WorldWideScience

Sample records for quantum ghost imaging

  1. Comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging. We first calculate the signal-to-noise ratio of each process in terms of its controllable experimental conditions. We show that a key distinction is that a thermal ghost image always resides on top of a large background; the fluctuations in this background constitutes an intrinsic noise source for thermal ghost imaging. In contrast, there is a negligible intrinsic background to a quantum ghost image. However, for practical reasons involving achievable illumination levels, acquisition times for thermal ghost images are often much shorter than those for quantum ghost images. We provide quantitative predictions for the conditions under which each process provides superior performance. Our conclusion is that each process can provide useful functionality, although under complementary conditions.

  2. Phase-Sensitive Coherence and the Classical-Quantum Boundary in Ghost Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Venkatraman, Dheera; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The theory of partial coherence has a long and storied history in classical statistical optics. the vast majority of this work addresses fields that are statistically stationary in time, hence their complex envelopes only have phase-insensitive correlations. The quantum optics of squeezed-state generation, however, depends on nonlinear interactions producing baseband field operators with phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive correlations. Utilizing quantum light to enhance imaging has been a topic of considerable current interest, much of it involving biphotons, i.e., streams of entangled-photon pairs. Biphotons have been employed for quantum versions of optical coherence tomography, ghost imaging, holography, and lithography. However, their seemingly quantum features have been mimicked with classical-sate light, questioning wherein lies the classical-quantum boundary. We have shown, for the case of Gaussian-state light, that this boundary is intimately connected to the theory of phase-sensitive partial coherence. Here we present that theory, contrasting it with the familiar case of phase-insensitive partial coherence, and use it to elucidate the classical-quantum boundary of ghost imaging. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that classical phase-sensitive light produces ghost imaging most closely mimicking those obtained in biphotons, and we derived the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of a standoff-sensing ghost imager, taking into account target-induced speckle.

  3. Classical and quantum ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbisà, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to provide a self-contained review of why it is generically a problem when a solution of a theory possesses ghost fields among the perturbation modes. We define what a ghost field is and we show that its presence is associated with a classical instability whenever the ghost field interacts with standard fields. We then show that the instability is more severe at quantum level, and that perturbative ghosts can exist only in low energy effective theories. However, if we do not consider very ad hoc choices, compatibility with observational constraints implies that low energy effective ghosts can exist only at the price of giving up Lorentz invariance or locality above the cut-off, in which case the cut-off has to be much lower that the energy scales we currently probe in particle colliders. We also comment on the possible role of extra degrees of freedom which break Lorentz invariance spontaneously. (paper)

  4. Ghost imaging with atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakimov, R. I.; Henson, B. M.; Shin, D. K.; Hodgman, S. S.; Dall, R. G.; Baldwin, K. G. H.; Truscott, A. G.

    2016-12-01

    Ghost imaging is a counter-intuitive phenomenon—first realized in quantum optics—that enables the image of a two-dimensional object (mask) to be reconstructed using the spatio-temporal properties of a beam of particles with which it never interacts. Typically, two beams of correlated photons are used: one passes through the mask to a single-pixel (bucket) detector while the spatial profile of the other is measured by a high-resolution (multi-pixel) detector. The second beam never interacts with the mask. Neither detector can reconstruct the mask independently, but temporal cross-correlation between the two beams can be used to recover a ‘ghost’ image. Here we report the realization of ghost imaging using massive particles instead of photons. In our experiment, the two beams are formed by correlated pairs of ultracold, metastable helium atoms, which originate from s-wave scattering of two colliding Bose-Einstein condensates. We use higher-order Kapitza-Dirac scattering to generate a large number of correlated atom pairs, enabling the creation of a clear ghost image with submillimetre resolution. Future extensions of our technique could lead to the realization of ghost interference, and enable tests of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement and Bell’s inequalities with atoms.

  5. Neutron Ghost Imaging Technology Research on CARR Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Ghost imaging is also known as quantum imaging. Different from the classical imaging, the neutron ghost imaging is based on the quantum mechanics properties of light field and its intrinsic parallel characteristic, and developed by new optical

  6. Interferences, ghost images and other quantum correlations according to stochastic optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca da Silva, Luciano; Dechoum, Kaled

    2012-01-01

    There are an extensive variety of experiments in quantum optics that emphasize the non-local character of the coincidence measurements recorded by spatially separated photocounters. These are the cases of ghost image and other interference experiments based on correlated photons produced in, for instance, the process of parametric down-conversion or photon cascades. We propose to analyse some of these correlations in the light of stochastic optics, a local formalism based on classical electrodynamics with added background fluctuations that simulate the vacuum field of quantum electrodynamics, and raise the following question: can these experiments be used to distinguish between quantum entanglement and classical correlations? - Highlights: ► We analyse some quantum correlations in the light of stochastic optics. ► We study how vacuum fluctuations can rule quantum correlations. ► Many criteria cannot be considered a boundary between quantum and classical theories. ► Non-locality is a misused term in relation to many observed experiments.

  7. Ghost imaging with a single detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberg, Yaron; Katz, Ori; Silberberg, Yaron

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate pseudothermal ghost imaging and ghost diffraction using only a single detector. We achieve this by replacing the high-resolution detector of the reference beam with a computation of the propagating field, following a recent proposal by Shapiro [Phys. Rev. A 78, 061802(R) (2008)]. Since only a single detector is used, this provides experimental evidence that pseudothermal ghost imaging does not rely on nonlocal quantum correlations. In addition, we show the depth-resolving capability of this ghost imaging technique.

  8. Karl Popper's Quantum Ghost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, William

    2004-05-01

    Karl Popper, though not trained as a physicist and embarrassed early in his career by a physics error pointed out by Einstein and Bohr, ultimately made substantial contributions to the interpretation of quantum mechanics. As was often the case, Popper initially formulated his position by criticizing the views of others - in this case Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg. Underlying Popper's criticism was his belief that, first, the "standard interpretation" of quantum mechanics, sometimes called the Copenhagen interpretation, abandoned scientific realism and second, the assertion that quantum theory was "complete" (an assertion rejected by Einstein among others) amounted to an unfalsifiable claim. Popper insisted that the most basic predictions of quantum mechanics should continue to be tested, with an eye towards falsification rather than mere adding of decimal places to confirmatory experiments. His persistent attacks on the Copenhagen interpretation were aimed not at the uncertainty principle itself and the formalism from which it was derived, but at the acceptance by physicists of an unclear epistemology and ontology that left critical questions unanswered. In 1999, physicists at the University of Maryland conducted a version of Popper's Experiment, re-igniting the debate over quantum predictions and the role of locality in physics.

  9. Ghost Imaging of Space Objects

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ghost imaging is an optical imaging technique that utilizes the correlations between optical fields in two channels. One of the channels contains the object, however...

  10. Correspondence between quantum gauge theories without ghost fields and their covariantly quantized theories with ghost fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Hung; Tsai Ercheng

    1986-01-01

    We give a correspondence formula which equates transition amplitudes in a quantum gauge field theory without ghost fields to those in a quantum theory with the gauge fields covariantly quantized and coupled to ghost fields. (orig.)

  11. Ghost Imaging of Space Objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V; Erkmen, Baris I; Yu Nan

    2013-01-01

    The term 'ghost imaging' was coined in 1995 when an optical correlation measurement in combination with an entangled photon-pair source was used to image a mask placed in one optical channel by raster-scanning a detector in the other, empty, optical channel. Later, it was shown that the entangled photon source could be replaced with thermal sources of light, which are abundantly available as natural illumination sources. It was also shown that the bucket detector could be replaced with a remote point-like detector, opening the possibility to remote-sensing imaging applications. In this paper, we discuss the application of ghost-imaging-like techniques to astronomy, with the objective of detecting intensity-correlation signatures resulting from space objects of interest, such as exo-planets, gas clouds, and gravitational lenses. An important aspect of being able to utilize ghost imaging in astronomy, is the recognition that in interstellar imaging geometries the object of interest can act as an effective beam splitter, yielding detectable variations in the intensity-correlation signature.

  12. Polarization-multiplexing ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongfeng, Shi; Jiamin, Zhang; Jian, Huang; Yingjian, Wang; Kee, Yuan; Kaifa, Cao; Chenbo, Xie; Dong, Liu; Wenyue, Zhu

    2018-03-01

    A novel technique for polarization-multiplexing ghost imaging is proposed to simultaneously obtain multiple polarimetric information by a single detector. Here, polarization-division multiplexing speckles are employed for object illumination. The light reflected from the objects is detected by a single-pixel detector. An iterative reconstruction method is used to restore the fused image containing the different polarimetric information by using the weighted sum of the multiplexed speckles based on the correlation coefficients obtained from the detected intensities. Next, clear images of the different polarimetric information are recovered by demultiplexing the fused image. The results clearly demonstrate that the proposed method is effective.

  13. Superrenormalizable quantum gravity with complex ghosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Modesto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We suggest and briefly review a new sort of superrenormalizable models of higher derivative quantum gravity. The higher derivative terms in the action can be introduced in such a way that all the unphysical massive states have complex poles. According to the literature on Lee–Wick quantization, in this case the theory can be formulated as unitary, since all massive ghosts-like degrees of freedom are unstable. Keywords: Quantum gravity, Higher derivatives, Complex poles

  14. Can quantum imaging be classically simulated?

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Milena; Shih, Yanhua

    2003-01-01

    Quantum imaging has been demonstrated since 1995 by using entangled photon pairs. The physics community named these experiments "ghost image", "quantum crypto-FAX", "ghost interference", etc. Recently, Bennink et al. simulated the "ghost" imaging experiment by two co-rotating k-vector correlated lasers. Did the classical simulation simulate the quantum aspect of the "ghost" image? We wish to provide an answer. In fact, the simulation is very similar to a historical model of local realism. The...

  15. Superrenormalizable quantum gravity with complex ghosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modesto, Leonardo, E-mail: lmodesto@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Physics & Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Fudan University, 200433, Shanghai (China); Shapiro, Ilya L., E-mail: shapiro@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Fisica – ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 33036-900 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Tomsk State Pedagogical University and Tomsk State University, 634041, Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-04-10

    We suggest and briefly review a new sort of superrenormalizable models of higher derivative quantum gravity. The higher derivative terms in the action can be introduced in such a way that all the unphysical massive states have complex poles. According to the literature on Lee–Wick quantization, in this case the theory can be formulated as unitary, since all massive ghosts-like degrees of freedom are unstable.

  16. High-quality compressive ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Heyan; Zhou, Cheng; Tian, Tian; Liu, Dongqi; Song, Lijun

    2018-04-01

    We propose a high-quality compressive ghost imaging method based on projected Landweber regularization and guided filter, which effectively reduce the undersampling noise and improve the resolution. In our scheme, the original object is reconstructed by decomposing of regularization and denoising steps instead of solving a minimization problem in compressive reconstruction process. The simulation and experimental results show that our method can obtain high ghost imaging quality in terms of PSNR and visual observation.

  17. Ghost imaging with paired x-ray photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schori, A.; Borodin, D.; Tamasaku, K.; Shwartz, S.

    2018-06-01

    We report the experimental observation of ghost imaging with paired x-ray photons, which are generated by parametric downconversion. We use the one-to-one relation between the photon energies and the emission angles and the anticorrelation between the k -vectors of the signal and the idler photons to reconstruct the images of slits with nominally zero background levels. Further extension of our procedure can be used for the observation of various quantum phenomena at x-ray wavelengths.

  18. Space-Time Quantum Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Meyers

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental and theoretical investigation of quantum imaging where the images are stored in both space and time. Ghost images of remote objects are produced with either one or two beams of chaotic laser light generated by a rotating ground glass and two sensors measuring the reference field and bucket field at different space-time points. We further observe that the ghost images translate depending on the time delay between the sensor measurements. The ghost imaging experiments are performed both with and without turbulence. A discussion of the physics of the space-time imaging is presented in terms of quantum nonlocal two-photon analysis to support the experimental results. The theoretical model includes certain phase factors of the rotating ground glass. These experiments demonstrated a means to investigate the time and space aspects of ghost imaging and showed that ghost imaging contains more information per measured photon than was previously recognized where multiple ghost images are stored within the same ghost imaging data sets. This suggests new pathways to explore quantum information stored not only in multi-photon coincidence information but also in time delayed multi-photon interference. The research is applicable to making enhanced space-time quantum images and videos of moving objects where the images are stored in both space and time.

  19. Fast ghost imaging and ghost encryption based on the discrete cosine transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanha, Mehrdad; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab; Kheradmand, Reza

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the discrete cosine transform as an advanced compression tool for images in computational ghost imaging. A novel approach to fast imaging and encryption, the discrete cosine transform, promotes the security level of ghost images and reduces the image retrieval time. To discuss the advantages of this technique we compare experimental outcomes with simulated ones. (paper)

  20. Optical encryption with selective computational ghost imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafari, Mohammad; Kheradmand, Reza; Ahmadi-Kandjani, Sohrab

    2014-01-01

    Selective computational ghost imaging (SCGI) is a technique which enables the reconstruction of an N-pixel image from N measurements or less. In this paper we propose an optical encryption method based on SCGI and experimentally demonstrate that this method has much higher security under eavesdropping and unauthorized accesses compared with previous reported methods. (paper)

  1. Ghost imaging based on Pearson correlation coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wen-Kai; Yao Xu-Ri; Liu Xue-Feng; Li Long-Zhen; Zhai Guang-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Correspondence imaging is a new modality of ghost imaging, which can retrieve a positive/negative image by simple conditional averaging of the reference frames that correspond to relatively large/small values of the total intensity measured at the bucket detector. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate a more rigorous and general approach in which a ghost image is retrieved by calculating a Pearson correlation coefficient between the bucket detector intensity and the brightness at a given pixel of the reference frames, and at the next pixel, and so on. Furthermore, we theoretically provide a statistical interpretation of these two imaging phenomena, and explain how the error depends on the sample size and what kind of distribution the error obeys. According to our analysis, the image signal-to-noise ratio can be greatly improved and the sampling number reduced by means of our new method. (paper)

  2. Computational Ghost Imaging for Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkmen, Baris I.

    2012-01-01

    This work relates to the generic problem of remote active imaging; that is, a source illuminates a target of interest and a receiver collects the scattered light off the target to obtain an image. Conventional imaging systems consist of an imaging lens and a high-resolution detector array [e.g., a CCD (charge coupled device) array] to register the image. However, conventional imaging systems for remote sensing require high-quality optics and need to support large detector arrays and associated electronics. This results in suboptimal size, weight, and power consumption. Computational ghost imaging (CGI) is a computational alternative to this traditional imaging concept that has a very simple receiver structure. In CGI, the transmitter illuminates the target with a modulated light source. A single-pixel (bucket) detector collects the scattered light. Then, via computation (i.e., postprocessing), the receiver can reconstruct the image using the knowledge of the modulation that was projected onto the target by the transmitter. This way, one can construct a very simple receiver that, in principle, requires no lens to image a target. Ghost imaging is a transverse imaging modality that has been receiving much attention owing to a rich interconnection of novel physical characteristics and novel signal processing algorithms suitable for active computational imaging. The original ghost imaging experiments consisted of two correlated optical beams traversing distinct paths and impinging on two spatially-separated photodetectors: one beam interacts with the target and then illuminates on a single-pixel (bucket) detector that provides no spatial resolution, whereas the other beam traverses an independent path and impinges on a high-resolution camera without any interaction with the target. The term ghost imaging was coined soon after the initial experiments were reported, to emphasize the fact that by cross-correlating two photocurrents, one generates an image of the target. In

  3. Ghost Imaging Using Orbital Angular Momentum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵生妹; 丁建; 董小亮; 郑宝玉

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel encoding scheme in a ghost-imaging system using orbital angular momentum. In the signal arm, object spatial information is encoded as a phase matrix. For an N-grey-scale object, different phase matrices, varying from 0 to K with increment n/N, are used for different greyscales, and then they are modulated to a signal beam by a spatial light modulator. According to the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in the ghost imaging system, these changes will give different coincidence rates in measurement, and hence the object information can be extracted in the idler arm. By simulations and experiments, the results show that our scheme can improve the resolution of the image effectively. Compared with another encoding method using orbital angular momentum, our scheme has a better performance for both characters and the image object.%We present a novel encoding scheme in a ghost-imaging system using orbital angular momentum.In the signal arm,object spatial information is encoded as a phase matrix.For an N-grey-scale object,different phase matrices,varying from 0 to π with increment π/N,are used for different greyscales,and then they are modulated to a signal beam by a spatial light modulator.According to the conservation of the orbital angular momentum in the ghost imaging system,these changes will give different coincidence rates in measurement,and hence the object information can be extracted in the idler arm.By simulations and experiments,the results show that our scheme can improve the resolution of the image effectively.Compared with another encoding method using orbital angular momentum,our scheme has a better performance for both characters and the image object.

  4. Ghost anomalous dimension in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Gies, Holger

    2010-01-01

    We compute the ghost anomalous dimension within the asymptotic-safety scenario for quantum gravity. For a class of covariant gauge fixings and using a functional renormalization group scheme, the anomalous dimension η c is negative, implying an improved UV behavior of ghost fluctuations. At the non-Gaussian UV fixed point, we observe a maximum value of η c ≅-0.78 for the Landau-deWitt gauge within the given scheme and truncation. Most importantly, the backreaction of the ghost flow onto the Einstein-Hilbert sector preserves the non-Gaussian fixed point with only mild modifications of the fixed-point values for the gravitational coupling and cosmological constant and the associated critical exponents; also their gauge dependence is slightly reduced. Our results provide further evidence for the asymptotic-safety scenario of quantum gravity.

  5. Computational ghost imaging using deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Endo, Yutaka; Nishitsuji, Takashi; Takahashi, Takayuki; Nagahama, Yuki; Hasegawa, Satoki; Sano, Marie; Hirayama, Ryuji; Kakue, Takashi; Shiraki, Atsushi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2018-04-01

    Computational ghost imaging (CGI) is a single-pixel imaging technique that exploits the correlation between known random patterns and the measured intensity of light transmitted (or reflected) by an object. Although CGI can obtain two- or three-dimensional images with a single or a few bucket detectors, the quality of the reconstructed images is reduced by noise due to the reconstruction of images from random patterns. In this study, we improve the quality of CGI images using deep learning. A deep neural network is used to automatically learn the features of noise-contaminated CGI images. After training, the network is able to predict low-noise images from new noise-contaminated CGI images.

  6. High visibility temporal ghost imaging with classical light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianbin; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Hui; Zheng, Huaibin; Liu, Yanyan; Zhou, Yu; Li, Fu-li; Xu, Zhuo

    2018-03-01

    High visibility temporal ghost imaging with classical light is possible when superbunching pseudothermal light is employed. In the numerical simulation, the visibility of temporal ghost imaging with pseudothermal light, equaling (4 . 7 ± 0 . 2)%, can be increased to (75 ± 8)% in the same scheme with superbunching pseudothermal light. The reasons for that the retrieved images are different for superbunching pseudothermal light with different values of degree of second-order coherence are discussed in detail. It is concluded that high visibility and high quality temporal ghost image can be obtained by collecting sufficient number of data points. The results are helpful to understand the difference between ghost imaging with classical light and entangled photon pairs. The superbunching pseudothermal light can be employed to improve the image quality in ghost imaging applications.

  7. Ghost imaging with third-order correlated thermal light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, L-H; Kuang, L-M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a ghost imaging scheme with third-order correlated thermal light. We show that it is possible to produce the spatial information of an object at two different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a third-order correlated imaging process with a third-order correlated thermal source and third-order correlation measurement. Concretely, we propose a protocol to create two ghost images at two different places from one object. This protocol involves two optical configurations. We derive the Gaussian thin lens equations and plot the geometrical optics of the ghost imaging processes for the two configurations. It is indicated that third-order correlated ghost imaging with thermal light exhibits richer correlated imaging effects than second-order correlated ghost imaging with thermal light

  8. Ghosted images: old lesbians on screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainitzki, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Screen images of old lesbians combine modes of representing female gender, lesbian sexuality, and old age, all of which contain layers of otherness within a hetero-patriarchal and youth-centered society. Analyzing a range of films, from independent to mainstream cinema, this article explores how the ghosted lesbian paradigm intersects with narratives of aging as decline in representations of lesbian characters who are over the age of sixty. The spectral matters of illness, death, mourning, and widowhood inevitably culminate in an unhappy ending. Removed from a lesbian community context, intergenerational continuity vanishes and the old lesbian emerges as the cultural other.

  9. Correspondence normalized ghost imaging on compressive sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Sheng-Mei; Zhuang Peng

    2014-01-01

    Ghost imaging (GI) offers great potential with respect to conventional imaging techniques. It is an open problem in GI systems that a long acquisition time is be required for reconstructing images with good visibility and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). In this paper, we propose a new scheme to get good performance with a shorter construction time. We call it correspondence normalized ghost imaging based on compressive sensing (CCNGI). In the scheme, we enhance the signal-to-noise performance by normalizing the reference beam intensity to eliminate the noise caused by laser power fluctuations, and reduce the reconstruction time by using both compressive sensing (CS) and time-correspondence imaging (CI) techniques. It is shown that the qualities of the images have been improved and the reconstruction time has been reduced using CCNGI scheme. For the two-grayscale ''double-slit'' image, the mean square error (MSE) by GI and the normalized GI (NGI) schemes with the measurement number of 5000 are 0.237 and 0.164, respectively, and that is 0.021 by CCNGI scheme with 2500 measurements. For the eight-grayscale ''lena'' object, the peak signal-to-noise rates (PSNRs) are 10.506 and 13.098, respectively using GI and NGI schemes while the value turns to 16.198 using CCNGI scheme. The results also show that a high-fidelity GI reconstruction has been achieved using only 44% of the number of measurements corresponding to the Nyquist limit for the two-grayscale “double-slit'' object. The qualities of the reconstructed images using CCNGI are almost the same as those from GI via sparsity constraints (GISC) with a shorter reconstruction time. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. Lensless ghost imaging through the strongly scattering medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhe; Zhao Xueliang; Li Junlin; Zhao Lianjie; Qin Wei

    2016-01-01

    Lensless ghost imaging has attracted much interest in recent years due to its profound physics and potential applications. In this paper we report studies of the robust properties of the lensless ghost imaging system with a pseudo-thermal light source in a strongly scattering medium. The effects of the positions of the strong medium on the ghost imaging are investigated. In the lensless ghost imaging system, a pseudo-thermal light is split into two correlated beams by a beam splitter. One beam goes to a charge-coupled detector camera, labeled as CCD2. The other beam goes to an object and then is collected in another charge-coupled detector camera, labeled as CCD1, which serves as a bucket detector. When the strong medium, a pane of ground glass disk, is placed between the object and CCD1, the bucket detector, the quality of ghost imaging is barely affected and a good image could still be obtained. The quality of the ghost imaging can also be maintained, even when the ground glass is rotating, which is the strongest scattering medium so far. However, when the strongly scattering medium is present in the optical path from the light source to CCD2 or the object, the lensless ghost imaging system hardly retrieves the image of the object. A theoretical analysis in terms of the second-order correlation function is also provided. (paper)

  11. Ghost imaging with bucket detection and point detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Jian; Yin, Rao; Wang, Tong-Biao; Liao, Qing-Hua; Li, Hong-Guo; Liao, Qinghong; Liu, Jiang-Tao

    2018-04-01

    We experimentally investigate ghost imaging with bucket detection and point detection in which three types of illuminating sources are applied: (a) pseudo-thermal light source; (b) amplitude modulated true thermal light source; (c) amplitude modulated laser source. Experimental results show that the quality of ghost images reconstructed with true thermal light or laser beam is insensitive to the usage of bucket or point detector, however, the quality of ghost images reconstructed with pseudo-thermal light in bucket detector case is better than that in point detector case. Our theoretical analysis shows that the reason for this is due to the first order transverse coherence of the illuminating source.

  12. Quantum imaging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M.; Boyd, R.W.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades, quantum mechanics has allowed the development of technologies that provide unconditionally secure communication. In parallel, the quantum nature of the transverse electromagnetic field has spawned the field of quantum imaging that encompasses technologies such as quantum lithography, quantum ghost imaging, and high-dimensional quantum key distribution (QKD). The emergence of such quantum technologies also highlights the need for the development of accurate and efficient methods of measuring and characterizing the elusive quantum state itself. In this paper, we describe new technologies that use the quantum properties of light for security. The first of these is a technique that extends the principles behind QKD to the field of imaging and optical ranging. By applying the polarization-based BB84 protocol to individual photons in an active imaging system, we obtained images that are secure against any interceptresend jamming attacks. The second technology presented in this article is based on an extension of quantum ghost imaging, a technique that uses position-momentum entangled photons to create an image of an object without directly obtaining any spatial information from it. We used a holographic filtering technique to build a quantum ghost image identification system that uses a few pairs of photons to identify an object from a set of known objects. The third technology addressed in this document is a high-dimensional QKD system that uses orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) modes of light for encoding. Moving to a high-dimensional state space in QKD allows one to impress more information on each photon, as well as introduce higher levels of security. We discuss the development of two OAM-QKD protocols based on the BB84 and Ekert protocols of QKD. The fourth and final technology presented in this article is a relatively new technique called direct measurement that uses sequential weak and strong measurements to characterize a quantum state

  13. Defocusing effects of lensless ghost imaging and ghost diffraction with partially coherent sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuang-Xi; Sheng, Wei; Bi, Yu-Bo; Luo, Chun-Ling

    2018-04-01

    The defocusing effect is inevitable and degrades the image quality in the conventional optical imaging process significantly due to the close confinement of the imaging lens. Based on classical optical coherent theory and linear algebra, we develop a unified formula to describe the defocusing effects of both lensless ghost imaging (LGI) and lensless ghost diffraction (LGD) systems with a partially coherent source. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the influence of defocusing length on the quality of LGI and LGD. We find that the defocusing effects of the test and reference paths in the LGI or LGD systems are entirely different, while the LGD system is more robust against defocusing than the LGI system. Specifically, we find that the imaging process for LGD systems can be viewed as pinhole imaging, which may find applications in ultra-short-wave band imaging without imaging lenses, e.g. x-ray diffraction and γ-ray imaging.

  14. Ghost suppression in image restoration filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1975-01-01

    An optimum image restoration filter is described in which provision is made to constrain the spatial extent of the restoration function, the noise level of the filter output and the rate of falloff of the composite system point-spread away from the origin. Experimental results show that sidelobes on the composite system point-spread function produce ghosts in the restored image near discontinuities in intensity level. By redetermining the filter using a penalty function that is zero over the main lobe of the composite point-spread function of the optimum filter and nonzero where the point-spread function departs from a smoothly decaying function in the sidelobe region, a great reduction in sidelobe level is obtained. Almost no loss in resolving power of the composite system results from this procedure. By iteratively carrying out the same procedure even further reductions in sidelobe level are obtained. Examples of original and iterated restoration functions are shown along with their effects on a test image.

  15. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosby, S; Castelletto, S; Aruldoss, C; Scholten, R E; Roberts, A

    2007-01-01

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres

  16. Modelling of classical ghost images obtained using scattered light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, S; Castelletto, S; Aruldoss, C; Scholten, R E; Roberts, A [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, 3010 (Australia)

    2007-08-15

    The images obtained in ghost imaging with pseudo-thermal light sources are highly dependent on the spatial coherence properties of the incident light. Pseudo-thermal light is often created by reducing the coherence length of a coherent source by passing it through a turbid mixture of scattering spheres. We describe a model for simulating ghost images obtained with such partially coherent light, using a wave-transport model to calculate the influence of the scattering on initially coherent light. The model is able to predict important properties of the pseudo-thermal source, such as the coherence length and the amplitude of the residual unscattered component of the light which influence the resolution and visibility of the final ghost image. We show that the residual ballistic component introduces an additional background in the reconstructed image, and the spatial resolution obtainable depends on the size of the scattering spheres.

  17. Is the key of the ghost imaging mystery given by the electromagnetic crossing symmetric photon reactions?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, L; Rusu, A

    2013-01-01

    In the ghost imaging system, the object and image are separately illuminated by a pair of correlated beams and the image is obtained through coincidence detection of the two beams. When the correlated beams are obtained by a spontaneous parametric down-conversion phenomenon, the image formation is attributed to either quantum entanglement or wave vector correlation. The physicist D B Ion has published a different point of view: the ghost imaging can be explained by electromagnetic crossing symmetric photon reactions. We report on an experimental setup to verify that a change of the object reflection coefficient modifies the idler single count rate. The obtained results are a confirmation proof and suggest the existence of a stimulated spontaneous parametric down-conversion effect. A possible application is mentioned. (paper)

  18. Two-Photon Ghost Image and Interference-Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Y. H.; Sergienko, A. V.; Pittman, T. B.; Strekalov, D. V.; Klyshko, D. N.

    1996-01-01

    One of the most surprising consequences of quantum mechanics is entanglement of two or more distance particles. The two-particle entangled state was mathematically formulated by Schrodinger. Based on this unusual quantum behavior, EPR defined their 'physical reality' and then asked the question: 'Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?' One may not appreciate EPR's criterion of physical reality and insist that 'no elementary quantum phenomenon is a phenomenon until it is a recorded phenomenon'. Optical spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) is the most effective mechanism to generate an EPR type entangled two-photon state. In SPDC, an optical beam, called the pump, is incident on a birefringent crystal. The pump is intense enough so that nonlinear effects lead to the conversion of pump photons into pairs of photons, historically called signal and idler. Technically, the SPDC is said to be type-1 or type-2, depending on whether the signal and idler beams have parallel or orthogonal polarization. The SPDC conversion efficiency is typically on the order of 10(exp -9) to 10(exp -11), depending on the SPDC nonlinear material. The signal and idler intensities are extremely low, only single photon detection devices can register them. The quantum entanglement nature of SPDC has been demonstrated in EPR-Bohm experiments and Bell's inequality measurements. The following two experiments were recently performed in our laboratory, which are more closely related to the original 1935 EPR gedankenezperiment. The first experiment is a two-photon optical imaging type experiment, which has been named 'ghost image' by the physics community. The signal and idler beams of SPDC are sent in different directions, so that the detection of the signal and idler photons can be performed by two distant photon counting detectors. An aperture object (mask) is placed in front of the signal photon detector and illuminated by the signal beam through a

  19. Pseudo color ghost coding imaging with pseudo thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, De-yang; Xia, Yun-jie

    2018-04-01

    We present a new pseudo color imaging scheme named pseudo color ghost coding imaging based on ghost imaging but with multiwavelength source modulated by a spatial light modulator. Compared with conventional pseudo color imaging where there is no nondegenerate wavelength spatial correlations resulting in extra monochromatic images, the degenerate wavelength and nondegenerate wavelength spatial correlations between the idle beam and signal beam can be obtained simultaneously. This scheme can obtain more colorful image with higher quality than that in conventional pseudo color coding techniques. More importantly, a significant advantage of the scheme compared to the conventional pseudo color coding imaging techniques is the image with different colors can be obtained without changing the light source and spatial filter.

  20. Image quality enhancement in low-light-level ghost imaging using modified compressive sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaohui; Huang, Xianwei; Nan, Suqin; Li, Hengxing; Bai, Yanfeng; Fu, Xiquan

    2018-04-01

    Detector noise has a significantly negative impact on ghost imaging at low light levels, especially for existing recovery algorithm. Based on the characteristics of the additive detector noise, a method named modified compressive sensing ghost imaging is proposed to reduce the background imposed by the randomly distributed detector noise at signal path. Experimental results show that, with an appropriate choice of threshold value, modified compressive sensing ghost imaging algorithm can dramatically enhance the contrast-to-noise ratio of the object reconstruction significantly compared with traditional ghost imaging and compressive sensing ghost imaging methods. The relationship between the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstruction image and the intensity ratio (namely, the average signal intensity to average noise intensity ratio) for the three reconstruction algorithms are also discussed. This noise suppression imaging technique will have great applications in remote-sensing and security areas.

  1. Theoretical scheme of thermal-light many-ghost imaging by Nth-order intensity correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yingchuan; Kuang Leman

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a theoretical scheme of many-ghost imaging in terms of Nth-order correlated thermal light. We obtain the Gaussian thin lens equations in the many-ghost imaging protocol. We show that it is possible to produce N-1 ghost images of an object at different places in a nonlocal fashion by means of a higher order correlated imaging process with an Nth-order correlated thermal source and correlation measurements. We investigate the visibility of the ghost images in the scheme and obtain the upper bounds of the visibility for the Nth-order correlated thermal-light ghost imaging. It is found that the visibility of the ghost images can be dramatically enhanced when the order of correlation becomes larger. It is pointed out that the many-ghost imaging phenomenon is an observable physical effect induced by higher order coherence or higher order correlations of optical fields.

  2. Use of the Location Inverse Solution to Reduce Ghost Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Zhong Hu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Through-the-wall imaging (TWI is a difficult but important task for both law enforcement and military missions. Acquiring information on both the internal features of a structure and the location of people inside plays an important role in many fields such as antiterrorism, hostage search and rescue, and barricade situations. Up to now, a number of promising experimental systems have been developed to validate and evaluate diverse imaging methods, most of which are based on a linear antenna array to obtain an image of the objects. However, these methods typically use the backward projection (BP algorithm based on ellipse curves, which usually generates additional ghost images. In this paper, the algorithm using the location inverse solution (LIS to reduce the ghost images is proposed and simulated. The results of simulation show that this approach is feasible.

  3. Ghost problem of quantum field theories with higher derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrielides, A.; Kuo, T.K.; Lee, S.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Second-order theories, i.e., theories described by Lagrangians quadratic in second derivatives of the fields, are carefully examined and their ghost problems are isolated and clearly exhibited. In particular, theories with gauge symmetry are shown to have precisely the same ghost problems as theories without gauge symmetry. It is also shown that massless theories of the same nature are the limit of massive theories containing ghost states

  4. Long-distance thermal temporal ghost imaging over optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Yidong

    2018-02-01

    A thermal ghost imaging scheme between two distant parties is proposed and experimentally demonstrated over long-distance optical fibers. In the scheme, the weak thermal light is split into two paths. Photons in one path are spatially diffused according to their frequencies by a spatial dispersion component, then illuminate the object and record its spatial transmission information. Photons in the other path are temporally diffused by a temporal dispersion component. By the coincidence measurement between photons of two paths, the object can be imaged in a way of ghost imaging, based on the frequency correlation between photons in the two paths. In the experiment, the weak thermal light source is prepared by the spontaneous four-wave mixing in a silicon waveguide. The temporal dispersion is introduced by single mode fibers of 50 km, which also could be looked as a fiber link. Experimental results show that this scheme can be realized over long-distance optical fibers.

  5. Spontaneous breaking of Lorentz symmetry by ghost condensation in perturbative quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal, Mir

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we will study the spontaneous breakdown of the Lorentz symmetry by ghost condensation in perturbative quantum gravity. Our analysis will be done in the Curci-Ferrari gauge. We will also analyse the modification of the BRST and anti-BRST transformations by the formation of this ghost condensate. It will be shown that even though the modified BRST and anti-BRST transformations are not nilpotent, their nilpotency is restored on-shell.

  6. Robust reflective ghost imaging against different partially polarized thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Guo; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Hong-Chao; Li, Zong-Guo; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the influence of degree of polarization (DOP) of thermal light on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the reflective ghost imaging (RGI), which is a novel and indirect imaging modality. An expression for the CNR of RGI with partially polarized thermal light is carefully derived, which suggests a weak dependence of CNR on the DOP, especially when the ratio of the object size to the speckle size of thermal light has a large value. Different from conventional imaging approaches, our work reveals that RGI is much more robust against the DOP of the light source, which thereby has advantages in practical applications, such as remote sensing.

  7. Information Security Scheme Based on Computational Temporal Ghost Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shan; Wang, Yurong; Long, Tao; Meng, Xiangfeng; Yang, Xiulun; Shu, Rong; Sun, Baoqing

    2017-08-09

    An information security scheme based on computational temporal ghost imaging is proposed. A sequence of independent 2D random binary patterns are used as encryption key to multiply with the 1D data stream. The cipher text is obtained by summing the weighted encryption key. The decryption process can be realized by correlation measurement between the encrypted information and the encryption key. Due to the instinct high-level randomness of the key, the security of this method is greatly guaranteed. The feasibility of this method and robustness against both occlusion and additional noise attacks are discussed with simulation, respectively.

  8. Ghost imaging and ghost diffraction with pseudo-thermal light generated by means of a programmable SLM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capeluto, M G; Schmiegelow, C T; Francisco, D; Ledesma, S; Iemmi, C; Duisterwinkel, H

    2011-01-01

    Ghost imaging and ghost diffraction are techniques in which information about the object or about its diffraction pattern is extracted by measuring the correlation between a reference beam and a beam that passes through the object. Although first experiments were carried on by using entangled photons, it was demonstrated that this technique can be performed by splitting incoherent pseudo-thermal radiation such as that obtained with a laser passing through a moving diffuser. In this work we implemented the use of a programmable phase spatial light modulator (SLM) in order to replace the rotating ground glass. In this way the random phase distributions obtained from the moving diffuser can be emulated by displaying onto the SLM different realizations of a random function with uniform distribution. Based on the programmability of the modulator we have studied the influence of diverse parameters such as speckle size or phase distributions in the final image quality. We carry on the experiment for two different cases ghost imaging and far field ghost diffraction.

  9. Edge detection based on computational ghost imaging with structured illuminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Xiang, Dong; Liu, Xuemei; Zhou, Xin; Bing, Pibin

    2018-03-01

    Edge detection is one of the most important tools to recognize the features of an object. In this paper, we propose an optical edge detection method based on computational ghost imaging (CGI) with structured illuminations which are generated by an interference system. The structured intensity patterns are designed to make the edge of an object be directly imaged from detected data in CGI. This edge detection method can extract the boundaries for both binary and grayscale objects in any direction at one time. We also numerically test the influence of distance deviations in the interference system on edge extraction, i.e., the tolerance of the optical edge detection system to distance deviation. Hopefully, it may provide a guideline for scholars to build an experimental system.

  10. Gravitational lensing and ghost images in the regular Bardeen no-horizon spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schee, Jan; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    We study deflection of light rays and gravitational lensing in the regular Bardeen no-horizon spacetimes. Flatness of these spacetimes in the central region implies existence of interesting optical effects related to photons crossing the gravitational field of the no-horizon spacetimes with low impact parameters. These effects occur due to existence of a critical impact parameter giving maximal deflection of light rays in the Bardeen no-horizon spacetimes. We give the critical impact parameter in dependence on the specific charge of the spacetimes, and discuss 'ghost' direct and indirect images of Keplerian discs, generated by photons with low impact parameters. The ghost direct images can occur only for large inclination angles of distant observers, while ghost indirect images can occur also for small inclination angles. We determine the range of the frequency shift of photons generating the ghost images and determine distribution of the frequency shift across these images. We compare them to those of the standard direct images of the Keplerian discs. The difference of the ranges of the frequency shift on the ghost and direct images could serve as a quantitative measure of the Bardeen no-horizon spacetimes. The regions of the Keplerian discs giving the ghost images are determined in dependence on the specific charge of the no-horizon spacetimes. For comparison we construct direct and indirect (ordinary and ghost) images of Keplerian discs around Reissner-Nördström naked singularities demonstrating a clear qualitative difference to the ghost direct images in the regular Bardeen no-horizon spacetimes. The optical effects related to the low impact parameter photons thus give clear signature of the regular Bardeen no-horizon spacetimes, as no similar phenomena could occur in the black hole or naked singularity spacetimes. Similar direct ghost images have to occur in any regular no-horizon spacetimes having nearly flat central region

  11. Theoretical study of ghost imaging with cold atomic waves under the condition of partial coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jun; Liu, Yun-Xian

    2014-01-01

    A matter wave ghost imaging mechanism is proposed and demonstrated theoretically. This mechanism is based on the Talbot-Lau effect. Periodic gratings of matter wave density, which appear as a result of interference of atoms diffracted by pulses of an optical standing wave, are utilized to produce the reference wave and the signal wave simultaneously for the ghost imaging. An advantage of this mechanism is that during the imaging process, the beam-splitter is not needed, which highly simplifies the experimental setup and makes the ghost imaging possible in the field of matter wave

  12. A spectre is haunting the cosmos: quantum stability of massive gravity with ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Könnig, Frank; Nersisyan, Henrik; Akrami, Yashar; Amendola, Luca; Zumalacárregui, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of modified gravity with higher order derivatives are usually ignored because of serious problems that appear due to an additional ghost degree of freedom. Most dangerously, it causes an immediate decay of the vacuum. However, breaking Lorentz invariance can cure such abominable behavior. By analyzing a model that describes a massive graviton together with a remaining Boulware-Deser ghost mode we show that even ghostly theories of modified gravity can yield models that are viable at both classical and quantum levels and, therefore, they should not generally be ruled out. Furthermore, we identify the most dangerous quantum scattering process that has the main impact on the decay time and find differences to simple theories that only describe an ordinary scalar field and a ghost. Additionally, constraints on the parameters of the theory including some upper bounds on the Lorentz-breaking cutoff scale are presented. In particular, for a simple theory of massive gravity we find that a breaking of Lorentz invariance is allowed to happen even at scales above the Planck mass. Finally, we discuss the relevance to other theories of modified gravity.

  13. Optical image encryption scheme with multiple light paths based on compressive ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinan; Yang, Xiulun; Meng, Xiangfeng; Wang, Yurong; Yin, Yongkai; Sun, Xiaowen; Dong, Guoyan

    2018-02-01

    An optical image encryption method with multiple light paths is proposed based on compressive ghost imaging. In the encryption process, M random phase-only masks (POMs) are generated by means of logistic map algorithm, and these masks are then uploaded to the spatial light modulator (SLM). The collimated laser light is divided into several beams by beam splitters as it passes through the SLM, and the light beams illuminate the secret images, which are converted into sparse images by discrete wavelet transform beforehand. Thus, the secret images are simultaneously encrypted into intensity vectors by ghost imaging. The distances between the SLM and secret images vary and can be used as the main keys with original POM and the logistic map algorithm coefficient in the decryption process. In the proposed method, the storage space can be significantly decreased and the security of the system can be improved. The feasibility, security and robustness of the method are further analysed through computer simulations.

  14. Quantum imaging with undetected photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Gabriela Barreto; Borish, Victoria; Cole, Garrett D; Ramelow, Sven; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Zeilinger, Anton

    2014-08-28

    Information is central to quantum mechanics. In particular, quantum interference occurs only if there exists no information to distinguish between the superposed states. The mere possibility of obtaining information that could distinguish between overlapping states inhibits quantum interference. Here we introduce and experimentally demonstrate a quantum imaging concept based on induced coherence without induced emission. Our experiment uses two separate down-conversion nonlinear crystals (numbered NL1 and NL2), each illuminated by the same pump laser, creating one pair of photons (denoted idler and signal). If the photon pair is created in NL1, one photon (the idler) passes through the object to be imaged and is overlapped with the idler amplitude created in NL2, its source thus being undefined. Interference of the signal amplitudes coming from the two crystals then reveals the image of the object. The photons that pass through the imaged object (idler photons from NL1) are never detected, while we obtain images exclusively with the signal photons (from NL1 and NL2), which do not interact with the object. Our experiment is fundamentally different from previous quantum imaging techniques, such as interaction-free imaging or ghost imaging, because now the photons used to illuminate the object do not have to be detected at all and no coincidence detection is necessary. This enables the probe wavelength to be chosen in a range for which suitable detectors are not available. To illustrate this, we show images of objects that are either opaque or invisible to the detected photons. Our experiment is a prototype in quantum information--knowledge can be extracted by, and about, a photon that is never detected.

  15. Elimination of ghost images in the response of PHASAR-demultiplexers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van C.; Staring, A.A.M.; Jansen, E.J.; Binsma, J.J.M.; Dongen, van T.; Smit, M.K.; Verbeek, B.H.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper the occurrence of first-order modes in the performance of phased-array demultiplexers is investigated. It is found that they cause "ghost" images, which can be circumvented by optimising waveguide junctions

  16. Debris Likelihood, based on GhostNet, NASA Aqua MODIS, and GOES Imager, EXPERIMENTAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Debris Likelihood Index (Estimated) is calculated from GhostNet, NASA Aqua MODIS Chl a and NOAA GOES Imager SST data. THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCT: intended...

  17. Ghost imaging and its visibility with partially coherent elliptical Gaussian Schell-model beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Meilan; Zhu, Weiting; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-01-01

    The performances of the ghost image and the visibility with partially coherent elliptical Gaussian Schell-model beams have been studied. In that case we have derived the condition under which the goal ghost image is achievable. Furthermore, the visibility is assessed in terms of the parameters related to the source to find that the visibility reduces with the increase of the beam size, while it is a monotonic increasing function of the transverse coherence length. More specifically, it is found that the inequalities of the source sizes in x and y directions, as well as the transverse coherence lengths, play an important role in the ghost image and the visibility. - Highlights: • We studied the ghost image and visibility with partially coherent EGSM beams. • We derived the condition under which the goal ghost image is achievable. • The visibility is assessed in terms of the parameters related to the source. • The source sizes and coherence lengths play role in the ghost image and visibility.

  18. Ghost image in enhanced self-heterodyne synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhou, Yu; Lu, Zhiyong; Li, Guangyuan; Xu, Mengmeng; Zhang, Bo; Lao, Chenzhe; He, Hongyu

    2018-03-01

    The enhanced self-heterodyne synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) self-heterodynes two polarization-orthogonal echo signals to eliminate the phase disturbance caused by atmospheric turbulence and mechanical trembling, uses heterodyne receiver instead of self-heterodyne receiver to improve signal-to-noise ratio. The principle and structure of the enhanced self-heterodyne SAIL are presented. The imaging process of enhanced self-heterodyne SAIL for distributed target is also analyzed. In enhanced self-heterodyne SAIL, the phases of two orthogonal-polarization beams are modulated by four cylindrical lenses in transmitter to improve resolutions in orthogonal direction and travel direction, which will generate ghost image. The generation process of ghost image in enhanced self-heterodyne SAIL is mathematically detailed, and a method of eliminating ghost image is also presented, which is significant for far-distance imaging. A number of experiments of enhanced self-heterodyne SAIL for distributed target are presented, these experimental results verify the theoretical analysis of enhanced self-heterodyne SAIL. The enhanced self-heterodyne SAIL has the capability to eliminate the influence from the atmospheric turbulence and mechanical trembling, has high advantage in detecting weak signals, and has promising application for far-distance ladar imaging.

  19. Adaptive compressive ghost imaging based on wavelet trees and sparse representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Kai; Li, Ming-Fei; Yao, Xu-Ri; Liu, Xue-Feng; Wu, Ling-An; Zhai, Guang-Jie

    2014-03-24

    Compressed sensing is a theory which can reconstruct an image almost perfectly with only a few measurements by finding its sparsest representation. However, the computation time consumed for large images may be a few hours or more. In this work, we both theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a method that combines the advantages of both adaptive computational ghost imaging and compressed sensing, which we call adaptive compressive ghost imaging, whereby both the reconstruction time and measurements required for any image size can be significantly reduced. The technique can be used to improve the performance of all computational ghost imaging protocols, especially when measuring ultra-weak or noisy signals, and can be extended to imaging applications at any wavelength.

  20. A Novel Probability Model for Suppressing Multipath Ghosts in GPR and TWI Imaging: A Numerical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Yun-hua

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept for suppressing the problem of multipath ghosts in Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR and Through-Wall Imaging (TWI is presented. Ghosts (i.e., false targets mainly arise from the use of the Born or single-scattering approximations that lead to linearized imaging algorithms; however, these approximations neglect the effect of multiple scattering (or multipath between the electromagnetic wavefield and the object under investigation. In contrast to existing methods of suppressing multipath ghosts, the proposed method models for the first time the reflectivity of the probed objects as a probability function up to a normalized factor and introduces the concept of random subaperture by randomly picking up measurement locations from the entire aperture. Thus, the final radar image is a joint probability distribution that corresponds to radar images derived from multiple random subapertures. Finally, numerical experiments are used to demonstrate the performance of the proposed methodology in GPR and TWI imaging.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Quality of Lensless Ghost Imaging with Pseudo-Thermal Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Shen; Yan-Feng, Bai; Tao, Qin; Shen-Sheng, Han

    2008-01-01

    Factors influencing the quality of lensless ghost imaging are investigated. According to the experimental results, we find that the imaging quality is determined by the number of independent sub light sources on the imaging plane of the reference arm. A qualitative picture based on advanced wave optics is presented to explain the physics behind the experimental phenomena. The present results will be helpful to provide a basis for improving the quality of ghost imaging systems in future works. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  2. Identification of ghost artifact using texture analysis in pediatric spinal cord diffusion tensor images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Mahdi; Conklin, Chris J; Middleton, Devon M; Shah, Pallav; Saksena, Sona; Krisa, Laura; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Faro, Scott H; Mulcahey, M J; Mohamed, Feroze B

    2018-04-01

    Ghost artifacts are a major contributor to degradation of spinal cord diffusion tensor images. A multi-stage post-processing pipeline was designed, implemented and validated to automatically remove ghost artifacts arising from reduced field of view diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the pediatric spinal cord. A total of 12 pediatric subjects including 7 healthy subjects (mean age=11.34years) with no evidence of spinal cord injury or pathology and 5 patients (mean age=10.96years) with cervical spinal cord injury were studied. Ghost/true cords, labeled as region of interests (ROIs), in non-diffusion weighted b0 images were segmented automatically using mathematical morphological processing. Initially, 21 texture features were extracted from each segmented ROI including 5 first-order features based on the histogram of the image (mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis and entropy) and 16s-order feature vector elements, incorporating four statistical measures (contrast, correlation, homogeneity and energy) calculated from co-occurrence matrices in directions of 0°, 45°, 90° and 135°. Next, ten features with a high value of mutual information (MI) relative to the pre-defined target class and within the features were selected as final features which were input to a trained classifier (adaptive neuro-fuzzy interface system) to separate the true cord from the ghost cord. The implemented pipeline was successfully able to separate the ghost artifacts from true cord structures. The results obtained from the classifier showed a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 79%, and accuracy of 84% in separating the true cord from ghost artifacts. The results show that the proposed method is promising for the automatic detection of ghost cords present in DTI images of the spinal cord. This step is crucial towards development of accurate, automatic DTI spinal cord post processing pipelines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Formation of ghost images due to metal objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Bárbara Couto; da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jéssica Lourdes Costa; Souza, Priscilla Sena; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; Tuji, Fabrício Mesquita; Manzi, Flávio Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses.

  4. Quantum Temporal Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01

    The concept of quantum temporal imaging is proposed to manipulate the temporal correlation of entangled photons. In particular, we show that time correlation and anticorrelation can be converted to each other using quantum temporal imaging.

  5. Forming positive-negative images using conditioned partial measurements from reference arm in ghost imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianming

    2012-09-01

    A recent thermal ghost imaging experiment implemented in Wu's group [Chin. Phys. Lett. 279, 074216 (2012)] showed that both positive and negative images can be constructed by applying a novel algorithm. This algorithm allows us to form the images with the use of partial measurements from the reference arm (even which never passes through the object), conditioned on the object arm. In this paper, we present a simple theory that explains the experimental observation and provides an in-depth understanding of conventional ghost imaging. In particular, we theoretically show that the visibility of formed images through such an algorithm is not bounded by the standard value 1/3. In fact, it can ideally grow up to unity (with reduced imaging quality). Thus, the algorithm described here not only offers an alternative way to decode spatial correlation of thermal light, but also mimics a "bandpass filter" to remove the constant background such that the visibility or imaging contrast is improved. We further show that conditioned on one still object present in the test arm, it is possible to construct the object's image by sampling the available reference data.

  6. Fourier-transform ghost imaging with pure far-field correlated thermal light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Honglin; Shen Xia; Han Shensheng; Zhu Daming

    2007-01-01

    Pure far-field correlated thermal light beams are created with phase grating, and Fourier-transform ghost imaging depending only on the far-field correlation is demonstrated experimentally. Theoretical analysis and the results of experimental investigation of this pure far-field correlated thermal light are presented. Applications which may be exploited with this imaging scheme are discussed

  7. A simple approach for EPID dosimetric calibration to overcome the effect of image-lag and ghosting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alshanqity, Mukhtar; Duane, Simon; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    EPID dosimetry has known drawbacks. The main issue is that a measurable residual signal is observed after the end of irradiation for prolonged periods of time, thus making measurement difficult. We present a detailed analysis of EPID response and suggest a simple, yet accurate approach for calibration that avoids the complexity of incorporating ghosting and image-lag using the maximum integrated signal instead of the total integrated signal. This approach is linear with dose and independent of dose rate. - Highlights: ► Image-lag and ghosting effects dosimetric accuracy. ► Image-lag and ghosting result in the reduction of total integrated signal for low doses. ► Residual signal is the most significant result for the image-lag and ghosting effects. ► Image-lag and ghosting can result in under-dosing of up to 2.5%.

  8. Ghost microscope imaging system from the perspective of coherent-mode representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qian; Bai, Yanfeng; Shi, Xiaohui; Nan, Suqin; Qu, Lijie; Li, Hengxing; Fu, Xiquan

    2018-03-01

    The coherent-mode representation theory of partially coherent fields is firstly used to analyze a two-arm ghost microscope imaging system. It is shown that imaging quality of the generated images depend crucially on the distribution of the decomposition coefficients of the object imaged when the light source is fixed. This theory is also suitable for demonstrating the effects from the distance the object is moved away from the original plane on imaging quality. Our results are verified theoretically and experimentally.

  9. Formation of ghost images due to metal objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, B?rbara Couto; da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, J?ssica Lourdes Costa; Souza, Priscilla Sena; Valerio, Claudia Scigliano; Tuji, Fabr?cio Mesquita; Manzi, Fl?vio Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a stu...

  10. Multiple-image encryption via lifting wavelet transform and XOR operation based on compressive ghost imaging scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianye; Meng, Xiangfeng; Yang, Xiulun; Wang, Yurong; Yin, Yongkai; Peng, Xiang; He, Wenqi; Dong, Guoyan; Chen, Hongyi

    2018-03-01

    A multiple-image encryption method via lifting wavelet transform (LWT) and XOR operation is proposed, which is based on a row scanning compressive ghost imaging scheme. In the encryption process, the scrambling operation is implemented for the sparse images transformed by LWT, then the XOR operation is performed on the scrambled images, and the resulting XOR images are compressed in the row scanning compressive ghost imaging, through which the ciphertext images can be detected by bucket detector arrays. During decryption, the participant who possesses his/her correct key-group, can successfully reconstruct the corresponding plaintext image by measurement key regeneration, compression algorithm reconstruction, XOR operation, sparse images recovery, and inverse LWT (iLWT). Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations validate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Optical image transformation and encryption by phase-retrieval-based double random-phase encoding and compressive ghost imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Sheng; Yang, Yangrui; Liu, Xuemei; Zhou, Xin; Wei, Zhenzhuo

    2018-01-01

    An optical image transformation and encryption scheme is proposed based on double random-phase encoding (DRPE) and compressive ghost imaging (CGI) techniques. In this scheme, a secret image is first transformed into a binary image with the phase-retrieval-based DRPE technique, and then encoded by a series of random amplitude patterns according to the ghost imaging (GI) principle. Compressive sensing, corrosion and expansion operations are implemented to retrieve the secret image in the decryption process. This encryption scheme takes the advantage of complementary capabilities offered by the phase-retrieval-based DRPE and GI-based encryption techniques. That is the phase-retrieval-based DRPE is used to overcome the blurring defect of the decrypted image in the GI-based encryption, and the CGI not only reduces the data amount of the ciphertext, but also enhances the security of DRPE. Computer simulation results are presented to verify the performance of the proposed encryption scheme.

  12. Objective lens simultaneously optimized for pupil ghosting, wavefront delivery and pupil imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Eugene G (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An objective lens includes multiple optical elements disposed between a first end and a second end, each optical element oriented along an optical axis. Each optical surface of the multiple optical elements provides an angle of incidence to a marginal ray that is above a minimum threshold angle. This threshold angle minimizes pupil ghosts that may enter an interferometer. The objective lens also optimizes wavefront delivery and pupil imaging onto an optical surface under test.

  13. Study on the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete fourier transform measurement matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Leihong; Liang, Dong; Li, Bei; Kang, Yi; Pan, Zilan; Zhang, Dawei; Gao, Xiumin; Ma, Xiuhua

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of analyzing the cosine light field with determined analytic expression and the pseudo-inverse method, the object is illuminated by a presetting light field with a determined discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix, and the object image is reconstructed by the pseudo-inverse method. The analytic expression of the algorithm of computational ghost imaging based on discrete Fourier transform measurement matrix is deduced theoretically, and compared with the algorithm of compressive computational ghost imaging based on random measurement matrix. The reconstruction process and the reconstruction error are analyzed. On this basis, the simulation is done to verify the theoretical analysis. When the sampling measurement number is similar to the number of object pixel, the rank of discrete Fourier transform matrix is the same as the one of the random measurement matrix, the PSNR of the reconstruction image of FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm are similar, the reconstruction error of the traditional CGI algorithm is lower than that of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm and PGI algorithm. As the decreasing of the number of sampling measurement, the PSNR of reconstruction image based on FGI algorithm decreases slowly, and the PSNR of reconstruction image based on PGI algorithm and CGI algorithm decreases sharply. The reconstruction time of FGI algorithm is lower than that of other algorithms and is not affected by the number of sampling measurement. The FGI algorithm can effectively filter out the random white noise through a low-pass filter and realize the reconstruction denoising which has a higher denoising capability than that of the CGI algorithm. The FGI algorithm can improve the reconstruction accuracy and the reconstruction speed of computational ghost imaging.

  14. High performance optical encryption based on computational ghost imaging with QR code and compressive sensing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shengmei; Wang, Le; Liang, Wenqiang; Cheng, Weiwen; Gong, Longyan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a high performance optical encryption (OE) scheme based on computational ghost imaging (GI) with QR code and compressive sensing (CS) technique, named QR-CGI-OE scheme. N random phase screens, generated by Alice, is a secret key and be shared with its authorized user, Bob. The information is first encoded by Alice with QR code, and the QR-coded image is then encrypted with the aid of computational ghost imaging optical system. Here, measurement results from the GI optical system's bucket detector are the encrypted information and be transmitted to Bob. With the key, Bob decrypts the encrypted information to obtain the QR-coded image with GI and CS techniques, and further recovers the information by QR decoding. The experimental and numerical simulated results show that the authorized users can recover completely the original image, whereas the eavesdroppers can not acquire any information about the image even the eavesdropping ratio (ER) is up to 60% at the given measurement times. For the proposed scheme, the number of bits sent from Alice to Bob are reduced considerably and the robustness is enhanced significantly. Meantime, the measurement times in GI system is reduced and the quality of the reconstructed QR-coded image is improved.

  15. Similarity analysis between quantum images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Liu, XingAo; Zhu, Changming; Wei, Lai; Zhang, Xiafen; Ian, Hou

    2018-06-01

    Similarity analyses between quantum images are so essential in quantum image processing that it provides fundamental research for the other fields, such as quantum image matching, quantum pattern recognition. In this paper, a quantum scheme based on a novel quantum image representation and quantum amplitude amplification algorithm is proposed. At the end of the paper, three examples and simulation experiments show that the measurement result must be 0 when two images are same, and the measurement result has high probability of being 1 when two images are different.

  16. Quantum memory for images: A quantum hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2008-01-01

    Matter-light quantum interface and quantum memory for light are important ingredients of quantum information protocols, such as quantum networks, distributed quantum computation, etc. [P. Zoller et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 36, 203 (2005)]. In this paper we present a spatially multimode scheme for quantum memory for light, which we call a quantum hologram. Our approach uses a multiatom ensemble which has been shown to be efficient for a single spatial mode quantum memory. Due to the multiatom nature of the ensemble and to the optical parallelism it is capable of storing many spatial modes, a feature critical for the present proposal. A quantum hologram with the fidelity exceeding that of classical hologram will be able to store quantum features of an image, such as multimode superposition and entangled quantum states, something that a standard hologram is unable to achieve

  17. Formation of ghost images due to meta objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramons, BarbaraCouto; Da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jessica Lourdes Costa; Souza Priscilla Serna; Valerio, Cludia Scigliano; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo; Tuji, Fabricio Mesquita

    2016-01-01

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses

  18. Formation of ghost images due to meta objects on the surface of the patient's face: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramons, BarbaraCouto; Da Silva Izar, Bruna Raquel; Pereira, Jessica Lourdes Costa; Souza Priscilla Serna; Valerio, Cludia Scigliano; Manzi, Flavio Ricardo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, School of Dentistry, Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Tuji, Fabricio Mesquita [Federal University of Pará, Belém do Pará (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Panoramic radiographs are a relatively simple technique that is commonly used in all dental specialties. In panoramic radiographs, in addition to the formation of real images of metal objects, ghost images may also form, and these ghost images can hinder an accurate diagnosis and interfere with the accuracy of radiology reports. Dentists must understand the formation of these images in order to avoid making incorrect radiographic diagnoses. Therefore, the present study sought to present a study of the formation of panoramic radiograph ghost images caused by metal objects in the head and neck region of a dry skull, as well as to report a clinical case n order to warn dentists about ghost images and to raise awareness thereof. An understanding of the principles of the formation of ghost images in panoramic radiographs helps prevent incorrect diagnoses.

  19. Study of key technology of ghost imaging via compressive sensing for a phase object based on phase-shifting digital holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leihong, Zhang; Dong, Liang; Bei, Li; Zilan, Pan; Dawei, Zhang; Xiuhua, Ma

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the algorithm of compressing sensing is used to improve the imaging resolution and realize ghost imaging via compressive sensing for a phase object based on the theoretical analysis of the lensless Fourier imaging of the algorithm of ghost imaging based on phase-shifting digital holography. The algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography uses the bucket detector to measure the total light intensity of the interference and the four-step phase-shifting method is used to obtain the total light intensity of differential interference light. The experimental platform is built based on the software simulation, and the experimental results show that the algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography can obtain the high-resolution phase distribution figure of the phase object. With the same sampling times, the phase clarity of the phase distribution figure obtained by the algorithm of ghost imaging via compressive sensing based on phase-shifting digital holography is higher than that obtained by the algorithm of ghost imaging based on phase-shift digital holography. In this article, this study further extends the application range of ghost imaging and obtains the phase distribution of the phase object. (letter)

  20. Ghost Images in Helioseismic Holography? Toy Models in a Uniform Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan

    2018-02-01

    Helioseismic holography is a powerful technique used to probe the solar interior based on estimations of the 3D wavefield. The Porter-Bojarski holography, which is a well-established method used in acoustics to recover sources and scatterers in 3D, is also an estimation of the wavefield, and hence it has the potential of being applied to helioseismology. Here we present a proof-of-concept study, where we compare helioseismic holography and Porter-Bojarski holography under the assumption that the waves propagate in a homogeneous medium. We consider the problem of locating a point source of wave excitation inside a sphere. Under these assumptions, we find that the two imaging methods have the same capability of locating the source, with the exception that helioseismic holography suffers from "ghost images" ( i.e. artificial peaks away from the source location). We conclude that Porter-Bojarski holography may improve the method currently used in helioseismology.

  1. Giving up the ghost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, Carl M; Mannheim, Philip D

    2008-01-01

    The Pais-Uhlenbeck model is a quantum theory described by a higher-derivative field equation. It has been believed for many years that this model possesses ghost states (quantum states of negative norm) and therefore that this model is a physically unacceptable quantum theory. The existence of such ghost states was believed to be attributable to the field equation having more than two derivatives. This paper shows that the Pais-Uhlenbeck model does not possess any ghost states at all and that it is a perfectly acceptable quantum theory. The supposed ghost states in this model arise if the Hamiltonian of the model is (incorrectly) treated as being Dirac Hermitian (invariant under combined matrix transposition and complex conjugation). However, the Hamiltonian is not Dirac Hermitian, but rather it is PT symmetric. When it is quantized correctly according to the rules of PT quantum mechanics, the energy spectrum is real and bounded below and all of the quantum states have positive norm

  2. Optical identity authentication technique based on compressive ghost imaging with QR code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenjie, Zhan; Leihong, Zhang; Xi, Zeng; Yi, Kang

    2018-04-01

    With the rapid development of computer technology, information security has attracted more and more attention. It is not only related to the information and property security of individuals and enterprises, but also to the security and social stability of a country. Identity authentication is the first line of defense in information security. In authentication systems, response time and security are the most important factors. An optical authentication technology based on compressive ghost imaging with QR codes is proposed in this paper. The scheme can be authenticated with a small number of samples. Therefore, the response time of the algorithm is short. At the same time, the algorithm can resist certain noise attacks, so it offers good security.

  3. Analysis of ghost image in high power laser system using computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingquan; Liu Jinsong; Wang Kejia; Zhu Qihua; Zhao Runchang; Wang Fang

    2011-01-01

    Using a self-made software named CatchGhost the ghost points' position and energy in a coaxial optic systems were calculated accurately in a short time without omission. The software can carry out massive calculation in a short time, and pick out the harmful ghosts in system automatically. Because all the elements which are related to beams' energy,including the pinhole' effect, reflectivity,gain and loss,are counted, data of ghost points given by the software are exact and useful. (authors)

  4. Ghosting effect in Siemens electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for step and shoot IMRT dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.; Vial, P.; Goozee, G.; Holloway, L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: To assess the ghosting effect of a Siemens EPID (Optivue 1000: while acquiring IMRT fluence with step and shoot delivery. Six sets of segmented fields with 1,2,3,5, J( and 20 monitor units (MU) per segment were designed. Each set consisted of ten segments of equal MU and field size (J 0 x 10 cm 2 ) Standard single fields (non-segmented) of the same total MU as the segmented fields were also created (10-200 MU). EPID images for these fields were acquired with multi-frame acquisition mode. The integrated EPID response was determined as the mean central 20 x 21 pixel readout multiplied by the number of frames. The same fields wen measured with an ionization chamber at a depth of dose maximum in, solid water phantom. The total signal measured from the segmented fields was compared to the corresponding non-segmented fields. The ratio of EPID response between segmented and non-segmented delivery indicates an under-response for segmented fields by 5, 4, 2.5 and 2% for 1,2,3, and 5 MU per segment exposures respectively compared to ionisation chamber response (se Fig. I). The ratio was within 2% for 5 MU per segment and above. Th error bar in Fig. I indicate the intra-segment response variation. The Siemens EPID exhibited significant ghosting effect and variation in response for small M U segments. EPID dosimetry ( IMRT fields with less than 5 MU per segment requires corrections t maintain dose calibration accuracy to within 2%. (author)

  5. Quantum entanglement and quantum teleportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Y.H.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most surprising consequences of quantum mechanics is the entanglement of two or more distance particles. The ''ghost'' interference and the ''ghost'' image experiments demonstrated the astonishing nonlocal behavior of an entangled photon pair. Even though we still have questions in regard to fundamental issues of the entangled quantum systems, quantum entanglement has started to play important roles in quantum information and quantum computation. Quantum teleportation is one of the hot topics. We have demonstrated a quantum teleportation experiment recently. The experimental results proved the working principle of irreversibly teleporting an unknown arbitrary quantum state from one system to another distant system by disassembling into and then later reconstructing from purely classical information and nonclassical EPR correlations. The distinct feature of this experiment is that the complete set of Bell states can be distinguished in the Bell state measurement. Teleportation of a quantum state can thus occur with certainty in principle. (orig.)

  6. Images in quantum entanglement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowden, G J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-28

    A system for classifying and quantifying entanglement in spin 1/2 pure states is presented based on simple images. From the image point of view, an entangled state can be described as a linear superposition of separable object wavefunction {psi}{sub O} plus a portion of its own inverse image. Bell states can be defined in this way: {psi}= 1/{radical}2 ({psi}{sub O}{+-}{psi}{sub I} ). Using the method of images, the three-spin 1/2 system is discussed in some detail. This system can exhibit exclusive three-particle {nu}{sub 123} entanglement, two-particle entanglements {nu}{sub 12}, {nu}{sub 13}, {nu}{sub 23} and/or mixtures of all four. All four image states are orthogonal both to each other and to the object wavefunction. In general, five entanglement parameters {nu}{sub 12}, {nu}{sub 13}, {nu}{sub 23}, {nu}{sub 123} and {phi}{sub 123} are required to define the general entangled state. In addition, it is shown that there is considerable scope for encoding numbers, at least from the classical point of view but using quantum-mechanical principles. Methods are developed for their extraction. It is shown that concurrence can be used to extract even-partite, but not odd-partite information. Additional relationships are also presented which can be helpful in the decoding process. However, in general, numerical methods are mandatory. A simple roulette method for decoding is presented and discussed. But it is shown that if the encoder chooses to use transcendental numbers for the angles defining the target function ({alpha}{sub 1}, {beta}{sub 1}), etc, the method rapidly turns into the Devil's roulette, requiring finer and finer angular steps.

  7. Images in quantum entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowden, G J

    2009-01-01

    A system for classifying and quantifying entanglement in spin 1/2 pure states is presented based on simple images. From the image point of view, an entangled state can be described as a linear superposition of separable object wavefunction Ψ O plus a portion of its own inverse image. Bell states can be defined in this way: Ψ= 1/√2 (Ψ O ±Ψ I ). Using the method of images, the three-spin 1/2 system is discussed in some detail. This system can exhibit exclusive three-particle ν 123 entanglement, two-particle entanglements ν 12 , ν 13 , ν 23 and/or mixtures of all four. All four image states are orthogonal both to each other and to the object wavefunction. In general, five entanglement parameters ν 12 , ν 13 , ν 23 , ν 123 and φ 123 are required to define the general entangled state. In addition, it is shown that there is considerable scope for encoding numbers, at least from the classical point of view but using quantum-mechanical principles. Methods are developed for their extraction. It is shown that concurrence can be used to extract even-partite, but not odd-partite information. Additional relationships are also presented which can be helpful in the decoding process. However, in general, numerical methods are mandatory. A simple roulette method for decoding is presented and discussed. But it is shown that if the encoder chooses to use transcendental numbers for the angles defining the target function (α 1 , β 1 ), etc, the method rapidly turns into the Devil's roulette, requiring finer and finer angular steps.

  8. The x-ray time of flight method for investigation of ghosting in amorphous selenium-based flat panel medical x-ray imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, A.W.; Bakueva, L.; Rowlands, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based real-time flat-panel imagers (FPIs) are finding their way into the digital radiology department because they offer the practical advantages of digital x-ray imaging combined with an image quality that equals or outperforms that of conventional systems. The temporal imaging characteristics of FPIs can be affected by ghosting (i.e., radiation-induced changes of sensitivity) when the dose to the detector is high (e.g., portal imaging and mammography) or the images are acquired at a high frame rate (e.g., fluoroscopy). In this paper, the x-ray time-of-flight (TOF) method is introduced as a tool for the investigation of ghosting in a-Se photoconductor layers. The method consists of irradiating layers of a-Se with short x-ray pulses. From the current generated in the a-Se layer, ghosting is quantified and the ghosting parameters (charge carrier generation rate and carrier lifetimes and mobilities) are assessed. The x-ray TOF method is novel in that (1) x-ray sensitivity (S) and ghosting parameters can be measured simultaneously (2) the transport of both holes and electrons can be isolated, and (3) the method is applicable to the practical a-Se layer structure with blocking contacts used in FPIs. The x-ray TOF method was applied to an analysis of ghosting in a-Se photoconductor layers under portal imaging conditions, i.e., 1 mm thick a-Se layers, biased at 5 V/μm, were irradiated using a 6 MV LINAC x-ray beam to a total dose (ghosting dose) of 30 Gy. The initial sensitivity (S 0 ) of the a-Se layers was 63±2 nC cm -2 cGy -1 . It was found that S decreases to 30% of S 0 after a ghosting dose of 5 Gy and to 21% after 30 Gy at which point no further change in S occurs. At an x-ray intensity of 22 Gy/s (instantaneous dose rate during a LINAC x-ray pulse), the charge carrier generation rate was 1.25±0.1x10 22 ehp m -3 s -1 and, to a first approximation, independent of the ghosting dose. However, both hole and electron transport showed a

  9. Classical geometrical interpretation of ghost fields and anomalies in Yang-Mills theory and quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Mieg, J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the reinterpretation of the BRS equations of Quantum Field Theory as the Maurer Cartan equation of a classical principal fiber bundle leads to a simple gauge invariant classification of the anomalies in Yang Mills theory and gravity

  10. Classical geometrical interpretation of ghost fields and anomalies in Yang-Mills theory and quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry-Mieg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The reinterpretation of the BRS equations of Quantum Field Theory as the Maurer Cartan equation of a classical principal fiber bundle leads to a simple gauge invariant classification of the anomalies in Yang Mills theory and gravity

  11. Photon-number correlation for quantum enhanced imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meda, A.; Losero, E.; Samantaray, N.; Scafirimuto, F.; Pradyumna, S.; Avella, A.; Ruo-Berchera, I.; Genovese, M.

    2017-09-01

    In this review we present the potentialities and the achievements of the use of non-classical photon-number correlations in twin-beam states for many applications, ranging from imaging to metrology. Photon-number correlations in the quantum regime are easily produced and are rather robust against unavoidable experimental losses, and noise in some cases, if compared to the entanglement, where losing one photon can completely compromise the state and its exploitable advantages. Here, we will focus on quantum enhanced protocols in which only phase-insensitive intensity measurements (photon-number counting) are performed, which allow probing the transmission/absorption properties of a system, leading, for example, to innovative target detection schemes in a strong background. In this framework, one of the advantages is that the sources experimentally available emit a wide number of pair-wise correlated modes, which can be intercepted and exploited separately, for example by many pixels of a camera, providing a parallelism, essential in several applications, such as wide-field sub-shot-noise imaging and quantum enhanced ghost imaging. Finally, non-classical correlation enables new possibilities in quantum radiometry, e.g. the possibility of absolute calibration of a spatial resolving detector from the on-off single-photon regime to the linear regime in the same setup.

  12. Hunting the ghosts of a 'strictly quantum field': the Klein-Gordon equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertozzi, Eugenio

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to identify and tackle some problems related to teaching quantum field theory (QFT) at university level. In particular, problems arising from the canonical quantization are addressed by focusing on the Klein-Gordon equation (KGE). After a brief description of the status of the KGE in teaching as it emerges from an analysis of a selected sample of university textbooks, an analysis of the applications of the KGE in contexts different from the QFT is presented. The results of the analysis show that, while in the real case the solutions of the equation can be easily interpreted from a physical point of view, in the complex case the coherence with relativistic quantum mechanics and the electrodynamics framework brings to light interpretative problems related to the classical complex KG field. The comparison between the classical cases investigated and the QFT framework, where the equation finds a coherent particle interpretation, leads to share Ryder's statement asserting that the KG field is a 'strictly quantum field'. Implications of the results in terms of remarks about the canonical procedure currently utilized for teaching are underlined.

  13. Bell's inequality and 'ghost-like action-at-a-distance' in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattuck, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The phenomenon of non-locality in quantum mechanics is one of its most fundamental features and is most strikingly exemplified in the discussion of the EPR type of experiment. The generality of Bell's inequality and the results of experiments done up to now show that local hidden-variable theories are ruled out as a means to resolve the famous EPR paradox. What remains for further consideration are the non-local and the Einstein-separable hidden-variable models. Finally, an alternative and possible successful approach in trying to 'explain' non-locality might involve ideas of backward causation. (author)

  14. Entangled spins and ghost-spins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileep P. Jatkar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study patterns of quantum entanglement in systems of spins and ghost-spins regarding them as simple quantum mechanical toy models for theories containing negative norm states. We define a single ghost-spin as in [20] as a 2-state spin variable with an indefinite inner product in the state space. We find that whenever the spin sector is disentangled from the ghost-spin sector (both of which could be entangled within themselves, the reduced density matrix obtained by tracing over all the ghost-spins gives rise to positive entanglement entropy for positive norm states, while negative norm states have an entanglement entropy with a negative real part and a constant imaginary part. However when the spins are entangled with the ghost-spins, there are new entanglement patterns in general. For systems where the number of ghost-spins is even, it is possible to find subsectors of the Hilbert space where positive norm states always lead to positive entanglement entropy after tracing over the ghost-spins. With an odd number of ghost-spins however, we find that there always exist positive norm states with negative real part for entanglement entropy after tracing over the ghost-spins.

  15. Quantum Image Filtering in the Frequency Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MANTA, V. I.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we address the emerging field of Quantum Image Processing. We investigate the use of quantum computing systems to represent and manipulate images. In particular, we consider the basic task of image filtering. We prove that a quantum version for this operation can be achieved, even though the quantum convolution of two sequences is physically impossible. In our approach we use the principle of the quantum oracle to implement the filter function. We provide the quantum circuit that implements the filtering task and present the results of several simulation experiments on grayscale images. There are important differences between the classical and the quantum implementations for image filtering. We analyze these differences and show that the major advantage of the quantum approach lies in the exploitation of the efficient implementation of the quantum Fourier transform.

  16. Recovering a hidden polarization by ghost polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janassek, Patrick; Blumenstein, Sébastien; Elsäßer, Wolfgang

    2018-02-15

    By exploiting polarization correlations of light from a broadband fiber-based amplified spontaneous emission source we succeed in reconstructing a hidden polarization in a ghost polarimetry experiment in close analogy to ghost imaging and ghost spectroscopy. Thereby, an original linear polarization state in the object arm of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration which has been camouflaged by a subsequent depolarizer is recovered by correlating it with light from a reference beam. The variation of a linear polarizer placed inside the reference beam results in a Malus law type second-order intensity correlation with high contrast, thus measuring a ghost polarigram.

  17. Ghost number anomaly in the Polyakov's light-cone gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi.

    1990-06-01

    The conformal (Weyl) anomaly of the ghost-anti-ghost system in the two-dimentional quantum gravity is calculated. A background covariant formalism allows us to treat the Polyakov's light-cone gauge in a systematic way. The anomaly gives a contribution to the central charge, -28, which agrees with the result of Kniznik, Polyakov and Zamolodchikov. The ghost number anomaly is also calculated, and the metric corrections to the naive ghost number current are given. It is suggested that a general scalar density in the light-cone gauge carries a screening ghost number. (author)

  18. Ghostly footsteps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinder, David

    2001-01-01

    ), which is set in east London. Connections are also drawn with other recent projects in the same area by Rachel Lichtenstein and Iain Sinclair. The paper discusses how these artists raise important issues about the cultural geographies of the city relating to subjectivity, representation and memory....... Cardiff’s audio-walk in particular works with connections between the self and the city, between the conscious and unconscious, and between multiple selves and urban footsteps. In so doing, she directs attention to the significance of dreams and ghostly matters for thinking about the real and imagined...

  19. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Image Correlation Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tianxiang; Chen, Jiamin; Pei, Dongju; Zhang, Wenquan; Zhou, Nanrun

    2015-02-01

    A novel quantum gray-level image encryption and decryption algorithm based on image correlation decomposition is proposed. The correlation among image pixels is established by utilizing the superposition and measurement principle of quantum states. And a whole quantum image is divided into a series of sub-images. These sub-images are stored into a complete binary tree array constructed previously and then randomly performed by one of the operations of quantum random-phase gate, quantum revolving gate and Hadamard transform. The encrypted image can be obtained by superimposing the resulting sub-images with the superposition principle of quantum states. For the encryption algorithm, the keys are the parameters of random phase gate, rotation angle, binary sequence and orthonormal basis states. The security and the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm are analyzed. The proposed encryption algorithm can resist brute force attack due to its very large key space and has lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  20. Living with ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawking, S.W.; Hertog, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Perturbation theory for gravity in dimensions greater than two requires higher derivatives in the free action. Higher derivatives seem to lead to ghosts, states with negative norm. We consider a fourth order scalar field theory and show that the problem with ghosts arises because, in the canonical treatment, φ and □φ are regarded as two independent variables. Instead, we base quantum theory on a path integral, evaluated in Euclidean space and then Wick rotated to Lorentzian space. The path integral requires that quantum states be specified by the values of φ and φ ,τ . To calculate probabilities for observations, one has to trace out over φ ,τ on the final surface. Hence one loses unitarity, but one can never produce a negative norm state or get a negative probability. It is shown that transition probabilities tend toward those of the second order theory, as the coefficient of the fourth order term in the action tends to zero. Hence unitarity is restored at the low energies that now occur in the universe

  1. LSB Based Quantum Image Steganography Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Na; Wang, Luo

    2016-01-01

    Quantum steganography is the technique which hides a secret message into quantum covers such as quantum images. In this paper, two blind LSB steganography algorithms in the form of quantum circuits are proposed based on the novel enhanced quantum representation (NEQR) for quantum images. One algorithm is plain LSB which uses the message bits to substitute for the pixels' LSB directly. The other is block LSB which embeds a message bit into a number of pixels that belong to one image block. The extracting circuits can regain the secret message only according to the stego cover. Analysis and simulation-based experimental results demonstrate that the invisibility is good, and the balance between the capacity and the robustness can be adjusted according to the needs of applications.

  2. Real-time imaging of quantum entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickler, Robert; Krenn, Mario; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Ramelow, Sven; Zeilinger, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement is widely regarded as one of the most prominent features of quantum mechanics and quantum information science. Although, photonic entanglement is routinely studied in many experiments nowadays, its signature has been out of the grasp for real-time imaging. Here we show that modern technology, namely triggered intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) cameras are fast and sensitive enough to image in real-time the effect of the measurement of one photon on its entangled partner. To quantitatively verify the non-classicality of the measurements we determine the detected photon number and error margin from the registered intensity image within a certain region. Additionally, the use of the ICCD camera allows us to demonstrate the high flexibility of the setup in creating any desired spatial-mode entanglement, which suggests as well that visual imaging in quantum optics not only provides a better intuitive understanding of entanglement but will improve applications of quantum science.

  3. Existence, uniqueness and cohomology of the classical BRST charge with ghosts of ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisch, J.; Stasheff, J.

    1989-01-01

    A complete canonical formulation of the BRST theory of systems with redundant gauge symmetries is presented. These systems include p-form gauge fields, the superparticle, and the superstring. We first define the Koszul-Tate differential and explicitly show how the introduction of the momenta conjugate to the ghosts of ghosts makes it acyclic. The global existence of the BRST generator is then demonstrated, and the BRST charge is proved to be unique up to canonical transformations in the extended phase space, which includes the ghosts. Finally, the BRST cohomology in classical mechanics is investigated and shown to be equal to the cohomology of the exterior derivative along the gauge orbits, as in the irreducible case. This is done by re-expressing the exterior algebra along the gauge orbits as a free differential algebra containing generators of higher degree, which are identified with the ghosts of ghosts. The quantum cohomology is not dealt with. (orig.)

  4. Quantum red-green-blue image steganography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Shahrokh; Pourarian, Mohammad Rasoul; Gheibi, Reza; Naseri, Mosayeb; Houshmand, Monireh

    One of the most considering matters in the field of quantum information processing is quantum data hiding including quantum steganography and quantum watermarking. This field is an efficient tool for protecting any kind of digital data. In this paper, three quantum color images steganography algorithms are investigated based on Least Significant Bit (LSB). The first algorithm employs only one of the image’s channels to cover secret data. The second procedure is based on LSB XORing technique, and the last algorithm utilizes two channels to cover the color image for hiding secret quantum data. The performances of the proposed schemes are analyzed by using software simulations in MATLAB environment. The analysis of PSNR, BER and Histogram graphs indicate that the presented schemes exhibit acceptable performances and also theoretical analysis demonstrates that the networks complexity of the approaches scales squarely.

  5. Tensor ghosts in the inflationary cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clunan, Tim; Sasaki, Misao

    2010-01-01

    Theories with curvature-squared terms in the action are known to contain ghost modes in general. However, if we regard curvature-squared terms as quantum corrections to the original theory, the emergence of ghosts may be simply due to the perturbative truncation of a full non-perturbative theory. If this is the case, there should be a way to live with ghosts. In this paper, we take the Euclidean path integral approach, in which ghost degrees of freedom can be, and are integrated out in the Euclideanized spacetime. We apply this procedure to Einstein gravity with a Weyl curvature-squared correction in the inflationary background. We find that the amplitude of tensor perturbations is modified by a term of O(α 2 H 2 ) where α 2 is a coupling constant in front of the Weyl-squared term and H is the Hubble parameter during inflation.

  6. Objective Lens Optimized for Wavefront Delivery, Pupil Imaging, and Pupil Ghosting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olzcak, Gene

    2009-01-01

    An interferometer objective lens (or diverger) may be used to transform a collimated beam into a diverging or converging beam. This innovation provides an objective lens that has diffraction-limited optical performance that is optimized at two sets of conjugates: imaging to the objective focus and imaging to the pupil. The lens thus provides for simultaneous delivery of a high-quality beam and excellent pupil resolution properties.

  7. Restoration for Noise Removal in Quantum Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Yi; Lu, Kai; Wang, Xiaoping

    2017-09-01

    Quantum computation has become increasingly attractive in the past few decades due to its extraordinary performance. As a result, some studies focusing on image representation and processing via quantum mechanics have been done. However, few of them have considered the quantum operations for images restoration. To address this problem, three noise removal algorithms are proposed in this paper based on the novel enhanced quantum representation model, oriented to two kinds of noise pollution (Salt-and-Pepper noise and Gaussian noise). For the first algorithm Q-Mean, it is designed to remove the Salt-and-Pepper noise. The noise points are extracted through comparisons with the adjacent pixel values, after which the restoration operation is finished by mean filtering. As for the second method Q-Gauss, a special mask is applied to weaken the Gaussian noise pollution. The third algorithm Q-Adapt is effective for the source image containing unknown noise. The type of noise can be judged through the quantum statistic operations for the color value of the whole image, and then different noise removal algorithms are used to conduct image restoration respectively. Performance analysis reveals that our methods can offer high restoration quality and achieve significant speedup through inherent parallelism of quantum computation.

  8. Observability of complex ghosts and tachyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    1976-01-01

    The complex ghost introduced previously by the present author is studied from a standpoint whether its effects are observable by experiments or not. According to the theory of complex ghost the scattering cross section of two real particles shows some particular properties. It has a kind of resonance peak at a certain energy which does not conform to the Breit-Wigner formula. It has also a peak for a certain energy transfer, if there exist tachyons. The tachyon is a kind of ghost and is allowed to exist in the theory. Using these properties the complex ghosts are expected to be detected by experiments. The recently observed resonance psi(3.1) is supposed to be the complex ghost of photon, since they have the same quantum numbers. If it is assumed, some properties of the resonance known by experiments are explained naturally to a certain extent. Along the same line it is not unnatural to expect that the photon is also accompanied by a tachyon as a ghost. An experiment to detect the tachyon is proposed. If the angular distribution of elastic electron-positron or electron-electron scattering is observed at a suitably high energy, then a peak will be found in the domain -1< cos theta<1, where it is assumed that the exchanged photon accompanies a tachyon. (auth.)

  9. Quantum dynamic imaging theoretical and numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Misha

    2011-01-01

    Studying and using light or "photons" to image and then to control and transmit molecular information is among the most challenging and significant research fields to emerge in recent years. One of the fastest growing areas involves research in the temporal imaging of quantum phenomena, ranging from molecular dynamics in the femto (10-15s) time regime for atomic motion to the atto (10-18s) time scale of electron motion. In fact, the attosecond "revolution" is now recognized as one of the most important recent breakthroughs and innovations in the science of the 21st century. A major participant in the development of ultrafast femto and attosecond temporal imaging of molecular quantum phenomena has been theory and numerical simulation of the nonlinear, non-perturbative response of atoms and molecules to ultrashort laser pulses. Therefore, imaging quantum dynamics is a new frontier of science requiring advanced mathematical approaches for analyzing and solving spatial and temporal multidimensional partial differ...

  10. Ghost story. II. The midpoint ghost vertex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonora, L; Maccaferri, C; Scherer Santos, R.J.; Tolla, D D

    2009-01-01

    We construct the ghost number 9 three strings vertex for OSFT in the natural normal ordering. We find two versions, one with a ghost insertion at z = i and a twist-conjugate one with insertion at z = -i. For this reason we call them midpoint vertices. We show that the relevant Neumann matrices commute among themselves and with the matrix G representing the operator K 1 . We analyze the spectrum of the latter and find that beside a continuous spectrum there is a (so far ignored) discrete one. We are able to write spectral formulas for all the Neumann matrices involved and clarify the important role of the integration contour over the continuous spectrum. We then pass to examine the (ghost) wedge states. We compute the discrete and continuous eigenvalues of the corresponding Neumann matrices and show that they satisfy the appropriate recursion relations. Using these results we show that the formulas for our vertices correctly define the star product in that, starting from the data of two ghost number 0 wedge states, they allow us to reconstruct a ghost number 3 state which is the expected wedge state with the ghost insertion at the midpoint, according to the star recursion relation.

  11. Ghost-like action-at-a-distance in quantum mechanics: an elementary introduction to the Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen paradox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattuck, R.D. (Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). H.C. Oersted Inst.)

    1982-01-01

    The remarkable quantum phenomenon of 'non-locality' discovered by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) is the centre of considerable experimental and theoretical activity these days. Nevertheless, many (perhaps most) physicists do not feel the phenomenon is especially paradoxical, or even worthy of interest. This article attempts to reveal, in a simple way, just where the fascination of the EPR paradox lies, and to answer some of the arguments invoked by critics to 'explain away' the paradox.

  12. Ghost-like action-at-a-distance in quantum mechanics: an elementary introduction to the Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen paradox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattuck, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The remarkable quantum phenomenon of 'non-locality' discovered by Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen (EPR) is the centre of considerable experimental and theoretical activity these days. Nevertheless, many (perhaps most) physicists do not feel the phenomenon is especially paradoxical, or even worthy of interest. This article attempts to reveal, in a simple way, just where the fascination of the EPR paradox lies, and to answer some of the arguments invoked by critics to 'explain away' the paradox. (author)

  13. The Ghost-Image on Metropolitan Borders—In Terms of Phantom of the Opera and 19th-Century Metropolis Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changnam Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews Gaston Leroux’s Phantom of the Opera in the context of the social and cultural changes of the metropolis Paris at the end of the 19th century. The Phantom of the Opera, a success in the literary world and widely proliferated in its musical and film renditions afterward, is considered and interpreted mainly in the literary and artistic tradition. In this paper, however, this work will be considered from an urban sociological perspective, especially from that of Walter Benjamin, who developed the theory of the urban culture, focusing on the dreaming collectives at the end of the 19th century. Leroux’s novel can be regarded as an exemplary social form of the collective dreams of the period expressed in arts, architectures, popular stories and films and other popular arts. Given the premise that the dream images in the novel, so-called kitsch, reflect the fears and desires of the bourgeois middle class that were pathologized in the figure of the ghost, this paper reveals the cultural, social and transnational implications of the Ghost-Image in relation to the rapidly changing borders of the 19th century metropolis.

  14. Ghost cell lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cells have been a controversy for a long time. Ghost cell is a swollen/enlarged epithelial cell with eosnophilic cytoplasm, but without a nucleus. In routine H and E staining these cells give a shadowy appearance. Hence these cells are also called as shadow cells or translucent cells. The appearance of these cells varies from lesion to lesion involving odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. This article review about the origin, nature and significance of ghost cells in different neoplasms.

  15. Bell's inequality and 'ghost-like action-at-a-distance' in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattuck, R.D. (Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). H.C. Oersted Inst.)

    1982-01-01

    The phenomenon of non-locality in quantum mechanics is one of its most fundamental features and is most strikingly exemplified in the discussion of the EPR type of experiment. The generality of Bell's inequality and the results of experiments done up to now show that local hidden-variable theories are ruled out as a means to resolve the famous EPR paradox. What remains for further consideration are the non-local and the Einstein-separable hidden-variable models. Finally, an alternative and possible successful approach in trying to 'explain' non-locality might involve ideas of backward causation.

  16. Ghost Head Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth. The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas. NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000. The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas. In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars. The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The

  17. Weyl and ghost number anomalies in the Polyakov's light-cone gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, H.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the conformal (Weyl) anomaly of the ghost-anti-ghost system in the 2-dimensional quantum gravity is calculated. A background covariant formalism allows us to treat the Polyakov's light-cone gauge in a systematic way. The anomaly gives a contribution to the central charge, -28, which agrees with the result of Kniznik, Polyakov, and Zamolodchikov. The ghost number anomaly is also calculated, and the metric corrections to the naive ghost number current are given. It is suggested that a general scalar density in the light-cone gauge carries a screening ghost number

  18. Ghost D-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Takuya; Takayanagi, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    We define a ghost D-brane in superstring theories as an object that cancels the effects of an ordinary D-brane. The supergroups U(N|M) and OSp(N/M) arise as gauge symmetries in the supersymmetric world-volume theory of D-branes and ghost D-branes. A system with a pair of D-brane and ghost D-brane located at the same location is physically equivalent to the closed string vacuum. When they are separated, the system becomes a new brane configuration. We generalize the type I/heterotic duality by including n ghost D9-branes on the type I side and by considering the heterotic string whose gauge group is OSp(32+2n/2n). Motivated by the type IIB S-duality applied to D9- and ghost D9-branes, we also find type II-like closed superstrings with U(n/n) gauge symmetry

  19. Ghost counting in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, N.K.

    1978-04-01

    The elimination of unphysical degrees of freedom from a quantized massless Rarita-Schwinger field interacting with a (quantized or classical) gravitational field is analyzed on the one-loop level. It is shown that, besides the ordinary Faddeev-Popov ghosts, an extra ghost is needed to remove the effects of unphysical modes. The new ghost only couples to the S matrix if the gauge-fixing of the Rarita-Schwinger field involves the gravitational field, but it is necessary in the partition function for other gauge choices. (Auth.)

  20. Ghost counting in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, N.K.

    1978-01-01

    The elimination of unphysical degrees of freedom from a quantized massless Rarita-Schwinger field interacting with a (quantized or classical) gravitational field is analyzed on the one-loop level. It is shown that, besides the ordinary Faddeev-Popov ghosts, an extra ghost is needed to remove the effects of unphysical modes. The new ghost only couples to the S-matrix if the gauge-fixing of the Rarita-Schwinger field involves the gravitational field, but it is necessary in the partition function for other gauge choices. (Auth.)

  1. Y-formalism and b ghost in the non-minimal pure spinor formalism of superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Ichiro; Tonin, Mario

    2007-01-01

    We present the Y-formalism for the non-minimal pure spinor quantization of superstrings. In the framework of this formalism we compute, at the quantum level, the explicit form of the compound operators involved in the construction of the b ghost, their normal-ordering contributions and the relevant relations among them. We use these results to construct the quantum-mechanical b ghost in the non-minimal pure spinor formalism. Moreover we show that this non-minimal b ghost is cohomologically equivalent to the non-covariant b ghost

  2. Quantum dot loaded immunomicelles for tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levchenko Tatyana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical imaging is a promising method for the detection of tumors in animals, with speed and minimal invasiveness. We have previously developed a lipid coated quantum dot system that doubles the fluorescence of PEG-grafted quantum dots at half the dose. Here, we describe a tumor-targeted near infrared imaging agent composed of cancer-specific monoclonal anti-nucleosome antibody 2C5, coupled to quantum dot (QD-containing polymeric micelles, prepared from a polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE conjugate. Its production is simple and involves no special equipment. Its imaging potential is great since the fluorescence intensity in the tumor is twofold that of non-targeted QD-loaded PEG-PE micelles at one hour after injection. Methods Para-nitrophenol-containing (5% PEG-PE quantum dot micelles were produced by the thin layer method. Following hydration, 2C5 antibody was attached to the PEG-PE micelles and the QD-micelles were purified using dialysis. 4T1 breast tumors were inoculated subcutaneously in the flank of the animals. A lung pseudometastatic B16F10 melanoma model was developed using tail vein injection. The contrast agents were injected via the tail vein and mice were depilated, anesthetized and imaged on a Kodak Image Station. Images were taken at one, two, and four hours and analyzed using a methodology that produces normalized signal-to-noise data. This allowed for the comparison between different subjects and time points. For the pseudometastatic model, lungs were removed and imaged ex vivo at one and twenty four hours. Results The contrast agent signal intensity at the tumor was double that of the passively targeted QD-micelles with equally fast and sharply contrasted images. With the side views of the animals only tumor is visible, while in the dorsal view internal organs including liver and kidney are visible. Ex vivo results demonstrated that the agent detects melanoma nodes in a lung

  3. Ghost basis for neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novello, M.

    1976-07-01

    A class of solutions of DIRAC'S equation in gravitational fields for ghost neutrinos is given. Comments are restricted to the neutrino cosmological model recently found by M. Novello e I.D. Soares [pt

  4. New Mexico Ghost Towns

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data provides locations and non-spatial attributes of many ghost towns in the State of New Mexico, compiled from various sources. Locations provided with...

  5. Geometric ghosts and unitarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ne'eman, Y.

    1980-09-01

    A review is given of the geometrical identification of the renormalization ghosts and the resulting derivation of Unitarity equations (BRST) for various gauges: Yang-Mills, Kalb-Ramond, and Soft-Group-Manifold

  6. Ghost telescope and ghost Fourier telescope with thermal light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Wenlin; Han Shensheng

    2011-01-01

    As important observation tools, telescopes are very useful in remote observations. We report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of ghost telescope scheme and show that, by measuring the intensity correlation of two light fields and only changing the position of the detector in the reference path, ghost telescope and ghost Fourier telescope can be obtained even if a single-pixel detector is fixed in Fresnel region of the object. Differences between conventional telescope and ghost telescope are also discussed.

  7. Influence of quantum noise on radiological images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, A. de.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental limits to the spatial resolution and to the contrast attainable in radiological images are owing to the quantum nature ox X-radiation. Small low-contrast details in anatomic structures may be revealed only by increasing the fluence of photons absorbed by those structures, an acceptable procedure in industrial applications but which incurs a proportional risk to the patient in clinical applications of X-rays. An analytical procedure to find the optimal compromise between the diagnostic conditions of high patient absorbance is developed, for which few photons remains to carry information to the detectors, and low patient absorbance, for which the quantum fluctuations in the large number of photons reaching the detectors obscure the information. (author)

  8. 'Ghost of Mirach' Rears its Spooky Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Visible/DSS Click on image for larger version Ultraviolet/GALEX Click on image for larger version Poster Version Click on image for larger version The 'Ghost of Mirach' galaxy is shown in visible light on the left, and in ultraviolet as seen by NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer on the right. The fields of view are identical in both pictures, with the Ghost of Mirach a galaxy called NGC 404 seen as the whitish spot in the center of the images. Mirach is a red giant star that looms large in visible light. Because NGC 404 is lost in the glare of this star, it was nicknamed the Ghost of Mirach. But when the galaxy is viewed in ultraviolet light, it comes to 'life,' revealing a never-before-seen ring. This ring, seen in blue in the picture on the right, contains new stars a surprise considering that the galaxy was previously thought to be, essentially, dead. The field of view spans 55,000 light years across. The Ghost of Mirach is located 11 million light-years from Earth. The star Mirach is very close in comparison it is only 200 light-years away and is visible with the naked eye. The visible data come from the Digitized Sky Survey of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md.

  9. Quantum Image Steganography and Steganalysis Based On LSQu-Blocks Image Information Concealing Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. AL-Salhi, Yahya E.; Lu, Songfeng

    2016-08-01

    Quantum steganography can solve some problems that are considered inefficient in image information concealing. It researches on Quantum image information concealing to have been widely exploited in recent years. Quantum image information concealing can be categorized into quantum image digital blocking, quantum image stereography, anonymity and other branches. Least significant bit (LSB) information concealing plays vital roles in the classical world because many image information concealing algorithms are designed based on it. Firstly, based on the novel enhanced quantum representation (NEQR), image uniform blocks clustering around the concrete the least significant Qu-block (LSQB) information concealing algorithm for quantum image steganography is presented. Secondly, a clustering algorithm is proposed to optimize the concealment of important data. Finally, we used Con-Steg algorithm to conceal the clustered image blocks. Information concealing located on the Fourier domain of an image can achieve the security of image information, thus we further discuss the Fourier domain LSQu-block information concealing algorithm for quantum image based on Quantum Fourier Transforms. In our algorithms, the corresponding unitary Transformations are designed to realize the aim of concealing the secret information to the least significant Qu-block representing color of the quantum cover image. Finally, the procedures of extracting the secret information are illustrated. Quantum image LSQu-block image information concealing algorithm can be applied in many fields according to different needs.

  10. On ghost fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grensing, G.

    2002-01-01

    The path integral for ghost fermions, which is heuristically made use of in the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky approach to quantization of constrained systems, is derived from first principles. The derivation turns out to be rather different from that of physical fermions since the definition of Dirac states for ghost fermions is subtle. With these results at hand, it is then shown that the nonminimal extension of the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin operator must be chosen differently from the notorious choice made in the literature in order to avoid the boundary terms that have always plagued earlier treatments. Furthermore it is pointed out that the elimination of states with nonzero ghost number requires the introduction of a thermodynamic potential for ghosts; the reason is that Schwarz's Lefschetz formula for the partition function of the time-evolution operator is not capable, despite claims to the contrary, to get rid of nonzero ghost number states on its own. Finally, we comment on the problems of global topological nature that one faces in the attempt to obtain the solutions of the Dirac condition for physical states in a configuration space of nontrivial geometry; such complications give rise to anomalies that do not obey the Wess-Zumino consistency conditions. (orig.)

  11. GHOST balloons around Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    The GHOST balloon position as a function of time data shows that the atmospheric circulation around the Antarctic Continent at the 100 mb and 200 mb levels is complex. The GHOST balloons supposedly follow the horizontal trajectory of the air at the balloon level. The position of GHOST balloon 98Q for a three month period in 1968 is shown. The balloon moved to within 2 deg of the South Pole on 1 October 1968 and then by 9 December 1968 was 35 deg from the South Pole and close to its position on 1 September 1968. The balloon generally moved from west to east but on two occasions moved in the opposite direction for a few days. The latitude of GHOST balloons 98Q and 149Z which was at 200 mb is given. Both balloons tended to get closer to the South Pole in September and October. Other GHOST balloons at the same pressure and time period may not indicate similar behavior.

  12. Half-integer ghost states and simple BRST quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnelius, R.

    1987-01-01

    Quantum mechanical BRST systems are considered. As is well known an odd number of ghost operators has a representation with respect to the ghost number operator consisting of states with half-integer ghost numbers. Here it is shown that an eigenstate representation of the ghost operators requires a particular mixed Grassmann character of the states. It is also shown that such states always may be avoided provided only one starts from a lagrangian where the fundamental constraints are generated by Lagrange multipliers. In the latter case there also exists an anti-BRST charge. Some relevant properties of the different BRST approaches are displayed. The existence of inequivalent physical representations is demonstrated. (orig.)

  13. Building Shadow Detection from Ghost Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G.; Sha, J.; Yue, T.; Wang, Q.; Liu, X.; Huang, S.; Pan, Q.; Wei, J.

    2018-05-01

    Shadow is one of the basic features of remote sensing image, it expresses a lot of information of the object which is loss or interference, and the removal of shadow is always a difficult problem to remote sensing image processing. In this paper, it is mainly analyzes the characteristics and properties of shadows from the ghost image (traditional orthorectification). The DBM and the interior and exterior orientation elements of the image are used to calculate the zenith angle of sun. Then this paper combines the scope of the architectural shadows which has be determined by the zenith angle of sun with the region growing method to make the detection of architectural shadow areas. This method lays a solid foundation for the shadow of the repair from the ghost image later. It will greatly improve the accuracy of shadow detection from buildings and make it more conducive to solve the problem of urban large-scale aerial imagines.

  14. BUILDING SHADOW DETECTION FROM GHOST IMAGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Shadow is one of the basic features of remote sensing image, it expresses a lot of information of the object which is loss or interference, and the removal of shadow is always a difficult problem to remote sensing image processing. In this paper, it is mainly analyzes the characteristics and properties of shadows from the ghost image (traditional orthorectification. The DBM and the interior and exterior orientation elements of the image are used to calculate the zenith angle of sun. Then this paper combines the scope of the architectural shadows which has be determined by the zenith angle of sun with the region growing method to make the detection of architectural shadow areas. This method lays a solid foundation for the shadow of the repair from the ghost image later. It will greatly improve the accuracy of shadow detection from buildings and make it more conducive to solve the problem of urban large-scale aerial imagines.

  15. Application of the quantum spin glass theory to image restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Inoue, Jun-ichi

    2000-01-01

    Quantum fluctuation is introduced into the Markov random-field model for image restoration in the context of a Bayesian approach. We investigate the dependence of the quantum fluctuation on the quality of a black and white image restoration by making use of statistical mechanics. We find that the maximum posterior marginal (MPM) estimate based on the quantum fluctuation gives a fine restoration in comparison with the maximum a posteriori estimate or the thermal fluctuation based MPM estimate.

  16. Application of the quantum spin glass theory to image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, J I

    2001-04-01

    Quantum fluctuation is introduced into the Markov random-field model for image restoration in the context of a Bayesian approach. We investigate the dependence of the quantum fluctuation on the quality of a black and white image restoration by making use of statistical mechanics. We find that the maximum posterior marginal (MPM) estimate based on the quantum fluctuation gives a fine restoration in comparison with the maximum a posteriori estimate or the thermal fluctuation based MPM estimate.

  17. Steganography on quantum pixel images using Shannon entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurel, Carlos Ortega; Dong, Shi-Hai; Cruz-Irisson, M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a steganographical algorithm based on least significant bit (LSB) from the most significant bit information (MSBI) and the equivalence of a bit pixel image to a quantum pixel image, which permits to make the information communicate secretly onto quantum pixel images for its secure transmission through insecure channels. This algorithm offers higher security since it exploits the Shannon entropy for an image.

  18. Ghost tablet in feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Morishita, Yosuke; Urata, Haruo; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-01

    Recently, we encountered a female patient who identified the presence of a ghost tablet in her fecal matter. Interestingly, although the patient was prescribed potassium chloride capsules, elemental composition analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was unable to detect the presence of either potassium or chloride in the fecal tablet remnant.

  19. Getting started with Ghost

    CERN Document Server

    Bracey, Kezz; Balderston, David

    2014-01-01

    If you are new to Ghost, this book is ideal for you. You might be completely new to content management systems or you might have experience with others such as WordPress. Some knowledge of web design basics such as HTML and CSS will be useful, but the book is designed so you can enter at the point relevant to you.

  20. Quantum Correlated Multi-Fragment Reaction Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feagin, James M. [California State Univ., Fullerton, CA (United States)

    2017-06-30

    This grant supported research in basic atomic, molecular and optical physics related to the interactions of atoms with particles and fields. This report will focus on the 12 year period from 2004 to 2017, although the DOE–BES has supported my research every year since 1986. All of the support from the grant was used to pay summer salaries of the PI and students and travel to conferences and meetings. The results were in the form of publications in peer reviewed journals as well as conference invited talks and colloquiums. There were 12 peer reviewed publications in these 12+ years. Innovations in few-body science at molecular and nano levels are a critical component of on- going efforts to establish sustainable environmental and energy resources. The varied research paths taken will require the development of basic science on broad fronts with increasing flexi- bility to crossover technologies. We thus worked to extract understanding and quantum control of few-body microscopic systems based on our long-time experience with more conventional studies of correlated electrons and ions. Given the enormous advances over the past 20 years to our understanding of quantum cor- relations with photon interferometry, AMO collision science generally is ready to move beyond the one-particle, single-port momentum detection that has dominated collision physics since Rutherford. Nevertheless, our familiar theoretical tools for collision theory need to be up- graded to incorporate these more generalized measurement formalisms and ultimately to give incentive for a new generation of experiments. Our interest in these topics remains motivated by the recent surge in and success of exper- iments involving few-body atomic and molecular fragmentation and the detection of all the fragments. The research described here thus involved two parallel efforts with (i) emphasis on reaction imaging while (ii) pursuing longtime work on quantum correlated collective excitations.

  1. Quantum mechanics II advanced topics

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Mechanics II: Advanced Topics uses more than a decade of research and the authors’ own teaching experience to expound on some of the more advanced topics and current research in quantum mechanics. A follow-up to the authors introductory book Quantum Mechanics I: The Fundamentals, this book begins with a chapter on quantum field theory, and goes on to present basic principles, key features, and applications. It outlines recent quantum technologies and phenomena, and introduces growing topics of interest in quantum mechanics. The authors describe promising applications that include ghost imaging, detection of weak amplitude objects, entangled two-photon microscopy, detection of small displacements, lithography, metrology, and teleportation of optical images. They also present worked-out examples and provide numerous problems at the end of each chapter.

  2. A novel quantum steganography scheme for color images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panchi; Liu, Xiande

    In quantum image steganography, embedding capacity and security are two important issues. This paper presents a novel quantum steganography scheme using color images as cover images. First, the secret information is divided into 3-bit segments, and then each 3-bit segment is embedded into the LSB of one color pixel in the cover image according to its own value and using Gray code mapping rules. Extraction is the inverse of embedding. We designed the quantum circuits that implement the embedding and extracting process. The simulation results on a classical computer show that the proposed scheme outperforms several other existing schemes in terms of embedding capacity and security.

  3. Significance of quantum fluctuations in roentgen imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strid, K G [Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1980-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in the roentgen radiation relief are analysed mathematically. The intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio of the radiation relief for a given object contrast is proportional to the square root of the number of photons contributing to the image of a characteristic detail in the object. In the presence of secondary radiation the signal-to-noise ratio is impaired, since the fluctuations of secondary radiation increase the noise of the radiation relief. By efficient secondary screening, the quality of the relief can be partially recovered. With a dynamically limited recording device, i.e. a film-screen combination, increased detection speed in conjunction with improved secondary screening will either result in unchanged image quality with the gain of an object-dose reduction or provide improved imaging at an unchanged dose value. As regards the relation between contrast resolution and spatial resolution, the dose required to barely demonstrate an object detail of given geometry and composition is found to vary inversely with the fourth power of the linear size of the detail. It is also concluded that recording and secondary-screening devices should always be considered together as far as recording quality is concerned.

  4. THE REPRESENTATION OF THE GHOST ARCHETYPE IN THE CANTERVILLE GHOST BY OSCAR WILDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaryan Agata Vladimirovna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article touches upon the actual interdisciplinary problems of modern cognitive linguistics, psychology, literary criticism and is related to the study of the archetypal representations of ethnicity and changes reflected in the linguistic consciousness. These changes are mainly influenced by the works of fiction and the role of writer's worldview in their formation. Guided by the thesis of universality of the archetypes, the author mentions that though the archetype represents the inherent characteristics of certain ethnic and cultural space, it retains the features which make an image recognizable at all times. By this fact the author explains the existence of beliefs in ghosts with different embodiments in all cultures. The awakening of the archetype is caused by certain historical events, i.e. the revival and further embodiment of the ghost archetype was the result of reversion to the cultural heritage during the Victorian England. The complex analysis of the means of speech representation that called up the realization of the ghost archetype in Oscar Wilde's short story The Canterville Ghost allowed to reveal that alongside with features that constitute the archetypal nature of ghosts in general, there appear the ones peculiar to the author's individual worldview, which either complement or change the existing notions about this being from another world.

  5. Quantum imaging for underwater arctic navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2017-05-01

    The precise navigation of underwater vehicles is a difficult task due to the challenges imposed by the variable oceanic environment. It is particularly difficult if the underwater vehicle is trying to navigate under the Arctic ice shelf. Indeed, in this scenario traditional navigation devices such as GPS, compasses and gyrocompasses are unavailable or unreliable. In addition, the shape and thickness of the ice shelf is variable throughout the year. Current Arctic underwater navigation systems include sonar arrays to detect the proximity to the ice. However, these systems are undesirable in a wartime environment, as the sound gives away the position of the underwater vehicle. In this paper we briefly describe the theoretical design of a quantum imaging system that could allow the safe and stealthy navigation of underwater Arctic vehicles.

  6. 3D super-resolution imaging with blinking quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Fruhwirth, Gilbert; Cai, En; Ng, Tony; Selvin, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots are promising candidates for single molecule imaging due to their exceptional photophysical properties, including their intense brightness and resistance to photobleaching. They are also notorious for their blinking. Here we report a novel way to take advantage of quantum dot blinking to develop an imaging technique in three-dimensions with nanometric resolution. We first applied this method to simulated images of quantum dots, and then to quantum dots immobilized on microspheres. We achieved imaging resolutions (FWHM) of 8–17 nm in the x-y plane and 58 nm (on coverslip) or 81 nm (deep in solution) in the z-direction, approximately 3–7 times better than what has been achieved previously with quantum dots. This approach was applied to resolve the 3D distribution of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) molecules at, and inside of, the plasma membrane of resting basal breast cancer cells. PMID:24093439

  7. Imaging vasculature and lymphatic flow in mice using quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballou, Byron; Ernst, Lauren A.; Andreko, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are ideal probes for fluorescent imaging of vascular and lymphatic tissues. On injection into appropriate sites, red- and near-infrared-emitting quantum dots provide excellent definition of vasculature, lymphoid organs, and lymph nodes draining both normal tissues and tumors. We detail...

  8. Quantum Color Image Encryption Algorithm Based on A Hyper-Chaotic System and Quantum Fourier Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ru-Chao; Lei, Tong; Zhao, Qing-Min; Gong, Li-Hua; Zhou, Zhi-Hong

    2016-12-01

    To improve the slow processing speed of the classical image encryption algorithms and enhance the security of the private color images, a new quantum color image encryption algorithm based on a hyper-chaotic system is proposed, in which the sequences generated by the Chen's hyper-chaotic system are scrambled and diffused with three components of the original color image. Sequentially, the quantum Fourier transform is exploited to fulfill the encryption. Numerical simulations show that the presented quantum color image encryption algorithm possesses large key space to resist illegal attacks, sensitive dependence on initial keys, uniform distribution of gray values for the encrypted image and weak correlation between two adjacent pixels in the cipher-image.

  9. A Novel Quantum Image Steganography Scheme Based on LSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Luo, Jia; Liu, XingAo; Zhu, Changming; Wei, Lai; Zhang, Xiafen

    2018-06-01

    Based on the NEQR representation of quantum images and least significant bit (LSB) scheme, a novel quantum image steganography scheme is proposed. The sizes of the cover image and the original information image are assumed to be 4 n × 4 n and n × n, respectively. Firstly, the bit-plane scrambling method is used to scramble the original information image. Then the scrambled information image is expanded to the same size of the cover image by using the key only known to the operator. The expanded image is scrambled to be a meaningless image with the Arnold scrambling. The embedding procedure and extracting procedure are carried out by K 1 and K 2 which are under control of the operator. For validation of the presented scheme, the peak-signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), the capacity, the security of the images and the circuit complexity are analyzed.

  10. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  11. Application of Quantum Dots in Biological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are a group of semiconducting nanomaterials with unique optical and electronic properties. They have distinct advantages over traditional fluorescent organic dyes in chemical and biological studies in terms of tunable emission spectra, signal brightness, photostability, and so forth. Currently, the major type of QDs is the heavy metal-containing II-IV, IV-VI, or III-V QDs. Silicon QDs and conjugated polymer dots have also been developed in order to lower the potential toxicity of the fluorescent probes for biological applications. Aqueous solubility is the common problem for all types of QDs when they are employed in the biological researches, such as in vitro and in vivo imaging. To circumvent this problem, ligand exchange and polymer coating are proven to be effective, besides synthesizing QDs in aqueous solutions directly. However, toxicity is another big concern especially for in vivo studies. Ligand protection and core/shell structure can partly solve this problem. With the rapid development of QDs research, new elements and new morphologies have been introduced to this area to fabricate more safe and efficient QDs for biological applications.

  12. Ghost Stories, Ghost Estates: Melancholia in Irish Recession Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Slavin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers representations of melancholia in post-Celtic Tiger Irish literature. By situating their post-recession fictions in “ghost estates,” or largely uninhabited housing developments, Donal Ryan and Tana French present neoliberally-inflected varieties of melancholia for their contemporary readers to contemplate. The settings of the ghost estates – and the accompanying supernatural elements to the texts – call to mind ghosts of Ireland’s past and legacies of recent economically unsound policies, spurring the reader to think about the imagined loss of futurity that accompanied the Irish economic crash. “Ghost stories for ghost estates,” then, represent an important contribution to the growing field of post-recession Irish literature.

  13. Ghost quintessence in fractal gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, using the time-like fractal theory of gravity, we mainly focus on the ghost dark energy model which was recently suggested to explain the present acceleration of the cosmic expansion. Next, we establish a connection between the quintessence scalar field and fractal ghost dark energy density.

  14. Ghost free dual vector theories in 2+1 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmazi, Denis

    2006-01-01

    We explore here the issue of duality versus spectrum equivalence in dual theories generated through the master action approach. Specifically we examine a generalized self-dual (GSD) model where a Maxwell term is added to the self-dual model. A gauge embedding procedure applied to the GSD model leads to a Maxwell-Chern-Simons (MCS) theory with higher derivatives. We show here that the latter contains a ghost mode contrary to the original GSD model. By figuring out the origin of the ghost we are able to suggest a new master action which interpolates between the local GSD model and a nonlocal MCS model. Those models share the same spectrum and are ghost free. Furthermore, there is a dual map between both theories at classical level which survives quantum correlation functions up to contact terms. The remarks made here may be relevant for other applications of the master action approach

  15. Magnetic ghosts and monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandewalle, N; Dorbolo, S

    2014-01-01

    While the physics of equilibrium systems composed of many particles is well known, the interplay between small-scale physics and global properties is still a mystery for athermal systems. Non-trivial patterns and metastable states are often reached in those systems. We explored the various arrangements adopted by magnetic beads along chains and rings. Here, we show that it is possible to create mechanically stable defects in dipole arrangements keeping the memory of dipole frustration. Such defects, nicknamed ‘ghost junctions’, seem to act as macroscopic magnetic monopoles, in a way reminiscent of spin ice systems. (paper)

  16. Ghost-Story Telling: Keeping It Appropriate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintraub, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for telling ghost stories at camp involve considering children's fears at different ages, telling age appropriate stories, determining appropriate times for telling ghost stories, and minimizing fear when a child becomes frightened by a ghost story. Includes tips on the selection, preparation, and presentation of ghost stories. (LP)

  17. Hydraulic activities by ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis induce oxic-anoxic oscillations in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    We applied porewater pressure sensing, time-lapse photography and planar optode imaging of oxygen to investigate hydraulic behaviors of the Thalassinidean ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and the associated dynamics of oxygen in and around their burrows. Ghost shrimp were h...

  18. Harry Potter and the Ghost Teacher: Resurrecting the Lost Art of Lecturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Kathryn N.

    2010-01-01

    A significant image of classroom lectures is the one presented in J. K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" series. At Harry's Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, the most torturous class is easily History of Magic, which is, incidentally, the only class in the school taught by a ghost. Being taught by a ghost could be quite exciting: not so in…

  19. Cosmology with a light ghost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Tokareva, Anna A., E-mail: mikhail.ivanov@cern.ch, E-mail: anna.tokareva@epfl.ch [Institute of Physics, LPPC, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-12-01

    We study the creation and evolution of cosmological perturbations in renormalizable quadratic gravity with a Weyl term. We adopt a prescription that implies the stability of the vacuum at the price of introducing a massive spin-two ghost state, leading to the loss of unitarity. The theory may still be predictive regardless the interpretation of non-unitary processes provided that their rate is negligible compared to the Universe expansion rate. This implies that the ghost is effectively stable. In such a setup, there are two scalar degrees of freedom excited during inflation. The first one is the usual curvature perturbation whose power spectrum appears to coincide with that of single-field inflation. The second one is a scalar component of the ghost encoded in the shift vector of the metric in the uniform inflaton gauge. The amplitudes of primordial tensor and vector perturbations are strongly suppressed. After inflation the ghost field starts to oscillate and its energy density shortly becomes dominant in the Universe. For all ghost masses allowed by laboratory constraints ghosts should have ''overclosed'' the Universe at temperatures higher than that of primordial nucleosynthesis. Thus, the model with the light Weyl ghost is ruled out.

  20. A Simple Encryption Algorithm for Quantum Color Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panchi; Zhao, Ya

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a simple encryption scheme for quantum color image is proposed. Firstly, a color image is transformed into a quantum superposition state by employing NEQR (novel enhanced quantum representation), where the R,G,B values of every pixel in a 24-bit RGB true color image are represented by 24 single-qubit basic states, and each value has 8 qubits. Then, these 24 qubits are respectively transformed from a basic state into a balanced superposition state by employed the controlled rotation gates. At this time, the gray-scale values of R, G, B of every pixel are in a balanced superposition of 224 multi-qubits basic states. After measuring, the whole image is an uniform white noise, which does not provide any information. Decryption is the reverse process of encryption. The experimental results on the classical computer show that the proposed encryption scheme has better security.

  1. A Quantum Network with Atoms and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    98, 111115. 5. Karmakar, S, Shih, Y. Two- color ghost imaging with enhanced angular resolving power. Physical Review A. 2010; 81, 033845. 6. Karmakar...information. We constructed the rubidium (⁸⁷Rb) atomic memory magneto optical trap (MOT) cell and laser controls, and developed protocols, hardware, and...software to control the secure teleportation of information between quantum memories at ARL and JQI. Notably, we performed successful in-laboratory

  2. Inflation with light Weyl ghost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokareva Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflationary perturbations are considered in a renormalizable but non-unitary theory of gravity with the additional Weyl term. We obtained that ghost degrees of freedom do not spoil the inflation and the scalar perturbation amplitude at the linear level even in a case of the ghost with mass smaller than Hubble parameter at inflation. The ghost impact to the observables is also estimated to be negligible for the range of masses allowed by the experiment. The non-linear level of the theory and its possible application are also discussed.

  3. Analysis of Generalized Ghost Dark Energy in LQC and Galileon Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Mahasweta; Debnath, Ujjal

    2016-01-01

    A so-called ghost dark energy was recently proposed to explain the present acceleration of the universe. The energy density of ghost dark energy, which originates from Veneziano ghost of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), in a time dependent background, can be written in the form, ρ_D = (αH + βH"2) where H is the Hubble parameter. We investigate the generalized ghost dark energy (GGDE) model in the setup of loop quantum Cosmology (LQC) and Galileon Cosmology. We study the cosmological implications of the models. We also obtain the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and differential equations governing the evolution of this dark energy model for LQC and Galileon Cosmology. (paper)

  4. Imaging GABAc Receptors with Ligand-Conjugated Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Tomlinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a methodology for labeling the GABAc receptor on the surface membrane of intact cells. This work builds upon our earlier work with serotonin-conjugated quantum dots and our studies with PEGylated quantum dots to reduce nonspecific binding. In the current approach, a PEGylated derivative of muscimol was synthesized and attached via an amide linkage to quantum dots coated in an amphiphilic polymer derivative of a modified polyacrylamide. These conjugates were used to image GABAC receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

  5. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D R; Lee, K; Park, H; Weissleder, R; Yacoby, A; Lukin, M D; Lee, H; Walsworth, R L; Connolly, C B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  6. Ghost Imaging of Space Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Erkmen, Baris I.; Yu, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Development of innovative aerospace technologies is critical for our nation to meet its goals to explore and under-stand the Earth, our solar system, and the universe. The spectacular success of many recent NASA missions hinges on the extensive technological innovations that NASA has been supporting for the past decades. To sustain this successful tradition it is very important to identify and stimulate the scientific research that may turn into a viable technology in the decades yet to come. Investment in innovative low-TRL research stimulates the growth of the scientific knowledge and enhances the technical capabilities in a way that answers the new questions and responds to new requirements.

  7. Witten's ghost vertex made simple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    First, we diagonalize the bc-ghost 3-string Neumann matrices using the technique described in Phys. Rev. D 68, 066003 (2003). Their eigenvalues are in complete agreement with the previous authors. Second, we diagonalize the N-string gluing vertices for the bosonized ghost system. Third, we verify the descent and associativity relations for the combined bosonic matter+ghost gluing vertices. We find that in order for these relations to be true, the vertices must be normalized by the factor Z N . Here Z N is the partition function of the bosonic matter+ghost CFT on the gluing surface, which is the unit disk with the Neumann boundary conditions and the midpoint conelike singularity specified by the angle excess π(N-2)

  8. Fuzzy Matching Based on Gray-scale Difference for Quantum Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, GaoFeng; Zhou, Ri-Gui; Liu, XingAo; Hu, WenWen; Luo, Jia

    2018-05-01

    Quantum image processing has recently emerged as an essential problem in practical tasks, e.g. real-time image matching. Previous studies have shown that the superposition and entanglement of quantum can greatly improve the efficiency of complex image processing. In this paper, a fuzzy quantum image matching scheme based on gray-scale difference is proposed to find out the target region in a reference image, which is very similar to the template image. Firstly, we employ the proposed enhanced quantum representation (NEQR) to store digital images. Then some certain quantum operations are used to evaluate the gray-scale difference between two quantum images by thresholding. If all of the obtained gray-scale differences are not greater than the threshold value, it indicates a successful fuzzy matching of quantum images. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that the proposed scheme performs fuzzy matching at a low cost and also enables exponentially significant speedup via quantum parallel computation.

  9. Effects of image processing on the detective quantum efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiography has gained popularity in many areas of clinical practice. This transition brings interest in advancing the methodologies for image quality characterization. However, as the methodologies for such characterizations have not been standardized, the results of these studies cannot be directly compared. The primary objective of this study was to standardize methodologies for image quality characterization. The secondary objective was to evaluate affected factors to Modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) according to image processing algorithm. Image performance parameters such as MTF, NPS, and DQE were evaluated using the international electro-technical commission (IEC 62220-1)-defined RQA5 radiographic techniques. Computed radiography (CR) images of hand posterior-anterior (PA) for measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR), slit image for measuring MTF, white image for measuring NPS were obtained and various Multi-Scale Image Contrast Amplification (MUSICA) parameters were applied to each of acquired images. In results, all of modified images were considerably influence on evaluating SNR, MTF, NPS, and DQE. Modified images by the post-processing had higher DQE than the MUSICA=0 image. This suggests that MUSICA values, as a post-processing, have an affect on the image when it is evaluating for image quality. In conclusion, the control parameters of image processing could be accounted for evaluating characterization of image quality in same way. The results of this study could be guided as a baseline to evaluate imaging systems and their imaging characteristics by measuring MTF, NPS, and DQE.

  10. Heparin conjugated quantum dots for in vitro imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Ciaran Manus; Mahfoud, Omar Kazem; Rakovich, Tatsiana; Gerard, Valerie Anne; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Gun'ko, Yurii; Volkov, Yuri

    2014-11-01

    In this work heparin-gelatine multi-layered cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDgel/hep) were synthesised using a novel 'one-pot' method. The QDs produced were characterised using various spectroscopic and physiochemical techniques. Suitable QDs were then selected and compared to thioglycolic acid stabilised quantum dots (QDTGA) and gelatine coated quantum dots (QDgel) for utilisation in in vitro imaging experiments on live and fixed permeabilised THP-1, A549 and Caco-2 cell lines. Exposure of live THP-1 cells to QDgel/hep resulted in localisation of the QDs to the nucleus of the cells. QDgel/hep show affinity for the nuclear compartment of fixed permeabilised THP-1 and A549 cells but remain confined to cytoplasm of fixed permeabilised Caco-2 cells. It is postulated that heparin binding to the CD11b receptor facilitates the internalisation of the QDs into the nucleus of THP-1 cells. In addition, the heparin layer may reduce the unfavourable thrombogenic nature of quantum dots observed in vivo. In this study, heparin conjugated quantum dots were found to have superior imaging properties compared to its native counterparts. The authors postulate that heparin binding to the CD11b receptor facilitates QD internalization to the nucleus, and the heparin layer may reduce the in vivo thrombogenic properties of quantum dots. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging Correlations in Heterodyne Spectra for Quantum Displacement Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontin, A.; Lang, J. E.; Chowdhury, A.; Vezio, P.; Marino, F.; Morana, B.; Serra, E.; Marin, F.; Monteiro, T. S.

    2018-01-01

    The extraordinary sensitivity of the output field of an optical cavity to small quantum-scale displacements has led to breakthroughs such as the first detection of gravitational waves and of the motions of quantum ground-state cooled mechanical oscillators. While heterodyne detection of the output optical field of an optomechanical system exhibits asymmetries which provide a key signature that the mechanical oscillator has attained the quantum regime, important quantum correlations are lost. In turn, homodyning can detect quantum squeezing in an optical quadrature but loses the important sideband asymmetries. Here we introduce and experimentally demonstrate a new technique, subjecting the autocorrelators of the output current to filter functions, which restores the lost heterodyne correlations (whether classical or quantum), drastically augmenting the useful information accessible. The filtering even adjusts for moderate errors in the locking phase of the local oscillator. Hence we demonstrate the single-shot measurement of hundreds of different field quadratures allowing the rapid imaging of detailed features from a simple heterodyne trace. We also obtain a spectrum of hybrid homodyne-heterodyne character, with motional sidebands of combined amplitudes comparable to homodyne. Although investigated here in a thermal regime, the method's robustness and generality represents a promising new approach to sensing of quantum-scale displacements.

  12. Quantum Computation-Based Image Representation, Processing Operations and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A flexible representation of quantum images (FRQI was proposed to facilitate the extension of classical (non-quantum-like image processing applications to the quantum computing domain. The representation encodes a quantum image in the form of a normalized state, which captures information about colors and their corresponding positions in the images. Since its conception, a handful of processing transformations have been formulated, among which are the geometric transformations on quantum images (GTQI and the CTQI that are focused on the color information of the images. In addition, extensions and applications of FRQI representation, such as multi-channel representation for quantum images (MCQI, quantum image data searching, watermarking strategies for quantum images, a framework to produce movies on quantum computers and a blueprint for quantum video encryption and decryption have also been suggested. These proposals extend classical-like image and video processing applications to the quantum computing domain and offer a significant speed-up with low computational resources in comparison to performing the same tasks on traditional computing devices. Each of the algorithms and the mathematical foundations for their execution were simulated using classical computing resources, and their results were analyzed alongside other classical computing equivalents. The work presented in this review is intended to serve as the epitome of advances made in FRQI quantum image processing over the past five years and to simulate further interest geared towards the realization of some secure and efficient image and video processing applications on quantum computers.

  13. Quantum computation and analysis of Wigner and Husimi functions: toward a quantum image treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraneo, M; Georgeot, B; Shepelyansky, D L

    2005-06-01

    We study the efficiency of quantum algorithms which aim at obtaining phase-space distribution functions of quantum systems. Wigner and Husimi functions are considered. Different quantum algorithms are envisioned to build these functions, and compared with the classical computation. Different procedures to extract more efficiently information from the final wave function of these algorithms are studied, including coarse-grained measurements, amplitude amplification, and measure of wavelet-transformed wave function. The algorithms are analyzed and numerically tested on a complex quantum system showing different behavior depending on parameters: namely, the kicked rotator. The results for the Wigner function show in particular that the use of the quantum wavelet transform gives a polynomial gain over classical computation. For the Husimi distribution, the gain is much larger than for the Wigner function and is larger with the help of amplitude amplification and wavelet transforms. We discuss the generalization of these results to the simulation of other quantum systems. We also apply the same set of techniques to the analysis of real images. The results show that the use of the quantum wavelet transform allows one to lower dramatically the number of measurements needed, but at the cost of a large loss of information.

  14. Plato's ghost the modernist transformation of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    Plato's Ghost is the first book to examine the development of mathematics from 1880 to 1920 as a modernist transformation similar to those in art, literature, and music. Jeremy Gray traces the growth of mathematical modernism from its roots in problem solving and theory to its interactions with physics, philosophy, theology, psychology, and ideas about real and artificial languages. He shows how mathematics was popularized, and explains how mathematical modernism not only gave expression to the work of mathematicians and the professional image they sought to create for themselves, but how modernism also introduced deeper and ultimately unanswerable questions

  15. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J.; Nguyen, Huy A.; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x0, y0) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x0, y0) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density |φi) (x0,y0)|nudge quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  16. Imaging electron wave functions inside open quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, F; Hackens, B; Pala, M G; Ouisse, T; Sellier, H; Wallart, X; Bollaert, S; Cappy, A; Chevrier, J; Bayot, V; Huant, S

    2007-09-28

    Combining scanning gate microscopy (SGM) experiments and simulations, we demonstrate low temperature imaging of the electron probability density |Psi|(2)(x,y) in embedded mesoscopic quantum rings. The tip-induced conductance modulations share the same temperature dependence as the Aharonov-Bohm effect, indicating that they originate from electron wave function interferences. Simulations of both |Psi|(2)(x,y) and SGM conductance maps reproduce the main experimental observations and link fringes in SGM images to |Psi|(2)(x,y).

  17. Lag and ghosting in a clinical flat-panel selenium digital mammography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomquist, Aili K.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mawdsley, Gordon E.; Hunter, David M.; Beideck, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    We present measurements of lag and ghosting in a FDA-approved digital mammography system that uses a dielectric/selenium based detector structure. Lag is the carryover of signal from a previous image, whereas ghosting is the reduction of sensitivity caused by previous exposure history of the detector. Data from six selenium units were acquired. For the type of selenium detector tested, and under typical clinical usage conditions, the lag was as high as 0.15% of source signal and the ghosting could be as high as 15%. The amount of lag and ghosting varied from unit to unit. Results were compared with data acquired on a phosphor-based full-field digital mammography system. Modifications in the technology of the selenium detectors appear to have resulted in a marked decrease in both lag and ghosting effects in more recent systems

  18. Effects of image processing on the detective quantum efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The evaluation of image quality is an important part of digital radiography. The modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are widely accepted measurements of the digital radiographic system performance. However, as the methodologies for such characterization have not been standardized, it is difficult to compare directly reported the MTF, NPS, and DQE results. In this study, we evaluated the effect of an image processing algorithm for estimating the MTF, NPS, and DQE. The image performance parameters were evaluated using the international electro-technical commission (IEC 62220-1)-defined RQA5 radiographic techniques. Computed radiography (CR) posterior-anterior (PA) images of a hand for measuring the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the slit images for measuring the MTF, and the white images for measuring the NPS were obtained, and various multi-Scale image contrast amplification (MUSICA) factors were applied to each of the acquired images. All of the modifications of the images obtained by using image processing had a considerable influence on the evaluated image quality. In conclusion, the control parameters of image processing can be accounted for evaluating characterization of image quality in same way. The results of this study should serve as a baseline for based on evaluating imaging systems and their imaging characteristics by MTF, NPS, and DQE measurements.

  19. Effects of image processing on the detective quantum efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na

    2010-01-01

    The evaluation of image quality is an important part of digital radiography. The modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) are widely accepted measurements of the digital radiographic system performance. However, as the methodologies for such characterization have not been standardized, it is difficult to compare directly reported the MTF, NPS, and DQE results. In this study, we evaluated the effect of an image processing algorithm for estimating the MTF, NPS, and DQE. The image performance parameters were evaluated using the international electro-technical commission (IEC 62220-1)-defined RQA5 radiographic techniques. Computed radiography (CR) posterior-anterior (PA) images of a hand for measuring the signal to noise ratio (SNR), the slit images for measuring the MTF, and the white images for measuring the NPS were obtained, and various multi-Scale image contrast amplification (MUSICA) factors were applied to each of the acquired images. All of the modifications of the images obtained by using image processing had a considerable influence on the evaluated image quality. In conclusion, the control parameters of image processing can be accounted for evaluating characterization of image quality in same way. The results of this study should serve as a baseline for based on evaluating imaging systems and their imaging characteristics by MTF, NPS, and DQE measurements.

  20. Quantum Enhanced Imaging by Entangled States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Zeilinger (GHZ) class and the W class. The GHZ-like entangled state 1,1,1 and the W-like state 2,1 were studied during the course of the QSP Program...D. M. Greenberger, M. Horne and A. Zeilinger , in Bell’s Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Concepts of the Universe, ed. M. Kafatos (Kluwer, Dordrecht 1989...Daniell, H. Weinfurter, and A. Zeilinger , Phys. Rev. Lett. 82,1345 (1999); Z. Zhao, T. Yang, Y.-A. Chen, A.-N. Zhang, M. Zukowski, and J.-W. Pan, Phys

  1. Geometrical theory of ghost and Higgs fields and SU(2/1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ne'eman, Y.; Thierry-Mieg, J.

    1979-10-01

    That a Principal Fiber Bundle provides a precise geometrical representation of Yang-Mills gauge theories has been known since 1963 and used since 1975. This work presents an entirely new domain of applications. The Feynman-DeWitt-Fadeev-Popov ghost-fields required in the renormalization procedure are identified with geometrical objects in the Principal Bundle. This procedure directly yields the BRS equations guaranteeing unitarity and Slavnov-Taylor invariance of the quantum effective Lagrangian. Except for one ghost field and its variation, this entire symmetry thus corresponds to classical notions, in that it is geometrical, and completely independent of the gauge-fixing procedure, which determines the quantized Lagrangian. These results may be used to fix the signs associated with the various ghost loops of quantum supergravity. The result is based upon the identification of a geometrical Z(2) x Z(2) double-gradation of the generalized fields in supergravity: [physical/ghost] fields and [integer/half integer] spins. Then the case of a supergroup as an internal symmetry gauge is considered. Ghosts geometrically associated to odd generators may be identified with the Goldstone-Nambu Higgs-Kibble scalar fields of conventional models with spontaneous symmetry breakdown. As an example, the chiral SU(3)/sub L/ x SU(3)/sub R/ flavor symmetry is realized by gauging the supergroup Q(3).Lastly, the main results concerning asthenodynamics (Weak-EM Unification) as given by the ghost-gauge SU(2/1) supergroup are recalled. 1 table

  2. Using Ghost Reflections Rather than Removing Them

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blacquiere, G.; Berkhout, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    In marine acquisition both a direct wavefield and a ghost wavefield are produced as well as recorded. Hence, the seismic data can be considered to be a natural blend of four wavefields related to the real sources, ghost sources, real detectors and ghost detectors respectively. We consider deghosting

  3. Confessions of Academic Ghost Authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Shahghasemi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Academic plagiarism exists in all academic spheres, but contextual factors determine the level, intensity, and forms of it. Over the last few years, the phenomenon of “Ghost Authorship” has become widespread in Iran, and concerns have been expressed regarding this issue, not only by academicians but also by officials. In this study, 143 students participated in a two-step interview study in which they spoke about their experiences on either seeing a ghost author doing the research of someone else in exchange of money or they themselves being a ghost author. In all, 29 students said that they had done it once or so. The in-depth interviews with these 29 students showed how the plagiarism industry works in Iran, who the customers are, how they find each other, and so on.

  4. Quantum Hash function and its application to privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Xu, Peng; Yang, Rui; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information and quantum computation have achieved a huge success during the last years. In this paper, we investigate the capability of quantum Hash function, which can be constructed by subtly modifying quantum walks, a famous quantum computation model. It is found that quantum Hash function can act as a hash function for the privacy amplification process of quantum key distribution systems with higher security. As a byproduct, quantum Hash function can also be used for pseudo-random number generation due to its inherent chaotic dynamics. Further we discuss the application of quantum Hash function to image encryption and propose a novel image encryption algorithm. Numerical simulations and performance comparisons show that quantum Hash function is eligible for privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption in terms of various hash tests and randomness tests. It extends the scope of application of quantum computation and quantum information.

  5. Quantum Hash function and its application to privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Xu, Peng; Yang, Rui; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Shi, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information and quantum computation have achieved a huge success during the last years. In this paper, we investigate the capability of quantum Hash function, which can be constructed by subtly modifying quantum walks, a famous quantum computation model. It is found that quantum Hash function can act as a hash function for the privacy amplification process of quantum key distribution systems with higher security. As a byproduct, quantum Hash function can also be used for pseudo-random number generation due to its inherent chaotic dynamics. Further we discuss the application of quantum Hash function to image encryption and propose a novel image encryption algorithm. Numerical simulations and performance comparisons show that quantum Hash function is eligible for privacy amplification in quantum key distribution, pseudo-random number generation and image encryption in terms of various hash tests and randomness tests. It extends the scope of application of quantum computation and quantum information. PMID:26823196

  6. Real-space imaging of fractional quantum Hall liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Junichiro; Muraki, Koji; Yusa, Go

    2013-01-01

    Electrons in semiconductors usually behave like a gas--as independent particles. However, when confined to two dimensions under a perpendicular magnetic field at low temperatures, they condense into an incompressible quantum liquid. This phenomenon, known as the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) effect, is a quantum-mechanical manifestation of the macroscopic behaviour of correlated electrons that arises when the Landau-level filling factor is a rational fraction. However, the diverse microscopic interactions responsible for its emergence have been hidden by its universality and macroscopic nature. Here, we report real-space imaging of FQH liquids, achieved with polarization-sensitive scanning optical microscopy using trions (charged excitons) as a local probe for electron spin polarization. When the FQH ground state is spin-polarized, the triplet/singlet intensity map exhibits a spatial pattern that mirrors the intrinsic disorder potential, which is interpreted as a mapping of compressible and incompressible electron liquids. In contrast, when FQH ground states with different spin polarization coexist, domain structures with spontaneous quasi-long-range order emerge, which can be reproduced remarkably well from the disorder patterns using a two-dimensional random-field Ising model. Our results constitute the first reported real-space observation of quantum liquids in a class of broken symmetry state known as the quantum Hall ferromagnet.

  7. An Improved Ghost-cell Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Inviscid Flow Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2015-05-01

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. In addition, a shock sensor is in- troduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against five test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward- facing step, (c) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder, (d) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, and (e) steady shock-induced combustion over a wedge. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Implementation of the improved ghost-cell method in reacting Euler flows further validates its general applicability for compressible flow simulations.

  8. Ghost condensate and generalized second law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2009-01-01

    Dubovsky and Sibiryakov recently proposed a scenario in which particles of different species propagate with different speeds due to their direct couplings to ghost condensate. It was argued that this extended version of ghost condensate allows a gedanken experiment leading to violation of the generalized second law. However, in the original ghost condensate scenario, difference in propagation speeds is suppressed by M 2 /M Pl 2 , where M is the order parameter of spontaneous Lorentz breaking and M Pl is the Planck scale. In this case the energy transfer necessary for the gedanken experiment is so slow that the timescale of decrease of entropy, if any, is always longer than the Jeans timescale of ghost condensate. Hence the generalized second law is not violated by the gedanken experiment in the original ghost condensate scenario. This conclusion trivially extends to gauged ghost condensation by taking into account accretion of gauged ghost condensate into a black hole.

  9. Unexorcized ghost in DGP brane world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izum, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takahiro; Koyama, Kazuya

    2007-01-01

    The brane world model proposed by Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati realizes self-acceleration of the universe. However, it is known that this cosmological solution contains a spin-2 ghost. We study the possibility of avoiding the appearance of the ghost by slightly modifying the model via the introduction of a second brane. First, we consider a simple model without stabilization of the brane separation. By changing the separation between the branes, we find that we can erase the spin-2 ghost. However, this can be done only at the expense of the appearance of a spin-0 ghost instead. We discuss why these two different types of ghosts are correlated. Then, we examine a model with stabilization of the brane separation. Even in this case, we find that the correlation between spin-0 and spin-2 ghosts remains. As a result we find that we cannot avoid the appearance of a ghost by introducing a second brane in the model

  10. Black holes in the ghost condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukohyama, Shinji

    2005-01-01

    We investigate how the ghost condensate reacts to black holes immersed in it. A ghost condensate defines a hypersurface-orthogonal congruence of timelike curves, each of which has the tangent vector u μ =-g μν ∂ ν φ. It is argued that the ghost condensate in this picture approximately corresponds to a congruence of geodesics. In other words, the ghost condensate accretes into a black hole just like a pressureless dust. Correspondingly, if the energy density of the ghost condensate at large distance is set to an extremely small value by cosmic expansion then the late-time accretion rate of the ghost condensate should be negligible. The accretion rate remains very small even if effects of higher derivative terms are taken into account, provided that the black hole is sufficiently large. It is also discussed how to reconcile the black-hole accretion with the possibility that the ghost condensate might behave like dark matter

  11. Analysis and improvement of the quantum image matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Yijie; Jiang, Nan; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Wenyin

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the quantum image matching algorithm proposed by Jiang et al. (Quantum Inf Process 15(9):3543-3572, 2016). Although the complexity of this algorithm is much better than the classical exhaustive algorithm, there may be an error in it: After matching the area between two images, only the pixel at the upper left corner of the matched area played part in following steps. That is to say, the paper only matched one pixel, instead of an area. If more than one pixels in the big image are the same as the one at the upper left corner of the small image, the algorithm will randomly measure one of them, which causes the error. In this paper, an improved version is presented which takes full advantage of the whole matched area to locate a small image in a big image. The theoretical analysis indicates that the network complexity is higher than the previous algorithm, but it is still far lower than the classical algorithm. Hence, this algorithm is still efficient.

  12. Quantum dots in imaging, drug delivery and sensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matea, Cristian T; Mocan, Teodora; Tabaran, Flaviu; Pop, Teodora; Mosteanu, Ofelia; Puia, Cosmin; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Lucian

    2017-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), also known as nanoscale semiconductor crystals, are nanoparticles with unique optical and electronic properties such as bright and intensive fluorescence. Since most conventional organic label dyes do not offer the near-infrared (>650 nm) emission possibility, QDs, with their tunable optical properties, have gained a lot of interest. They possess characteristics such as good chemical and photo-stability, high quantum yield and size-tunable light emission. Different types of QDs can be excited with the same light wavelength, and their narrow emission bands can be detected simultaneously for multiple assays. There is an increasing interest in the development of nano-theranostics platforms for simultaneous sensing, imaging and therapy. QDs have great potential for such applications, with notable results already published in the fields of sensors, drug delivery and biomedical imaging. This review summarizes the latest developments available in literature regarding the use of QDs for medical applications.

  13. Ghost quintessence in fractal gravity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, using the time-like fractal theory of gravity, we mainly focus on the ghost ... Here a(t) is the cosmic scale factor and it measures the expansion of the Universe. ..... effectively appear as self-conserved dark energy, with a non-trivial ...

  14. A novel quantum LSB-based steganography method using the Gray code for colored quantum images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Shahrokh; Farzadnia, Ehsan

    2017-10-01

    As one of the prevalent data-hiding techniques, steganography is defined as the act of concealing secret information in a cover multimedia encompassing text, image, video and audio, imperceptibly, in order to perform interaction between the sender and the receiver in which nobody except the receiver can figure out the secret data. In this approach a quantum LSB-based steganography method utilizing the Gray code for quantum RGB images is investigated. This method uses the Gray code to accommodate two secret qubits in 3 LSBs of each pixel simultaneously according to reference tables. Experimental consequences which are analyzed in MATLAB environment, exhibit that the present schema shows good performance and also it is more secure and applicable than the previous one currently found in the literature.

  15. The ghost of Afrikaner identity in Ancestral voices, Leap year and The long silence of Mario Salviati (Etienne van Heerden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariëtte van Graan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ghost characters are a characteristic of the novels of Etienne van Heerden, but little research has been done concerning the nature and function of these ghost characters. In this article I discuss Van Heerden’s use of ghost characters diachronically with reference to the novels Ancestral voices (1986, Leap year (1993 and The long silence of Mario Salviati (2000. In order to clarify the nature of these ghosts, I use the so-called science of the paranormal as a framework. The ghosts in the three novels will be classified accordingly, and then discussed within the context of the novels in which they appear. In this way, I shall show how the ghost characters in these novels can be read as a constantly changing embodiment of Afrikaner identity (a central theme in Van Heerden’s oeuvre. Van Heerden’s Afrikaner changes with the times: in Ancestral voices the ghost characters form a collective that represents a fragmented image of the stereotypical, archaic male Afrikaner identity; in Leap year a liminal character is written in a liminal time to embody a liminal Afrikaner identity; and in The long silence of Mario Salviati Van Heerden moves away from the exclusive Afrikaner identity to a broader South African identity by using ghost characters from very different backgrounds and origins. In conclusion I shall compare these identities and the historical contexts of these novels in order to show the function of Van Heerden’s ghost characters as constant rewritings of South African identities.

  16. Characterization of encapsulated quantum dots via electron channeling contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitz, Julia I.; McComb, David W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Carnevale, Santino D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); De Graef, Marc [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Grassman, Tyler J., E-mail: grassman.5@osu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-08-08

    A method for characterization of encapsulated epitaxial quantum dots (QD) in plan-view geometry using electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) is presented. The efficacy of the method, which requires minimal sample preparation, is demonstrated with proof-of-concept data from encapsulated (sub-surface) epitaxial InAs QDs within a GaAs matrix. Imaging of the QDs under multiple diffraction conditions is presented, establishing that ECCI can provide effectively identical visualization capabilities as conventional two-beam transmission electron microscopy. This method facilitates rapid, non-destructive characterization of sub-surface QDs giving immediate access to valuable nanostructural information.

  17. Ghost Remains After Black Hole Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found a cosmic "ghost" lurking around a distant supermassive black hole. This is the first detection of such a high-energy apparition, and scientists think it is evidence of a huge eruption produced by the black hole. This discovery presents astronomers with a valuable opportunity to observe phenomena that occurred when the Universe was very young. The X-ray ghost, so-called because a diffuse X-ray source has remained after other radiation from the outburst has died away, is in the Chandra Deep Field-North, one of the deepest X-ray images ever taken. The source, a.k.a. HDF 130, is over 10 billion light years away and existed at a time 3 billion years after the Big Bang, when galaxies and black holes were forming at a high rate. "We'd seen this fuzzy object a few years ago, but didn't realize until now that we were seeing a ghost", said Andy Fabian of the Cambridge University in the United Kingdom. "It's not out there to haunt us, rather it's telling us something - in this case what was happening in this galaxy billions of year ago." Fabian and colleagues think the X-ray glow from HDF 130 is evidence for a powerful outburst from its central black hole in the form of jets of energetic particles traveling at almost the speed of light. When the eruption was ongoing, it produced prodigious amounts of radio and X-radiation, but after several million years, the radio signal faded from view as the electrons radiated away their energy. HDF 130 Chandra X-ray Image of HDF 130 However, less energetic electrons can still produce X-rays by interacting with the pervasive sea of photons remaining from the Big Bang - the cosmic background radiation. Collisions between these electrons and the background photons can impart enough energy to the photons to boost them into the X-ray energy band. This process produces an extended X-ray source that lasts for another 30 million years or so. "This ghost tells us about the black hole's eruption long after

  18. Testing the ghost with the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Zubicaray, G.

    2002-01-01

    Since its introduction during the 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to investigate brain activity occurring during a bewildering variety of sensory, motor and cognitive tasks. That is, a machine is being used to test 'the ghost in the machine' - the human mind. The use of imaging techniques to investigate these issues has even led to the emergence of a new scientific field called cognitive neuroscience. Currently, there are only a few groups in Australia actively publishing fMRI studies in the international literature, and the majority of these laboratories are clustered on the east coast. My own research with fMRI has focused on areas such as language and memory, with a special interest in how we solve competitive processes in our thinking

  19. Dual-emissive quantum dots for multispectral intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Patrick T K; Buckle, Tessa; Aguirre de Miguel, Arantxa; Meskers, Stefan C J; Janssen, René A J; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2010-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging is rapidly increasing its popularity in image guided surgery applications. To help develop its full surgical potential it remains a challenge to generate dual-emissive imaging agents that allow for combined visible assessment and sensitive camera based imaging. To this end, we now describe multispectral InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) that exhibit a bright visible green/yellow exciton emission combined with a long-lived far red defect emission. The intensity of the latter emission was enhanced by X-ray irradiation and allows for: 1) inverted QD density dependent defect emission intensity, showing improved efficacies at lower QD densities, and 2) detection without direct illumination and interference from autofluorescence. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Research on active imaging information transmission technology of satellite borne quantum remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Siwen; Zhen, Ming; Yang, Song; Lin, Xuling; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2017-08-01

    According to the development and application needs of Remote Sensing Science and technology, Prof. Siwen Bi proposed quantum remote sensing. Firstly, the paper gives a brief introduction of the background of quantum remote sensing, the research status and related researches at home and abroad on the theory, information mechanism and imaging experiments of quantum remote sensing and the production of principle prototype.Then, the quantization of pure remote sensing radiation field, the state function and squeezing effect of quantum remote sensing radiation field are emphasized. It also describes the squeezing optical operator of quantum light field in active imaging information transmission experiment and imaging experiments, achieving 2-3 times higher resolution than that of coherent light detection imaging and completing the production of quantum remote sensing imaging prototype. The application of quantum remote sensing technology can significantly improve both the signal-to-noise ratio of information transmission imaging and the spatial resolution of quantum remote sensing .On the above basis, Prof.Bi proposed the technical solution of active imaging information transmission technology of satellite borne quantum remote sensing, launched researches on its system composition and operation principle and on quantum noiseless amplifying devices, providing solutions and technical basis for implementing active imaging information technology of satellite borne Quantum Remote Sensing.

  1. Quantum image pseudocolor coding based on the density-stratified method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Wu, Wenya; Wang, Luo; Zhao, Na

    2015-05-01

    Pseudocolor processing is a branch of image enhancement. It dyes grayscale images to color images to make the images more beautiful or to highlight some parts on the images. This paper proposes a quantum image pseudocolor coding scheme based on the density-stratified method which defines a colormap and changes the density value from gray to color parallel according to the colormap. Firstly, two data structures: quantum image GQIR and quantum colormap QCR are reviewed or proposed. Then, the quantum density-stratified algorithm is presented. Based on them, the quantum realization in the form of circuits is given. The main advantages of the quantum version for pseudocolor processing over the classical approach are that it needs less memory and can speed up the computation. Two kinds of examples help us to describe the scheme further. Finally, the future work are analyzed.

  2. Ghost reflections of Gaussian beams in anamorphic optical systems with an application to Michelson interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Maksoud, Rania H

    2016-02-20

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to model and analyze the effect of undesired (ghost) reflections of Gaussian beams that are produced by anamorphic optical systems. The superposition of these beams with the nominal beam modulates the nominal power distribution at the recording plane. This modulation may cause contrast reduction, veiling parts of the nominal image, and/or the formation of spurious interference fringes. The developed methodology is based on synthesizing the beam optical paths into nominal and ghost optical beam paths. Similar to the nominal beam, we present the concept that each ghost beam is characterized by a beam size, wavefront radius of curvature, and Gouy phase in the paraxial regime. The nominal and ghost beams are sequentially traced through the system and formulas for estimating the electric field magnitude and phase of each ghost beam at the recording plane are presented. The effective electric field is the addition of the individual nominal and ghost electric fields. Formulas for estimating Gouy phase, the shape of the interference fringes, and the central interference order are introduced. As an application, the theory of the formation of the interference fringes by Michelson interferometer is presented. This theory takes into consideration the ghost reflections that are formed by the beam splitter. To illustrate the theory and to show its wide applicability, simulation examples that include a Mangin mirror, a Michelson interferometer, and a black box optical system are provided.

  3. Real-time single-molecule imaging of quantum interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juffmann, Thomas; Milic, Adriana; Müllneritsch, Michael; Asenbaum, Peter; Tsukernik, Alexander; Tüxen, Jens; Mayor, Marcel; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Arndt, Markus

    2012-03-25

    The observation of interference patterns in double-slit experiments with massive particles is generally regarded as the ultimate demonstration of the quantum nature of these objects. Such matter-wave interference has been observed for electrons, neutrons, atoms and molecules and, in contrast to classical physics, quantum interference can be observed when single particles arrive at the detector one by one. The build-up of such patterns in experiments with electrons has been described as the "most beautiful experiment in physics". Here, we show how a combination of nanofabrication and nano-imaging allows us to record the full two-dimensional build-up of quantum interference patterns in real time for phthalocyanine molecules and for derivatives of phthalocyanine molecules, which have masses of 514 AMU and 1,298 AMU respectively. A laser-controlled micro-evaporation source was used to produce a beam of molecules with the required intensity and coherence, and the gratings were machined in 10-nm-thick silicon nitride membranes to reduce the effect of van der Waals forces. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy detected the position of each molecule with an accuracy of 10 nm and revealed the build-up of a deterministic ensemble interference pattern from single molecules that arrived stochastically at the detector. In addition to providing this particularly clear demonstration of wave-particle duality, our approach could also be used to study larger molecules and explore the boundary between quantum and classical physics.

  4. An Improved Filtering Method for Quantum Color Image in Frequency Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panchi; Xiao, Hong

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the use of quantum Fourier transform (QFT) in the field of image processing. We consider QFT-based color image filtering operations and their applications in image smoothing, sharpening, and selective filtering using quantum frequency domain filters. The underlying principle used for constructing the proposed quantum filters is to use the principle of the quantum Oracle to implement the filter function. Compared with the existing methods, our method is not only suitable for color images, but also can flexibly design the notch filters. We provide the quantum circuit that implements the filtering task and present the results of several simulation experiments on color images. The major advantages of the quantum frequency filtering lies in the exploitation of the efficient implementation of the quantum Fourier transform.

  5. Cinematography in Motherhood: a Hong Kong film adaptation of Ghosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-kan Tam

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This is a study of a Hong Kong Chinese film adaptation of Ghosts made in 1960. It deals with processes of cross-cultural and cross-media adaptation, and probes issues of how stage techniques are turned into cinematographic devices. Ibsen’s plays, except Ghosts, have been adapted numerous times for the Chinese stage and screen in Hong Kong and China. Unlike in China, the reception of Ibsen in Hong Kong is not meant for political purposes. In most Hong Kong adaptations, Ibsen is valued for the purpose of theatrical experimentation. Among the stage adaptations, A Doll’s House and The Master Builder are the most popular. However, there was a film adaptation of Ghosts in 1960, which has never been discussed in Ibsen scholarship. In this adaptation, Director Tso Kea borrowed the plot from Ghosts and made a perfect Chinese melodrama film highlighting the Chinese emotions and relations in a wealthy family that undergoes a crisis. In traditional Chinese drama, there is the lack of psychological rendering in characterization and characters act according to moral considerations. In Tso Kea’s film, the portrayal of the mother provides a new sense of characterization by combining Mrs Alving with the traditional Chinese mother figure. The borrowing from Ibsen makes it possible for the Chinese film to create a character with emotional and psychological complexities. Images from the film are selected as illustration in the article.

  6. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; Welton, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%

  7. Ghost Signals In Allison Emittance Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, Martin P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R. F.

    2005-01-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%

  8. Ghost properties of generalized theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.B.; Moffat, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    We investigate theories of gravitation, in which spacetime is non-Riemannian and the metric g/sub munu/ is nonsymmetric, for ghosts and tachyons, using a spin-projection operator formalism. Ghosts are removed not by gauge invariance but by a Lagrange multiplier W/sub μ/, which occurs due to the breaking of projective invariance in the theory. Unified theories based on a Lagrangian containing a term lambdag/sup munu/g/sub / are proved to contain ghosts or tachyons

  9. Peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant S Kamat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumors (DGCT are uncommon lesions mainly with rare peripheral types. This report presents a case of peripheral DGCT on the left side of the mandibular alveolar ridge of a heavy smoker, a 68-year-old man, with main presenting feature as a mild pain. Submandibular lymphadenopathy and radiological "saucerization" were evident. Differential diagnosis included fibroma, neurofibroma, peripheral ameloblastoma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. Histologically, ameloblastoma-like epithelial elements were seen in association with grouped ghost cells. Proliferating polyhedral cells and stellate reticulum-like cells with various densities were spread over a wide range of the field. The lesion was curetted and after 2 years of follow up, it did not recur.

  10. UV-extending Ghost Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Mikhail M

    2014-01-01

    We present a setup that provides a partial UV-completion of the ghost inflation model up to a scale which can be almost as high as the Planck mass. This is achieved by coupling the inflaton to the Lorentz-violating sector described by the Einstein-aether theory or its khronometric version. Compared to previous works on ghost inflation our setup allows to go beyond the study of small perturbations and include the background dynamics in a unified framework. In the specific regime when the expansion of the Universe is dominated by the kinetic energy of the inflaton we find that the model predicts rather high tensor-to-scalar ratio r ~ 0.02 $\\div$ 0.2 and non-Gaussianity of equilateral type with f_NL in the range from -50 to -5.

  11. Exorcising the ghost of the Sputnik crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolberg, Espen Skarstein; Holt, Heidi Marie; Klevan, Ingvild

    2017-10-01

    Drug calculation is not immune to the undesirable impact of math anxiety and negative attitudes on test outcomes in nursing studies, and several studies indicate that math anxiety is present in the student population at such a degree that it is likely to interfere with these students' mathematical ability. Examining the educational system through the lens of history and adding a dash of cultural theory, a contributing cause to the math anxiety may be found in the Sputnik Crisis of the late 1950s, the ghostly remnants of which are still present in the stereotypes of mathematics promoted by mass media. In an effort to reshape the culturally conditioned attitudes which may be responsible for math anxiety, we suggest using elements from popular culture to diversify the perception and image of mathematics in drug calculation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. AXAF-I ghost ray study: On orbit case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaetz, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of baffles for control of singly reflected (and nonreflected) ghost rays is considered. The theory of baffle design for Wolter Type I grazing incidence optics is reviewed, and a set of sample baffle parameters is obtained subject to the assumptions of nominal mirror figures and perfect manufacture and alignment of baffles. It is found that baffles forward of the optics (in the thermal precollimator) and between the mirror elements (at the CAP) are sufficient to allow the simultaneous ghost image and vignetting requirements to be satisfied for HRMA shells P1H1, P3H3, and P4H4. However, these baffles are not sufficient for the innermost shell P6H6; at best the requirements are slightly violated and there is no margin for tolerances. The addition of a baffle interior to the P6 space at an axial station about one third of the way forward from the aft end of the paraboloid will allow the ghost ray and vignetting requirements to be met. The minimum ghost ray angles and the vignetting angles are sensitive functions of the baffle positions and radii; tolerances of considerably better than 1 mm will be required. The sensitivities are coupled and correlated; further investigations should be undertaken in order to obtain baffle parameters which, combined with likely achievable tolerances, will minimize the risk of the vignetting/ghost ray requirements not being met. The lightweight carbon-epoxy composite used for thermal baffles has insufficient X-ray opacity to be a suitable material for construction of the controlling X-ray baffles; further study is needed to determine an appropriate material and to investigate its thermal and mechanical implications.

  13. Exorcising ghosts in induced gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narain, Gaurav [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC), Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-10-15

    Unitarity of the scale-invariant coupled theory of higher-derivative gravity and matter is investigated. A scalar field coupled with a Dirac fermion is taken as the matter sector. Following the idea of induced gravity the Einstein-Hilbert term is generated via dynamical symmetry breaking of scale invariance. The renormalisation group flows are computed and one-loop RG improved effective potential of scalar is calculated. The scalar field develops a new minimum via the Coleman-Weinberg procedure inducing the Newton constant and masses in the matter sector. The spin-2 problematic ghost and the spin-0 mode of the metric fluctuation get a mass in the broken phase of the theory. The energy dependence of the vacuum expectation value in the RG improved scenario implies a running for the induced parameters. This sets up platform to ask whether it is possible to evade the spin-2 ghost by keeping its mass always above the running energy scale? In broken phase this question is satisfactorily answered for a large domain of coupling parameter space where the ghost is evaded. The spin-0 mode can be made physically realisable or not depending upon the choice of the initial parameters. The induced Newton constant is seen to vanish in the ultraviolet case. By properly choosing parameters it is possible to make the matter fields physically unrealisable. (orig.)

  14. Pico-femtosecond image-tube photography in quantum electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelev, M Ya

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of experimental achievement of the time resolution of image-converter tubes (ICTs) corresponding to the theoretical limit of 10 fs is considered as applied to quantum electronics problems. A new generation of ICTs with a temporal resolution of 200 - 500 fs has been developed for recording femtosecond laser radiation. The entirely new devices based on time-analysing ICTs such as femtosecond photoelectronic diffractometers, have been created for studying the dynamics of phase transitions in substances using diffrac-tion of electrons with energies ranging from 20 to 40 keV. (femtosecond technologies)

  15. An improved ghost-cell immersed boundary method for compressible flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2016-05-20

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary described using a level-set method to farther image points, incorporating a higher-order extra/interpolation scheme for the ghost cell values. A sensor is introduced to deal with image points near the discontinuities in the flow field. Adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) is used to improve the representation of the geometry efficiently in the Cartesian grid system. The improved ghost-cell method is validated against four test cases: (a) double Mach reflections on a ramp, (b) smooth Prandtl-Meyer expansion flows, (c) supersonic flows in a wind tunnel with a forward-facing step, and (d) supersonic flows over a circular cylinder. It is demonstrated that the improved ghost-cell method can reach the accuracy of second order in L1 norm and higher than first order in L∞ norm. Direct comparisons against the cut-cell method demonstrate that the improved ghost-cell method is almost equally accurate with better efficiency for boundary representation in high-fidelity compressible flow simulations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. An algebraic approach to laying a ghost to rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucci, M C; Leach, P G L

    2010-01-01

    In the recent literature there has been a resurgence of interest in the fourth-order field-theoretic model of Pais-Uhlenbeck (1950 Phys. Rev. 79 145-65) which has not had a good reception over the past half a century due to the existence of ghosts in the properties of the quantum mechanical solution. Bender and Mannheim (2008 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41 304018) were successful in persuading the corresponding quantum operator to 'give up the ghost'. Their success had the advantage of making the model of Pais-Uhlenbeck acceptable to the physics community and in the process added further credit to the cause of advancement of the use of PT symmetry. We present a case for the acceptance of the Pais-Uhlenbeck model in the context of Dirac's theory by providing an Hamiltonian that is not quantum mechanically haunted. The essential point is the manner in which a fourth-order equation is rendered into a system of second-order equations. We show by means of the method of reduction of order (Nucci M C 1996 J. Math. Phys. 37 1772-5) that it is possible to construct a Hamiltonian that gives rise to a satisfactory quantal description without having to abandon Dirac.

  17. Quantum correlated imaging is a promising new technique in medical imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Zhang; Zhaohua Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-cerebral vascular diseases are common and frequently occurring serious diseases that threaten humans. In recent years, Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) has played a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardio-cerebral vascular diseases. However, DSA is not able to visualize intravascular structures in real time, and it is especially difficult to evaluate each layer of the vascular wall and the composition of atherosclerotic plaques with DSA. Quantum correlated imaging is a new technique that can be used to perform real-time online imaging of intravascular flow, vascular wall structure, and atherosclerotic plaque composition. Quantum correlated imaging is a promising new technique that will soon be used in the diagnosis and treatment of cardio-cerebral vascular diseases.

  18. Bit-level quantum color image encryption scheme with quantum cross-exchange operation and hyper-chaotic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nanrun; Chen, Weiwei; Yan, Xinyu; Wang, Yunqian

    2018-06-01

    In order to obtain higher encryption efficiency, a bit-level quantum color image encryption scheme by exploiting quantum cross-exchange operation and a 5D hyper-chaotic system is designed. Additionally, to enhance the scrambling effect, the quantum channel swapping operation is employed to swap the gray values of corresponding pixels. The proposed color image encryption algorithm has larger key space and higher security since the 5D hyper-chaotic system has more complex dynamic behavior, better randomness and unpredictability than those based on low-dimensional hyper-chaotic systems. Simulations and theoretical analyses demonstrate that the presented bit-level quantum color image encryption scheme outperforms its classical counterparts in efficiency and security.

  19. El silencio del monstruo: imagénes espectrales en el cine de terror americano de comienzos del sonoro / Silence of the Monster. Ghostly Images in American Horror Film at the Beginning of Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Cueto

    2016-09-01

    extra-diegetic music or sound effects generated the appearance of certain «holes of silence» in the film narrative. In subsequent years, these lapses of silence were hidden with music or sound effects, which indicates that they had to be corrected for the standards of classic American film. The following essay tries to analyze how the silence transforms these icons of monstrosity into the sort of «ghostly images» or «uncanny bodies» which Hollywood films preferred to avoid. On the other hand, the importance of extra-diegetic music in Hollywood film also will be analyzed for the specific narrative functions it carried out: a greater involvement of the viewer, the incorporation of the film into the codes of the horror genre and an effect of «tridimensionality» applied to two dimensional images.Keywords: film music, horror film, sound in film, transition from silent to sound.

  20. Infrared behavior of gluons and ghosts in ghost-antighost symmetric gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkofer, R.; Fischer, C.S.; Reinhardt, H.; Smekal, L. von

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of a ghost-antighost condensate, the coupled Dyson-Schwinger equations for the gluon and ghost propagators in Yang-Mills theories are derived in general covariant gauges, including ghost-antighost symmetric gauges. The infrared behavior of these two-point functions is studied in a bare-vertex truncation scheme which has proven to be successful in the Landau gauge. In all linear covariant gauges the same infrared behavior as in the Landau gauge is found: The gluon propagator is infrared-suppressed whereas the ghost propagator is infrared-enhanced. This infrared singular behavior provides an indication against a ghost-antighost condensate. In the ghost-antighost symmetric gauges we find that the infrared behavior of the gluon and ghost propagators cannot be determined when replacing all dressed vertices by bare ones. The question of a BRS invariant dimension-2 condensate remains to be further studied

  1. Ghost Children: Invisible Middle Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteson, Shirley M.

    2014-01-01

    For this study, 119 middle level teacher candidates identified, observed, and documented their interactions with middle school "ghost children" as part of their field placement activities. About two thirds of the 124 ghost children identified for this study were male. The teacher candidates documented additional characteristics of ghost…

  2. Some issues in the ghost condensation scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, A.

    2004-01-01

    In the recently proposed 'ghost condensation' scenario a model of consistent infrared modification of gravity was suggested. We first review the basic ideas of this scenario. We discuss various phenomenological aspects of the ghost condensation, such as stability of the condensate, bounds on the UV cut-off scale of the corresponding effective field theory and other issues. (author)

  3. Are ghosts necessary in planar gauges?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummer, W.

    1988-01-01

    The introduction of Faddeev-Popov ghosts in axial gauges and especially in the ones of the planar type is not a technical necessity for the general proof of renormalization and gauge independence. It is shown that all necessary identities for Green's functions and for one-particle-irreducible vertices arise in a completely ghost-free formulation as well

  4. Variational method for lattice spectroscopy with ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, Tommy; Hagen, Christian; Gattringer, Christof; Glozman, Leonid Ya.; Lang, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the variational method used in lattice spectroscopy calculations. In particular we address the role of ghost contributions which appear in quenched or partially quenched simulations and have a nonstandard euclidean time dependence. We show that the ghosts can be separated from the physical states. Our result is illustrated with numerical data for the scalar meson

  5. Accretion of Ghost Condensate by Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, A

    2004-06-02

    The intent of this letter is to point out that the accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes could be extremely efficient. We analyze steady-state spherically symmetric flows of the ghost fluid in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole and calculate the accretion rate. Unlike minimally coupled scalar field or quintessence, the accretion rate is set not by the cosmological energy density of the field, but by the energy scale of the ghost condensate theory. If hydrodynamical flow is established, it could be as high as tenth of a solar mass per second for 10MeV-scale ghost condensate accreting onto a stellar-sized black hole, which puts serious constraints on the parameters of the ghost condensate model.

  6. Quantization of gauge theories with open algebra in the representation with the third ghost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batalin, I.A.; Kallosh, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    We suggest a modified representation of the general BRS construction, which gives in a closed form the quantization of gauge theories with open algebra. Instead of gauging the Lagrange multiplier in this representation, we have the third ghost πsup(α) which appears in the quantization procedure on equal footing with the Faddeev-Popov ghosts anti Csup(α), Csup(α). This new representation is especially convenient in the non-singular gauges of the form 1/2#betta#sub(α#betta#chi)sup(#betta#)sub(chi)sup(α), where both sub(chi)sup(α) and #betta#sub(α#betta#) may arbitrarily depend on quantum fields. In the closed algebra case, we recover the result of Nielsen, whereas for the theories with open algebra we find new ghost couplings of the form anti Csup(n)Csup(n)πsup(m), n = 1, ...; m = 0, 1, ..., n. (orig.)

  7. Compact quantum dots for single-molecule imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M; Nie, Shuming

    2012-10-09

    Single-molecule imaging is an important tool for understanding the mechanisms of biomolecular function and for visualizing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of molecular behaviors that underlie cellular biology (1-4). To image an individual molecule of interest, it is typically conjugated to a fluorescent tag (dye, protein, bead, or quantum dot) and observed with epifluorescence or total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. While dyes and fluorescent proteins have been the mainstay of fluorescence imaging for decades, their fluorescence is unstable under high photon fluxes necessary to observe individual molecules, yielding only a few seconds of observation before complete loss of signal. Latex beads and dye-labeled beads provide improved signal stability but at the expense of drastically larger hydrodynamic size, which can deleteriously alter the diffusion and behavior of the molecule under study. Quantum dots (QDs) offer a balance between these two problematic regimes. These nanoparticles are composed of semiconductor materials and can be engineered with a hydrodynamically compact size with exceptional resistance to photodegradation (5). Thus in recent years QDs have been instrumental in enabling long-term observation of complex macromolecular behavior on the single molecule level. However these particles have still been found to exhibit impaired diffusion in crowded molecular environments such as the cellular cytoplasm and the neuronal synaptic cleft, where their sizes are still too large (4,6,7). Recently we have engineered the cores and surface coatings of QDs for minimized hydrodynamic size, while balancing offsets to colloidal stability, photostability, brightness, and nonspecific binding that have hindered the utility of compact QDs in the past (8,9). The goal of this article is to demonstrate the synthesis, modification, and characterization of these optimized nanocrystals, composed of an alloyed HgxCd1-xSe core coated with an

  8. Aptamer-conjugated dendrimer-modified quantum dots for glioblastoma cells imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiming; Huang Peng; He Rong; Bao Chenchen; Cui Daxiang; Zhang Xiaomin; Ren Qiushi

    2009-01-01

    Targeted quantum dots have shown potential as a platform for development of cancer imaging. Aptamers have recently been demonstrated as ideal candidates for molecular targeting applications. In present work, polyamidoamine dendrimers were used to modify surface of quantum dots and improve their solubility in water solution. Then, dendrimer-modified quantum dots were conjugated with DNA aptamer, GBI-10, can recognize the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C on the surface of human glioblastoma cells. The dendrimer-modified quantum dots exhibit water-soluble, high quantum yield, and good biocompatibility. Aptamer-conjugated quantum dots can specifically target U251 human glioblastoma cells. High-performance aptamer-conjugated dendrimers modified quantum dot-based nanoprobes have great potential in application such as cancer imaging.

  9. Selection of Quantum Dot Wavelengths for Biomedical Assays and Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Taik Lim

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots [QDs] are hypothesized to be excellent contrast agents for biomedical assays and imaging. A unique property of QDs is that their absorbance increases with increasing separation between excitation and emission wavelengths. Much of the enthusiasm for using QDs in vivo stems from this property, since photon yield should be proportional to the integral of the broadband absorption. In this study, we demonstrate that tissue scatter and absorbance can sometimes offset increasing QD absorption at bluer wavelengths, and counteract this potential advantage. By using a previously validated mathematical model, we explored the effects of tissue absorbance, tissue scatter, wavelength dependence of the scatter, water-to- hemoglobin ratio, and tissue thickness on QD performance. We conclude that when embedded in biological fluids and tissues, QD excitation wavelengths will often be quite constrained, and that excitation and emission wavelengths should be selected carefully based on the particular application. Based on our results, we produced near-infrared QDs optimized for imaging surface vasculature with white light excitation and a silicon CCD camera, and used them to image the coronary vasculature in vivo. Taken together, our data should prove useful in designing fluorescent QD contrast agents optimized for specific biomedical applications.

  10. Imaging pancreatic cancer using bioconjugated InP quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ken-Tye; Ding, Hong; Roy, Indrajit; Law, Wing-Cheung; Bergey, Earl J; Maitra, Anirban; Prasad, Paras N

    2009-03-24

    In this paper, we report the successful use of non-cadmium-based quantum dots (QDs) as highly efficient and nontoxic optical probes for imaging live pancreatic cancer cells. Indium phosphide (core)-zinc sulfide (shell), or InP/ZnS, QDs with high quality and bright luminescence were prepared by a hot colloidal synthesis method in nonaqueous media. The surfaces of these QDs were then functionalized with mercaptosuccinic acid to make them highly dispersible in aqueous media. Further bioconjugation with pancreatic cancer specific monoclonal antibodies, such as anticlaudin 4 and antiprostate stem cell antigen (anti-PSCA), to the functionalized InP/ZnS QDs, allowed specific in vitro targeting of pancreatic cancer cell lines (both immortalized and low passage ones). The receptor-mediated delivery of the bioconjugates was further confirmed by the observation of poor in vitro targeting in nonpancreatic cancer based cell lines which are negative for the claudin-4-receptor. These observations suggest the immense potential of InP/ZnS QDs as non-cadmium-based safe and efficient optical imaging nanoprobes in diagnostic imaging, particularly for early detection of cancer.

  11. Imaging of Coulomb-Driven Quantum Hall Edge States

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-10-01

    The edges of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime are divided into alternating metallic and insulating strips, with their widths determined by the energy gaps of the QHE states and the electrostatic Coulomb interaction. Local probing of these submicrometer features, however, is challenging due to the buried 2DEG structures. Using a newly developed microwave impedance microscope, we demonstrate the real-space conductivity mapping of the edge and bulk states. The sizes, positions, and field dependence of the edge strips around the sample perimeter agree quantitatively with the self-consistent electrostatic picture. The evolution of microwave images as a function of magnetic fields provides rich microscopic information around the ν=2 QHE state. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  12. Quantum dots in bio-imaging: Revolution by the small

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, Harinder; Kaul, Zeenia; Wadhwa, Renu; Taira, Kazunari; Hirano, Takashi; Kaul, Sunil C.

    2005-01-01

    Visual analysis of biomolecules is an integral avenue of basic and applied biological research. It has been widely carried out by tagging of nucleotides and proteins with traditional fluorophores that are limited in their application by features such as photobleaching, spectral overlaps, and operational difficulties. Quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a superior alternative and are poised to change the world of bio-imaging and further its applications in basic and applied biology. The interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology is experiencing a revolution and QDs as an enabling technology have become a harbinger of this hybrid field. Within a decade, research on QDs has evolved from being a pure science subject to the one with high-end commercial applications

  13. Non-perturbative materialization of ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emparan, Roberto; Garriga, Jaume

    2006-01-01

    In theories with a hidden ghost sector that couples to visible matter through gravity only, empty space can decay into ghosts and ordinary matter by graviton exchange. Perturbatively, such processes can be very slow provided that the gravity sector violates Lorentz invariance above some cut-off scale. Here, we investigate non-perturbative decay processes involving ghosts, such as the spontaneous creation of self-gravitating lumps of ghost matter, as well as pairs of Bondi dipoles (i.e. lumps of ghost matter chasing after positive energy objects). We find the corresponding instantons and calculate their Euclidean action. In some cases, the instantons induce topology change or have negative Euclidean action. To shed some light on the meaning of such peculiarities, we also consider the nucleation of concentrical domain walls of ordinary and ghost matter, where the Euclidean calculation can be compared with the canonical (Lorentzian) description of tunneling. We conclude that non-perturbative ghost nucleation processes can be safely suppressed in phenomenological scenarios

  14. Quantum image encryption based on generalized affine transform and logistic map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao-Ran; Tao, Xiang-Yang; Zhou, Nan-Run

    2016-07-01

    Quantum circuits of the generalized affine transform are devised based on the novel enhanced quantum representation of digital images. A novel quantum image encryption algorithm combining the generalized affine transform with logistic map is suggested. The gray-level information of the quantum image is encrypted by the XOR operation with a key generator controlled by the logistic map, while the position information of the quantum image is encoded by the generalized affine transform. The encryption keys include the independent control parameters used in the generalized affine transform and the logistic map. Thus, the key space is large enough to frustrate the possible brute-force attack. Numerical simulations and analyses indicate that the proposed algorithm is realizable, robust and has a better performance than its classical counterpart in terms of computational complexity.

  15. IR finiteness of the ghost dressing function from numerical resolution of the ghost SD equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J.P.; Yaouanc, A. Le; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; RodrIguez-Quintero, J.

    2008-01-01

    We solve numerically the Schwinger-Dyson ghost equation in the Landau gauge for a given, finite at k = 0 gluon propagator (i.e. the infrared exponent of its dressing function, α gluon , is 1) and under the usual assumption of constancy of the ghost-gluon vertex ; we show that there exist two possible types of ghost dressing function solutions, as we have previously inferred from analytical considerations: one which is singular at zero momentum (the infrared exponent of its dressing function, α ghost , (We shall use α G and α F as shorthands for α gluon and α ghost respectively; let us recall that we denote the gluon by a G and the ghost by a F, for ''fantome''.) is gluon +2α ghost = 0 and has therefore α ghost = -1/2, and another one which is finite at the origin with α ghost = 0 and violates the relation. It is most important that the type of solution which is realized depends on the value of the coupling constant. There are regular ones - α F = 0 - for any coupling below some value, while there is only one singular solution - α F <0 -, obtained for a single critical value of the coupling. For all momenta k <.5 GeV where they can be trusted, our lattice data exclude neatly the singular one, and agree very well with the regular solution we obtain at a coupling constant compatible with the bare lattice value.

  16. The ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, P.; Reinhardt, H.

    2011-01-01

    We present results for a numerical study of the ghost propagator in Coulomb gauge whereby lattice results for the spatial gluon propagator are used as input to solving the ghost Dyson-Schwinger equation. We show that in order to solve completely, the ghost equation must be supplemented by a boundary condition (the value of the inverse ghost propagator dressing function at zero momentum) which determines if the solution is critical (zero value for the boundary condition) or subcritical (finite value). The various solutions exhibit a characteristic behavior where all curves follow the same (critical) solution when going from high to low momenta until 'forced' to freeze out in the infrared to the value of the boundary condition. The boundary condition can be interpreted in terms of the Gribov gauge-fixing ambiguity; we also demonstrate that this is not connected to the renormalization. Further, the connection to the temporal gluon propagator and the infrared slavery picture of confinement is discussed.

  17. Ghost lines in Moessbauer relaxation spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    The appearance in Moessbauer relaxation spectra of 'ghost' lines, which are narrow lines that do not correspond to transitions between real hyperfine energy levels of the resonant system, is examined. It is shown that in many cases of interest, the appearance of these 'ghost' lines can be interpreted in terms of the relaxational averaging of one or more of the static interactions of the ion. (orig.)

  18. In vivo cation exchange in quantum dots for tumor-specific imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangyou; Braun, Gary B; Qin, Mingde; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Sugahara, Kazuki N

    2017-08-24

    In vivo tumor imaging with nanoprobes suffers from poor tumor specificity. Here, we introduce a nanosystem, which allows selective background quenching to gain exceptionally tumor-specific signals. The system uses near-infrared quantum dots and a membrane-impermeable etchant, which serves as a cation donor. The etchant rapidly quenches the quantum dots through cation exchange (ionic etching), and facilitates renal clearance of metal ions released from the quantum dots. The quantum dots are intravenously delivered into orthotopic breast and pancreas tumors in mice by using the tumor-penetrating iRGD peptide. Subsequent etching quenches excess quantum dots, leaving a highly tumor-specific signal provided by the intact quantum dots remaining in the extravascular tumor cells and fibroblasts. No toxicity is noted. The system also facilitates the detection of peritoneal tumors with high specificity upon intraperitoneal tumor targeting and selective etching of excess untargeted quantum dots. In vivo cation exchange may be a promising strategy to enhance specificity of tumor imaging.The imaging of tumors in vivo using nanoprobes has been challenging due to the lack of sufficient tumor specificity. Here, the authors develop a tumor-specific quantum dot system that permits in vivo cation exchange to achieve selective background quenching and high tumor-specific imaging.

  19. Quantum theory in vector bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a framework capable of accomodating quantum gauge theory (QGT), based on recent insights on the cohomological interpretation of ghosts, BRS-transformations, anomalies, and Schwinger terms. The hope is that the approach will lead to a trial marriage of quantum theory and gravity. Some points that are stressed are: nonabelian QGT is subtler than QED; in spite of their BRS-variance, the Yang-Mills potential together with the ghost-form are needed in addition to the field theory; the ghost form together with their Lagrange multiplier in a Lagrangian formalism makes its appearance through the BRS cohomology; and, in QGT one can treat the connection form, the curvature form and the ghost form in one of several ways

  20. Infra-red ghost contribution to the gluon Green's functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paccanoni, F.

    1985-01-01

    The Schwinger-Dyson equations for the ghost propagator and the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex function are studied in the Landau gauge. A confining infra-red singularity is assumed for the gluon propagator and a suitable approximation is devised for the solution of the integral equations. It is found that the bare values of the ghost propagator and coupling cannot be a consistent solution of either equation. It is determined a possible behaviour of the correction factor for the ghost propagator in the small-momentum limit and discussed the consistency of the approximation schemes for the gluon propagator that neglet Faddeev-Popov ghost

  1. Detection and correction of blinking bias in image correlation transport measurements of quantum dot tagged macromolecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durisic, Nela; Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) are becoming widely used as fluorescent labels for biological applications. Here we demonstrate that fluorescence fluctuation analysis of their diffusional mobility using temporal image correlation spectroscopy is highly susceptible to systematic e...

  2. Ghost Spectroscopy with Classical Thermal Light Emitted by a Superluminescent Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janassek, Patrick; Blumenstein, Sébastien; Elsäßer, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    We propose and realize the first classical ghost-imaging (GI) experiment in the frequency or wavelength domain, thus performing ghost spectroscopy using thermal light exhibiting photon bunching. The required wavelength correlations are provided by light emitted by spectrally broadband near-infrared amplified spontaneous emission of a semiconductor-based superluminescent diode. They are characterized by wavelength-resolved intensity cross-correlation measurements utilizing two-photon-absorption interferometry. Finally, a real-world spectroscopic application of this ghost spectroscopy with a classical light scheme is demonstrated in which an absorption band of trichloromethane (chloroform) at 1214 nm is reconstructed with a spectral resolution of 10 nm as a proof-of-principle experiment. This ghost-spectroscopy work fills the gap of a hitherto missing analogy between the spatial and the spectral domain in classical GI modalities, with the expectation of contributing towards a broader dissemination of correlated photon ghost modalities, hence paving the way towards more applications which exploit the favorable advantages.

  3. Two-color ghost interference with photon pairs generated in hot atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sheng Ding

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental observation of a two-photon ghost interference experiment. A distinguishing feature of our experiment is that the photons are generated via a non-degenerated spontaneous four-wave mixing process in a hot atomic ensemble; therefore the photon has narrow bandwidth. Besides, there is a large difference in frequency between two photons in a pair. Our works may be important to achieve more secure, large transmission capacity long-distance quantum communication.

  4. "Walking with a Ghost": Arts-Based Research, Music Videos, and the Re-Performing Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Pamela G.; Wilder, Shannon O.; Helms, Kathryn R.

    2007-01-01

    In folk-rock duo Tegan and Sara's 2004 music video "Walking with a Ghost," two women face one another, mirrored images in black and white. One is dressed in black--grunge shirt, pants and boots, while the other stands barefoot in a simple white dress. The black-clad figure removes three red paper hearts from her twin's chest, leaving crimson…

  5. Ghost instabilities of cosmological models with vector fields nonminimally coupled to the curvature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himmetoglu, Burak; Peloso, Marco; Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2009-01-01

    We prove that many cosmological models characterized by vectors nonminimally coupled to the curvature (such as the Turner-Widrow mechanism for the production of magnetic fields during inflation, and models of vector inflation or vector curvaton) contain ghosts. The ghosts are associated with the longitudinal vector polarization present in these models and are found from studying the sign of the eigenvalues of the kinetic matrix for the physical perturbations. Ghosts introduce two main problems: (1) they make the theories ill defined at the quantum level in the high energy/subhorizon regime (and create serious problems for finding a well-behaved UV completion), and (2) they create an instability already at the linearized level. This happens because the eigenvalue corresponding to the ghost crosses zero during the cosmological evolution. At this point the linearized equations for the perturbations become singular (we show that this happens for all the models mentioned above). We explicitly solve the equations in the simplest cases of a vector without a vacuum expectation value in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker geometry, and of a vector with a vacuum expectation value plus a cosmological constant, and we show that indeed the solutions of the linearized equations diverge when these equations become singular.

  6. Noncanonical quantization-on the coexistence of particles and ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saller, H.

    1988-01-01

    Local interactions of quantized fields are sometimes parametrized with the aid of ghostlike degrees of freedom, e.g., in non-Abelian gauge theories. These ghosts do not necessarily lead to eigenstates of energy. Such a situation requires a discussion of the asymptotic boundary condition for the ghosts, leading to ghost propagation only for timelike distance. Coexisting particle and ghost degrees of freedom in one basic field operator allow the formulation of interactions for such a field without local ambiguities

  7. Are ghost surfaces quadratic-flux-minimizing?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, S.R.; Dewar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Two candidates for 'almost-invariant' toroidal surfaces passing through magnetic islands, namely quadratic-flux-minimizing (QFMin) surfaces and ghost surfaces, use families of periodic pseudo-orbits (i.e. paths for which the action is not exactly extremal). QFMin pseudo-orbits, which are coordinate-dependent, are field lines obtained from a modified magnetic field, and ghost-surface pseudo-orbits are obtained by displacing closed field lines in the direction of steepest descent of magnetic action, ∫A.dl. A generalized Hamiltonian definition of ghost surfaces is given and specialized to the usual Lagrangian definition. A modified Hamilton's Principle is introduced that allows the use of Lagrangian integration for calculation of the QFMin pseudo-orbits. Numerical calculations show QFMin and Lagrangian ghost surfaces give very similar results for a chaotic magnetic field perturbed from an integrable case, and this is explained using a perturbative construction of an auxiliary poloidal angle for which QFMin and Lagrangian ghost surfaces are the same up to second order. While presented in the context of 3-dimensional magnetic field line systems, the concepts are applicable to defining almost-invariant tori in other 11/2 degree-of-freedom nonintegrable Lagrangian/Hamiltonian systems.

  8. Second-harmonic imaging of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld

    2000-01-01

    Resonant second-harmonic generation is observed at room temperature in reflection from self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots grown on a GaAs (001) substrate. The detected second-harmonic signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm corresponding to the quantum-dot photoluminescence maximum....... In addition, the second-harmonic spectrum exhibits another smaller but well-pronounced peak at 765 nm not found in the linear experiments. We attribute this peak to the generation of second-harmonic radiation in the AlGaAs spacer layer enhanced by the local symmetry at the quantum-dot interface. We further...

  9. Advances in Gamma-Ray Imaging with Intensified Quantum-Imaging Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ling

    Nuclear medicine, an important branch of modern medical imaging, is an essential tool for both diagnosis and treatment of disease. As the fundamental element of nuclear medicine imaging, the gamma camera is able to detect gamma-ray photons emitted by radiotracers injected into a patient and form an image of the radiotracer distribution, reflecting biological functions of organs or tissues. Recently, an intensified CCD/CMOS-based quantum detector, called iQID, was developed in the Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging. Originally designed as a novel type of gamma camera, iQID demonstrated ultra-high spatial resolution (advancing this conceptually-proven gamma-ray imaging technology to make it ready for both preclinical and clinical applications. To start with, a Monte Carlo simulation of the key light-intensification device, i.e. the image intensifier, was developed, which revealed the dominating factor(s) that limit energy resolution performance of the iQID cameras. For preclinical imaging applications, a previously-developed iQID-based single-photon-emission computed-tomography (SPECT) system, called FastSPECT III, was fully advanced in terms of data acquisition software, system sensitivity and effective FOV by developing and adopting a new photon-counting algorithm, thicker columnar scintillation detectors, and system calibration method. Originally designed for mouse brain imaging, the system is now able to provide full-body mouse imaging with sub-350-micron spatial resolution. To further advance the iQID technology to include clinical imaging applications, a novel large-area iQID gamma camera, called LA-iQID, was developed from concept to prototype. Sub-mm system resolution in an effective FOV of 188 mm x 188 mm has been achieved. The camera architecture, system components, design and integration, data acquisition, camera calibration, and performance evaluation are presented in this work. Mounted on a castered counter-weighted clinical cart, the camera also features

  10. Ghost hunting—an assessment of ghost particle detection and removal methods for tomographic-PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsinga, G E; Tokgoz, S

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses and compares several methods, which aim to remove spurious peaks, i.e. ghost particles, from the volume intensity reconstruction in tomographic-PIV. The assessment is based on numerical simulations of time-resolved tomographic-PIV experiments in linear shear flows. Within the reconstructed volumes, intensity peaks are detected and tracked over time. These peaks are associated with particles (either ghosts or actual particles) and are characterized by their peak intensity, size and track length. Peak intensity and track length are found to be effective in discriminating between most ghosts and the actual particles, although not all ghosts can be detected using only a single threshold. The size of the reconstructed particles does not reveal an important difference between ghosts and actual particles. The joint distribution of peak intensity and track length however does, under certain conditions, allow a complete separation of ghosts and actual particles. The ghosts can have either a high intensity or a long track length, but not both combined, like all the actual particles. Removing the detected ghosts from the reconstructed volume and performing additional MART iterations can decrease the particle position error at low to moderate seeding densities, but increases the position error, velocity error and tracking errors at higher densities. The observed trends in the joint distribution of peak intensity and track length are confirmed by results from a real experiment in laminar Taylor–Couette flow. This diagnostic plot allows an estimate of the number of ghosts that are indistinguishable from the actual particles. (paper)

  11. Optimization of digital image processing to determine quantum dots' height and density from atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J E; Paciornik, S; Pinto, L D; Ptak, F; Pires, M P; Souza, P L

    2018-01-01

    An optimized method of digital image processing to interpret quantum dots' height measurements obtained by atomic force microscopy is presented. The method was developed by combining well-known digital image processing techniques and particle recognition algorithms. The properties of quantum dot structures strongly depend on dots' height, among other features. Determination of their height is sensitive to small variations in their digital image processing parameters, which can generate misleading results. Comparing the results obtained with two image processing techniques - a conventional method and the new method proposed herein - with the data obtained by determining the height of quantum dots one by one within a fixed area, showed that the optimized method leads to more accurate results. Moreover, the log-normal distribution, which is often used to represent natural processes, shows a better fit to the quantum dots' height histogram obtained with the proposed method. Finally, the quantum dots' height obtained were used to calculate the predicted photoluminescence peak energies which were compared with the experimental data. Again, a better match was observed when using the proposed method to evaluate the quantum dots' height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Improving spatial resolution in quantum imaging beyond the Rayleigh diffraction limit using multiphoton W entangled states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Jianming, E-mail: jianming.wen@gmail.co [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Du, Shengwang [Department of Physics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Bay (Hong Kong); Xiao Min [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); School of Modern Engineering and Applied Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2010-08-23

    Using multiphoton entangled states, we demonstrate improving spatial imaging resolution beyond the Rayleigh diffraction limit in the quantum imaging process. In particular, we examine resolution enhancement using triphoton W state and a factor of 2 is achievable as with the use of the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state, compared to using a classical-light source.

  13. GHOST: global hepatitis outbreak and surveillance technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Atkinson G; Sims, Seth; Rytsareva, Inna; Campo, David S; Skums, Pavel; Dimitrova, Zoya; Ramachandran, Sumathi; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Thai, Hong; Ganova-Raeva, Lilia; Lin, Yulin; Punkova, Lili T; Sue, Amanda; Mirabito, Massimo; Wang, Silver; Tracy, Robin; Bolet, Victor; Sukalac, Thom; Lynberg, Chris; Khudyakov, Yury

    2017-12-06

    Hepatitis C is a major public health problem in the United States and worldwide. Outbreaks of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections associated with unsafe injection practices, drug diversion, and other exposures to blood are difficult to detect and investigate. Effective HCV outbreak investigation requires comprehensive surveillance and robust case investigation. We previously developed and validated a methodology for the rapid and cost-effective identification of HCV transmission clusters. Global Hepatitis Outbreak and Surveillance Technology (GHOST) is a cloud-based system enabling users, regardless of computational expertise, to analyze and visualize transmission clusters in an independent, accurate and reproducible way. We present and explore performance of several GHOST implemented algorithms using next-generation sequencing data experimentally obtained from hypervariable region 1 of genetically related and unrelated HCV strains. GHOST processes data from an entire MiSeq run in approximately 3 h. A panel of seven specimens was used for preparation of six repeats of MiSeq libraries. Testing sequence data from these libraries by GHOST showed a consistent transmission linkage detection, testifying to high reproducibility of the system. Lack of linkage among genetically unrelated HCV strains and constant detection of genetic linkage between HCV strains from known transmission pairs and from follow-up specimens at different levels of MiSeq-read sampling indicate high specificity and sensitivity of GHOST in accurate detection of HCV transmission. GHOST enables automatic extraction of timely and relevant public health information suitable for guiding effective intervention measures. It is designed as a virtual diagnostic system intended for use in molecular surveillance and outbreak investigations rather than in research. The system produces accurate and reproducible information on HCV transmission clusters for all users, irrespective of their level of bioinformatics

  14. Exorcising the Ostrogradsky ghost in coupled systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Remko; Roest, Diederik [Van Swinderen Institute for Particle Physics and Gravity, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-07-27

    The Ostrogradsky theorem implies that higher-derivative terms of a single mechanical variable are either trivial or lead to additional, ghost-like degrees of freedom. In this letter we systematically investigate how the introduction of additional variables can remedy this situation. Employing a Lagrangian analysis, we identify conditions on the Lagrangian to ensure the existence of primary and secondary constraints that together imply the absence of Ostrogradsky ghosts. We also show the implications of these conditions for the structure of the equations of motion as well as possible redefinitions of the variables. We discuss applications to analogous higher-derivative field theories such as multi-Galileons and beyond Horndeski.

  15. Exorcising the Ostrogradsky ghost in coupled systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Remko; Roest, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    The Ostrogradsky theorem implies that higher-derivative terms of a single mechanical variable are either trivial or lead to additional, ghost-like degrees of freedom. In this letter we systematically investigate how the introduction of additional variables can remedy this situation. Employing a Lagrangian analysis, we identify conditions on the Lagrangian to ensure the existence of primary and secondary constraints that together imply the absence of Ostrogradsky ghosts. We also show the implications of these conditions for the structure of the equations of motion as well as possible redefinitions of the variables. We discuss applications to analogous higher-derivative field theories such as multi-Galileons and beyond Horndeski.

  16. Imaging quantum vibrations on an ultrashort timescale: the deuterium molecular ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenna, J; Calvert, C R; Bryan, W A; English, E M L; Wood, J; Murphy, D S; Turcu, I C E; Smith, J M; Ertel, K G; Chekhlov, O; Divall, E J; McCann, J F; Newell, W R; Williams, I D

    2007-01-01

    The vibrational wavepacket revival of a basic quantum system is demonstrated experimentally. Using few-cycle laser pulse technology, pump and probe imaging of the vibrational motion of D + 2 molecules is conducted, and together with a quantum-mechanical simulation of the excited wavepacket motion, the vibrational revival phenomenon has been characterised. The simulation shows good correlation with the temporal motion and structural features obtained from the data, relaying fundamental information on this diatomic system

  17. LSB-based Steganography Using Reflected Gray Code for Color Quantum Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Panchi; Lu, Aiping

    2018-02-01

    At present, the classical least-significant-bit (LSB) based image steganography has been extended to quantum image processing. For the existing LSB-based quantum image steganography schemes, the embedding capacity is no more than 3 bits per pixel. Therefore, it is meaningful to study how to improve the embedding capacity of quantum image steganography. This work presents a novel LSB-based steganography using reflected Gray code for colored quantum images, and the embedding capacity of this scheme is up to 4 bits per pixel. In proposed scheme, the secret qubit sequence is considered as a sequence of 4-bit segments. For the four bits in each segment, the first bit is embedded in the second LSB of B channel of the cover image, and and the remaining three bits are embedded in LSB of RGB channels of each color pixel simultaneously using reflected-Gray code to determine the embedded bit from secret information. Following the transforming rule, the LSB of stego-image are not always same as the secret bits and the differences are up to almost 50%. Experimental results confirm that the proposed scheme shows good performance and outperforms the previous ones currently found in the literature in terms of embedding capacity.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and cells and tissues imaging of carbon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Li, Qilong; Zhou, JingE.; Wang, Yiting; Yu, Lei; Peng, Hui; Zhu, Jianzhong

    2017-10-01

    Compare to other quantum dots, carbon quantum dots have its own incomparable advantages, such as low cell toxicity, favorable biocompatibility, cheap production cost, mild reaction conditions, easy to large-scale synthesis and functionalization. In this thesis, we took citric acid monohydrate and diethylene glycol bis (3-aMinopropyl) ether as materials, used decomposition method to acquire carbon quantum dots (CQDs) which can emission blue fluorescence under ultraviolet excitation. In the aspect of application, we achieved the biological imaging of CQDs in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Numerical Study of the Ghost-Ghost-Gluon Vertex on the Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, A.; Cucchieri, A.; Mendes, T.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that, in Landau gauge, the renormalization function of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex Z-tilde1 (p2) is finite and constant, at least to all orders of perturbation theory. On the other hand, a direct non-perturbative verification of this result using numerical simulations of lattice QCD is still missing. Here we present a preliminary numerical study of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex and of its corresponding renormalization function using Monte Carlo simulations in SU(2) lattice Landau gauge. Data were obtained in 4 dimensions for lattice couplings β = 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and lattice sides N = 4, 8, 16

  20. Numerical study of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, A.; Cucchieri, A.; Mendes, T.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known that, in Landau gauge, the renormalization function of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex Z∼ 1 1(p 2 ) is finite and constant, at least to all orders of perturbation theory. On the other hand, a direct non-perturbative verification of this result using numerical simulations of lattice QCD is still missing. Here we present a preliminary numerical study of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex and of its corresponding renormalization function using Monte Carlo simulations in SU(2) lattice Landau gauge. Data were obtained in 4 dimensions for lattice couplings β= 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and lattice sides N = 4, 8, 16. (author)

  1. Imperceptible reversible watermarking of radiographic images based on quantum noise masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Bouslimi, Dalel; Karasad, Mohamed; Cozic, Michel; Coatrieux, Gouenou

    2018-07-01

    Advances in information and communication technologies boost the sharing and remote access to medical images. Along with this evolution, needs in terms of data security are also increased. Watermarking can contribute to better protect images by dissimulating into their pixels some security attributes (e.g., digital signature, user identifier). But, to take full advantage of this technology in healthcare, one key problem to address is to ensure that the image distortion induced by the watermarking process does not endanger the image diagnosis value. To overcome this issue, reversible watermarking is one solution. It allows watermark removal with the exact recovery of the image. Unfortunately, reversibility does not mean that imperceptibility constraints are relaxed. Indeed, once the watermark removed, the image is unprotected. It is thus important to ensure the invisibility of reversible watermark in order to ensure a permanent image protection. We propose a new fragile reversible watermarking scheme for digital radiographic images, the main originality of which stands in masking a reversible watermark into the image quantum noise (the dominant noise in radiographic images). More clearly, in order to ensure the watermark imperceptibility, our scheme differentiates the image black background, where message embedding is conducted into pixel gray values with the well-known histogram shifting (HS) modulation, from the anatomical object, where HS is applied to wavelet detail coefficients, masking the watermark with the image quantum noise. In order to maintain the watermark embedder and reader synchronized in terms of image partitioning and insertion domain, our scheme makes use of different classification processes that are invariant to message embedding. We provide the theoretical performance limits of our scheme into the image quantum noise in terms of image distortion and message size (i.e. capacity). Experiments conducted on more than 800 12 bits radiographic images

  2. A Shearlet-based algorithm for quantum noise removal in low-dose CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aguan; Jiang, Huiqin; Ma, Ling; Liu, Yumin; Yang, Xiaopeng

    2016-03-01

    Low-dose CT (LDCT) scanning is a potential way to reduce the radiation exposure of X-ray in the population. It is necessary to improve the quality of low-dose CT images. In this paper, we propose an effective algorithm for quantum noise removal in LDCT images using shearlet transform. Because the quantum noise can be simulated by Poisson process, we first transform the quantum noise by using anscombe variance stabilizing transform (VST), producing an approximately Gaussian noise with unitary variance. Second, the non-noise shearlet coefficients are obtained by adaptive hard-threshold processing in shearlet domain. Third, we reconstruct the de-noised image using the inverse shearlet transform. Finally, an anscombe inverse transform is applied to the de-noised image, which can produce the improved image. The main contribution is to combine the anscombe VST with the shearlet transform. By this way, edge coefficients and noise coefficients can be separated from high frequency sub-bands effectively. A number of experiments are performed over some LDCT images by using the proposed method. Both quantitative and visual results show that the proposed method can effectively reduce the quantum noise while enhancing the subtle details. It has certain value in clinical application.

  3. Preparation of Graphene Quantum Dots and Their Application in Cell Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aims to increase the fluorescence quantum yield by improving the conditions of preparing graphene quantum dots (GQDs through the solvothermal route and observe the GQDs performance in imaging oral squamous cells. Methodology. The following experimental conditions of GQDs preparation through the solvothermal route were improved: graphene oxide (GO/N-N dimethyl formamide (DMF ratio, filling percentage, and reaction time. A fluorescence spectrophotometer was used to measure photoluminescence, and the peak values were compared. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium (MTT bromide was used to detect the cytotoxicity of GQDs, which was compared with that of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs. GQDs were cultured with tongue cancer cells. After the coculture, a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM was used to observe cell imaging. Results. The optimal conditions of GQD preparation through the solvothermal route included the following: 10 mg/mL GO/DMF ratio, 80% filling percentage, 12 h reaction time, and 17.4% fluorescence quantum yield. As the cell concentration increased, the GQD and CdTe QD groups exhibited a decreasing cell survival rate, with the decrease in the CdTe QD group being more significant. The LSCM observations showed bright green fluorescence images. Conclusion. The improved experimental conditions increased the fluorescence quantum yield of GQDs. In this study, the prepared GQDs exhibited low cytotoxicity level and satisfactory cell imaging performance.

  4. Gribov's horizon and the ghost dressing function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2009-01-01

    We study a relation recently derived by K. Kondo at zero momentum between the Zwanziger's horizon function, the ghost dressing function and Kugo's functions u and w. We agree with this result as far as bare quantities are considered. However, assuming the validity of the horizon gap equation, we argue that the solution w(0)=0 is not acceptable since it would lead to a vanishing renormalized ghost dressing function. On the contrary, when the cutoff goes to infinity, u(0)→∞, w(0)→-∞ such that u(0)+w(0)→-1. Furthermore w and u are not multiplicatively renormalizable. Relaxing the gap equation allows w(0)=0 with u(0)→-1. In both cases the bare ghost dressing function, F(0,Λ), goes logarithmically to infinity at infinite cutoff. We show that, although the lattice results provide bare results not so different from the F(0,Λ)=3 solution, this is an accident due to the fact that the lattice cutoffs lie in the range 1-3 GeV -1 . We show that the renormalized ghost dressing function should be finite and nonzero at zero momentum and can be reliably estimated on the lattice up to powers of the lattice spacing; from published data on a 80 4 lattice at β=5.7 we obtain F R (0,μ=1.5 GeV)≅2.2.

  5. The Ghostly Workings of Danish Accountability Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pors, Justine Grønbaek

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a framework for thinking about the ghostly, thus arguing that policy can be understood as a landscape of intersecting and colliding temporalities from which arouse curious workings of barely-there forces, spooky energies and vibrating saturations of affective ambivalences. I present an empirical study of a policy agenda of…

  6. Lucia's Ghosts: Sonic, Gothic, and Postmodern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fillerup, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I use an intertextual interference – the spectral presence of Norma Desmond in a performance of Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor – as a locus through which to explore the consequences of the ‘open’ text in theatrical spectatorship, criticism and historical study. Norma’s ghosting...

  7. Imaging of Coulomb-Driven Quantum Hall Edge States

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji; Kundhikanjana, Worasom; Kelly, Michael A.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Shabani, Javad; Shayegan, Mansour

    2011-01-01

    The edges of a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in the quantum Hall effect (QHE) regime are divided into alternating metallic and insulating strips, with their widths determined by the energy gaps of the QHE states and the electrostatic Coulomb

  8. The Color Antisymmetric Ghost Propagator and One-Loop Vertex Renormalization

    OpenAIRE

    Furui, Sadataka

    2007-01-01

    The color matrix elements of the ghost triangle diagram that appears in the triple gluon vertex and the ghost-ghost-gluon triangle diagram that appears in the ghost-gluon-ghost vertex are calculated. The ghost-ghost-gluon triangle contains a loop consisting of two color diagonal ghosts and one gluon and a loop consisting of two color antisymmetric ghosts and one gluon. Consequently, the pQCD argument in the infrared region based on the one particle irreducible diagram should be modified. Impl...

  9. The color antisymmetric ghost propagator and one-loop vertex renormalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furui, Sadataka

    2008-01-01

    The color matrix elements of the ghost triangle diagram that appears in the triple gluon vertex and the ghost-ghost-gluon triangle diagram that appears in the ghost-gluon-ghost vertex are calculated. The ghost-ghost-gluon triangle contains a loop consisting of two color diagonal ghosts and one gluon and a loop consisting of two color antisymmetric ghosts and one gluon. Consequently, the pQCD argument in the infrared region based on the one particle irreducible diagram should be modified. Implications for the Kugo-Ojima color confinement and the QCD running coupling are discussed. (author)

  10. Combined atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence imaging to select single InAs/GaAs quantum dots for quantum photonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Luca; Liu, Jin; Song, Jin Dong; Fält, Stefan; Wegscheider, Werner; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2017-07-24

    We report on a combined photoluminescence imaging and atomic force microscopy study of single, isolated self-assembled InAs quantum dots. The motivation of this work is to determine an approach that allows to assess single quantum dots as candidates for quantum nanophotonic devices. By combining optical and scanning probe characterization techniques, we find that single quantum dots often appear in the vicinity of comparatively large topographic features. Despite this, the quantum dots generally do not exhibit significant differences in their non-resonantly pumped emission spectra in comparison to quantum dots appearing in defect-free regions, and this behavior is observed across multiple wafers produced in different growth chambers. Such large surface features are nevertheless a detriment to applications in which single quantum dots are embedded within nanofabricated photonic devices: they are likely to cause large spectral shifts in the wavelength of cavity modes designed to resonantly enhance the quantum dot emission, thereby resulting in a nominally perfectly-fabricated single quantum dot device failing to behave in accordance with design. We anticipate that the approach of screening quantum dots not only based on their optical properties, but also their surrounding surface topographies, will be necessary to improve the yield of single quantum dot nanophotonic devices.

  11. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  12. Molecular Imaging of the Brain Using Multi-Quantum Coherence and Diagnostics of Brain Disorders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaila, M M

    2013-01-01

    This book examines multi-quantum magnetic resonance imaging methods and the diagnostics of brain disorders. It consists of two Parts. The part I is initially devoted towards the basic concepts of the conventional single quantum MRI techniques. It is supplemented by the basic knowledge required to understand multi-quantum MRI. Practical illustrations are included both on recent developments in conventional MRI and the MQ-MRI. This is to illustrate the connection between theoretical concepts and their scope in the clinical applications. The Part II initially sets out the basic details about quadrupole charge distribution present in certain nuclei and their importance about the functions they perform in our brain. Some simplified final mathematical expressions are included to illustrate facts about the basic concepts of the quantum level interactions between magnetic dipole and the electric quadrupole behavior of useful nuclei present in the brain. Selected practical illustrations, from research and clinical pra...

  13. Chandra Finds Ghosts Of Eruption In Galaxy Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    "Ghostly" relics of an ancient eruption that tore through a cluster of galaxies were recently uncovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. The discovery implies that galaxy clusters are the sites of enormously energetic and recurring explosions, and may provide an explanation why galaxy clusters behave like giant cosmic magnets. "Chandra's image revealed vast regions in the galaxy cluster Abell 2597 that contain almost no X-ray or radio emission. We call them ghost cavities," said Brian McNamara of Ohio University in Athens today during a press conference at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Washington. "They appear to be remnants of an old explosion where the radio emission has faded away over millions of years." The ghost cavities were likely created by extremely powerful explosions, due to material falling toward a black hole millions of times more massive than the Sun. As the matter swirled around the black hole, located in a galaxy near the center of the cluster, it generated enormous electromagnetic fields that expelled material from the vicinity of the black hole at high speeds. This explosive activity in Abell 2597 created jets of highly energetic particles that cleared out voids in the hot gas. Because they are lighter than the surrounding material, the cavities will eventually push their way to the edge of the cluster, just as air bubbles in water make their way to the surface. Researchers also found evidence that this explosion was not a one-time event. "We detected a small, bright radio source near the center of the cluster that indicates a new explosion has occurred recently," said team member Michael Wise of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, "so the cycle of eruption is apparently continuing." Though dim, the ghost cavities are not completely empty. They contain a mixture of very hot gas, high-energy particles and magnetic fields -- otherwise the cavities would have collapsed under the pressure of the surrounding hot

  14. Quantum Image Processing and Storage with Four Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-10

    information. 15. SUBJECT TERMS. Key words or phrases identifying major concepts in the report. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION. Enter security...Such detectors are often used in the detection of squeezed light or other non- classical states of light, or in quantum key distribution (QKD) systems...efficiency, then we can insert a (noiseless) gain of 2 PSA in front of the homodyne system to partially compensate for this. The reason that the

  15. Nanogel-quantum dot hybrid nanoparticles for live cell imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Urara; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Hirano, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2005-01-01

    We report here a novel carrier of quantum dots (QDs) for intracellular labeling. Monodisperse hybrid nanoparticles (38 nm in diameter) of QDs were prepared by simple mixing with nanogels of cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHP) modified with amino groups (CHPNH 2 ). The CHPNH 2 -QD nanoparticles were effectively internalized into the various human cells examined. The efficiency of cellular uptake was much higher than that of a conventional carrier, cationic liposome. These hybrid nanoparticles could be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging

  16. Near-infrared quantum dots for HER2 localization and imaging of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Sarwat B; Rouhi, Sepideh; Taniguchi, Shohei; Yang, Shi Yu; Green, Mark; Keshtgar, Mo; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Quantum dots are fluorescent nanoparticles with unique photophysical properties that allow them to be used as diagnostic, therapeutic, and theranostic agents, particularly in medical and surgical oncology. Near-infrared-emitting quantum dots can be visualized in deep tissues because the biological window is transparent to these wavelengths. Their small sizes and free surface reactive groups that can be conjugated to biomolecules make them ideal probes for in vivo cancer localization, targeted chemotherapy, and image-guided cancer surgery. The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene (HER2/neu) is overexpressed in 25%-30% of breast cancers. The current methods of detection for HER2 status, including immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization, are used ex vivo and cannot be used in vivo. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of near-infrared-emitting quantum dots for HER2 localization in fixed and live cancer cells as a first step prior to their in vivo application. Near-infrared-emitting quantum dots were characterized and their in vitro toxicity was established using three cancer cell lines, ie, HepG2, SK-BR-3 (HER2-overexpressing), and MCF7 (HER2-underexpressing). Mouse antihuman anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody was conjugated to the near-infrared-emitting quantum dots. In vitro toxicity studies showed biocompatibility of SK-BR-3 and MCF7 cell lines with near-infrared-emitting quantum dots at a concentration of 60 μg/mL after one hour and 24 hours of exposure. Near-infrared-emitting quantum dot antiHER2-antibody bioconjugates successfully localized HER2 receptors on SK-BR-3 cells. Near-infrared-emitting quantum dot bioconjugates can be used for rapid localization of HER2 receptors and can potentially be used for targeted therapy as well as image-guided surgery.

  17. Quantum color image watermarking based on Arnold transformation and LSB steganography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Hu, Wenwen; Fan, Ping; Luo, Gaofeng

    In this paper, a quantum color image watermarking scheme is proposed through twice-scrambling of Arnold transformations and steganography of least significant bit (LSB). Both carrier image and watermark images are represented by the novel quantum representation of color digital images model (NCQI). The image sizes for carrier and watermark are assumed to be 2n×2n and 2n‑1×2n‑1, respectively. At first, the watermark is scrambled into a disordered form through image preprocessing technique of exchanging the image pixel position and altering the color information based on Arnold transforms, simultaneously. Then, the scrambled watermark with 2n‑1×2n‑1 image size and 24-qubit grayscale is further expanded to an image with size 2n×2n and 6-qubit grayscale using the nearest-neighbor interpolation method. Finally, the scrambled and expanded watermark is embedded into the carrier by steganography of LSB scheme, and a key image with 2n×2n size and 3-qubit information is generated at the meantime, which only can use the key image to retrieve the original watermark. The extraction of watermark is the reverse process of embedding, which is achieved by applying a sequence of operations in the reverse order. Simulation-based experimental results involving different carrier and watermark images (i.e. conventional or non-quantum) are simulated based on the classical computer’s MATLAB 2014b software, which illustrates that the present method has a good performance in terms of three items: visual quality, robustness and steganography capacity.

  18. An Image Enhancement Method Using the Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with an Adaptive Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement techniques are very important to image processing, which are used to improve image quality or extract the fine details in degraded images. In this paper, two novel objective functions based on the normalized incomplete Beta transform function are proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of grayscale image enhancement and color image enhancement, respectively. Using these objective functions, the parameters of transform functions are estimated by the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO. We also propose an improved QPSO with an adaptive parameter control strategy. The QPSO and the AQPSO algorithms, along with genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO, are tested on several benchmark grayscale and color images. The results show that the QPSO and AQPSO perform better than GA and PSO for the enhancement of these images, and the AQPSO has some advantages over QPSO due to its adaptive parameter control strategy.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell anode image segmentation based on a novel quantum-inspired fuzzy clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Yuhan; Chen, Li; Xu, Xin; Li, Xi

    2015-12-01

    High quality microstructure modeling can optimize the design of fuel cells. For three-phase accurate identification of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) microstructure, this paper proposes a novel image segmentation method on YSZ/Ni anode Optical Microscopic (OM) images. According to Quantum Signal Processing (QSP), the proposed approach exploits a quantum-inspired adaptive fuzziness factor to adaptively estimate the energy function in the fuzzy system based on Markov Random Filed (MRF). Before defuzzification, a quantum-inspired probability distribution based on distance and gray correction is proposed, which can adaptively adjust the inaccurate probability estimation of uncertain points caused by noises and edge points. In this study, the proposed method improves accuracy and effectiveness of three-phase identification on the micro-investigation. It provides firm foundation to investigate the microstructural evolution and its related properties.

  20. Infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, A. C.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate how to obtain from the Schwinger-Dyson equations of QCD an infrared finite ghost propagator in the Feynman gauge. The key ingredient in this construction is the longitudinal form factor of the nonperturbative gluon-ghost vertex, which, contrary to what happens in the Landau gauge, contributes nontrivially to the gap equation of the ghost. The detailed study of the corresponding vertex equation reveals that in the presence of a dynamical infrared cutoff this form factor remains finite in the limit of vanishing ghost momentum. This, in turn, allows the ghost self-energy to reach a finite value in the infrared, without having to assume any additional properties for the gluon-ghost vertex, such as the presence of massless poles. The implications of this result and possible future directions are briefly outlined

  1. Kinetic k-essence ghost dark energy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozas-Fernández, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    A ghost dark energy model has been recently put forward to explain the current accelerated expansion of the Universe. In this model, the energy density of ghost dark energy, which comes from the Veneziano ghost of QCD, is proportional to the Hubble parameter, ρ D =αH. Here α is a constant of order Λ QCD 3 where Λ QCD ∼100 MeV is the QCD mass scale. We consider a connection between ghost dark energy with/without interaction between the components of the dark sector and the kinetic k-essence field. It is shown that the cosmological evolution of the ghost dark energy dominated Universe can be completely described a kinetic k-essence scalar field. We reconstruct the kinetic k-essence function F(X) in a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker Universe according to the evolution of ghost dark energy density.

  2. Chemical nature and structure of organic coating of quantum dots is crucial for their application in imaging diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Zhelev, Zhivko; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Spasov, Lubomir; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2011-01-01

    Background: One of the most attractive properties of quantum dots is their potential to extend the opportunities for fluorescent and multimodal imaging in vivo. The aim of the present study was to clarify whether the composition and structure of organic coating of nanoparticles are crucial for their application in vivo. Methods: We compared quantum dots coated with non-crosslinked amino-functionalized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers, quantum dots encapsulated in crosslinked carboxyl-functionalized PAMAM dendrimers, and silica-shelled amino-functionalized quantum dots. A multimodal fluorescent and paramagnetic quantum dot probe was also developed and analyzed. The probes were applied intravenously in anesthetized animals for visualization of brain vasculature using two-photon excited fluorescent microscopy and visualization of tumors using fluorescent IVIS® imaging (Caliper Life Sciences, Hopkinton, MA) and magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Quantum dots coated with non-crosslinked dendrimers were cytotoxic. They induced side effects in vivo, including vasodilatation with a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate. The quantum dots penetrated the vessels, which caused the quality of fluorescent imaging to deteriorate. Quantum dots encapsulated in crosslinked dendrimers had low cytotoxicity and were biocompatible. In concentrations quantum dots/kg bodyweight, these nanoparticles did not affect blood pressure and heart rate, and did not induce vasodilatation or vasoconstriction. PEGylation (PEG [polyethylene glycol]) was an indispensable step in development of a quantum dot probe for in vivo imaging, based on silica-shelled quantum dots. The non-PEGylated silica-shelled quantum dots possessed low colloidal stability in high-salt physiological fluids, accompanied by rapid aggregation in vivo. The conjugation of silica-shelled quantum dots with PEG1100 increased their stability and half-life in the circulation without significant enhancement of their

  3. Terahertz imaging using quantum cascade lasers—a review of systems and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, P; Valavanis, A; Keeley, J; Alhathlool, R; Burnett, A D; Li, L H; Khanna, S P; Indjin, D; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Bertling, K; Lim, Y L; Rakić, A D; Taimre, T

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) frequency quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a compact source of THz radiation offering high power, high spectral purity and moderate tunability. As such, these sources are particularly suited to the application of THz frequency imaging across a range of disciplines, and have motivated significant research interest in this area over the past decade. In this paper we review the technological approaches to THz QCL-based imaging and the key advancements within this field. We discuss in detail a number of imaging approaches targeted to application areas including multiple-frequency transmission and diffuse reflection imaging for the spectral mapping of targets; as well as coherent approaches based on the self-mixing phenomenon in THz QCLs for long-range imaging, three-dimensional imaging, materials analysis, and high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging. (paper)

  4. BRST cohomology of the superstring at arbitrary ghost number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, G.T.; Myers, R.C.; Martin, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate the cohomology of the BRST operator of the NSR superstring. No restriction is placed on the ghost number of the states. It is shown that every cohomology class can be written as a picture changed version of one of the known cohomology classes at a fixed ghost number. A generalization of this result is also found for the cohomology in the large algebra of a new bosonization of the superconformal ghosts. (orig.)

  5. All-optical control and super-resolution imaging of quantum emitters in layered materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianinia, Mehran; Bradac, Carlo; Sontheimer, Bernd; Wang, Fan; Tran, Toan Trong; Nguyen, Minh; Kim, Sejeong; Xu, Zai-Quan; Jin, Dayong; Schell, Andreas W; Lobo, Charlene J; Aharonovich, Igor; Toth, Milos

    2018-02-28

    Layered van der Waals materials are emerging as compelling two-dimensional platforms for nanophotonics, polaritonics, valleytronics and spintronics, and have the potential to transform applications in sensing, imaging and quantum information processing. Among these, hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) is known to host ultra-bright, room-temperature quantum emitters, whose nature is yet to be fully understood. Here we present a set of measurements that give unique insight into the photophysical properties and level structure of hBN quantum emitters. Specifically, we report the existence of a class of hBN quantum emitters with a fast-decaying intermediate and a long-lived metastable state accessible from the first excited electronic state. Furthermore, by means of a two-laser repumping scheme, we show an enhanced photoluminescence and emission intensity, which can be utilized to realize a new modality of far-field super-resolution imaging. Our findings expand current understanding of quantum emitters in hBN and show new potential ways of harnessing their nonlinear optical properties in sub-diffraction nanoscopy.

  6. Phase contribution of image potential on empty quantum well States in pb islands on the cu(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M C; Lin, C L; Su, W B; Lin, S P; Lu, S M; Lin, H Y; Chang, C S; Hsu, W K; Tsong, Tien T

    2009-05-15

    We use scanning tunneling spectroscopy to explore the quantum well states in the Pb islands grown on a Cu(111) surface. Our observation demonstrates that the empty quantum well states, whose energy levels lie beyond 1.2 eV above the Fermi level, are significantly affected by the image potential. As the quantum number increases, the energy separation between adjacent states is shrinking rather than widening, contrary to the prediction for a square potential well. By simply introducing a phase factor to reckon the effect of the image potential, the shrinking behavior of the energy separation can be reasonably explained with the phase accumulation model. The model also reveals that there exists a quantum regime above the Pb surface in which the image potential is vanished. Moreover, the quasi-image-potential state in the tunneling gap is quenched because of the existence of the quantum well states.

  7. Honorary and ghost authorship in nursing publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maureen Shawn; Barnsteiner, Jane; Daly, John

    2014-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) assess the prevalence of articles with honorary authors and ghost authors in 10 leading peer-reviewed nursing journals between 2010 to 2012; (b) compare the results to prevalence reported by authors of articles published in high-impact medical journals; and (c) assess the experiences of editors in the International Academy of Nursing Editors with honorary and guest authorship. Corresponding authors of articles published in 10 nursing journals between 2010 and 2012 were invited to complete an online survey about the contributions of coauthors to see if the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors () criteria for authorship were met. Additionally, members of the International Academy of Nursing Editors were invited to complete an online survey about their experiences in identifying honorary or ghost authors in articles submitted for publication. The prevalence of articles published in 10 nursing journals with honorary authors was 42%, and the prevalence of ghost authorship was 27.6%. This is a greater prevalence than what has been reported among medical journals. Qualitative data yielded five themes: lack of awareness around the rules for authorship; acknowledged need for debate, discussion, and promotion of ethical practice; knowingly tolerating, and sometimes deliberately promoting, transgressions in practice; power relations and expectations; and avoiding scrutiny. Among the 60 respondents to the editor survey, 22 (36.7%) reported identifying honorary authors and 13 (21.7%) reported ghost authors among papers submitted to their publications. Inappropriate authorship is a significant problem among scholarly nursing publications. If nursing scholarship is to maintain integrity and be considered trustworthy, and if publications are to be a factor in professional advancement, editors, nursing leaders, and faculty need to disseminate and adhere to ethical authorship practices. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Lucia's Ghosts: Sonic, Gothic, and Postmodern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fillerup, Jessie

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I use an intertextual interference – the spectral presence of Norma Desmond in a performance of Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor – as a locus through which to explore the consequences of the ‘open’ text in theatrical spectatorship, criticism and historical study. Norma’s ghosting...... the lens of Sunset Boulevard inverts chronological sequence, it acknowledges the temporal contradictions inherent in historical work and assigns productive meaning to nostalgic impulses that engage a reflective mode of thought....

  9. Superconformal ghost correlators and picture changing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonini, M.; Iengo, R.; Nunez, C.

    1988-12-01

    We compute the correlation functions for the system of superconformal ghosts β, γ(λ=3/2), including the corresponding spin fields, on arbitrary Riemann surfaces. Using fermionization, defined as a change of variables in the functional integration, we derive and generalize previous results obtained by bosonization. As an application we study the picture changing mechanism in the Ramond sector of the superstring. (author). 11 refs

  10. Soluble theory with massive ghosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisarski, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the unitarity of asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories, like certain models of quantum gravity, I study a prototype in two space-time dimensions. The prototype is a kind of higher-derivative nonlinear sigma model; it is asymptotically free, exhibits dimensional transmutation, and is soluble in a large-N expansion. The S-matrix elements, constructed from the analytic continuation of the Euclidean Green's functions, conserve probability to approx.O(N -1 ), but violate unitarity at approx.O(N -2 ). The model demonstrates that in higher-derivative theories unitarity, or the lack thereof, cannot be decided without explicit control over the infrared limit. Even so, the results suggest that there may exist some (rather special) asymptotically free, higher-derivative theories which are unitary

  11. Vertex operators of ghost number three in Type IIB supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    We study the cohomology of the massless BRST complex of the Type IIB pure spinor superstring in flat space. In particular, we find that the cohomology at the ghost number three is nontrivial and transforms in the same representation of the supersymmetry algebra as the solutions of the linearized classical supergravity equations. Modulo some finite dimensional spaces, the ghost number three cohomology is the same as the ghost number two cohomology. We also comment on the difference between the naive and semi-relative cohomology, and the role of b-ghost.

  12. QCD ghost f(T)-gravity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karami, K.; Abdolmaleki, A.; Asadzadeh, S. [University of Kurdistan, Department of Physics, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safari, Z. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    Within the framework of modified teleparallel gravity, we reconstruct a f(T) model corresponding to the QCD ghost dark energy scenario. For a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter, we obtain the time evolution of the torsion scalar T (or the Hubble parameter). Then, we calculate the effective torsion equation of state parameter of the QCD ghost f(T)-gravity model as well as the deceleration parameter of the universe. Furthermore, we fit the model parameters by using the latest observational data including SNeIa, CMB and BAO data. We also check the viability of our model using a cosmographic analysis approach. Moreover, we investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics for our model. Finally, we point out the growth rate of matter density perturbation. We conclude that in QCD ghost f(T)-gravity model, the universe begins a matter dominated phase and approaches a de Sitter regime at late times, as expected. Also this model is consistent with current data, passes the cosmographic test, satisfies the GSL and fits the data of the growth factor well as the {Lambda}CDM model. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of ghosting effects for three commercial a-Si EPIDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, L. N.; Nijsten, S. M. J. J. G.; Sonke, J.-J.; Partridge, M.; Herk, M. van; Mijnheer, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have reported dosimetric characteristics of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). Some studies ascribed a non-linear signal to gain ghosting and image lag. Other reports, however, state the effect is negligible. This study compares the signal-to-monitor unit (MU) ratio for three different brands of EPID systems. The signal was measured for a wide range of monitor units (5-1000), dose-rates, and beam energies. All EPIDs exhibited a relative under-response for beams of few MUs; giving 4 to 10% lower signal-to-MU ratios relative to that of 1000 MUs. This under-response is consistent with ghosting effects due to charge trapping

  14. Three dimensional atom probe imaging of GaAsSb quantum rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, A M; Marquis, E A; Taboada, A G; Ripalda, J M; García, J M; Molina, S I

    2011-07-01

    Unambiguous evidence of ring-shaped self-assembled GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented on the basis of atom-probe tomography reconstructions and dark field transmission electron microscopy imaging. The GaAs capping process causes a strong segregation of Sb out of the center of GaSb quantum dots, leading to the self-assembled GaAs(x)Sb(1-x) quantum rings of 20-30 nm in diameter with x ∼ 0.33. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-time terahertz imaging through self-mixing in a quantum-cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wienold, M., E-mail: martin.wienold@dlr.de; Rothbart, N.; Hübers, H.-W. [Institute of Optical Sensor Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Department of Physics, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hagelschuer, T. [Institute of Optical Sensor Systems, German Aerospace Center (DLR), Rutherfordstr. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Schrottke, L.; Biermann, K.; Grahn, H. T. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-07-04

    We report on a fast self-mixing approach for real-time, coherent terahertz imaging based on a quantum-cascade laser and a scanning mirror. Due to a fast deflection of the terahertz beam, images with frame rates up to several Hz are obtained, eventually limited by the mechanical inertia of the employed scanning mirror. A phase modulation technique allows for the separation of the amplitude and phase information without the necessity of parameter fitting routines. We further demonstrate the potential for transmission imaging.

  16. Spectral ansatz in quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, D.; Slim, H.A.

    1979-01-01

    An ansatz of Delbourgo and Salam for the spectral representation of the vertex function in quantum electrodynamics. The Ward-Takahashi identity is respected, and the electron propagator does not have a ghost. The infra-red and ultraviolet behaviours of the electron propagator in this theory are considered, and a rigorous existence theorem for the propagator in the Yennie gauge is presented

  17. Markov constant and quantum instabilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelantová, E.; Starosta, Š.; Znojil, Miloslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 15 (2016), s. 155201 ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-22945S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : renormalizable quantum theories with ghosts * Pais-Uhlenbeck model * singular spectra * square-well model * number theory analysis * physical applications Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2016

  18. Imaging and Manipulating Energy Transfer Among Quantum Dots at Individual Dot Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nguyen, Huy A; Lyding, Joseph W; Gruebele, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Many processes of interest in quantum dots involve charge or energy transfer from one dot to another. Energy transfer in films of quantum dots as well as between linked quantum dots has been demonstrated by luminescence shift, and the ultrafast time-dependence of energy transfer processes has been resolved. Bandgap variation among dots (energy disorder) and dot separation are known to play an important role in how energy diffuses. Thus, it would be very useful if energy transfer could be visualized directly on a dot-by-dot basis among small clusters or within films of quantum dots. To that effect, we report single molecule optical absorption detected by scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM) to image energy pooling from donor into acceptor dots on a dot-by-dot basis. We show that we can manipulate groups of quantum dots by pruning away the dominant acceptor dot, and switching the energy transfer path to a different acceptor dot. Our experimental data agrees well with a simple Monte Carlo lattice model of energy transfer, similar to models in the literature, in which excitation energy is transferred preferentially from dots with a larger bandgap to dots with a smaller bandgap.

  19. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems and in encapsulated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertal, Dorri

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical systems. In condensed matter physics, in particular, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information, or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Despite its vital importance the microscopic behavior of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because the latter is not a readily measureable quantity on the microscale. While the motivation is clear, existing thermal imaging methods lack the necessary sensitivity and are unsuitable for low temperature operation required for the study of quantum systems. We developed a superconducting quantum interference nano thermometer device with sub 50 nm diameter that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette and provides scanning cryogenic thermal sensing with four orders of magnitude improved thermal sensitivity of below 1 uK/sqrtHz. The noncontact noninvasive thermometry allows thermal imaging of very low nanoscale energy dissipation down to the fundamental Landauer limitý of 40 fW for continuous readout of a single qubit at 1 GHz at 4.2 K. These advances enable observation of dissipation due to single electron charging of individual quantum dots in carbon nanotubes, opening the door to direct imaging of nanoscale dissipation processes in quantum matter. In this talk I will describe the technique and present a study of hBN encapsulated graphene which reveals a novel dissipation mechanism due to atomic-scale resonant localized states at the edges of graphene. These results provide a direct valuable glimpse into the electron thermalization process in systems with weak electron-phonon interactions. Funded by European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 programme (Grant No. 655416), Minerva Foundation with funding from the Federal German Ministry of Education and Research, Rosa and Emilio Segré Research Award, and the MISTI.

  20. Facile Synthesis of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Quantum Dots for Bio-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Yro Persia Ada N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon quantum dots (CQD with fascinating properties has gradually become a rising star as a new nanocarbon member due to its nonthreatening, abundant and inexpensive nature. This study reports on a facile preparation of fluorescent carbon quantum dots (CQD from iota Carrageenan. CQD from iota Carrageenan was produced by hydrothermal method with a quantum yield (QY of 16 to 20%. Doping the CQD with nitrogen by the addition of tetraethylene pentamine (TEPE produced CQD with a QY of 77%. FTIR data confirmed the formation of hydroxyl, carboxylic and carbonyl functional groups as confirmed by the ToFSIMS data due to the presence of nitrogen bonds on the N-CQD produced with TEPE. The CQD and N-CQD produced are crystalline with graphitic structures because of the presence of sp2 graphitic d line spacing with the sizes ranging from 2 to 10nm. To examine the feasibility of using the CQD as nanoprobe in practical applications, labelling and detection of E.coli was performed. The E.coli fluoresced proving CQD as an effective probe in bio imaging application. This study has successfully demonstrated a facile approach of producing CQD with significant high quantum yields to fluorescent CQD for bio imaging applications.

  1. Ghost Whisperer's Ghost in the Machine: An example of pop cultural representation of virtual worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, CarrieLynn D.

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of an episode of the CBS series "Ghost Whisperer" for how it depicts a) what is a virtual world and b) the tensions that are involved in discussing the uses and effects of a virtual world.  Discussion focuses on the overriding negative reception of virtual worlds in popular culture due...

  2. Visions of Inflation in World History: Ghost Story III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederjohn, M. Scott; Schug, Mark C.; Wood, William C.

    2013-01-01

    This article represents the third in a "ghost story" series by the same authors. Readers may recall that Mr. Bernanke was "visited" by the ghosts of Adam Smith and John Maynard Keynes in the March/April 2010 issue of "Social Education" as these two famous economists debated the economic recovery (see EJ878912). Mr.…

  3. Mn-doped near-infrared quantum dots as multimodal targeted probes for pancreatic cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ken-Tye

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a novel approach to producing manganese (Mn)-doped quantum dots (Mnd-QDs) emitting in the near-infrared (NIR). Surface functionalization of Mnd-QDs with lysine makes them stably disperse in aqueous media and able to conjugate with targeting molecules. The nanoparticles were structurally and compositionally characterized and maintained a high photoluminescence quantum yield and displayed paramagnetism in water. The receptor-mediated delivery of bioconjugated Mnd-QDs into pancreatic cancer cells was demonstrated using the confocal microscopy technique. Cytotoxicity of Mnd-QDs on live cells has been evaluated. The NIR-emitting characteristic of the QDs has been exploited to acquire whole animal body imaging with high contrast signals. In addition, histological and blood analysis of mice have revealed that no long-term toxic effects arise from MnD-QDs. These studies suggest multimodal Mnd-QDs have the potentials as probes for early pancreatic cancer imaging and detection.

  4. Beam Dumping Ghost Signals in Electric Sweep Scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.; Leitner, M.; Keller, R.; Moehs, D.P.; Welton, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure low-energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates

  5. Beam dumping ghost signals in electric sweep scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockli, M.P.; SNS Project, Oak Ridge; Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; Keller, R.; LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; SNS Project, Oak Ridge

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 20 years many labs started to use Allison scanners to measure loW--energy ion beam emittances. We show that large trajectory angles produce ghost signals due to the impact of the beamlet on the electric deflection plates. The strength of the ghost signal is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions and their velocity, ghost signals can have the opposite polarity as the main beam signals or the same polarity. These ghost signals are easily overlooked because they partly overlap the real signals, they are mostly below the 1% level, and they are often hidden in the noise. However, they cause significant errors in emittance estimates because they are associated with large trajectory angles. The strength of ghost signals, and the associated errors, can be drastically reduced with a simple modification of the deflection plates

  6. Accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, Andrei V.

    2004-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to point out that the accretion of a ghost condensate by black holes could be extremely efficient. We analyze steady-state spherically symmetric flows of the ghost fluid in the gravitational field of a Schwarzschild black hole and calculate the accretion rate. Unlike minimally coupled scalar field or quintessence, the accretion rate is set not by the cosmological energy density of the field, but by the energy scale of the ghost condensate theory. If hydrodynamical flow is established, it could be as high as a tenth of a solar mass per second for 10 MeV scale ghost condensate accreting onto a stellar-sized black hole, which puts serious constraints on the parameters of the ghost condensate model

  7. Interacting ghost dark energy in Brans-Dicke theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Sheykhi, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the QCD ghost model of dark energy in the framework of Brans-Dicke cosmology. First, we study the non-interacting ghost dark energy in a flat Brans-Dicke theory. In this case we obtain the equation of state and the deceleration parameters and a differential equation governing the evolution of ghost energy density. Interestingly enough, we find that the equation of state parameter of the non-interacting ghost dark energy can cross the phantom line (w D =-1) provided the parameters of the model are chosen suitably. Then, we generalize the study to the interacting ghost dark energy in both flat and non-flat Brans-Dicke framework and find out that the transition of w D to phantom regime can be more easily achieved for than when resort to the Einstein field equations is made.

  8. Low-momentum ghost dressing function and the gluon mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucaud, Ph.; Leroy, J. P.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Micheli, J.; Pene, O.; Gomez, M. E.; Rodriguez-Quintero, J.

    2010-01-01

    We study the low-momentum ghost propagator Dyson-Schwinger equation in the Landau gauge, assuming for the truncation a constant ghost-gluon vertex, as it is extensively done, and a simple model for a massive gluon propagator. Then, regular Dyson-Schwinger equation solutions (the zero-momentum ghost dressing function not diverging) appear to emerge, and we show the ghost propagator to be described by an asymptotic expression reliable up to the order O(q 2 ). That expression, depending on the gluon mass and the zero-momentum Taylor-scheme effective charge, is proven to fit pretty well some low-momentum ghost propagator data [I. L. Bogolubsky, E. M. Ilgenfritz, M. Muller-Preussker, and A. Sternbeck, Phys. Lett. B 676, 69 (2009); Proc. Sci., LAT2007 (2007) 290] from big-volume lattice simulations where the so-called ''simulated annealing algorithm'' is applied to fix the Landau gauge.

  9. Detective quantum efficiency of medical x-ray image intensifiers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thirlwall, JT

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available -energyphotons,thevariancesofstagesafterthe photoemitterhavenegligiblein?uenc eonthevalueofBand thesehavebeenomittedfromthecalculationsreportedhere. Ithasbeenpointedout,however,11 thatwithanintensex-ray input,theXRIIoutputsignalmayhavetobeattenuated,for examplewithanirisintheopticalcomponents....W.ArndtandD.J.Gilmore,J.Appl.Crystallogr.12,1~1979!. 9 M.Stanton,W.Phillips,Y.Li,andK.Kalata,J.Appl.Crystallogr.25, 638~1992!. 10 W.KuhlandJ.E.Schrijvers,Medicamundi22,6~1977!. 11 A.Makovski,MedicalImagingSystems~Prentice?Hall,Englewood Cliffs,NJ,1983!,p.87. 12 S...

  10. Quantum dot tailored to single wall carbon nanotubes: a multifunctional hybrid nanoconstruct for cellular imaging and targeted photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Lakshmi V; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthikumar, D; Jayasree, Ramapurath S

    2014-07-23

    Hybrid nanomaterial based on quantum dots and SWCNTs is used for cellular imaging and photothermal therapy. Furthermore, the ligand conjugated hybrid system (FaQd@CNT) enables selective targeting in cancer cells. The imaging capability of quantum dots and the therapeutic potential of SWCNT are available in a single system with cancer targeting property. Heat generated by the system is found to be high enough to destroy cancer cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Imaging the He2 quantum halo state using a free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Stefan; Kunitski, Maksim; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Kalinin, Anton; Schottelius, Alexander; Schober, Carl; Waitz, Markus; Sann, Hendrik; Hartung, Alexander; Bauer, Tobias; Pitzer, Martin; Trinter, Florian; Goihl, Christoph; Janke, Christian; Richter, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Weller, Miriam; Czasch, Achim; Kitzler, Markus; Braune, Markus; Grisenti, Robert E.; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Schmidt, Lothar Ph. H.; Schöffler, Markus S.; Williams, Joshua B.; Jahnke, Till; Dörner, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    Quantum tunneling is a ubiquitous phenomenon in nature and crucial for many technological applications. It allows quantum particles to reach regions in space which are energetically not accessible according to classical mechanics. In this “tunneling region,” the particle density is known to decay exponentially. This behavior is universal across all energy scales from nuclear physics to chemistry and solid state systems. Although typically only a small fraction of a particle wavefunction extends into the tunneling region, we present here an extreme quantum system: a gigantic molecule consisting of two helium atoms, with an 80% probability that its two nuclei will be found in this classical forbidden region. This circumstance allows us to directly image the exponentially decaying density of a tunneling particle, which we achieved for over two orders of magnitude. Imaging a tunneling particle shows one of the few features of our world that is truly universal: the probability to find one of the constituents of bound matter far away is never zero but decreases exponentially. The results were obtained by Coulomb explosion imaging using a free electron laser and furthermore yielded He2’s binding energy of 151.9±13.3151.9±13.3 neV, which is in agreement with most recent calculations.

  12. Fluorescence Imaging Assisted Photodynamic Therapy Using Photosensitizer-Linked Gold Quantum Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Lakshmi V; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-06-23

    Fluorescence imaging assisted photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a viable two-in-one clinical tool for cancer treatment and follow-up. While the surface plasmon effect of gold nanorods and nanoparticles has been effective for cancer therapy, their emission properties when compared to gold nanoclusters are weak for fluorescence imaging guided PDT. In order to address the above issues, we have synthesized a near-infrared-emitting gold quantum cluster capped with lipoic acid (L-AuC with (Au)18(L)14) based nanoplatform with excellent tumor reduction property by incorporating a tumor-targeting agent (folic acid) and a photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX), for selective PDT. The synthesized quantum cluster based photosensitizer PFL-AuC showed 80% triplet quantum yield when compared to that of the photosensitizer alone (63%). PFL-AuC having 60 μg (0.136 mM) of protoporphyrin IX was sufficient to kill 50% of the tumor cell population. Effective destruction of tumor cells was evident from the histopathology and fluorescence imaging, which confirm the in vivo PDT efficacy of PFL-AuC.

  13. The Ghostly Workings of Danish Accountability Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Justine Grønbæk

    2016-01-01

    present an empirical study of a policy agenda of introducing an assessment culture and improving the management of the Danish public school. I explore how all the routines and habits deemed outdated and sought annihilated by a new policy paradigm continue to haunt head teachers as seething presence...... of lurking resistance towards the policy aims as well as insidious doubts. Thinking about the ghostly contributes to studies of education policy by locating the reality of power in the mundane everyday doings and experiences of educational practitioners and insisting on the very tangled way people sense...... and intuit the complexities of contemporary forms of power....

  14. GHOSTLY REFLECTIONS IN THE PLEIADES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has caught the eerie, wispy tendrils of a dark interstellar cloud being destroyed by the passage of one of the brightest stars in the Pleiades star cluster. Like a flashlight beam shining off the wall of a cave, the star is reflecting light off the surface of pitch black clouds of cold gas laced with dust. These are called reflection nebulae. The famous cluster is easily visible in the evening sky during the winter months as a small grouping of bright blue stars, named after the 'Seven Sisters' of Greek mythology. Resembling a small dipper, this star cluster lies in the constellation Taurus at a distance of about 380 light-years from Earth. The unaided eye can discern about half a dozen bright stars in the cluster, but a small telescope will reveal that the Pleiades contains many hundreds of fainter stars. In many cases, the nebulae surrounding star clusters represent material from which the stars have formed recently. However the Pleiades nebulosity is actually an independent cloud, drifting through the cluster at a relative speed of about 6.8 miles/second (11 kilometers/second). In 1890, American astronomer E. E. Barnard, observing visually with the Lick Observatory 36-inch telescope in California, discovered an exceptionally bright nebulosity adjacent to the bright Pleiades star Merope. It is now cataloged as IC 349, or 'Barnard's Merope Nebula.' IC 349 is so bright because it lies extremely close to Merope--only about 3,500 times the separation of the Earth from the Sun, or about 0.06 light-year--and thus is strongly illuminated by the star's light. In the new Hubble image, Merope itself is just outside the frame on the upper right. The colorful rays of light at the upper right, pointing back to the star, are an optical phenomenon produced within the telescope, and are not real. However, the remarkable parallel wisps extending from lower left to upper right are real features, revealed for the first time through Hubble's high

  15. Terahertz near-field imaging using subwavelength plasmonic apertures and a quantum cascade laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragwanath, Adam J; Freeman, Joshua R; Gallant, Andrew J; Zeitler, J Axel; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Chamberlain, J Martyn

    2011-07-01

    The first demonstration, to our knowledge, of near-field imaging using subwavelength plasmonic apertures with a terahertz quantum cascade laser source is presented. "Bull's-eye" apertures, featuring subwavelength circular apertures flanked by periodic annular corrugations were created using a novel fabrication method. A fivefold increase in intensity was observed for plasmonic apertures over plain apertures of the same diameter. Detailed studies of the transmitted beam profiles were undertaken for apertures with both planarized and corrugated exit facets, with the former producing spatially uniform intensity profiles and subwavelength spatial resolution. Finally, a proof-of-concept imaging experiment is presented, where an inhomogeneous pharmaceutical drug coating is investigated.

  16. Microwave Imaging Using a Tunable Reflectarray Antenna and Superradiance in Open Quantum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebi, Amin

    Theory, experiment, and computation are the three paradigms for scientific discoveries. This dissertation includes work in all three areas. The first part is dedicated to the practical design and development of a microwave imaging system, a problem mostly experimental and computational in nature. The second part discusses theoretical foundations of possible future advances in quantum signal transmission. In part one, a new active microwave imaging system is proposed. At the heart of this novel system lies an electronically reconfigurable beam-scanning reflectarray antenna. The high tuning capability of the reflectarray provides a broad steering range of +/- 60 degrees in two distinct frequency bands: S and F bands. The array, combined with an external source, dynamically steers the incoming beam across this range in order to generate multi-angle projection data for target detection. The collected data is then used for image reconstruction by means of time reversal signal processing technique. Our design significantly reduces cost and operational complexities compared to traditional imaging systems. In conventional systems, the region of interest is enclosed by a costly array of transceiver antennas which additionally requires a complicated switching circuitry. The inclusion of the beam scanning array and the utilization of a single source, eliminates the need for multiple antennas and the involved circuitry. In addition, unlike conventional setups, this system is not constrained by the dimensions of the object under test. Therefore the inspection of large objects, such as extended laminate structures, composite airplane wings and wind turbine blades becomes possible. Experimental results of detection of various dielectric targets as well as detecting anomalies within them, such as defects and metallic impurities, using the imaging prototype are presented. The second part includes the theoretical consideration of three different problems: quantum transport through

  17. Improvement image in tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomi, Tsutomu; Umeda, Tokuo; Takeda, Tohoru; Saito, Kyouko; Sakaguchi, Kazuya; Nakajima, Masahiro; Koshida, Kichirou

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the X-ray digital tomosynthesis (DT) reconstruction processing method for metal artifact reduction and the application of wavelet denoising to selectively remove quantum noise and suggest the possibility of image quality improvement using a novel application for chest. In orthopedic DT imaging, we developed artifact reduction methods based on a modified Shepp and Logan reconstruction filter kernel realized by taking into account additional weighing by direct current (DC) components in frequency domain space. Processing leads to an increase in the ratio of low-frequency components in an image. The effectiveness of the method in enhancing the visibility of a prosthetic case was quantified in terms of removal of ghosting artifacts. In chest DT imaging, the technique was implemented on a DT system and experimentally evaluated through chest phantom measurements, spatial resolution and compared with an existing post-reconstruction wavelet denoise algorithm by Badea et al. Our wavelet technique with balance sparsity-norm contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) effectively decreased quantum noise in the reconstructed images with and improvement when applied to pre-reconstruction image for post-reconstruction. The results of our technique showed that although modulation transfer function (MTF) did not vary (preserving spatial resolution), the existing wavelet denoise algorithm caused MTF deterioration. (author)

  18. RADIANCE AND PHOTON NOISE: Imaging in geometrical optics, physical optics, quantum optics and radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Harrison H; Myers, Kyle J; Caucci, Luca

    2014-08-17

    A fundamental way of describing a photon-limited imaging system is in terms of a Poisson random process in spatial, angular and wavelength variables. The mean of this random process is the spectral radiance. The principle of conservation of radiance then allows a full characterization of the noise in the image (conditional on viewing a specified object). To elucidate these connections, we first review the definitions and basic properties of radiance as defined in terms of geometrical optics, radiology, physical optics and quantum optics. The propagation and conservation laws for radiance in each of these domains are reviewed. Then we distinguish four categories of imaging detectors that all respond in some way to the incident radiance, including the new category of photon-processing detectors. The relation between the radiance and the statistical properties of the detector output is discussed and related to task-based measures of image quality and the information content of a single detected photon.

  19. Imaging surface plasmon polaritons using proximal self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracher, Gregor; Schraml, Konrad; Blauth, Mäx; Wierzbowski, Jakob; López, Nicolás Coca; Bichler, Max; Müller, Kai; Finley, Jonathan J.; Kaniber, Michael, E-mail: Michael.Kaniber@wsi.tum.de [Walter Schottky Institut and Physik Department, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4, 85748 Garching, Germany and Nanosystems Initiative Munich, Schellingstraße 4, 80799 München (Germany)

    2014-07-21

    We present optical investigations of hybrid plasmonic nanosystems consisting of lithographically defined plasmonic Au-waveguides or beamsplitters on GaAs substrates coupled to proximal self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots. We designed a sample structure that enabled us to precisely tune the distance between quantum dots and the sample surface during nano-fabrication and demonstrated that non-radiative processes do not play a major role for separations down to ∼10 nm. A polarized laser beam focused on one end of the plasmonic nanostructure generates propagating surface plasmon polaritons that, in turn, create electron-hole pairs in the GaAs substrate during propagation. These free carriers are subsequently captured by the quantum dots ∼25 nm below the surface, giving rise to luminescence. The intensity of the spectrally integrated quantum dot luminescence is used to image the propagating plasmon modes. As the waveguide width reduces from 5 μm to 1 μm, we clearly observe different plasmonic modes at the remote waveguide end, enabling their direct imaging in real space. This imaging technique is applied to a plasmonic beamsplitter facilitating the determination of the splitting ratio between the two beamsplitter output ports as the interaction length L{sub i} is varied. A splitting ratio of 50:50 is observed for L{sub i}∼9±1 μm and 1 μm wide waveguides for excitation energies close to the GaAs band edge. Our experimental findings are in good agreement with mode profile and finite difference time domain simulations for both waveguides and beamsplitters.

  20. The Ghosts of Justice and the Law of Historical Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica López Lerma

    2011-04-01

    representational practices (words, images, expressions that seek to do justice to the victims, with unequal success. The novel’s recurring expressions (i.e., shadows, the repressed, eternal return, ghosts, and blindness stress the importance of coming to terms with the “ghosts of the past.” The law focuses instead on other words and images (i.e., foundation, reconciliation, concord, and closure that allude to the idea of historical progress, it will be argued, without proper acknowledgment of the injustices of the past. In doing so, the law becomes a commemorative site for the Spanish Transition, but not for the recovery of the victims’ memory. The law’s re-appropriation of the “spirit of the Transition” reveals Spain’s deep fear of confronting the ghosts of the past, a fear that can be perceived still today.

  1. Quantum noise properties of CT images with anatomical textured backgrounds across reconstruction algorithms: FBP and SAFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Justin, E-mail: justin.solomon@duke.edu [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Quantum noise properties of CT images are generally assessed using simple geometric phantoms with uniform backgrounds. Such phantoms may be inadequate when assessing nonlinear reconstruction or postprocessing algorithms. The purpose of this study was to design anatomically informed textured phantoms and use the phantoms to assess quantum noise properties across two clinically available reconstruction algorithms, filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). Methods: Two phantoms were designed to represent lung and soft-tissue textures. The lung phantom included intricate vessel-like structures along with embedded nodules (spherical, lobulated, and spiculated). The soft tissue phantom was designed based on a three-dimensional clustered lumpy background with included low-contrast lesions (spherical and anthropomorphic). The phantoms were built using rapid prototyping (3D printing) technology and, along with a uniform phantom of similar size, were imaged on a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash CT scanner and reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE. Fifty repeated acquisitions were acquired for each background type and noise was assessed by estimating pixel-value statistics, such as standard deviation (i.e., noise magnitude), autocorrelation, and noise power spectrum. Noise stationarity was also assessed by examining the spatial distribution of noise magnitude. The noise properties were compared across background types and between the two reconstruction algorithms. Results: In FBP and SAFIRE images, noise was globally nonstationary for all phantoms. In FBP images of all phantoms, and in SAFIRE images of the uniform phantom, noise appeared to be locally stationary (within a reasonably small region of interest). Noise was locally nonstationary in SAFIRE images of the textured phantoms with edge pixels showing higher noise magnitude compared to pixels in more homogenous regions. For pixels in uniform regions, noise magnitude was

  2. Quantum noise properties of CT images with anatomical textured backgrounds across reconstruction algorithms: FBP and SAFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Justin; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantum noise properties of CT images are generally assessed using simple geometric phantoms with uniform backgrounds. Such phantoms may be inadequate when assessing nonlinear reconstruction or postprocessing algorithms. The purpose of this study was to design anatomically informed textured phantoms and use the phantoms to assess quantum noise properties across two clinically available reconstruction algorithms, filtered back projection (FBP) and sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE). Methods: Two phantoms were designed to represent lung and soft-tissue textures. The lung phantom included intricate vessel-like structures along with embedded nodules (spherical, lobulated, and spiculated). The soft tissue phantom was designed based on a three-dimensional clustered lumpy background with included low-contrast lesions (spherical and anthropomorphic). The phantoms were built using rapid prototyping (3D printing) technology and, along with a uniform phantom of similar size, were imaged on a Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash CT scanner and reconstructed with FBP and SAFIRE. Fifty repeated acquisitions were acquired for each background type and noise was assessed by estimating pixel-value statistics, such as standard deviation (i.e., noise magnitude), autocorrelation, and noise power spectrum. Noise stationarity was also assessed by examining the spatial distribution of noise magnitude. The noise properties were compared across background types and between the two reconstruction algorithms. Results: In FBP and SAFIRE images, noise was globally nonstationary for all phantoms. In FBP images of all phantoms, and in SAFIRE images of the uniform phantom, noise appeared to be locally stationary (within a reasonably small region of interest). Noise was locally nonstationary in SAFIRE images of the textured phantoms with edge pixels showing higher noise magnitude compared to pixels in more homogenous regions. For pixels in uniform regions, noise magnitude was

  3. A Robust Blind Quantum Copyright Protection Method for Colored Images Based on Owner's Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Shahrokh; Gheibi, Reza; Houshmand, Monireh; Nagata, Koji

    2017-08-01

    Watermarking is the imperceptible embedding of watermark bits into multimedia data in order to use for different applications. Among all its applications, copyright protection is the most prominent usage which conceals information about the owner in the carrier, so as to prohibit others from assertion copyright. This application requires high level of robustness. In this paper, a new blind quantum copyright protection method based on owners's signature in RGB images is proposed. The method utilizes one of the RGB channels as indicator and two remained channels are used for embedding information about the owner. In our contribution the owner's signature is considered as a text. Therefore, in order to embed in colored image as watermark, a new quantum representation of text based on ASCII character set is offered. Experimental results which are analyzed in MATLAB environment, exhibit that the presented scheme shows good performance against attacks and can be used to find out who the real owner is. Finally, the discussed quantum copyright protection method is compared with a related work that our analysis confirm that the presented scheme is more secure and applicable than the previous ones currently found in the literature.

  4. An Adaptive Cultural Algorithm with Improved Quantum-behaved Particle Swarm Optimization for Sonar Image Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingmei; Hao, Wenqian; Li, Qiming

    2017-12-18

    This paper proposes an adaptive cultural algorithm with improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (ACA-IQPSO) to detect the underwater sonar image. In the population space, to improve searching ability of particles, iterative times and the fitness value of particles are regarded as factors to adaptively adjust the contraction-expansion coefficient of the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm (QPSO). The improved quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization algorithm (IQPSO) can make particles adjust their behaviours according to their quality. In the belief space, a new update strategy is adopted to update cultural individuals according to the idea of the update strategy in shuffled frog leaping algorithm (SFLA). Moreover, to enhance the utilization of information in the population space and belief space, accept function and influence function are redesigned in the new communication protocol. The experimental results show that ACA-IQPSO can obtain good clustering centres according to the grey distribution information of underwater sonar images, and accurately complete underwater objects detection. Compared with other algorithms, the proposed ACA-IQPSO has good effectiveness, excellent adaptability, a powerful searching ability and high convergence efficiency. Meanwhile, the experimental results of the benchmark functions can further demonstrate that the proposed ACA-IQPSO has better searching ability, convergence efficiency and stability.

  5. Vertex operator construction of superconformal ghosts and string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezawa, Z.F.; Nakamura, S.; Tezuka, A.

    1987-01-01

    Superconformal ghosts in string theories are characterized by the SU(1,1) Kac-Moody algebra with central charge -1/2. These ghost fields are constructed as the vertex operators realizing spinor representations of the Kac-Moody algebra. Representations of the canonical commutation relations of the superconformal ghosts are analyzed extensively. All irreducible representations are found to possess only the trivial inner product but for one exceptional case. Consequently, in superstring field theory it is necessary to consider reducible representations in general. Hilbert spaces with a non-trivial inner product are explicitly obtained upon which second quantization of superstring may be carried out. (orig.)

  6. Ghost neutrinos as test fields in curved space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audretsch, J.

    1976-01-01

    Without restricting to empty space-times, it is shown that ghost neutrinos (their energy-momentum tensor vanishes) can only be found in algebraically special space-times with a neutrino flux vector parallel to one of the principal null vectors of the conformal tensor. The optical properties are studied. There are no ghost neutrinos in the Kerr-Newman and in spherically symmetric space-times. The example of a non-vacuum gravitational pp-wave accompanied by a ghost neutrino pp-wave is discussed. (Auth.)

  7. Microwave Synthesis of Nearly Monodisperse Core/Multishell Quantum Dots with Cell Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hengyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report in this article the microwave synthesis of relatively monodisperse, highly crystalline CdSe quantum dots (QDs overcoated with Cd0.5Zn0.5S/ZnS multishells. The as-prepared QDs exhibited narrow photoluminescence bandwidth as the consequence of homogeneous size distribution and uniform crystallinity, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. A high photoluminescence quantum yield up to 80% was measured for the core/multishell nanocrystals. Finally, the resulting CdSe/Cd0.5Zn0.5S/ZnS core/multishell QDs have been successfully applied to the labeling and imaging of breast cancer cells (SK-BR3.

  8. Three dimensional atom probe imaging of GaAsSb quantum rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltran, A.M.; Marquis, E.A.; Taboada, A.G.; Ripalda, J.M.; Garcia, J.M.; Molina, S.I.

    2011-01-01

    Unambiguous evidence of ring-shaped self-assembled GaSb nanostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy is presented on the basis of atom-probe tomography reconstructions and dark field transmission electron microscopy imaging. The GaAs capping process causes a strong segregation of Sb out of the center of GaSb quantum dots, leading to the self-assembled GaAs x Sb 1-x quantum rings of 20-30 nm in diameter with x∼0.33. -- Highlights: → Atom-probe tomography resolves QR morphology of GaSb self-assembled GaSb buried nanostructures. → From atom-probe tomography compositional distribution has been obtained. → Strong segregation and morphological changes are observed with respect to uncapped QR.

  9. B0 insensitive multiple-quantum resolved sodium imaging using a phase-rotation scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiege, Daniel P.; Romanzetti, Sandro; Tse, Desmond H. Y.; Brenner, Daniel; Celik, Avdo; Felder, Jörg; Jon Shah, N.

    2013-03-01

    Triple-quantum filtering has been suggested as a mechanism to differentiate signals from different physiological compartments. However, the filtering method is sensitive to static field inhomogeneities because different coherence pathways may interfere destructively. Previously suggested methods employed additional phase-cycles to separately acquire pathways. Whilst this removes the signal dropouts, it reduces the signal-to-noise per unit time. In this work we suggest the use of a phase-rotation scheme to simultaneously acquire all coherence pathways and then separate them via Fourier transform. Hence the method yields single-, double- and triple-quantum filtered images. The phase-rotation requires a minimum of 36 instead of six cycling steps. However, destructive interference is circumvented whilst maintaining full signal-to-noise efficiency for all coherences.

  10. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  11. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems

  12. Effect of capsid proteins to ICG mass ratio on fluorescent quantum yield of virus-resembling optical nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Ico, Gerardo; Matsumura, Paul; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, Valentine; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported construction of a new type of optical nano-construct composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore. We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. To utilize OVGs as effective nano-probes in fluorescence imaging applications, their fluorescence quantum yield needs to be maximized. In this study, we investigate the effect of altering the CP to ICG mass ratio on the fluorescent quantum yield of OVGs. Results of this study provide the basis for construction of OVGs with optimal amounts of CP and ICG to yield maximal fluorescence quantum yield.

  13. Statistical analysis of AFM topographic images of self-assembled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevriuk, V. A.; Brunkov, P. N., E-mail: brunkov@mail.ioffe.ru; Shalnev, I. V.; Gutkin, A. A.; Klimko, G. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Sorokin, S. V.; Konnikov, S. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    To obtain statistical data on quantum-dot sizes, AFM topographic images of the substrate on which the dots under study are grown are analyzed. Due to the nonideality of the substrate containing height differences on the order of the size of nanoparticles at distances of 1-10 {mu}m and the insufficient resolution of closely arranged dots due to the finite curvature radius of the AFM probe, automation of the statistical analysis of their large dot array requires special techniques for processing topographic images to eliminate the loss of a particle fraction during conventional processing. As such a technique, convolution of the initial matrix of the AFM image with a specially selected matrix is used. This makes it possible to determine the position of each nanoparticle and, using the initial matrix, to measure their geometrical parameters. The results of statistical analysis by this method of self-assembled InAs quantum dots formed on the surface of an AlGaAs epitaxial layer are presented. It is shown that their concentration, average size, and half-width of height distribution depend strongly on the In flow and total amount of deposited InAs which are varied within insignificant limits.

  14. Quantum dot-based molecular imaging of cancer cell growth using a clone formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xia-Fei; Fang, Min; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    This aim of the present study was to investigate clonal growth behavior and analyze the proliferation characteristics of cancer cells. The MCF‑7 human breast cancer cell line, SW480 human colon cancer cell line and SGC7901 human gastric cancer cell line were selected to investigate the morphology of cell clones. Quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques (which stained pan‑cytokeratin in the cytoplasm green and Ki67 in the cell nucleus yellow or red) were used to investigate the clone formation rate, cell morphology, discrete tendency, and Ki67 expression and distribution in clones. From the cell clone formation assay, the MCF‑7, SW480 and SGC7901 cells were observed to form clones on days 6, 8 and 12 of cell culture, respectively. These three types of cells had heterogeneous morphology, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratios, and conspicuous pathological mitotic features. The cells at the clone periphery formed multiple pseudopodium. In certain clones, cancer cells at the borderline were separated from the central cell clusters or presented a discrete tendency. With quantum dot‑based molecular targeted imaging techniques, cells with strong Ki67 expression were predominantly shown to be distributed at the clone periphery, or concentrated on one side of the clones. In conclusion, cancer cell clones showed asymmetric growth behavior, and Ki67 was widely expressed in clones of these three cell lines, with strong expression around the clones, or aggregated at one side. Cell clone formation assay based on quantum dots molecular imaging offered a novel method to study the proliferative features of cancer cells, thus providing a further insight into tumor biology.

  15. The Ghosts of Acetylcholine : structure-activity relationships of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ghosts of Acetylcholine : structure-activity relationships of muscle relaxants : registrar communication. ... AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's ...

  16. Micrometer-scale magnetic imaging of geological samples using a quantum diamond microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D. R.; Fu, R. R.; Kehayias, P.; Le Sage, D.; Lima, E. A.; Weiss, B. P.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2017-08-01

    Remanent magnetization in geological samples may record the past intensity and direction of planetary magnetic fields. Traditionally, this magnetization is analyzed through measurements of the net magnetic moment of bulk millimeter to centimeter sized samples. However, geological samples are often mineralogically and texturally heterogeneous at submillimeter scales, with only a fraction of the ferromagnetic grains carrying the remanent magnetization of interest. Therefore, characterizing this magnetization in such cases requires a technique capable of imaging magnetic fields at fine spatial scales and with high sensitivity. To address this challenge, we developed a new instrument, based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, which enables direct imaging of magnetic fields due to both remanent and induced magnetization, as well as optical imaging, of room-temperature geological samples with spatial resolution approaching the optical diffraction limit. We describe the operating principles of this device, which we call the quantum diamond microscope (QDM), and report its optimized image-area-normalized magnetic field sensitivity (20 µTṡµm/Hz1/2), spatial resolution (5 µm), and field of view (4 mm), as well as trade-offs between these parameters. We also perform an absolute magnetic field calibration for the device in different modes of operation, including three-axis (vector) and single-axis (projective) magnetic field imaging. Finally, we use the QDM to obtain magnetic images of several terrestrial and meteoritic rock samples, demonstrating its ability to resolve spatially distinct populations of ferromagnetic carriers.

  17. The b ghost of the pure spinor formalism is nilpotent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandia, Osvaldo, E-mail: osvaldo.chandia@uai.c [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales and Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-01-10

    The ghost for world-sheet reparametrization invariance is not a fundamental field in the pure spinor formalism. It is written as a combination of pure spinor variables which have conformal dimension two and such that it commutes with the BRST operator to give the world-sheet stress tensor. We show that the ghost variable defined in this way is nilpotent since the OPE of b with itself does not have singularities.

  18. Quantum Control of Spins in Diamond for Nanoscale Magnetic Sensing and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutt, Gurudev [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-10-25

    Our research activities during the grant period focused on the challenges of highly accurate and precise magnetometry and magnetic imaging using quantum spins inside diamond. Our work has resulted in 6 papers published in peer-reviewed journals, with two more currently under consideration by referees. We showed that through the use of novel phase estimation algorithms inspired by quantum information science we can carry out accurate and high dynamic range DC magnetometry as well as lock-in detection of oscillating (AC) magnetic fields. We investigated the geometric phase as a route to higher precision quantum information and magnetic sensing applications, and probed the experimental limits to the fidelity of such geometric phase gates. We also demonstrated that there is a spin dependent signal in the charge state flipping of the NV defect center in diamond, which could potentialy be useful for higher fidelity spin readout at room temperature. Some of these projects have now led to further investigation in our lab on multi-photon spectroscopy (manuscript in preparation), and plasmonic guiding of light in metal nanowires (manuscript available on arxiv). In addition, several invited talks were given by the PI, and conference presentations were given by the graduate students and postdocs.

  19. Publication ethics and the ghost management of medical publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sismondo, Sergio; Doucet, Mathieu

    2010-07-01

    It is by now no secret that some scientific articles are ghost authored - that is, written by someone other than the person whose name appears at the top of the article. Ghost authorship, however, is only one sort of ghosting. In this article, we present evidence that pharmaceutical companies engage in the ghost management of the scientific literature, by controlling or shaping several crucial steps in the research, writing, and publication of scientific articles. Ghost management allows the pharmaceutical industry to shape the literature in ways that serve its interests. This article aims to reinforce and expand publication ethics as an important area of concern for bioethics. Since ghost-managed research is primarily undertaken in the interests of marketing, large quantities of medical research violate not just publication norms but also research ethics. Much of this research involves human subjects, and yet is performed not primarily to increase knowledge for broad human benefit, but to disseminate results in the service of profits. Those who sponsor, manage, conduct, and publish such research therefore behave unethically, since they put patients at risk without justification. This leads us to a strong conclusion: if medical journals want to ensure that the research they publish is ethically sound, they should not publish articles that are commercially sponsored.

  20. Ghost poles in the nucleon propagator in the linear σ model approach and its role in πN low-energy theorems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Rocha, C.A.; Wilets, L.

    1997-01-01

    Complex mass poles, or ghost poles, are present in the Hartree-Fock solution of the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the nucleon propagator in renormalizable models with Yukawa-type meson-nucleon couplings, as shown many years ago by Brown, Puff and Wilets (BPW). These ghosts violate basic theorems of quantum field theory and their origin is related to the ultraviolet behavior of the model interactions. Recently, Krein et.al, proved that the ghosts disappear when vertex corrections are included in a self-consistent way, softening the interaction sufficiently in the ultraviolet region. In previous studies of πN scattering using ''dressed'' nucleon propagator and bare vertices, did by Nutt and Wilets in the 70's (NW), it was found that if these poles are explicitly included, the value of the isospin-even amplitude A (+) is satisfied within 20% at threshold. The absence of a theoretical explanation for the ghosts and the lack of chiral symmetry in these previous studies led us to re-investigate the subject using the approach of the linear σ-model and study the interplay of low-energy theorems for πN scattering and ghost poles. For bare interaction vertices we find that ghosts are present in this model as well and that the A (+) value is badly described. As a first approach to remove these complex poles, we dress the vertices with phenomenological form factors and a reasonable agreement with experiment is achieved. In order to fix the two cutoff parameters, we use the A (+) value for the chiral limit (m π →0) and the experimental value of the isoscalar scattering length. Finally, we test our model by calculating the phase shifts for the S waves and we find a good agreement at threshold. (orig.)

  1. Infrared Behavior of Gluon and Ghost Propagators in Landau Gauge QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Smekal, L.; Hauck, A.; Alkofer, R.

    1997-01-01

    A truncation scheme for the Dyson-Schwinger equations of Euclidean QCD in Landau gauge is presented. It implements the Slavnov-Taylor identities for the three-gluon and ghost-gluon vertices, whereas irreducible four-gluon couplings as well as the gluon-ghost and ghost-ghost scattering kernels are neglected. The infrared behavior of gluon and ghost propagators is obtained analytically: The gluon propagator vanishes for small momenta, whereas the ghost propagator diverges strongly. The numerical solutions are compared with recent lattice results. The running coupling approaches a fixed point, α c ≅9.5 , in the infrared. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Scanning tunneling microscopic images and scanning tunneling spectra for coupled rectangular quantum corrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuoka, Shigenori; Tamura, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Assuming that an electron confined by double δ-function barriers lies in a quasi-stationary state, we derived eigenstates and eigenenergies of the electron. Such an electron has a complex eigenenergy, and the imaginary part naturally leads to the lifetime of the electron associated with tunneling through barriers. We applied this point of view to the electron confined in a rectangular quantum corral (QC) on a noble metal surface, and obtained scanning tunneling microscopic images and a scanning tunneling spectrum consistent with experimental ones. We investigated the electron states confined in coupled QCs and obtained the coupled states constructed with bonding and anti-bonding states. Using those energy levels and wavefunctions we specified scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images and scanning tunneling spectra (STS) for the doubly and triply coupled QCs. In addition we pointed out the feature of resonant electron states associated with the same QCs at both ends of the triply coupled QCs.

  3. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses. (paper)

  4. The iQID camera: An ionizing-radiation quantum imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Brian W., E-mail: brian.miller@pnnl.gov [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gregory, Stephanie J.; Fuller, Erin S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Barrett, Harrison H.; Bradford Barber, H.; Furenlid, Lars R. [Center for Gamma-Ray Imaging, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2014-12-11

    We have developed and tested a novel, ionizing-radiation Quantum Imaging Detector (iQID). This scintillation-based detector was originally developed as a high-resolution gamma-ray imager, called BazookaSPECT, for use in single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Recently, we have investigated the detector's response and imaging potential with other forms of ionizing radiation including alpha, neutron, beta, and fission fragment particles. The confirmed response to this broad range of ionizing radiation has prompted its new title. The principle operation of the iQID camera involves coupling a scintillator to an image intensifier. The scintillation light generated by particle interactions is optically amplified by the intensifier and then re-imaged onto a CCD/CMOS camera sensor. The intensifier provides sufficient optical gain that practically any CCD/CMOS camera can be used to image ionizing radiation. The spatial location and energy of individual particles are estimated on an event-by-event basis in real time using image analysis algorithms on high-performance graphics processing hardware. Distinguishing features of the iQID camera include portability, large active areas, excellent detection efficiency for charged particles, and high spatial resolution (tens of microns). Although modest, iQID has energy resolution that is sufficient to discriminate between particles. Additionally, spatial features of individual events can be used for particle discrimination. An important iQID imaging application that has recently been developed is real-time, single-particle digital autoradiography. We present the latest results and discuss potential applications.

  5. Study of the detective quantum efficiency for the kinestatic charge detector as a megavoltage imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samant, Sanjiv S.; Gopal, Arun; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2003-06-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from relatively poor contrast and spatial resolution compared to diagnostic kilovoltage x-ray imaging due to the dominant Compton scattering in the former. Recently available amorphous silicon/selenium based flat-panel imagers overcome many of the limitations of poor contrast and spatial resolution that affect conventional video based electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). An alternative technology is presented here: kinestatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD uses a slot photon beam, high-pressure gas (xenon, 100 atm) and a multi-ion rectangular chamber in scanning mode. An electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning speed with that of the cation drift, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. KCD imaging is characterized by reduced scatter and a high signal-to-noise ratio. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations of modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS) and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of a prototype small field of view KCD detector (384 channels, 0.5 mm spacing) were carried out. Measurements yield DQE[0]=0.19 and DQE[0.5cy/mm]=0.01. KCD imaging is compared to film and commercial EPID systems using phantoms, with the KCD requiring an extremely low dose (0.1 cGy) per image. A proposed cylindrical chamber design with a higher ion-collection depth is expected to further improve image quality (DQE[0]>0.25).

  6. Single molecule localization imaging of exosomes using blinking silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shenfei; Zong, Junzhu; Chen, Chen; Jiang, Xiaoyue; Zhang, Yizhi; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2018-02-01

    Discovering new fluorophores, which are suitable for single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) is important for promoting the applications of SMLM in biological or material sciences. Here, we found that silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) possess a fluorescence blinking behavior, making them an excellent candidate for SMLM. The Si QDs are fabricated using a facile microwave-assisted method. Blinking of Si QDs is confirmed by single particle fluorescence measurement and the spatial resolution achieved is about 30 nm. To explore the potential application of Si QDs as the nanoprobes for SMLM imaging, cell derived exosomes are chosen as the object owing to their small size (50-100 nm in diameter). Since CD63 is commonly presented on the membrane of exosomes, CD63 aptamers are attached to the surface of Si QDs to form nanoprobes which can specifically recognize exosomes. SMLM imaging shows that Si QDs based nanoprobes can indeed realize super resolved optical imaging of exosomes. More importantly, blinking of Si QDs is observed in water or PBS buffer with no need for special imaging buffers. Besides, considering that silicon is highly biocompatible, Si QDs should have minimal cytotoxicity. These features make Si QDs quite suitable for SMLM applications especially for live cell imaging.

  7. Lipidots: competitive organic alternative to quantum dots for in vivo fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravier, Julien; Navarro, Fabrice P.; Delmas, Thomas; Mittler, Frédérique; Couffin, Anne-Claude; Vinet, Françoise; Texier, Isabelle

    2011-09-01

    The use of fluorescent nanostructures can bring several benefits on the signal to background ratio for in vitro microscopy, in vivo small animal imaging, and image-guided surgery. Fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) display outstanding optical properties, with high brightness and low photobleaching rate. However, because of their toxic element core composition and their potential long term retention in reticulo-endothelial organs such as liver, their in vivo human applications seem compromised. The development of new dye-loaded (DiO, DiI, DiD, DiR, and Indocyanine Green (ICG)) lipid nanoparticles for fluorescence imaging (lipidots) is described here. Lipidot optical properties quantitatively compete with those of commercial QDs (QTracker®705). Multichannel in vivo imaging of lymph nodes in mice is demonstrated for doses as low as 2 pmols of particles. Along with their optical properties, fluorescent lipidots display very low cytotoxicity (IC50 > 75 nM), which make them suitable tools for in vitro, and especially in vivo, fluorescence imaging applications.

  8. Synthesis of carbon nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots nanocomposite and its applications in cells labeling and in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; He, Zhe [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Guo, Changrun [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Wang, Liping, E-mail: wanglp@jlu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Xu, Shukun, E-mail: xushukun46@126.com [Chemistry Department, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Due to the unique optical and chemical features of quantum dots and the special structural advantages of carbon nanohorns, it is highly desirable to synthesize nanohorns/quantum dots nanocompsite which can be applied in cell labeling and in vivo imaging. Here, we report a new method which uses chitosan as connector to synthesize nanohorns/chitosan/quantum dots fluorescent nanocomposite. Further more, the synthesized nanocomposite demonstrated strong red fluorescence and had been successfully used in Hela cells labeling and in vivo imaging of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). -- Highlights: Carbon nanohorn/chitosan/QDs nanocomposite was prepared by covalent linkage The nanocomposite was successfully used in the labeling of HeLa cells The nanocomposite was used for in vivo imaging with C. elegans as animal mode.

  9. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Whittier R.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 (micro)T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz -1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm 3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm 3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm 3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T 1 ) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T 1 of ex vivo normal and cancerous

  10. Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Whittier Ryan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 μT. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz-1/2 referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm3 resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm3 images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm3 in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T1) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The

  11. Nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped graphene quantum dots: synthesis from adenosine triphosphate, optical properties, and cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Arundithi; Wang, Yue; Routh, Parimal; Sk, Mahasin Alam; Than, Aung; Lin, Ming; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jie; Sun, Handong; Chen, Peng

    2015-05-07

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are emerging zero-dimensional materials promising a wide spectrum of applications, particularly, as superior fluorescent reporters for bio-imaging and optical sensing. Heteroatom doping can endow GQDs with new or improved photoluminescence properties. Here, we demonstrate a simple strategy for the synthesis of nitrogen and phosphorus co-doped GQDs from a single biomolecule precursor (adenosine triphosphate - ATP). Such ATP-GQDs exhibit high fluorescence quantum yield, strong two-photon upconversion, small molecular weight, high photostability, and good biocompatibility. Furthermore, transferrin conjugated ATP-GQDs have been used for imaging and real-time tracking of transferrin receptors in live cells.

  12. Quantum dot imaging in the second near-infrared optical window: studies on reflectance fluorescence imaging depths by effective fluence rate and multiple image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yebin; Jeong, Sanghwa; Nayoun, Won; Ahn, Boeun; Kwag, Jungheon; Geol Kim, Sang; Kim, Sungjee

    2015-04-01

    Quantum dot (QD) imaging capability was investigated by the imaging depth at a near-infrared second optical window (SOW; 1000 to 1400 nm) using time-modulated pulsed laser excitations to control the effective fluence rate. Various media, such as liquid phantoms, tissues, and in vivo small animals, were used and the imaging depths were compared with our predicted values. The QD imaging depth under excitation of continuous 20 mW/cm2 laser was determined to be 10.3 mm for 2 wt% hemoglobin phantom medium and 5.85 mm for 1 wt% intralipid phantom, which were extended by more than two times on increasing the effective fluence rate to 2000 mW/cm2. Bovine liver and porcine skin tissues also showed similar enhancement in the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) values. A QD sample was inserted into the abdomen of a mouse. With a higher effective fluence rate, the CNR increased more than twofold and the QD sample became clearly visualized, which was completely undetectable under continuous excitation. Multiple acquisitions of QD images and averaging process pixel by pixel were performed to overcome the thermal noise issue of the detector in SOW, which yielded significant enhancement in the imaging capability, showing up to a 1.5 times increase in the CNR.

  13. Self-assembling complexes of quantum dots and scFv antibodies for cancer cell targeting and imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana A Zdobnova

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots represent a novel class of fluorophores with unique physical and chemical properties which could enable a remarkable broadening of the current applications of fluorescent imaging and optical diagnostics. Complexes of quantum dots and antibodies are promising visualising agents for fluorescent detection of selective biomarkers overexpressed in tumor tissues. Here we describe the construction of self-assembling fluorescent complexes of quantum dots and anti-HER1 or anti-HER2/neu scFv antibodies and their interactions with cultured tumor cells. A binding strategy based on a very specific non-covalent interaction between two proteins, barnase and barstar, was used to connect quantum dots and the targeting antibodies. Such a strategy allows combining the targeting and visualization functions simply by varying the corresponding modules of the fluorescent complex.

  14. Methods for reducing ghost rays on the Wolter-I focusing figures of the FOXSI rocket payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago-Casas, Juan Camilo; Glesener, Lindsay; Christe, Steven; Ramsey, Brian; Elsner, Ronald; Courtade, Sasha; Vievering, Juliana; Subramania, Athiray; Krucker, Sam; Bale, Stuart

    2017-08-01

    In high energy solar astrophysics, imaging hard X-rays by direct focusing offers higher dynamic range and greater sensitivity compared to past techniques that used indirect imaging. The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is a sounding rocket payload which uses seven sets of nested Wolter-I figured mirrors that, together with seven high-sensitive semiconductor detectors, observes the Sun in hard X-rays by direct focusing. The FOXSI rocket has successfully flown twice and is funded to fly a third time in summer 2018.The Wolter-I geometry consists of two consecutive mirrors, one paraboloid, and one hyperboloid, that reflect photons at grazing angles. Correctly focused X-rays reflect twice, once per mirror segment. For extended sources, like the Sun, off-axis photons at certain incident angles can reflect on only one mirror and still reach the focal plane, generating a pattern of single-bounce photons, or ‘ghost rays’ that can limit the sensitivity of the observation of focused X-rays. Understanding and cutting down the ghost rays on the FOXSI optics will maximize the instrument’s sensitivity of the solar faintest sources for future flights. We present an analysis of the FOXSI ghost rays based on ray-tracing simulations, as well as the effectiveness of different physical strategies to reduce them.

  15. An Improved Ghost-cell Immersed Boundary Method for Compressible Inviscid Flow Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary

  16. An improved ghost-cell immersed boundary method for compressible flow simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Cheng; Lee, Bok Jik; Im, Hong G.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents an improved ghost-cell immersed boundary approach to represent a solid body in compressible flow simulations. In contrast to the commonly used approaches, in the present work ghost cells are mirrored through the boundary

  17. A new interpretation of the two-photon entangled experiments via quantum mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, D.B.; Constantin, P.

    1997-01-01

    The spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) is a nonlinear optical process in which a laser pump beam (p) incident on a nonlinear crystal leads to the emission of a correlated pair of photons (signal (s) and idler (i)). In this process, energy and momentum of photons are conserved. Recently, the process allowed to demonstrate two photon 'ghost' imaging and 'ghost' interference diffraction patterns as well as other new phenomena from the geometric and physical optics. In this paper we consider that the key for understanding all of above results is given by the following two distinctive features of the SPDC crystals: 1 - the Cherenkov-like coherence conditions of the signal (or idler) photon; 2 - the existence of the crossing symmetric processes: p + s → i, p + i → s, as real processes in the SPDC crystals which can be described by the same transitions amplitude as that of the original SPDC process. Hence, the SPDC crystals can act as real mirrors (quantum mirror) since by the crossing processes and signal photon s(ω s , - k s vector) (or idler photon i(ω i , - k i vector)) is transformed in an idler photon i s (ω i , - k i vector) (or signal photon s i (ω s , - k s vector)), respectively. The proof of the reality of these phenomena is based on the optical phase conjugation property of the SPDC crystals. The high quality of the quantum mirrors is given by the distortion-undoing and amplification properties of these mirrors. Therefore, image of an object will be well observed only in coincidence measurements when the aperture, lens, and fiber tip are located according to the Gaussian thin-lens equation. In a similar way we obtain the interpretation of the results for the two photon entangled interference-diffraction patterns. These new results allow us to suggest that the quantum photography of objects, quantum holography, etc, can be now experimentally demonstrated. (authors)

  18. Short term depression unmasks the ghost frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd V Olde Scheper

    Full Text Available Short Term Plasticity (STP has been shown to exist extensively in synapses throughout the brain. Its function is more or less clear in the sense that it alters the probability of synaptic transmission at short time scales. However, it is still unclear what effect STP has on the dynamics of neural networks. We show, using a novel dynamic STP model, that Short Term Depression (STD can affect the phase of frequency coded input such that small networks can perform temporal signal summation and determination with high accuracy. We show that this property of STD can readily solve the problem of the ghost frequency, the perceived pitch of a harmonic complex in absence of the base frequency. Additionally, we demonstrate that this property can explain dynamics in larger networks. By means of two models, one of chopper neurons in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus and one of a cortical microcircuit with inhibitory Martinotti neurons, it is shown that the dynamics in these microcircuits can reliably be reproduced using STP. Our model of STP gives important insights into the potential roles of STP in self-regulation of cortical activity and long-range afferent input in neuronal microcircuits.

  19. Dermot Bolger’s Ghosting the War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Kędzierska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dermot Bolger’s Walking the Road (2007 is a tribute to Francis Ledwidge (1887–1917, one of the greatest Irish poets of the First World War. Focusing on the life and afterlife of Ledwidge who, as depicted in Bolger’s play, emblematizes the condition of other Great War combatants doomed to oblivion, this essay, concerned with the various functions of the deployment of ghosts in Bolger’s drama, argues that spectrality can become an effective means of revealing the plight of the war dead: the unremembered, whose names were effectively erased from public memory and who, thus turned into homeless revenants, were forced into a continual involvement in the war from which they cannot escape, even after death. As a spectral witness who moves between pre-war Ireland and the world of the trenches, Bolger’s hero makes one aware how similar these realities are. Furthermore, as a classic case of shell shock, he demonstrates the role of haunting in the narrative of trauma, identity and memory. Last but not least, whilst enhancing the gothic dimension of the war, Frank’s perceptions, as well as his spectral discourse, not only contribute significantly to illuminating the enigma which he personified, but, by providing an insight into his search for himself, they convey the plight of truth seekers who grasp, yet never fully encompass the Irish experience of the war.

  20. Evidence of ghost suppression in gluon mass scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, A. C.; Binosi, D.; Figueiredo, C. T.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2018-03-01

    In this work we study the impact that the ghost sector of pure Yang-Mills theories may have on the generation of a dynamical gauge boson mass scale, which hinges on the appearance of massless poles in the fundamental vertices of the theory, and the subsequent realization of the well-known Schwinger mechanism. The process responsible for the formation of such structures is itself dynamical in nature, and is governed by a set of Bethe-Salpeter type of integral equations. While in previous studies the presence of massless poles was assumed to be exclusively associated with the background-gauge three-gluon vertex, in the present analysis we allow them to appear also in the corresponding ghost-gluon vertex. The full analysis of the resulting Bethe-Salpeter system reveals that the contribution of the poles associated with the ghost-gluon vertex are particularly suppressed, their sole discernible effect being a slight modification in the running of the gluon mass scale, for momenta larger than a few GeV. In addition, we examine the behavior of the (background-gauge) ghost-gluon vertex in the limit of vanishing ghost momentum, and derive the corresponding version of Taylor's theorem. These considerations, together with a suitable Ansatz, permit us the full reconstruction of the pole sector of the two vertices involved.

  1. Atomic-Scale Nuclear Spin Imaging Using Quantum-Assisted Sensors in Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ajoy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear spin imaging at the atomic level is essential for the understanding of fundamental biological phenomena and for applications such as drug discovery. The advent of novel nanoscale sensors promises to achieve the long-standing goal of single-protein, high spatial-resolution structure determination under ambient conditions. In particular, quantum sensors based on the spin-dependent photoluminescence of nitrogen-vacancy (NV centers in diamond have recently been used to detect nanoscale ensembles of external nuclear spins. While NV sensitivity is approaching single-spin levels, extracting relevant information from a very complex structure is a further challenge since it requires not only the ability to sense the magnetic field of an isolated nuclear spin but also to achieve atomic-scale spatial resolution. Here, we propose a method that, by exploiting the coupling of the NV center to an intrinsic quantum memory associated with the nitrogen nuclear spin, can reach a tenfold improvement in spatial resolution, down to atomic scales. The spatial resolution enhancement is achieved through coherent control of the sensor spin, which creates a dynamic frequency filter selecting only a few nuclear spins at a time. We propose and analyze a protocol that would allow not only sensing individual spins in a complex biomolecule, but also unraveling couplings among them, thus elucidating local characteristics of the molecule structure.

  2. Are quantum dots ready for in vivo imaging in human subjects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Weibo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNanotechnology has the potential to profoundly transform the nature of cancer diagnosis and cancer patient management in the future. Over the past decade, quantum dots (QDs have become one of the fastest growing areas of research in nanotechnology. QDs are fluorescent semiconductor nanoparticles suitable for multiplexed in vitro and in vivo imaging. Numerous studies on QDs have resulted in major advancements in QD surface modification, coating, biocompatibility, sensitivity, multiplexing, targeting specificity, as well as important findings regarding toxicity and applicability. For in vitro applications, QDs can be used in place of traditional organic fluorescent dyes in virtually any system, outperforming organic dyes in the majority of cases. In vivo targeted tumor imaging with biocompatible QDs has recently become possible in mouse models. With new advances in QD technology such as bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, synthesis of smaller size non-Cd based QDs, improved surface coating and conjugation, and multifunctional probes for multimodality imaging, it is likely that human applications of QDs will soon be possible in a clinical setting.

  3. Fluorescence-enhanced gadolinium-doped zinc oxide quantum dots for magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanlan; Ai, Kelong; Yuan, Qinghai; Lu, Lehui

    2011-02-01

    We report here the development of Gd-doped ZnO quantum dots (QDs) as dual modal fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging nanoprobes. They are fabricated in a simple, versatile and environmentally friendly method, not only decreasing the difficulty and complexity, but also avoiding the increase of particle's size brought about by silica coating procedure in the synthesis of nanoprobes reported previously. These nanoprobes, with exceptionally small size and enhanced fluorescence resulting from the Gd doping, can label successfully the HeLa cells in short time and present no evidence of toxicity or adverse affect on cell growth even at the concentration up to 1 mm. These results show that such nanoprobes have low toxicity, especially in comparison with the traditional PEGylated CdSe/ZnS or CdSe/CdS QDs. In MRI studies, they exert strong positive contrast effect with a large longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) of water proton of 16 mm(-1) s(-1). Their capability of imaging HeLa cells with MRI implies that they have great potential as MRI contrast agents. Combining the high sensitivity of fluorescence imaging with high spatial resolution of MRI, We expect that the as-prepared Gd-doped Zno QDs can provide a better reliability of the collected data and find promising applications in biological, medical and other fields. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Scintillating Quantum Dots for Imaging X-rays (SQDIX) for Aircraft Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Eric (Principal Investigator); Williams, Phillip (Principal Investigator); Dehaven, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Scintillation is the process currently employed by conventional x-ray detectors to create x-ray images. Scintillating quantum dots or nano-crystals (StQDs) are a novel, nanometer-scale material that upon excitation by x-rays, re-emit the absorbed energy as visible light. StQDs theoretically have higher output efficiency than conventional scintillating materials and are more environmental friendly. This paper will present the characterization of several critical elements in the use of StQDs that have been performed along a path to the use of this technology in wide spread x-ray imaging. Initial work on the SQDIX system has shown great promise to create state-of-the-art sensors using StQDs as a sensor material. In addition, this work also demonstrates a high degree of promise using StQDs in microstructured fiber optics. Using the microstructured fiber as a light guide could greatly increase the capture efficiency a StQDs based imaging sensor.

  5. Integrated smartphone imaging of quantum dot photoluminescence and Förster resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W. Russ

    2015-06-01

    Smartphones and other mobile devices are emerging as promising analytical platforms for point-of-care diagnostics, particularly when combined with nanotechnology. For example, we have shown that the optical properties of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are well suited to photoluminescence (PL) detection with a smartphone camera. However, this previous work has utilized an external excitation source for interrogation of QD PL. In this proceeding, we demonstrate that the white-light LED photographic flashes built into smartphones can be optically filtered to yield blue light suitable for excitation of QD PL. Measurements were made by recording video with filtered flash illumination and averaging the frames of the video to obtain images with good signal-to-background ratios. These images permitted detection of green-emitting and red-emitting QDs at levels comparable to those possible with excitation using an external long-wave UV lamp. The optical properties of QDs proved to be uniquely suited to smartphone PL imaging, exhibiting emission that was 1-2 orders magnitude brighter than that of common fluorescent dyes under the same conditions. Excitation with the smartphone flash was also suitable for imaging of FRET between green-emitting QD donors and Alexa Fluor 555 (A555) fluorescent dye acceptors. No significant difference in FRET imaging capability was observed between excitation with the smartphone flash and a long-wave UV lamp. Although the smartphone flash did have some disadvantages compared to an external UV lamp, these disadvantages are potentially offset by the benefit of having excitation and detection integrated into the smartphone.

  6. CLONING HARDDISK MELALUI JARINGAN KOMPUTER DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN SOFTWARE GHOST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mufadhol

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Kloning adalah proses duplikat isi harddisk ke harddisk yang lain. Jadi isi kedua harddisk adalah sama persis. Kloning harddisk dilakukan untuk mempercepat proses instalasi perangkat lunak dengan spesifikasi hardware yang sama. Kloning harddisk melalui jaringan komputer dapat dilakukan dari harddisk master ke harddisk slave atau harddisk tujuan. Pada proses kloning harddisk melalui jaringan komputer hardis induk berada di komputer server saja sedangkan slave harddisk berada di komputer klien saja. Harddisk setiap komputer tidak perlu digandeng (diparalel. Dalam melakukan kloning harddisk melalui jaringan komputer diperlukan beberapa program aplikasi antara lain: Ghost Cast Server, Boot Wizard, LAN Boot Floppy Klien, Ghost Explore. Aplikasi yang sering digunakan untuk kloning adalah software Ghost yang dirilis oleh Symantect Coorporation.

  7. Ombud’s corner: Do you believe in ghosts?

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    “Ghosting” is the common term used to describe situations when a piece of work is done by somebody but credited to somebody else. Ghosting often occurs in creative fields, such as writing texts, music, developing graphic charters or translating. Let’s celebrate Halloween this year by acknowledging the contributions of all the CERN ghosts who work tirelessly behind the scenes in all areas of the Organization.   “Ghosting” is a recognised job with international professional associations, particularly in the field of text writing. The role requires strict anonymity, good reciprocal trust and understanding between the people involved, and the professional flexibility to be able to adapt to different situations and different styles of expression as needed. At CERN there are many ghosts: you can find them in the Translation and Minute-writing service, whose members also provide valuable editing and proof-reading skills; in the Communications group w...

  8. The Ghost Tradition: Helen Of Troy In The Elizabethan Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADUCANU ADRIANA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reputedly the most beautiful woman who has ever lived, Helen of Troy (or Sparta is less well known for her elusive, ghost-like dimension. Homer wrote that the greatest war of Western classical antiquity started because of Helen's adultery followed by her elopement to Troy. Other ancient writers and historians, among theme Aeschylus, Stesichorus, Hesiod, Pausanias, Aristophanes, Euripides and Gorgias of Leontini, challenged the Homeric version, in various ways and attempted to exonerate Helen either by focusing on her phantom/ ghost/ as the generic object of man's desire and scorn or by casting doubt on the mechanisms of the blaming process. This paper argues that the Elizabethans Christopher Marlowe and William Shakespeare adopted and adapted the anti-Homer version of the depiction of Helen, what I here call “the ancient Helen ghost tradition”; nevertheless, in so doing they further reinforced the character's demonic features and paradoxically achieved a return to the adulterous Homeric Helen.

  9. Non-perturbative power corrections to ghost and gluon propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucaud, Philippe; Leroy, Jean-Pierre; Yaouanc, Alain Le; Lokhov, Alexey; Micheli, Jacques; Pene, Olivier; RodrIguez-Quintero, Jose; Roiesnel, Claude

    2006-01-01

    We study the dominant non-perturbative power corrections to the ghost and gluon propagators in Landau gauge pure Yang-Mills theory using OPE and lattice simulations. The leading order Wilson coefficients are proven to be the same for both propagators. The ratio of the ghost and gluon propagators is thus free from this dominant power correction. Indeed, a purely perturbative fit of this ratio gives smaller value ( ≅ 270MeV) of Λ M-barS-bar than the one obtained from the propagators separately( ≅ 320MeV). This argues in favour of significant non-perturbative ∼ 1/q 2 power corrections in the ghost and gluon propagators. We check the self-consistency of the method

  10. Ghost-free, finite, fourth-order D = 3 gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deser, S

    2009-09-04

    Canonical analysis of a recently proposed linear + quadratic curvature gravity model in D = 3 establishes its pure, irreducibly fourth derivative, quadratic curvature limit as both ghost-free and power-counting UV finite, thereby maximally violating standard folklore. This limit is representative of a generic class whose kinetic terms are conformally invariant in any dimension, but it is unique in simultaneously avoiding the transverse-traceless graviton ghosts plaguing D > 3 quadratic actions as well as double pole propagators in its other variables. While the two-term model is also unitary, its additional mode's second-derivative nature forfeits finiteness.

  11. Evaluation of high frequency ghost cavitation emissions for two different seismic air-gun arrays using numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabandeloo, Babak; Landrø, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Sound is deployed by marine mammals for variety of vital purposes such as finding food, communication, echolocation, etc. On the other hand human activities generate underwater noise. One major type of acoustic source is marine seismic acquisition which is carried out to image layers beneath the seabed exploiting reflected acoustic and elastic waves. Air-gun arrays are the most common and efficient marine seismic sources. Field measurements using broad band hydrophones have revealed that acoustic energies emitted by air-gun arrays contains frequencies from a few Hz up to tens of kHz. Frequencies below 200 Hz benefit seismic imaging and the rest is normally considered as wasted energy. On the other hand, the high frequency range (above 200 Hz) overlaps with hearing curves of many marine mammals and especially toothed whales and may have an impact on their behavior. A phenomenon called ghost cavitation is recently recognized to be responsible for a major part of these high frequencies (> 5 kHz). Acoustic pressure waves of individual air guns reflected from sea surface can cause the hydrostatic pressure to drop towards zero close to the source array. In these regions there is a high probability for water vapor cavity growth and subsequent collapse. We have simulated ghost cavitation cloud using numerical modelling and the results are validated by comparing with field measurements. The model is used to compare the amount of high frequency noise due to ghost cavitation for two different air gun arrays. Both of the arrays have three subarrays but the array distance for the one with 2730 in3 air volume is 6 meters and for the slightly bigger array (3250 in3 in air volume) the subarrays are separated by 8 meters. Simulation results indicate that the second array, despite larger subarray distance, generates stronger ghost cavitation signal.

  12. Anti-VEGF antibody conjugated CdHgTe quantum dots as a fluorescent probe for imaging in living mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Lili; Cui, Hongjing [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Liu, Yu [Department of Biochemistry, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Zhong, Wenying, E-mail: wyzhong@cpu.edu.cn [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China); Key laboratory of Biomedical Functional Materials, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing (China)

    2016-05-15

    The dual-function anti-VEGF antibody conjugated CdHgTe quantum dots with good targeting property was successfully prepared. In this system, anti-VEGF antibody is not only a target agent but also a therapeutic drug. The anti-VEGF antibody conjugated near-infrared quantum dots can achieve the purposes of detection and treatment at the same time. As-prepared dual-function fluorescent probe in this work has been successfully applied for in vivo and in vitro imaging, which is promising in rapid tumor detection.

  13. Ghost responses of the FitzHugh–Nagumo system induced by colored noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordet, M.; Morfu, S.; Marquié, P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate both numerically and experimentally how the triggering of Ghost Stochastic Resonance is affected by colored noise in a FitzHugh–Nagumo circuit. It is experimentally shown that when the circuit is excited with a bichromatic signal, weak colored noise can induce a response with a main ghost frequency which is not present in the excitation. We analyze the occurrence of this ghost frequency versus the noise intensity and the correlation time of the colored noise. Numerical simulations and experiments confirm that for larger noise correlation time, submultiples of this ghost frequency dominate the system response while the previous expected ghost frequency is less observed

  14. Quantum dots. From multimodal imaging diagnostics to radiation-induced photodynamic therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakalova, R.; Aoki, Ichio; Zhelev, Z.; Kanno, Iwao

    2008-01-01

    Nanotechnology-based tools and techniques are rapidly emerging in the field of molecular imaging, biosensing and targeted drug delivery. Employing constructs such as quantum dots (QDs), fullerenes, dendrimers, liposomes, nanotubes and emulsion, these advances lead toward the concept of personalized medicine and the potential for very early, even pre-symptomatic, diagnoses coupled with highly effective targeted therapy. The new term nanomedicine has been used recently. Why nanoparticles are so attractive for molecular imaging diagnostics? Nanoparticles allow a concentration of a large amount of contrast molecules in a very small area/volume (∼20-100 nm in diameter). Thus, after conjugation with target-specific ligands, even single cells or molecules could be detected in the blood stream or tissues, using different techniques. The nanoparticles have also a potential for therapeutic purposes (e.g., drug and gene delivery), which is expected to generate innovations and play a crucial role in medicine. For example, the diagnosis and treatment of cancer at the cellular level could be greatly improved with the development of techniques that enable a highly selective interaction and delivery of analyte probes into the cancer cells and subcellular compartments. Target-specific drug/gene delivery and early diagnosis of cancer is one of the priority research areas in which nanomedicine will play a vital role. Nanomedicine attracts also other clinical fields as surgery, cardiology, respiratory diseases, etc. (author)

  15. Thin-Film Quantum Dot Photodiode for Monolithic Infrared Image Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Pawel E; Georgitzikis, Epimitheas; Maes, Jorick; Vamvaka, Ioanna; Frazzica, Fortunato; Van Olmen, Jan; De Moor, Piet; Heremans, Paul; Hens, Zeger; Cheyns, David

    2017-12-10

    Imaging in the infrared wavelength range has been fundamental in scientific, military and surveillance applications. Currently, it is a crucial enabler of new industries such as autonomous mobility (for obstacle detection), augmented reality (for eye tracking) and biometrics. Ubiquitous deployment of infrared cameras (on a scale similar to visible cameras) is however prevented by high manufacturing cost and low resolution related to the need of using image sensors based on flip-chip hybridization. One way to enable monolithic integration is by replacing expensive, small-scale III-V-based detector chips with narrow bandgap thin-films compatible with 8- and 12-inch full-wafer processing. This work describes a CMOS-compatible pixel stack based on lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS QD) with tunable absorption peak. Photodiode with a 150-nm thick absorber in an inverted architecture shows dark current of 10 -6 A/cm² at -2 V reverse bias and EQE above 20% at 1440 nm wavelength. Optical modeling for top illumination architecture can improve the contact transparency to 70%. Additional cooling (193 K) can improve the sensitivity to 60 dB. This stack can be integrated on a CMOS ROIC, enabling order-of-magnitude cost reduction for infrared sensors.

  16. Harriot, Digges, and the Ghost in Hamlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, P. D.

    1998-12-01

    The cosmic allegorical interpretation of Hamlet (BAAS 28, 1305, 1996; 29, 1262, 1997; Giornale di Astronomia 24:3, 27, 1998) may be regarded as a Galilean postulatum with testable consequences. It associates leading characters in the play with cosmologists from the time of Ptolemy (Claudius) to Tycho Brahe (Rosencrantz and Guildenstern) and Thomas Digges (Hamlet). Lines 3.3.8-23 describe how the concepts of geocentricism and the sphere of fixed stars shared by the Ptolemaic and Tychonic models are imperiled by the Infinite Universe of Digges. Hitherto baffling lines 5.2.100-125 list in short order at least 16 attributes of Thomas Harriot, including his short bibliography (``soul of great article'') which may explain why he receives mention only in passing. The Ghost is Thomas Digges' father Leonard, who is a ``mole'' in the ``cellarage.'' That Leonard may have gone underground following restoration of his lands is supported by the range of years (1559-1574) of his alleged death, and conspicuous absence of a gravesite. Circumstances of his disappearance have remained mysterious (N&Q 2:X, 162, 1860; 6:X, 368, 515, 1884; 8:V, 186, 1894.) I suggest that, having been saved from execution and restored to gentility, he continued to work, writing in the tradition of his confrere's father Thomas Wyatt, Sr. who pioneered the English sonnet. The first Dowden series of sonnets reflects his love for his only child. The history of the perspective glass explains lines in Sonnets 14 and 103 (``my blunt invention'') and in the I.M.S. encomium wherein he did ``rowle back the heavens'' with a ``cleere and equall surface'' that is ``reflecting ages past.'' A portrait of Tycho helps date Sonnet 16 to between 1581 and 1585. Sonnets 18 and 87 would date to 1583 and 1595. Allusions to old age are not surprising. I.M.'s words: ``Wee wondred (Shake-speare) that thou went'st so soone'' and ``An Actors Art, can dye, and liue to acte a second part'' are explained, as are sources for The

  17. Elimination of ghost markers during dual sensor-based infrared tracking of multiple individual reflective markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroian, G.; Falco, T.; Seuntjens, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The accuracy of dose delivery in radiotherapy is affected by the uncertainty in tumor localization. Motion of internal anatomy due to physiological processes such as respiration may lead to significant displacements which compromise tumor coverage and generate irradiation of healthy tissue. Real-time tracking with infrared-based systems is often used for tracking thoracic motion in radiation therapy. We studied the origin of ghost markers ('crosstalk') which may appear during dual sensor-based infrared tracking of independent reflective markers. Ghost markers occur when two or more reflective markers are coplanar with each other and with the sensors of the two camera-based infrared tracking system. Analysis shows that sensors are not points but they have a finite extent and this extent determines for each marker a 'ghost volume'. If one reflective marker enters the ghost volume of another marker, ghost markers will be reported by the tracking system; if the reflective markers belong to a surface their 'ghost volume' is reduced to a 'ghost surface' (ghost zone). Appearance of ghost markers is predicted for markers taped on the torso of an anthropomorphic phantom. This study illustrates the dependence of the shape, extent, and location of the ghost zones on the shape of the anthropomorphic phantom, the angle of view of the tracking system, and the distance between the tracking system and the anthropomorphic phantom. It is concluded that the appearance of ghost markers can be avoided by positioning the markers outside the ghost zones of the other markers. However, if this is not possible and the initial marker configuration is ghost marker-free, ghost markers can be eliminated during real-time tracking by virtue of the fact that they appear in the coordinate data sequence only temporarily

  18. Suppressing Ghost Diffraction in E-Beam-Written Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel; Backlund, Johan

    2009-01-01

    A modified scheme for electron-beam (E-beam) writing used in the fabrication of convex or concave diffraction gratings makes it possible to suppress the ghost diffraction heretofore exhibited by such gratings. Ghost diffraction is a spurious component of diffraction caused by a spurious component of grating periodicity as described below. The ghost diffraction orders appear between the main diffraction orders and are typically more intense than is the diffuse scattering from the grating. At such high intensity, ghost diffraction is the dominant source of degradation of grating performance. The pattern of a convex or concave grating is established by electron-beam writing in a resist material coating a substrate that has the desired convex or concave shape. Unfortunately, as a result of the characteristics of electrostatic deflectors used to control the electron beam, it is possible to expose only a small field - typically between 0.5 and 1.0 mm wide - at a given fixed position of the electron gun relative to the substrate. To make a grating larger than the field size, it is necessary to move the substrate to make it possible to write fields centered at different positions, so that the larger area is synthesized by "stitching" the exposed fields.

  19. Teen Girls' Resistance and the Disappearing Social in "Ghost World."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroux, Henry A.

    2002-01-01

    Examines "Ghost World," a Hollywood film about youth, friendship, alienation, and survival, critically investigating how popular representations of youth signal a particular crisis of the social through a discourse of privatization, which fails to locate youth and problems they face within the related geographies of the social and political. The…

  20. Ghost crabs on a treadmill: Oxygen Uptake and Haemocyanin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ghost crabs Ocypode ceratophthalmus were exercised on a specially constructed treadmill. At a running speed of 13,3 cm s-1, most crabs ran for 2 h before getting fatigued. At this speed the oxygen consumption rate (MO2) was measured in time intervals for a total of 52 min. For exercised crabs the MO2 values are about ...

  1. Ghost fringe removal techniques using Lissajous data presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, David J; Eggert, J H; Celliers, P M; Hicks, D G

    2016-03-01

    A VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a Doppler velocity interferometer which is an important optical diagnostic in shockwave experiments at the national laboratories, used to measure equation of state (EOS) of materials under extreme conditions. Unwanted reflection of laser light from target windows can produce an additional component to the VISAR fringe record that can distort and obscure the true velocity signal. Accurately removing this so-called ghost artifact component is essential for achieving high accuracy EOS measurements, especially when the true light signal is only weakly reflected from the shock front. Independent of the choice of algorithm for processing the raw data into a complex fringe signal, we have found it beneficial to plot this signal as a Lissajous and seek the proper center of this path, even under time varying intensity which can shift the perceived center. The ghost contribution is then solved by a simple translation in the complex plane that recenters the Lissajous path. For continuous velocity histories, we find that plotting the fringe magnitude vs nonfringing intensity and optimizing linearity is an invaluable tool for determining accurate ghost offsets. For discontinuous velocity histories, we have developed graphically inspired methods which relate the results of two VISARs having different velocity per fringe proportionalities or assumptions of constant fringe magnitude to find the ghost offset. The technique can also remove window reflection artifacts in generic interferometers, such as in the metrology of surfaces.

  2. Fundamental aspects of quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorini, V.; Frigerio, A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: general problems and crucial experiments; the classical behavior of measuring instruments; quantum interference effect for two atoms radiating a single photon; quantization and stochastic processes; quantum Markov processes driven by Bose noise; chaotic behavior in quantum mechanics; quantum ergodicity and chaos; microscopic and macroscopic levels of description; fundamental properties of the ground state of atoms and molecules; n-level systems interacting with Bosons - semiclassical limits; general aspects of gauge theories; adiabatic phase shifts for neutrons and photons; the spins of cyons and dyons; round-table discussion the the Aharonov-Bohm effect; gravity in quantum mechanics; the gravitational phase transition; anomalies and their cancellation; a new gauge without any ghost for Yang-Mills Theory; and energy density and roughening in the 3-D Ising ferromagnet

  3. X-ray ‘ghost images’ could cut radiation doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sophia

    2018-03-01

    On its own, a single-pixel camera captures pictures that are pretty dull: squares that are completely black, completely white, or some shade of gray in between. All it does, after all, is detect brightness. Yet by connecting a single-pixel camera to a patterned light source, a team of physicists in China has made detailed x-ray images using a statistical technique called ghost imaging, first pioneered 20 years ago in infrared and visible light. Researchers in the field say future versions of this system could take clear x-ray photographs with cheap cameras—no need for lenses and multipixel detectors—and less cancer-causing radiation than conventional techniques.

  4. Single molecule localization imaging of telomeres and centromeres using fluorescence in situ hybridization and semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Lu, Ju; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Ruohu; Cui, Yiping

    2018-07-13

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) is a powerful tool for imaging biological targets at the nanoscale. In this report, we present SMLM imaging of telomeres and centromeres using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The FISH probes were fabricated by decorating CdSSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with telomere or centromere complementary DNA strands. SMLM imaging experiments using commercially available peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes labeled with organic fluorophores were also conducted to demonstrate the advantages of using QDs FISH probes. Compared with the PNA probes, the QDs probes have the following merits. First, the fluorescence blinking of QDs can be realized in aqueous solution or PBS buffer without thiol, which is a key buffer component for organic fluorophores' blinking. Second, fluorescence blinking of the QDs probe needs only one excitation light (i.e. 405 nm). While fluorescence blinking of the organic fluorophores usually requires two illumination lights, that is, the activation light (i.e. 405 nm) and the imaging light. Third, the high quantum yield, multiple switching times and a good optical stability make the QDs more suitable for long-term imaging. The localization precision achieved in telomeres and centromeres imaging experiments is about 30 nm, which is far beyond the diffraction limit. SMLM has enabled new insights into telomeres or centromeres on the molecular level, and it is even possible to determine the length of telomere and become a potential technique for telomere-related investigation.

  5. High-resolution imaging of magnetic fields using scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong de Los Santos, Luis E.

    Development of a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope system with interchangeable sensor configurations for imaging magnetic fields of room-temperature (RT) samples with sub-millimeter resolution. The low-critical-temperature (Tc) niobium-based monolithic SQUID sensor is mounted in the tip of a sapphire rod and thermally anchored to the cryostat helium reservoir. A 25 mum sapphire window separates the vacuum space from the RT sample. A positioning mechanism allows adjusting the sample-to-sensor spacing from the top of the Dewar. I have achieved a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100 mum, which could be maintained for periods of up to 4 weeks. Different SQUID sensor configurations are necessary to achieve the best combination of spatial resolution and field sensitivity for a given magnetic source. For imaging thin sections of geological samples, I used a custom-designed monolithic low-Tc niobium bare SQUID sensor, with an effective diameter of 80 mum, and achieved a field sensitivity of 1.5 pT/Hz1/2 and a magnetic moment sensitivity of 5.4 x 10-18 Am2/Hz1/2 at a sensor-to-sample spacing of 100 mum in the white noise region for frequencies above 100 Hz. Imaging action currents in cardiac tissue requires higher field sensitivity, which can only be achieved by compromising spatial resolution. I developed a monolithic low-Tc niobium multiloop SQUID sensor, with sensor sizes ranging from 250 mum to 1 mm, and achieved sensitivities of 480 - 180 fT/Hz1/2 in the white noise region for frequencies above 100 Hz, respectively. For all sensor configurations, the spatial resolution was comparable to the effective diameter and limited by the sensor-to-sample spacing. Spatial registration allowed us to compare high-resolution images of magnetic fields associated with action currents and optical recordings of transmembrane potentials to study the bidomain nature of cardiac tissue or to match petrography to magnetic field maps in thin sections of

  6. Modeling quantum noise of phosphors used in medical X-ray imaging detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kalivas, N; Cavouras, D; Costaridou, L; Nomicos, C D; Panayiotakis, G S

    1999-01-01

    The noise properties of the granular phosphor screens, which are utilized in X-ray imaging detectors, are studied in terms of the quantum noise transfer function (QNTF). An analytical model, taking into account the effect of K-characteristic X-rays reabsorption within the phosphor material and the optical properties of the phosphor, was developed. The optical properties of the phosphor material required by the model were obtained from literature, except for the optical diffusion length (sigma) that was determined by data fitting and was found to be 26 cm sup 2 /g. The deviation between theoretical and experimental data is sigma depended. Specifically for sigma=26 cm sup 2 /g and sigma=25 cm sup 2 /g the respective deviations between experimental and predicted results were 0.698% and -1.597%. However for relative differences in sigma more than 15% from the value 26 cm sup 2 /g, the corresponding deviations exceed by 6 times the value of 0.698%. The model was tested via comparison to experimental results obtain...

  7. Nano-imaging of the lymph network structure with quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikage, Makoto; Gonda, Kohsuke; Takeda, Motohiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki [Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kamei, Takashi; Satomi, Susumu [Department of Advanced Surgical Science and Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); Kobayashi, Masaki; Kumasaka, Masutaka [Department of Electronics and Intelligent Systems, Tohoku Institute of Technology, Yagiyama Kasumicho, Taihaku-ku, Sendai 982-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, Mika, E-mail: gonda@m.tains.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Tohoku University Hospital, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan)

    2010-05-07

    Sentinel lymph node diagnosis contributes to operative strategy in cancer surgery. During lymph node metastasis, cancer cells first reach the sentinel lymph node (SLN) via lymph flow. To perform SLN biopsy effectively, it is important that cancer cells are detected with high sensitivity in SLN connected to the tumor site. Here we present a method to visualize a high-risk area in the SLN for lymph node metastasis with a high degree of accuracy. Quantum dots (QDs), bright fluorescent nanoparticles, were endoscopically injected into the gastrointestinal wall of pigs, and their signal was specifically detected in the SLN with a laparoscopic device. Single-particle imaging under a confocal microscope showed that the QDs were distributed heterogeneously in the SLN and that their distribution marked the inflow locus of afferent lymphatic vessels where lymph node metastasis begins. Moreover, we developed a method using cellular marker conjugated QDs that visualizes specific cells in SLNs, suggesting that this method can be applied for the detection of cancer cells in sentinel lymph nodes using tumor-specific-molecular conjugated QDs. These results show that our method might significantly increase the detection rate of cancer metastasis in SLNs.

  8. A photoelectron imaging and quantum chemistry study of the deprotonated indole anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Michael A; Crellin, Jonathan; Henley, Alice; Fielding, Helen H

    2018-05-29

    Indole is an important molecular motif in many biological molecules and exists in its deprotonated anionic form in the cyan fluorescent protein, an analogue of green fluorescent protein. However, the electronic structure of the deprotonated indole anion has been relatively unexplored. Here, we use a combination of anion photoelectron velocity-map imaging measurements and quantum chemistry calculations to probe the electronic structure of the deprotonated indole anion. We report vertical detachment energies (VDEs) of 2.45 ± 0.05 eV and 3.20 ± 0.05 eV, respectively. The value for D0 is in agreement with recent high-resolution measurements whereas the value for D1 is a new measurement. We find that the first electronically excited singlet state of the anion, S1(ππ*), lies above the VDE and has shape resonance character with respect to the D0 detachment continuum and Feshbach resonance character with respect to the D1 continuum.

  9. Characterization of VCAM-1-binding peptide-functionalized quantum dots for molecular imaging of inflamed endothelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chen

    Full Text Available Inflammation-induced activation of endothelium constitutes one of the earliest changes during atherogenesis. New imaging techniques that allow detecting activated endothelial cells can improve the identification of persons at high cardiovascular risk in early stages. Quantum dots (QDs have attractive optical properties such as bright fluorescence and high photostability, and have been increasingly studied and developed for bio-imaging and bio-targeting applications. We report here the development of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 binding peptide (VCAM-1 binding peptide functionalized QDs (VQDs from amino QDs. It was found that the QD fluorescence signal in tumor necrosis factor [Formula: see text] (TNF-[Formula: see text] treated endothelial cells in vitro was significantly higher when these cells were labeled with VQDs than amino QDs. The VQD labeling of TNF-[Formula: see text]-treated endothelial cells was VCAM-1 specific since pre-incubation with recombinant VCAM-1 blocked cells' uptake of VQDs. Our ex vivo and in vivo experiments showed that in the inflamed endothelium, QD fluorescence signal from VQDs was also much stronger than that of amino QDs. Moreover, we observed that the QD fluorescence peak was significantly blue-shifted after VQDs interacted with aortic endothelial cells in vivo and in vitro. A similar blue-shift was observed after VQDs were incubated with recombinant VCAM-1 in tube. We anticipate that the specific interaction between VQDs and VCAM-1 and the blue-shift of the QD fluorescence peak can be very useful for VCAM-1 detection in vivo.

  10. Schwinger-Keldysh superspace in quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geracie, Michael; Haehl, Felix M.; Loganayagam, R.; Narayan, Prithvi; Ramirez, David M.; Rangamani, Mukund

    2018-05-01

    We examine, in a quantum mechanical setting, the Hilbert space representation of the Becchi, Rouet, Stora, and Tyutin (BRST) symmetry associated with Schwinger-Keldysh path integrals. This structure had been postulated to encode important constraints on influence functionals in coarse-grained systems with dissipation, or in open quantum systems. Operationally, this entails uplifting the standard Schwinger-Keldysh two-copy formalism into superspace by appending BRST ghost degrees of freedom. These statements were previously argued at the level of the correlation functions. We provide herein a complementary perspective by working out the Hilbert space structure explicitly. Our analysis clarifies two crucial issues not evident in earlier works: first, certain background ghost insertions necessary to reproduce the correct Schwinger-Keldysh correlators arise naturally, and, second, the Schwinger-Keldysh difference operators are systematically dressed by the ghost bilinears, which turn out to be necessary to give rise to a consistent operator algebra. We also elaborate on the structure of the final state (which is BRST closed) and the future boundary condition of the ghost fields.

  11. Ghost microstructure evolution and identification in the coarse grain heat affected zone of 2.25Cr-1Mo-V-Ti steel using tint etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyongwoon [Corporate R& D Institute, Doosan Heavy Industries & Construction,Gwigok-dong, Gyeongsangnam-do Seongsan-gu, Changwon-si 642-792 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seonghyeong; Na, Hyesung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chungyun, E-mail: kangcy@pusan.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, San 30 Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Microstructural characteristics of the CGHAZ (coarse grained heat affected zone) made of the 2.25Cr-1Mo-V-Ti material for the thermal power plant boiler tube were discussed using the technique of tint etching. To conduct the micro structural characterization, the sample on which CGHAZ was produced by using a high temperature thermal cycle simulator, Gleeble 3500 equipment was used for comparative analyses using the existing Nital etching (ASTM E407-74) and the alkaline etching (ASTM E40785). The latter was used to observe a specific phase. For the microstructure on which the alkaline etching was experimented, the shape of a black strip (Ghost microstructure) in a few microns was observed, which was not observed from the Nital etching. It was found from the phase identifications based EPMA, EBSD and TEM experiments that the image of the black strip in a few microns represented the alpha phase in which C, Cr and Mo became segregated. In addition, it was verified that austenite and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} phase were present around the segregated zone. Based on such results, the mechanism by which the image of the black strip in a few microns was formed at the CGHAZ. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism of the appeared black strip in the CGHAZ. - Highlights: •Ghost microstructure was observed which was not observed from the nital etching. •Ghost microstructure has high concentrations of carbon and molybdenum than matrix. •Schematic illustration proposed of why Ghost microstructure was generated. •Ghost microstructure caused by partial dissolution of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation.

  12. Gluon and ghost propagator studies in lattice QCD at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aouane, Rafik

    2013-01-01

    Gluon and ghost propagators in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) computed in the infrared momentum region play an important role to understand quark and gluon confinement. They are the subject of intensive research thanks to non-perturbative methods based on Dyson-Schwinger (DS) and functional renormalization group (FRG) equations. Moreover, their temperature behavior might also help to explore the chiral and deconfinement phase transition or crossover within QCD at non-zero temperature. Our prime tool is the lattice discretized QCD (LQCD) providing a unique ab-initio non-perturbative approach to deal with the computation of various observables of the hadronic world. We investigate the temperature dependence of Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators in pure gluodynamics and in full QCD. Regarding the gluon propagator, we compute its longitudinal D L as well its transversal D T components. The aim is to provide a data set in terms of fitting formulae which can be used as input for DS (or FRG) equations. We deal with full (N f =2) LQCD with the twisted mass fermion discretization. We employ gauge field configurations provided by the tmfT collaboration for temperatures in the crossover region and for three fixed pion mass values in the range [300,500] MeV. Finally, within SU(3) pure gauge theory (at T=0) we compute the Landau gauge gluon propagator according to different gauge fixing criteria. Our goal is to understand the influence of gauge copies with minimal (non-trivial) eigenvalues of the Faddeev-Popov operator.

  13. Gluon and ghost propagator studies in lattice QCD at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aouane, Rafik

    2013-04-29

    Gluon and ghost propagators in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) computed in the infrared momentum region play an important role to understand quark and gluon confinement. They are the subject of intensive research thanks to non-perturbative methods based on Dyson-Schwinger (DS) and functional renormalization group (FRG) equations. Moreover, their temperature behavior might also help to explore the chiral and deconfinement phase transition or crossover within QCD at non-zero temperature. Our prime tool is the lattice discretized QCD (LQCD) providing a unique ab-initio non-perturbative approach to deal with the computation of various observables of the hadronic world. We investigate the temperature dependence of Landau gauge gluon and ghost propagators in pure gluodynamics and in full QCD. Regarding the gluon propagator, we compute its longitudinal D{sub L} as well its transversal D{sub T} components. The aim is to provide a data set in terms of fitting formulae which can be used as input for DS (or FRG) equations. We deal with full (N{sub f}=2) LQCD with the twisted mass fermion discretization. We employ gauge field configurations provided by the tmfT collaboration for temperatures in the crossover region and for three fixed pion mass values in the range [300,500] MeV. Finally, within SU(3) pure gauge theory (at T=0) we compute the Landau gauge gluon propagator according to different gauge fixing criteria. Our goal is to understand the influence of gauge copies with minimal (non-trivial) eigenvalues of the Faddeev-Popov operator.

  14. Quantum dot-based local field imaging reveals plasmon-based interferometric logic in silver nanowire networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Li, Zhipeng; Tian, Xiaorui; Wang, Zhuoxian; Cong, Fengzi; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Shunping; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J; Xu, Hongxing

    2011-02-09

    We show that the local electric field distribution of propagating plasmons along silver nanowires can be imaged by coating the nanowires with a layer of quantum dots, held off the surface of the nanowire by a nanoscale dielectric spacer layer. In simple networks of silver nanowires with two optical inputs, control of the optical polarization and phase of the input fields directs the guided waves to a specific nanowire output. The QD-luminescent images of these structures reveal that a complete family of phase-dependent, interferometric logic functions can be performed on these simple networks. These results show the potential for plasmonic waveguides to support compact interferometric logic operations.

  15. Quantum-dot-based immunofluorescent imaging of HER2 and ER provides new insights into breast cancer heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Chuang; Li Yan; Peng Jun; Xu Hao; Tang Hongwu; Zhang Zhiling; Pang Daiwen; Xia Heshun; Wu Qiongshui; Zeng Libo; Zhu Xiaobo

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous tumor, and better understanding of its heterogeneity is essential to improving treatment effect. Quantum dot (QD)-based immunofluorescent nanotechnology (QD-IHC) for molecular pathology has potential advantages in delineating tumor heterogeneity. This potential is explored in this paper by QD-IHC imaging of HER2 and ER. BC heterogeneity can be displayed more clearly and sensitively by QD-IHC than conventional IHC in BC tissue microarrays. Furthermore, the simultaneous imaging of ER and HER2 might help understand their interactions during the process of evolution of heterogeneous BC.

  16. High-Speed Single Quantum Dot Imaging of Artificial Lipids in Live Cells Reveal Partial Hop Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagerholm, B. Christoffer; Clausen, Mathias P.; Christensen, Eva Arnspang

    2010-01-01

    -81). These findings have yet to be independently confirmed. In this work, we show that high-speed single particle tracking with quantum dots(QDs)and using a standard wide-field fluorescence microscope and an EMCCD is possible at image acquisition rates of up to ~2000 Hz with an image integration time of ~0.5 msec....... The spatial precision in these experiments is ~40 nm (as determined from the standard deviation of repeated position measurements of an immobile QD on a cell). Using this system, we further show that an artificial lipid, biotin-cap-DPPE, inserted in a mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF), labeled with sAv-QD655...

  17. Ghost-like action at a distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattuck, D.

    1981-01-01

    No matter how we try to ''resolve'' the Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen (EPR) paradox, it seems that we come up with another paradox. If we try using hidden-variables, it turns out that they have to be non-local, so B's result depends on the setting of distant apparatus A. Introduction of backwards collapse requires that the future influence the past. Any way you look at it, the EPR paradox remains ''number 1'' on the hit-list of weird quantum effects, '' the most difficult of all to reconcile with our usual picture of the physical world''. (EG)

  18. Low Dose X-Ray Sources and High Quantum Efficiency Sensors: The Next Challenge in Dental Digital Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnav R. Mistry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s. The major challenge encountered to decrease the milliamperes (mA level in X-ray imaging systems is the quantum noise phenomena. This investigation evaluated dose exposure and image resolution of a low dose X-ray imaging (LDXI prototype comprising a low mA X-ray source and a novel microlens-based sensor relative to current imaging technologies. Study Design. A LDXI in static (group 1 and dynamic (group 2 modes was compared to medical fluoroscopy (group 3, digital intraoral radiography (group 4, and CBCT scan (group 5 using a dental phantom. Results. The Mann-Whitney test showed no statistical significance (α=0.01 in dose exposure between groups 1 and 3 and 1 and 4 and timing exposure (seconds between groups 1 and 5 and 2 and 3. Image resolution test showed group 1 > group 4 > group 2 > group 3 > group 5. Conclusions. The LDXI proved the concept for obtaining a high definition image resolution for static and dynamic radiography at lower or similar dose exposure and smaller pixel size, respectively, when compared to current imaging technologies. Lower mA at the X-ray source and high QE at the detector level principles with microlens could be applied to current imaging technologies to considerably reduce dose exposure without compromising image resolution in the near future.

  19. Effect of intrinsic-gain fluctuations on quantum noise of phosphor materials used in medical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalivas, N.; Costaridou, L.; Panayiotakis, G.; Nomicos, C.D.

    1999-01-01

    The quality of a medical image depends, among other parameters, on quantum noise. Quantum noise is affected by the fluctuations in the number of optical quanta produced within the phosphor, per absorbed X-ray (i.e. phosphor intrinsic-gain fluctuations). This effect is considered by means of a factor, called in this study intrinsic-gain noise factor, IGNF(E). In existing theoretical models of quantum noise, the corresponding factor is taken to be equal to one. In this paper, an expression that accounts for the coefficient of variation of the phosphor intrinsic gain is introduced. This expression takes into account the process of electron-hole pair conversion to optical photons and the frequency distribution function of the emitted optical photon energy. Subsequently IGNF(E) is expressed in terms of this coefficient of variation. IGNF(E) has been calculated for several phosphors and for various energies. For all medical X-ray energies studied, phosphors that exhibit a high relative fluctuation of emitted optical photon energy, IGNF(E) exceeds by 2% to over 17% the corresponding factor of the existing theoretical models of quantum noise. (orig.)

  20. Masslessness of ghosts in equivariantly gauge-fixed Yang-Mills theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golterman, Maarten; Zimmerman, Leah

    2005-01-01

    We show that the one-loop ghost self-energy in an equivariantly gauge-fixed Yang-Mills theory vanishes at zero momentum. A ghost mass is forbidden by equivariant BRST symmetry, and our calculation confirms this explicitly. The four-ghost self interaction which appears in the equivariantly gauge-fixed Yang-Mills theory is needed in order to obtain this result

  1. On the state space of the dipole ghost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binegar, B.

    1984-01-01

    A particular representation of SO(4, 2) is identified with the state space of the free dipole ghost. This representation is then given an explicit realization as the solution space of a 4th-order wave equation on a spacetime locally isomorphic to Minkowski space. A discrete basis for this solution space is given, as well as an explicit expression for its SO(4, 2) invariant inner product. The connection between the modes of dipole field and those of the massless scalar field is clarified, and a recent conjecture concerning the restriction of the dipole representation to the Poincare subgroup is confirmed. A particular coordinate transformation then reveals the theory of the dipole ghost in Minkowski space. Finally, it is shown that the solution space of the dipole equation is not unitarizable in a Poincare invariant manner. (orig.)

  2. Phantom dark ghost in Einstein-Cartan gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Chiao [National Taiwan University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, LeCosPA, Taipei (China); Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao (Spain); Basque Foundation for Science, IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Chen, Pisin [National Taiwan University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, LeCosPA, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Astrophysics, Taipei (China); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    A class of dynamical dark energy models is constructed through an extended version of fermion fields corresponding to phantom dark ghost spinors, which are spin 1/2 with mass dimension 1. We find that if these spinors interact with torsion fields in a homogeneous and isotropic universe, then it does not imply any future dark energy singularity or any abrupt event, though the fermion has a negative kinetic energy. In fact, the equation of state of this dark energy model will asymptotically approach the value w = -1 from above without crossing the phantom divide and inducing therefore a de Sitter state. Consequently, we expect the model to be stable because no real phantom fields will be created. At late time, the torsion fields will vanish as the corresponding phantom dark ghost spinors dilute. As would be expected, intuitively, this result is unaffected by the presence of cold dark matter although the proof is not as straightforward as in general relativity. (orig.)

  3. Field theory of interacting open superstrings of fermionic ghost representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aref'eva, I.Ya.; Medvedev, P.V.

    1987-01-01

    Field theory of interacting open superstring in fermionic ghost representation based on anticommuting and commuting ghosts corresponding respectively to world sheet bosonic x μ and fermionic φ μ coordinates is presented. The author have to revise once more the field theory of the free Ramond (R) string and starting from general algebraic point of view they obtain that the number of degrees of freedom in the R and NS (Neveu-Schwartz) sectors equalise themselves permitting to construct a supersymmetric operator. It is proposed to solve a specific equation guaranteeing superinvariance in order to find the R-R-NS and NS-R-R vertices in the term of the NS-NS-NS vertex

  4. Ghost circles in lattice Aubry-Mather theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mramor, Blaz; Rink, Bob

    Monotone lattice recurrence relations such as the Frenkel-Kontorova lattice, arise in Hamiltonian lattice mechanics, as models for ferromagnetism and as discretization of elliptic PDEs. Mathematically, they are a multi-dimensional counterpart of monotone twist maps. Such recurrence relations often admit a variational structure, so that the solutions x:Z→R are the stationary points of a formal action function W(x). Given any rotation vector ω∈R, classical Aubry-Mather theory establishes the existence of a large collection of solutions of ∇W(x)=0 of rotation vector ω. For irrational ω, this is the well-known Aubry-Mather set. It consists of global minimizers and it may have gaps. In this paper, we study the parabolic gradient flow {dx}/{dt}=-∇W(x) and we will prove that every Aubry-Mather set can be interpolated by a continuous gradient-flow invariant family, the so-called 'ghost circle'. The existence of these ghost circles is known in dimension d=1, for rational rotation vectors and Morse action functions. The main technical result of this paper is therefore a compactness theorem for lattice ghost circles, based on a parabolic Harnack inequality for the gradient flow. This implies the existence of lattice ghost circles of arbitrary rotation vectors and for arbitrary actions. As a consequence, we can give a simple proof of the fact that when an Aubry-Mather set has a gap, then this gap must be filled with minimizers, or contain a non-minimizing solution.

  5. Interacting viscous ghost tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karami, K; Fahimi, K

    2013-01-01

    We study the correspondence between the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model with the tachyon, K-essence and dilaton scalar field models in the framework of Einstein gravity. We consider a spatially non-flat FRW universe filled with interacting viscous ghost dark energy and dark matter. We reconstruct both the dynamics and potential of these scalar field models according to the evolutionary behavior of the interacting viscous ghost dark energy model, which can describe the accelerated expansion of the universe. Our numerical results show that the interaction and viscosity have opposite effects on the evolutionary properties of the ghost scalar field models. (paper)

  6. Roles of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator in the Infrared QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furui, S.

    2009-01-01

    The results of Coulomb gauge and Landau gauge lattice QCD simulation do not agree completely with continuum theory. There are indications that the ghost propagator in the infrared region has strong fluctuation whose modulus is compatible with that of the color diagonal ghost propagator. After presenting lattice simulation of configurations produced with Kogut-Susskind fermion (MILC collaboration) and those with domain wall fermion (RBC/UKQCD collaboration), I investigate in triple gluon vertex and the ghost-gluon-ghost vertex how the square of the color antisymmetric ghost contributes. Then the effect of the vertex correction to the gluon propagator and the ghost propagator is investigated. Recent Dyson-Schwinger equation analysis suggests the ghost dressing function G(0) = finite and no infrared enhancement or a G = 0. But the ghost propagator renormalized by the loop containing a product of color antisymmetric ghost is expected to behave as [cc] r = - (G(q 2 ))/(q 2 ) with G(q 2 ) ∝ q -2aG with a G = 0.5, if the fixed point scenario is valid. I interpret the a G = 0 solution should contain a vertex correction. The infrared exponent of our lattice Landau gauge gluon propagator of the RBC/UKQCD is a D = - 0.5 and that of MILC is about - 0.7. A possible interpretation of the origin of the fluctuation is given. (author)

  7. Physicochemical characterization of artificial nanoerythrosomes derived from erythrocyte ghost membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, Róbert; Mihály, Judith; Szigyártó, Imola Cs; Wacha, András; Lelkes, Gábor; Bóta, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal stabile nanoerythrosomes with 200 nm average diameter were formed from hemoglobin-free erythrocyte ghost membrane via sonication and membrane extrusion. The incorporation of extra lipid (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, DPPC), added to the sonicated ghosts, caused significant changes in the thermotropic character of the original membranes. As a result of the increased DPPC ratio the chain melting of the hydrated DPPC system and the characteristic small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) of the lipid bilayers appeared. Significant morphological changes were followed by transmission electron microscopy combined with freeze fracture method (FF-TEM). After the ultrasonic treatment the large entities of erythrocyte ghosts transformed into nearly spherical nanoerythrosomes with diameters between 100 and 300 nm and at the same time a great number of 10-30 nm large membrane proteins or protein clusters were dispersed in the aqueous medium. The infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) pointed out, that the sonication did not cause changes in the secondary structures of the membrane proteins under our preparation conditions. About fivefold of extra lipid--compared to the lipid content of the original membrane--caused homogeneous dispersion of nanoerythrosomes however the shape of the vesicles was not uniform. After the addition of about tenfold of DPPC, monoform and monodisperse nanoerythrosomes became typical. The outer surfaces of these roughly spherical objects were frequently polygonal, consisting of a net of pentagons and hexagons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Annual air pollution caused by the Hungry Ghost Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khezri, B; Chan, Y Y; Tiong, L Y D; Webster, R D

    2015-09-01

    Burning of joss paper and incense is still a very common traditional custom in countries with a majority Chinese population. The Hungry Ghost Festival which is celebrated in the 7 month of the Chinese calendar is one of the events where joss paper and incense are burned as offerings. This study investigates the impact of the Ghost Month Festival (open burning event) on air quality by analysis of the chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) and rainwater samples collected during this event, compared with data collected throughout the year, as well as bottom ash samples from burning the original joss paper and incense. The results showed that the change in the chemical composition of the rainwater and PM2.5 (PM ≤ 2.5 μm) atmospheric samples could be correlated directly with burning events during this festival, with many elements increasing between 18% and 60% during August and September compared to the yearly mean concentrations. The order of percentage increase in elemental composition (in rain water and PM2.5) during the Hungry Ghost Festival is as follows: Zn > Ca > K > Mg > Fe > Al > Na ∼ Mn ∼ Ti ∼ V > Cu > As > Ni > Co > Cd > Cr > Pb. The chemical composition of the original source materials (joss paper and incense for combustion) and their associated bottom ash were analysed to explain the impact of burning on air quality.

  9. Ghost condensation and a consistent IR modification of gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkani Hamed, N.; Cheng, H.S.; Luty, M.A.; Mukohyama, S.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a theoretically consistent modification of gravity in the infrared, which is compatible with all current experimental observations. This is an analog of Higgs mechanism in general relativity, and can be thought of as arising from ghost condensation-a background where a scalar field φhas a constant velocity, = M 2 . The ghost condensate is a new kind of fluid that can fill the universe, which has the same equation of state, ρ = -p, as a cosmological constant, and can hence drive de Sitter expansion of the universe. However, unlike a cosmological constant, it is a physical fluid with a physical scalar excitation, which can be described by a systematic effective field theory at low energies. The excitation has an unusual low-energy dispersion relation ω 2 ∼ k 4 /M 2 . If coupled to matter directly, it gives rise to small Lorentz-violating effects and a new long-range 1/r 2 spin dependent force. In the ghost condensate, the energy that gravitates is not the same as the particle physics energy, leading to the possibility of both sources that can gravitate and antigravitate. The Newtonian potential is modified with an oscillatory behavior starting at the distance scale M Pl /M 2 and the time scale M Pl 2 /M 3 . This theory opens up a number of new avenues for attacking cosmological problems, including inflation, dark matter and dark energy. (author)

  10. Thermal and ghost reflection modeling for a 180-deg. field-of-view long-wave infrared lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Weimin; Couture, Michael E.

    2001-03-01

    Optics 1, Inc. has successfully designed and developed a 180 degree(s) field of view long wave infrared lens for USAF/AFRL under SBIR phase I and II funded projects in support of the multi-national Programmable Integrated Ordinance Suite (PIOS) program. In this paper, a procedure is presented on how to evaluate image degradation caused by asymmetric aerodynamic dome heating. In addition, a thermal gradient model is proposed to evaluate degradation caused by axial temperature gradient throughout the entire PIOS lens. Finally, a ghost reflection analysis is demonstrated with non-sequential model.

  11. Influence of image charge effect on exciton fine structure in an organic-inorganic quantum well material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Hidetsugu; Kunugita, Hideyuki; Ema, Kazuhiro [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Sato, Mikio; Takeoka, Yuko [Department of Materials and Life Sciences, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioi-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated experimentally excitonic properties in organic-inorganic hybrid multi quantum well crystals, (C{sub 4}H{sub 9}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4} and (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}−C{sub 2}H{sub 4}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbBr{sub 4}, by measuring photoluminescence, reflectance, photoluminescence excitation spectra. In these materials, the excitonic binding energies are enhanced not only by quantum confinement effect (QCE) but also by image charge effect (ICE), since the dielectric constant of the barrier layers is much smaller than that of the well layers. By comparing the 1s-exciton and 2s-exciton energies, we have investigated the influence of ICE with regard to the difference of the Bohr radius.

  12. Dangerous narratives: politics, lies, and ghost stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Katz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Narratives that resonate in the cultural imagination inform the ways in which we apprehend the world. This paper considers how certain images and stories that have been valorised over time, bleed into reality and become socially and politically affective. The identity of an entire people, for example, can be rendered down so that those social groups come to seem more spectral than human, through either misrecognition or a lack of acknowledgment. This idea will be discussed through two examples: one provided by traditional anti-Semitism, in which the Jew is viewed as a vampiristic agent of decay; and another in which the Arab presence becomes ‘spectralised’ in contemporary Israel/Palestine. We will look at the development of narratives that create these images, and also consider the liminal zone wherein those images have their source, because it is through imagination and storytelling that we continually create and recreate the realities we must then inhabit.

  13. Semiconductor quantum dots as fluorescent probes for in vitro and in vivo bio-molecular and cellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwat B. Rizvi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, biological imaging has seen many advances, allowing scientists to unfold many of the mysteries surrounding biological processes. The ideal imaging resolution would be in nanometres, as most biological processes occur at this scale. Nanotechnology has made this possible with functionalised nanoparticles that can bind to specific targets and trace processes at the cellular and molecular level. Quantum dots (QDs or semiconductor nanocrystals are luminescent particles that have the potential to be the next generation fluorophores. This paper is an overview of the basics of QDs and their role as fluorescent probes for various biological imaging applications. Their potential clinical applications and the limitations that need to be overcome have also been discussed.

  14. Tsunami and ghost stories in Thailand: exploring the psychology of ghosts and religious rituals within the context of Thai Buddhism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorajjakool, Siroj

    2007-01-01

    The post-tsunami ghost phenomena in Thailand may be understood, in Jungian terms, as an expression of the autonomous complex of the collective psyche resulting from traumatic loss. Religious rituals, as in the context of Thai Buddhism, provide an alternative method of dealing with grief, and hence they affirm the place of religious practices in the overall psychological well-being of people from various cultural backgrounds.

  15. Simple method for sub-diffraction resolution imaging of cellular structures on standard confocal microscopes by three-photon absorption of quantum dots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anje Sporbert

    Full Text Available This study describes a simple technique that improves a recently developed 3D sub-diffraction imaging method based on three-photon absorption of commercially available quantum dots. The method combines imaging of biological samples via tri-exciton generation in quantum dots with deconvolution and spectral multiplexing, resulting in a novel approach for multi-color imaging of even thick biological samples at a 1.4 to 1.9-fold better spatial resolution. This approach is realized on a conventional confocal microscope equipped with standard continuous-wave lasers. We demonstrate the potential of multi-color tri-exciton imaging of quantum dots combined with deconvolution on viral vesicles in lentivirally transduced cells as well as intermediate filaments in three-dimensional clusters of mouse-derived neural stem cells (neurospheres and dense microtubuli arrays in myotubes formed by stacks of differentiated C2C12 myoblasts.

  16. Cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy of excited states in InAs self-assembled quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsevich, S.; Rich, D.H.; Kim, Eui-Tae; Madhukar, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined state filling and thermal activation of carriers in buried InAs self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) with excitation-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and spectroscopy. The InAs SAQDs were formed during molecular-beam epitaxial growth of InAs on undoped planar GaAs (001). The intensities of the ground- and excited-state transitions were analyzed as a function of temperature and excitation density to study the thermal activation and reemission of carriers. The thermal activation energies associated with the thermal quenching of the luminescence were measured for ground- and excited-state transitions of the SAQDs, as a function of excitation density. By comparing these activation energies with the ground- and excited-state transition energies, we have considered various processes that describe the reemission of carriers. Thermal quenching of the intensity of the QD ground- and first excited-state transitions at low excitations in the ∼230-300-K temperature range is attributed to dissociation of excitons from the QD states into the InAs wetting layer. At high excitations, much lower activation energies of the ground and excited states are obtained, suggesting that thermal reemission of single holes from QD states into the GaAs matrix is responsible for the observed temperature dependence of the QD luminescence in the ∼230-300-K temperature range. The dependence of the CL intensity of the ground-and first excited-state transition on excitation density was shown to be linear at all temperatures at low-excitation density. This result can be understood by considering that carriers escape and are recaptured as excitons or correlated electron-hole pairs. At sufficiently high excitations, state-filling and spatial smearing effects are observed together with a sublinear dependence of the CL intensity on excitation. Successive filling of the ground and excited states in adjacent groups of QDs that possess different size distributions is assumed to

  17. 50 CFR 697.21 - Gear identification and marking, escape vent, maximum trap size, and ghost panel requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vent, maximum trap size, and ghost panel requirements. 697.21 Section 697.21 Wildlife and Fisheries... identification and marking, escape vent, maximum trap size, and ghost panel requirements. (a) Gear identification... Administrator finds to be consistent with paragraph (c) of this section. (d) Ghost panel. (1) Lobster traps not...

  18. Ghosts of inventions: Patent law's digital mediations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyo Yoon

    2018-04-01

    This article examines the shifts in the material ordering of inventions in patent law organization and their effects on the meaning and scope of inventions as intellectual property. Formats and media are constitutive of the establishment and stabilization of inventions as objects of intellectual property. Modern patent law's materiality had been dominated by paper documents but ever more consists of digital images, files, and networked data. The article traces and analyzes such effects of digital media on the meaning of intellectual/intangible property and argues that inventions increasingly matter as digital data in the legal realm.

  19. 76 FR 76812 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BARBARY GHOST; Invitation for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration [Docket No. MARAD 2011 0148] Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel BARBARY GHOST; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY... BARBARY GHOST is: Intended Commercial Use Of Vessel: ``Sightseeing tours in the San Francisco Bay for a...

  20. The Ghost in the Touchscreen: Social Scaffolds Promote Learning by Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Laura; Moser, Alecia; Lee, Herietta; Gerhardstein, Peter; Barr, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a "ghost" demonstration on toddlers' imitation. In the "ghost" condition, virtual pieces moved to make a fish or boat puzzle. Fifty-two 2.5- and 3-year-olds were tested on a touchscreen (no transfer) or with 3D pieces (transfer); children tested with 3D pieces scored above a no demonstration…

  1. Hunting The Ghost Gun: An Analysis Of The U.S. Army Infantry Rifle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA JOINT APPLIED PROJECT HUNTING THE GHOST GUN : AN ANALYSIS OF THE U.S. ARMY......LEFT BLANK iii Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited HUNTING THE GHOST GUN : AN ANALYSIS OF THE U.S. ARMY INFANTRY

  2. Simplified pure spinor b ghost in a curved heterotic superstring background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovits, Nathan [ICTP South American Institute for Fundamental Research,Instituto de Física Teórica, UNESP - Universidade Estadual Paulista,Rua Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, 01140-070, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Chandia, Osvaldo [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales,Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez,Diagonal Las Torres 2640, Peñalolén, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-06-03

    Using the RNS-like fermionic vector variables introduced in arXiv:1305.0693, the pure spinor b ghost in a curved heterotic superstring background is easily constructed. This construction simplifies and completes the b ghost construction in a curved background of arXiv:1311.7012.

  3. 128 Gothicism/Ghost Stories in Nigerian Literature: Facts or Fiction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ike Odimegwu

    In The Castle of Otranto, a gigantic hand in armour, a ghost ling figure, a vast helmet ... literature, the “literary ghost stories are stories written by creative artists who .... nurses, lovers, civil servants, the palm wine tapers, widows, job applicants ...

  4. Quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, Maria; Petruccione, Francesco

    2018-02-09

    Quantum machine learning witnesses an increasing amount of quantum algorithms for data-driven decision making, a problem with potential applications ranging from automated image recognition to medical diagnosis. Many of those algorithms are implementations of quantum classifiers, or models for the classification of data inputs with a quantum computer. Following the success of collective decision making with ensembles in classical machine learning, this paper introduces the concept of quantum ensembles of quantum classifiers. Creating the ensemble corresponds to a state preparation routine, after which the quantum classifiers are evaluated in parallel and their combined decision is accessed by a single-qubit measurement. This framework naturally allows for exponentially large ensembles in which - similar to Bayesian learning - the individual classifiers do not have to be trained. As an example, we analyse an exponentially large quantum ensemble in which each classifier is weighed according to its performance in classifying the training data, leading to new results for quantum as well as classical machine learning.

  5. Evidence of marine debris usage by the ghost crab Ocypode quadrata (Fabricius, 1787).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Lopes; Rangel, Danilo Freitas; Zalmon, Ilana Rosental

    2018-03-01

    Sandy beaches are sites of marine debris stranding, but the interaction of beach biota with waste is poorly studied. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the ghost crab Ocypode quadrata selects marine debris by types using a non-destructive method on sandy beaches of Southeastern Brazil. We found marine debris in 7% of 1696 surveyed burrows, and the ghost crabs selectivity was mainly by soft plastic (30%), straw (11%), rope (6%) and foam (4%). Burrows with marine debris showed higher occupation rate (~68%) compared to burrows without debris (~28%), indicating that these materials may increase the capacity of ghost crabs to memorize their burrows placement (homing). The percentage of marine debris was not always related to their amount in the drift line, but ghost crabs used more debris near urbanized areas. Future studies should test whether ghost crabs are using marine debris for feeding, homing or other mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ghost sector of vacuum string field theory and the projection equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potting, Robertus; Raeymaekers, Joris

    2002-01-01

    We study the ghost sector of vacuum string field theory where the BRST operator Q is given by the midpoint insertion proposed by Gaiotto, Rastelli, Sen and Zwiebach. We introduce a convenient basis of half-string modes in terms of which Q takes a particularly simple form. We show that there exists a field redefinition which reduces the ghost sector field equation to a pure projection equation for string fields satisfying the constraint that the ghost number is equally divided over the left- and right halves of the string. When this constraint is imposed, vacuum string field theory can be reformulated as a U(∞) cubic matrix model. Ghost sector solutions can be constructed from projection operators on half-string Hilbert space just as in the matter sector. We construct the ghost sector equivalent of various well-known matter sector projectors such as the sliver, butterfly and nothing states. (author)

  7. Apertureless near-field terahertz imaging using the self-mixing effect in a quantum cascade laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, Paul, E-mail: p.dean@leeds.ac.uk; Keeley, James; Kundu, Iman; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund H.; Giles Davies, A. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mitrofanov, Oleg [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-29

    We report two-dimensional apertureless near-field terahertz (THz) imaging using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) source and a scattering probe. A near-field enhancement of the scattered field amplitude is observed for small tip-sample separations, allowing image resolutions of ∼1 μm (∼λ/100) and ∼7 μm to be achieved along orthogonal directions on the sample surface. This represents the highest resolution demonstrated to date with a THz QCL. By employing a detection scheme based on self-mixing interferometry, our approach offers experimental simplicity by removing the need for an external detector and also provides sensitivity to the phase of the reinjected field.

  8. Near-infrared quantum-dot-based non-invasive in vivo imaging of squamous cell carcinoma U14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yu'an; Yang Kai; Li Zhigang; Zhao Cheng; Yang Jia; Shi Chunmeng

    2010-01-01

    Near-infrared (near-ir) quantum dots (QDs) are well known for their excellent optical characteristics. They hold great potential for applications in non-invasive long term observation and tracing of cells in vivo. Here, near-ir QDs with an emission wavelength of 800 nm (QD800) were used to label squamous cell carcinoma cell line U14 (U14/QD800). The effect of tissue depth and animal fur on the imaging sensitivity and stability was evaluated following subcutaneous and intramuscular injection into Kunming mice, employing an in vivo imaging system. We have demonstrated that QD800-based visual in vivo imaging increased the sensitivity of cancer early detection by a factor of 100 compared with traditional detection methods. More importantly, this study proved for the first time that animal fur has a serious impact on the detection sensitivity and duration of QD-based in vivo imaging. In general, the duration and sensitivity of QD800 for in vivo imaging were not greatly affected by a depth less than 1.8 ± 0.21 mm (subcutaneous or intramuscular). This study provides critical reference data for further research on near-ir QD-based early detection and in vivo visual observation of cancer.

  9. Preparation and Characterization of Highly Fluorescent, Glutathione-coated Near Infrared Quantum Dots for in Vivo Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshichika Yoshioka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent probes that emit in the near-infrared (NIR, 700-1,300 nm region are suitable as optical contrast agents for in vivo fluorescence imaging because of low scattering and absorption of the NIR light in tissues. Recently, NIR quantum dots (QDs have become a new class of fluorescent materials that can be used for in vivo imaging. Compared with traditional organic fluorescent dyes, QDs have several unique advantages such as size- and composition-tunable emission, high brightness, narrow emission bands, large Stokes shifts, and high resistance to photobleaching. In this paper, we report a facile method for the preparation of highly fluorescent, water-soluble glutathione (GSH-coated NIR QDs for in vivo imaging. GSH-coated NIR QDs (GSH-QDs were prepared by surface modification of hydrophobic CdSeTe/CdS (core/shell QDs. The hydrophobic surface of the CdSeTe/CdS QDs was exchanged with GSH in tetrahydrofuran-water. The resulting GSH-QDs were monodisperse particles and stable in PBS (phosphate buffered saline, pH = 7.4. The GSH-QDs (800 nm emission were highly fluorescent in aqueous solutions (quantum yield = 22% in PBS buffer, and their hydrodynamic diameter was less than 10 nm, which is comparable to the size of proteins. The cellular uptake and viability for the GSH-QDs were examined using HeLa and HEK 293 cells. When the cells were incubated with aqueous solutions of the GSH-QDs (10 nM, the QDs were taken into the cells and distributed in the perinuclear region of both cells. After 12 hrs incubation of 4 nM of GSH-QDs, the viabilities of HeLa and HEK 293 cells were ca. 80 and 50%, respectively. As a biomedical utility of the GSH-QDs, in vivo NIRfluorescence imaging of a lymph node in a mouse is presented.

  10. Scanning tomographic particle image velocimetry applied to a turbulent jet

    KAUST Repository

    Casey, T. A.; Sakakibara, J.; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-01-01

    planes in the depth direction by maintaining optimal particle image density and limiting the number of ghost particles. The total measurement volumes contain between 1 ×106 and 3 ×106 velocity vectors calculated from up to 1500 reconstructed depthwise

  11. Kaehler-Dirac ghosts for self-dual fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labastida, J.M.F.; Pernici, M.

    1988-01-01

    We present the generalization to spacetime dimension D=4n+2 of the Lorentz covariant quadratic lagrangian for pairs of (anti)self-dual fields previously obtained by the authors in D=2. In the process of BRST quantizing this lagrangian a first-order quadratic lagrangian for ghost (anti)self-dual fields is found which, after gauge fixing, can be written in terms of bispinors and it turns out to be a Kaehler-Dirac lagrangian. The coupling to gravity is straightforward and the gravitational anomaly due to (anti)self-dual fields is obtained directly from an action principle. (orig.)

  12. Recovery of compacted soils in Mojave Desert ghost towns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R.H.; Steiger, J.W.; Wilshire, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    Residual compaction of soils was measured at seven sites in five Mojave Desert ghost towns. Soils in these Death Valley National Monument townsites were compacted by vehicles, animals, and human trampling, and the townsites had been completely abandoned and the buildings removed for 64 to 75 yr. Recovery times extrapolated using a linear recovery model ranged from 80 to 140 yr and averaged 100 yr. The recovery times were related to elevation, suggesting freeze-thaw loosening as an important factor in ameliorating soil compaction in the Mojave Desert. -from Authors

  13. Influence map baserad Ms. Pac-Man och Ghost Kontroller

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Johan

    2012-01-01

    This thesis will cover the use oftheinfluence map technique applied to the retro game Ms. Pac-Man. A game thatis easy to learn but hard to master. The Ms. Pac-Man controller is implemented with five main parameters that alters the behaviour of the controller while the Ghost controller have three parameters. The experimental results of the controllers is explored to using the alterations of the parameters to find its peak of performance. The conclusion from using the influence map for this gam...

  14. Ghost properties of algebraically extended theories of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.F.; Mann, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    Recently a technique for extending general relativity called algebraic extension was shown to yield only five classes of gravitational theories (general relativity plus four extensions). The particle spectra of these theories are analysed and it is shown that only one of these extensions is ghost free. Two inequivalent theories are shown to result from this extension at the linearised level. One of these is the linearised version of Moffat's theory of gravitation; the other is a new theory which possesses an additional gauge invariance which has been associated with a closed string. (author)

  15. Ghosts of the City: A Spectrology of Cinematic Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Löffler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how, in early cinema, in-between spaces were created that were receptive to scenes of haunting. Adopting Derrida’s notions of a hauntology and a spectrology it argues for a genuine productivity of cinematic space that is able to build ghostly environments without incorporating an actual specter. This productivity is described as ‘making appear’ and ‘making act’. Furthermore, the paper explains how, in the era of silent cinema, cinematic techniques were used to create scenes of haunting.

  16. Ghosts of the City: A Spectrology of Cinematic Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Löffler

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates how, in early cinema, in-between spaces were created that were receptive to scenes of haunting. Adopting Derrida’s notions of a hauntology and a spectrology it argues for a genuine productivity of cinematic space that is able to build ghostly environments without incorporating an actual specter. This productivity is described as ‘making appear’ and ‘making act’. Furthermore, the paper explains how, in the era of silent cinema, cinematic techniques were used to create s...

  17. Direct nanoscale imaging of evolving electric field domains in quantum structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Rudra Sankar; Razavipour, Seyed Ghasem; Dupont, Emmanuel; Xu, Chao; Laframboise, Sylvain; Wasilewski, Zbig; Hu, Qing; Ban, Dayan

    2014-11-28

    The external performance of quantum optoelectronic devices is governed by the spatial profiles of electrons and potentials within the active regions of these devices. For example, in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), the electric field domain (EFD) hypothesis posits that the potential distribution might be simultaneously spatially nonuniform and temporally unstable. Unfortunately, there exists no prior means of probing the inner potential profile directly. Here we report the nanoscale measured electric potential distribution inside operating QCLs by using scanning voltage microscopy at a cryogenic temperature. We prove that, per the EFD hypothesis, the multi-quantum-well active region is indeed divided into multiple sections having distinctly different electric fields. The electric field across these serially-stacked quantum cascade modules does not continuously increase in proportion to gradual increases in the applied device bias, but rather hops between discrete values that are related to tunneling resonances. We also report the evolution of EFDs, finding that an incremental change in device bias leads to a hopping-style shift in the EFD boundary--the higher electric field domain expands at least one module each step at the expense of the lower field domain within the active region.

  18. Computational models for interpretation of wave function imaging in cross-sectional STM of quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maksym, P.A.; Roy, M.; Wijnheijmer, A.P.; Koenraad, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Computational models are used to investigate the role of electron-electron interactions in cross-sectional STM of cleaved quantum dots. If correlation effects are weak, the tunnelling current reflects the nodal structure of the non-interacting dot states. If correlation is strong, peaks in the

  19. Mapping prehistoric ghosts in the synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, N.P.; Wogelius, R.A. [University of Manchester, School of Earth, Atmospheric, and Environmental Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bergmann, U. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Linac Coherent Light Source, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Larson, P. [Black Hills Institute of Geological Research, Inc., Hill City, SD (United States); Sellers, W.I. [University of Manchester, Faculty of Life Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Manning, P.L. [University of Manchester, School of Earth, Atmospheric, and Environmental Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Williamson Research Centre for Molecular Environmental Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Pennsylvania, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The detailed chemical analysis of fossils has the potential to reveal great insight to the composition, preservation and biochemistry of ancient life. Such analyses would ideally identify, quantify, and spatially resolve the chemical composition of preserved bone and soft tissue structures, but also the embedding matrix. Mapping the chemistry of a fossil in situ can place constraints on mass transfer between the enclosing matrix and the preserved organism(s), and therefore aid in distinguishing taphonomic processes from original chemical zonation remnant within the fossils themselves. Conventional analytical methods, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) have serious limitations in this case, primarily, an inability to provide large (i.e., decimeter) scale chemical maps. Additionally, vacuum chamber size and the need for destructive sampling preclude analysis of large and precious fossil specimens. However, the recent development of Synchrotron Rapid Scanning X-ray Fluorescence (SRS-XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) allows the non-destructive chemical analysis and imaging of major, minor, and trace element concentrations of large paleontological and archeological specimens in rapid scanning times. Here we present elemental maps of a fossil reptile produced using the new SRS-XRF method. Our results unequivocally show that preserved biological structures are not simply impressions or carbonized remains, but possess a remnant of the original organismal biochemistry. We show that SRS-XRF is a powerful new tool for the study of paleontological and archaeological samples. (orig.)

  20. Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Lithographic Techniques: III-V Semiconductors and Carbon: 15. Electrically controlling single spin coherence in semiconductor nanostructures Y. Dovzhenko, K. Wang, M. D. Schroer and J. R. Petta; 16. Theory of electron and nuclear spins in III-V semiconductor and carbon-based dots H. Ribeiro and G. Burkard; 17. Graphene quantum dots: transport experiments and local imaging S. Schnez, J. Guettinger, F. Molitor, C. Stampfer, M. Huefner, T. Ihn and K. Ensslin; Part VI. Single Dots for Future Telecommunications Applications: 18. Electrically operated entangled light sources based on quantum dots R. M. Stevenson, A. J. Bennett and A. J. Shields; 19. Deterministic single quantum dot cavities at telecommunication wavelengths D. Dalacu, K. Mnaymneh, J. Lapointe, G. C. Aers, P. J. Poole, R. L. Williams and S. Hughes; Index.

  1. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats (p quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group (p < 0.01), and the MSC-injected diabetic rat group displayed lower blood glucose levels. In conclusion, CdSe/ZnS-labeled MSCs can target in vivo pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  2. CdSe/ZnS Quantum Dots-Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Targeted Fluorescence Imaging of Pancreas Tissues and Therapy of Type 1 Diabetic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoqi; Tang, Wei; Li, Chao; Lv, Pinlei; Wang, Zheng; Liu, Yanlei; Zhang, Cunlei; Bao, Yi; Chen, Haiyan; Meng, Xiangying; Song, Yan; Xia, Xiaoling; Pan, Fei; Cui, Daxiang; Shi, Yongquan

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used for therapy of type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, the in vivo distribution and therapeutic effects of transplanted MSCs are not clarified well. Herein, we reported that CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were prepared for targeted fluorescence imaging and therapy of pancreas tissues in rat models with type 1 diabetes. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots were synthesized, their biocompatibility was evaluated, and then, the appropriate concentration of quantum dots was selected to label MSCs. CdSe/ZnS quantum dots-labeled MSCs were injected into mouse models with type 1 diabetes via tail vessel and then were observed by using the Bruker In-Vivo F PRO system, and the blood glucose levels were monitored for 8 weeks. Results showed that prepared CdSe/ZnS quantum dots owned good biocompatibility. Significant differences existed in distribution of quantum dots-labeled MSCs between normal control rats and diabetic rats ( p pancreas of rats in the diabetes group, and was about 32 %, while that in the normal control group rats was about 18 %. The blood glucose levels were also monitored for 8 weeks after quantum dots-labeled MSC injection. Statistical differences existed between the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rat control group and MSC-injected diabetic rat group ( p pancreas tissues in diabetic rats, and significantly reduce the blood glucose levels in diabetic rats, and own potential application in therapy of diabetic patients in the near future.

  3. Luisa's Ghosts: Haunted Legality and Collective Expressions of Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Amy

    2018-04-25

    Feminist health care providers have debated the efficacy of the decriminalization of abortion in Mexico City. Luisa, a counselor in a private clinic, suggested that while the law has expanded the visibility of, and access to safe abortion, it has also called forth "other ghosts." In this article, I take Luisa's critical perspective as a starting point for examining ongoing criminalization and moral stigma as forms of haunting that arise in the wake of the Mexico City abortion policy. Drawing on ethnographic research, I explore how Luisa's ghosts materialize in the embodied- affective relations between patients in new legal clinics. Women who attend public clinics negotiate moral stigma along with religious and familial pressures in the ways they suffer, as well as normalize abortion as a painful experience. Rather than approach pain as purely a sign of victimization, I suggest that its expression constitutes an effervescent collectivity between women in the clinic, making explicit, while at the same time dissipating, an intractable moral-affective knot that might otherwise be ignored.

  4. Quark imaging in the proton via quantum phase-space distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belitsky, A.V.; Ji Xiangdong; Yuan Feng

    2004-01-01

    We develop the concept of quantum phase-space (Wigner) distributions for quarks and gluons in the proton. To appreciate their physical content, we analyze the contraints from special relativity on the interpretation of elastic form factors, and examine the physics of the Feynman parton distributions in the proton's rest frame. We relate the quark Wigner functions to the transverse-momentum dependent parton distributions and generalized parton distributions, emphasizing the physical role of the skewness parameter. We show that the Wigner functions allow us to visualize quantum quarks and gluons using the language of classical phase space. We present two examples of the quark Wigner distributions and point out some model-independent features

  5. EDUCATIONAL COMPUTER SIMULATION EXPERIMENT «REAL-TIME SINGLE-MOLECULE IMAGING OF QUANTUM INTERFERENCE»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Baranov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking part in the organized project activities students of the technical University create virtual physics laboratories. The article gives an example of the student’s project-computer modeling and visualization one of the most wonderful manifestations of reality-quantum interference of particles. The real experiment with heavy organic fluorescent molecules is used as a prototype for this computer simulation. The student’s software product can be used in informational space of the system of open education.

  6. Effects of the quark field on the ghost propagator of lattice Landau gauge QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furui, Sadataka; Nakajima, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    Infrared features of the ghost propagator of color-diagonal and color antisymmetric ghost propagator of quenched SU(2) and quenched SU(3) are compared with those of unquenched Kogut-Susskind fermion SU(3) lattice Landau gauge. We compare (i) the fluctuation of the ghost propagator (ii) the ghost condensate parameter v of the local composite operator (LCO) approach, and (iii) the Binder cumulant of color antisymmetric ghost propagator between quenched and unquenched configurations. The color-diagonal SU(3) ghost dressing function of unquenched configurations has weaker singularity than the quenched configurations. In both cases fluctuations become large in q c configuration samples is ∼0.002-0.04 GeV 2 while that of the SU(2) parallel tempering samples is consistent with 0. The Binder cumulant defined as U(q)=1-(1/3)( 4 >/( 2 >) 2 ), where φ-vector(q) is the color antisymmetric ghost propagator measured by the sample average of gauge fixed configurations via parallel tempering method, becomes ∼4/9 in all the momentum region. The Binder cumulant of the color antisymmetric ghost propagator of quenched SU(2) can be explained by the 3D Gaussian distribution, but that of the unquenched MILC c deviates slightly from that of the eight-dimensional Gaussian distribution. The stronger singularity and large fluctuation in the quenched configuration could be the cause of the deviation of the Kugo-Ojima confinement parameter c from 1, and the presence of ordering in the ghost propagator of unquenched configurations makes it closer to 1

  7. Low voltage operation of electro-absorption modulator promising for high-definition 3D imaging application using a three step asymmetric coupled quantum well structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Byung Hoon; Ju, Gun Wu; Cho, Yong Chul; Lee, Yong Tak; Choi, Hee Ju; Jeon, Jin Myeong; Lee, Soo Kyung; Park, Yong Hwa; Park, Chang Young

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a transmission type electro-absorption modulator (EAM) operating at 850 nm having low operating voltage and high absorption change with low insertion loss using a novel three step asymmetric coupled quantum well (3 ACQW) structure which can be used as an optical image shutter for high-definition (HD) three dimensional (3D) imaging. Theoretical calculations show that the exciton red shift of 3 ACQW structure is more than two times larger than that of rectangular quantum well (RQW) structure while maintaining high absorption change. The EAM having coupled cavities with 3 ACQW structure shows a wide spectral bandwidth and high amplitude modulation at a bias voltage of only -8V, which is 41% lower in operating voltage than that of RQW, making the proposed EAM highly attractive as an optical image shutter for HD 3D imaging applications

  8. Enhanced fluorescence of tetrasulfonated zinc phthalocyanine by graphene quantum dots and its application in molecular sensing/imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yanjun; Ye, Jiqing; Jiang, Zhou

    2017-06-01

    When excited at 435 nm, tetra-sulfonate zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPcS 4 ) emitted dual fluorescence at 495 and 702 nm. The abnormal fluorescence at 495 nm was experimentally studied and analyzed in detail for the first time. The abnormal fluorescence at 495 nm was deduced to originate from triplet-triplet (T-T) energy transfer of excited phthalocyanine ( 3 *ZnPcS 4 ). Furthermore, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) enhanced the 495 nm fluorescence quantum yield (Q) of ZnPcS 4 . The fluorescence properties of ZnPcS 4 -GQDs conjugate were retained in a cellular environment. Based on the fluorescence of ZnPcS 4 -GQDs conjugate, we designed and prepared an Apt29/thrombin/Apt15 sandwich thrombin sensor with high specificity and affinity. This cost-saving, simple operational sensing strategy can be extended to use in sensing/imaging of other biomolecules. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The BRST quantization and the no-ghost theorem for AdS3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Masako; Natsuume, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    In our previous papers, we prove the no-ghost theorem without light-cone directions. We point out that our results are valid for more general backgrounds. In particular, we prove the no-ghost theorem for AdS 3 in the context of the BRST quantization (with the standard restriction on the spin). We compare our BRST proof with the OCQ proof and establish the BRST-OCQ equivalence for AdS 3 . The key in both approaches lies in the certain structure of the matter Hilbert space as a product of two Verma modules. We also present the no-ghost theorem in the most general form. (author)

  10. Ghost free massive gravity in the Stückelberg language

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rham, Claudia de; Gabadadze, Gregory; Tolley, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Massive gravity in 4 dimensions has been shown to be free of the Boulware-Deser (BD) ghost in the ADM language for a specific choice of mass terms. We show here how this is consistent with the Stückelberg language beyond the decoupling limit, and how the constraint required to remove the BD ghost arises in this framework non-perturbatively, without the use of field redefinitions. We emphasize a subtlety in obtaining this constraint, that has been overlooked in previous literature. In both the ADM and Stückelberg formalisms the vanishing of the determinant of a Hessian guarantees the absence of the BD ghost.

  11. Vacuum correlation functions for ghost superfields and multiloop amplitudes in the theory of closed superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    A new formalism for ghosts on complex (1 bar 1) supermanifolds of genus n > 1 is discussed in superstring theory. In this formalism, vacuum correlation functions for ghost superfields differ substantially from correlation functions discussed earlier. In particular, the new correlation functions do not have unphysical poles. Among other things, these correlation functions take into account contributions to partition functions from the phase space of modular forms and from zero modes of ghosts. The above correlation functions, obtained for all even spinor structures, can be used to evaluate partition functions from equations that are nothing but Ward identities. 21 refs

  12. Ghosts in the self-accelerating DGP branch with Gauss–Bonnet effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yen-Wei; Izumi, Keisuke; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Chen, Pisin

    2015-06-01

    The Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati brane-world model provides a possible approach to address the late-time cosmic acceleration. However, it has subsequently been pointed out that a ghost instability will arise on the self-accelerating branch. Here, we carefully investigate whether this ghost problem could be possibly cured by introducing the Gauss–Bonnet term in the five-dimensional bulk action, a natural generalization to the Dvali–Gabadadze–Porrati model. Our analysis is carried out for a background where a de Sitter brane is embedded in an anti–de Sitter bulk. Our result shows that the ghost excitations cannot be avoided even in this modified model.

  13. Coherent Imaging at 2.4 THz with a CW Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    of the source, or signal bandwidth, with consequent improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio. Image data obtained with the system will be...reciprocal of the source, or signal bandwidth, with consequent improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio. Image data obtained with the system will be...b) 2.4 THz image of the medal. The words “Boston Athletic Association” and the unicorn are well-resolved. However, the words “113 Boston Marathon

  14. Quantum dots versus organic fluorophores in fluorescent deep-tissue imaging--merits and demerits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Zhelev, Zhivko; Gadjeva, Veselina

    2008-12-01

    The use of fluorescence in deep-tissue imaging is rapidly expanding in last several years. The progress in fluorescent molecular probes and fluorescent imaging techniques gives an opportunity to detect single cells and even molecular targets in live organisms. The highly sensitive and high-speed fluorescent molecular sensors and detection devices allow the application of fluorescence in functional imaging. With the development of novel bright fluorophores based on nanotechnologies and 3D fluorescence scanners with high spatial and temporal resolution, the fluorescent imaging has a potential to become an alternative of the other non-invasive imaging techniques as magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, X-ray, computing tomography. The fluorescent imaging has also a potential to give a real map of human anatomy and physiology. The current review outlines the advantages of fluorescent nanoparticles over conventional organic dyes in deep-tissue imaging in vivo and defines the major requirements to the "perfect fluorophore". The analysis proceeds from the basic principles of fluorescence and major characteristics of fluorophores, light-tissue interactions, and major limitations of fluorescent deep-tissue imaging. The article is addressed to a broad readership - from specialists in this field to university students.

  15. Examination of the ion-implantation route to fabrication of the Kane quantum computer using advanced imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakes, C.; Millar, V.; Peng, J.; Cimmino, A.; Prawer, S.; Jamieson, D.; Yang, C.; McKinnon, R.; Stanley, F.; Clark, R.; University of New South Wales, NSW; Dzurak, A.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Kane solid-state quantum computer employs as qubits an array of 31 P atoms embedded with nanoscale precision in a silicon matrix. One proposal for the fabrication of such an array is by phosphorous-ion implantation. We present an overview of a program of research aiming to develop advanced imaging techniques to address key issues relating to the fabrication of the Kane device by ion implantation, focusing particularly on the development of surface-resist technology to allow the registration of single implanted ions and an examination of the extent of damage imposed on the silicon matrix. Our surface resists take the form of a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin-films, which have been exposed both to MeV and keV ions. Registration of ion implantation is based on the development of localised chemical modification arising from latent damage caused within the PMMA layer by the passage of an implanted ion. On development of the resist, atomic force microscopy imaging demonstrates the formation of clearly defined etched holes, of typical diameter 30 nm, which are ascribed to single-ion impacts. The use of novel scanning probes, such as carbon nanotubes, for imaging complex PMMA resist structures will be illustrated. Potential applications to the fabrication of self-aligned gate structures will be discussed

  16. Spectacular Attractions: Museums, Audio-Visuals and the Ghosts of Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandelli Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, moving images have become a common feature not only in art museums, but also in a wide range of institutions devoted to the conservation and transmission of memory. This paper focuses on the role of audio-visuals in the exhibition design of history and memory museums, arguing that they are privileged means to achieve the spectacular effects and the visitors’ emotional and “experiential” engagement that constitute the main objective of contemporary museums. I will discuss this topic through the concept of “cinematic attraction,” claiming that when embedded in displays, films and moving images often produce spectacular mises en scène with immersive effects, creating wonder and astonishment, and involving visitors on an emotional, visceral and physical level. Moreover, I will consider the diffusion of audio-visual witnesses of real or imaginary historical characters, presented in Phantasmagoria-like displays that simulate ghostly and uncanny apparitions, creating an ambiguous and often problematic coexistence of truth and illusion, subjectivity and objectivity, facts and imagination.

  17. New ekpyrotic quantum cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehners, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jlehners@aei.mpg.de

    2015-11-12

    Ekpyrotic instantons describe the emergence of classical contracting universes out of the no-boundary quantum state. However, up to now these instantons ended in a big crunch singularity. We remedy this by adding a higher-derivative term, allowing a ghost condensate to form. This causes a smooth, non-singular bounce from the contracting phase into an expanding, kinetic-dominated phase. Remarkably, and although there is a non-trivial evolution during the bounce, the wavefunction of the universe is “classical” in a WKB sense just as much after the bounce as before. These new non-singular instantons can thus form the basis for a fully non-singular and calculable ekpyrotic history of the universe, from creation until now.

  18. New ekpyrotic quantum cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Lehners

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ekpyrotic instantons describe the emergence of classical contracting universes out of the no-boundary quantum state. However, up to now these instantons ended in a big crunch singularity. We remedy this by adding a higher-derivative term, allowing a ghost condensate to form. This causes a smooth, non-singular bounce from the contracting phase into an expanding, kinetic-dominated phase. Remarkably, and although there is a non-trivial evolution during the bounce, the wavefunction of the universe is “classical” in a WKB sense just as much after the bounce as before. These new non-singular instantons can thus form the basis for a fully non-singular and calculable ekpyrotic history of the universe, from creation until now.

  19. Quantum volume hologram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2010-01-01

    We propose a scheme for parallel spatially multimode quantum memory for light. The scheme is based on a counterpropagating quantum signal wave and a strong classical reference wave as in a classical volume hologram and therefore can be called a quantum volume hologram. The medium for the hologram consists of a spatially extended ensemble of atoms placed in a magnetic field. The write-in and readout of this quantum hologram is as simple as that of its classical counterpart and consists of a single-pass illumination. In addition, we show that the present scheme for a quantum hologram is less sensitive to diffraction and therefore is capable of achieving a higher density of storage of spatial modes as compared to previous proposals. We present a feasibility study and show that experimental implementation is possible with available cold atomic samples. A quantum hologram capable of storing entangled images can become an important ingredient in quantum information processing and quantum imaging.

  20. Remark on Hopf images in quantum permutation groups $S_n^+$

    OpenAIRE

    Józiak, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by a question of A.~Skalski and P.M.~So{\\l}tan about inner faithfulness of the S.~Curran's map, we revisit the results and techniques of T.~Banica and J.~Bichon's Crelle paper and study some group-theoretic properties of the quantum permutation group on $4$ points. This enables us not only to answer the aforementioned question in positive in case $n=4, k=2$, but also to classify the automorphisms of $S_4^+$, describe all the embeddings $O_{-1}(2)\\subset S_4^+$ and show that all the ...

  1. Low energy excitations in fermionic spin glasses: A quantum-dynamical image of Parisi symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppermann, R.; Rosenow, B.

    1997-10-01

    We report large effects of Parisi replica permutation symmetry breaking (RPSB) on elementary excitations of fermionic systems with frustrated magnetic interactions. The electronic density of states is obtained exactly in the zero temperature limit for (K = 1)- step RPSB together with relations for arbitrary breaking K, which lead to a new fermionic and dynamical Parisi solution at K = ∞. The Ward identity for charge conservation indicates RPSB-effects on the conductivity in metallic quantum spin glasses. This implies that RPSB is essential for any fermionic system showing spin glass sections within its phase diagram. An astonishing similarity with a neural network problem is also observed. (author)

  2. Imaging the Conductance of Integer and Fractional Quantum Hall Edge States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Pascher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We measure the conductance of a quantum point contact while the biased tip of a scanning probe microscope induces a depleted region in the electron gas underneath. At a finite magnetic field, we find plateaus in the real-space maps of the conductance as a function of tip position at integer (ν=1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and fractional (ν=1/3, 2/3, 5/3, 4/5 values of transmission. They resemble theoretically predicted compressible and incompressible stripes of quantum Hall edge states. The scanning tip allows us to shift the constriction limiting the conductance in real space over distances of many microns. The resulting stripes of integer and fractional filling factors are rugged on scales of a few hundred nanometers, i.e., on a scale much smaller than the zero-field elastic mean free path of the electrons. Our experiments demonstrate that microscopic inhomogeneities are relevant even in high-quality samples and lead to locally strongly fluctuating widths of incompressible regions even down to their complete suppression for certain tip positions. The macroscopic quantization of the Hall resistance measured experimentally in a nonlocal contact configuration survives in the presence of these inhomogeneities, and the relevant local energy scale for the ν=2 state turns out to be independent of tip position.

  3. Ghosting Politics: Speechwriters, Speechmakers and the (Recrafting of Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Richardson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite public awareness of their role, speechwriters occupy an anxiously liminal position within the political process. As the ongoing dispute between former Australian prime minister Paul Keating and Don Watson over the Redfern Speech suggests, the authorship and ownership of speeches can be a fraught proposition, no matter the professional codes. Crafting and re-crafting identity places speechwriter and speechmaker in a relation of intense intimacy, one in which neither party may be comfortable and from which both may well emerge changed. Having written speeches for Jack Layton, former leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada, I know just how complex, uncertain and productive that relation can be. This article conceives of identity as transindividual, formed in the intensity and flux of encounter, and weaves together the personal and the critical to examine politics’ speechwriting ghost.

  4. Ghost forest creation and the conversion of uplands to wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, M. L.; Schieder, N. W.; Reay, W.

    2017-12-01

    Global sea level rise rates began accelerating sharply in the late 19th century, with an approximate tripling in sea level rise rates in many regions of the world. Some portions of the coastal landscape, such as marshes and barrier islands, survive relative sea level rise by natural eco-geomorphic processes that allow them to build elevation vertically and migrate landward. In contrast, adjacent uplands typically occupied by forests and agricultural fields have limited ability to resist the impacts of sea level rise. This portion of the coastal landscape consists of mostly salt intolerant plants, receives little mineral sediment deposition, and rarely builds elevation through the accumulation of soil organic matter. Thus, ghost forests- dead trees surrounded by marshland- are a prominent feature of many low-relief coastal landscapes, and represent a striking visual indicator of upland to wetland conversion. Here, we report preliminary results of several efforts designed to quantify rates and drivers of upland to wetland conversion in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Drone based canopy monitoring and ground-based seedling experiments suggest that ghost forests are created by episodic, storm-driven adult tree mortality paired with continuous seedling mortality. Preliminary comparisons between sediment cores and historical photographs from 5 sites in Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina suggest that modern coastal forest retreat is 2-10 times faster than late-Holocene retreat rates, and that rates have accelerated in most decades since the 1930's. Finally, historical T-Sheet maps suggest that approximately 100,000 acres (400 km2) of uplands have converted to wetlands in the Chesapeake region, and that about 1/3 of all present-day marsh was created by upland drowning since the late 19th Century. Together, these observations indicate rapid coastal transgression, where low-relief, terrestrial portions of the coastal landscape are perhaps more sensitive to

  5. Enhancing Tomo-PIV reconstruction quality by reducing ghost particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, C M; Baidya, R; Marusic, I

    2013-01-01

    A technique to enhance the reconstruction quality and consequently the accuracy of the velocity vector field obtained in Tomo-PIV experiments is presented here. The methodology involves detecting and eliminating spurious outliers in the reconstructed intensity field (ghost particles). A simulacrum matching-based reconstruction enhancement (SMRE) technique is proposed, which utilizes the characteristic shape and size of actual particles to remove ghost particles in the reconstructed intensity field. An assessment of SMRE is performed by a quantitative comparison of Tomo-PIV simulation results and DNS data, together with a comparison to Tomo-PIV experimental data measured in a turbulent channel flow at a matched Reynolds number (Re τ = 937) to the DNS study. For the simulation data, a comparative study is performed on the reconstruction quality based on an ideal reconstruction determined from known particle positions. The results suggest that a significant improvement in the reconstruction quality and flow statistics is achievable at typical seeding densities used in Tomo-PIV experiments. This improvement is further amplified at higher seeding densities, enabling the use of up to twice the typical seeding densities currently used in Tomo-PIV experiments. A reduction of spurious vectors present in the velocity field is also observed based on a median outlier detection criterion. The application of SMRE to Tomo-PIV experimental data shows an improvement in flow statistics, comparable to the improvement seen in simulations. Finally, due to the non-iterative nature of SMRE, the increase in processing time is marginal since only a single pass of the reconstruction algorithm is required. (paper)

  6. "Haunting experiences: Ghosts in contemporary folklore," by Diane E. Goldstein et al.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Levitt

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Diane E. Goldstein, Sylvia Ann Grider, and Jeannie Banks Thomas. Haunting experiences: Ghosts in contemporary folklore. Logan: Utah State University Press, 2007, paperback, $24.95 (272p ISBN 978-0-87421-636-3.

  7. A review of ghost gear entanglement amongst marine mammals, reptiles and elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelfox, Martin; Hudgins, Jillian; Sweet, Michael

    2016-10-15

    This review focuses on the effect that ghost gear entanglement has on marine megafauna, namely mammals, reptiles and elasmobranchs. A total of 76 publications and other sources of grey literature were assessed, and these highlighted that over 5400 individuals from 40 different species were recorded as entangled in, or associated with, ghost gear. Interestingly, there appeared to be a deficit of research in the Indian, Southern, and Arctic Oceans; and so, we recommend that future studies focus efforts on these areas. Furthermore, studies assessing the effects of ghost gear on elasmobranchs, manatees, and dugongs should also be prioritised, as these groups were underrepresented in the current literature. The development of regional databases, capable of recording entanglement incidences following a minimum global set of criteria, would be a logical next step in order to analyse the effect that ghost gear has on megafauna populations worldwide. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High Dynamic Range Imaging at the Quantum Limit with Single Photon Avalanche Diode-Based Image Sensors †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli Della Rocca, Francescopaolo

    2018-01-01

    This paper examines methods to best exploit the High Dynamic Range (HDR) of the single photon avalanche diode (SPAD) in a high fill-factor HDR photon counting pixel that is scalable to megapixel arrays. The proposed method combines multi-exposure HDR with temporal oversampling in-pixel. We present a silicon demonstration IC with 96 × 40 array of 8.25 µm pitch 66% fill-factor SPAD-based pixels achieving >100 dB dynamic range with 3 back-to-back exposures (short, mid, long). Each pixel sums 15 bit-planes or binary field images internally to constitute one frame providing 3.75× data compression, hence the 1k frames per second (FPS) output off-chip represents 45,000 individual field images per second on chip. Two future projections of this work are described: scaling SPAD-based image sensors to HDR 1 MPixel formats and shrinking the pixel pitch to 1–3 µm. PMID:29641479

  9. Transport Imaging for the Study of Quantum Scattering Phenomena in Next Generation Semiconductor Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bradley, Frank M

    2005-01-01

    ...) and highly efficient solar cells. A novel technique has been developed utilizing direct imaging of electron/hole recombination via an optical microscope and a high sensitivity charge coupled device coupled to a scanning electron...

  10. Metastatic ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma: description of a case and search for actionable targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilien J. Rappaport

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ghost cell odontogenic carcinoma (GCOC is an exceedingly rare malignant tumor on the spectrum of already uncommon odontogenic or dentinogenic tumors. We describe here the case of metastatic GCOC in a patient with a history of recurrent dentinogenic ghost cell tumor of the mandible, now presenting with bilateral pleural effusions. We will discuss typical histopathologic and histochemical features of GCOC, along with results of genomic testing and their role in directing therapy.

  11. The hunters of humanity: creatures of horror in M. R. James's ghost stories

    OpenAIRE

    Oryshchuk, Nataliya

    2017-01-01

    In his ghost stories, M.R. James disclosed the most irrational and fearful aspects of archaic demonology still haunting the modern world. He turns humans into prey species, hunted and haunted by repulsive insect- and spider-like demons. This paper offers a closer look at the creatures of horror and the recurrent theme of the hunt in James's ghost stories, viewing them in the context of Victorian evolutionary theories as well as traditional medieval beliefs. James's protagonists, unimaginative...

  12. Systematics, phylogeny, and taphonomy of ghost shrimps (Decapoda): a perspective from the fossil record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klompmaker, Adiël A.

    2016-01-01

    Ghost shrimps of Callianassidae and Ctenochelidae are soft-bodied, usually heterochelous decapods representing major bioturbators of muddy and sandy (sub)marine substrates. Ghost shrimps have a robust fossil record spanning from the Early Cretaceous (~ 133 Ma) to the Holocene and their remains are present in most assemblages of Cenozoic decapod crustaceans. Their taxonomic interpretation is in flux, mainly because the generic assignment is hindered by their insufficient preservation and disagreement in the biological classification. Furthermore, numerous taxa are incorrectly classified within the catch-all taxon Callianassa. To show the historical patterns in describing fossil ghost shrimps and to evaluate taphonomic aspects influencing the attribution of ghost shrimp remains to higher level taxa, a database of all fossil species treated at some time as belonging to the group has been compiled: 250 / 274 species are considered valid ghost shrimp taxa herein. More than half of these taxa (160 species, 58.4%) are known only from distal cheliped elements, i.e., dactylus and / or propodus, due to the more calcified cuticle locally. Rarely, ghost shrimps are preserved in situ in burrows or in direct association with them, and several previously unpublished occurrences are reported herein. For generic assignment, fossil material should be compared to living species because many of them have modern relatives. Heterochely, intraspecific variation, ontogenetic changes and sexual dimorphism are all factors that have to be taken into account when working with fossil ghost shrimps. Distal elements are usually more variable than proximal ones. Preliminary results suggest that the ghost shrimp clade emerged not before the Hauterivian (~ 133 Ma). The divergence of Ctenochelidae and Paracalliacinae is estimated to occur within the interval of Hauterivian to Albian (133–100 Ma). Callichirinae and Eucalliacinae likely diverged later during the Late Cretaceous (100–66 Ma

  13. Quantum optics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Agarwal, G. S

    2013-01-01

    .... Focusing on applications of quantum optics, the textbook covers recent developments such as engineering of quantum states, quantum optics on a chip, nano-mechanical mirrors, quantum entanglement...

  14. Quantum-dot nanoprobes and AOTF based cross talk eliminated six color imaging of biomolecules in cellular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Solji; Arumugam, Parthasarathy; Purushothaman, Baskaran; Kim, Sung-Yon; Min, Dal-Hee; Jeon, Noo Li; Song, Joon Myong

    2017-01-01

    Primary cell cultures mimic the physiology and genetic makeup of in-vivo tissue of origin, nonetheless, a complication in the derivation and propagation of primary cell culture limits its use in biological research. However, in-vitro models using primary cells might be a complement model to mimic in vivo response. But, conventional techniques such as western blot and PCR employed to study the expression and activation of proteins requires a large number of cells, hence repeated establishment and maintenance of primary culture are unavoidable. Quantum dot (Q-dot) and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) based multiplex imaging system is a viable alternative choice to evaluate multiple signaling molecules by using a small number of cells. Q-dots have broad excitation and narrow emission spectra, which allows to simultaneously excite multiple Q-dots by using single excitation wavelength. The use of AOTF in the fluorescence detection system enables to scan the fluorescence emission intensity of a Q-dot at their central wavelength, this phenomenon effectively avoids spectral overlap among the neighboring Q-dots. When Q-dots are conjugated with antibodies it acts as effective sensing probes. To validate this, the expression pattern of p-JNK-1, p-GSK3β, p-IRS1ser, p-IRS1tyr, p-FOXO1, and PPAR-γ, involved in the insulin resistance were concurrently monitored in adipocyte and HepG2 co-cell culture model. The observed results clearly indicate that PPAR-γ is the critical component in the development of insulin resistance. Moreover, the results proved that developed Q-dot based AOTF imaging methodology is a sensible choice to concurrently monitor multiple signaling molecules with limited cell population. - Highlights: • Quantum dot (Q-dot) and acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) based six-colour imaging. • Expression of PPAR-γ in adipocyte regulates insulin resistance in hepatic (HepG2) cells. • Aspirin improved insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and HepG2 co

  15. Folic acid targeted Mn:ZnS quantum dots for theranostic applications of cancer cell imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bwatanglang IB

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Birma Bwatanglang,1,2 Faruq Mohammad,3 Nor Azah Yusof,1,3 Jaafar Abdullah,1 Mohd Zobir Hussein,3 Noorjahan Banu Alitheen,4 Nadiah Abu4 1Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Adamawa State University, Mubi, Nigeria; 3Institute of Advanced Technology, 4Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: In this study, we synthesized a multifunctional nanoparticulate system with specific targeting, imaging, and drug delivering functionalities by following a three-step protocol that operates at room temperature and solely in aqueous media. The synthesis involves the encapsulation of luminescent Mn:ZnS quantum dots (QDs with chitosan not only as a stabilizer in biological environment, but also to further provide active binding sites for the conjugation of other biomolecules. Folic acid was incorporated as targeting agent for the specific targeting of the nanocarrier toward the cells overexpressing folate receptors. Thus, the formed composite emits orange–red fluorescence around 600 nm and investigated to the highest intensity at Mn2+ doping concentration of 15 at.% and relatively more stable at low acidic and low alkaline pH levels. The structural characteristics and optical properties were thoroughly analyzed by using Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, ultraviolet-visible, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Further characterization was conducted using thermogravimetric analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The cell viability and proliferation studies by means of MTT assay have demonstrated that the as-synthesized composites do not

  16. Comparative studies on osmosis based encapsulation of sodium diclofenac in porcine and outdated human erythrocyte ghosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukara, Katarina; Drvenica, Ivana; Ilić, Vesna; Stančić, Ana; Mišić, Danijela; Vasić, Borislav; Gajić, Radoš; Vučetić, Dušan; Kiekens, Filip; Bugarski, Branko

    2016-12-20

    The objective of our study was to develop controlled drug delivery system based on erythrocyte ghosts for amphiphilic compound sodium diclofenac considering the differences between erythrocytes derived from two readily available materials - porcine slaughterhouse and outdated transfusion human blood. Starting erythrocytes, empty erythrocyte ghosts and diclofenac loaded ghosts were compared in terms of the encapsulation efficiency, drug releasing profiles, size distribution, surface charge, conductivity, surface roughness and morphology. The encapsulation of sodium diclofenac was performed by an osmosis based process - gradual hemolysis. During this process sodium diclofenac exerted mild and delayed antihemolytic effect and increased potassium efflux in porcine but not in outdated human erythrocytes. FTIR spectra revealed lack of any membrane lipid disorder and chemical reaction with sodium diclofenac in encapsulated ghosts. Outdated human erythrocyte ghosts with detected nanoscale damages and reduced ability to shrink had encapsulation efficiency of only 8%. On the other hand, porcine erythrocyte ghosts had encapsulation efficiency of 37% and relatively slow drug release rate. More preserved structure and functional properties of porcine erythrocytes related to their superior encapsulation and release performances, define them as more appropriate for the usage in sodium diclofenac encapsulation process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Delayed transitions in non-linear replicator networks: About ghosts and hypercycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanyes, Josep; Sole, Ricard V.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we analyze delayed transition phenomena associated to extinction thresholds in a mean field model for hypercycles composed of three and four units, respectively. Hence, we extend a previous analysis carried out with the two-membered hypercycle [see Sardanyes J, Sole RV. Ghosts in the origins of life? Int J Bifurcation Chaos 2006;16(9), in press]. The models we analyze show that, after the tangent bifurcation, these hypercycles also leave a ghost in phase space. These ghosts, which actually conserve the dynamical properties of the coalesced coexistence fixed point, delay the flows before hypercycle extinction. In contrast with the two-component hypercycle, both ghosts show a plateau in the delay as φ → 0, thus displacing the power-law dependence to higher values of φ, in which the scaling law is now given by τ ∼ φ β , with β = -1/3 (where τ is the delay and φ = ε - ε c , the parametric distance above the extinction bifurcation point). These results suggest that the presence of the ghost is a general property of hypercycles. Such ghosts actually cause a memory effect which might increase hypercycle survival chances in fluctuating environments

  18. BRST and Anti-BRST Symmetries in Perturbative Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal, Mir

    2011-02-01

    In perturbative quantum gravity, the sum of the classical Lagrangian density, a gauge fixing term and a ghost term is invariant under two sets of supersymmetric transformations called the BRST and the anti-BRST transformations. In this paper we will analyse the BRST and the anti-BRST symmetries of perturbative quantum gravity in curved spacetime, in linear as well as non-linear gauges. We will show that even though the sum of ghost term and the gauge fixing term can always be expressed as a total BRST or a total anti-BRST variation, we can express it as a combination of both of them only in certain special gauges. We will also analyse the violation of nilpotency of the BRST and the anti-BRST transformations by introduction of a bare mass term, in the massive Curci-Ferrari gauge.

  19. Information retrieval based on single-pixel optical imaging with quick-response code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yin; Chen, Wen

    2018-04-01

    Quick-response (QR) code technique is combined with ghost imaging (GI) to recover original information with high quality. An image is first transformed into a QR code. Then the QR code is treated as an input image in the input plane of a ghost imaging setup. After measurements, traditional correlation algorithm of ghost imaging is utilized to reconstruct an image (QR code form) with low quality. With this low-quality image as an initial guess, a Gerchberg-Saxton-like algorithm is used to improve its contrast, which is actually a post processing. Taking advantage of high error correction capability of QR code, original information can be recovered with high quality. Compared to the previous method, our method can obtain a high-quality image with comparatively fewer measurements, which means that the time-consuming postprocessing procedure can be avoided to some extent. In addition, for conventional ghost imaging, the larger the image size is, the more measurements are needed. However, for our method, images with different sizes can be converted into QR code with the same small size by using a QR generator. Hence, for the larger-size images, the time required to recover original information with high quality will be dramatically reduced. Our method makes it easy to recover a color image in a ghost imaging setup, because it is not necessary to divide the color image into three channels and respectively recover them.

  20. Optically controlled polarizer using a ladder transition for high speed Stokesmetric Imaging and Quantum Zeno Effect based optical logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Subramanian; Wang, Y; Tu, Y; Tseng, S; Shahriar, M S

    2013-10-21

    We demonstrate an optically controlled polarizer at ~1323 nm using a ladder transition in a Rb vapor cell. The lower leg of the 5S(1/2),F = 1->5P(1/2),F = 1,2->6S(1/2),F = 1,2 transitions is excited by a Ti:Sapphire laser locked to a saturated absorption signal, representing the control beam. A tunable fiber laser at ~1323 nm is used to excite the upper leg of the transitions, representing the signal beam. When the control beam is linearly polarized, it produces an excitation of the intermediate level with a particular orientation of the angular momentum. Under ideal conditions, this orientation is transparent to the signal beam if it has the same polarization as the control beam and is absorbed when it is polarized orthogonally. We also present numerical simulations of the system using a comprehensive model which incorporates all the relevant Zeeman sub-levels in the system, and identify means to improve the performance of the polarizer. A novel algorithm to compute the evolution of large scale quantum system enabled us to perform this computation, which may have been considered too cumbersome to carry out previously. We describe how such a polarizer may serve as a key component for high-speed Stokesmetric imaging. We also show how such a polarizer, combined with an optically controlled waveplate, recently demonstrated by us, can be used to realize a high speed optical logic gate by making use of the Quantum Zeno Effect. Finally, we describe how such a logic gate can be realized at an ultra-low power level using a tapered nanofiber embedded in a vapor cell.

  1. THE GHOSTS SURVEY. I. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radburn-Smith, D. J.; Dalcanton, J. J.; De Jong, R. S.; Streich, D.; Vlajic, M.; Seth, A. C.; Bailin, J.; Bell, E. F.; Brown, T. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Holfeltz, S.; Bullock, J. S.; Courteau, S.; Sick, J.; Holwerda, B. W.; Purcell, C.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-01-01

    We present an overview of the GHOSTS survey, the largest study to date of the resolved stellar populations in the outskirts of disk galaxies. The sample consists of 14 disk galaxies within 17 Mpc, whose outer disks and halos are imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). In the first paper of this series, we describe the sample, explore the benefits of using resolved stellar populations, and discuss our ACS F606W and F814W photometry. We use artificial star tests to assess completeness and use overlapping regions to estimate photometric uncertainties. The median depth of the survey at 50% completeness is 2.7 mag below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). We comprehensively explore and parameterize contamination from unresolved background galaxies and foreground stars using archival fields of high-redshift ACS observations. Left uncorrected, these would account for 10 0.65xF814W-19.0 detections per mag per arcsec 2 . We therefore identify several selection criteria that typically remove 95% of the contaminants. Even with these culls, background galaxies are a significant limitation to the surface brightness detection limit which, for this survey, is typically V ∼ 30 mag arcsec -2 . The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly available and contain some 3.1 million stars across 76 ACS fields, predominantly of low extinction. The uniform magnitudes of TRGB stars in these fields enable galaxy distance estimates with 2%-7% accuracy.

  2. Application of image-converter technique in quantum radiophysics and nonlinear optics (survey paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobkin, V.V.; Malyutin, A.A.; Prokhorov, A.M.; Serov, R.V.; Schelev, M.Ya.

    Some requirements which high-speed image-converter cameras intended for laser research should meet are analyzed. Different modifications of the developed cameras are described and some methodological aspects of their application are discussed. These cameras were applied for lasers, laser plasma and self-focusing studies. The experimental results obtained are also presented

  3. Quantum imaging with incoherently scattered light from a free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Raimund; Mehringer, Thomas; Mercurio, Giuseppe; Wenthaus, Lukas; Classen, Anton; Brenner, Günter; Gorobtsov, Oleg; Benz, Adrian; Bhatti, Daniel; Bocklage, Lars; Fischer, Birgit; Lazarev, Sergey; Obukhov, Yuri; Schlage, Kai; Skopintsev, Petr; Wagner, Jochen; Waldmann, Felix; Willing, Svenja; Zaluzhnyy, Ivan; Wurth, Wilfried; Vartanyants, Ivan A.; Röhlsberger, Ralf; von Zanthier, Joachim

    2018-02-01

    The advent of accelerator-driven free-electron lasers (FEL) has opened new avenues for high-resolution structure determination via diffraction methods that go far beyond conventional X-ray crystallography methods. These techniques rely on coherent scattering processes that require the maintenance of first-order coherence of the radiation field throughout the imaging procedure. Here we show that higher-order degrees of coherence, displayed in the intensity correlations of incoherently scattered X-rays from an FEL, can be used to image two-dimensional objects with a spatial resolution close to or even below the Abbe limit. This constitutes a new approach towards structure determination based on incoherent processes, including fluorescence emission or wavefront distortions, generally considered detrimental for imaging applications. Our method is an extension of the landmark intensity correlation measurements of Hanbury Brown and Twiss to higher than second order, paving the way towards determination of structure and dynamics of matter in regimes where coherent imaging methods have intrinsic limitations.

  4. Terahertz Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR) Imaging With a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    shown in Fig. 3 as compared to the frequency stability of the locked THz QCL, reported in Ref. 13. However, phase noise is not only a consequence of...a) photograph of a Boston Marathon medal, (b) 2.4 THz az/el image of the medal. The words “Boston Athletic Association” and the unicorn are well

  5. On the Separation of Quantum Noise for Cardiac X-Ray Image Compression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, F.J.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    1996-01-01

    In lossy medical image compression, the requirements for the preservation of diagnostic integrity cannot be easily formulated in terms of a perceptual model. Especially, since human visual perception is dependent on numerous factors such as the viewing conditions and psycho-visual factors.

  6. Fabrication of genetically engineered polypeptide@quantum dots hybrid nanogels for targeted imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Yao, Ming-Hao; Zhao, Dong-Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Jin, Rui-Mei; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Liu, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Nanogels have been widely used as multifunctional drug delivery carriers because of high water content, biocompatibility, and high loading capability. We designed and biosynthesized two triblock artificial polypeptides PC10A and PC10ARGD as vehicles for encapsulating hydrophobic materials. These polypeptides can form nanogels by self-assembly when the concentration is below 2% ( w/ v). The physical properties of nanogels, including size, surface potential, and targeting domain, are able to be tuned. Hydrophobic materials from molecular size to nano-size can be loaded into the polypeptide nanogels to form hybrid nanogels. Hydrophobic quantum dots CdSe@ZnS below 10 nM were loaded into the polypeptide nanogels by ultrasonic treatment. Encapsulation endows hydrophobic QDs with good tunability of size, water solubility, stability, targeting, and biocompatibility. PC10ARGD nanogels and PC10ARGD@QDs hybrid nanogels showed excellent biocompatibility, which the cellular viabilities of HeLa and MCF-7 cells treated with 1% PC10ARGD nanogels and PC10ARGD@QDs hybrid nanogels contained 20 nM QDs were above 90 and 80%, respectively. PC10ARGD@QDs hybrid nanogels with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid motif present efficient receptor-mediated endocytosis in α v β 3 overexpressing HeLa cells but not in the control MCF-7 cells as analyzed by confocal microscopy. These results demonstrate that such polypeptide nanogels as nanocarriers are expected to have great potential applications in biomedicine.

  7. Aptamer-conjugated PEGylated quantum dots targeting epidermal growth factor receptor variant III for fluorescence imaging of glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang J

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jiaze Tang,1 Ning Huang,1 Xiang Zhang,1,2 Tao Zhou,3 Ying Tan,1,4 Jiangli Pi,5 Li Pi,1 Si Cheng,6 Huzhi Zheng,5 Yuan Cheng1 1Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, 2Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, Institute of Ultrasound Imaging, 3Chongqing Key Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, 4Institute of Life Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, 5Key Laboratory on Luminescent and Real-Time Analytical Chemistry, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, 6Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The extent of resection is a significant prognostic factor in glioma patients. However, the maximum safe resection level is difficult to determine due to the inherent infiltrative character of tumors. Recently, fluorescence-guided surgery has emerged as a new technique that allows safe resection of glioma. In this study, we constructed a new kind of quantum dot (QD-labeled aptamer (QD-Apt nanoprobe by conjugating aptamer 32 (A32 to the QDs surface, which can specially bind to the tumors. A32 is a single-stranded DNA capable of binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII specially distributed on the surface of glioma cells. To detect the expression of EGFRvIII in human brain tissues, 120 specimens, including 110 glioma tissues and 10 normal brain tissues, were examined by immunohistochemistry, and the results showed that the rate of positive expression of EGFRvIII in the glioma tissues was 41.82%, and 0.00% in normal brain tissues. Besides, the physiochemical properties of QD-Apt nanoparticles (NPs were thoroughly characterized. Biocompatibility of the NPs was evaluated, and the results suggested that the QD-Apt was nontoxic in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the use of the QD-Apt in labeling

  8. Quantum fields in the non-perturbative regime. Yang-Mills theory and gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Astrid

    2011-09-06

    In this thesis we study candidates for fundamental quantum field theories, namely non-Abelian gauge theories and asymptotically safe quantum gravity. Whereas the first ones have a stronglyinteracting low-energy limit, the second one enters a non-perturbative regime at high energies. Thus, we apply a tool suited to the study of quantum field theories beyond the perturbative regime, namely the Functional Renormalisation Group. In a first part, we concentrate on the physical properties of non-Abelian gauge theories at low energies. Focussing on the vacuum properties of the theory, we present an evaluation of the full effective potential for the field strength invariant F{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}F{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}} from non-perturbative gauge correlation functions and find a non-trivial minimum corresponding to the existence of a dimension four gluon condensate in the vacuum. We also relate the infrared asymptotic form of the {beta} function of the running background-gauge coupling to the asymptotic behavior of Landau-gauge gluon and ghost propagators and derive an upper bound on their scaling exponents. We then consider the theory at finite temperature and study the nature of the confinement phase transition in d = 3+1 dimensions in various non-Abelian gauge theories. For SU(N) with N= 3,..,12 and Sp(2) we find a first-order phase transition in agreement with general expectations. Moreover our study suggests that the phase transition in E(7) Yang-Mills theory also is of first order. Our studies shed light on the question which property of a gauge group determines the order of the phase transition. In a second part we consider asymptotically safe quantum gravity. Here, we focus on the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector of the theory, to study its properties in the context of an interacting UV regime. We investigate several truncations, which all lend support to the conjecture that gravity may be asymptotically safe. In a first truncation, we study the ghost anomalous dimension

  9. Quantum fields in the non-perturbative regime. Yang-Mills theory and gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, Astrid

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis we study candidates for fundamental quantum field theories, namely non-Abelian gauge theories and asymptotically safe quantum gravity. Whereas the first ones have a stronglyinteracting low-energy limit, the second one enters a non-perturbative regime at high energies. Thus, we apply a tool suited to the study of quantum field theories beyond the perturbative regime, namely the Functional Renormalisation Group. In a first part, we concentrate on the physical properties of non-Abelian gauge theories at low energies. Focussing on the vacuum properties of the theory, we present an evaluation of the full effective potential for the field strength invariant F μν F μν from non-perturbative gauge correlation functions and find a non-trivial minimum corresponding to the existence of a dimension four gluon condensate in the vacuum. We also relate the infrared asymptotic form of the β function of the running background-gauge coupling to the asymptotic behavior of Landau-gauge gluon and ghost propagators and derive an upper bound on their scaling exponents. We then consider the theory at finite temperature and study the nature of the confinement phase transition in d = 3+1 dimensions in various non-Abelian gauge theories. For SU(N) with N= 3,..,12 and Sp(2) we find a first-order phase transition in agreement with general expectations. Moreover our study suggests that the phase transition in E(7) Yang-Mills theory also is of first order. Our studies shed light on the question which property of a gauge group determines the order of the phase transition. In a second part we consider asymptotically safe quantum gravity. Here, we focus on the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector of the theory, to study its properties in the context of an interacting UV regime. We investigate several truncations, which all lend support to the conjecture that gravity may be asymptotically safe. In a first truncation, we study the ghost anomalous dimension which we find to be negative at the

  10. Note: Time-gated 3D single quantum dot tracking with simultaneous spinning disk imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVore, M. S.; Stich, D. G.; Keller, A. M.; Phipps, M. E.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Goodwin, P. M.; Werner, J. H.; Cleyrat, C.; Lidke, D. S.; Wilson, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    We describe recent upgrades to a 3D tracking microscope to include simultaneous Nipkow spinning disk imaging and time-gated single-particle tracking (SPT). Simultaneous 3D molecular tracking and spinning disk imaging enable the visualization of cellular structures and proteins around a given fluorescently labeled target molecule. The addition of photon time-gating to the SPT hardware improves signal to noise by discriminating against Raman scattering and short-lived fluorescence. In contrast to camera-based SPT, single-photon arrival times are recorded, enabling time-resolved spectroscopy (e.g., measurement of fluorescence lifetimes and photon correlations) to be performed during single molecule/particle tracking experiments

  11. Note: Time-gated 3D single quantum dot tracking with simultaneous spinning disk imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVore, M. S.; Stich, D. G.; Keller, A. M.; Phipps, M. E.; Hollingsworth, J. A.; Goodwin, P. M.; Werner, J. H., E-mail: jwerner@lanl.gov [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop G755, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Cleyrat, C.; Lidke, D. S.; Wilson, B. S. [Department of Pathology and Cancer Research and Treatment Center, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We describe recent upgrades to a 3D tracking microscope to include simultaneous Nipkow spinning disk imaging and time-gated single-particle tracking (SPT). Simultaneous 3D molecular tracking and spinning disk imaging enable the visualization of cellular structures and proteins around a given fluorescently labeled target molecule. The addition of photon time-gating to the SPT hardware improves signal to noise by discriminating against Raman scattering and short-lived fluorescence. In contrast to camera-based SPT, single-photon arrival times are recorded, enabling time-resolved spectroscopy (e.g., measurement of fluorescence lifetimes and photon correlations) to be performed during single molecule/particle tracking experiments.

  12. Non-Invasive Imaging Method of Microwave Near Field Based on Solid State Quantum Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Bo; Du, Guanxiang; Dong, Yue; Liu, Guoquan; Hu, Zhenzhong; Wang, Yongjin

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a non-invasive imaging method of microwave near field using a diamond containing nitrogen-vacancy centers. We applied synchronous pulsed sequence combined with charge coupled device camera to measure the amplitude of the microwave magnetic field. A full reconstruction formulation of the local field vector, including the amplitude and phase, is developed by measuring both left and right circular polarizations along the four nitrogen-vacancy axes. Compared to the raste...

  13. Aspects of Nonlocality in Quantum Field Theory, Quantum Gravity and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Barvinsky, A O

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a collection of essays on nonlocal phenomena in quantum field theory, gravity and cosmology. Mechanisms of nonlocal contributions to the quantum effective action are discussed within the covariant perturbation expansion in field strengths and spacetime curvatures and the nonperturbative method based on the late time asymptotics of the heat kernel. Euclidean version of the Schwinger-Keldysh technique for quantum expectation values is presented as a special rule of obtaining the nonlocal effective equations of motion for the mean quantum field from the Euclidean effective action. This rule is applied to a new model of ghost free nonlocal cosmology which can generate the de Sitter stage of cosmological evolution at an arbitrary value of $\\varLambda$ -- a model of dark energy with its scale played by the dynamical variable that can be fixed by a kind of a scaling symmetry breaking mechanism. This model is shown to interpolate between the superhorizon phase of gravity theory mediated by a scala...

  14. Effects of ghost shrimp on zinc and cadmium in sediments from Tampa Bay, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerks, P.L.; Felder, D.L.; Strasser, K.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects that ghost shrimp have on the distribution of metals in sediment. We measured levels of HNO3-extractable zinc and cadmium in surface sediment, in ghost shrimp burrow walls and in sediment ejected by the ghost shrimp from their burrows, at five sandy intertidal sites in Tampa Bay. Ghost shrimp densities and their rate of sediment ejection were also quantified, as were sediment organic content and silt + clay content. Densities of ghost shrimp (Sergio trilobata and Lepidophthalmus louisianensis) averaged 33/m2 at our sites, and they ejected sediment at an average rate of 28 g/burrow/day. Levels of both Zn and Cd were significantly higher in burrow walls than in surface sediments. Sediment ejected by the shrimp from their burrows had elevated levels of Zn (relative to surface sediments) at one of the sites. Sediment organic content and silt + clay content were higher in burrow-wall sediments than in ejected sediment, which in turn tended to have values above those of surface sediments. Differences in levels of HNO3-extractable Zn and Cd among sediment types may be a consequence of these sediments differing in other physiochemical characteristics, though the differences in metal levels remained statistically significant for some sites after correcting for differences in organic content and silt + clay content. We conclude that the presence of ghost shrimp burrows contributes to spatial heterogeneity of sedimentary metal levels, while the ghost shrimp bioturbation results in a significant flux of metals to the sediment surface and is expected to decrease heterogeneity of metal levels in sedimentary depth profiles.

  15. GHOSTS I: A new faint very isolated dwarf galaxy at D = 12 ± 2 Mpc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monachesi, Antonela; Bell, Eric F.; Radburn-Smith, David J.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; De Jong, Roelof S.; Streich, David; Vlajić, Marija; Bailin, Jeremy; Holwerda, Benne W.; Alyson Ford, H.; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, GHOSTS I, using HST/ACS data from one of our GHOSTS (Galaxy Halos, Outer disks, Substructure, Thick disk, and Star clusters) fields. Its detected individual stars populate an approximately 1 mag range of its luminosity function (LF). Using synthetic color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) to compare with the galaxy's CMD, we find that the colors and magnitudes of GHOSTS I's individual stars are most consistent with being young helium-burning and asymptotic giant branch stars at a distance of ∼12 ± 2 Mpc. Morphologically, GHOSTS I appears to be actively forming stars, so we tentatively classify it as a dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxy, although future Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations deep enough to resolve a larger magnitude range in its LF are required to make a more secure classification. GHOSTS I's absolute magnitude is M V ∼−9.85 −0.33 +0.40 , making it one of the least luminous dIrr galaxies known, and its metallicity is lower than [Fe/H] = –1.5 dex. The half-light radius of GHOSTS I is 226 ± 38 pc and its ellipticity is 0.47 ± 0.07, similar to Milky Way and M31 dwarf satellites at comparable luminosity. There are no luminous massive galaxies or galaxy clusters within ∼4 Mpc from GHOSTS I that could be considered as its host, making it a very isolated dwarf galaxy in the local universe.

  16. One-pot fabrication of high-quality InP/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots and their application to cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Sahid; Won, Nayoun; Nam, Jutaek; Bang, Jiwon; Chung, Hyokyun; Kim, Sungjee

    2009-07-13

    True colors: High-quality InP and InP/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) are obtained by means of a simple one-pot method in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG). Rapid and size-controlled reactions lead to highly crystalline and nearly monodisperse QDs at relatively low temperatures. The particles emit from cyan blue to far-red, and are successfully used in cellular imaging (see figure).

  17. Cryptographic quantum hashing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablayev, F. M.; Vasiliev, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    We present a version of quantum hash functions based on non-binary discrete functions. The proposed quantum procedure is ‘classical-quantum’, that is, it takes a classical bit string as an input and produces a quantum state. The resulting function has the property of a one-way function (pre-image resistance); in addition it has properties analogous to classical cryptographic hash second pre-image resistance and collision resistance. We also show that the proposed function can be naturally used in a quantum digital signature protocol.

  18. Cryptographic quantum hashing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ablayev, F M; Vasiliev, A V

    2014-01-01

    We present a version of quantum hash functions based on non-binary discrete functions. The proposed quantum procedure is ‘classical-quantum’, that is, it takes a classical bit string as an input and produces a quantum state. The resulting function has the property of a one-way function (pre-image resistance); in addition it has properties analogous to classical cryptographic hash second pre-image resistance and collision resistance. We also show that the proposed function can be naturally used in a quantum digital signature protocol. (letter)

  19. Imaging the Anomalous Charge Distribution Inside CsPbBr3 Perovskite Quantum Dots Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahi, Shrabani; Jana, Santanu; Calmeiro, Tomás; Nunes, Daniela; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2017-10-24

    Highly luminescent CsPbBr 3 perovskite quantum dots (QDs) have gained huge attention in research due to their various applications in optoelectronics, including as a light absorber in photovoltaic solar cells. To improve the performances of such devices, it requires a deeper knowledge on the charge transport dynamics inside the solar cell, which are related to its power-conversion efficiency. Here, we report the successful fabrication of an all-inorganic CsPbBr 3 perovskite QD sensitized solar cell and the imaging of anomalous electrical potential distribution across the layers of the cell under different illuminations using Kelvin probe force microscopy. Carrier generation, separation, and transport capacity inside the cells are dependent on the light illumination. Large differences in surface potential between electron and hole transport layers with unbalanced carrier separation at the junction have been observed under white light (full solar spectrum) illumination. However, under monochromatic light (single wavelength of solar spectrum) illumination, poor charge transport occurred across the junction as a consequence of less difference in surface potential between the active layers. The outcome of this study provides a clear idea on the carrier dynamic processes inside the cells and corresponding surface potential across the layers under the illumination of different wavelengths of light to understand the functioning of the solar cells and ultimately for the improvement of their photovoltaic performances.

  20. Cell-permeable Ln(III) chelate-functionalized InP quantum dots as multimodal imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasiuk, Graeme J; Tamang, Sudarsan; Imbert, Daniel; Poillot, Cathy; Giardiello, Marco; Tisseyre, Céline; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Fries, Pascal Henry; de Waard, Michel; Reiss, Peter; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2011-10-25

    Quantum dots (QDs) are ideal scaffolds for the development of multimodal imaging agents, but their application in clinical diagnostics is limited by the toxicity of classical CdSe QDs. A new bimodal MRI/optical nanosized contrast agent with high gadolinium payload has been prepared through direct covalent attachment of up to 80 Gd(III) chelates on fluorescent nontoxic InP/ZnS QDs. It shows a high relaxivity of 900 mM(-1) s(-1) (13 mM(-1 )s(-1) per Gd ion) at 35 MHz (0.81 T) and 298 K, while the bright luminescence of the QDs is preserved. Eu(III) and Tb(III) chelates were also successfully grafted to the InP/ZnS QDs. The absence of energy transfer between the QD and lanthanide emitting centers results in a multicolor system. Using this convenient direct grafting strategy additional targeting ligands can be included on the QD. Here a cell-penetrating peptide has been co-grafted in a one-pot reaction to afford a cell-permeable multimodal multimeric MRI contrast agent that reports cellular localization by fluorescence and provides high relaxivity and increased tissue retention with respect to commercial contrast agents.