MD) wavefunctions multiplied by a Jastrow fuctor as a trial/guiding wavefunction. The molecular orbitals (MOs) in the SD were calculated using restricted or unrestricted Hartree-Fock or density functional theory (DFT) calculations where five commonly-used local (SVWN5), semi-local (PW91PW91 and BLYP), and hybrid (B1LYP and B3LYP) functionals were examined. The MD expansions were obtained from the complete-active space SCF, generalized valence bond, and unrestricted configuration interaction methods. We also adopted the UB3LYP-MOs to construct the MD expansion (UB3LYP-MD) and optimized their coefficients at the VMC level. In addition to the wavefunction dependence, we investigated the time-step bias in the DMC calculation and the effects of pseudopotentials and backflow transformation for the UB3LYP-SD case. Some...

  20. Analytic nuclear forces and molecular properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert E; Opalka, Daniel; Overy, Catherine; Knowles, Peter J; Alavi, Ali; Booth, George H

    2015-08-07

    Unbiased stochastic sampling of the one- and two-body reduced density matrices is achieved in full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo with the introduction of a second, "replica" ensemble of walkers, whose population evolves in imaginary time independently from the first and which entails only modest additional computational overheads. The matrices obtained from this approach are shown to be representative of full configuration-interaction quality and hence provide a realistic opportunity to achieve high-quality results for a range of properties whose operators do not necessarily commute with the Hamiltonian. A density-matrix formulated quasi-variational energy estimator having been already proposed and investigated, the present work extends the scope of the theory to take in studies of analytic nuclear forces, molecular dipole moments, and polarisabilities, with extensive comparison to exact results where possible. These new results confirm the suitability of the sampling technique and, where sufficiently large basis sets are available, achieve close agreement with experimental values, expanding the scope of the method to new areas of investigation.

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo for large chemical systems: implementing efficient strategies for petascale platforms and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scemama, Anthony; Caffarel, Michel; Oseret, Emmanuel; Jalby, William

    2013-04-30

    Various strategies to implement efficiently quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations for large chemical systems are presented. These include: (i) the introduction of an efficient algorithm to calculate the computationally expensive Slater matrices. This novel scheme is based on the use of the highly localized character of atomic Gaussian basis functions (not the molecular orbitals as usually done), (ii) the possibility of keeping the memory footprint minimal, (iii) the important enhancement of single-core performance when efficient optimization tools are used, and (iv) the definition of a universal, dynamic, fault-tolerant, and load-balanced framework adapted to all kinds of computational platforms (massively parallel machines, clusters, or distributed grids). These strategies have been implemented in the QMC=Chem code developed at Toulouse and illustrated with numerical applications on small peptides of increasing sizes (158, 434, 1056, and 1731 electrons). Using 10-80 k computing cores of the Curie machine (GENCI-TGCC-CEA, France), QMC=Chem has been shown to be capable of running at the petascale level, thus demonstrating that for this machine a large part of the peak performance can be achieved. Implementation of large-scale QMC simulations for future exascale platforms with a comparable level of efficiency is expected to be feasible. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Fixed-phase vs fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo with local and nonlocal interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitas, Lubos; Melton, Cody

    We study several systems that can be formulated in the fixed-phase and/or fixed-node framework in quantum Monte Carlo calculations. In particular, we try to understand the differences between the biases caused by these approximations that result from using complex vs real trial wave functions. One system is a model that enables us to construct systematically the same type of nodal errors in both real and complex formalism. The errors are comparably similar whenever trial functions are correspondingly accurate. Another aspect of the fixed-phase vs fixed-node approximations is studied for systems with nonlocal operators such as with pseudopotentials and/or spin-orbit effects. We specify how to obtain variational formulation for complex wave functions and nonlocal operators in a manner analogous to the fixed-node calculations with T-moves algorithm. In particular, we show that the fixed-phase/fixed-node is the primary condition for proving that the upper bound property holds.

  3. An optimized initialization algorithm to ensure accuracy in quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Daniel R; Kent, David R; Feldmann, Michael T; Goddard, William A

    2008-11-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations require the generation of random electronic configurations with respect to a desired probability density, usually the square of the magnitude of the wavefunction. In most cases, the Metropolis algorithm is used to generate a sequence of configurations in a Markov chain. This method has an inherent equilibration phase, during which the configurations are not representative of the desired density and must be discarded. If statistics are gathered before the walkers have equilibrated, contamination by nonequilibrated configurations can greatly reduce the accuracy of the results. Because separate Markov chains must be equilibrated for the walkers on each processor, the use of a long equilibration phase has a profoundly detrimental effect on the efficiency of large parallel calculations. The stratified atomic walker initialization (STRAW) shortens the equilibration phase of QMC calculations by generating statistically independent electronic configurations in regions of high probability density. This ensures the accuracy of calculations by avoiding contamination by nonequilibrated configurations. Shortening the length of the equilibration phase also results in significant improvements in the efficiency of parallel calculations, which reduces the total computational run time. For example, using STRAW rather than a standard initialization method in 512 processor calculations reduces the amount of time needed to calculate the energy expectation value of a trial function for a molecule of the energetic material RDX to within 0.01 au by 33%.

  4. Benchmarking density functionals for hydrogen-helium mixtures with quantum Monte Carlo: Energetics, pressures, and forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Raymond C.; Holzmann, Markus; Ceperley, David M.; Morales, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    An accurate understanding of the phase diagram of dense hydrogen and helium mixtures is a crucial component in the construction of accurate models of Jupiter, Saturn, and Jovian extrasolar planets. Though density-functional-theory-based first-principles methods have the potential to provide the accuracy and computational efficiency required for this task, recent benchmarking in hydrogen has shown that achieving this accuracy requires a judicious choice of functional, and a quantification of the errors introduced. In this work, we present a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) -based benchmarking study of a wide range of density functionals for use in hydrogen-helium mixtures at thermodynamic conditions relevant for Jovian planets. Not only do we continue our program of benchmarking energetics and pressures, but we deploy QMC-based force estimators and use them to gain insight into how well the local liquid structure is captured by different density functionals. We find that TPSS, BLYP, and vdW-DF are the most accurate functionals by most metrics, and that the enthalpy, energy, and pressure errors are very well behaved as a function of helium concentration. Beyond this, we highlight and analyze the major error trends and relative differences exhibited by the major classes of functionals, and we estimate the magnitudes of these effects when possible.

  5. A deterministic alternative to the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubman, Norm M.; Lee, Joonho; Takeshita, Tyler Y.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2016-07-01

    Development of exponentially scaling methods has seen great progress in tackling larger systems than previously thought possible. One such technique, full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo, is a useful algorithm that allows exact diagonalization through stochastically sampling determinants. The method derives its utility from the information in the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian, along with a stochastic projected wave function, to find the important parts of Hilbert space. However, the stochastic representation of the wave function is not required to search Hilbert space efficiently, and here we describe a highly efficient deterministic method that can achieve chemical accuracy for a wide range of systems, including the difficult Cr2 molecule. We demonstrate for systems like Cr2 that such calculations can be performed in just a few cpu hours which makes it one of the most efficient and accurate methods that can attain chemical accuracy for strongly correlated systems. In addition our method also allows efficient calculation of excited state energies, which we illustrate with benchmark results for the excited states of C2.

  6. Comparison of gamma (Anger) camera systems in terms of detective quantum efficiency using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ida; Starck, Sven-Åke; Båth, Magnus

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform an extensive evaluation of available gamma camera systems in terms of their detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and determine their dependency on relevant parameters such as collimator type, imaging depth, and energy window using the Monte Carlo technique. The modulation transfer function was determined from a simulated (99m)Tc point source and was combined with the system sensitivity and photon yield to obtain the DQE of the system. The simulations were performed for different imaging depths in a water phantom for 13 gamma camera systems from four manufacturers. Except at very low spatial frequencies, the highest DQE values were found with a lower energy window threshold of around 130 keV for all systems. The height and shape of the DQE curves were affected by the collimator design and the intrinsic properties of the gamma camera systems. High-sensitivity collimators gave the highest DQE at low spatial frequencies, whereas the high-resolution and ultrahigh-resolution collimators showed higher DQE values at higher frequencies. The intrinsic resolution of the system mainly affected the DQE curve at superficial depths. The results indicate that the manufacturers have succeeded differently in their attempts to design a system constituting an optimal compromise between sensitivity and spatial resolution.

  7. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of nanoscale MgH2 cluster thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhigang; Allendorf, Mark D; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2009-10-07

    We calculated the desorption energy of MgH(2) clusters using the highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approach, which can provide desorption energies with chemical accuracy (within approximately 1 kcal/mol) and therefore provides a valuable benchmark for such hydrogen-storage simulations. Compared with these QMC results, the most widely used density functional theory (DFT) computations (including a wide range of exchange-correlation functionals) cannot reach a consistent and suitable level of accuracy across the thermodynamically tunable range for MgH(2) clusters. Furthermore, our QMC calculations show that the DFT error depends substantially on cluster size. These results suggest that in simulating metal-hydride systems it is very important to apply accurate methods that go beyond traditional mean-field approaches as a benchmark of their performance for a given material, and QMC is an appealing method to provide such a benchmark due to its high level of accuracy and favorable scaling (N(3)) with the number of electrons.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the energetics of the rutile, anatase, brookite, and columbite TiO$_2$ polymorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Trail, John; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Ríos, Pablo López; Maezono, Ryo; Needs, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The relative energies of the low-pressure rutile, anatase, and brookite polymorphs and the high-pressure columbite polymorph of TiO$_2$ have been calculated as a function of temperature using the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method and density functional theory (DFT). The vibrational energies are found to be important on the scale of interest and significant quartic anharmonicity is found in the rutile phase. Static-lattice DFT calculations predict that anatase is lower in energy than ...

  9. N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid-based lanthanide coordination polymers: Synthesis, magnetism and quantum Monte Carlo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang Guilin, E-mail: glzhuang@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Chen Wulin [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Zheng Jun [Center of Modern Experimental Technology, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Yu Huiyou [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Wang Jianguo, E-mail: jgw@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

    2012-08-15

    A series of lanthanide coordination polymers have been obtained through the hydrothermal reaction of N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid (H{sub 3}SIDA) and Ln(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (Ln=La, 1; Pr, 2; Nd, 3; Gd, 4). Crystal structure analysis exhibits that lanthanide ions affect the coordination number, bond length and dimension of compounds 1-4, which reveal that their structure diversity can be attributed to the effect of lanthanide contraction. Furthermore, the combination of magnetic measure with quantum Monte Carlo(QMC) studies exhibits that the coupling parameters between two adjacent Gd{sup 3+} ions for anti-anti and syn-anti carboxylate bridges are -1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and -5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1}, respectively, which reveals weak antiferromagnetic interaction in 4. - Graphical abstract: Four lanthanide coordination polymers with N-(sulfoethyl) iminodiacetic acid were obtained under hydrothermal condition and reveal the weak antiferromagnetic coupling between two Gd{sup 3+} ions by Quantum Monte Carlo studies. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four lanthanide coordination polymers of H{sub 3}SIDA ligand were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanide ions play an important role in their structural diversity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic measure exhibits that compound 4 features antiferromagnetic property. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum Monte Carlo studies reveal the coupling parameters of two Gd{sup 3+} ions.

  10. Measure of Bias Cancellation in Fixed-Node Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Dubecký, Matúš

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a measure of fixed-node (FN) bias cancellation useful for a priori assessment of FN diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) energy differences, based on post-Hartree-Fock natural orbital occupation numbers. The proposed quantity reflects the non-equivalency of static correlations in trial wave functions and uncovers the nature of biases observed in some small noncovalent complexes.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of a dissipative chain of Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbert, P.A. (Delft Univ. of Tech. (Netherlands))

    1991-02-01

    The phase diagram of a chain of Josephson junctions with self-capacitance and Ohmic dissipation is studied in a Monte Carlo simulation. The problem is mapped onto a generalized 2d Coulomb gas model. Apart from the expected dipole transition a theoretically predicted quadrupole transition at a critical strength of the dissipation is clearly observed. (orig.).

  12. Localized Polycentric Orbital Basis Set for Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations Derived from the Decomposition of Kohn-Sham Optimized Orbitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Amovilli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a simple decomposition scheme of the Kohn-Sham optimized orbitals which is able to provide a reduced basis set, made of localized polycentric orbitals, specifically designed for Quantum Monte Carlo. The decomposition follows a standard Density functional theory (DFT calculation and is based on atomic connectivity and shell structure. The new orbitals are used to construct a compact correlated wave function of the Slater–Jastrow form which is optimized at the Variational Monte Carlo level and then used as the trial wave function for a final Diffusion Monte Carlo accurate energy calculation. We are able, in this way, to capture the basic information on the real system brought by the Kohn-Sham orbitals and use it for the calculation of the ground state energy within a strictly variational method. Here, we show test calculations performed on some small selected systems to assess the validity of the proposed approach in a molecular fragmentation, in the calculation of a barrier height of a chemical reaction and in the determination of intermolecular potentials. The final Diffusion Monte Carlo energies are in very good agreement with the best literature data within chemical accuracy.

  13. Monte Carlo Option Princing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Maya

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El método Monte Carlo se aplica a varios casos de valoración de opciones financieras. El método genera una buena aproximación al comparar su precisión con la de otros métodos numéricos. La estimación que produce la versión Cruda de Monte Carlo puede ser aún más exacta si se recurre a metodologías de reducción de la varianza entre las cuales se sugieren la variable antitética y de la variable de control. Sin embargo, dichas metodologías requieren un esfuerzo computacional mayor por lo cual las mismas deben ser evaluadas en términos no sólo de su precisión sino también de su eficiencia.

  14. Monte Carlo and nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Caliot, Cyril; Charon, Julien; Coustet, Christophe; Hafi, Mouna El; Eymet, Vincent; Farges, Olivier; Forest, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Galtier, Mathieu; Gautrais, Jacques; Khuong, Anaïs; Pelissier, Lionel; Piaud, Benjamin; Roger, Maxime; Terrée, Guillaume; Weitz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is widely used to numerically predict systems behaviour. However, its powerful incremental design assumes a strong premise which has severely limited application so far: the estimation process must combine linearly over dimensions. Here we show that this premise can be alleviated by projecting nonlinearities on a polynomial basis and increasing the configuration-space dimension. Considering phytoplankton growth in light-limited environments, radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres, electromagnetic scattering by particles and concentrated-solar-power-plant productions, we prove the real world usability of this advance on four test-cases that were so far regarded as impracticable by Monte Carlo approaches. We also illustrate an outstanding feature of our method when applied to sharp problems with interacting particles: handling rare events is now straightforward. Overall, our extension preserves the features that made the method popular: addressing nonlinearities does not compromise o...

  15. The Wigner Monte-Carlo method for nanoelectronic devices a particle description of quantum transport and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Querlioz, Damien

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of the quantum transport approaches for nanodevices and focuses on the Wigner formalism. It details the implementation of a particle-based Monte Carlo solution of the Wigner transport equation and how the technique is applied to typical devices exhibiting quantum phenomena, such as the resonant tunnelling diode, the ultra-short silicon MOSFET and the carbon nanotube transistor. In the final part, decoherence theory is used to explain the emergence of the semi-classical transport in nanodevices.

  16. Fundamentals of Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaber, Allan Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation which serves as lecture material for the Parallel Computing summer school. It goes over the fundamentals of the Monte Carlo calculation method. The material is presented according to the following outline: Introduction (background, a simple example: estimating π), Why does this even work? (The Law of Large Numbers, The Central Limit Theorem), How to sample (inverse transform sampling, rejection), and An example from particle transport.

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo Benchmark of Exchange-Correlation Functionals for Bulk Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Miguel A; Gergely, John R; McMinis, Jeremy; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Kim, Jeongnim; Ceperley, David M

    2014-06-10

    The accurate description of the thermodynamic and dynamical properties of liquid water from first-principles is a very important challenge to the theoretical community. This represents not only a critical test of the predictive capabilities of first-principles methods, but it will also shed light into the microscopic properties of such an important substance. Density Functional Theory, the main workhorse in the field of first-principles methods, has been so far unable to properly describe water and its unusual properties in the liquid state. With the recent introduction of exact exchange and an improved description of dispersion interaction, the possibility of an accurate description of the liquid is finally within reach. Unfortunately, there is still no way to systematically improve exchange-correlation functionals, and the number of available functionals is very large. In this article we use highly accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations to benchmark a selection of exchange-correlation functionals typically used in Density Functional Theory simulations of bulk water. This allows us to test the predictive capabilities of these functionals in water, giving us a way to choose optimal functionals for first-principles simulations. We compare and contrast the importance of different features of functionals, including the hybrid component, the vdW component, and their importance within different aspects of the PES. In addition, in order to correct the inaccuracies in the description of short-range interactions in the liquid, we test a recently introduced scheme that combines Density Functional Theory with Coupled Cluster calculations through a Many-Body expansion of the energy.

  18. Multiple-Resonance Local Wave Functions for Accurate Excited States in Quantum Monte Carlo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfikri, Habiburrahman; Amovilli, Claudio; Filippi, Claudia

    2016-03-08

    We introduce a novel class of local multideterminant Jastrow-Slater wave functions for the efficient and accurate treatment of excited states in quantum Monte Carlo. The wave function is expanded as a linear combination of excitations built from multiple sets of localized orbitals that correspond to the bonding patterns of the different Lewis resonance structures of the molecule. We capitalize on the concept of orbital domains of local coupled-cluster methods, which is here applied to the active space to select the orbitals to correlate and construct the important transitions. The excitations are further grouped into classes, which are ordered in importance and can be systematically included in the Jastrow-Slater wave function to ensure a balanced description of all states of interest. We assess the performance of the proposed wave function in the calculation of vertical excitation energies and excited-state geometry optimization of retinal models whose π → π* state has a strong intramolecular charge-transfer character. We find that our multiresonance wave functions recover the reference values of the total energies of the ground and excited states with only a small number of excitations and that the same expansion can be flexibly used at very different geometries. Furthermore, significant computational saving can also be gained in the orbital optimization step by selectively mixing occupied and virtual orbitals based on spatial considerations without loss of accuracy on the excitation energy. Our multiresonance wave functions are therefore compact, accurate, and very promising for the calculation of multiple excited states of different character in large molecules.

  19. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Franca Maria; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We investigate here the vertical n → π* and π → π* transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π* case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π* transition.

  20. Electronic excitations in a dielectric continuum solvent with quantum Monte Carlo: Acrolein in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floris, Franca Maria, E-mail: floris@dcci.unipi.it; Amovilli, Claudio [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, Via Risorgimento 35, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Filippi, Claudia [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-01-21

    We investigate here the vertical n → π{sup *} and π → π{sup *} transitions of s-trans-acrolein in aqueous solution by means of a polarizable continuum model (PCM) we have developed for the treatment of the solute at the quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) level of the theory. We employ the QMC approach which allows us to work with highly correlated electronic wave functions for both the solute ground and excited states and, to study the vertical transitions in the solvent, adopt the commonly used scheme of considering fast and slow dielectric polarization. To perform calculations in a non-equilibrium solvation regime for the solute excited state, we add a correction to the global dielectric polarization charge density, obtained self consistently with the solute ground-state wave function by assuming a linear-response scheme. For the solvent polarization in the field of the solute in the ground state, we use the static dielectric constant while, for the electronic dielectric polarization, we employ the solvent refractive index evaluated at the same frequency of the photon absorbed by the solute for the transition. This choice is shown to be better than adopting the most commonly used value of refractive index measured in the region of visible radiation. Our QMC calculations show that, for standard cavities, the solvatochromic shifts obtained with the PCM are underestimated, even though of the correct sign, for both transitions of acrolein in water. Only by reducing the size of the cavity to values where more than one electron is escaped to the solvent region, we regain the experimental shift for the n → π{sup *} case and also improve considerably the shift for the π → π{sup *} transition.

  1. Quantum Mechanical Single Molecule Partition Function from PathIntegral Monte Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji; Bell, Alexis T.; Predescu, Cristian

    2006-10-01

    An algorithm for calculating the partition function of a molecule with the path integral Monte Carlo method is presented. Staged thermodynamic perturbation with respect to a reference harmonic potential is utilized to evaluate the ratio of partition functions. Parallel tempering and a new Monte Carlo estimator for the ratio of partition functions are implemented here to achieve well converged simulations that give an accuracy of 0.04 kcal/mol in the reported free energies. The method is applied to various test systems, including a catalytic system composed of 18 atoms. Absolute free energies calculated by this method lead to corrections as large as 2.6 kcal/mol at 300 K for some of the examples presented.

  2. Monte Carlo Hamiltonian:Inverse Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiang-Qian; CHENG Xiao-Ni; Helmut KR(O)GER

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Hamiltonian method developed recently allows to investigate the ground state and low-lying excited states of a quantum system,using Monte Carlo(MC)algorithm with importance sampling.However,conventional MC algorithm has some difficulties when applied to inverse potentials.We propose to use effective potential and extrapolation method to solve the problem.We present examples from the hydrogen system.

  3. LMC: Logarithmantic Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, Adam B.

    2017-06-01

    LMC is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo engine in Python that implements adaptive Metropolis-Hastings and slice sampling, as well as the affine-invariant method of Goodman & Weare, in a flexible framework. It can be used for simple problems, but the main use case is problems where expensive likelihood evaluations are provided by less flexible third-party software, which benefit from parallelization across many nodes at the sampling level. The parallel/adaptive methods use communication through MPI, or alternatively by writing/reading files, and mostly follow the approaches pioneered by CosmoMC (ascl:1106.025).

  4. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electronic excitation energies: the case of the singlet $n \\to \\pi^*$ (CO) transition in acrolein

    CERN Document Server

    Toulouse, Julien; Reinhardt, Peter; Hoggan, Philip E; Umrigar, C J

    2010-01-01

    We report state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the singlet $n \\to \\pi^*$ (CO) vertical excitation energy in the acrolein molecule, extending the recent study of Bouab\\c{c}a {\\it et al.} [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 130}, 114107 (2009)]. We investigate the effect of using a Slater basis set instead of a Gaussian basis set, and of using state-average versus state-specific complete-active-space (CAS) wave functions, with or without reoptimization of the coefficients of the configuration state functions (CSFs) and of the orbitals in variational Monte Carlo (VMC). It is found that, with the Slater basis set used here, both state-average and state-specific CAS(6,5) wave functions give an accurate excitation energy in diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC), with or without reoptimization of the CSF and orbital coefficients in the presence of the Jastrow factor. In contrast, the CAS(2,2) wave functions require reoptimization of the CSF and orbital coefficients to give a good DMC excitation energy. Our best estimates of ...

  5. Creation of a GUI for Zori, a Quantum Monte Carlo program, usingRappture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares-Amaya, R.; Salomon Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Amador-Bedolla, C.

    2007-12-01

    In their research laboratories, academic institutions produce some of the most advanced software for scientific applications. However, this software is usually developed only for local application in the research laboratory or for method development. In spite of having the latest advances in the particular field of science, such software often lacks adequate documentation and therefore is difficult to use by anyone other than the code developers. As such codes become more complex, so typically do the input files and command statements necessary to operate them. Many programs offer the flexibility of performing calculations based on different methods that have their own set of variables and options to be specified. Moreover, situations can arise in which certain options are incompatible with each other. For this reason, users outside the development group can be unaware of how the program runs in detail. The opportunity can be lost to make the software readily available outside of the laboratory of origin. This is a long-standing problem in scientific programming. Rappture, Rapid Application Infrastructure [1], is a new GUI development kit that enables a developer to build an I/O interface for a specific application. This capability enables users to work only with the generated GUI and avoids the problem of the user needing to learn details of the code. Further, it reduces input errors by explicitly specifying the variables required. Zori, a quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) program, developed by the Lester group at the University of California, Berkeley [2], is one of the few free tools available for this field. Like many scientific computer packages, Zori suffers from the problems described above. Potential users outside the research group have acquired it, but some have found the code difficult to use. Furthermore, new members of the Lester group usually have to take considerable time learning all the options the code has to offer before they can use it successfully. In

  6. Super-resolution quantum sensing using NV centers based on rotating linear polarized light and Monte-Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Hua-Yu; Guo, Guang-Can; Sun, Fang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond has been widely applied for quantum information and sensing in last decade. Based on the laser polarization dependent excitation of fluorescence emission, we propose a super-resolution microscopy of NV center. A series of wide field images of NV centers are taken with different polarizations of the linear polarized excitation laser. The fluorescence intensity of NV center is changed with the relative angle between excitation laser polarization and the orientation of NV center dipole. The images pumped by different excitation laser polarizations are analyzed with Monte Carlo method. Then the symmetry axis and position of NV center are obtained with sub-diffraction resolution.

  7. Calculation of space localized properties in correlated quantum Monte Carlo methods with reweighting: the nonlocality of statistical uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaraf, Roland; Domin, Dominik

    2014-03-01

    We study the efficiency of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods in computing space localized ground state properties (properties which do not depend on distant degrees of freedom) as a function of the system size N. We prove that for the commonly used correlated sampling with reweighting method, the statistical fluctuations σ2(N) do not obey the locality property. σ2(N) grow at least linearly with N and with a slope that is related to the fluctuations of the reweighting factors. We provide numerical illustrations of these tendencies in the form of QMC calculations on linear chains of hydrogen atoms.

  8. Monte Carlo study of PbSe quantum dots as the fluorescent material in luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, S R; Fetterman, M R; Low, J J; You, Guanjun; Jiang, Zhenyu; Xu, Jian

    2014-01-13

    In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the potential efficiencies of luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) systems using PbSe quantum dots (QDs) as the active fluorescent material. The simulation results suggest that PbSe QD LSCs display good absorption characteristics, but yield limited LSC power conversion efficiency due to self-absorption and down-conversion loss. It is proposed that the self-absorption loss can be reduced by utilizing Förster resonance energy transfer between two different sizes of PbSe QDs, yielding pronounced improvement in the optical efficiency of LSCs.

  9. Impact of the Electron Density on the Fixed-Node Errors in Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Rasch, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the effect of increasing charge density on the Fixed Node Errors in Diffusion Monte Carlo by comparing FN-DMC calculations of the total ground state energy on a 4 electron system done with a Hartree-Fock based trial wave function to calculations by the same method on the same system using a Configuration Interaction based trial wave function. We do this for several different values of nuclear charge, Z. The Fixed Node Error of a Hartree-Fock trial wave function for a 4 electron system increases linearly with increasing nuclear charge.

  10. SU-E-T-489: Quantum versus Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo Simulations of Low Energy Electron Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R; Kawrakow, I

    2012-06-01

    Widely-used classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations of low energy electron transport neglect the quantum nature of electrons; however, at sub-1 keV energies quantum effects have the potential to become significant. This work compares quantum and classical simulations within a simplified model of electron transport in water. Electron transport is modeled in water droplets using quantum mechanical (QM) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Water droplets are modeled as collections of point scatterers representing water molecules from which electrons may be isotropically scattered. The role of inelastic scattering is investigated by introducing absorption. QM calculations involve numerically solving a system of coupled equations for the electron wavefield incident on each scatterer. A minimum distance between scatterers is introduced to approximate structured water. The average QM water droplet incoherent cross section is compared with the MC cross section; a relative error (RE) on the MC results is computed. RE varies with electron energy, average and minimum distances between scatterers, and scattering amplitude. The mean free path is generally the relevant length scale for estimating RE. The introduction of a minimum distance between scatterers increases RE substantially (factors of 5 to 10), suggesting that the structure of water must be modeled for accurate simulations. Inelastic scattering does not improve agreement between QM and MC simulations: for the same magnitude of elastic scattering, the introduction of inelastic scattering increases RE. Droplet cross sections are sensitive to droplet size and shape; considerable variations in RE are observed with changing droplet size and shape. At sub-1 keV energies, quantum effects may become non-negligible for electron transport in condensed media. Electron transport is strongly affected by the structure of the medium. Inelastic scatter does not improve agreement between QM and MC simulations of low

  11. MCMini: Monte Carlo on GPGPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Ryan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    MCMini is a proof of concept that demonstrates the possibility for Monte Carlo neutron transport using OpenCL with a focus on performance. This implementation, written in C, shows that tracing particles and calculating reactions on a 3D mesh can be done in a highly scalable fashion. These results demonstrate a potential path forward for MCNP or other Monte Carlo codes.

  12. Ab initio molecular dynamics with noisy forces: Validating the quantum Monte Carlo approach with benchmark calculations of molecular vibrational properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Ye, E-mail: xw111luoye@gmail.com; Sorella, Sandro, E-mail: sorella@sissa.it [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), and CRS Democritos, CNR-INFM, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Zen, Andrea, E-mail: zen.andrea.x@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-11-21

    We present a systematic study of a recently developed ab initio simulation scheme based on molecular dynamics and quantum Monte Carlo. In this approach, a damped Langevin molecular dynamics is employed by using a statistical evaluation of the forces acting on each atom by means of quantum Monte Carlo. This allows the use of an highly correlated wave function parametrized by several variational parameters and describing quite accurately the Born-Oppenheimer energy surface, as long as these parameters are determined at the minimum energy condition. However, in a statistical method both the minimization method and the evaluation of the atomic forces are affected by the statistical noise. In this work, we study systematically the accuracy and reliability of this scheme by targeting the vibrational frequencies of simple molecules such as the water monomer, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and phosphine. We show that all sources of systematic errors can be controlled and reliable frequencies can be obtained with a reasonable computational effort. This work provides convincing evidence that this molecular dynamics scheme can be safely applied also to realistic systems containing several atoms.

  13. Monte Carlo methods for electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Sadiku, Matthew NO

    2009-01-01

    Until now, novices had to painstakingly dig through the literature to discover how to use Monte Carlo techniques for solving electromagnetic problems. Written by one of the foremost researchers in the field, Monte Carlo Methods for Electromagnetics provides a solid understanding of these methods and their applications in electromagnetic computation. Including much of his own work, the author brings together essential information from several different publications.Using a simple, clear writing style, the author begins with a historical background and review of electromagnetic theory. After addressing probability and statistics, he introduces the finite difference method as well as the fixed and floating random walk Monte Carlo methods. The text then applies the Exodus method to Laplace's and Poisson's equations and presents Monte Carlo techniques for handing Neumann problems. It also deals with whole field computation using the Markov chain, applies Monte Carlo methods to time-varying diffusion problems, and ...

  14. Energy-consistent small-core pseudopotentials for 3d-transition metals adapted to quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkatzki, M; Filippi, Claudia; Dolg, M

    2008-10-28

    We extend our recently published set of energy-consistent scalar-relativistic Hartree-Fock pseudopotentials by the 3d-transition metal elements, scandium through zinc. The pseudopotentials do not exhibit a singularity at the nucleus and are therefore suitable for quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations. The pseudopotentials and the accompanying basis sets (VnZ with n=T,Q) are given in standard Gaussian representation and their parameter sets are presented. Coupled cluster, configuration interaction, and QMC studies are carried out for the scandium and titanium atoms and their oxides, demonstrating the good performance of the pseudopotentials. Even though the choice of pseudopotential form is motivated by QMC, these pseudopotentials can also be employed in other quantum chemical approaches.

  15. Statistical Exploration of Electronic Structure of Molecules from Quantum Monte-Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhat, Mr; Zubarev, Dmitry; Lester, Jr., William A.

    2010-12-22

    In this report, we present results from analysis of Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulation data with the goal of determining internal structure of a 3N-dimensional phase space of an N-electron molecule. We are interested in mining the simulation data for patterns that might be indicative of the bond rearrangement as molecules change electronic states. We examined simulation output that tracks the positions of two coupled electrons in the singlet and triplet states of an H2 molecule. The electrons trace out a trajectory, which was analyzed with a number of statistical techniques. This project was intended to address the following scientific questions: (1) Do high-dimensional phase spaces characterizing electronic structure of molecules tend to cluster in any natural way? Do we see a change in clustering patterns as we explore different electronic states of the same molecule? (2) Since it is hard to understand the high-dimensional space of trajectories, can we project these trajectories to a lower dimensional subspace to gain a better understanding of patterns? (3) Do trajectories inherently lie in a lower-dimensional manifold? Can we recover that manifold? After extensive statistical analysis, we are now in a better position to respond to these questions. (1) We definitely see clustering patterns, and differences between the H2 and H2tri datasets. These are revealed by the pamk method in a fairly reliable manner and can potentially be used to distinguish bonded and non-bonded systems and get insight into the nature of bonding. (2) Projecting to a lower dimensional subspace ({approx}4-5) using PCA or Kernel PCA reveals interesting patterns in the distribution of scalar values, which can be related to the existing descriptors of electronic structure of molecules. Also, these results can be immediately used to develop robust tools for analysis of noisy data obtained during QMC simulations (3) All dimensionality reduction and estimation techniques that we tried seem to

  16. Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion quantum Monte Carlo study on the bond lengths and harmonic frequencies of some first-row diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2004-02-01

    This article accesses the performance of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion quantum Monte Carlo with regard to the calculation of molecular geometries and harmonic frequencies of H2, LiH, HF, Li2, LiF, CO, N2, and F2 molecules. A comparison of the results for the eight first-row diatomic molecules from experiments, CCSD(T)/6-311G(3df,3pd) and CCSD(T)/cc-pV5Z levels of theory as well as our work is given. The results presented show that quantum Monte Carlo is becoming powerful tools for ab initio electronic structure calculations.

  17. Lectures on Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Madras, Neal

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods form an experimental branch of mathematics that employs simulations driven by random number generators. These methods are often used when others fail, since they are much less sensitive to the "curse of dimensionality", which plagues deterministic methods in problems with a large number of variables. Monte Carlo methods are used in many fields: mathematics, statistics, physics, chemistry, finance, computer science, and biology, for instance. This book is an introduction to Monte Carlo methods for anyone who would like to use these methods to study various kinds of mathemati

  18. A multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model for charge transport: Application to organic field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Thilo; Jäger, Christof M. [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Computer-Chemistry-Center and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nägelsbachstrasse 25, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Jordan, Meredith J. T. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Clark, Timothy, E-mail: tim.clark@fau.de [Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy, Computer-Chemistry-Center and Interdisciplinary Center for Molecular Materials, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Nägelsbachstrasse 25, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Centre for Molecular Design, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-28

    We have developed a multi-agent quantum Monte Carlo model to describe the spatial dynamics of multiple majority charge carriers during conduction of electric current in the channel of organic field-effect transistors. The charge carriers are treated by a neglect of diatomic differential overlap Hamiltonian using a lattice of hydrogen-like basis functions. The local ionization energy and local electron affinity defined previously map the bulk structure of the transistor channel to external potentials for the simulations of electron- and hole-conduction, respectively. The model is designed without a specific charge-transport mechanism like hopping- or band-transport in mind and does not arbitrarily localize charge. An electrode model allows dynamic injection and depletion of charge carriers according to source-drain voltage. The field-effect is modeled by using the source-gate voltage in a Metropolis-like acceptance criterion. Although the current cannot be calculated because the simulations have no time axis, using the number of Monte Carlo moves as pseudo-time gives results that resemble experimental I/V curves.

  19. A benchmark study of the two-dimensional Hubbard model with auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Mingpu; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Ground state properties of the Hubbard model on a two-dimensional square lattice are studied by the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method. Accurate results for energy, double occupancy, effective hopping, magnetization, and momentum distribution are calculated for interaction strengths of U/t from 2 to 8, for a range of densities including half-filling and n = 0.3, 0.5, 0.6, 0.75, and 0.875. At half-filling, the results are numerically exact. Away from half-filling, the constrained path Monte Carlo method is employed to control the sign problem. Our results are obtained with several advances in the computational algorithm, which are described in detail. We discuss the advantages of generalized Hartree-Fock trial wave functions and its connection to pairing wave functions, as well as the interplay with different forms of Hubbard-Stratonovich decompositions. We study the use of different twist angle sets when applying the twist averaged boundary conditions. We propose the use of quasi-random sequences, whi...

  20. Quantum Monte Carlo study on the phase transition for a generalized two-dimensional staggered dimerized Heisenberg model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Rui; Liu Bang-Gui

    2012-01-01

    In order to gain a deeper understanding of the quantum criticality in the explicitly staggered dimerized Heisenberg models,we study a generalized staggered dimer model named the J0 J1-J2 model,which corresponds to the staggered J J’ model on a square lattice and a honeycomb lattice when J1/J0 equals 1 and 0,respectively.Using the quantum Monte Carlo method,we investigate all the quantum critical points of these models with J1/J0 changing from 0 to 1as a function of coupling ratio α =J2/J0.We extract all the critical values of the coupling ratio αc for these models,and we also obtain the critical exponents v,β/v,and η using different finite-size scaling ans(a)tz,.All these exponents are not consistent with the three-dimensional Heisenberg universality class,indicating some unconventional quantum ciritcial points in these models.

  1. Monte Carlo integration on GPU

    OpenAIRE

    Kanzaki, J.

    2010-01-01

    We use a graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computations of Monte Carlo integrations. Two widely used Monte Carlo integration programs, VEGAS and BASES, are parallelized on GPU. By using $W^{+}$ plus multi-gluon production processes at LHC, we test integrated cross sections and execution time for programs in FORTRAN and C on CPU and those on GPU. Integrated results agree with each other within statistical errors. Execution time of programs on GPU run about 50 times faster than those in C...

  2. Static and dynamical correlation in diradical molecules by Quantum Monte Carlo using the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power ansatz

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Diradical molecules are essential species involved in many organic and inorganic chemical reactions. The computational study of their electronic structure is often challenging, because a reliable description of the correlation, and in particular of the static one, requires multi-reference techniques. The Jastrow correlated Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) is a compact and efficient wave function ansatz, based on the valence-bond representation, which can be used within Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approaches. The AGP part can be rewritten in terms of molecular orbitals, obtaining a multi-determinant expansion with zero-seniority number. In the present work we demonstrate the capability of the JAGP ansatz to correctly describe the electronic structure of two diradical prototypes: the orthogonally twisted ethylene, C2H4, and the methylene, CH2, representing respectively a homosymmetric and heterosymmetric system. On the other hand, we show that the simple ansatz of a Jastrow correlated Single Determinant (JSD)...

  3. Wang-Landau method for calculating Rényi entropies in finite-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Stephen; Melko, Roger G

    2013-01-01

    We implement a Wang-Landau sampling technique in quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations for the purpose of calculating the Rényi entanglement entropies and associated mutual information. The algorithm converges an estimate for an analog to the density of states for stochastic series expansion QMC, allowing a direct calculation of Rényi entropies without explicit thermodynamic integration. We benchmark results for the mutual information on two-dimensional (2D) isotropic and anisotropic Heisenberg models, a 2D transverse field Ising model, and a three-dimensional Heisenberg model, confirming a critical scaling of the mutual information in cases with a finite-temperature transition. We discuss the benefits and limitations of broad sampling techniques compared to standard importance sampling methods.

  4. Spin gap and string order parameter in the ferromagnetic spiral staircase heisenberg ladder: a quantum Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brünger, C; Assaad, F F; Capponi, S; Alet, F; Aristov, D N; Kiselev, M N

    2008-01-11

    We consider a spin-1/2 ladder with a ferromagnetic rung coupling J perpendicular and inequivalent chains. This model is obtained by a twist (theta) deformation of the ladder and interpolates between the isotropic ladder (theta=0) and the SU(2) ferromagnetic Kondo necklace model (theta = pi). We show that the ground state in the (theta, J perpendicular) plane has a finite string order parameter characterizing the Haldane phase. Twisting the chain introduces a new energy scale, which we interpret in terms of a Suhl-Nakamura interaction. As a consequence we observe a crossover in the scaling of the spin gap at weak coupling from delta/J parallel proportional, variant J perpendicular/J parallel for theta theta c. Those results are obtained on the basis of large scale quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

  5. Quantum Disordered State without Frustration in the Double Layer Heisenberg Antiferromagnet —Dimer Expansion and Projector Monte Carlo Study—

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Kazuo

    1992-03-01

    The quantum disordered state (QDOS) of the spin 1/2 double layer square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet is studied. Using the dimer expansion from the limit of the large interlayer coupling J', the staggered susceptibility χ, the antiferromagnetic structure factor Sπ and the antiferromagnetic correlation length ξ are calculated up to the 6-th order in the intralayer coupling J. The ratio analysis shows that the QDOS becomes unstable against the Néel ordering at J'/J≃2.56. The critical exponents are not inconsistent with the universality class of the 3-dimensional classical Heisenberg model, suggesting that our QDOS corresponds to that expected in the 2-dimensional square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet with unphysically small spin (<0.276). The results of the projector Monte Carlo simulation also confirms the dimer expansion results.

  6. Binding energies of trions and biexcitons in two-dimensional semiconductors from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyniszewski, M.; Mostaani, E.; Drummond, N. D.; Fal'ko, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    Excitonic effects play a particularly important role in the optoelectronic behavior of two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors. To facilitate the interpretation of experimental photoabsorption and photoluminescence spectra we provide statistically exact diffusion quantum Monte Carlo binding-energy data for Mott-Wannier models of excitons, trions, and biexcitons in 2D semiconductors. We also provide contact pair densities to allow a description of contact (exchange) interactions between charge carriers using first-order perturbation theory. Our data indicate that the binding energy of a trion is generally larger than that of a biexciton in 2D semiconductors. We provide interpolation formulas giving the binding energy and contact density of 2D semiconductors as functions of the electron and hole effective masses and the in-plane polarizability.

  7. {\\em Ab initio} Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of the warm dense electron gas in the thermodynamic limit

    CERN Document Server

    Dornheim, Tobias; Sjostrom, Travis; Malone, Fionn D; Foulkes, W M C; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We perform \\emph{ab initio} quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations of the warm dense uniform electron gas in the thermodynamic limit. By combining QMC data with linear response theory we are able to remove finite-size errors from the potential energy over the entire warm dense regime, overcoming the deficiencies of the existing finite-size corrections by Brown \\emph{et al.}~[PRL \\textbf{110}, 146405 (2013)]. Extensive new QMC results for up to $N=1000$ electrons enable us to compute the potential energy $V$ and the exchange-correlation free energy $F_{xc}$ of the macroscopic electron gas with an unprecedented accuracy of $|\\Delta V|/|V|, |\\Delta F_{xc}|/|F|_{xc} \\sim 10^{-3}$. A comparison of our new data to the recent parametrization of $F_{xc}$ by Karasiev {\\em et al.} [PRL {\\bf 112}, 076403 (2014)] reveals significant inaccuracies of the latter.

  8. Toward Accurate Reaction Energetics for Molecular Line Growth at Surface: Quantum Monte Carlo and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai, Y; Takeuchi, N

    2009-10-14

    We revisit the molecular line growth mechanism of styrene on the hydrogenated Si(001) 2x1 surface. In particular, we investigate the energetics of the radical chain reaction mechanism by means of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the exchange correlation (XC) functional we use the non-empirical generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) and meta-GGA. We find that the QMC result also predicts the intra dimer-row growth of the molecular line over the inter dimer-row growth, supporting the conclusion based on DFT results. However, the absolute magnitudes of the adsorption and reaction energies, and the heights of the energy barriers differ considerably between the QMC and DFT with the GGA/meta-GGA XC functionals.

  9. The roles of antiferromagnetic and nematic fluctuations in cuprate superconductors: a sign-free quantum Monte-Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zixiang; Yao, Hong; Wang, Fa; Lee, Dung-Hai

    Superconductivity is an emergent phenomena in the sense that the energy scale at which Cooper pairs form is generically much lower than the bare energy scale, namely the electron kinetic energy bandwidth. Addressing the mechanism of Cooper pairing amounts to finding out the effective interaction (or the renormalized interaction) that operates at the low energies. Finding such interaction from the bare microscopic Hamiltonian has not been possible for strong correlated superconductors such as the copper-oxide high temperature superconductor. In fact even one is given the effective interaction, determining its implied electronic instabilities without making any approximation has been a formidable task. Here, we perform sign-free quantum Monte-Carlo simulations to study the antiferromagnetic, superconducting, and the charge density wave instabilities which are ubiquitous in both electron and hole doped cuprates. Our result suggests only after including both the nematic and antiferromagnetic fluctuation, are the observed properties associated with these instabilities reproduced by the theory.

  10. Ab initio quantum Monte Carlo study of the binding of a positron to alkali-metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Yukiumi; Maezono, Ryo; Tachikawa, Masanori; Towler, Mike D; Needs, Richard J

    2011-08-07

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used to investigate the binding of a positron to the alkali-metal hydrides, XH (X = Na and K). We obtain positron affinities for the NaH and KH molecules of 1.422(10) eV and 2.051(39) eV, respectively. These are considerably larger than the previous results of 1.035 eV and 1.273 eV obtained from multireference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction calculations. Together with our previous results for [LiH;e(+)] [Y. Kita et al., J. Chem. Phys. 131, 134310 (2009)], our study confirms the strong correlation between the positron affinity and dipole moment of alkali-metal hydrides.

  11. Quantum Monte Carlo study of one-dimensional transition metal organometallic cluster systems and their suitability as spin filters

    CERN Document Server

    Horváthová, L; Mitas, L; Štich, I

    2014-01-01

    We present calculations of electronic and magnetic structures of vanadium-benzene multidecker clusters V$_{n}$Bz$_{n+1}$ ($n$ = 1 - 3) using advanced quantum Monte Carlo methods. These and related systems have been identified as prospective spin filters in spintronic applications, assuming that their ground states are half-metallic ferromagnets. Although we find that magnetic properties of these multideckers are consistent with ferromagnetic coupling, their electronic structures do not appear to be half-metallic as previously assumed. In fact, they are ferromagnetic insulators with large and broadly similar $\\uparrow$-/$\\downarrow$-spin gaps. This makes the potential of these and related materials as spin filtering devices very limited, unless they are further modified or functionalized.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo studies of relativistic effects in 3H and 4He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaga, A.

    2000-03-01

    Relativistic effects in 3H and 4He have been studied in the context of Relativistic Hamiltonian Dynamics, using Variational Monte Carlo Methods. Relativistic invariance is achieved through Poincaré group algebra, which introduces a boost interaction term defining the first relativistic effect considered. The second consists in the nonlocalities associated with the relativistic kinetic energy operator and with the relativistic one-pion exchange potential (OPEP). These nonlocalities tend to cancel, being the total effect on the binding energy attractive and very small, of the order of 1%. The dominant relativistic effect is due to the boost interaction, whose contribution is repulsive and of the order of 5%. The repulsive term of the nonrelativistic 3-body interaction has to be reduced by 37% so that the optimal triton binding energy is recovered, meaning that around 1/3 of this phenomenological term accounts for relativisitic effects. The changes induced on the wave functions of nuclei by these relativistic effetcs are very small and short ranged. Although the nonlocalities of OPEP, resulting in a reduction of 15%, are cancelled by other relativistic contributions, they may have significant effects on pion exchange currents in nuclei.

  13. Noncovalent Interactions by Quantum Monte Carlo: A Speedup by a Smart Basis Set Reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Dubecký, Matúš

    2015-01-01

    A fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) method provides a promising alternative to the commonly used coupled-cluster (CC) methods, in the domain of benchmark noncovalent interaction energy calculations. This is mainly true for a low-order polynomial CPU cost scaling of FN-DMC and favorable FN error cancellation leading to benchmark interaction energies accurate to 0.1 kcal/mol. While it is empirically accepted that the FN-DMC results depend weakly on the one-particle basis sets used to expand the guiding functions, limits of this assumption remain elusive. Our recent work indicates that augmented triple zeta basis sets are sufficient to achieve a benchmark level of 0.1 kcal/mol. Here we report on a possibility of significant truncation of the one-particle basis sets without any visible bias on the overall accuracy of the final FN-DMC energy differences. The approach is tested on a set of seven small noncovalent closed-shell complexes including a water dimer. The reported findings enable cheaper high-quali...

  14. Microscopic distribution functions, structure, and kinetic energy of liquid and solid neon: quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Martin; Zoppi, Marco

    2002-03-01

    We have performed extensive path integral Monte Carlo simulations of liquid and solid neon, in order to derive the kinetic energy as well as the single-particle and pair distribution functions of neon atoms in the condensed phases. From the single-particle distribution function n(r) one can derive the momentum distribution and thus obtain an independent estimate of the kinetic energy. The simulations have been carried out using mostly the semiempirical HFD-C2 pair potential by Aziz et al. [R. A. Aziz, W. J. Meath, and A. R. Allnatt, Chem. Phys. 79, 295 (1983)], but, in a few cases, we have also used the Lennard-Jones potential. The differences between the potentials, as measured by the properties investigated, are not very large, especially when compared with the actual precision of the experimental data. The simulation results have been compared with all the experimental information that is available from neutron scattering. The overall agreement with the experiments is very good.

  15. Monte Carlo Hamiltonian:Linear Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUOXiang-Qian; HelmutKROEGER; 等

    2002-01-01

    We further study the validity of the Monte Carlo Hamiltonian method .The advantage of the method,in comparison with the standard Monte Carlo Lagrangian approach,is its capability to study the excited states.We consider two quantum mechanical models:a symmetric one V(x)=/x/2;and an asymmetric one V(x)==∞,for x<0 and V(x)=2,for x≥0.The results for the spectrum,wave functions and thermodynamical observables are in agreement with the analytical or Runge-Kutta calculations.

  16. Self-learning Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwei; Qi, Yang; Meng, Zi Yang; Fu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is an unbiased numerical tool for studying classical and quantum many-body systems. One of its bottlenecks is the lack of a general and efficient update algorithm for large size systems close to the phase transition, for which local updates perform badly. In this Rapid Communication, we propose a general-purpose Monte Carlo method, dubbed self-learning Monte Carlo (SLMC), in which an efficient update algorithm is first learned from the training data generated in trial simulations and then used to speed up the actual simulation. We demonstrate the efficiency of SLMC in a spin model at the phase transition point, achieving a 10-20 times speedup.

  17. Exploring the foundations of quantum mechanics using Monte Carlo simulations of the Freedman-Clauser experimental test of Bell's Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulkes, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of the Freedman-Clauser experiment are used to test the Copenhagen interpretation and a local realistic interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. The simulated results are compared to the actual results of the experiment which confirmed the quantum mechanical calculation for nine different relative angles between the two polarization analyzers. For each simulation 5x10^7 total simulated photon pairs were generated at each relative angle. The Copenhagen interpretation model closely followed the general shape of the theoretical calculation but differed from the calculated values by 2.5% to 3.3% for angles less than or equal to π/8 and differed by 15.0% to 52.5% for angles greater than or equal to 3π/8. The local realistic interpretation model did not replicate the experimental results but was generally within 1% of a classical calculation for all analyzer angles. An alternative, ``fuzzy polarization'' interpretation wherein the photon polarization is not assumed to have a fixed value, yielded values within 1% of the quantum mechanical calculation.

  18. Variational Monte Carlo study of chiral spin liquid in quantum antiferromagnet on the triangular lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-Jun; Gong, Shou-Shu; Sheng, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    By using Gutzwiller projected fermionic wave functions and variational Monte Carlo technique, we study the spin-1 /2 Heisenberg model with the first-neighbor (J1), second-neighbor (J2), and additional scalar chiral interaction JχSi.(Sj×Sk) on the triangular lattice. In the nonmagnetic phase of the J1-J2 triangular model with 0.08 ≲J2/J1≲0.16 , recent density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) studies [Zhu and White, Phys. Rev. B 92, 041105(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.041105 and Hu, Gong, Zhu, and Sheng, Phys. Rev. B 92, 140403(R) (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.140403] find a possible gapped spin liquid with the signal of a competition between a chiral and a Z2 spin liquid. Motivated by the DMRG results, we consider the chiral interaction JχSi.(Sj×Sk) as a perturbation for this nonmagnetic phase. We find that with growing Jχ, the gapless U(1) Dirac spin liquid, which has the best variational energy for Jχ=0 , exhibits the energy instability towards a gapped spin liquid with nontrivial magnetic fluxes and nonzero chiral order. We calculate topological Chern number and ground-state degeneracy, both of which identify this flux state as the chiral spin liquid with fractionalized Chern number C =1 /2 and twofold topological degeneracy. Our results indicate a positive direction to stabilize a chiral spin liquid near the nonmagnetic phase of the J1-J2 triangular model.

  19. Molecular properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: an investigation on the role of the wave function ansatz and the basis set in the water molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Zen, Andrea; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely: the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Throu...

  20. Static and Dynamical Correlation in Diradical Molecules by Quantum Monte Carlo Using the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power Ansatz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Andrea; Coccia, Emanuele; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-03-11

    Diradical molecules are essential species involved in many organic and inorganic chemical reactions. The computational study of their electronic structure is often challenging, because a reliable description of the correlation, and in particular of the static one, requires multireference techniques. The Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) is a compact and efficient wave function ansatz, based on the valence-bond representation, which can be used within quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) approaches. The AGP part can be rewritten in terms of molecular orbitals, obtaining a multideterminant expansion with zero-seniority number. In the present work we demonstrate the capability of the JAGP ansatz to correctly describe the electronic structure of two diradical prototypes: the orthogonally twisted ethylene, C2H4, and the methylene, CH2, representing respectively a homosymmetric and heterosymmetric system. In the orthogonally twisted ethylene, we find a degeneracy of π and π* molecular orbitals, as correctly predicted by multireference procedures, and our best estimates of the twisting barrier, using respectively the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods, are 71.9(1) and 70.2(2) kcal/mol, in very good agreement with the high-level MR-CISD+Q value, 69.2 kcal/mol. In the methylene we estimate an adiabatic triplet-singlet (X̃(3)B1-ã(1)A1) energy gap of 8.32(7) and 8.64(6) kcal/mol, using respectively VMC and LRDMC, consistently with the experimental-derived finding for Te, 9.363 kcal/mol. On the other hand, we show that the simple ansatz of a Jastrow correlated single determinant (JSD) wave function is unable to provide an accurate description of the electronic structure in these diradical molecules, both at variational level (VMC torsional barrier of C2H4 of 99.3(2) kcal/mol, triplet-singlet energy gap of CH2 of 13.45(10) kcal/mol) and, more remarkably, in the fixed-nodes projection schemes (LRDMC

  1. Multilevel sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    KAUST Repository

    Beskos, Alexandros

    2016-08-29

    In this article we consider the approximation of expectations w.r.t. probability distributions associated to the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs); this scenario appears routinely in Bayesian inverse problems. In practice, one often has to solve the associated PDE numerically, using, for instance finite element methods which depend on the step-size level . hL. In addition, the expectation cannot be computed analytically and one often resorts to Monte Carlo methods. In the context of this problem, it is known that the introduction of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method can reduce the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error. This is achieved via a telescoping identity associated to a Monte Carlo approximation of a sequence of probability distributions with discretization levels . ∞>h0>h1⋯>hL. In many practical problems of interest, one cannot achieve an i.i.d. sampling of the associated sequence and a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) version of the MLMC method is introduced to deal with this problem. It is shown that under appropriate assumptions, the attractive property of a reduction of the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error, can be maintained within the SMC context. That is, relative to exact sampling and Monte Carlo for the distribution at the finest level . hL. The approach is numerically illustrated on a Bayesian inverse problem. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Characterization and Monte Carlo simulation of single ion Geiger mode avalanche diodes integrated with a quantum dot nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Peter; Abraham, J. B. S.; Ten Eyck, G.; Childs, K. D.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S.

    Detection of single ion implantation within a nanostructure is necessary for the high yield fabrication of implanted donor-based quantum computing architectures. Single ion Geiger mode avalanche (SIGMA) diodes with a laterally integrated nanostructure capable of forming a quantum dot were fabricated and characterized using photon pulses. The detection efficiency of this design was measured as a function of wavelength, lateral position, and for varying delay times between the photon pulse and the overbias detection window. Monte Carlo simulations based only on the random diffusion of photo-generated carriers and the geometrical placement of the avalanche region agrees qualitatively with device characterization. Based on these results, SIGMA detection efficiency appears to be determined solely by the diffusion of photo-generated electron-hole pairs into a buried avalanche region. Device performance is then highly dependent on the uniformity of the underlying silicon substrate and the proximity of photo-generated carriers to the silicon-silicon dioxide interface, which are the most important limiting factors for reaching the single ion detection limit with SIGMA detectors. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the Bose-polaron problem in a one-dimensional gas with contact interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, L.; Giorgini, S.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theoretical study based upon quantum Monte Carlo methods of the Bose polaron in one-dimensional systems with contact interactions. In this instance of the problem of a single impurity immersed in a quantum bath, the medium is a Lieb-Liniger gas of bosons ranging from the weakly interacting to the Tonks-Girardeau regime, whereas the impurity is coupled to the bath via a different contact potential, producing both repulsive and attractive interactions. Both the case of a mobile impurity, having the same mass as the particles in the medium, and the case of a static impurity with infinite mass are considered. We make use of numerical techniques that allow us to calculate the ground-state energy of the impurity, its effective mass, and the contact parameter between the impurity and the bath. These quantities are investigated as a function of the strength of interactions between the impurity and the bath and within the bath. In particular, we find that the effective mass rapidly increases to very large values when the impurity gets strongly coupled to an otherwise weakly repulsive bath. This heavy impurity hardly moves within the medium, thereby realizing the "self-localization" regime of the Landau-Pekar polaron. Furthermore, we compare our results with predictions of perturbation theory valid for weak interactions and with exact solutions available when the bosons in the medium behave as impenetrable particles.

  4. Numerical stabilization of entanglement computation in auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo simulations of interacting many-fermion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broecker, Peter; Trebst, Simon

    2016-12-01

    In the absence of a fermion sign problem, auxiliary-field (or determinantal) quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) approaches have long been the numerical method of choice for unbiased, large-scale simulations of interacting many-fermion systems. More recently, the conceptual scope of this approach has been expanded by introducing ingenious schemes to compute entanglement entropies within its framework. On a practical level, these approaches, however, suffer from a variety of numerical instabilities that have largely impeded their applicability. Here we report on a number of algorithmic advances to overcome many of these numerical instabilities and significantly improve the calculation of entanglement measures in the zero-temperature projective DQMC approach, ultimately allowing us to reach similar system sizes as for the computation of conventional observables. We demonstrate the applicability of this improved DQMC approach by providing an entanglement perspective on the quantum phase transition from a magnetically ordered Mott insulator to a band insulator in the bilayer square lattice Hubbard model at half filling.

  5. Equilibrium Statistics: Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Martin

    Monte Carlo methods use random numbers, or ‘random’ sequences, to sample from a known shape of a distribution, or to extract distribution by other means. and, in the context of this book, to (i) generate representative equilibrated samples prior being subjected to external fields, or (ii) evaluate high-dimensional integrals. Recipes for both topics, and some more general methods, are summarized in this chapter. It is important to realize, that Monte Carlo should be as artificial as possible to be efficient and elegant. Advanced Monte Carlo ‘moves’, required to optimize the speed of algorithms for a particular problem at hand, are outside the scope of this brief introduction. One particular modern example is the wavelet-accelerated MC sampling of polymer chains [406].

  6. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  7. Theoretical study of transition state structure and reaction enthalpy of the F + H2-->HF + H reaction by a diffusion quantum Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I

    2005-05-15

    Ab initio calculations of transition state structure and reaction enthalpy of the F + H2-->HF + H reaction has been carried out by the fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method in this study. The Monte Carlo sampling is based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck random walks guided by a trial wave function constructed from the floating spherical Gaussian orbitals and spherical Gaussian geminals. The Monte Carlo calculated barrier height of 1.09(16) kcal/mol is consistent with the experimental values, 0.86(10)/1.18(10) kcal/mol, and the calculated value from the multireference-type coupled-cluster (MRCC) calculation with the aug-cc-pVQZ(F)/cc-pVQZ(H) basis set, 1.11 kcal/mol. The Monte Carlo-based calculation also gives a similar value of the reaction enthalpy, -32.00(4) kcal/mol, compared with the experimental value, -32.06(17) kcal/mol, and the calculated value from a MRCC/aug-cc-pVQZ(F)/cc-pVQZ(H) calculation, -31.94 kcal/mol. This study clearly indicates a further application of the random-walk-based approach in the field of quantum chemical calculation.

  8. Monte Carlo study of real time dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandru, Andrei; Bedaque, Paulo F; Vartak, Sohan; Warrington, Neill C

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo studies involving real time dynamics are severely restricted by the sign problem that emerges from highly oscillatory phase of the path integral. In this letter, we present a new method to compute real time quantities on the lattice using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism via Monte Carlo simulations. The key idea is to deform the path integration domain to a complex manifold where the phase oscillations are mild and the sign problem is manageable. We use the previously introduced "contraction algorithm" to create a Markov chain on this alternative manifold. We substantiate our approach by analyzing the quantum mechanical anharmonic oscillator. Our results are in agreement with the exact ones obtained by diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The method we introduce is generic and in principle applicable to quantum field theory albeit very slow. We discuss some possible improvements that should speed up the algorithm.

  9. Typicality in Ensembles of Quantum States: Monte Carlo Sampling vs Analytical Approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Fresch, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Random Quantum States are presently of interest in the fields of quantum information theory and quantum chaos. Moreover, a detailed study of their properties can shed light on some foundational issues of the quantum statistical mechanics such as the emergence of well defined thermal properties from the pure quantum mechanical description of large many body systems. When dealing with an ensemble of pure quantum states, two questions naturally arise: what is the probability density function on the parameters which specify the state of the system in a given ensemble? And, does there exist a most typical value of a function of interest in the considered ensemble? Here two different ensembles are considered: the Random Pure State Ensemble (RPSE) and the Fixed Expectation Energy Ensemble (FEEE). By means of a suitable parameterization of the wave function in terms of populations and phases, we focus on the probability distribution of the populations in such ensembles. A comparison is made between the distribution i...

  10. Monte Carlo Particle Lists: MCPL

    CERN Document Server

    Kittelmann, Thomas; Knudsen, Erik B; Willendrup, Peter; Cai, Xiao Xiao; Kanaki, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    A binary format with lists of particle state information, for interchanging particles between various Monte Carlo simulation applications, is presented. Portable C code for file manipulation is made available to the scientific community, along with converters and plugins for several popular simulation packages.

  11. Applications of Monte Carlo Methods in Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheldon P.; Gordon, Florence S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the application of probabilistic ideas, especially Monte Carlo simulation, to calculus. Describes some applications using the Monte Carlo method: Riemann sums; maximizing and minimizing a function; mean value theorems; and testing conjectures. (YP)

  12. Competing collinear magnetic structures in superconducting FeSe by first-principles quantum Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Brian; Dagrada, Mario; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2016-07-01

    Resolving the interplay between magnetic interactions and structural properties in strongly correlated materials through a quantitatively accurate approach has been a major challenge in condensed-matter physics. Here we apply highly accurate first-principles quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) techniques to obtain structural and magnetic properties of the iron selenide (FeSe) superconductor under pressure. Where comparable, the computed properties are very close to the experimental values. Of potential ordered magnetic configurations, collinear spin configurations are the most energetically favorable over the explored pressure range. They become nearly degenerate in energy with bicollinear spin orderings at around 7 GPa, when the experimental critical temperature Tc is the highest. On the other hand, ferromagnetic, checkerboard, and staggered dimer configurations become relatively higher in energy as the pressure increases. The behavior under pressure is explained by an analysis of the local charge compressibility and the orbital occupation as described by the QMC many-body wave function, which reveals how spin, charge, and orbital degrees of freedom are strongly coupled in this compound. This remarkable pressure evolution suggests that stripelike magnetic fluctuations may be responsible for the enhanced Tc in FeSe and that higher Tc is associated with nearness to a crossover between collinear and bicollinear ordering.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation of antiferromagnetic spin ladder (C5H12N)2CuBr4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Augusto S.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper I present a Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) study of the magnetic properties of an antiferromagnetic spin ladder (C5H12N)2CuBr4. This compound is the prototype of the Heisenberg model for a two leg spin ladder in the presence of an external magnetic field. The susceptibility phase diagram has a rounded peak in the vicinity of T=7.4 K, obeys Troyer's law for low temperatures, and Curie's law for high temperatures. I also study the susceptibility diagram in low temperatures and I found the spin gap Δ=9.26 K, in good concordance with the experimental value, 9.5 K. In high field, I present a diagram of magnetization as a function of temperature. In the vicinity of a critical field, Hci, the magnetization scales with T1/2 and this result was found also in the QMC simulation. In all the results, there is a very good concordance with the experimental data. I also show in this paper that the spin gap is null and the susceptibility is proportional to T for low temperatures when relatively high values of the ladders' coupling is taken in account.

  14. Kernel polynomial representation for imaginary-time Green’s functions in continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li

    2016-11-01

    Inspired by the recently proposed Legendre orthogonal polynomial representation for imaginary-time Green’s functions G(τ), we develop an alternate and superior representation for G(τ) and implement it in the hybridization expansion continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver. This representation is based on the kernel polynomial method, which introduces some integral kernel functions to filter the numerical fluctuations caused by the explicit truncations of polynomial expansion series and can improve the computational precision significantly. As an illustration of the new representation, we re-examine the imaginary-time Green’s functions of the single-band Hubbard model in the framework of dynamical mean-field theory. The calculated results suggest that with carefully chosen integral kernel functions, whether the system is metallic or insulating, the Gibbs oscillations found in the previous Legendre orthogonal polynomial representation have been vastly suppressed and remarkable corrections to the measured Green’s functions have been obtained. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11504340).

  15. Computation of dynamical correlation functions for many-fermion systems with auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Ettore; Shi, Hao; Qin, Mingpu; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-08-01

    We address the calculation of dynamical correlation functions for many fermion systems at zero temperature, using the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo method. The two-dimensional Hubbard hamiltonian is used as a model system. Although most of the calculations performed here are for cases where the sign problem is absent, the discussions are kept general for applications to physical problems when the sign problem does arise. We study the use of twisted boundary conditions to improve the extrapolation of the results to the thermodynamic limit. A strategy is proposed to drastically reduce finite size effects relying on a minimization among the twist angles. This approach is demonstrated by computing the charge gap at half filling. We obtain accurate results showing the scaling of the gap with the interaction strength U in two dimensions, connecting to the scaling of the unrestricted Hartree-Fock method at small U and Bethe ansatz exact result in one dimension at large U . An alternative algorithm is then proposed to compute dynamical Green functions and correlation functions which explicitly varies the number of particles during the random walks in the manifold of Slater determinants. In dilute systems, such as ultracold Fermi gases, this algorithm enables calculations with much more favorable complexity, with computational cost proportional to basis size or the number of lattice sites.

  16. Cohesive energy and structural parameters of binary oxides of groups IIA and IIIB from diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Juan A.; Krogel, Jaron T.; Kent, Paul R. C.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2016-05-01

    We have applied the diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) method to calculate the cohesive energy and the structural parameters of the binary oxides CaO, SrO, BaO, Sc2O3, Y2O3, and La2O3. The aim of our calculations is to systematically quantify the accuracy of the DMC method to study this type of metal oxides. The DMC results were compared with local, semi-local, and hybrid Density Functional Theory (DFT) approximations as well as with experimental measurements. The DMC method yields cohesive energies for these oxides with a mean absolute deviation from experimental measurements of 0.18(2) eV, while with local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations, the deviation is 3.06, 0.94, and 1.23 eV, respectively. For lattice constants, the mean absolute deviations in DMC, local, semi-local, and hybrid DFT approximations are 0.017(1), 0.07, 0.05, and 0.04 Å, respectively. DMC is a highly accurate method, outperforming the DFT approximations in describing the cohesive energies and structural parameters of these binary oxides.

  17. Impurity in a Bose-Einstein condensate: Study of the attractive and repulsive branch using quantum Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, L. A. Peña; Giorgini, S.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the properties of an impurity immersed in a dilute Bose gas at zero temperature using quantum Monte Carlo methods. The interactions between bosons are modeled by a hard-sphere potential with scattering length a , whereas the interactions between the impurity and the bosons are modeled by a short-range, square-well potential where both the sign and the strength of the scattering length b can be varied by adjusting the well depth. We characterize the attractive and the repulsive polaron branch by calculating the binding energy and the effective mass of the impurity. Furthermore, we investigate the structural properties of the bath, such as the impurity-boson contact parameter and the change of the density profile around the impurity. At the unitary limit of the impurity-boson interaction, we find that the effective mass of the impurity remains smaller than twice its bare mass, while the binding energy scales with ℏ2n2 /3/m , where n is the density of the bath and m is the common mass of the impurity and the bosons in the bath. The implications for the phase diagram of binary Bose-Bose mixtures at low concentrations are also discussed.

  18. Multi-level quantum Monte Carlo wave functions for complex reactions: the decomposition of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracchia, Francesco; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, Claudio

    2014-01-05

    We present here several novel features of our recently proposed Jastrow linear generalized valence bond (J-LGVB) wave functions, which allow a consistently accurate description of complex potential energy surfaces (PES) of medium-large systems within quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). In particular, we develop a multilevel scheme to treat different regions of the molecule at different levels of the theory. As prototypical study case, we investigate the decomposition of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine, a carcinogenic metabolite of dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA), through a two-step mechanism of isomerization followed by a retro-ene reaction. We compute a reliable reaction path with the quadratic configuration interaction method and employ QMC for the calculation of the electronic energies. We show that the use of multideterminantal wave functions is very important to correctly describe the critical points of this PES within QMC, and that our multilevel J-LGVB approach is an effective tool to significantly reduce the cost of QMC calculations without loss of accuracy. As regards the complex PES of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine, the accurate energies computed with our approach allows us to confirm the validity of the two-step reaction mechanism of decomposition originally proposed within density functional theory, but with some important differences in the barrier heights of the individual steps.

  19. The ground state tunneling splitting and the zero point energy of malonaldehyde: a quantum Monte Carlo determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Alexandra; Coutinho-Neto, Maurício D; Manthe, Uwe

    2007-01-14

    Quantum dynamics calculations of the ground state tunneling splitting and of the zero point energy of malonaldehyde on the full dimensional potential energy surface proposed by Yagi et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 1154, 10647 (2001)] are reported. The exact diffusion Monte Carlo and the projection operator imaginary time spectral evolution methods are used to compute accurate benchmark results for this 21-dimensional ab initio potential energy surface. A tunneling splitting of 25.7+/-0.3 cm-1 is obtained, and the vibrational ground state energy is found to be 15 122+/-4 cm-1. Isotopic substitution of the tunneling hydrogen modifies the tunneling splitting down to 3.21+/-0.09 cm-1 and the vibrational ground state energy to 14 385+/-2 cm-1. The computed tunneling splittings are slightly higher than the experimental values as expected from the potential energy surface which slightly underestimates the barrier height, and they are slightly lower than the results from the instanton theory obtained using the same potential energy surface.

  20. A density functional and quantum Monte Carlo study of glutamic acid in vacuo and in a dielectric continuum medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Franca Maria; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, Claudio

    2012-08-21

    We present density functional theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of the glutamic acid and glutamate ion in vacuo and in various dielectric continuum media within the polarizable continuum model (PCM). In DFT, we employ the integral equation formalism variant of PCM while, in QMC, we use a PCM scheme we have developed to include both surface and volume polarization. We investigate the gas-phase protonation thermochemistry of the glutamic acid using a large set of structural conformations, and find that QMC is in excellent agreement with the best available theoretical and experimental results. For the solvated glutamic acid and glutamate ion, we perform DFT calculations for dielectric constants, ε, between 4 and 78. We find that the glutamate ion in the zwitterionic form is more stable than the non-zwitterionic form over the whole range of dielectric constants, while the glutamic acid is more stable in its non-zwitterionic form at ε = 4. The dielectric constant at which the two glutamic acid species have the same energy depends on the cavity size and lies between 5 and 12.5. We validate these results with QMC for the two limiting values of the dielectric constant, and find qualitative agreement with DFT even though the solvent polarization is less pronounced at the QMC level.

  1. Predicting absorption and dispersion in acoustics by direct simulation Monte Carlo: Quantum and classical models for molecular relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanford, Amanda D; O'Connor, Patrick D; Anderson, James B; Long, Lyle N

    2008-06-01

    In the current study, real gas effects in the propagation of sound waves are simulated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method for a wide range of frequencies. This particle method allows for treatment of acoustic phenomena at high Knudsen numbers, corresponding to low densities and a high ratio of the molecular mean free path to wavelength. Different methods to model the internal degrees of freedom of diatomic molecules and the exchange of translational, rotational and vibrational energies in collisions are employed in the current simulations of a diatomic gas. One of these methods is the fully classical rigid-rotor/harmonic-oscillator model for rotation and vibration. A second method takes into account the discrete quantum energy levels for vibration with the closely spaced rotational levels classically treated. This method gives a more realistic representation of the internal structure of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Applications of these methods are investigated in diatomic nitrogen gas in order to study the propagation of sound and its attenuation and dispersion along with their dependence on temperature. With the direct simulation method, significant deviations from continuum predictions are also observed for high Knudsen number flows.

  2. Auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo study of first- and second-row post-d elements

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Saidi, W A; Zhang, S; Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei

    2006-01-01

    A series of calculations for the first- and second-row post-d elements (Ga-Br and In-I) are presented using the phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AF QMC) method. This method is formulated in a Hilbert space defined by any chosen one-particle basis, and maps the many-body problem into a linear combination of independent-particle solutions with external auxiliary fields. The phase/sign problem is handled approximately by the phaseless formalism using a trial wave function, which in our calculations was chosen to be the Hartree-Fock solution. We used the consistent correlated basis sets of Peterson and coworkers, which employ a small core relativistic pseudopotential. The AF QMC results are compared with experiment and with those from density-functional (GGA and B3LYP) and coupled-cluster CCSD(T) calculations. The AF QMC total energies agree with CCSD(T) to within a few milli-hartrees across the systems and over several basis sets. The calculated atomic electron affinities, ionization energies, and ...

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo computations of phase stability, equations of state, and elasticity of high-pressure silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, K P; Cohen, R E; Wu, Zhigang; Militzer, B; Ríos, P López; Towler, M D; Needs, R J; Wilkins, J W

    2010-05-25

    Silica (SiO(2)) is an abundant component of the Earth whose crystalline polymorphs play key roles in its structure and dynamics. First principle density functional theory (DFT) methods have often been used to accurately predict properties of silicates, but fundamental failures occur. Such failures occur even in silica, the simplest silicate, and understanding pure silica is a prerequisite to understanding the rocky part of the Earth. Here, we study silica with quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), which until now was not computationally possible for such complex materials, and find that QMC overcomes the failures of DFT. QMC is a benchmark method that does not rely on density functionals but rather explicitly treats the electrons and their interactions via a stochastic solution of Schrödinger's equation. Using ground-state QMC plus phonons within the quasiharmonic approximation of density functional perturbation theory, we obtain the thermal pressure and equations of state of silica phases up to Earth's core-mantle boundary. Our results provide the best constrained equations of state and phase boundaries available for silica. QMC indicates a transition to the dense alpha-PbO(2) structure above the core-insulating D" layer, but the absence of a seismic signature suggests the transition does not contribute significantly to global seismic discontinuities in the lower mantle. However, the transition could still provide seismic signals from deeply subducted oceanic crust. We also find an accurate shear elastic constant for stishovite and its geophysically important softening with pressure.

  4. (U) Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungerford, Aimee L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Monte Carlo methods are very valuable for representing solutions to particle transport problems. Here we describe a “cook book” approach to handling the terms in a transport equation using Monte Carlo methods. Focus is on the mechanics of a numerical Monte Carlo code, rather than the mathematical foundations of the method.

  5. Electron-pair densities with time-dependent quantum Monte-Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Ivan P

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we use sets of de Broglie-Bohm trajectories to describe the quantum correlation effects which take place between the electrons in helium atom due to exchange and Coulomb interactions. A short-range screening of the Coulomb potential is used to modify the repulsion between the same spin electrons in physical space in order to comply with the Pauli's exclusion principle. By calculating the electron-pair density for ortho-helium we found that the shape of the exchange hole can be controlled uniquely by a simple screening parameter. For para-helium the inter-electronic distance, and hence the Coulomb hole, results from the combined action of the Coulomb repulsion and the non-local quantum correlations. In this way a robust and self-interaction-free approach is present to find both the ground state and the time evolution of non-relativistic quantum systems.

  6. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Tim P.

    2008-02-01

    This paper concerns kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithms that have a single-event execution time independent of the system size. Two methods are presented—one that combines the use of inverted-list data structures with rejection Monte Carlo and a second that combines inverted lists with the Marsaglia-Norman-Cannon algorithm. The resulting algorithms apply to models with rates that are determined by the local environment but are otherwise arbitrary, time-dependent and spatially heterogeneous. While especially useful for crystal growth simulation, the algorithms are presented from the point of view that KMC is the numerical task of simulating a single realization of a Markov process, allowing application to a broad range of areas where heterogeneous random walks are the dominate simulation cost.

  7. Interpolated wave functions for nonadiabatic simulations with the fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Tubman, Norm; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Ceperley, David

    2016-01-01

    Simulating nonadiabatic effects with many-body wave function approaches is an open field with many challenges. Recent interest has been driven by new algorithmic developments and improved theoretical understanding of properties unique to electron-ion wave functions. Fixed-node diffusion Monte Caro is one technique that has shown promising results for simulating electron-ion systems. In particular, we focus on the CH molecule for which previous results suggested a relatively significant contribution to the energy from nonadiabatic effects. We propose a new wave function ansatz for diatomic systems which involves interpolating the determinant coefficients calculated from configuration interaction methods. We find this to be an improvement beyond previous wave function forms that have been considered. The calculated nonadiabatic contribution to the energy in the CH molecule is reduced compared to our previous results, but still remains the largest among the molecules under consideration.

  8. Adaptive Multilevel Monte Carlo Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Hoel, H

    2011-08-23

    This work generalizes a multilevel forward Euler Monte Carlo method introduced in Michael B. Giles. (Michael Giles. Oper. Res. 56(3):607–617, 2008.) for the approximation of expected values depending on the solution to an Itô stochastic differential equation. The work (Michael Giles. Oper. Res. 56(3):607– 617, 2008.) proposed and analyzed a forward Euler multilevelMonte Carlo method based on a hierarchy of uniform time discretizations and control variates to reduce the computational effort required by a standard, single level, Forward Euler Monte Carlo method. This work introduces an adaptive hierarchy of non uniform time discretizations, generated by an adaptive algorithmintroduced in (AnnaDzougoutov et al. Raùl Tempone. Adaptive Monte Carlo algorithms for stopped diffusion. In Multiscale methods in science and engineering, volume 44 of Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. Eng., pages 59–88. Springer, Berlin, 2005; Kyoung-Sook Moon et al. Stoch. Anal. Appl. 23(3):511–558, 2005; Kyoung-Sook Moon et al. An adaptive algorithm for ordinary, stochastic and partial differential equations. In Recent advances in adaptive computation, volume 383 of Contemp. Math., pages 325–343. Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2005.). This form of the adaptive algorithm generates stochastic, path dependent, time steps and is based on a posteriori error expansions first developed in (Anders Szepessy et al. Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 54(10):1169– 1214, 2001). Our numerical results for a stopped diffusion problem, exhibit savings in the computational cost to achieve an accuracy of ϑ(TOL),from(TOL−3), from using a single level version of the adaptive algorithm to ϑ(((TOL−1)log(TOL))2).

  9. Correlated many-electron wavefunctions for quantum Monte Carlo calculations of strongly inhomogeneous systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudoin, R

    2000-01-01

    correlation terms. 2. We use standard VMC in conjunction with iterative variance minimisation to study bulk aluminium as a test bed for future work on surfaces. QMC has been used successfully for insulators and semiconductors, but little is known about applying it to metals. LDA calculations for aluminium are reasonably accurate for the bulk modulus and lattice constant. In contrast, the LDA cohesive energy is 1.25 times the experimental value. Due to the large statistical uncertainties the VMC result for the bulk modulus is disappointing, but the VMC cohesive energy is a clear improvement on LDA. In general, we find that QMC is applicable to metals and that the finite-size and other errors are qualitatively no different from those encountered in non-metallic systems. The quantum many-body problem is among the most challenging in physics. A popular approach is to reduce the problem to the study of a single particle in an effective potential. These one-particle schemes, the most popular of which is density fun...

  10. Monte Carlo methods and applications in nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods for studying few- and many-body quantum systems are introduced, with special emphasis given to their applications in nuclear physics. Variational and Green's function Monte Carlo methods are presented in some detail. The status of calculations of light nuclei is reviewed, including discussions of the three-nucleon-interaction, charge and magnetic form factors, the coulomb sum rule, and studies of low-energy radiative transitions. 58 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Archimedes, the Free Monte Carlo simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Sellier, Jean Michel D

    2012-01-01

    Archimedes is the GNU package for Monte Carlo simulations of electron transport in semiconductor devices. The first release appeared in 2004 and since then it has been improved with many new features like quantum corrections, magnetic fields, new materials, GUI, etc. This document represents the first attempt to have a complete manual. Many of the Physics models implemented are described and a detailed description is presented to make the user able to write his/her own input deck. Please, feel free to contact the author if you want to contribute to the project.

  12. Monte Carlo approach to turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueben, P.; Homeier, D.; Muenster, G. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Jansen, K. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Mesterhazy, D. [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2009-11-15

    The behavior of the one-dimensional random-force-driven Burgers equation is investigated in the path integral formalism on a discrete space-time lattice. We show that by means of Monte Carlo methods one may evaluate observables, such as structure functions, as ensemble averages over different field realizations. The regularization of shock solutions to the zero-viscosity limit (Hopf-equation) eventually leads to constraints on lattice parameters required for the stability of the simulations. Insight into the formation of localized structures (shocks) and their dynamics is obtained. (orig.)

  13. Molecular Properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: An Investigation on the Role of the Wave Function Ansatz and the Basis Set in the Water Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Andrea; Luo, Ye; Sorella, Sandro; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2013-10-08

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely, the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Through a systematic study, we provide a useful guide to the choice of the wave function, the pseudopotential, and the basis set for QMC calculations. We also introduce a new method for the computation of forces with finite variance on open systems and a new strategy for the definition of the atomic orbitals involved in the Jastrow-Antisymmetrised Geminal power wave function, in order to drastically reduce the number of variational parameters. This scheme significantly improves the efficiency of QMC energy minimization in case of large basis sets.

  14. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  15. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    and validation of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator (i), converting a CT scan of a patient to a Monte Carlo compliant phantom (ii) and translating the treatment plan parameters (including beam energy, angles of incidence, collimator settings etc) to a Monte Carlo input file (iii). A protocol...... previous algorithms since it uses delineations of structures in order to include and/or exclude certain media in various anatomical regions. This method has the potential to reduce anatomically irrelevant media assignment. In house MATLAB scripts translating the treatment plan parameters to Monte Carlo...

  16. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  17. Accurate Ab initio calculation of ionization potentials of the first-row transition metals with the configuration-interaction quantum Monte Carlo technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert E; Booth, George H; Alavi, Ali

    2015-01-23

    Accurate ionization potentials of the first-row transition-metal atoms are obtained via the initiator full configuration quantum Monte Carlo technique, performing a stochastic integration of the electronic Schrödinger equation in exponentially large Hilbert spaces, with a mean absolute error of 0.13  kcal/mol (5 meV). This accuracy requires correlation of the 3p semicore electrons and in some cases the 3s manifold, along with extrapolation of the correlation energies to the complete-basis-set limit, and provides a new theoretical benchmark for the ionization potentials of these systems.

  18. Error in Monte Carlo, quasi-error in Quasi-Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiss, R. H. P.; Lazopoulos, A.

    2006-01-01

    While the Quasi-Monte Carlo method of numerical integration achieves smaller integration error than standard Monte Carlo, its use in particle physics phenomenology has been hindered by the abscence of a reliable way to estimate that error. The standard Monte Carlo error estimator relies on the assumption that the points are generated independently of each other and, therefore, fails to account for the error improvement advertised by the Quasi-Monte Carlo method. We advocate the construction o...

  19. Langevin Monte Carlo filtering for target tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iglesias Garcia, Fernando; Bocquel, Melanie; Driessen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the Langevin Monte Carlo Filter (LMCF), a particle filter with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm which draws proposals by simulating Hamiltonian dynamics. This approach is well suited to non-linear filtering problems in high dimensional state spaces where the bootstrap filte

  20. An introduction to Monte Carlo methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, J. -C.; Barkema, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are methods for simulating statistical systems. The aim is to generate a representative ensemble of configurations to access thermodynamical quantities without the need to solve the system analytically or to perform an exact enumeration. The main principles of Monte Carlo sim

  1. An introduction to Monte Carlo methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, J. -C.; Barkema, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are methods for simulating statistical systems. The aim is to generate a representative ensemble of configurations to access thermodynamical quantities without the need to solve the system analytically or to perform an exact enumeration. The main principles of Monte Carlo sim

  2. Challenges of Monte Carlo Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Alex Roberts [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-10

    These are slides from a presentation for Parallel Summer School at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Solving discretized partial differential equations (PDEs) of interest can require a large number of computations. We can identify concurrency to allow parallel solution of discrete PDEs. Simulated particles histories can be used to solve the Boltzmann transport equation. Particle histories are independent in neutral particle transport, making them amenable to parallel computation. Physical parameters and method type determine the data dependencies of particle histories. Data requirements shape parallel algorithms for Monte Carlo. Then, Parallel Computational Physics and Parallel Monte Carlo are discussed and, finally, the results are given. The mesh passing method greatly simplifies the IMC implementation and allows simple load-balancing. Using MPI windows and passive, one-sided RMA further simplifies the implementation by removing target synchronization. The author is very interested in implementations of PGAS that may allow further optimization for one-sided, read-only memory access (e.g. Open SHMEM). The MPICH_RMA_OVER_DMAPP option and library is required to make one-sided messaging scale on Trinitite - Moonlight scales poorly. Interconnect specific libraries or functions are likely necessary to ensure performance. BRANSON has been used to directly compare the current standard method to a proposed method on idealized problems. The mesh passing algorithm performs well on problems that are designed to show the scalability of the particle passing method. BRANSON can now run load-imbalanced, dynamic problems. Potential avenues of improvement in the mesh passing algorithm will be implemented and explored. A suite of test problems that stress DD methods will elucidate a possible path forward for production codes.

  3. The MC21 Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton TM, Donovan TJ, Trumbull TH, Dobreff PS, Caro E, Griesheimer DP, Tyburski LJ, Carpenter DC, Joo H

    2007-01-09

    MC21 is a new Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code currently under joint development at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. MC21 is the Monte Carlo transport kernel of the broader Common Monte Carlo Design Tool (CMCDT), which is also currently under development. The vision for CMCDT is to provide an automated, computer-aided modeling and post-processing environment integrated with a Monte Carlo solver that is optimized for reactor analysis. CMCDT represents a strategy to push the Monte Carlo method beyond its traditional role as a benchmarking tool or ''tool of last resort'' and into a dominant design role. This paper describes various aspects of the code, including the neutron physics and nuclear data treatments, the geometry representation, and the tally and depletion capabilities.

  4. A Quantum Monte Carlo Study on Mixed-Spin Chains of 1/2-1/2-1-1 and 3/2-3/2 -1-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zhao-Xin; ZHANG Jun; YING He-Ping

    2003-01-01

    The ground-state and thermodynamic properties of quantum mixed-spin chains of1/2-1/2-1-1and 3/2-3/2-1-1are investigated by a quantum Monte Carlo simulation with the loop-cluster algorithm. For 1/2-1/2-1-1 chain, we find it has two phases separated by an energy-gap vanishing point in the ground-state. For 3/2-3/2-1-1 chain, the numerical results show two energy-gap vanishing points isolated by different phases in its ground-state. Our calculations indicate that all these ground state phases can be understood by means of valence-bond-solid picture, and the thermodynamic behavior at finite temperatures is continuous as a function of parameterα=J2/J1.

  5. Exact Dynamics via Poisson Process: a unifying Monte Carlo paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubernatis, James

    2014-03-01

    A common computational task is solving a set of ordinary differential equations (o.d.e.'s). A little known theorem says that the solution of any set of o.d.e.'s is exactly solved by the expectation value over a set of arbitary Poisson processes of a particular function of the elements of the matrix that defines the o.d.e.'s. The theorem thus provides a new starting point to develop real and imaginary-time continous-time solvers for quantum Monte Carlo algorithms, and several simple observations enable various quantum Monte Carlo techniques and variance reduction methods to transfer to a new context. I will state the theorem, note a transformation to a very simple computational scheme, and illustrate the use of some techniques from the directed-loop algorithm in context of the wavefunction Monte Carlo method that is used to solve the Lindblad master equation for the dynamics of open quantum systems. I will end by noting that as the theorem does not depend on the source of the o.d.e.'s coming from quantum mechanics, it also enables the transfer of continuous-time methods from quantum Monte Carlo to the simulation of various classical equations of motion heretofore only solved deterministically.

  6. Spike Inference from Calcium Imaging using Sequential Monte Carlo Methods

    OpenAIRE

    NeuroData; Paninski, L

    2015-01-01

    Vogelstein JT, Paninski L. Spike Inference from Calcium Imaging using Sequential Monte Carlo Methods. Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI) Program on Sequential Monte Carlo Methods, 2008

  7. Monte Carlo approaches to light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in the application of Monte Carlo methods to the study of light nuclei. We review new Green's function Monte Carlo results for the alpha particle, Variational Monte Carlo studies of {sup 16}O, and methods for low-energy scattering and transitions. Through these calculations, a coherent picture of the structure and electromagnetic properties of light nuclei has arisen. In particular, we examine the effect of the three-nucleon interaction and the importance of exchange currents in a variety of experimentally measured properties, including form factors and capture cross sections. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Monte carlo simulation for soot dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo method termed Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is developed to simulate the soot dynamics. Detailed stochastic error analysis is provided. Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is coupled with the gas phase solver Chemkin II to simulate soot formation in a 1-D premixed burner stabilized flame. The simulated soot number density, volume fraction, and particle size distribution all agree well with the measurement available in literature. The origin of the bimodal distribution of particle size distribution is revealed with quantitative proof.

  9. Lattice gauge theories and Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rebbi, Claudio

    1983-01-01

    This volume is the most up-to-date review on Lattice Gauge Theories and Monte Carlo Simulations. It consists of two parts. Part one is an introductory lecture on the lattice gauge theories in general, Monte Carlo techniques and on the results to date. Part two consists of important original papers in this field. These selected reprints involve the following: Lattice Gauge Theories, General Formalism and Expansion Techniques, Monte Carlo Simulations. Phase Structures, Observables in Pure Gauge Theories, Systems with Bosonic Matter Fields, Simulation of Systems with Fermions.

  10. 11th International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Nuyens, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the refereed proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing that was held at the University of Leuven (Belgium) in April 2014. These biennial conferences are major events for Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo researchers. The proceedings include articles based on invited lectures as well as carefully selected contributed papers on all theoretical aspects and applications of Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods. Offering information on the latest developments in these very active areas, this book is an excellent reference resource for theoreticians and practitioners interested in solving high-dimensional computational problems, arising, in particular, in finance, statistics and computer graphics.

  11. Simulation and the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Reuven Y

    2016-01-01

    Simulation and the Monte Carlo Method, Third Edition reflects the latest developments in the field and presents a fully updated and comprehensive account of the major topics that have emerged in Monte Carlo simulation since the publication of the classic First Edition over more than a quarter of a century ago. While maintaining its accessible and intuitive approach, this revised edition features a wealth of up-to-date information that facilitates a deeper understanding of problem solving across a wide array of subject areas, such as engineering, statistics, computer science, mathematics, and the physical and life sciences. The book begins with a modernized introduction that addresses the basic concepts of probability, Markov processes, and convex optimization. Subsequent chapters discuss the dramatic changes that have occurred in the field of the Monte Carlo method, with coverage of many modern topics including: Markov Chain Monte Carlo, variance reduction techniques such as the transform likelihood ratio...

  12. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  13. Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R.; Wilson, K. G.; Umrigar, C.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive program to analyze critical systems using an Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method (IMCRG) being undertaken at LANL and Cornell is described. Here we first briefly review the method and then list some of the topics being investigated.

  14. Monte Carlo methods for particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighat, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become the de facto standard in radiation transport. Although powerful, if not understood and used appropriately, the method can give misleading results. Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport teaches appropriate use of the Monte Carlo method, explaining the method's fundamental concepts as well as its limitations. Concise yet comprehensive, this well-organized text: * Introduces the particle importance equation and its use for variance reduction * Describes general and particle-transport-specific variance reduction techniques * Presents particle transport eigenvalue issues and methodologies to address these issues * Explores advanced formulations based on the author's research activities * Discusses parallel processing concepts and factors affecting parallel performance Featuring illustrative examples, mathematical derivations, computer algorithms, and homework problems, Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport provides nuclear engineers and scientists with a practical guide ...

  15. Smart detectors for Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Many optimization techniques have been invented to reduce the noise that is inherent in Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. As the typical detectors used in Monte Carlo simulations do not take into account all the information contained in the impacting photon packages, there is still room to optimize this detection process and the corresponding estimate of the surface brightness distributions. We want to investigate how all the information contained in the distribution of impacting photon packages can be optimally used to decrease the noise in the surface brightness distributions and hence to increase the efficiency of Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. We demonstrate that the estimate of the surface brightness distribution in a Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation is similar to the estimate of the density distribution in an SPH simulation. Based on this similarity, a recipe is constructed for smart detectors that take full advantage of the exact location of the impact of the photon pack...

  16. Coupling quantum Monte Carlo and independent-particle calculations: self-consistent constraint for the sign problem based on density or density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Mingpu; Zhang, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations in interacting fermion systems require a constraint to control the sign problem. The constraint involves an input trial wave function which restricts the random walks. We introduce a systematically improvable constraint which relies on the fundamental role of the density or one-body density matrix. An independent-particle calculation is coupled to an auxiliary-field QMC calculation. The independent-particle solution is used as the constraint in QMC, which then produces the input density or density matrix for the next iteration. The constraint is optimized by the self-consistency between the many-body and independent-particle calculations. The approach is demonstrated in the two-dimensional Hubbard model by accurately determining the spin densities when collective modes separated by tiny energy scales are present in the magnetic and charge correlations. Our approach also provides an ab initio way to predict effective "U" parameters for independent-par...

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo Study of π-Bonded Transition Metal Organometallics: Neutral and Cationic Vanadium-Benzene and Cobalt-Benzene Half Sandwiches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, L; Dubecký, M; Mitas, L; Štich, I

    2013-01-08

    We present accurate quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations that enabled us to determine the structure, spin multiplicity, ionization energy, dissociation energy, and spin-dependent electronic gaps of neutral and positively charged vanadium-benzene and cobalt-benzene systems. From total/ionization energy, we deduce a sextet (quintet) state of neutral (cationic) vanadium-benzene systems and quartet (triplet) state of the neutral (cationic) cobalt-benzene systems. Vastly different energy gaps for the two spin channels are predicted for the vanadium-benzene system and broadly similar energy gaps for the cobalt-benzene system. For this purpose, we have used a multistage combination of techniques with consecutive elimination of systematic biases except for the fixed-node approximation in QMC. Our results significantly differ from the established picture based on previous less accurate calculations and point out the importance of high-level many-body methods for predictive calculations of similar transition metal-based organometallic systems.

  18. Convergence of the variational parameter without convergence of the energy in Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations using the Stochastic Gradient Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissenbaum, Daniel; Lin, Hsin; Barbiellini, Bernardo; Bansil, Arun

    2009-03-01

    To study the performance of the Stochastic Gradient Approximation (SGA) for variational Quantum Monte Carlo methods, we have considered lithium nano-clusters [1] described by Hartree-Fock wavefunctions multiplied by two-body Jastrow factors with a single variational parameter b. Even when the system size increases, we have shown the feasibility of obtaining an accurate value of b that minimizes the energy without an explicit calculation of the energy itself. The present SGA algorithm is so efficient because an analytic gradient formula is used and because the statistical noise in the gradient is smaller than in the energy [2]. Interestingly, in this scheme the absolute value of the gradient is less important than the sign of the gradient. Work supported in part by U.S. DOE. [1] D. Nissenbaum et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 033412 (2007). [2] A. Harju, J. Low. Temp. Phys. 140, 181 (2005).

  19. Cluster size convergence of the density matrix embedding theory and its dynamical cluster formulation: A study with an auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cluster size convergence of the energy and observables using two forms of density matrix embedding theory (DMET): the original cluster form (CDMET) and a new formulation motivated by the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA-DMET). Both methods are applied to the half-filled one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models using a sign-problem free auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, which allows for the treatment of large impurity clusters of up to 100 sites. While CDMET is more accurate at smaller impurity cluster sizes, DCA-DMET exhibits faster asymptotic convergence towards the thermodynamic limit. We use our two formulations to produce new accurate estimates for the energy and local moment of the two-dimensional Hubbard model for U /t =2 ,4 ,6 . These results compare favorably with the best data available in the literature, and help resolve earlier uncertainties in the moment for U /t =2 .

  20. LCG Monte-Carlo Data Base

    CERN Document Server

    Bartalini, P.; Kryukov, A.; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya V.; Sherstnev, A.; Vologdin, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Monte-Carlo events Data Base (MCDB) project and its development plans. MCDB facilitates communication between authors of Monte-Carlo generators and experimental users. It also provides a convenient book-keeping and an easy access to generator level samples. The first release of MCDB is now operational for the CMS collaboration. In this paper we review the main ideas behind MCDB and discuss future plans to develop this Data Base further within the CERN LCG framework.

  1. Monte Carlo Algorithms for Linear Problems

    OpenAIRE

    DIMOV, Ivan

    2000-01-01

    MSC Subject Classification: 65C05, 65U05. Monte Carlo methods are a powerful tool in many fields of mathematics, physics and engineering. It is known, that these methods give statistical estimates for the functional of the solution by performing random sampling of a certain chance variable whose mathematical expectation is the desired functional. Monte Carlo methods are methods for solving problems using random variables. In the book [16] edited by Yu. A. Shreider one can find the followin...

  2. Self-consistent kinetic lattice Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsfield, A.; Dunham, S.; Fujitani, Hideaki

    1999-07-01

    The authors present a brief description of a formalism for modeling point defect diffusion in crystalline systems using a Monte Carlo technique. The main approximations required to construct a practical scheme are briefly discussed, with special emphasis on the proper treatment of charged dopants and defects. This is followed by tight binding calculations of the diffusion barrier heights for charged vacancies. Finally, an application of the kinetic lattice Monte Carlo method to vacancy diffusion is presented.

  3. Ab initio geometry and bright excitation of carotenoids: Quantum Monte Carlo and Many Body Green's Function Theory calculations on peridinin

    CERN Document Server

    Coccia, Emanuele; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In this letter we report the singlet ground state structure of the full carotenoid peridinin by means of variational Monte Carlo (VMC) calculations. The VMC relaxed geometry has an average bond length alternation of 0.1165(10) {\\AA}, larger than the values obtained by DFT (PBE, B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP) and shorter than that calculated at the Hartree-Fock (HF) level. TDDFT and EOM-CCSD calculations on a reduced peridinin model confirm the HOMO-LUMO major contribution of the Bu+-like (S2) bright excited state. Many Body Green's Function Theory (MBGFT) calculations of the vertical excitation energy of the Bu+-like state for the VMC structure (VMC/MBGFT) provide excitation energy of 2.62 eV, in agreement with experimental results in n-hexane (2.72 eV). The dependence of the excitation energy on the bond length alternation in the MBGFT and TDDFT calculations with different functionals is discussed.

  4. Toward an improved control of the fixed-node error in quantum Monte Carlo: The case of the water molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Caffarel, Michel; Giner, Emmanuel; Scemama, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    All-electron Fixed-node Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) calculations for the nonrelativistic ground-state energy of the water molecule at equilibrium geometry are presented. The determinantal part of the trial wavefunction is obtained from a perturbatively selected Configuration Interaction calculation (CIPSI method) including up to about 1.4 million of determinants. Calculations are made using the cc-pCV$n$Z family of basis sets, with $n$=2 to 5. In contrast with most QMC works no re-optimization of the determinantal part in presence of a Jastrow is performed. For the largest cc-pCV5Z basis set the lowest upper bound for the ground-state energy reported so far of -76.43744(18) is obtained. The fixed-node energy is found to decrease regularly as a function of the cardinal number $n$ and the Complete Basis Set limit (CBS) associated with {\\it exact nodes} is easily extracted. The resulting energy of -76.43894(12) -in perfect agreement with the best experimentally derived value- is the most accurate theoretical ...

  5. Error in Monte Carlo, quasi-error in Quasi-Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiss, R H

    2006-01-01

    While the Quasi-Monte Carlo method of numerical integration achieves smaller integration error than standard Monte Carlo, its use in particle physics phenomenology has been hindered by the abscence of a reliable way to estimate that error. The standard Monte Carlo error estimator relies on the assumption that the points are generated independently of each other and, therefore, fails to account for the error improvement advertised by the Quasi-Monte Carlo method. We advocate the construction of an estimator of stochastic nature, based on the ensemble of pointsets with a particular discrepancy value. We investigate the consequences of this choice and give some first empirical results on the suggested estimators.

  6. TAKING THE NEXT STEP WITH INTELLIGENT MONTE CARLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, T.E.; Carlson, J.A. [and others

    2000-10-01

    For many scientific calculations, Monte Carlo is the only practical method available. Unfortunately, standard Monte Carlo methods converge slowly as the square root of the computer time. We have shown, both numerically and theoretically, that the convergence rate can be increased dramatically if the Monte Carlo algorithm is allowed to adapt based on what it has learned from previous samples. As the learning continues, computational efficiency increases, often geometrically fast. The particle transport work achieved geometric convergence for a two-region problem as well as for problems with rapidly changing nuclear data. The statistics work provided theoretical proof of geometic convergence for continuous transport problems and promising initial results for airborne migration of particles. The statistical physics work applied adaptive methods to a variety of physical problems including the three-dimensional Ising glass, quantum scattering, and eigenvalue problems.

  7. Introduction to the variational and diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C J

    2015-01-01

    We provide a pedagogical introduction to the two main variants of real-space quantum Monte Carlo methods for electronic-structure calculations: variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). Assuming no prior knowledge on the subject, we review in depth the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm used in VMC for sampling the square of an approximate wave function, discussing details important for applications to electronic systems. We also review in detail the more sophisticated DMC algorithm within the fixed-node approximation, introduced to avoid the infamous Fermionic sign problem, which allows one to sample a more accurate approximation to the ground-state wave function. Throughout this review, we discuss the statistical methods used for evaluating expectation values and statistical uncertainties. In particular, we show how to estimate nonlinear functions of expectation values and their statistical uncertainties.

  8. Monte Carlo Simulation in Statistical Physics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation in Statistical Physics deals with the computer simulation of many-body systems in condensed-matter physics and related fields of physics, chemistry and beyond, to traffic flows, stock market fluctuations, etc.). Using random numbers generated by a computer, probability distributions are calculated, allowing the estimation of the thermodynamic properties of various systems. This book describes the theoretical background to several variants of these Monte Carlo methods and gives a systematic presentation from which newcomers can learn to perform such simulations and to analyze their results. The fifth edition covers Classical as well as Quantum Monte Carlo methods. Furthermore a new chapter on the sampling of free-energy landscapes has been added. To help students in their work a special web server has been installed to host programs and discussion groups (http://wwwcp.tphys.uni-heidelberg.de). Prof. Binder was awarded the Berni J. Alder CECAM Award for Computational Physics 2001 as well ...

  9. Applicability of Quasi-Monte Carlo for lattice systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ammon, Andreas; Jansen, Karl; Leovey, Hernan; Griewank, Andreas; Müller-Preussker, Micheal

    2013-01-01

    This project investigates the applicability of quasi-Monte Carlo methods to Euclidean lattice systems in order to improve the asymptotic error scaling of observables for such theories. The error of an observable calculated by averaging over random observations generated from ordinary Monte Carlo simulations scales like $N^{-1/2}$, where $N$ is the number of observations. By means of quasi-Monte Carlo methods it is possible to improve this scaling for certain problems to $N^{-1}$, or even further if the problems are regular enough. We adapted and applied this approach to simple systems like the quantum harmonic and anharmonic oscillator and verified an improved error scaling of all investigated observables in both cases.

  10. Reaction mechanism and tautomeric equilibrium of 2-mercaptopyrimidine in the gas phase and in aqueous solution: a combined Monte Carlo and quantum mechanics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Maria Carolina P; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio; Rocha, Willian R

    2006-06-08

    A combined Monte Carlo and quantum mechanical study was carried out to analyze the tautomeric equilibrium of 2-mercaptopyrimidine in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. Second- and fourth-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory calculations indicate that in the gas phase thiol (Pym-SH) is more stable than the thione (Pym-NH) by ca. 8 kcal/mol. In aqueous solution, thermodynamic perturbation theory implemented on a Monte Carlo NpT simulation indicates that both the differential enthalpy and Gibbs free energy favor the thione form. The calculated differential enthalpy is DeltaH(SH)(-->)(NH)(solv) = -1.7 kcal/mol and the differential Gibbs free energy is DeltaG(SH)(-->)(NH)(solv) = -1.9 kcal/mol. Analysis is made of the contribution of the solute-solvent hydrogen bonds and it is noted that the SH group in the thiol and NH group in the thione tautomers act exclusively as a hydrogen bond donor in aqueous solution. The proton transfer reaction between the tautomeric forms was also investigated in the gas phase and in aqueous solution. Two distinct mechanisms were considered: a direct intramolecular transfer and a water-assisted mechanism. In the gas phase, the intramolecular transfer leads to a large energy barrier of 34.4 kcal/mol, passing through a three-center transition state. The proton transfer with the assistance of one water molecule decreases the energy barrier to 17.2 kcal/mol. In solution, these calculated activation barriers are, respectively, 32.0 and 14.8 kcal/mol. The solvent effect is found to be sizable but it is considerably more important as a participant in the water-assisted mechanism than the solvent field of the solute-solvent interaction. Finally, the calculated total Gibbs free energy is used to estimate the equilibrium constant.

  11. Monte Carlo EM加速算法%Acceleration of Monte Carlo EM Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗季

    2008-01-01

    EM算法是近年来常用的求后验众数的估计的一种数据增广算法,但由于求出其E步中积分的显示表达式有时很困难,甚至不可能,限制了其应用的广泛性.而Monte Carlo EM算法很好地解决了这个问题,将EM算法中E步的积分用Monte Carlo模拟来有效实现,使其适用性大大增强.但无论是EM算法,还是Monte Carlo EM算法,其收敛速度都是线性的,被缺损信息的倒数所控制,当缺损数据的比例很高时,收敛速度就非常缓慢.而Newton-Raphson算法在后验众数的附近具有二次收敛速率.本文提出Monte Carlo EM加速算法,将Monte Carlo EM算法与Newton-Raphson算法结合,既使得EM算法中的E步用Monte Carlo模拟得以实现,又证明了该算法在后验众数附近具有二次收敛速度.从而使其保留了Monte Carlo EM算法的优点,并改进了Monte Carlo EM算法的收敛速度.本文通过数值例子,将Monte Carlo EM加速算法的结果与EM算法、Monte Carlo EM算法的结果进行比较,进一步说明了Monte Carlo EM加速算法的优良性.

  12. Excited state calculations using phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo: potential energy curves of low lying C2 singlet states

    CERN Document Server

    Purwanto, Wirawan; Krakauer, Henry

    2009-01-01

    We show that the recently developed phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method can be used to study excited states, providing an alternative to standard quantum chemistry methods. The phaseless AFQMC approach, whose computational cost scales as M^3-M^4 with system size M, has been shown to be among the most accurate many-body methods in ground state calculations. For excited states, prevention of collapse into the ground state and control of the Fermion sign/phase problem are accomplished by the approximate phaseless constraint with a trial wave function. Using the challenging C2 molecule as a test case, we calculate the potential energy curves of the ground and two low-lying singlet excited states. The trial wave function is obtained by truncating complete active space wave functions, with no further optimization. The phaseless AFQMC results using a small basis set are in good agreement with exact full configuration interaction calculations, while those using large basis sets are in good ag...

  13. Random Numbers and Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Many-body problems often involve the calculation of integrals of very high dimension which cannot be treated by standard methods. For the calculation of thermodynamic averages Monte Carlo methods are very useful which sample the integration volume at randomly chosen points. After summarizing some basic statistics, we discuss algorithms for the generation of pseudo-random numbers with given probability distribution which are essential for all Monte Carlo methods. We show how the efficiency of Monte Carlo integration can be improved by sampling preferentially the important configurations. Finally the famous Metropolis algorithm is applied to classical many-particle systems. Computer experiments visualize the central limit theorem and apply the Metropolis method to the traveling salesman problem.

  14. SMCTC: Sequential Monte Carlo in C++

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Johansen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Sequential Monte Carlo methods are a very general class of Monte Carlo methodsfor sampling from sequences of distributions. Simple examples of these algorithms areused very widely in the tracking and signal processing literature. Recent developmentsillustrate that these techniques have much more general applicability, and can be appliedvery eectively to statistical inference problems. Unfortunately, these methods are oftenperceived as being computationally expensive and dicult to implement. This articleseeks to address both of these problems.A C++ template class library for the ecient and convenient implementation of verygeneral Sequential Monte Carlo algorithms is presented. Two example applications areprovided: a simple particle lter for illustrative purposes and a state-of-the-art algorithmfor rare event estimation.

  15. Shell model the Monte Carlo way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The formalism for the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the nuclear shell model is presented. The method is based on a linearization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian in an imaginary-time propagator using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The foundation of the method, as applied to the nuclear many-body problem, is discussed. Topics presented in detail include: (1) the density-density formulation of the method, (2) computation of the overlaps, (3) the sign of the Monte Carlo weight function, (4) techniques for performing Monte Carlo sampling, and (5) the reconstruction of response functions from an imaginary-time auto-correlation function using MaxEnt techniques. Results obtained using schematic interactions, which have no sign problem, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, while an extrapolation method for realistic Hamiltonians is presented. In addition, applications at finite temperature are outlined.

  16. A brief introduction to Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonate, P L

    2001-01-01

    Simulation affects our life every day through our interactions with the automobile, airline and entertainment industries, just to name a few. The use of simulation in drug development is relatively new, but its use is increasing in relation to the speed at which modern computers run. One well known example of simulation in drug development is molecular modelling. Another use of simulation that is being seen recently in drug development is Monte Carlo simulation of clinical trials. Monte Carlo simulation differs from traditional simulation in that the model parameters are treated as stochastic or random variables, rather than as fixed values. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief introduction to Monte Carlo simulation methods.

  17. CosmoPMC: Cosmology Population Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Kilbinger, Martin; Cappe, Olivier; Cardoso, Jean-Francois; Fort, Gersende; Prunet, Simon; Robert, Christian P; Wraith, Darren

    2011-01-01

    We present the public release of the Bayesian sampling algorithm for cosmology, CosmoPMC (Cosmology Population Monte Carlo). CosmoPMC explores the parameter space of various cosmological probes, and also provides a robust estimate of the Bayesian evidence. CosmoPMC is based on an adaptive importance sampling method called Population Monte Carlo (PMC). Various cosmology likelihood modules are implemented, and new modules can be added easily. The importance-sampling algorithm is written in C, and fully parallelised using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). Due to very little overhead, the wall-clock time required for sampling scales approximately with the number of CPUs. The CosmoPMC package contains post-processing and plotting programs, and in addition a Monte-Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) algorithm. The sampling engine is implemented in the library pmclib, and can be used independently. The software is available for download at http://www.cosmopmc.info.

  18. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  19. Monte Carlo strategies in scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun S

    2008-01-01

    This paperback edition is a reprint of the 2001 Springer edition This book provides a self-contained and up-to-date treatment of the Monte Carlo method and develops a common framework under which various Monte Carlo techniques can be "standardized" and compared Given the interdisciplinary nature of the topics and a moderate prerequisite for the reader, this book should be of interest to a broad audience of quantitative researchers such as computational biologists, computer scientists, econometricians, engineers, probabilists, and statisticians It can also be used as the textbook for a graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods Many problems discussed in the alter chapters can be potential thesis topics for masters’ or PhD students in statistics or computer science departments Jun Liu is Professor of Statistics at Harvard University, with a courtesy Professor appointment at Harvard Biostatistics Department Professor Liu was the recipient of the 2002 COPSS Presidents' Award, the most prestigious one for sta...

  20. Parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ruichao; Orkoulas, G

    2007-06-07

    With strict detailed balance, parallel Monte Carlo simulation through domain decomposition cannot be validated with conventional Markov chain theory, which describes an intrinsically serial stochastic process. In this work, the parallel version of Markov chain theory and its role in accelerating Monte Carlo simulations via cluster computing is explored. It is shown that sequential updating is the key to improving efficiency in parallel simulations through domain decomposition. A parallel scheme is proposed to reduce interprocessor communication or synchronization, which slows down parallel simulation with increasing number of processors. Parallel simulation results for the two-dimensional lattice gas model show substantial reduction of simulation time for systems of moderate and large size.

  1. Monte Carlo dose distributions for radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perucha, M.; Leal, A.; Rincon, M.; Carrasco, E. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica; Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica]|[Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Nunez, L. [Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Radiofisica; Arrans, R.; Sanchez-Calzado, J.A.; Errazquin, L. [Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Sanchez-Nieto, B. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics]|[Inst. of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The precision of Radiosurgery Treatment planning systems is limited by the approximations of their algorithms and by their dosimetrical input data. This fact is especially important in small fields. However, the Monte Carlo methods is an accurate alternative as it considers every aspect of particle transport. In this work an acoustic neurinoma is studied by comparing the dose distribution of both a planning system and Monte Carlo. Relative shifts have been measured and furthermore, Dose-Volume Histograms have been calculated for target and adjacent organs at risk. (orig.)

  2. Monte carlo simulations of organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Chris; Greenham, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are a valuable tool to model the generation, separation, and collection of charges in organic photovoltaics where charges move by hopping in a complex nanostructure and Coulomb interactions between charge carriers are important. We review the Monte Carlo techniques that have been applied to this problem, and describe the results of simulations of the various recombination processes that limit device performance. We show how these processes are influenced by the local physical and energetic structure of the material, providing information that is useful for design of efficient photovoltaic systems.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    A library of Monte Carlo subroutines has been developed for the purpose of design of neutron scattering instruments. Using small-angle scattering as an example, the philosophy and structure of the library are described and the programs are used to compare instruments at continuous wave (CW) and long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) neutron facilities. The Monte Carlo results give a count-rate gain of a factor between 2 and 4 using time-of-flight analysis. This is comparable to scaling arguments based on the ratio of wavelength bandwidth to resolution width.

  4. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, M A

    2006-01-01

    The past few years have seen considerable progress in algorithmic development for the generation of gauge fields including the effects of dynamical fermions. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, where Hybrid Monte Carlo is performed using a rational approximation in place the usual inverse quark matrix kernel is one of these developments. This algorithm has been found to be extremely beneficial in many areas of lattice QCD (chiral fermions, finite temperature, Wilson fermions etc.). We review the algorithm and some of these benefits, and we compare against other recent algorithm developements. We conclude with an update of the Berlin wall plot comparing costs of all popular fermion formulations.

  5. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael

    2006-12-01

    The past few years have seen considerable progress in algorithmic development for the generation of gauge fields including the effects of dynamical fermions. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, where Hybrid Monte Carlo is performed using a rational approximation in place the usual inverse quark matrix kernel is one of these developments. This algorithm has been found to be extremely beneficial in many areas of lattice QCD (chiral fermions, finite temperature, Wilson fermions etc.). We review the algorithm and some of these benefits, and we compare against other recent algorithm developements. We conclude with an update of the Berlin wall plot comparing costs of all popular fermion formulations.

  6. Fast sequential Monte Carlo methods for counting and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Reuven Y; Vaisman, Radislav

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive account of the theory and application of Monte Carlo methods Based on years of research in efficient Monte Carlo methods for estimation of rare-event probabilities, counting problems, and combinatorial optimization, Fast Sequential Monte Carlo Methods for Counting and Optimization is a complete illustration of fast sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The book provides an accessible overview of current work in the field of Monte Carlo methods, specifically sequential Monte Carlo techniques, for solving abstract counting and optimization problems. Written by authorities in the

  7. Monte Carlo Study of Real Time Dynamics on the Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Andrei; Başar, Gökçe; Bedaque, Paulo F.; Vartak, Sohan; Warrington, Neill C.

    2016-08-01

    Monte Carlo studies involving real time dynamics are severely restricted by the sign problem that emerges from a highly oscillatory phase of the path integral. In this Letter, we present a new method to compute real time quantities on the lattice using the Schwinger-Keldysh formalism via Monte Carlo simulations. The key idea is to deform the path integration domain to a complex manifold where the phase oscillations are mild and the sign problem is manageable. We use the previously introduced "contraction algorithm" to create a Markov chain on this alternative manifold. We substantiate our approach by analyzing the quantum mechanical anharmonic oscillator. Our results are in agreement with the exact ones obtained by diagonalization of the Hamiltonian. The method we introduce is generic and, in principle, applicable to quantum field theory albeit very slow. We discuss some possible improvements that should speed up the algorithm.

  8. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  9. On the use of stochastic approximation Monte Carlo for Monte Carlo integration

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Faming

    2009-03-01

    The stochastic approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) algorithm has recently been proposed as a dynamic optimization algorithm in the literature. In this paper, we show in theory that the samples generated by SAMC can be used for Monte Carlo integration via a dynamically weighted estimator by calling some results from the literature of nonhomogeneous Markov chains. Our numerical results indicate that SAMC can yield significant savings over conventional Monte Carlo algorithms, such as the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, for the problems for which the energy landscape is rugged. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Monte Carlo methods in continuous time for lattice Hamiltonians

    CERN Document Server

    Huffman, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    We solve a variety of sign problems for models in lattice field theory using the Hamiltonian formulation, including Yukawa models and simple lattice gauge theories. The solutions emerge naturally in continuous time and use the dual representation for the bosonic fields. These solutions allow us to construct quantum Monte Carlo methods for these problems. The methods could provide an alternative approach to understanding non-perturbative dynamics of some lattice field theories.

  11. A comparison of Monte Carlo generators

    CERN Document Server

    Golan, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE, and NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generators is presented using a set of four observables: protons multiplicity, total visible energy, most energetic proton momentum, and $\\pi^+$ two-dimensional energy vs cosine distribution.

  12. Monte Carlo Tools for Jet Quenching

    OpenAIRE

    Zapp, Korinna

    2011-01-01

    A thorough understanding of jet quenching on the basis of multi-particle final states and jet observables requires new theoretical tools. This talk summarises the status and propects of the theoretical description of jet quenching in terms of Monte Carlo generators.

  13. An Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeside, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the principles of Monte Carlo calculation and random number generation in an attempt to introduce the direct and the rejection method of sampling techniques as well as the variance-reduction procedures. Indicates that the increasing availability of computers makes it possible for a wider audience to learn about these powerful methods. (CC)

  14. Variance Reduction Techniques in Monte Carlo Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.; Ridder, A.A.N.; Rubinstein, R.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are simulation algorithms to estimate a numerical quantity in a statistical model of a real system. These algorithms are executed by computer programs. Variance reduction techniques (VRT) are needed, even though computer speed has been increasing dramatically, ever since the intr

  15. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Matthew Joseph [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  16. Monte Carlo methods beyond detailed balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, Raoul D.; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo algorithms are nearly always based on the concept of detailed balance and ergodicity. In this paper we focus on algorithms that do not satisfy detailed balance. We introduce a general method for designing non-detailed balance algorithms, starting from a conventional algorithm satisfying

  17. Variance Reduction Techniques in Monte Carlo Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.; Ridder, A.A.N.; Rubinstein, R.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are simulation algorithms to estimate a numerical quantity in a statistical model of a real system. These algorithms are executed by computer programs. Variance reduction techniques (VRT) are needed, even though computer speed has been increasing dramatically, ever since the intr

  18. An analysis of Monte Carlo tree search

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo Tree Search (MCTS) is a family of directed search algorithms that has gained widespread attention in recent years. Despite the vast amount of research into MCTS, the effect of modifications on the algorithm, as well as the manner...

  19. Monte Carlo Simulation of Counting Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Philip M.

    A computer program to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of counting experiments was written. The program was based on a mathematical derivation which started with counts in a time interval. The time interval was subdivided to form a binomial distribution with no two counts in the same subinterval. Then the number of subintervals was extended to…

  20. Observations on variational and projector Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umrigar, C J

    2015-10-28

    Variational Monte Carlo and various projector Monte Carlo (PMC) methods are presented in a unified manner. Similarities and differences between the methods and choices made in designing the methods are discussed. Both methods where the Monte Carlo walk is performed in a discrete space and methods where it is performed in a continuous space are considered. It is pointed out that the usual prescription for importance sampling may not be advantageous depending on the particular quantum Monte Carlo method used and the observables of interest, so alternate prescriptions are presented. The nature of the sign problem is discussed for various versions of PMC methods. A prescription for an exact PMC method in real space, i.e., a method that does not make a fixed-node or similar approximation and does not have a finite basis error, is presented. This method is likely to be practical for systems with a small number of electrons. Approximate PMC methods that are applicable to larger systems and go beyond the fixed-node approximation are also discussed.

  1. Monte Carlo: in the beginning and some great expectations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metropolis, N.

    1985-01-01

    The central theme will be on the historical setting and origins of the Monte Carlo Method. The scene was post-war Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. There was an inevitability about the Monte Carlo Event: the ENIAC had recently enjoyed its meteoric rise (on a classified Los Alamos problem); Stan Ulam had returned to Los Alamos; John von Neumann was a frequent visitor. Techniques, algorithms, and applications developed rapidly at Los Alamos. Soon, the fascination of the Method reached wider horizons. The first paper was submitted for publication in the spring of 1949. In the summer of 1949, the first open conference was held at the University of California at Los Angeles. Of some interst perhaps is an account of Fermi's earlier, independent application in neutron moderation studies while at the University of Rome. The quantum leap expected with the advent of massively parallel processors will provide stimuli for very ambitious applications of the Monte Carlo Method in disciplines ranging from field theories to cosmology, including more realistic models in the neurosciences. A structure of multi-instruction sets for parallel processing is ideally suited for the Monte Carlo approach. One may even hope for a modest hardening of the soft sciences.

  2. A study of H+H2 and several H-bonded molecules by phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo with plane wave and Gaussian basis sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saidi, W A; Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei

    2007-05-21

    The authors present phaseless auxiliary-field (AF) quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations of the ground states of some hydrogen-bonded systems. These systems were selected to test and benchmark different aspects of the new phaseless AF QMC method. They include the transition state of H+H(2) near the equilibrium geometry and in the van der Walls limit, as well as the H(2)O, OH, and H(2)O(2) molecules. Most of these systems present significant challenges for traditional independent-particle electronic structure approaches, and many also have exact results available. The phaseless AF QMC method is used either with a plane wave basis with pseudopotentials or with all-electron Gaussian basis sets. For some systems, calculations are done with both to compare and characterize the performance of AF QMC under different basis sets and different Hubbard-Stratonovich decompositions. Excellent results are obtained using as input single Slater determinant wave functions taken from independent-particle calculations. Comparisons of the Gaussian based AF QMC results with exact full configuration interaction show that the errors from controlling the phase problem with the phaseless approximation are small. At the large basis-size limit, the AF QMC results using both types of basis sets are in good agreement with each other and with experimental values.

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic transitions in $^8$Be with meson-exchange currents derived from chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastore, S. [University of South Carolina; Wiringa, Robert B. [ANL; Pieper, Steven C. [ANL; Schiavilla, Rocco [Old Dominion U., JLAB

    2014-08-01

    We report quantum Monte Carlo calculations of electromagnetic transitions in $^8$Be. The realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Illinois-7 three-nucleon potentials are used to generate the ground state and nine excited states, with energies that are in excellent agreement with experiment. A dozen $M1$ and eight $E2$ transition matrix elements between these states are then evaluated. The $E2$ matrix elements are computed only in impulse approximation, with those transitions from broad resonant states requiring special treatment. The $M1$ matrix elements include two-body meson-exchange currents derived from chiral effective field theory, which typically contribute 20--30\\% of the total expectation value. Many of the transitions are between isospin-mixed states; the calculations are performed for isospin-pure states and then combined with the empirical mixing coefficients to compare to experiment. In general, we find that transitions between states that have the same dominant spatial symmetry are in decent agreement with experiment, but those transitions between different spatial symmetries are often significantly underpredicted.

  4. A quantum Monte Carlo study on electron correlation in all-metal aromatic clusters MAl4(-) (M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cu, Ag and Au).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Bráulio Gabriel A; Hai, G-Q; Teixeira Rabelo, J N; Cândido, Ladir

    2014-05-14

    Using fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) simulation we investigate the electron correlation in all-metal aromatic clusters MAl4(-) (with M = Li, Na, K, Rb, Cu, Ag and Au). The electron detachment energies and electron affinities of the clusters are obtained. The vertical electron detachment energies obtained from the FN-DMC calculations are in very good agreement with the available experimental results. Calculations are also performed within the Hartree-Fock approximation, density-functional theory (DFT), and the couple-cluster (CCSD(T)) method. From the obtained results, we analyse the impact of the electron correlation effects in these bimetallic clusters and find that the correlation of the valence electrons contributes significantly to the detachment energies and electron affinities, varying between 20% and 50% of their total values. Furthermore, we discuss the electron correlation effects on the stability of the clusters as well as the accuracy of the DFT and CCSD(T) calculations in the present systems.

  5. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods for lattice systems: a first look

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, K; Nube, A; Griewank, A; Müller-Preussker, M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the applicability of Quasi-Monte Carlo methods to Euclidean lattice systems for quantum mechanics in order to improve the asymptotic error behavior of observables for such theories. In most cases the error of an observable calculated by averaging over random observations generated from an ordinary Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation behaves like 1/Sqrt(N), where N is the number of observations. By means of Quasi-Monte Carlo methods it is possible to improve this behavior for certain problems up to 1/N. We adapted and applied this approach to simple systems like the quantum harmonic and anharmonic oscillator and verified an improved error scaling.

  6. Monte Carlo radiation transport in external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Çeçen, Yiğit

    2013-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo in radiation transport is an effective way to predict absorbed dose distributions. Monte Carlo modeling has contributed to a better understanding of photon and electron transport by radiotherapy physicists. The aim of this review is to introduce Monte Carlo as a powerful radiation transport tool. In this review, photon and electron transport algorithms for Monte Carlo techniques are investigated and a clinical linear accelerator model is studied for external beam radiot...

  7. Porphyrins as Corrosion Inhibitors for N80 Steel in 3.5% NaCl Solution: Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical, QSAR and Monte Carlo Simulations Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrish Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition of the corrosion of N80 steel in 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution saturated with CO2 by four porphyrins, namely 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (HPTB, 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (T4PP, 4,4′,4″,4‴-(porphyrin-5,10,15,20-tetrayltetrakis(benzoic acid (THP and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (TPP was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, potentiodynamic polarization, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency, η% increases with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The EIS results revealed that the N80 steel surface with adsorbed porphyrins exhibited non-ideal capacitive behaviour with reduced charge transfer activity. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the studied porphyrins acted as mixed type inhibitors. The SECM results confirmed the adsorption of the porphyrins on N80 steel thereby forming a relatively insulated surface. The SEM also confirmed the formation of protective films of the porphyrins on N80 steel surface thereby protecting the surface from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR were also carried out on the studied porphyrins and the results showed that the corrosion inhibition performances of the porphyrins could be related to their EHOMO, ELUMO, ω, and μ values. Monte Carlo simulation studies showed that THP has the highest adsorption energy, while T4PP has the least adsorption energy in agreement with the values of σ from quantum chemical calculations.

  8. Porphyrins as Corrosion Inhibitors for N80 Steel in 3.5% NaCl Solution: Electrochemical, Quantum Chemical, QSAR and Monte Carlo Simulations Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ambrish; Lin, Yuanhua; Quraishi, Mumtaz A; Olasunkanmi, Lukman O; Fayemi, Omolola E; Sasikumar, Yesudass; Ramaganthan, Baskar; Bahadur, Indra; Obot, Ime B; Adekunle, Abolanle S; Kabanda, Mwadham M; Ebenso, Eno E

    2015-08-18

    The inhibition of the corrosion of N80 steel in 3.5 wt. % NaCl solution saturated with CO2 by four porphyrins, namely 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (HPTB), 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphyrin (T4PP), 4,4',4″,4‴-(porphyrin-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis(benzoic acid) (THP) and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin (TPP) was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results showed that the inhibition efficiency, η% increases with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The EIS results revealed that the N80 steel surface with adsorbed porphyrins exhibited non-ideal capacitive behaviour with reduced charge transfer activity. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the studied porphyrins acted as mixed type inhibitors. The SECM results confirmed the adsorption of the porphyrins on N80 steel thereby forming a relatively insulated surface. The SEM also confirmed the formation of protective films of the porphyrins on N80 steel surface thereby protecting the surface from direct acid attack. Quantum chemical calculations, quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) were also carried out on the studied porphyrins and the results showed that the corrosion inhibition performances of the porphyrins could be related to their EHOMO, ELUMO, ω, and μ values. Monte Carlo simulation studies showed that THP has the highest adsorption energy, while T4PP has the least adsorption energy in agreement with the values of σ from quantum chemical calculations.

  9. Materials Design of Core-Shell Nanostructure Catalysts and New Quantum Monte Carlo Methods, with Application to Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-12

    perovskite ", Chem. Mater. 19, 1418-26 (2007). 4. M. W. Lee, S. V. Levchenko, and A. M. Rappe, "Force calculation of polyatomic molecules in quantum...Grinberg, and A. M. Rappe, "New Highly Polar Semiconductor Ferroelectrics through d8 Cation-0 Vacancy Substitution into PbTiOu: A Theoretical Study

  10. Fixed-Node Diffusion Monte Carlo of Lithium Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rasch, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We study lithium systems over a range of number of atoms, e.g., atomic anion, dimer, metallic cluster, and body-centered cubic crystal by the diffusion Monte Carlo method. The calculations include both core and valence electrons in order to avoid any possible impact by pseudo potentials. The focus of the study is the fixed-node errors, and for that purpose we test several orbital sets in order to provide the most accurate nodal hyper surfaces. We compare our results to other high accuracy calculations wherever available and to experimental results so as to quantify the the fixed-node errors. The results for these Li systems show that fixed-node quantum Monte Carlo achieves remarkably high accuracy total energies and recovers 97-99 % of the correlation energy.

  11. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful [Department of Physical Sciences, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Independent University, Bangladesh (IUB) Dhaka (Bangladesh); Halder, Amal [Department of Mathematics, University of Dhaka Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2015-05-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  12. Hybrid Monte Carlo with Chaotic Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Kadakia, Nirag

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) technique applicable to high-dimensional multivariate normal distributions that effectively samples along chaotic trajectories. The method is predicated on the freedom of choice of the HMC momentum distribution, and due to its mixing properties, exhibits sample-to-sample autocorrelations that decay far faster than those in the traditional hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. We test the methods on distributions of varying correlation structure, finding that the proposed technique produces superior covariance estimates, is less reliant on step-size tuning, and can even function with sparse or no momentum re-sampling. The method presented here is promising for more general distributions, such as those that arise in Bayesian learning of artificial neural networks and in the state and parameter estimation of dynamical systems.

  13. Multilevel sequential Monte-Carlo samplers

    KAUST Repository

    Jasra, Ajay

    2016-01-05

    Multilevel Monte-Carlo methods provide a powerful computational technique for reducing the computational cost of estimating expectations for a given computational effort. They are particularly relevant for computational problems when approximate distributions are determined via a resolution parameter h, with h=0 giving the theoretical exact distribution (e.g. SDEs or inverse problems with PDEs). The method provides a benefit by coupling samples from successive resolutions, and estimating differences of successive expectations. We develop a methodology that brings Sequential Monte-Carlo (SMC) algorithms within the framework of the Multilevel idea, as SMC provides a natural set-up for coupling samples over different resolutions. We prove that the new algorithm indeed preserves the benefits of the multilevel principle, even if samples at all resolutions are now correlated.

  14. Monte Carlo Simulation for Particle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is an essential component of experimental particle physics in all the phases of its life-cycle: the investigation of the physics reach of detector concepts, the design of facilities and detectors, the development and optimization of data reconstruction software, the data analysis for the production of physics results. This note briefly outlines some research topics related to Monte Carlo simulation, that are relevant to future experimental perspectives in particle physics. The focus is on physics aspects: conceptual progress beyond current particle transport schemes, the incorporation of materials science knowledge relevant to novel detection technologies, functionality to model radiation damage, the capability for multi-scale simulation, quantitative validation and uncertainty quantification to determine the predictive power of simulation. The R&D on simulation for future detectors would profit from cooperation within various components of the particle physics community, and synerg...

  15. An enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangxiao; Li, Peiwu; Mao, Jin; Ma, Fei; Ding, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qi

    2015-09-30

    Outlier detection is crucial in building a highly predictive model. In this study, we proposed an enhanced Monte Carlo outlier detection method by establishing cross-prediction models based on determinate normal samples and analyzing the distribution of prediction errors individually for dubious samples. One simulated and three real datasets were used to illustrate and validate the performance of our method, and the results indicated that this method outperformed Monte Carlo outlier detection in outlier diagnosis. After these outliers were removed, the value of validation by Kovats retention indices and the root mean square error of prediction decreased from 3.195 to 1.655, and the average cross-validation prediction error decreased from 2.0341 to 1.2780. This method helps establish a good model by eliminating outliers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  17. Multilevel Monte Carlo Approaches for Numerical Homogenization

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2015-10-01

    In this article, we study the application of multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) approaches to numerical random homogenization. Our objective is to compute the expectation of some functionals of the homogenized coefficients, or of the homogenized solutions. This is accomplished within MLMC by considering different sizes of representative volumes (RVEs). Many inexpensive computations with the smallest RVE size are combined with fewer expensive computations performed on larger RVEs. Likewise, when it comes to homogenized solutions, different levels of coarse-grid meshes are used to solve the homogenized equation. We show that, by carefully selecting the number of realizations at each level, we can achieve a speed-up in the computations in comparison to a standard Monte Carlo method. Numerical results are presented for both one-dimensional and two-dimensional test-cases that illustrate the efficiency of the approach.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations on SIMD computer architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmester, C.P.; Gronsky, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Wille, L.T. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-03-01

    Algorithmic considerations regarding the implementation of various materials science applications of the Monte Carlo technique to single instruction multiple data (SMM) computer architectures are presented. In particular, implementation of the Ising model with nearest, next nearest, and long range screened Coulomb interactions on the SIMD architecture MasPar MP-1 (DEC mpp-12000) series of massively parallel computers is demonstrated. Methods of code development which optimize processor array use and minimize inter-processor communication are presented including lattice partitioning and the use of processor array spanning tree structures for data reduction. Both geometric and algorithmic parallel approaches are utilized. Benchmarks in terms of Monte Carlo updates per second for the MasPar architecture are presented and compared to values reported in the literature from comparable studies on other architectures.

  19. Part i: Lie-Backlund Theory and Linearization of Differential Equations. Part II: Monte Carlo Simulations of 1-D Quantum Spin Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, John J.

    Part I begins with an account of groups of Lie -Back-lund (L-B) tangent transformations; it is then shown that L-B symmetry operators depending on integrals (nonlocal variables), such as discussed by Konopelchenko and Mokhnachev (1979), are related by change of variables to the L-B operators which involve no more than derivatives. A general method is set down for transforming a given L-B operator into a new one, by any invertible transformation depending on (. . ., D(,x)('-1) u, u, u(,x), . . .). It is shown that once a given differential equation admits a L-B operator, there is in general a very large number of related ("secondary") equations which admit the same operator. The L-B Theory involving nonlocal variables is used to characterize group theoretically the linearization both of the Burgers equation, u(,t) + uu(,x) - u(,xx) = 0, and of the o.d.e. u(,xx) + (omega)('2)(x)u + Ku('-3) = 0. Secondary equations are found to play an important role in understanding the group theoretical background to the linearization of differential equations. Part II deals with Monte Carlo simulations of the l-d quantum Heisenberg and XY-models, using an approach suggested by Suzuki (1976). The simulation is actually carried out on a 2-d, m x N, Isinglike system, equivalent to the original N-spin quantum system when m (--->) (INFIN). The results for m (LESSTHEQ) 10 and kT/(VBAR)J(VBAR) (GREATERTHEQ) .0125 are good enough to show that the method is generally applicable to quantum spin models; however some difficulties caused by singular bonding in the classical lattice (Wiesler 1982) and by the generation of unwanted states have to be taken into account in practice. The finite-size scaling method of Fisher and Ferdinard is adapted for use near T = 0 in the ferromagnetic Heisenberg model; applied to the simulation data it shows that the low temperature susceptibiltiy behaves at T('-(gamma)), where (gamma) = 1.32 (+OR-) 10%. Also, simple and potentially useful finite-size scaling

  20. Inhomogeneous Monte Carlo simulations of dermoscopic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gareau, Daniel S.; Li, Ting; Jacques, Steven; Krueger, James

    2012-03-01

    Clinical skin-lesion diagnosis uses dermoscopy: 10X epiluminescence microscopy. Skin appearance ranges from black to white with shades of blue, red, gray and orange. Color is an important diagnostic criteria for diseases including melanoma. Melanin and blood content and distribution impact the diffuse spectral remittance (300-1000nm). Skin layers: immersion medium, stratum corneum, spinous epidermis, basal epidermis and dermis as well as laterally asymmetric features (eg. melanocytic invasion) were modeled in an inhomogeneous Monte Carlo model.

  1. Handbook of Markov chain Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Steve

    2011-01-01

    ""Handbook of Markov Chain Monte Carlo"" brings together the major advances that have occurred in recent years while incorporating enough introductory material for new users of MCMC. Along with thorough coverage of the theoretical foundations and algorithmic and computational methodology, this comprehensive handbook includes substantial realistic case studies from a variety of disciplines. These case studies demonstrate the application of MCMC methods and serve as a series of templates for the construction, implementation, and choice of MCMC methodology.

  2. Accelerated Monte Carlo by Embedded Cluster Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, R. C.; Gross, N. A.; Moriarty, K. J. M.

    1991-07-01

    We present an overview of the new methods for embedding Ising spins in continuous fields to achieve accelerated cluster Monte Carlo algorithms. The methods of Brower and Tamayo and Wolff are summarized and variations are suggested for the O( N) models based on multiple embedded Z2 spin components and/or correlated projections. Topological features are discussed for the XY model and numerical simulations presented for d=2, d=3 and mean field theory lattices.

  3. An introduction to Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, J.-C.; Barkema, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are methods for simulating statistical systems. The aim is to generate a representative ensemble of configurations to access thermodynamical quantities without the need to solve the system analytically or to perform an exact enumeration. The main principles of Monte Carlo simulations are ergodicity and detailed balance. The Ising model is a lattice spin system with nearest neighbor interactions that is appropriate to illustrate different examples of Monte Carlo simulations. It displays a second order phase transition between disordered (high temperature) and ordered (low temperature) phases, leading to different strategies of simulations. The Metropolis algorithm and the Glauber dynamics are efficient at high temperature. Close to the critical temperature, where the spins display long range correlations, cluster algorithms are more efficient. We introduce the rejection free (or continuous time) algorithm and describe in details an interesting alternative representation of the Ising model using graphs instead of spins with the so-called Worm algorithm. We conclude with an important discussion of the dynamical effects such as thermalization and correlation time.

  4. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele

    2015-06-01

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π∗ (1La) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the 1La excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral 1La excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  5. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Nicolas; Bouaouli, Samira; Mauri, Francesco; Sorella, Sandro; Casula, Michele

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π(∗) ((1)La) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the (1)La excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral (1)La excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  6. Vertical and adiabatic excitations in anthracene from quantum Monte Carlo: Constrained energy minimization for structural and electronic excited-state properties in the JAGP ansatz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.dupuy@impmc.upmc.fr [Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, case 115, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bouaouli, Samira, E-mail: samira.bouaouli@lct.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, case 115, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Mauri, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.mauri@impmc.upmc.fr; Casula, Michele, E-mail: michele.casula@impmc.upmc.fr [CNRS and Institut de Minéralogie, de Physique des Matériaux et de Cosmochimie, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, case 115, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Sorella, Sandro, E-mail: sorella@sissa.it [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Via Beirut 2-4, 34014 Trieste, Italy and INFM Democritos National Simulation Center, Trieste (Italy)

    2015-06-07

    We study the ionization energy, electron affinity, and the π → π{sup ∗} ({sup 1}L{sub a}) excitation energy of the anthracene molecule, by means of variational quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods based on a Jastrow correlated antisymmetrized geminal power (JAGP) wave function, developed on molecular orbitals (MOs). The MO-based JAGP ansatz allows one to rigorously treat electron transitions, such as the HOMO → LUMO one, which underlies the {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state. We present a QMC optimization scheme able to preserve the rank of the antisymmetrized geminal power matrix, thanks to a constrained minimization with projectors built upon symmetry selected MOs. We show that this approach leads to stable energy minimization and geometry relaxation of both ground and excited states, performed consistently within the correlated QMC framework. Geometry optimization of excited states is needed to make a reliable and direct comparison with experimental adiabatic excitation energies. This is particularly important in π-conjugated and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, where there is a strong interplay between low-lying energy excitations and structural modifications, playing a functional role in many photochemical processes. Anthracene is an ideal benchmark to test these effects. Its geometry relaxation energies upon electron excitation are of up to 0.3 eV in the neutral {sup 1}L{sub a} excited state, while they are of the order of 0.1 eV in electron addition and removal processes. Significant modifications of the ground state bond length alternation are revealed in the QMC excited state geometry optimizations. Our QMC study yields benchmark results for both geometries and energies, with values below chemical accuracy if compared to experiments, once zero point energy effects are taken into account.

  7. Material properties of one-dimensional systems studied by path-integral quantum Monte Carlo simulations and an analytical many-body model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Michael C.; Schulte, Joachim; Utrera, Luis

    Feynman path-integral quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations and an analytic many-body approach are used to study the ground state properties of one-dimensional (1D) chains in the theoretical framework of model Hamiltonians of the Hubbard type. The QMC algorithm is employed to derive position-space quantities, while band structure properties are evaluated by combining QMC data with expressions derived in momentum (k) space. Bridging link between both representations is the quasi-chemical approximation (QCA). Electronic charge fluctuations and the fluctuations of the magnetic local moments are studied as a function of the on-site density and correlation strength, which is given by the ratio between two-electron interaction and kinetic hopping. Caused by the non-analytic behaviour of the chemical potential μ = ∂E/∂ (with E denoting the electronic energy), strict 1D systems with an on-site density of 1·0 do not exhibit the properties of a conductor for any non-zero interaction beyond the mean-field approximation. The QMC simulations lead to straightforward access to the probabilities Pi(n) of finding n = 0, 1, 2 electrons at the ith lattice site. The Pi(n) elements allow to calculate the enhancement factors on the electron spin susceptibility χ, effective electronic mass m* and Knight shift κ. m* is enhanced by a bandwidth renormalization factor D-10, κ by an element ηK mapping the additional localization of the correlated electrons in the presence of an external magnetic field B and χ by the product D-10 ηK. Available experimental data are discussed in the light of the present theoretical findings.

  8. Fixed-node and fixed-phase approximations and their relationship to variable spins in quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Melton, Cody A

    2016-01-01

    We compare the fixed-phase approximation with the better known, but closely related fixed-node approximation on several testing examples. We found that both approximations behave very similarly with the fixed-phase results being very close to the fixed-node method whenever nodes/phase were of high and comparable accuracy. The fixed-phase exhibited larger biases when the trial wave functions errors in the nodes/phase were intentionally driven to unrealistically large values. We also present a formalism that enables to describe wave functions with the full antisymmetry in spin-spatial degrees of freedom using our recently developed method for systems with spins as fully quantum variables. This opens new possibilities for simulations of fermionic systems in the fixed-phase approximation formalism.

  9. Dynamics of the Anderson model for dilute magnetic alloys: A quantum Monte Carlo and maximum entropy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N.; Gubernatis, J.E.; Sivia, D.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Jarrell, M. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (USA). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    In this article we describe the results of a new method for calculating the dynamical properties of the Anderson model. QMC generates data about the Matsubara Green's functions in imaginary time. To obtain dynamical properties, one must analytically continue these data to real time. This is an extremely ill-posed inverse problem similar to the inversion of a Laplace transform from incomplete and noisy data. Our method is a general one, applicable to the calculation of dynamical properties from a wide variety of quantum simulations. We use Bayesian methods of statistical inference to determine the dynamical properties based on both the QMC data and any prior information we may have such as sum rules, symmetry, high frequency limits, etc. This provides a natural means of combining perturbation theory and numerical simulations in order to understand dynamical many-body problems. Specifically we use the well-established maximum entropy (ME) method for image reconstruction. We obtain the spectral density and transport coefficients over the entire range of model parameters accessible by QMC, with data having much larger statistical error than required by other proposed analytic continuation methods.

  10. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  11. Thermodynamic properties of van der Waals fluids from Monte Carlo simulations and perturbative Monte Carlo theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, A; Largo, J; Solana, J R

    2006-08-21

    Computer simulations have been performed for fluids with van der Waals potential, that is, hard spheres with attractive inverse power tails, to determine the equation of state and the excess energy. On the other hand, the first- and second-order perturbative contributions to the energy and the zero- and first-order perturbative contributions to the compressibility factor have been determined too from Monte Carlo simulations performed on the reference hard-sphere system. The aim was to test the reliability of this "exact" perturbation theory. It has been found that the results obtained from the Monte Carlo perturbation theory for these two thermodynamic properties agree well with the direct Monte Carlo simulations. Moreover, it has been found that results from the Barker-Henderson [J. Chem. Phys. 47, 2856 (1967)] perturbation theory are in good agreement with those from the exact perturbation theory.

  12. A first look at quasi-Monte Carlo for lattice field theory problems

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, K; Nube, A; Griewank, A; Mueller-Preussker, M

    2012-01-01

    In this project we initiate an investigation of the applicability of Quasi-Monte Carlo methods to lattice field theories in order to improve the asymptotic error behavior of observables for such theories. In most cases the error of an observable calculated by averaging over random observations generated from an ordinary Monte Carlo simulation behaves like 1/sqrt(N), where N is the number of observations. By means of Quasi-Monte Carlo methods it is possible to improve this behavior for certain problems to up to 1/N. We adapted and applied this approach to simple systems like the quantum harmonic and anharmonic oscillator and verified an improved error scaling.

  13. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics. II. Benchmarks and comparison with established methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Cohen, Guy; Reichman, David R.

    2017-02-01

    In this second paper of a two part series, we present extensive benchmark results for two different inchworm Monte Carlo expansions for the spin-boson model. Our results are compared to previously developed numerically exact approaches for this problem. A detailed discussion of convergence and error propagation is presented. Our results and analysis allow for an understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of inchworm Monte Carlo compared to other approaches for exact real-time non-adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  14. Inchworm Monte Carlo for exact non-adiabatic dynamics. II. Benchmarks and comparison with established methods

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsing-Ta; Reichman, David R

    2016-01-01

    In this second paper of a two part series, we present extensive benchmark results for two different inchworm Monte Carlo expansions for the spin-boson model. Our results are compared to previously developed numerically exact approaches for this problem. A detailed discussion of convergence and error propagation is presented. Our results and analysis allow for an understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of inchworm Monte Carlo compared to other approaches for exact real-time non-adiabatic quantum dynamics.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of a prototype photodetector used in radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kausch, C; Albers, D; Schmidt, R; Schreiber, B

    2000-01-01

    The imaging performance of prototype electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) has been investigated. Monte Carlo simulations have been applied to calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF( f )), the noise power spectrum (NPS( f )) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE( f )) for different new type of EPIDs, which consist of a detector combination of metal or polyethylene (PE), a phosphor layer of Gd sub 2 O sub 2 S and a flat array of photodiodes. The simulated results agree well with measurements. Based on simulated results, possible optimization of these devices is discussed.

  16. Communication: Water on hexagonal boron nitride from diffusion Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hamdani, Yasmine S.; Ma, Ming; Michaelides, Angelos, E-mail: angelos.michaelides@ucl.ac.uk [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Alfè, Dario [Thomas Young Centre and London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17–19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Lilienfeld, O. Anatole von [Institute of Physical Chemistry and National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratories, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Despite a recent flurry of experimental and simulation studies, an accurate estimate of the interaction strength of water molecules with hexagonal boron nitride is lacking. Here, we report quantum Monte Carlo results for the adsorption of a water monomer on a periodic hexagonal boron nitride sheet, which yield a water monomer interaction energy of −84 ± 5 meV. We use the results to evaluate the performance of several widely used density functional theory (DFT) exchange correlation functionals and find that they all deviate substantially. Differences in interaction energies between different adsorption sites are however better reproduced by DFT.

  17. Status of Monte-Carlo Event Generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeche, Stefan; /SLAC

    2011-08-11

    Recent progress on general-purpose Monte-Carlo event generators is reviewed with emphasis on the simulation of hard QCD processes and subsequent parton cascades. Describing full final states of high-energy particle collisions in contemporary experiments is an intricate task. Hundreds of particles are typically produced, and the reactions involve both large and small momentum transfer. The high-dimensional phase space makes an exact solution of the problem impossible. Instead, one typically resorts to regarding events as factorized into different steps, ordered descending in the mass scales or invariant momentum transfers which are involved. In this picture, a hard interaction, described through fixed-order perturbation theory, is followed by multiple Bremsstrahlung emissions off initial- and final-state and, finally, by the hadronization process, which binds QCD partons into color-neutral hadrons. Each of these steps can be treated independently, which is the basic concept inherent to general-purpose event generators. Their development is nowadays often focused on an improved description of radiative corrections to hard processes through perturbative QCD. In this context, the concept of jets is introduced, which allows to relate sprays of hadronic particles in detectors to the partons in perturbation theory. In this talk, we briefly review recent progress on perturbative QCD in event generation. The main focus lies on the general-purpose Monte-Carlo programs HERWIG, PYTHIA and SHERPA, which will be the workhorses for LHC phenomenology. A detailed description of the physics models included in these generators can be found in [8]. We also discuss matrix-element generators, which provide the parton-level input for general-purpose Monte Carlo.

  18. A Monte Carlo algorithm for degenerate plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turrell, A.E., E-mail: a.turrell09@imperial.ac.uk; Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2013-09-15

    A procedure for performing Monte Carlo calculations of plasmas with an arbitrary level of degeneracy is outlined. It has possible applications in inertial confinement fusion and astrophysics. Degenerate particles are initialised according to the Fermi–Dirac distribution function, and scattering is via a Pauli blocked binary collision approximation. The algorithm is tested against degenerate electron–ion equilibration, and the degenerate resistivity transport coefficient from unmagnetised first order transport theory. The code is applied to the cold fuel shell and alpha particle equilibration problem of inertial confinement fusion.

  19. A note on simultaneous Monte Carlo tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Ute

    In this short note, Monte Carlo tests of goodness of fit for data of the form X(t), t ∈ I are considered, that reject the null hypothesis if X(t) leaves an acceptance region bounded by an upper and lower curve for some t in I. A construction of the acceptance region is proposed that complies to a...... to a given target level of rejection, and yields exact p-values. The construction is based on pointwise quantiles, estimated from simulated realizations of X(t) under the null hypothesis....

  20. Cluster hybrid Monte Carlo simulation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascak, J. A.; Ferrenberg, Alan M.; Landau, D. P.

    2002-06-01

    We show that addition of Metropolis single spin flips to the Wolff cluster-flipping Monte Carlo procedure leads to a dramatic increase in performance for the spin-1/2 Ising model. We also show that adding Wolff cluster flipping to the Metropolis or heat bath algorithms in systems where just cluster flipping is not immediately obvious (such as the spin-3/2 Ising model) can substantially reduce the statistical errors of the simulations. A further advantage of these methods is that systematic errors introduced by the use of imperfect random-number generation may be largely healed by hybridizing single spin flips with cluster flipping.

  1. Introduction to Cluster Monte Carlo Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijten, E.

    This chapter provides an introduction to cluster Monte Carlo algorithms for classical statistical-mechanical systems. A brief review of the conventional Metropolis algorithm is given, followed by a detailed discussion of the lattice cluster algorithm developed by Swendsen and Wang and the single-cluster variant introduced by Wolff. For continuum systems, the geometric cluster algorithm of Dress and Krauth is described. It is shown how their geometric approach can be generalized to incorporate particle interactions beyond hardcore repulsions, thus forging a connection between the lattice and continuum approaches. Several illustrative examples are discussed.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation for the transport beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, F.; Cuttone, G.; Jia, S. B.; Varisano, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania (Italy); Attili, A.; Marchetto, F.; Russo, G. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P.Giuria, 1 10125 Torino (Italy); Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Institute of Physics Czech Academy of Science, ELI-Beamlines project, Na Slovance 2, Prague (Czech Republic); Carpinelli, M. [INFN Sezione di Cagliari, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); Tramontana, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via Santa Sofia 62, Catania, Italy and Università di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Via S. Sofia 64, Catania (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    In the framework of the ELIMED project, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are widely used to study the physical transport of charged particles generated by laser-target interactions and to preliminarily evaluate fluence and dose distributions. An energy selection system and the experimental setup for the TARANIS laser facility in Belfast (UK) have been already simulated with the GEANT4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) MC toolkit. Preliminary results are reported here. Future developments are planned to implement a MC based 3D treatment planning in order to optimize shots number and dose delivery.

  3. Mosaic crystal algorithm for Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Seeger, P A

    2002-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for calculating reflectivity, absorption, and scattering of mosaic crystals in Monte Carlo simulations of neutron instruments. The algorithm uses multi-step transport through the crystal with an exact solution of the Darwin equations at each step. It relies on the kinematical model for Bragg reflection (with parameters adjusted to reproduce experimental data). For computation of thermal effects (the Debye-Waller factor and coherent inelastic scattering), an expansion of the Debye integral as a rapidly converging series of exponential terms is also presented. Any crystal geometry and plane orientation may be treated. The algorithm has been incorporated into the neutron instrument simulation package NISP. (orig.)

  4. Exascale Monte Carlo R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Ryan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Overview of this presentation is (1) Exascale computing - different technologies, getting there; (2) high-performance proof-of-concept MCMini - features and results; and (3) OpenCL toolkit - Oatmeal (OpenCL Automatic Memory Allocation Library) - purpose and features. Despite driver issues, OpenCL seems like a good, hardware agnostic tool. MCMini demonstrates the possibility for GPGPU-based Monte Carlo methods - it shows great scaling for HPC application and algorithmic equivalence. Oatmeal provides a flexible framework to aid in the development of scientific OpenCL codes.

  5. State-of-the-art Monte Carlo 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soran, P.D.

    1988-06-28

    Particle transport calculations in highly dimensional and physically complex geometries, such as detector calibration, radiation shielding, space reactors, and oil-well logging, generally require Monte Carlo transport techniques. Monte Carlo particle transport can be performed on a variety of computers ranging from APOLLOs to VAXs. Some of the hardware and software developments, which now permit Monte Carlo methods to be routinely used, are reviewed in this paper. The development of inexpensive, large, fast computer memory, coupled with fast central processing units, permits Monte Carlo calculations to be performed on workstations, minicomputers, and supercomputers. The Monte Carlo renaissance is further aided by innovations in computer architecture and software development. Advances in vectorization and parallelization architecture have resulted in the development of new algorithms which have greatly reduced processing times. Finally, the renewed interest in Monte Carlo has spawned new variance reduction techniques which are being implemented in large computer codes. 45 refs.

  6. Equations of state and phase transitions in (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite and post-perovskites, position of the phase boundary and its double crossing, by Quantum Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R. E.; Lin, Y.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulations and density functional theory calculations to study the equations of state and phase transitions in (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite (Pv, bridgmanite) and post-perovskite (PPv) .[1] The ground-state energies were derived using quantum QMC simulations and the temperature-dependent Helmholtz free energies were calculated within the quasiharmonic approximation and density functional perturbation theory. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) within Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) is a stochastic numerical solution of Schrödinger's equation within the fixed many-particle nodes obtained, in our case, from a determinant of DFT orbitals. Agreement with experiments is improved over DFT alone. Furthermore, we obtain statistical error bounds on the results, rather than the unconstrained errors of DFT. The Pv-PPv phase boundary calculated from our QMC equations of state is also consistent with experiments, and better than previous DFT computations. In order to understand the H-phase reported in (Mg,Fe)SiO3 [2], we have performed evolutionary structure searching for FeSiO3.[3] We find a new structure type which may be consistent with the experimental observations, but is a lower pressure, less dense, phase. We have built a thermodynamic model for (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite as a function of P and T, and will discuss implications for the location of the phase boundary in D'' and its double crossing [4]. This work is supported by NSF and the ERC Advanced Grant ToMCaT. [1] Y. Lin, R. E. Cohen, S. Stackhouse, K. P. Driver, B. Militzer, L. Shulenburger, and J. Kim, Phys. Rev. B 90 (2014). [2] L. Zhang et al., Science 344, 877 (2014). [3] R. E. Cohen and Y. Lin, Phys. Rev. B 90 (2014). [4] J.W. Hernlund, C. Thomas and P.J. Tackley, Nature 434, 882 (2005).

  7. Monte Carlo Simulations: Number of Iterations and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Jessica Schultheis for her editorial review. vi INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK. 1 1. Introduction Monte Carlo (MC) methods1 are often used...ARL-TN-0684 ● JULY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Monte Carlo Simulations: Number of Iterations and Accuracy by William...needed. Do not return it to the originator. ARL-TN-0684 ● JULY 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Monte Carlo Simulations: Number

  8. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  9. Alternative Monte Carlo Approach for General Global Illumination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐庆; 李朋; 徐源; 孙济洲

    2004-01-01

    An alternative Monte Carlo strategy for the computation of global illumination problem was presented.The proposed approach provided a new and optimal way for solving Monte Carlo global illumination based on the zero variance importance sampling procedure. A new importance driven Monte Carlo global illumination algorithm in the framework of the new computing scheme was developed and implemented. Results, which were obtained by rendering test scenes, show that this new framework and the newly derived algorithm are effective and promising.

  10. Validation of Compton Scattering Monte Carlo Simulation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Weidenspointner, Georg; Hauf, Steffen; Hoff, Gabriela; Kuster, Markus; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several models for the Monte Carlo simulation of Compton scattering on electrons are quantitatively evaluated with respect to a large collection of experimental data retrieved from the literature. Some of these models are currently implemented in general purpose Monte Carlo systems; some have been implemented and evaluated for possible use in Monte Carlo particle transport for the first time in this study. Here we present first and preliminary results concerning total and differential Compton scattering cross sections.

  11. Self-healing diffusion quantum Monte Carlo algorithms: methods for direct reduction of the fermion sign error in electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboredo, F A; Hood, R Q; Kent, P C

    2009-01-06

    We develop a formalism and present an algorithm for optimization of the trial wave-function used in fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) methods. The formalism is based on the DMC mixed estimator of the ground state probability density. We take advantage of a basic property of the walker configuration distribution generated in a DMC calculation, to (i) project-out a multi-determinant expansion of the fixed node ground state wave function and (ii) to define a cost function that relates the interacting-ground-state-fixed-node and the non-interacting trial wave functions. We show that (a) locally smoothing out the kink of the fixed-node ground-state wave function at the node generates a new trial wave function with better nodal structure and (b) we argue that the noise in the fixed-node wave function resulting from finite sampling plays a beneficial role, allowing the nodes to adjust towards the ones of the exact many-body ground state in a simulated annealing-like process. Based on these principles, we propose a method to improve both single determinant and multi-determinant expansions of the trial wave function. The method can be generalized to other wave function forms such as pfaffians. We test the method in a model system where benchmark configuration interaction calculations can be performed and most components of the Hamiltonian are evaluated analytically. Comparing the DMC calculations with the exact solutions, we find that the trial wave function is systematically improved. The overlap of the optimized trial wave function and the exact ground state converges to 100% even starting from wave functions orthogonal to the exact ground state. Similarly, the DMC total energy and density converges to the exact solutions for the model. In the optimization process we find an optimal non-interacting nodal potential of density-functional-like form whose existence was predicted in a previous publication [Phys. Rev. B 77 245110 (2008)]. Tests of the method are

  12. Multiple Monte Carlo Testing with Applications in Spatial Point Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrkvička, Tomáš; Myllymäki, Mari; Hahn, Ute

    with a function as the test statistic, 3) several Monte Carlo tests with functions as test statistics. The rank test has correct (global) type I error in each case and it is accompanied with a p-value and with a graphical interpretation which shows which subtest or which distances of the used test function......The rank envelope test (Myllym\\"aki et al., Global envelope tests for spatial processes, arXiv:1307.0239 [stat.ME]) is proposed as a solution to multiple testing problem for Monte Carlo tests. Three different situations are recognized: 1) a few univariate Monte Carlo tests, 2) a Monte Carlo test...

  13. THE MCNPX MONTE CARLO RADIATION TRANSPORT CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATERS, LAURIE S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCKINNEY, GREGG W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DURKEE, JOE W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; FENSIN, MICHAEL L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JAMES, MICHAEL R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; JOHNS, RUSSELL C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PELOWITZ, DENISE B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-10

    MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code with three-dimensional geometry and continuous-energy transport of 34 particles and light ions. It contains flexible source and tally options, interactive graphics, and support for both sequential and multi-processing computer platforms. MCNPX is based on MCNP4B, and has been upgraded to most MCNP5 capabilities. MCNP is a highly stable code tracking neutrons, photons and electrons, and using evaluated nuclear data libraries for low-energy interaction probabilities. MCNPX has extended this base to a comprehensive set of particles and light ions, with heavy ion transport in development. Models have been included to calculate interaction probabilities when libraries are not available. Recent additions focus on the time evolution of residual nuclei decay, allowing calculation of transmutation and delayed particle emission. MCNPX is now a code of great dynamic range, and the excellent neutronics capabilities allow new opportunities to simulate devices of interest to experimental particle physics; particularly calorimetry. This paper describes the capabilities of the current MCNPX version 2.6.C, and also discusses ongoing code development.

  14. Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC)

    KAUST Repository

    Haji Ali, Abdul Lateef

    2015-01-07

    We propose and analyze a novel Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC) method for weak approximation of stochastic models that are described in terms of differential equations either driven by random measures or with random coefficients. The MIMC method is both a stochastic version of the combination technique introduced by Zenger, Griebel and collaborators and an extension of the Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method first described by Heinrich and Giles. Inspired by Giles’s seminal work, instead of using first-order differences as in MLMC, we use in MIMC high-order mixed differences to reduce the variance of the hierarchical differences dramatically. Under standard assumptions on the convergence rates of the weak error, variance and work per sample, the optimal index set turns out to be of Total Degree (TD) type. When using such sets, MIMC yields new and improved complexity results, which are natural generalizations of Giles’s MLMC analysis, and which increase the domain of problem parameters for which we achieve the optimal convergence.

  15. Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC)

    KAUST Repository

    Haji Ali, Abdul Lateef

    2016-01-06

    We propose and analyze a novel Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC) method for weak approximation of stochastic models that are described in terms of differential equations either driven by random measures or with random coefficients. The MIMC method is both a stochastic version of the combination technique introduced by Zenger, Griebel and collaborators and an extension of the Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method first described by Heinrich and Giles. Inspired by Giles s seminal work, instead of using first-order differences as in MLMC, we use in MIMC high-order mixed differences to reduce the variance of the hierarchical differences dramatically. Under standard assumptions on the convergence rates of the weak error, variance and work per sample, the optimal index set turns out to be of Total Degree (TD) type. When using such sets, MIMC yields new and improved complexity results, which are natural generalizations of Giles s MLMC analysis, and which increase the domain of problem parameters for which we achieve the optimal convergence, O(TOL-2).

  16. Discrete range clustering using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, G. B.; Sridhar, B.

    1993-01-01

    For automatic obstacle avoidance guidance during rotorcraft low altitude flight, a reliable model of the nearby environment is needed. Such a model may be constructed by applying surface fitting techniques to the dense range map obtained by active sensing using radars. However, for covertness, passive sensing techniques using electro-optic sensors are desirable. As opposed to the dense range map obtained via active sensing, passive sensing algorithms produce reliable range at sparse locations, and therefore, surface fitting techniques to fill the gaps in the range measurement are not directly applicable. Both for automatic guidance and as a display for aiding the pilot, these discrete ranges need to be grouped into sets which correspond to objects in the nearby environment. The focus of this paper is on using Monte Carlo methods for clustering range points into meaningful groups. One of the aims of the paper is to explore whether simulated annealing methods offer significant advantage over the basic Monte Carlo method for this class of problems. We compare three different approaches and present application results of these algorithms to a laboratory image sequence and a helicopter flight sequence.

  17. Information Geometry and Sequential Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Sim, Aaron; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the application of methods from information geometry to the sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) sampler. In particular the Riemannian manifold Metropolis-adjusted Langevin algorithm (mMALA) is adapted for the transition kernels in SMC. Similar to its function in Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, the mMALA is a fully adaptable kernel which allows for efficient sampling of high-dimensional and highly correlated parameter spaces. We set up the theoretical framework for its use in SMC with a focus on the application to the problem of sequential Bayesian inference for dynamical systems as modelled by sets of ordinary differential equations. In addition, we argue that defining the sequence of distributions on geodesics optimises the effective sample sizes in the SMC run. We illustrate the application of the methodology by inferring the parameters of simulated Lotka-Volterra and Fitzhugh-Nagumo models. In particular we demonstrate that compared to employing a standard adaptive random walk kernel, the SM...

  18. Monte-Carlo simulation of decananometric nMOSFETs: Multi-subband vs. 3D-electron gas with quantum corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolino, I.; Braccioli, M.; Lucci, L.; Palestri, P.; Esseni, D.; Fiegna, C.; Selmi, L.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper two Monte-Carlo simulators implementing different models for the influence of carrier quantization on the electrostatics and transport are used to analyze sub-100 nm double-gate SOI devices. To this purpose a new stable and efficient scheme to implement the contacts in the simulation of double-gate SOI devices is introduced first. Then, results in terms of drain current and microscopic quantities are compared, providing new insight on the limitation of a well assessed semiclassical transport simulation approach and a more rigorous multi-subband model.

  19. Effect of surface corrugation on low temperature phases of adsorbed (p-H{sub 2}){sub 7}: A quantum path integral Monte Carlo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Anthony; López, Gustavo E., E-mail: gustavo.lopez1@lehman.cuny.edu

    2014-04-01

    By using path integral Monte Carlo simulations coupled to Replica Exchange algorithms, various phases of (p-H{sub 2}){sub 7} physically adsorbed on a model graphite surface were identified at low temperatures. At T=0.5 K, the expected superfluid phase was observed for flat and slightly corrugated surfaces. At intermediate and high corrugations, a “supersolid” phase in C{sub 7/16} registry and a solid phase in C{sub 1/3} registry were observed, respectively. At higher temperatures, the superfluid is converted to a fluid and the “supersolid” to a solid.

  20. Final Report: 06-LW-013, Nuclear Physics the Monte Carlo Way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E

    2009-03-01

    This is document reports the progress and accomplishments achieved in 2006-2007 with LDRD funding under the proposal 06-LW-013, 'Nuclear Physics the Monte Carlo Way'. The project was a theoretical study to explore a novel approach to dealing with a persistent problem in Monte Carlo approaches to quantum many-body systems. The goal was to implement a solution to the notorious 'sign-problem', which if successful, would permit, for the first time, exact solutions to quantum many-body systems that cannot be addressed with other methods. In this document, we outline the progress and accomplishments achieved during FY2006-2007 with LDRD funding in the proposal 06-LW-013, 'Nuclear Physics the Monte Carlo Way'. This project was funded under the Lab Wide LDRD competition at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The primary objective of this project was to test the feasibility of implementing a novel approach to solving the generic quantum many-body problem, which is one of the most important problems being addressed in theoretical physics today. Instead of traditional methods based matrix diagonalization, this proposal focused a Monte Carlo method. The principal difficulty with Monte Carlo methods, is the so-called 'sign problem'. The sign problem, which will discussed in some detail later, is endemic to Monte Carlo approaches to the quantum many-body problem, and is the principal reason that they have not been completely successful in the past. Here, we outline our research in the 'shifted-contour method' applied the Auxiliary Field Monte Carlo (AFMC) method.

  1. Bold diagrammatic Monte Carlo method applied to fermionized frustrated spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulagin, S A; Prokof'ev, N; Starykh, O A; Svistunov, B; Varney, C N

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate, by considering the triangular lattice spin-1/2 Heisenberg model, that Monte Carlo sampling of skeleton Feynman diagrams within the fermionization framework offers a universal first-principles tool for strongly correlated lattice quantum systems. We observe the fermionic sign blessing--cancellation of higher order diagrams leading to a finite convergence radius of the series. We calculate the magnetic susceptibility of the triangular-lattice quantum antiferromagnet in the correlated paramagnet regime and reveal a surprisingly accurate microscopic correspondence with its classical counterpart at all accessible temperatures. The extrapolation of the observed relation to zero temperature suggests the absence of the magnetic order in the ground state. We critically examine the implications of this unusual scenario.

  2. Spin density distribution in open-shell transition metal systems: A comparative post-Hartree-Fock, Density Functional Theory and quantum Monte Carlo study of the CuCl2 molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Caffarel, Michel; Scemama, Anthony; Ramírez-Solís, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparative study of the spatial distribution of the spin density (SD) of the ground state of CuCl2 using Density Functional Theory (DFT), quantum Monte Carlo (QMC), and post-Hartree-Fock wavefunction theory (WFT). A number of studies have shown that an accurate description of the electronic structure of the lowest-lying states of this molecule is particularly challenging due to the interplay between the strong dynamical correlation effects in the 3d shell of the copper atom and the delocalization of the 3d hole over the chlorine atoms. It is shown here that qualitatively different results for SD are obtained from these various quantum-chemical approaches. At the DFT level, the spin density distribution is directly related to the amount of Hartree-Fock exchange introduced in hybrid functionals. At the QMC level, Fixed-node Diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) results for SD are strongly dependent on the nodal structure of the trial wavefunction employed (here, Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham with a particula...

  3. Morse Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Code System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmett, M.B.

    1975-02-01

    The report contains sections containing descriptions of the MORSE and PICTURE codes, input descriptions, sample problems, deviations of the physical equations and explanations of the various error messages. The MORSE code is a multipurpose neutron and gamma-ray transport Monte Carlo code. Time dependence for both shielding and criticality problems is provided. General three-dimensional geometry may be used with an albedo option available at any material surface. The PICTURE code provide aid in preparing correct input data for the combinatorial geometry package CG. It provides a printed view of arbitrary two-dimensional slices through the geometry. By inspecting these pictures one may determine if the geometry specified by the input cards is indeed the desired geometry. 23 refs. (WRF)

  4. Variational Monte Carlo study of pentaquark states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark W. Paris

    2005-07-01

    Accurate numerical solution of the five-body Schrodinger equation is effected via variational Monte Carlo. The spectrum is assumed to exhibit a narrow resonance with strangeness S=+1. A fully antisymmetrized and pair-correlated five-quark wave function is obtained for the assumed non-relativistic Hamiltonian which has spin, isospin, and color dependent pair interactions and many-body confining terms which are fixed by the non-exotic spectra. Gauge field dynamics are modeled via flux tube exchange factors. The energy determined for the ground states with J=1/2 and negative (positive) parity is 2.22 GeV (2.50 GeV). A lower energy negative parity state is consistent with recent lattice results. The short-range structure of the state is analyzed via its diquark content.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, P.A.; Daemen, L.L.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1998-12-01

    A code package consisting of the Monte Carlo Library MCLIB, the executing code MC{_}RUN, the web application MC{_}Web, and various ancillary codes is proposed as an open standard for simulation of neutron scattering instruments. The architecture of the package includes structures to define surfaces, regions, and optical elements contained in regions. A particle is defined by its vector position and velocity, its time of flight, its mass and charge, and a polarization vector. The MC{_}RUN code handles neutron transport and bookkeeping, while the action on the neutron within any region is computed using algorithms that may be deterministic, probabilistic, or a combination. Complete versatility is possible because the existing library may be supplemented by any procedures a user is able to code. Some examples are shown.

  6. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    , as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential......Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction...... into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches...

  7. Gas discharges modeling by Monte Carlo technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Marija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic assumption of the Townsend theory - that ions produce secondary electrons - is valid only in a very narrow range of the reduced electric field E/N. In accordance with the revised Townsend theory that was suggested by Phelps and Petrović, secondary electrons are produced in collisions of ions, fast neutrals, metastable atoms or photons with the cathode, or in gas phase ionizations by fast neutrals. In this paper we tried to build up a Monte Carlo code that can be used to calculate secondary electron yields for different types of particles. The obtained results are in good agreement with the analytical results of Phelps and. Petrović [Plasma Sourc. Sci. Technol. 8 (1999 R1].

  8. On nonlinear Markov chain Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieu, Christophe; Doucet, Arnaud; Del Moral, Pierre; 10.3150/10-BEJ307

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\mathscr{P}(E)$ be the space of probability measures on a measurable space $(E,\\mathcal{E})$. In this paper we introduce a class of nonlinear Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for simulating from a probability measure $\\pi\\in\\mathscr{P}(E)$. Nonlinear Markov kernels (see [Feynman--Kac Formulae: Genealogical and Interacting Particle Systems with Applications (2004) Springer]) $K:\\mathscr{P}(E)\\times E\\rightarrow\\mathscr{P}(E)$ can be constructed to, in some sense, improve over MCMC methods. However, such nonlinear kernels cannot be simulated exactly, so approximations of the nonlinear kernels are constructed using auxiliary or potentially self-interacting chains. Several nonlinear kernels are presented and it is demonstrated that, under some conditions, the associated approximations exhibit a strong law of large numbers; our proof technique is via the Poisson equation and Foster--Lyapunov conditions. We investigate the performance of our approximations with some simulations.

  9. Monte Carlo exploration of warped Higgsless models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, JoAnne L.; Lillie, Benjamin; Rizzo, Thomas Gerard [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, 2575 Sand Hill Rd., Menlo Park, CA, 94025 (United States)]. E-mail: rizzo@slac.stanford.edu

    2004-10-01

    We have performed a detailed Monte Carlo exploration of the parameter space for a warped Higgsless model of electroweak symmetry breaking in 5 dimensions. This model is based on the SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} x U(1){sub B-L} gauge group in an AdS{sub 5} bulk with arbitrary gauge kinetic terms on both the Planck and TeV branes. Constraints arising from precision electroweak measurements and collider data are found to be relatively easy to satisfy. We show, however, that the additional requirement of perturbative unitarity up to the cut-off, {approx_equal} 10 TeV, in W{sub L}{sup +}W{sub L}{sup -} elastic scattering in the absence of dangerous tachyons eliminates all models. If successful models of this class exist, they must be highly fine-tuned. (author)

  10. Monte Carlo Exploration of Warped Higgsless Models

    CERN Document Server

    Hewett, J L; Rizzo, T G

    2004-01-01

    We have performed a detailed Monte Carlo exploration of the parameter space for a warped Higgsless model of electroweak symmetry breaking in 5 dimensions. This model is based on the $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R\\times U(1)_{B-L}$ gauge group in an AdS$_5$ bulk with arbitrary gauge kinetic terms on both the Planck and TeV branes. Constraints arising from precision electroweak measurements and collider data are found to be relatively easy to satisfy. We show, however, that the additional requirement of perturbative unitarity up to the cut-off, $\\simeq 10$ TeV, in $W_L^+W_L^-$ elastic scattering in the absence of dangerous tachyons eliminates all models. If successful models of this class exist, they must be highly fine-tuned.

  11. Monte Carlo Implementation of Polarized Hadronization

    CERN Document Server

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H; Thomas, Anthony W

    2016-01-01

    We study the polarized quark hadronization in a Monte Carlo (MC) framework based on the recent extension of the quark-jet framework, where a self-consistent treatment of the quark polarization transfer in a sequential hadronization picture has been presented. Here, we first adopt this approach for MC simulations of hadronization process with finite number of produced hadrons, expressing the relevant probabilities in terms of the eight leading twist quark-to-quark transverse momentum dependent (TMD) splitting functions (SFs) for elementary $q \\to q'+h$ transition. We present explicit expressions for the unpolarized and Collins fragmentation functions (FFs) of unpolarized hadrons emitted at rank two. Further, we demonstrate that all the current spectator-type model calculations of the leading twist quark-to-quark TMD SFs violate the positivity constraints, and propose quark model based ansatz for these input functions that circumvents the problem. We validate our MC framework by explicitly proving the absence o...

  12. Commensurabilities between ETNOs: a Monte Carlo survey

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2016-01-01

    Many asteroids in the main and trans-Neptunian belts are trapped in mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune, respectively. As a side effect, they experience accidental commensurabilities among themselves. These commensurabilities define characteristic patterns that can be used to trace the source of the observed resonant behaviour. Here, we explore systematically the existence of commensurabilities between the known ETNOs using their heliocentric and barycentric semimajor axes, their uncertainties, and Monte Carlo techniques. We find that the commensurability patterns present in the known ETNO population resemble those found in the main and trans-Neptunian belts. Although based on small number statistics, such patterns can only be properly explained if most, if not all, of the known ETNOs are subjected to the resonant gravitational perturbations of yet undetected trans-Plutonian planets. We show explicitly that some of the statistically significant commensurabilities are compatible with the Planet Nin...

  13. Variable length trajectory compressible hybrid Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) generates samples from a prescribed probability distribution in a configuration space by simulating Hamiltonian dynamics, followed by the Metropolis (-Hastings) acceptance/rejection step. Compressible HMC (CHMC) generalizes HMC to a situation in which the dynamics is reversible but not necessarily Hamiltonian. This article presents a framework to further extend the algorithm. Within the existing framework, each trajectory of the dynamics must be integrated for the same amount of (random) time to generate a valid Metropolis proposal. Our generalized acceptance/rejection mechanism allows a more deliberate choice of the integration time for each trajectory. The proposed algorithm in particular enables an effective application of variable step size integrators to HMC-type sampling algorithms based on reversible dynamics. The potential of our framework is further demonstrated by another extension of HMC which reduces the wasted computations due to unstable numerical approximations and corr...

  14. Lunar Regolith Albedos Using Monte Carlos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. L.; Andersen, V.; Pinsky, L. S.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of planetary regoliths for their backscatter albedos produced by cosmic rays (CRs) is important for space exploration and its potential contributions to science investigations in fundamental physics and astrophysics. Albedos affect all such experiments and the personnel that operate them. Groups have analyzed the production rates of various particles and elemental species by planetary surfaces when bombarded with Galactic CR fluxes, both theoretically and by means of various transport codes, some of which have emphasized neutrons. Here we report on the preliminary results of our current Monte Carlo investigation into the production of charged particles, neutrons, and neutrinos by the lunar surface using FLUKA. In contrast to previous work, the effects of charm are now included.

  15. Nuclear reactions in Monte Carlo codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, A; Sala, P R

    2002-01-01

    The physics foundations of hadronic interactions as implemented in most Monte Carlo codes are presented together with a few practical examples. The description of the relevant physics is presented schematically split into the major steps in order to stress the different approaches required for the full understanding of nuclear reactions at intermediate and high energies. Due to the complexity of the problem, only a few semi-qualitative arguments are developed in this paper. The description will be necessarily schematic and somewhat incomplete, but hopefully it will be useful for a first introduction into this topic. Examples are shown mostly for the high energy regime, where all mechanisms mentioned in the paper are at work and to which perhaps most of the readers are less accustomed. Examples for lower energies can be found in the references.

  16. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction......, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential...... of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol....

  17. Geometric Monte Carlo and Black Janus Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Bak, Dongsu; Kim, Kyung Kiu; Min, Hyunsoo; Song, Jeong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    We describe an application of the Monte Carlo method to the Janus deformation of the black brane background. We present numerical results for three and five dimensional black Janus geometries with planar and spherical interfaces. In particular, we argue that the 5D geometry with a spherical interface has an application in understanding the finite temperature bag-like QCD model via the AdS/CFT correspondence. The accuracy and convergence of the algorithm are evaluated with respect to the grid spacing. The systematic errors of the method are determined using an exact solution of 3D black Janus. This numerical approach for solving linear problems is unaffected initial guess of a trial solution and can handle an arbitrary geometry under various boundary conditions in the presence of source fields.

  18. Modeling neutron guides using Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, D Q; Crow, M L; Wang, X L; Lee, W T; Hubbard, C R

    2002-01-01

    Four neutron guide geometries, straight, converging, diverging and curved, were characterized using Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations. The main areas of interest are the transmission of the guides at various neutron energies and the intrinsic time-of-flight (TOF) peak broadening. Use of a delta-function time pulse from a uniform Lambert neutron source allows one to quantitatively simulate the effect of guides' geometry on the TOF peak broadening. With a converging guide, the intensity and the beam divergence increases while the TOF peak width decreases compared with that of a straight guide. By contrast, use of a diverging guide decreases the intensity and the beam divergence, and broadens the width (in TOF) of the transmitted neutron pulse.

  19. Accurate barrier heights using diffusion Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Krongchon, Kittithat; Wagner, Lucas K

    2016-01-01

    Fixed node diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) has been performed on a test set of forward and reverse barrier heights for 19 non-hydrogen-transfer reactions, and the nodal error has been assessed. The DMC results are robust to changes in the nodal surface, as assessed by using different mean-field techniques to generate single determinant wave functions. Using these single determinant nodal surfaces, DMC results in errors of 1.5(5) kcal/mol on barrier heights. Using the large data set of DMC energies, we attempted to find good descriptors of the fixed node error. It does not correlate with a number of descriptors including change in density, but does correlate with the gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied orbital energies in the mean-field calculation.

  20. Reporting Monte Carlo Studies in Structural Equation Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Anne

    2013-01-01

    In structural equation modeling, Monte Carlo simulations have been used increasingly over the last two decades, as an inventory from the journal Structural Equation Modeling illustrates. Reaching out to a broad audience, this article provides guidelines for reporting Monte Carlo studies in that fiel

  1. Efficiency and accuracy of Monte Carlo (importance) sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waarts, P.H.

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo Analysis is often regarded as the most simple and accurate reliability method. Be-sides it is the most transparent method. The only problem is the accuracy in correlation with the efficiency. Monte Carlo gets less efficient or less accurate when very low probabilities are to be computed

  2. The Monte Carlo Method. Popular Lectures in Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol', I. M.

    The Monte Carlo Method is a method of approximately solving mathematical and physical problems by the simulation of random quantities. The principal goal of this booklet is to suggest to specialists in all areas that they will encounter problems which can be solved by the Monte Carlo Method. Part I of the booklet discusses the simulation of random…

  3. Forest canopy BRDF simulation using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Zeng, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is a random statistic method, which has been widely used to simulate the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation canopy in the field of visible remote sensing. The random process between photons and forest canopy was designed using Monte Carlo method.

  4. Sensitivity of Monte Carlo simulations to input distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RamoRao, B. S.; Srikanta Mishra, S.; McNeish, J.; Andrews, R. W.

    2001-07-01

    The sensitivity of the results of a Monte Carlo simulation to the shapes and moments of the probability distributions of the input variables is studied. An economical computational scheme is presented as an alternative to the replicate Monte Carlo simulations and is explained with an illustrative example. (Author) 4 refs.

  5. Further experience in Bayesian analysis using Monte Carlo Integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.K. van Dijk (Herman); T. Kloek (Teun)

    1980-01-01

    textabstractAn earlier paper [Kloek and Van Dijk (1978)] is extended in three ways. First, Monte Carlo integration is performed in a nine-dimensional parameter space of Klein's model I [Klein (1950)]. Second, Monte Carlo is used as a tool for the elicitation of a uniform prior on a finite region by

  6. New Approaches and Applications for Monte Carlo Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufiero, Manuele; Bidaud, Adrien; Kotlyar, Dan; Leppänen, Jaakko; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Salvatores, Massimo; Sen, Sonat; Shwageraus, Eugene; Fratoni, Massimiliano

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents some of the recent and new advancements in the extension of Monte Carlo Perturbation Theory methodologies and application. In particular, the discussed problems involve Brunup calculation, perturbation calculation based on continuous energy functions, and Monte Carlo Perturbation Theory in loosely coupled systems.

  7. Forest canopy BRDF simulation using Monte Carlo method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, J.; Wu, B.; Zeng, Y.; Tian, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo method is a random statistic method, which has been widely used to simulate the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of vegetation canopy in the field of visible remote sensing. The random process between photons and forest canopy was designed using Monte Carlo method.

  8. CERN Summer Student Report 2016 Monte Carlo Data Base Improvement

    CERN Document Server

    Caciulescu, Alexandru Razvan

    2016-01-01

    During my Summer Student project I worked on improving the Monte Carlo Data Base and MonALISA services for the ALICE Collaboration. The project included learning the infrastructure for tracking and monitoring of the Monte Carlo productions as well as developing a new RESTful API for seamless integration with the JIRA issue tracking framework.

  9. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: 99m Tc, 111In and 131I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational efficiency

  10. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  11. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: (99m) Tc, (111)In and (131)I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational

  12. Monte Carlo scatter correction for SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zemei

    The goal of this dissertation is to present a quantitatively accurate and computationally fast scatter correction method that is robust and easily accessible for routine applications in SPECT imaging. A Monte Carlo based scatter estimation method is investigated and developed further. The Monte Carlo simulation program SIMIND (Simulating Medical Imaging Nuclear Detectors), was specifically developed to simulate clinical SPECT systems. The SIMIND scatter estimation (SSE) method was developed further using a multithreading technique to distribute the scatter estimation task across multiple threads running concurrently on multi-core CPU's to accelerate the scatter estimation process. An analytical collimator that ensures less noise was used during SSE. The research includes the addition to SIMIND of charge transport modeling in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Phenomena associated with radiation-induced charge transport including charge trapping, charge diffusion, charge sharing between neighboring detector pixels, as well as uncertainties in the detection process are addressed. Experimental measurements and simulation studies were designed for scintillation crystal based SPECT and CZT based SPECT systems to verify and evaluate the expanded SSE method. Jaszczak Deluxe and Anthropomorphic Torso Phantoms (Data Spectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC, USA) were used for experimental measurements and digital versions of the same phantoms employed during simulations to mimic experimental acquisitions. This study design enabled easy comparison of experimental and simulated data. The results have consistently shown that the SSE method performed similarly or better than the triple energy window (TEW) and effective scatter source estimation (ESSE) methods for experiments on all the clinical SPECT systems. The SSE method is proven to be a viable method for scatter estimation for routine clinical use.

  13. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carney, Sean E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05

    In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a

  14. Vectorized Monte Carlo methods for reactor lattice analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, F. B.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the new computational methods and equivalent mathematical representations of physics models used in the MCV code, a vectorized continuous-enery Monte Carlo code for use on the CYBER-205 computer are discussed. While the principal application of MCV is the neutronics analysis of repeating reactor lattices, the new methods used in MCV should be generally useful for vectorizing Monte Carlo for other applications. For background, a brief overview of the vector processing features of the CYBER-205 is included, followed by a discussion of the fundamentals of Monte Carlo vectorization. The physics models used in the MCV vectorized Monte Carlo code are then summarized. The new methods used in scattering analysis are presented along with details of several key, highly specialized computational routines. Finally, speedups relative to CDC-7600 scalar Monte Carlo are discussed.

  15. A Quantum Monte Carlo Study on Mixed-Spin Chains of 1/2-1/2-1-1 and 3/2-3/2-1-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUZhao-Xin; ZHANGJun; YINGHe-Ping

    2003-01-01

    The ground-state and thermodynamic properties of quantum mixed-spin chains of 1/2-1/2-1-1 and 3/2-3/2-1-1 are investigated by a quantum Monte Carlo simulation with the loop-cluster algorithm. For 1/2-1/2-1-1 chain, we find it hastwo phases separated by an energy-gap vanishing point in the ground-state. For 3/2-3/2-1-1 chain,the numerical results show two energy-gap vanishing points isolated by different phases in its ground-state. Our calculations indicate that all these ground state phases can be understood by means of valence-bond-solid picture, and the thermodynamic behavior at finite temperatures is continuous as a function of parameter α=J2/J1.

  16. Monte Carlo 2000 Conference : Advanced Monte Carlo for Radiation Physics, Particle Transport Simulation and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Baräo, Fernando; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Távora, Luis; Vaz, Pedro

    2001-01-01

    This book focusses on the state of the art of Monte Carlo methods in radiation physics and particle transport simulation and applications, the latter involving in particular, the use and development of electron--gamma, neutron--gamma and hadronic codes. Besides the basic theory and the methods employed, special attention is paid to algorithm development for modeling, and the analysis of experiments and measurements in a variety of fields ranging from particle to medical physics.

  17. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods for lattice systems. A first look

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Leovey, H.; Griewank, A. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik; Nube, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Mueller-Preussker, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2013-02-15

    We investigate the applicability of Quasi-Monte Carlo methods to Euclidean lattice systems for quantum mechanics in order to improve the asymptotic error behavior of observables for such theories. In most cases the error of an observable calculated by averaging over random observations generated from an ordinary Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation behaves like N{sup -1/2}, where N is the number of observations. By means of Quasi-Monte Carlo methods it is possible to improve this behavior for certain problems up to N{sup -1}. We adapted and applied this approach to simple systems like the quantum harmonic and anharmonic oscillator and verified an improved error scaling.

  18. Iterative acceleration methods for Monte Carlo and deterministic criticality calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, T.J.

    1995-11-01

    If you have ever given up on a nuclear criticality calculation and terminated it because it took so long to converge, you might find this thesis of interest. The author develops three methods for improving the fission source convergence in nuclear criticality calculations for physical systems with high dominance ratios for which convergence is slow. The Fission Matrix Acceleration Method and the Fission Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (FDSA) Method are acceleration methods that speed fission source convergence for both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods. The third method is a hybrid Monte Carlo method that also converges for difficult problems where the unaccelerated Monte Carlo method fails. The author tested the feasibility of all three methods in a test bed consisting of idealized problems. He has successfully accelerated fission source convergence in both deterministic and Monte Carlo criticality calculations. By filtering statistical noise, he has incorporated deterministic attributes into the Monte Carlo calculations in order to speed their source convergence. He has used both the fission matrix and a diffusion approximation to perform unbiased accelerations. The Fission Matrix Acceleration method has been implemented in the production code MCNP and successfully applied to a real problem. When the unaccelerated calculations are unable to converge to the correct solution, they cannot be accelerated in an unbiased fashion. A Hybrid Monte Carlo method weds Monte Carlo and a modified diffusion calculation to overcome these deficiencies. The Hybrid method additionally possesses reduced statistical errors.

  19. Information-Geometric Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods Using Diffusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Livingstone

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent work incorporating geometric ideas in Markov chain Monte Carlo is reviewed in order to highlight these advances and their possible application in a range of domains beyond statistics. A full exposition of Markov chains and their use in Monte Carlo simulation for statistical inference and molecular dynamics is provided, with particular emphasis on methods based on Langevin diffusions. After this, geometric concepts in Markov chain Monte Carlo are introduced. A full derivation of the Langevin diffusion on a Riemannian manifold is given, together with a discussion of the appropriate Riemannian metric choice for different problems. A survey of applications is provided, and some open questions are discussed.

  20. The Monte Carlo method the method of statistical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Shreider, YuA

    1966-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Method: The Method of Statistical Trials is a systematic account of the fundamental concepts and techniques of the Monte Carlo method, together with its range of applications. Some of these applications include the computation of definite integrals, neutron physics, and in the investigation of servicing processes. This volume is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an overview of the basic features of the Monte Carlo method and typical examples of its application to simple problems in computational mathematics. The next chapter examines the computation of multi-dimensio

  1. Monte Carlo simulations for heavy ion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, O.

    2006-07-26

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio (s{sub w,air}) calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinically relevant ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used which is a substantially modified version of its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1. The code was partially rewritten, replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe- Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. Optional MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data were included. The fragmentation model was verified using all available experimental data and some parameters were adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Additional to the calculations of stopping power ratios, s{sub w,air}, the influence of fragments and I-values on s{sub w,air} for carbon ion beams was investigated. The value of s{sub w,air} deviates as much as 2.3% at the Bragg peak from the recommended by TRS-398 constant value of 1.130 for an energy of 50 MeV/u. (orig.)

  2. Rare event simulation using Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Rubino, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    In a probabilistic model, a rare event is an event with a very small probability of occurrence. The forecasting of rare events is a formidable task but is important in many areas. For instance a catastrophic failure in a transport system or in a nuclear power plant, the failure of an information processing system in a bank, or in the communication network of a group of banks, leading to financial losses. Being able to evaluate the probability of rare events is therefore a critical issue. Monte Carlo Methods, the simulation of corresponding models, are used to analyze rare events. This book sets out to present the mathematical tools available for the efficient simulation of rare events. Importance sampling and splitting are presented along with an exposition of how to apply these tools to a variety of fields ranging from performance and dependability evaluation of complex systems, typically in computer science or in telecommunications, to chemical reaction analysis in biology or particle transport in physics. ...

  3. A continuation multilevel Monte Carlo algorithm

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2014-09-05

    We propose a novel Continuation Multi Level Monte Carlo (CMLMC) algorithm for weak approximation of stochastic models. The CMLMC algorithm solves the given approximation problem for a sequence of decreasing tolerances, ending when the required error tolerance is satisfied. CMLMC assumes discretization hierarchies that are defined a priori for each level and are geometrically refined across levels. The actual choice of computational work across levels is based on parametric models for the average cost per sample and the corresponding variance and weak error. These parameters are calibrated using Bayesian estimation, taking particular notice of the deepest levels of the discretization hierarchy, where only few realizations are available to produce the estimates. The resulting CMLMC estimator exhibits a non-trivial splitting between bias and statistical contributions. We also show the asymptotic normality of the statistical error in the MLMC estimator and justify in this way our error estimate that allows prescribing both required accuracy and confidence in the final result. Numerical results substantiate the above results and illustrate the corresponding computational savings in examples that are described in terms of differential equations either driven by random measures or with random coefficients. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  4. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Photospheric Process

    CERN Document Server

    Santana, Rodolfo; Hernandez, Roberto A; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo (MC) code we wrote to simulate the photospheric process and to study the photospheric spectrum above the peak energy. Our simulations were performed with a photon to electron ratio $N_{\\gamma}/N_{e} = 10^{5}$, as determined by observations of the GRB prompt emission. We searched an exhaustive parameter space to determine if the photospheric process can match the observed high-energy spectrum of the prompt emission. If we do not consider electron re-heating, we determined that the best conditions to produce the observed high-energy spectrum are low photon temperatures and high optical depths. However, for these simulations, the spectrum peaks at an energy below 300 keV by a factor $\\sim 10$. For the cases we consider with higher photon temperatures and lower optical depths, we demonstrate that additional energy in the electrons is required to produce a power-law spectrum above the peak-energy. By considering electron re-heating near the photosphere, the spectrum for these simulations h...

  5. Finding Planet Nine: a Monte Carlo approach

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2016-01-01

    Planet Nine is a hypothetical planet located well beyond Pluto that has been proposed in an attempt to explain the observed clustering in physical space of the perihelia of six extreme trans-Neptunian objects or ETNOs. The predicted approximate values of its orbital elements include a semimajor axis of 700 au, an eccentricity of 0.6, an inclination of 30 degrees, and an argument of perihelion of 150 degrees. Searching for this putative planet is already under way. Here, we use a Monte Carlo approach to create a synthetic population of Planet Nine orbits and study its visibility statistically in terms of various parameters and focusing on the aphelion configuration. Our analysis shows that, if Planet Nine exists and is at aphelion, it might be found projected against one out of four specific areas in the sky. Each area is linked to a particular value of the longitude of the ascending node and two of them are compatible with an apsidal antialignment scenario. In addition and after studying the current statistic...

  6. Atomistic Monte Carlo simulation of lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Sklenar, Heinz

    2014-01-24

    Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC) local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA) for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

  7. Parallel Monte Carlo Simulation of Aerosol Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient Monte Carlo (MC algorithm is developed for the numerical simulation of aerosol dynamics, that is, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation. Nucleation and surface growth are handled with deterministic means, while coagulation is simulated with a stochastic method (Marcus-Lushnikov stochastic process. Operator splitting techniques are used to synthesize the deterministic and stochastic parts in the algorithm. The algorithm is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI. The parallel computing efficiency is investigated through numerical examples. Near 60% parallel efficiency is achieved for the maximum testing case with 3.7 million MC particles running on 93 parallel computing nodes. The algorithm is verified through simulating various testing cases and comparing the simulation results with available analytical and/or other numerical solutions. Generally, it is found that only small number (hundreds or thousands of MC particles is necessary to accurately predict the aerosol particle number density, volume fraction, and so forth, that is, low order moments of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD function. Accurately predicting the high order moments of the PSD needs to dramatically increase the number of MC particles.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations of Protein Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sumit; Kumar, Sanat K.; Belfort, Georges

    2008-03-01

    Amyloidogenic diseases, such as, Alzheimer's are caused by adsorption and aggregation of partially unfolded proteins. Adsorption of proteins is a concern in design of biomedical devices, such as dialysis membranes. Protein adsorption is often accompanied by conformational rearrangements in protein molecules. Such conformational rearrangements are thought to affect many properties of adsorbed protein molecules such as their adhesion strength to the surface, biological activity, and aggregation tendency. It has been experimentally shown that many naturally occurring proteins, upon adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces, undergo a helix to sheet or random coil secondary structural rearrangement. However, to better understand the equilibrium structural complexities of this phenomenon, we have performed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of adsorption of a four helix bundle, modeled as a lattice protein, and studied the adsorption behavior and equilibrium protein conformations at different temperatures and degrees of surface hydrophobicity. To study the free energy and entropic effects on adsorption, Canonical ensemble MC simulations have been combined with Weighted Histogram Analysis Method(WHAM). Conformational transitions of proteins on surfaces will be discussed as a function of surface hydrophobicity and compared to analogous bulk transitions.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of the NIMROD diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botti, A. [University of Roma TRE, Rome (Italy)]. E-mail: botti@fis.uniroma3.it; Ricci, M.A. [University of Roma TRE, Rome (Italy); Bowron, D.T. [ISIS-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom); Soper, A.K. [ISIS-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    The near and intermediate range order diffractometer (NIMROD) has been selected as a day one instrument on the second target station at ISIS. Uniquely, NIMROD will provide continuous access to particle separations ranging from the interatomic (<1A) to the mesoscopic (<300A). This instrument is mainly designed for structural investigations, although the possibility of putting a Fermi chopper (and corresponding NIMONIC chopper) in the incident beam line, will potentially allow the performance of low resolution inelastic scattering measurements. The performance characteristics of the TOF diffractometer have been simulated by means of a series of Monte Carlo calculations. In particular, the flux as a function of the transferred momentum Q as well as the resolution in Q and transferred energy have been estimated. Moreover, the possibility of including a honeycomb collimator in order to achieve better resolution has been tested. Here, we want to present the design of this diffractometer that will bridge the gap between wide- and small-angle neutron scattering experiments.

  10. Monte Carlo Simulation of River Meander Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A. J.; Duan, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    This study first compares the first order analytical solutions for flow field by Ikeda et. al. (1981) and Johanesson and Parker (1989b). Ikeda et. al.’s (1981) linear bank erosion model was implemented to predict the rate of bank erosion in which the bank erosion coefficient is treated as a stochastic variable that varies with physical properties of the bank (e.g. cohesiveness, stratigraphy, vegetation density). The developed model was used to predict the evolution of meandering planforms. Then, the modeling results were analyzed and compared to the observed data. Since the migration of meandering channel consists of downstream translation, lateral expansion, and downstream or upstream rotations. Several measures are formulated in order to determine which of the resulting planform is closest to the experimental measured one. Results from the deterministic model highly depend on the calibrated erosion coefficient. Since field measurements are always limited, the stochastic model yielded more realistic predictions of meandering planform evolutions. Due to the random nature of bank erosion coefficient, the meandering planform evolution is a stochastic process that can only be accurately predicted by a stochastic model. Quasi-2D Ikeda (1989) flow solution with Monte Carlo Simulation of Bank Erosion Coefficient.

  11. Commensurabilities between ETNOs: a Monte Carlo survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-07-01

    Many asteroids in the main and trans-Neptunian belts are trapped in mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune, respectively. As a side effect, they experience accidental commensurabilities among themselves. These commensurabilities define characteristic patterns that can be used to trace the source of the observed resonant behaviour. Here, we explore systematically the existence of commensurabilities between the known ETNOs using their heliocentric and barycentric semimajor axes, their uncertainties, and Monte Carlo techniques. We find that the commensurability patterns present in the known ETNO population resemble those found in the main and trans-Neptunian belts. Although based on small number statistics, such patterns can only be properly explained if most, if not all, of the known ETNOs are subjected to the resonant gravitational perturbations of yet undetected trans-Plutonian planets. We show explicitly that some of the statistically significant commensurabilities are compatible with the Planet Nine hypothesis; in particular, a number of objects may be trapped in the 5:3 and 3:1 mean motion resonances with a putative Planet Nine with semimajor axis ˜700 au.

  12. Diffusion Monte Carlo in internal coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Andrew S; McCoy, Anne B

    2013-08-15

    An internal coordinate extension of diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) is described as a first step toward a generalized reduced-dimensional DMC approach. The method places no constraints on the choice of internal coordinates other than the requirement that they all be independent. Using H(3)(+) and its isotopologues as model systems, the methodology is shown to be capable of successfully describing the ground state properties of molecules that undergo large amplitude, zero-point vibrational motions. Combining the approach developed here with the fixed-node approximation allows vibrationally excited states to be treated. Analysis of the ground state probability distribution is shown to provide important insights into the set of internal coordinates that are less strongly coupled and therefore more suitable for use as the nodal coordinates for the fixed-node DMC calculations. In particular, the curvilinear normal mode coordinates are found to provide reasonable nodal surfaces for the fundamentals of H(2)D(+) and D(2)H(+) despite both molecules being highly fluxional.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations for focusing elliptical guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicu, Roxana [FRM2 Garching, Muenchen (Germany); Boeni, Peter [E20, TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the Monte Carlo simulations using McStas Programme was to improve the focusing of the neutron beam existing at PGAA (FRM II) by prolongation of the existing elliptic guide (coated now with supermirrors with m=3) with a new part. First we have tried with an initial length of the additional guide of 7,5cm and coatings for the neutron guide of supermirrors with m=4,5 and 6. The gain (calculated by dividing the intensity in the focal point after adding the guide by the intensity at the focal point with the initial guide) obtained for this coatings indicated that a coating with m=5 would be appropriate for a first trial. The next step was to vary the length of the additional guide for this m value and therefore choosing the appropriate length for the maximal gain. With the m value and the length of the guide fixed we have introduced an aperture 1 cm before the focal point and we have varied the radius of this aperture in order to obtain a focused beam. We have observed a dramatic decrease in the size of the beam in the focal point after introducing this aperture. The simulation results, the gains obtained and the evolution of the beam size will be presented.

  14. Monte Carlo Production Management at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Boudoul, G.; Pol, A; Srimanobhas, P; Vlimant, J R; Franzoni, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the LHC data at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment requires the production of a large number of simulated events.During the runI of LHC (2010-2012), CMS has produced over 12 Billion simulated events,organized in approximately sixty different campaigns each emulating specific detector conditions and LHC running conditions (pile up).In order toaggregate the information needed for the configuration and prioritization of the events production,assure the book-keeping and of all the processing requests placed by the physics analysis groups,and to interface with the CMS production infrastructure,the web-based service Monte Carlo Management (McM) has been developed and put in production in 2012.McM is based on recent server infrastructure technology (CherryPy + java) and relies on a CouchDB database back-end.This contribution will coverthe one and half year of operational experience managing samples of simulated events for CMS,the evolution of its functionalitiesand the extension of its capabi...

  15. Monte Carlo models of dust coagulation

    CERN Document Server

    Zsom, Andras

    2010-01-01

    The thesis deals with the first stage of planet formation, namely dust coagulation from micron to millimeter sizes in circumstellar disks. For the first time, we collect and compile the recent laboratory experiments on dust aggregates into a collision model that can be implemented into dust coagulation models. We put this model into a Monte Carlo code that uses representative particles to simulate dust evolution. Simulations are performed using three different disk models in a local box (0D) located at 1 AU distance from the central star. We find that the dust evolution does not follow the previously assumed growth-fragmentation cycle, but growth is halted by bouncing before the fragmentation regime is reached. We call this the bouncing barrier which is an additional obstacle during the already complex formation process of planetesimals. The absence of the growth-fragmentation cycle and the halted growth has two important consequences for planet formation. 1) It is observed that disk atmospheres are dusty thr...

  16. Atomistic Monte Carlo Simulation of Lipid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wüstner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological membranes are complex assemblies of many different molecules of which analysis demands a variety of experimental and computational approaches. In this article, we explain challenges and advantages of atomistic Monte Carlo (MC simulation of lipid membranes. We provide an introduction into the various move sets that are implemented in current MC methods for efficient conformational sampling of lipids and other molecules. In the second part, we demonstrate for a concrete example, how an atomistic local-move set can be implemented for MC simulations of phospholipid monomers and bilayer patches. We use our recently devised chain breakage/closure (CBC local move set in the bond-/torsion angle space with the constant-bond-length approximation (CBLA for the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC. We demonstrate rapid conformational equilibration for a single DPPC molecule, as assessed by calculation of molecular energies and entropies. We also show transition from a crystalline-like to a fluid DPPC bilayer by the CBC local-move MC method, as indicated by the electron density profile, head group orientation, area per lipid, and whole-lipid displacements. We discuss the potential of local-move MC methods in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, for example, for studying multi-component lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

  17. Parallel Monte Carlo simulation of aerosol dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, K.

    2014-01-01

    A highly efficient Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm is developed for the numerical simulation of aerosol dynamics, that is, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation. Nucleation and surface growth are handled with deterministic means, while coagulation is simulated with a stochastic method (Marcus-Lushnikov stochastic process). Operator splitting techniques are used to synthesize the deterministic and stochastic parts in the algorithm. The algorithm is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The parallel computing efficiency is investigated through numerical examples. Near 60% parallel efficiency is achieved for the maximum testing case with 3.7 million MC particles running on 93 parallel computing nodes. The algorithm is verified through simulating various testing cases and comparing the simulation results with available analytical and/or other numerical solutions. Generally, it is found that only small number (hundreds or thousands) of MC particles is necessary to accurately predict the aerosol particle number density, volume fraction, and so forth, that is, low order moments of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) function. Accurately predicting the high order moments of the PSD needs to dramatically increase the number of MC particles. 2014 Kun Zhou et al.

  18. Multidiscontinuity algorithm for world-line Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a multidiscontinuity algorithm for the efficient global update of world-line configurations in Monte Carlo simulations of interacting quantum systems. This algorithm is a generalization of the two-discontinuity algorithms introduced in Refs. [N. Prokof'ev, B. Svistunov, and I. Tupitsyn, Phys. Lett. A 238, 253 (1998)] and [O. F. Syljuåsen and A. W. Sandvik, Phys. Rev. E 66, 046701 (2002)]. This generalization is particularly effective for studying Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of composite particles. In particular, we demonstrate the utility of the generalized algorithm by simulating a Hamiltonian for an S=1 antiferromagnet with strong uniaxial single-ion anisotropy. The multidiscontinuity algorithm not only solves the freezing problem that arises in this limit, but also allows the efficient computing of the off-diagonal correlator that characterizes a BEC of composite particles.

  19. Hellman-Feynman operator sampling in diffusion Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudoin, R; Pitarke, J M

    2007-09-21

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations typically yield highly accurate results in solid-state and quantum-chemical calculations. However, operators that do not commute with the Hamiltonian are at best sampled correctly up to second order in the error of the underlying trial wave function once simple corrections have been applied. This error is of the same order as that for the energy in variational calculations. Operators that suffer from these problems include potential energies and the density. This Letter presents a new method, based on the Hellman-Feynman theorem, for the correct DMC sampling of all operators diagonal in real space. Our method is easy to implement in any standard DMC code.

  20. Monte-Carlo simulation-based statistical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, John

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together expert researchers engaged in Monte-Carlo simulation-based statistical modeling, offering them a forum to present and discuss recent issues in methodological development as well as public health applications. It is divided into three parts, with the first providing an overview of Monte-Carlo techniques, the second focusing on missing data Monte-Carlo methods, and the third addressing Bayesian and general statistical modeling using Monte-Carlo simulations. The data and computer programs used here will also be made publicly available, allowing readers to replicate the model development and data analysis presented in each chapter, and to readily apply them in their own research. Featuring highly topical content, the book has the potential to impact model development and data analyses across a wide spectrum of fields, and to spark further research in this direction.