WorldWideScience

Sample records for quantum effects due

  1. Effects on the eigenvalues of the quantum bouncer due to dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    López, G

    2003-01-01

    Effects on the spectra of the quantum bouncer due to dissipation are given when a linear or quadratic dissipation is taken into account. Classical constant of motions and Hamiltonians are deduced for these systems and their quantized eigenvalues are estimated through perturbation theory. we found some differences when we compare the eigenvalues of these two quantities.

  2. Enhancement of fusion rates due to quantum effects in the particles momentum distribution in nonideal media

    CERN Document Server

    Fisch, N J; Petrushevich, Yu V; Quarati, Piero; Starostin, A N

    2011-01-01

    This study concerns a situation when measurements of the nonresonant cross-section of nuclear reactions appear highly dependent on the environment in which the particles interact. An appealing example discussed in the paper is the interaction of a deuteron beam with a target of deuterated metal Ta. In these experiments, the reaction cross section for d(d,p)t was shown to be orders of magnitude greater than what the conventional model predicts for the low-energy particles. In this paper we take into account the influence of quantum effects due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for particles in a non-ideal medium elastically interacting with the medium particles. In order to calculate the nuclear reaction rate in the non-ideal environment we apply both the Monte Carlo technique and approximate analytical calculation of the Feynman diagram using nonrelativistic kinetic Green's functions in the medium which correspond to the generalized energy and momentum distribution functions of interacting particles. We...

  3. Smearing of the quantum anomalous Hall effect due to statistical fluctuations of magnetic dopants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Z.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-10-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect is induced by substitution of a certain portion x of Bi atoms in a BiTe-based insulating parent compound by magnetic ions (Cr or V). We find the density of in-gap states N (E ) emerging as a result of statistical fluctuations of the composition x in the vicinity of the transition point where the average gap E¯g passes through zero. A local gap follows the fluctuations of x . Using the instanton approach, we show that, near the gap edges, the tails are exponential lnN (E ) ∝-(E¯g-|E |) and the tail states are due to small local gap reduction. Our main finding is that, even when the smearing magnitude exceeds the gap width, there exists a semihard gap around zero energy, where lnN (E ) ∝-E/¯g|E | ln(E/¯g|E | ) . The states responsible for N (E ) originate from local gap reversals within narrow rings. The consequence of the semihard gap is the Arrhenius, rather than variable-range hopping, temperature dependence of the diagonal conductivity at low temperatures.

  4. Modeling of photon and pair production due to quantum electrodynamics effects in particle-in-cell simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W -M; Gibbon, P; Li, Y -T

    2016-01-01

    We develop the particle-in-cell (PIC) code KLAPS to include the photon generation via the Compton scattering and electron-positron creation via the Breit-Wheeler process due to quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects. We compare two sets of existing formulas for the photon generation and different Monte Carlo algorithms. Then we benchmark the PIC simulation results.

  5. Breakdown of the quantum Hall effect in InAs/AlSb quantum wells due to counterflowing edge channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, B.J. van; Meijer, G.I.; Kuipers, J.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Graaf, W. van de; Borghs, G.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated magnetotransport in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) present in InAs/AlSb quantum wells. The filling factor Ng underneath a gate electrode was reduced relative to the bulk filling factor Nb. For Ng

  6. Enhancement of fusion rates due to quantum effects in the particles momentum distribution in nonideal plasma media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.; Gladush, M. G.; Petrushevich, Y. V.; Quarati, P.; Starostin, A. N.

    2012-06-01

    This study concerns a situation when measurements of the nonresonant cross-section of nuclear reactions appear highly dependent on the environment in which the particles interact. An appealing example discussed in the paper is the interaction of a deuteron beam with a target of deuterated metal Ta. In these experiments, the reaction cross section for d(d, p)t was shown to be orders of magnitude greater than what the conventional model predicts for the low-energy particles. In this paper we take into account the influence of quantum effects due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for particles in a non-ideal plasma medium elastically interacting with the medium particles. In order to calculate the nuclear reaction rate in the non-ideal environment we apply both the Monte Carlo technique and approximate analytical calculation of the Feynman diagram using nonrelativistic kinetic Green's functions in the medium which correspond to the generalized energy and momentum distribution functions of interacting particles. We show a possibility to reduce the 12-fold integral corresponding to this diagram to a fivefold integral. This can significantly speed up the computation and control accuracy. Our calculations show that quantum effects significantly influence reaction rates such as p +7Be, 3He +4He, p +7Li, and 12C +12C. The new reaction rates may be much higher than the classical ones for the interior of the Sun and supernova stars. The possibility to observe the theoretical predictions under laboratory conditions is discussed.

  7. Induced wormholes due to quantum effects of spherically reduced matter in large N approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Nojiri, S; Odintsov, S D; Osetrin, K E

    1999-01-01

    Using one-loop effective action in large N and s-wave approximation we discuss the possibility to induce primordial wormholes at the early Universe. An analytical solution is found for self-consistent primordial wormhole with constant radius. Numerical study gives the wormhole solution with increasing throat radius and red-shift function which first increases and then decreases. This may indicate the possibility of a topological phase transition.

  8. Quantum critical point due to nested Fermi surface: damping of quasi-particles, resistivity and Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlottmann, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, MC 4350-309 Keene Building, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)]. E-mail: schlottm@martech.fsu.edu

    2004-12-31

    The nesting of the Fermi surfaces of an electron pocket and a hole pocket separated by a wave vector Q and the interaction between electrons gives rise to spin- and charge-density waves. The order can gradually be suppressed by mismatching the nesting and a quantum critical point is obtained as the critical temperature tends to zero. We calculate the quasi-particle damping close to the quantum critical point and discuss its consequences on the resistivity and Hall effect.

  9. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect in zeolite due to Ag2Se quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Nuñez, C. E.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Flores-López, N. S.; Román-Zamorano, J. F.; Flores-Valenzuela, J.; Flores-Acosta, M.

    2017-02-01

    This study shows the presence of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect caused by Ag2Se quantum dots embedded in the zeolite matrix. The quantum dots that were synthesised and stabilised in the matrix of F9-NaX zeolite show a size of 5 nm and a quasi-spherical morphology. The calculated interplanar distances confirm the presence of quantum dots in cubic phase Im-m. We suppose that the in situ SERS effect in the material is caused by chemical-enhancement mechanism (CEM). The density functional theory (DFT) is undertaken to corroborate our hypothesis. The structure H8Si8Al8O12 represents the zeolite cavity unit, and small clusters of (Ag2Se) n represent the quantum dots. Both structures interact in the cavity to obtain the local minimum of the potential energy surface, leading to new molecular orbitals. After the analysis of the predicted Raman spectrum, the Raman bands increase significantly, agreeing with the experimental results at low wavenumbers in F9-NaX zeolite.

  10. Quantum cosmological correlations in inflating universe: Effect of gravitational fluctuation due to fermion, gauge, and others loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaicherdsakul, Kanokkuan

    2006-08-01

    Quantum theory of cosmological fluctuations with other matters is studied to higher order to understand the origin of the universe during the time of inflation. This study also links gravitational and all matter fluctuations with the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy. It is important to keep in mind that what is tested observationally is the paradigm that the primordial spectrum of inhomogeneities was nearly scale invariant and predominantly adiabatic. Therefore, if other matters such as fermion and gauge fields which do not drive inflation predict the scale invariant spectrums, their existence during inflation cannot be ruled out. We therefore extend the calculation of quantum corrections to the cosmological correlation which has been done by Weinberg for a loop of minimally coupled scalars, to other types of matters loops and a general and realistic potential. This dissertation shows that departures from scale invariance are never large even when Dirac, vector, and conformal scalar fields are present during inflation and even when the two-loop spectrum is calculated. No fine tuning is needed, in the sense that effective masses can be arbitrary values. Although the loop power spectrum was generally expected to be smaller than the classical one by a factor of GH2, I find that the quantum effect could be in the order of the classical value at the two loop level. The momentum dependence of the quantum spectrum goes as q -3ln q for all massless matters at one-loop and goes as q-3 ln 2 q at two-loop. For massive matters, the momentum dependence goes as q-3+eta (m), where |eta| interactions between gravity and various matters during the time of Big Bang inflation.

  11. Quantum effects due to coordinate non-inertial systems; Efeitos quanticos devidos a sistemas nao inerciais de coordenadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Daniel

    1996-12-31

    In chapter 1 we make an introduction to quantum fields in curved spaces, mentioning something about fermions. Chapter 2 begins a brief introduction to General Relativity, and the calculation of the linearized limit to obtain Thirring`s metric, which is a first approximation to the Kerr metric. In Chapter 3 we calculate Dirac`s equation in Thirring`s space-time and work out the non relativistic limit obtaining the modifications in Schroedinger`s equation resulting from the geometry. Particularly, we observe the interference of a particle beam. And in Chapter 4, we present a revision of classical and quantum detectors and discuss the response of detectors in non-inertial motion, in particular, for uniform acceleration and uniform circular motion. The latter is known to yield and integral for the response function which has been so far carried out only numerically. We propose a semi-analytical solution for the spectrum of a circular moving detector. We consider c=1. (author) 27 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Quantum Hamlet Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Panković, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work, by use of a formalism similar to formalism of the quantum Zeno effect (decrease of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements) and quantum anti-Zeno effect (increase of the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurements), we introduce so-called quantum Hamlet effect. It represents a complete destruction of the quantum predictions on the decay probability of an unstable quantum system by frequent measurement. Precisely, by means of some especial, correctly defined, frequent measurements, decay probability of an unstable quantum system can behave as a divergent series without any definite value. In this way there is quantum mechanically completely unsolvable ``Hamlet dilemma'', to decay or not to decay.

  13. Dephasing of a qubit due to quantum and classical noise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ebad Kamil; Sushanta Dattagupta

    2012-09-01

    The qubit (or a system of two quantum dots) has become a standard paradigm for studying quantum information processes. Our focus is decoherence due to interaction of the qubit with its environment, leading to noise. We consider quantum noise generated by a dissipative quantum bath. A detailed comparative study with the results for a classical noise source such as generated by a telegraph process, enebles us to set limits on the pplicability of this process $ is à is$ its quantum counterpart, as well as lend handle on the parameters that can be tuned for analysing decoherence. Both Ohmic and non-Ohmic dissipations are treated and appropriate limits are analysed for facilitating comparison with the telegraph process.

  14. Quantum Cosmology: Effective Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Quantum cosmology has traditionally been studied at the level of symmetry-reduced minisuperspace models, analyzing the behavior of wave functions. However, in the absence of a complete full setting of quantum gravity and detailed knowledge of specific properties of quantum states, it remained difficult to make testable predictions. For quantum cosmology to be part of empirical science, it must allow for a systematic framework in which corrections to well-tested classical equations can be derived, with any ambiguities and ignorance sufficiently parameterized. As in particle and condensed-matter physics, a successful viewpoint is one of effective theories, adapted to specific issues one encounters in quantum cosmology. This review presents such an effective framework of quantum cosmology, taking into account, among other things, space-time structures, covariance, the problem of time and the anomaly issue.

  15. Quantum Effects in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Masoud; Omar, Yasser; Engel, Gregory S.; Plenio, Martin B.

    2014-08-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Quantum biology: introduction Graham R. Fleming and Gregory D. Scholes; 2. Open quantum system approaches to biological systems Alireza Shabani, Masoud Mohseni, Seogjoo Jang, Akihito Ishizaki, Martin Plenio, Patrick Rebentrost, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Jianshu Cao, Seth Lloyd and Robert Silbey; 3. Generalized Förster resonance energy transfer Seogjoo Jang, Hoda Hossein-Nejad and Gregory D. Scholes; 4. Multidimensional electronic spectroscopy Tomáš Mančal; Part II. Quantum Effects in Bacterial Photosynthetic Energy Transfer: 5. Structure, function, and quantum dynamics of pigment protein complexes Ioan Kosztin and Klaus Schulten; 6. Direct observation of quantum coherence Gregory S. Engel; 7. Environment-assisted quantum transport Masoud Mohseni, Alàn Aspuru-Guzik, Patrick Rebentrost, Alireza Shabani, Seth Lloyd, Susana F. Huelga and Martin B. Plenio; Part III. Quantum Effects in Higher Organisms and Applications: 8. Excitation energy transfer in higher plants Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin and Rienk van Grondelle; 9. Electron transfer in proteins Spiros S. Skourtis; 10. A chemical compass for bird navigation Ilia A. Solov'yov, Thorsten Ritz, Klaus Schulten and Peter J. Hore; 11. Quantum biology of retinal Klaus Schulten and Shigehiko Hayashi; 12. Quantum vibrational effects on sense of smell A. M. Stoneham, L. Turin, J. C. Brookes and A. P. Horsfield; 13. A perspective on possible manifestations of entanglement in biological systems Hans J. Briegel and Sandu Popescu; 14. Design and applications of bio-inspired quantum materials Mohan Sarovar, Dörthe M. Eisele and K. Birgitta Whaley; 15. Coherent excitons in carbon nanotubes Leonas Valkunas and Darius Abramavicius; Glossary; References; Index.

  16. Quantum Spin Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernevig, B.Andrei; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The quantum Hall liquid is a novel state of matter with profound emergent properties such as fractional charge and statistics. Existence of the quantum Hall effect requires breaking of the time reversal symmetry caused by an external magnetic field. In this work, we predict a quantized spin Hall effect in the absence of any magnetic field, where the intrinsic spin Hall conductance is quantized in units of 2 e/4{pi}. The degenerate quantum Landau levels are created by the spin-orbit coupling in conventional semiconductors in the presence of a strain gradient. This new state of matter has many profound correlated properties described by a topological field theory.

  17. Effectively Emergent Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Exirifard, Qasem

    2008-01-01

    We consider non minimal coupling between matters and gravity in modified theories of gravity. In contrary to the current common sense, we report that quantum mechanics can effectively emerge when the space-time geometry is sufficiently flat. In other words, quantum mechanics might play no role when and where the space-time geometry is highly curved. We study the first two simple models of Effectively Emergent Quantum Mechanics(EEQM): R-dependent EEQM and G-dependent EEQM where R is the Ricci scalar and G is the Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian density. We discuss that these EEQM theories might be fine tuned to remain consistent with all the implemented experiments and performed observations. In particular, we observe that G-dependent EEQM softens the problem of quantum gravity.

  18. Effectively calculable quantum mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Bolotin, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    According to mathematical constructivism, a mathematical object can exist only if there is a way to compute (or "construct") it; so, what is non-computable is non-constructive. In the example of the quantum model, whose Fock states are associated with Fibonacci numbers, this paper shows that the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics is non-constructive since it permits an undecidable (or effectively impossible) subset of Hilbert space. On the other hand, as it is argued in the paper, if...

  19. The quantum sweeper effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grössing, G.; Fussy, S.; Mesa Pascasio, J.; Schwabl, H.

    2015-07-01

    We show that during stochastic beam attenuation in double slit experiments, there appear unexpected new effects for transmission factors below a ≤ 10-4, which can eventually be observed with the aid of weak measurement techniques. These are denoted as quantum sweeper effects, which are characterized by the bunching together of low counting rate particles within very narrow spatial domains. We employ a “superclassical” modeling procedure which we have previously shown to produce predictions identical with those of standard quantum theory. Thus it is demonstrated that in reaching down to ever weaker channel intensities, the nonlinear nature of the probability density currents becomes ever more important. We finally show that the resulting unexpected effects nevertheless implicitly also exist in standard quantum mechanics.

  20. Quantum Magellan Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2009-01-01

    In this work we consider remarkable experiment of the quantum dynamical interaction between a photon and fixed beam splitter with additional two optical fibers. Given fibers, having "circular", almost completely closed loop forms, admit that both superposition terms, corresponding to reflecting and passing photon, interact unlimitedly periodically with splitter. For increasing number of given interactions final state of the photon tends to superposition of reflecting and passing photon with equivalent superposition coefficients quite independently of their initial values. So, many time repeated unitary quantum dynamical evolution implies an unexpected degeneration. Feynman ingeniously observed that a time of the degeneration of the ideas will come, known to any great geographer-explorer (e.g. Magellan that first circumnavigate Earth), when he thinks about the army of the tourists that will come after him. For this reason mentioned dynamical degeneration will be called quantum Magellan effect. Also, we conside...

  1. Generation and protection of steady-state quantum correlations due to quantum channels with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, You-neng; Fang, Mao-fa; Wang, Guo-you; Zeng, Ke

    2016-12-01

    We have proposed a scheme of the generation and preservation of two-qubit steady-state quantum correlations through quantum channels where successive uses of the channels are correlated. Different types of noisy channels with memory, such as amplitude damping, phase damping, and depolarizing channels, have been taken into account. Some analytical or numerical results are presented. The effect of channels with memory on dynamics of quantum correlations has been discussed in detail. The results show that steady-state entanglement between two initial qubits whose initial states are prepared in a specific family states without entanglement subject to amplitude damping channel with memory can be generated. The entanglement creation is related to the memory coefficient of channel μ . The stronger the memory coefficient of channel μ is, the more the entanglement creation is, and the earlier the separable state becomes the entangled state. Besides, we compare the dynamics of entanglement with that of quantum discord when a two-qubit system is initially prepared in an entangled state. We show that entanglement dynamics suddenly disappears, while quantum discord dynamics displays only in the asymptotic limit. Furthermore, two-qubit quantum correlations can be preserved at a long time in the limit of μ → 1.

  2. Generation and protection of steady-state quantum correlations due to quantum channels with memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, You-neng; Fang, Mao-fa; Wang, Guo-you; Zeng, Ke

    2016-09-01

    We have proposed a scheme of the generation and preservation of two-qubit steady-state quantum correlations through quantum channels where successive uses of the channels are correlated. Different types of noisy channels with memory, such as amplitude damping, phase damping, and depolarizing channels, have been taken into account. Some analytical or numerical results are presented. The effect of channels with memory on dynamics of quantum correlations has been discussed in detail. The results show that steady-state entanglement between two initial qubits whose initial states are prepared in a specific family states without entanglement subject to amplitude damping channel with memory can be generated. The entanglement creation is related to the memory coefficient of channel μ . The stronger the memory coefficient of channel μ is, the more the entanglement creation is, and the earlier the separable state becomes the entangled state. Besides, we compare the dynamics of entanglement with that of quantum discord when a two-qubit system is initially prepared in an entangled state. We show that entanglement dynamics suddenly disappears, while quantum discord dynamics displays only in the asymptotic limit. Furthermore, two-qubit quantum correlations can be preserved at a long time in the limit of μ → 1.

  3. Rogue wavefunctions due to noisy quantum tunneling potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Bayındır, Cihan Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the effects of white-noised potentials on nonlinear quantum tunneling. We use a split-step scheme to numerically solve the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE) with a tunneling potential. We consider three different types of potentials, namely; the single rectangular barrier, double rectangular barrier and triangular barrier. For all these three cases we show that white-noise given to potentials do not trigger modulation instability for tunneling of the sech type soliton solutions of the NLSE. However white-noised potentials trigger modulation instability for tunneling of the sinusoidal wavefunctions, thus such a wavefield turns into a chaotic one with many apparent peaks. We argue that peaks of such a field may be in the form of rational rogue wave solutions of the NLSE. Our results can be used to examine the effects of noise on quantum tunneling. Since a rogue wavefunction means a higher probability of the tunneling particle to be at a given (x,t) coordinate, our results may also be ...

  4. The effect of quantum noise on the restricted quantum game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Shuai; Fang Mao-Fa

    2006-01-01

    It has recently been established that quantum strategies have great advantage over classical ones in quantum games. However, quantum states are easily affected by the quantum noise resulting in decoherence. In this paper, we investigate the effect of quantum noise on the restricted quantum game in which one player is restricted in classical strategic space, another in quantum strategic space and only the quantum player is affected by the quantum noise. Our results show that in the maximally entangled state, no Nash equilibria exist in the range of 0< p≤0.422 (p is the quantum noise parameter), while two special Nash equilibria appear in the range of 0.422 < p< 1. The advantage that the quantum player diminished only in the limit of maximum quantum noise. Increasing the amount of quantum noise leads to the increase of the classical player's payoff and the reduction of the quantum player's payoff, but is helpful in forming two Nash equilibria.

  5. Interband Optical Transitions due to Donor Bound Excitons in Wurtzite InGaN Strained Coupled Quantum Dots: Strong Built-in Electric Field Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHI Yue-Meng; SHI Jun-Jie

    2006-01-01

    @@ Considering the three-dimensional confinement of the electrons and holes and the strong built-in electric field (BEF) in the wurtzite InGaN strained coupled quantum dots (QDs), the positively charged donor bound exciton states and interband optical transitions are investigated theoretically by means of a variational method. Our calculations indicate that the emission wavelengths sensitively depend on the donor position, the strong BEF,and the structure parameters of the QD system.

  6. Coherent quantum squeezing due to the phase space noncommutativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardini, Alex E

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phase space general noncommutativity on producing deformed coherent squeezed states is examined. A two-dimensional noncommutative quantum system supported by a deformed mathematical structure similar to that of Hadamard billiards is obtained and their components behavior are monitored in time. It is assumed that the independent degrees of freedom are two \\emph{free} 1D harmonic oscillators (HO's), so the system Hamiltonian does not contain interaction terms. Through the noncommutative deformation parameterized by a Seiberg-Witten transform on the original canonical variables, one gets the standard commutation relations for the new ones, such that the obtained Hamiltonian represents then two \\emph{interacting} 1D HO's. By assuming that one HO is inverted relatively to the other, we show that their effective interaction induces a squeezing dynamics for initial coherent states imaged in the phase space. A suitable pattern of logarithmic spirals is obtained and some relevant properties are discussed...

  7. Field enhancement at metallic interfaces due to quantum confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Fatih; Xiao, Sanshui; Yan, Min

    2011-01-01

    triangular nanoislands via numerical solutions of the appropriate Maxwell equations, and show that the field enhancement is several orders of magnitude larger than what the conventional theory predicts. (C) 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3574159]......We point out an apparently overlooked consequence of the boundary conditions obeyed by the electric displacement vector at air-metal interfaces: the continuity of the normal component combined with the quantum mechanical penetration of the electron gas in the air implies the existence of a surface...... on which the dielectric function vanishes. This, in turn, leads to an enhancement of the normal component of the total electric field. We study this effect for a planar metal surface, with the inhomogeneous electron density accounted for by a Jellium model. We also illustrate the effect for equilateral...

  8. Gravitational and rotational effects in quantum interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandan, J.

    1977-03-15

    The phase shift due to gravitation and rotation in the quantum interference of two coherent beams is obtained relativistically and compared with the recent experiment of Colella, Overhauser, and Werner. A general expression relating the quantum phase shift to the transverse acceleration of a classical particle in the plane of interference for an arbitrary interaction with any external field is given. This can serve as a correspondence principle between quantum physics and classical physics. The phase shift due to the coupling of spin to curvature of space-time is deduced and written explicitly for the special case of a Schwarzschild field. The last result implies that a massless spinning particle can have at most two helicity states and its world line in a gravitational field is a null geodesic. Finally, new experiments are proposed to test the effect of rotation on quantum interference and to obtain direct evidence of the equivalence principle in quantum mechanics.

  9. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  10. Magneto-thermoelectric effects in the two-dimensional electron gas of a HgTe quantum well due to THz laser heating by cyclotron resonance absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Bruene, Christoph; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens; McCombe, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    HgTe quantum wells (QWs) have shown a number of interesting phenomena over the past 20 years, most recently the first two-dimensional topological insulating state. We have studied thermoelectric photovoltages of 2D electrons in a 6.1 nm wide HgTe quantum well induced by cyclotron resonance absorption (B = 2 - 5 T) of a focused THz laser beam. We have estimated thermo-power coefficients by detailed analysis of the beam profile at the sample surface and the photovoltage signals developed across various contacts of a large Hall bar structure at a bath temperature of 1.6 K. We obtain reasonable values of the magneto-thermopower coefficients. Work at UB was supported by NSF DMR 1008138 and the Office of the Provost, and at the University of Wuerzburg by DARPA MESO Contract N6601-11-1-4105, by DFG Grant HA5893/4-1 within SPP 1666 and the Leibnitz Program, and the EU ERC-AG Program (Project 3-TOP.

  11. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Since the last decade the study of quantum mechanical phenomena in biological systems has become a vibrant field of research. Initially sparked by evidence of quantum effects in energy transport that is instrumental for photosynthesis, quantum biology asks the question of how methods and models from quantum theory can help us to understand fundamental mechanisms in living organisms. This approach entails a paradigm change challenging the related disciplines: The successful framework of quantum theory is taken out of its low-temperature, microscopic regimes and applied to hot and dense macroscopic environments, thereby extending the toolbox of biology and biochemistry at the same time. The Quantum Effects in Biological Systems conference is a platform for researchers from biology, chemistry and physics to present and discuss the latest developments in the field of quantum biology. After meetings in Lisbon (2009), Harvard (2010), Ulm (2011), Berkeley (2012), Vienna (2013), Singapore (2014) and Florence (2015),...

  12. Coherent quantum squeezing due to the phase space noncommutativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Alex E.; Mizrahi, Salomon S.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of general noncommutativity of operators on producing deformed coherent squeezed states is examined in phase space. A two-dimensional noncommutative (NC) quantum system supported by a deformed mathematical structure, similar to that of Hadamard billiard, is obtained and the components behaviour is monitored in time. It is assumed that the independent degrees of freedom are two free 1D harmonic oscillators (HOs), so the system Hamiltonian does not contain interaction terms. Through the NC deformation parameterized by a Seiberg-Witten transform on the original canonical variables, one gets the standard commutation relations for the new ones, such that the obtained, new, Hamiltonian represents two interacting 1D HOs. By admitting that one HO is inverted relatively to the other, we show that their effective interaction induces a squeezing dynamics for initial coherent states imaged in the phase space. A suitable pattern of logarithmic spirals is obtained and some relevant properties are discussed in terms of Wigner functions, which are essential to put in evidence the effects of the noncommutativity.

  13. Scaling of the Coulomb Energy Due to Quantum Fluctuations in the Charge on a Quantum Dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molenkamp, L. W; Flensberg, Karsten; Kemerink, M.

    1995-01-01

    The charging energy of a quantum dot is measured through the effect of its potential on the conductance of a second dot. This technique allows a measurement of the scaling of the dot's charging energy with the conductance of the tunnel barriers leading to the dot. We find that the charging energy...... scales quadratically with the reflection probability of the barriers. The observed power law agrees with a recent theory....

  14. Effective equations for the quantum pendulum from momentous quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Hector H.; Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo [Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Nuevo Campus Universitario, Chihuahua 31125 (Mexico); Departamento de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Artificios 40, Mexico D. F. 01120 (Mexico)

    2012-08-24

    In this work we study the quantum pendulum within the framework of momentous quantum mechanics. This description replaces the Schroedinger equation for the quantum evolution of the system with an infinite set of classical equations for expectation values of configuration variables, and quantum dispersions. We solve numerically the effective equations up to the second order, and describe its evolution.

  15. The effect of quantum noise on multiplayer quantum game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Shuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Zheng Xiao-Juan

    2007-01-01

    It has recently been realized that quantum strategies have a great advantage over classical ones in quantum games.However, quantum states are easily affected by the quantum noise, resulting in decoherence. In this paper, we investigate the effect of quantum noise on a multiplayer quantum game with a certain strategic space, with all players affected by the same quantum noise at the same time. Our results show that in a maximally entangled state, a special Nash equilibrium appears in the range of 0 (≤) p (≤) 0.622 (p is the quantum noise parameter), and then disappears in the range of 0.622 < p (≤) 1. Increasing the amount of quantum noise leads to the reduction of the quantum player's payoff.

  16. Observable Effects of Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Lay Nam; Sun, Chen; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the generic phenomenology of quantum gravity and, in particular, argue that the observable effects of quantum gravity, associated with new, extended, non-local, non-particle-like quanta, and accompanied by a dynamical energy-momentum space, are not necessarily Planckian and that they could be observed at much lower and experimentally accessible energy scales.

  17. Nonlocal Quantum Effects in Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii V. Dumin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since it is commonly believed that the observed large-scale structure of the universe is an imprint of quantum fluctuations existing at the very early stage of its evolution, it is reasonable to pose the question: do the effects of quantum nonlocality, which are well established now by the laboratory studies, manifest themselves also in the early universe? We try to answer this question by utilizing the results of a few experiments, namely, with the superconducting multi-Josephson-junction loops and the ultracold gases in periodic potentials. Employing a close analogy between the above-mentioned setups and the simplest one-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, we show that the specific nonlocal correlations revealed in the laboratory studies might be of considerable importance also in treating the strongly nonequilibrium phase transitions of Higgs fields in the early universe. Particularly, they should substantially reduce the number of topological defects (e.g., domain walls expected due to independent establishment of the new phases in the remote spatial regions. This gives us a hint on resolving a long-standing problem of the excessive concentration of topological defects, inconsistent with observational constraints. The same effect may be also relevant to the recent problem of the anomalous behavior of cosmic microwave background fluctuations at large angular scales.

  18. Quantum gravitational effects on boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Park, I Y

    2016-01-01

    Quantum gravitational effects may hold the key to some of the outstanding problems in theoretical physics. In this work we analyze the perturbative quantum effects on the boundary of a gravitational system and Dirichlet boundary condtion imposed at the classical level. Our analysis reveals that for a black hole solution there exists a clash between the quantum effects and Dirichlet boundary condition: the solution of the one-particle-irreducible (1PI) action no longer obeys the Dirichlet boundary condition. The analysis also suggests that the violation of the Dirichlet boundary condition should be tied with a certain mechanism of information storage on the boundary.

  19. Quantum Effects in Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharian, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the vacuum expectation value of the current density for a charged scalar field on a slice of anti-de Sitter (AdS) space with toroidally compact dimensions. Along the compact dimensions periodicity conditions are imposed on the field operator with general phases and the presence of a constant gauge field is assumed. The latter gives rise to Aharonov-Bohm-like effects on the vacuum currents. The current density along compact dimensions is a periodic function of the gauge field flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. It vanishes on the AdS boundary and, near the horizon, to the leading order, it is conformally related to the corresponding quantity in Minkowski bulk for a massless field. For large values of the length of the compact dimension compared with the AdS curvature radius, the vacuum current decays as power-law for both massless and massive fields. This behavior is essentially different from the corresponding one in Minkowski background, where the currents for a massive field are suppressed exponentially.

  20. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance and Anisotropic Tunneling Magnetoresistance due to Quantum Interference in Ferromagnetic Metal Break Junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolotin, Kirill; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Ralph, D

    2006-01-01

    We measure the low-temperature resistance of permalloy break junctions as a function of contact size and the magnetic field angle in applied fields large enough to saturate the magnetization. For both nanometer-scale metallic contacts and tunneling devices we observe large changes in resistance...... with the angle, as large as 25% in the tunneling regime. The pattern of magnetoresistance is sensitive to changes in bias on a scale of a few mV. We interpret the effect as a consequence of conductance fluctuations due to quantum interference....

  1. Higgs-Like Particle due to Revised Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehnert B.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A Higgs-like particle having zero net electric charge, zero spin, and a nonzero rest mass can be deduced from an earlier elaborated revised quantum electrodynamical theory which is based on linear symmetry breaking through a nonzero electric field divergence in the vacuum state. This special particle is obtained from a composite longitudinal solution based on a zero magnetic field strength and on a nonzero divergence but a vanishing curl of the electric field strength. The present theory further differs from that of the nonlinear spontaneously broken symmetry by Higgs, in which elementary particles obtain their masses through an interaction with the Higgs field. An experimental proof of the basic features of a Higgs-like particle thus supports the present theory, but does not for certain confirm the process which would generate massive particles through a Higgs field

  2. Quantum mechanical effects analysis of nanostructured solar cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badea Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum mechanical effects resulted from the inclusion of nanostructures, represented by quantum wells and quantum dots, in the i-layer of an intermediate band solar cell will be analyzed. We will discuss the role of these specific nanostructures in the increasing of the solar cells efficiency. InAs quantum wells being placed in the i-layer of a gallium arsenide (GaAs p-i-n cell, we will analyze the quantum confined regions and determine the properties of the eigenstates located therein. Also, we simulate the electroluminescence that occurs due to the nanostructured regions.

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum Zeno effect in the brain

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Danko

    2014-01-01

    Environmental decoherence appears to be the biggest obstacle for successful construction of quantum mind theories. Nevertheless, the quantum physicist Henry Stapp promoted the view that the mind could utilize quantum Zeno effect to influence brain dynamics and that the efficacy of such mental efforts would not be undermined by environmental decoherence of the brain. To address the physical plausibility of Stapp's claim, we modeled the brain using quantum tunneling of an electron in a multiple-well structure such as the voltage sensor in neuronal ion channels and performed Monte Carlo simulations of quantum Zeno effect exerted by the mind upon the brain in the presence or absence of environmental decoherence. The simulations unambiguously showed that the quantum Zeno effect breaks down for timescales greater than the brain decoherence time. To generalize the Monte Carlo simulation results for any n-level quantum system, we further analyzed the change of brain entropy due to the mind probing actions and proved ...

  4. Quantum statistical gravity: time dilation due to local information in many-body quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sels, Dries; Wouters, Michiel

    2017-08-01

    We propose a generic mechanism for the emergence of a gravitational potential that acts on all classical objects in a quantum system. Our conjecture is based on the analysis of mutual information in many-body quantum systems. Since measurements in quantum systems affect the surroundings through entanglement, a measurement at one position reduces the entropy in its neighbourhood. This reduction in entropy can be described by a local temperature, that is directly related to the gravitational potential. A crucial ingredient in our argument is that ideal classical mechanical motion occurs at constant probability. This definition is motivated by the analysis of entropic forces in classical systems.

  5. Nonlinear random gravity. I. Stochastic gravitational waves and spontaneous conformal fluctuations due to the quantum vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Charles H -T; Bingham, Robert; Mendonca, J Tito

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the problem of metric fluctuations in the presence of the vacuum fluctuations of matter fields and critically assess the usual assertion that vacuum energy implies a Planckian cosmological constant. A new stochastic classical approach to the quantum fluctuations of spacetime is developed. The work extends conceptually Boyer's random electrodynamics to a theory of random gravity but has a considerably richer structure for inheriting nonlinearity from general relativity. Attention is drawn to subtleties in choosing boundary conditions for metric fluctuations in relation to their dynamical consequences. Those compatible with the observed Lorentz invariance must allow for spontaneous conformal fluctuations, in addition to stochastic gravitational waves due to zero point gravitons. This is implemented through an effective metric defined in terms of the random spacetime metric modulo a fluctuating conformal factor. It satisfies an effective Einstein equation coupled to an effective stress-energy tens...

  6. Local Classical and Quantum Criticality due to Electron-Vibration Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We study the local classical and quantum critical properties of electron-vibration interaction, represented by the Yu-Anderson model. It exhibits an instability, similar to the Wentzel-Bardeen singularity, whose nature resembles to weakly first order quantum phase transitions at low temperatures, and crosses over to Gaussian behaviour with increasing temperature. We determine the dominant energy scale separating the quantum from classical criticality, study the effect of dissipation and analy...

  7. Quantum effects near future singularities

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Dito, Giuseppe; Fabris, Julio C; Houndjo, Mahouton J S

    2012-01-01

    General relativity allows a variety of future singularities to occur in the evolution of the universe. At these future singularities, the universe will end in a singular state after a finite proper time and geometrical invariants of the space time will diverge. One question that naturally arises with respect to these cosmological scenarios is the following: can quantum effects lead to the avoidance of these future singularities? We analyze this problem considering massless and conformally coupled scalar fields in an isotropic and homogeneous background leading to future singularities. It is shown that near strong, big rip-type singularities, with violation of the energy conditions, the quantum effects are very important, while near some milder classes of singularity like the sudden singularity, which preserve the energy conditions, quantum effects are irrelevant.

  8. Field enhancement at metallic interfaces due to quantum confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öztürk, Fatih; Xiao, Sanshui; Yan, Min;

    2011-01-01

    on which the dielectric function vanishes. This, in turn, leads to an enhancement of the normal component of the total electric field. We study this effect for a planar metal surface, with the inhomogeneous electron density accounted for by a Jellium model. We also illustrate the effect for equilateral...... triangular nanoislands via numerical solutions of the appropriate Maxwell equations, and show that the field enhancement is several orders of magnitude larger than what the conventional theory predicts. (C) 2011 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). [DOI: 10.1117/1.3574159]...

  9. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R. V.; Sanders, M. M.; Saraceno, M.; Sundaram, B.

    1989-01-01

    A new quantum mechanism for the suppression of chaotic ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms explains the appearance of anomalously stable states in the microwave ionization experiments of Koch et al. A novel phase-space representation of the perturbed wave functions reveals that the inhibition of quantum transport is due to the selective excitation of wave functions that are highly localized near unstable periodic orbits in the chaotic classical phase space. The 'scarred' wave functions provide a new basis for the quantum description of a variety of classically chaotic systems.

  10. Effective Constraints for Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin; Skirzewski, Aureliano; Tsobanjan, Artur

    2008-01-01

    An effective formalism for quantum constrained systems is presented which allows manageable derivations of solutions and observables, including a treatment of physical reality conditions without requiring full knowledge of the physical inner product. Instead of a state equation from a constraint operator, an infinite system of constraint functions on the quantum phase space of expectation values and moments of states is used. The examples of linear constraints as well as the free non-relativistic particle in parameterized form illustrate how standard problems of constrained systems can be dealt with in this framework.

  11. Quantum effects in warp drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finazzi Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Warp drives are interesting configurations that, at least theoretically, provide a way to travel at superluminal speed. Unfortunately, several issues seem to forbid their realization. First, a huge amount of exotic matter is required to build them. Second, the presence of quantum fields propagating in superluminal warp-drive geometries makes them semiclassically unstable. Indeed, a Hawking-like high-temperature flux of particles is generated inside the warp-drive bubble, which causes an exponential growth of the energy density measured at the front wall of the bubble by freely falling observers. Moreover, superluminal warp drives remain unstable even if the Lorentz symmetry is broken by the introduction of regulating higher order terms in the Lagrangian of the quantum field. If the dispersion relation of the quantum field is subluminal, a black-hole laser phenomenon yields an exponential amplification of the emitted flux. If it is superluminal, infrared effects cause a linear growth of this flux.

  12. Quantum channels and memory effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Filippo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    Any physical process can be represented as a quantum channel mapping an initial state to a final state. Hence it can be characterized from the point of view of communication theory, i.e., in terms of its ability to transfer information. Quantum information provides a theoretical framework and the proper mathematical tools to accomplish this. In this context the notion of codes and communication capacities have been introduced by generalizing them from the classical Shannon theory of information transmission and error correction. The underlying assumption of this approach is to consider the channel not as acting on a single system, but on sequences of systems, which, when properly initialized allow one to overcome the noisy effects induced by the physical process under consideration. While most of the work produced so far has been focused on the case in which a given channel transformation acts identically and independently on the various elements of the sequence (memoryless configuration in jargon), correlated error models appear to be a more realistic way to approach the problem. A slightly different, yet conceptually related, notion of correlated errors applies to a single quantum system which evolves continuously in time under the influence of an external disturbance which acts on it in a non-Markovian fashion. This leads to the study of memory effects in quantum channels: a fertile ground where interesting novel phenomena emerge at the intersection of quantum information theory and other branches of physics. A survey is taken of the field of quantum channels theory while also embracing these specific and complex settings.

  13. THz quantum-confined Stark effect in semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an instantaneous all-optical manipulation of optical absorption at the ground state of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) via a quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) induced by the electric field of incident THz pulses with peak electric fields reaching 200 kV/cm in the free space...

  14. Effects of Quantum Noise on Quantum Clock Synchronization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢端; 彭进业

    2012-01-01

    In laboratory environment, the channel apparatus will generate particular dominant quantum noise. The noise then will give rise to some errors during synchronization. In this work, the accuracies of one qubit transport protocol and entangled states transport protocol in the presence of noise have been studied. With the help of three important and familiar noise models, the quantum noise will degrade the accuracy has been proved. Due to the influence of quantum noise, the accuracy of entangled qubits decrease faster than that of one qubit. The entangled states will improve the accuracy in noise-free channel, and will degrade the accuracy in noise channel.

  15. Quantum radiation reaction effects in multiphoton Compton scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Piazza, A; Hatsagortsyan, K Z; Keitel, C H

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  16. Phase effects in HgTe quantum structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, M.; Buhmann, H.; Becker, C.R.; Molenkamp, L.W. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisches Inst.

    2007-07-01

    HgTe quantum well structures with high electron mobilities have been used to fabricate quantum interference devices. Aharonov-Bohm oscillations have been studied in the low and high magnetic field regime. In the latter case a decrease of the effective ring radius is observed. Additionally, as a consequence of the strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling within this material, it was possible to observe conductance oscillations which are due to the so-called Aharonov-Casher effect. These quantum interference effects are effectively controlled by the applied magnetic and electric field. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Lectures on the Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to describe the basic theoretical structures underlying the rich and beautiful physics of the quantum Hall effect. The focus is on the interplay between microscopic wavefunctions, long-distance effective Chern-Simons theories, and the modes which live on the boundary. The notes are aimed at graduate students in any discipline where $\\hbar=1$. A working knowledge of quantum field theory is assumed. Contents: 1. The Basics (Landau levels and Berry phase). 2. The Integer Quantum Hall Effect. 3. The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. 4. Non-Abelian Quantum Hall States. 5. Chern-Simons Theories. 6. Edge Modes.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Ze; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Samarth, Nitin; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2014-10-03

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect has recently been observed experimentally in thin films of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)(2)Te(3) at a low temperature (∼ 30 mK). In this work, we propose realizing the quantum anomalous Hall effect in more conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors with magnetically doped InAs/GaSb type-II quantum wells. Based on a four-band model, we find an enhancement of the Curie temperature of ferromagnetism due to band edge singularities in the inverted regime of InAs/GaSb quantum wells. Below the Curie temperature, the quantum anomalous Hall effect is confirmed by the direct calculation of Hall conductance. The parameter regime for the quantum anomalous Hall phase is identified based on the eight-band Kane model. The high sample quality and strong exchange coupling make magnetically doped InAs/GaSb quantum wells good candidates for realizing the quantum anomalous Hall insulator at a high temperature.

  19. Broadening of Plasmonic Resonance Due to Electron Collisions with Nanoparticle Boundary: а Quantum Mechanical Consideration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander; Protsenko, Igor E.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantum mechanical approach to calculate broadening of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures due to collisions of electrons with the surface of the structure. The approach is applicable if the characteristic size of the structure is much larger than the de Broglie electron ...

  20. Dynamical memory effects in correlated quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Carole; Karpat, Göktuǧ; Macchiavello, Chiara; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-09-01

    Memory effects play a fundamental role in the study of the dynamics of open quantum systems. There exist two conceptually distinct notions of memory discussed for quantum channels in the literature. In quantum information theory quantum channels with memory are characterized by the existence of correlations between successive applications of the channel on a sequence of quantum systems. In open quantum systems theory memory effects arise dynamically during the time evolution of quantum systems and define non-Markovian dynamics. Here we relate and combine these two different concepts of memory. In particular, we study the interplay between correlations between multiple uses of quantum channels and non-Markovianity as nondivisibility of the t -parametrized family of channels defining the dynamical map.

  1. Quantum coherence in the dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samos-Sáenz de Buruaga, D. N.; Sabín, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    We propose to use quantum coherence as the ultimate proof of the quantum nature of the radiation that appears by means of the dynamical Casimir effect in experiments with superconducting microwave waveguides. We show that, unlike previously considered measurements such as entanglement and discord, quantum coherence does not require a threshold value of the external pump amplitude and is highly robust to thermal noise.

  2. Nonlocal Quantum Effects in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dumin, Yurii V

    2014-01-01

    Since it is commonly believed that the observed large-scale structure of the Universe is an imprint of quantum fluctuations existing at the very early stage of its evolution, it is reasonable to pose the question: Do the effects of quantum nonlocality, which are well established now by the laboratory studies, manifest themselves also in the early Universe? We try to answer this question by utilizing the results of a few experiments, namely, with the superconducting multi-Josephson-junction loops and the ultracold gases in periodic potentials. Employing a close analogy between the above-mentioned setups and the simplest one-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model, we show that the specific nonlocal correlations revealed in the laboratory studies might be of considerable importance also in treating the strongly-nonequilibrium phase transitions of Higgs fields in the early Universe. Particularly, they should substantially reduce the number of topological defects (e.g., domain walls) expected du...

  3. Greenhouse effect due to atmospheric nitrous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Y. L.; Wang, W. C.; Lacis, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    The greenhouse effect due to nitrous oxide in the present atmosphere is about 0.8 K. Increase in atmospheric N2O due to perturbation of the nitrogen cycle by man may lead to an increase in surface temperature as large as 0.5 K by 2025, or 1.0 K by 2100. Other climatic effects of N2O are briefly discussed.

  4. Quantum Decoherence of a Single Trapped Ion due to Engineered Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Xue-Xi

    2002-01-01

    Known as an engineered reservoir due to fluctuations in trap parameter,a classical source of quantum decoherence is considered for a single trapped ion theoretically.For simplicity it is assumed that the fluctuations involved are white noise processes,which enables us to give a simple master equation description of this source of decoherence.Our results show that the decoherence rate depends on the vibrational quantum number in different ways corresponding to the vibrational excitation sideband used there.Besides,this source of decoherence also leads to occurrence of dissipation in the ion system.

  5. Back-reaction due to quantum tunneling and modification to black hole evaporation process

    CERN Document Server

    Modak, Sujoy K

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of back-reaction on the evaporation of quantum black holes. The method used is based on quantum tunneling formalism as proposed in [4]. We give a more realistic picture by considering the fact that a black hole looses its energy while modes are tunneled outside the event horizon. It is shown how the tunneling quantum field modes affect the geometry and how this change in geometry is arrested in the quantum field. Exploiting this we calculate the modified (nonthermal) radiation spectrum, associating energy fluxes and discuss various issues related with these. The results obtained here are often expected on physical grounds, but, importantly we find them in a quantitative manner.

  6. Gravitational Effects of a Crystalline Quantum Foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, David

    2017-01-01

    In this work, concepts in quantum mechanics and general relativity are used to derive the quantums of space and time. After showing that space and time, at the Planck scale, must be discrete and not continuous, various anomalous gravitational effects are described. It is discussed how discrete space necessarily imposes order upon Wheeler's quantum foam, changing the foam into a crystal. The forces in this crystal are gravitational forces due to the ordered array of electrically neutral Planck masses, and with a lattice constant on the order of the Planck length. Thus the crystal is a gravity crystal rather than the more common crystals (e.g., silicon) that rely on electromagnetic forces. It is shown that similar solid-state physics techniques can be applied to this universe-wide gravity crystal to calculate particles' dispersion curves. It is shown that the crystal produces typical crystalline effects, namely bandgaps, Brillouin zones, and effective inertial masses that may differ from the gravitational masses with possible values even being near zero or negative. It is shown that the gravity crystal can affect the motion of black holes in dramatic ways, imbuing them with a negative inertial mass such that they are pushed by the pull of gravity.

  7. Effects of quantum gravity on black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Deyou; Yang, Haitang; Yang, Shuzheng

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we discuss effects of quantum gravity on black hole physics. After a brief review of the origin of the minimal observable length from various quantum gravity theories, we present the tunneling method. To incorporate quantum gravity effects, we modify the Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac equation by the modified fundamental commutation relations. Then we use the modified equations to discuss the tunneling radiation of scalar particles and fermions. The corrected Hawking temperatures are related to the quantum numbers of the emitted particles. Quantum gravity corrections slow down the increase of the temperatures. The remnants are observed as $M_{\\hbox{Res}}\\gtrsim \\frac{M_p}{\\sqrt{\\beta_0}}$. The mass is quantized by the modified Wheeler-DeWitt equation and is proportional to $n$ in quantum gravity regime. The thermodynamical property of the black hole is studied by the influence of quantum gravity effects.

  8. Light propagation on quantum curved spacetime and back reaction effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozameh, Carlos; Parisi, Florencia [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2007-09-07

    We study the electromagnetic field equations on an arbitrary quantum curved background in the semiclassical approximation of loop quantum gravity. The effective interaction Hamiltonian for the Maxwell and gravitational fields is obtained and the corresponding field equations, which can be expressed as a modified wave equation for the Maxwell potential, are derived. We use these results to analyze electromagnetic wave propagation on a quantum Robertson-Walker spacetime and show that Lorentz invariance is not preserved. The formalism developed can be applied to the case where back reaction effects on the metric due to the electromagnetic field are taken into account, leading to non-covariant field equations.

  9. Effects of Spin Quantum Force in Magnetized Quantum Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨秀峰; 姜虹; 祁学宏; 段文山

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the governing equations for a quantum magnetoplasma including the electron spin -1/2 effects and quantum Bohm potential, we derive Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation of the system of quantum magneto- hydrodynamics (QMHD). The amplitude and width of magnetosonic soliton with different parameters in the system are studied. It is found that the normalized Zeeman energy E plays a crucial role, for E ≥ 1 the amplitude τmξ and the width we of solitary wave all decrease as E increases. That is, the introduction of spin quantum force modifies the shape of solitary magnetosonic waves and makes them more narrower and shallower.

  10. Magnetoresistance in quantum Hall metals due to Pancharatnam wavefunction transformation and degenerate Landau levels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2015-07-01

    We derive the trial Hall resistance formula for the quantum Hall metals to address both the integer and fractional quantum Hall effects. Within the degenerate (and crossed) Landau levels, and in the presence of changing magnetic field strength, one can invoke two physical processes responsible for the electron conduction and quantum Hall effects in Fermi metals. One of the process requires the Pancharatnam wavefunction transformation, while the second involves electron transfer between two orthogonalized wavefunctions (within the degenerate and crossed Landau levels). We discuss the relevant physical postulates with respect to these physical processes to qualitatively reproduce the measured Hall resistance’s zigzag curve for both the integer and the fractional filling factors. Along the way, we give out some evidence to contradict the postulates with experiments.

  11. First quantum correction to entropy of Vaidya-Bonner black holes due to arbitrary spin fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高长军; 沈有根

    2002-01-01

    Using the improved brick-wall model, we have calculated the first quantum correction to the entropy of non-staticblack holes, Vaidya-Bonner black holes, due to the gravitational, electro-magnetic and neutrino fields. The result showsthat both bosonic entropy and fermionic entropy are exactly proportional to the area of the event horizon. Thus, theentropy-area law still holds in such a non-static case.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of quantum Zeno effect in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Danko

    2015-12-01

    Environmental decoherence appears to be the biggest obstacle for successful construction of quantum mind theories. Nevertheless, the quantum physicist Henry Stapp promoted the view that the mind could utilize quantum Zeno effect to influence brain dynamics and that the efficacy of such mental efforts would not be undermined by environmental decoherence of the brain. To address the physical plausibility of Stapp's claim, we modeled the brain using quantum tunneling of an electron in a multiple-well structure such as the voltage sensor in neuronal ion channels and performed Monte Carlo simulations of quantum Zeno effect exerted by the mind upon the brain in the presence or absence of environmental decoherence. The simulations unambiguously showed that the quantum Zeno effect breaks down for timescales greater than the brain decoherence time. To generalize the Monte Carlo simulation results for any n-level quantum system, we further analyzed the change of brain entropy due to the mind probing actions and proved a theorem according to which local projections cannot decrease the von Neumann entropy of the unconditional brain density matrix. The latter theorem establishes that Stapp's model is physically implausible but leaves a door open for future development of quantum mind theories provided the brain has a decoherence-free subspace.

  13. Quantum effects in beam-plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A

    2015-01-01

    Among the numerous works on quantum effects that have been published in recent years, streaming instabilities in plasma have also been revisited. Both the fluid quantum and the kinetic Wigner-Maxwell models have been used to explore quantum effects on the Weibel, Filamentation and Two-Stream instabilities. While quantum effects usually tend to reduce the instabilities, they can also spur new unstable branches. A number of theoretical results will be reviewed together with the implications to one physical setting, namely the electron driven fast ignition scenario.

  14. Quantum confinement effects in low-dimensional systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Topwal

    2015-06-01

    The confinement effects of electrons in ultrathin films and nanowires grown on metallic and semiconducting substrates investigated using band mapping of their electronic structures using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy is discussed here. It has been shown that finite electron reflectivity at the interface is sufficient to sustain the formation of quantum well states and weak quantum well resonance states even in closely matched metals. The expected parabolic dispersion of sp-derived quantum well states for free-standing layers undergoes deviations from parabolic behaviour and modifications due to the underlying substrate bands, suggesting the effects of strong hybridization between the quantum well states and the substrate bands. Electron confinement effects in low dimensions as observed from the dispersionless features in the band structures are also discussed.

  15. Orbital effects due to gravitational induction

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Giordano, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    We study the motion of test particles in the metric of a localized and slowly rotating astronomical source, within the framework of linear gravitoelectromagnetism, grounded on a Post-Minkowskian approximation of general relativity. Special attention is paid to gravitational inductive effects due to time-varying gravitomagnetic fields. We show that, within the limits of the approximation mentioned above, there are cumulative effects on the orbit of the particles either for planetary sources or for binary systems. They turn out to be negligible.

  16. Boundary Effects in Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Asorey, M

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the role of boundaries in the infrared behavior of quantum field theories. By means of a novel method we calculate the vacuum energy for a massless scalar field confined between two homogeneous parallel plates with the most general type of boundary properties. This allows the discrimination between boundary conditions which generate attractive or repulsive Casimir forces between the plates. In the interface between both regimes we find a very interesting family of boundary conditions which do not induce any type of Casimir force. We analyze the effect of the renormalization group flow on these boundary conditions. Even if the Casimirless conformal invariant conditions are physically unstable under renormalization group flow they emerge as a new set of conformally invariant boundary conditions which are anomaly free.

  17. Temperature Insensitivity of Optical Properties of InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots due to a Pregrown InGaAs Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Zhi-Mei; JIN Can; JIN Peng; WU Ju; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2009-01-01

    Both the peak position and linewidth in the photoluminescence spectrum of the InAs/GaAs quantum dots usually vary in an anomalous way with increasing temperature. Such anomalous optical behaviour is eliminated by inserting an In0.2Ga0.8As quantum well below the quantum dot layer in molecular beam epitaxy. The insensitivity of the photoluminescence spectra to temperature is explained in terms of the effective carrier redistribution between quantum dots through the ln0.2Ga0.8As quantum well.

  18. Discrete quantum geometries and their effective dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Thürigen, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In several approaches towards a quantum theory of gravity, such as group field theory and loop quantum gravity, quantum states and histories of the geometric degrees of freedom turn out to be based on discrete spacetime. The most pressing issue is then how the smooth geometries of general relativity, expressed in terms of suitable geometric observables, arise from such discrete quantum geometries in some semiclassical and continuum limit. In this thesis I tackle the question of suitable observables focusing on the effective dimension of discrete quantum geometries. For this purpose I give a purely combinatorial description of the discrete structures which these geometries have support on. As a side topic, this allows to present an extension of group field theory to cover the combinatorially larger kinematical state space of loop quantum gravity. Moreover, I introduce a discrete calculus for fields on such fundamentally discrete geometries with a particular focus on the Laplacian. This permits to define the ef...

  19. Scattering rates due to electron-phonon interaction in CdS1-xSex quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Augusto M.; Weber, Gerald

    2000-11-01

    We calculate electron-LO-confined and surface phonon scattering rates in CdS1-xSex spherical quantum dots. The phonon modes are described in the frame of the two-mode dielectric continuum model, and the standard k.p formalism is used for treating the electronic band structure. We include the effects of inhomogeneous broadening due to statistical dot size distribution, which can create a wide channel of efficient relaxation. We demonstrate that changes in the concentration can generate variations of more than one order of magnitude in the relaxation rates.

  20. Discrete quantum geometries and their effective dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuerigen, Johannes

    2015-07-02

    In several approaches towards a quantum theory of gravity, such as group field theory and loop quantum gravity, quantum states and histories of the geometric degrees of freedom turn out to be based on discrete spacetime. The most pressing issue is then how the smooth geometries of general relativity, expressed in terms of suitable geometric observables, arise from such discrete quantum geometries in some semiclassical and continuum limit. In this thesis I tackle the question of suitable observables focusing on the effective dimension of discrete quantum geometries. For this purpose I give a purely combinatorial description of the discrete structures which these geometries have support on. As a side topic, this allows to present an extension of group field theory to cover the combinatorially larger kinematical state space of loop quantum gravity. Moreover, I introduce a discrete calculus for fields on such fundamentally discrete geometries with a particular focus on the Laplacian. This permits to define the effective-dimension observables for quantum geometries. Analysing various classes of quantum geometries, I find as a general result that the spectral dimension is more sensitive to the underlying combinatorial structure than to the details of the additional geometric data thereon. Semiclassical states in loop quantum gravity approximate the classical geometries they are peaking on rather well and there are no indications for stronger quantum effects. On the other hand, in the context of a more general model of states which are superposition over a large number of complexes, based on analytic solutions, there is a flow of the spectral dimension from the topological dimension d on low energy scales to a real number between 0 and d on high energy scales. In the particular case of 1 these results allow to understand the quantum geometry as effectively fractal.

  1. The Quantum Zeno Effect -- Watched Pots in the Quantum World

    CERN Document Server

    Venugopalan, Anu

    2012-01-01

    In the 5th century B.C.,the philosopher and logician Zeno of Elea posed several paradoxes which remained unresolved for over two thousand five hundred years. The $20^{th}$ century saw some resolutions to Zeno's mind boggling problems. This long journey saw many significant milestones in the form of discoveries like the tools of converging series and theories on infinite sets in mathematics. In recent times, the Zeno effect made an intriguing appearance in a rather unlikely place - a situation involving the time evolution of a quantum system, which is subject to "observations" over a period of time. Leonid Khalfin working in the former USSR in the 1960s and ECG Sudarshan and B. Misra at the University of Texas, Austin, first drew attention to this problem. In 1977, ECG Sudarshan and B. Misra published a paper on the quantum Zeno effect, called "The Zeno's paradox in quantum theory". Their fascinating result revealed the bizarre workings of the quantum world. Misra and Sudarshan's 1977 paper activated over two ...

  2. Quantum size effects in InP inner film fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ting-yun; WANG Ke-xin; LU Jun

    2005-01-01

    Based on the semiconductor amplifiing properties and the structure of optical fiber wave guide an InP inner fiber is developed.The InP inner film fiber can be employed as a small size,broadband,and ultra-short fiber amplifier.The quantum size effects of the fiber are emphatically investigated in the work.Using the experimental data,we compare the effective mass approximation (EMA) with effective parameterization within the tight binding (EPTB) models for the accurate description of the quantum size effects in InP.The results show that the EPTB model provides an excellent description of band gap variation over a wide range of sizes.The Bohr diameter and the effective Rydberg energy of InP are calculated.Finally,the amplifiing properties of the InP inner film fiber are discussed due to the quantum size effects.

  3. Chaos in effective classical and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Casetti, L; Modugno, M; Casetti, Lapo; Gatto, Raoul; Modugno, Michele

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of classical and quantum N-component phi^4 oscillators in presence of an external field. In the large N limit the effective dynamics is described by two-degree-of-freedom classical Hamiltonian systems. In the classical model we observe chaotic orbits for any value of the external field, while in the quantum case chaos is strongly suppressed. A simple explanation of this behaviour is found in the change in the structure of the orbits induced by quantum corrections. Consistently with Heisenberg's principle, quantum fluctuations are forced away from zero, removing in the effective quantum dynamics a hyperbolic fixed point that is a major source of chaos in the classical model.

  4. The quantum Hall effects: Philosophical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, P.

    2015-05-01

    The Quantum Hall Effects offer a rich variety of theoretical and experimental advances. They provide interesting insights on such topics as gauge invariance, strong interactions in Condensed Matter physics, emergence of new paradigms. This paper focuses on some related philosophical questions. Various brands of positivism or agnosticism are confronted with the physics of the Quantum Hall Effects. Hacking's views on Scientific Realism, Chalmers' on Non-Figurative Realism are discussed. It is argued that the difficulties with those versions of realism may be resolved within a dialectical materialist approach. The latter is argued to provide a rational approach to the phenomena, theory and ontology of the Quantum Hall Effects.

  5. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Croon, Djuna; Fritz, Christopher [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background. (orig.)

  6. Non-locality in quantum field theory due to general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier, E-mail: x.calmet@sussex.ac.uk; Croon, Djuna, E-mail: d.croon@sussex.ac.uk; Fritz, Christopher, E-mail: c.fritz@sussex.ac.uk [Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Falmer, BN1 9QH, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-19

    We show that general relativity coupled to a quantum field theory generically leads to non-local effects in the matter sector. These non-local effects can be described by non-local higher dimensional operators which remarkably have an approximate shift symmetry. When applied to inflationary models, our results imply that small non-Gaussianities are a generic feature of models based on general relativity coupled to matter fields. However, these effects are too small to be observable in the cosmic microwave background.

  7. The Temperature Effects on the Ion Trap Quantum Computer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongmin; JiatiLIN

    2001-01-01

    We consider one source of decoherence for a quantum computer composed of many trapped ions due to the thermal effects of the system in the presence of laser-ion interaction.The upper limit of the temperature at which the logical gate operations could be carried out reliably is given,and our result is agreement with the experiment.

  8. Peltier effect in strongly driven quantum wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierzejewski, M.; Crivelli, D.; Prelovšek, P.

    2014-08-01

    We study a microscopic model of a thermocouple device with two connected correlated quantum wires driven by a constant electric field. In such a closed system we follow the time and position dependence of the entropy density using the concept of the reduced density matrix. At weak driving, the initial changes of the entropy at the junctions can be described by the linear Peltier response. At longer times the quasiequilibrium situation is reached with well defined local temperatures which increase due to an overall Joule heating. On the other hand, a strong electric field induces a nontrivial nonlinear thermoelectric response, e.g., the Bloch oscillations of the energy current. Moreover, we show for the doped Mott insulators that strong driving can reverse the Peltier effect.

  9. Thermodynamics of the quantum butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Campisi, Michele

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we consider the quantum analogue of the butterfly effect which is well known in the field of classical non-linear dynamics. Recently, it has been proposed to measure the effect using an out-of-time-order correlator (OTOC) between two local operators. Effectively measuring the degree of non-commutativity in time, this correlator describes the phenomenon of information scrambling in quantum information. Here we show that the butterfly effect can be recast as a two-measurement scheme inspired from the field of non-equilibrium quan- tum thermodynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an OTOC can emerge as the characteristic function of the work distribution. Our realisation not only offers a physically intuitive thermodynamical interpretation of the quantum butterfly effect, it also inspires novel experimental schemes to study the problem of quantum information scrambling.

  10. Quantum Hall effect in momentum space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Price, Hannah M.; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically discuss a momentum-space analog of the quantum Hall effect, which could be observed in topologically nontrivial lattice models subject to an external harmonic trapping potential. In our proposal, the Niu-Thouless-Wu formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a torus is realized in the toroidally shaped Brillouin zone. In this analogy, the position of the trap center in real space controls the magnetic fluxes that are inserted through the holes of the torus in momentum space. We illustrate the momentum-space quantum Hall effect with the noninteracting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model, for which we numerically demonstrate how this effect manifests itself in experimental observables. Extension to the interacting trapped Harper-Hofstadter model is also briefly considered. We finally discuss possible experimental platforms where our proposal for the momentum-space quantum Hall effect could be realized.

  11. Seismoelectric effects due to mesoscopic heterogeneities

    CERN Document Server

    Jougnot, D; Carbajal, M Rosas; Linde, N; Holliger, K

    2014-01-01

    While the seismic effects of wave-induced fluid flow due to mesoscopic heterogeneities have been studied for several decades, the role played by these types of heterogeneities on seismoelectric phenomena is largely unexplored. To address this issue, we have developed a novel methodological framework which allows for the coupling of wave-induced fluid flow, as inferred through numerical oscillatory compressibility tests, with the pertinent seismoelectric conversion mechanisms. Simulating the corresponding response of a water-saturated sandstone sample containing mesoscopic fractures, we demonstrate for the first time that these kinds of heterogeneities can produce measurable seismoelectric signals under typical laboratory conditions. Given that this phenomenon is sensitive to key hydraulic and mechanical properties, we expect that the results of this pilot study will stimulate further exploration on this topic in several domains of the Earth, environmental, and engineering sciences.

  12. Unusual quantum confined Stark effect and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in semiconductor quantum rings with anisotropic effective masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, G. O.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, Andrey; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the energy spectrum of quantum rings made out of a bidimensional semiconductor material with anisotropic band structures are investigated within the effective-mass model. The interplay between the effective-mass anisotropy and the radial confinement leads to wave functions that are strongly localized at two diametrically opposite regions where the kinetic energy is lowest due to the highest effective mass. We show that this quantum phenomenon has clear consequences on the behavior of the energy states in the presence of applied in-plane electric fields and out-of-plane magnetic fields. In the former, the quantum confined Stark effect is observed with either linear or quadratic shifts, depending on the direction of the applied field. As for the latter, the usual Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are not observed for a circularly symmetric confining potential, however they can be reinstated if an elliptic ring with an appropriate aspect ratio is chosen.

  13. Oscillatory quantum interference effects in narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillianfeld, R. B.; Kallaher, R. L.; Heremans, J. J.; Chen, Hong; Goel, N.; Chung, S. J.; Santos, M. B.; Van Roy, W.; Borghs, G.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate quantum interference phenomena in narrow bandgap semiconductors under strong spin-orbit interaction, by measuring the magnetoresistance across mesoscopic closed-path structures fabricated in two-dimensional electron systems. We discuss our results in terms of four quantum interference effects brought about by geometric phases acquired by the electron wave functions: the Aharonov-Bohm phase, the Altshuler-Aronov-Spivak effect, the Berry's phase due to the evolution of the spin degree of freedom, and the Aharonov-Casher phase.

  14. Enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a quantum dot due to external ac field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiao, E-mail: cqhy1127@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Maths and Physics, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411104 (China); Wang, Zhi-yong, E-mail: wzyong@cqut.edu.cn [School of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Xie, Zhong-Xiang [Department of Mathematics and Physics, Hunan Institute of Technology, Hengyang 421002 (China)

    2013-08-15

    We investigate the figure of merit of a quantum dot (QD) system irradiated with an external microwave filed by nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. Results show that the frequency of microwave field influence the figure of merit ZT significantly. At low temperature, a sharp peak can be observed in the figure of merit ZT as the frequency of ac field increases. As the frequency varies, several zero points and resonant peaks emerge in the figure of merit ZT. By adjusting the frequency of the microwave field, we can obtain high ZT. The figure of merit ZT increases with the decreasing of linewidth function Γ. In addition, Wiedemann–Franz law does not hold, particularly in the low frequency region due to multi-photon emission and absorption. Some novel thermoelectric properties are also found in two-level QD system.

  15. Conductance maps of quantum rings due to a local potential perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, M. D.; Peeters, F. M.; Chaves, A.; Farias, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of the dynamics of a Gaussian shaped wavepacket inside a small sized quantum ring, smoothly connected to two leads and exposed to a perturbing potential of a biased atomic force microscope tip. Using the Landauer formalism, we calculated conductance maps of this system in the case of single and two subband transport. We explain the main features in the conductance maps as due to the AFM tip influence on the wavepacket phase and amplitude. In the presence of an external magnetic field, the tip modifies the ϕ0 periodic Aharonov-Bohm oscillation pattern into a ϕ0/2 periodic Al’tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillation pattern. Our results in the case of multiband transport suggest tip selectivity to higher subbands, making them more observable in the total conductance map.

  16. Unwanted effects due to cosmetics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnuch, A.

    2007-01-01

    Cosmetics are a heterogeneous group of products, consisting of products abundantly used as shampoos or cleansing agents on the one hand, and of products not so frequently used as those applied for decorative purposes such as nail cosmetics. Due to a differing frequency of use and due to differing (c

  17. Unwanted effects due to cosmetics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnuch, A.

    2007-01-01

    Cosmetics are a heterogeneous group of products, consisting of products abundantly used as shampoos or cleansing agents on the one hand, and of products not so frequently used as those applied for decorative purposes such as nail cosmetics. Due to a differing frequency of use and due to differing (c

  18. Unwanted effects due to cosmetics - a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnuch, A.

    2007-01-01

    Cosmetics are a heterogeneous group of products, consisting of products abundantly used as shampoos or cleansing agents on the one hand, and of products not so frequently used as those applied for decorative purposes such as nail cosmetics. Due to a differing frequency of use and due to differing

  19. Correction to Neutrino Mass Square Difference in the Co-Bimaximal Mixings due to Quantum Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koranga, Bipin Singh; Narayan, Mohan

    2017-08-01

    We consider non-renormalizable interaction term as a perturbation of the neutrino mass matrix. We assume that the neutrino masses and mixing arise through physics at a scale intermediate between Planck scale and the electroweak breaking scale. We also assume that, just above the electroweak breaking scale, neutrino masses are nearly degenerate and their mixing is Co-bimaximal mixing by assumming mixing angle θ _{13}≠ 0=10°,θ _{23}=π/4, tanθ _{12}2= {1-3sinθ _{13}2}/{2}=34° and Dirac phase δ =± π/2. Quantum gravity (Planck scale effects) lead to an effective S U(2) L × U(1) invariant dimension-5 Lagrangian involving neutrino and Higgs fields. On symmetry breaking, this operator gives rise to correction to the above masses and mixing. The gravitational interaction M X = M p l , we find that for degenerate neutrino mass spectrum, the considered perturbation term change the {Δ }_{21}^' } by 12% and {Δ }_{31}^' } mass square difference is unchanged above GUT scale. The nature of gravitational interaction demands that the element of this perturbation matrix should be independent of flavor indices. In this paper, we study the quantum gravity effects on neutrino mass square difference, namely modified dispersion relation for neutrino mass square differences.

  20. Coherent quantum effects through dispersive bosonic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Sai-Yun; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Serafini, Alessio

    2010-01-01

    The coherent evolution of two atomic qubits mediated by a set of bosonic field modes is investigated. By assuming a specific encoding of the quantum states in the internal levels of the two atoms we show that entangling quantum gates can be realised, with high fidelity, even when a large number of mediating modes is involved. The effect of losses and imperfections on the gates' operation is also considered in detail.

  1. Algorithmic quantum simulation of memory effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, U.; Di Candia, R.; Casanova, J.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a method for the algorithmic quantum simulation of memory effects described by integrodifferential evolution equations. It consists in the systematic use of perturbation theory techniques and a Markovian quantum simulator. Our method aims to efficiently simulate both completely positive and nonpositive dynamics without the requirement of engineering non-Markovian environments. Finally, we find that small error bounds can be reached with polynomially scaling resources, evaluated as the time required for the simulation.

  2. Quantum corrections to the gravitational potentials of a point source due to conformal fields in de Sitter

    CERN Document Server

    Fröb, Markus B

    2016-01-01

    We derive the leading quantum corrections to the gravitational potentials in a de Sitter background, due to the vacuum polarization from loops of conformal fields. Our results are valid for arbitrary conformal theories, even strongly interacting ones, and are expressed using the coefficients $b$ and $b'$ appearing in the trace anomaly. Apart from the de Sitter generalization of the known flat-space results, we find two additional contributions: one which depends on the finite coefficients of terms quadratic in the curvature appearing in the renormalized effective action, and one which grows logarithmically with physical distance. While the first contribution corresponds to a rescaling of the effective mass, the second contribution leads to a faster fall-off of the Newton potential at large distances, and is potentially measurable.

  3. Kondo effects in triangular triple quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Akira; Numata, Takahide; Nisikawa, Yunori; Hewson, A. C.

    2009-03-01

    We study the conductance through a triangular triple quantum dot, which is connected to two noninteracting leads, using the numerical renormalization group (NRG). It is found that the system shows a variety of Kondo effects depending on the filling of the triangle. The SU(4) Kondo effect occurs at half-filling, and a sharp conductance dip due to a phase lapse appears in the gate-voltage dependence. Furthermore, when four electrons occupy the three sites on average, a local S=1 moment, which is caused by the Nagaoka mechanism, is induced along the triangle. The temperature dependence of the entropy and spin susceptibility of the triangle shows that this moment is screened by the conduction electrons via two separate stages at different temperatures. The two-terminal and four-terminal conductances show a clear difference at the gate voltages, where the SU(4) or the S=1 Kondo effects occur[1]. We will also discuss effects of deformations of the triangular configuration, caused by the inhomogeneity in the inter-dot couplings and in the gate voltages. [4pt] [1] T.Numata, Y.Nisikawa, A.Oguri, and A.C.Hewson: arXiv:0808.3496.

  4. Effects of reservoir squeezing on quantum systems and work extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X. L.; Wang, Tao; Yi, X. X.

    2012-11-01

    We establish a quantum Otto engine cycle in which the working substance contacts with squeezed reservoirs during the two quantum isochoric processes. We consider two working substances: (1) a qubit and (2) two coupled qubits. Due to the effects of squeezing, the working substance can be heated to a higher effective temperature, which leads to many interesting features different from the ordinary ones, such as (1) for the qubit as working substance, if we choose the squeezed parameters properly, the positive work can be exported even when THquantum fuel is more efficient than the classical one.

  5. Bound values for Hall conductivity of heterogeneous medium under quantum Hall effect conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V E Arkhincheev

    2008-02-01

    Bound values for Hall conductivity under quantum Hall effect (QHE) conditions in inhomogeneous medium has been studied. It is shown that bound values for Hall conductivity differ from bound values for metallic conductivity. This is due to the unusual character of current percolation under quantum Hall effect conditions.

  6. Effective pure states for bulk quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knill, E.; Chuang, I.; Laflamme, R.

    1997-11-01

    In bulk quantum computation one can manipulate a large number of indistinguishable quantum computers by parallel unitary operations and measure expectation values of certain observables with limited sensitivity. The initial state of each computer in the ensemble is known but not pure. Methods for obtaining effective pure input states by a series of manipulations have been described by Gershenfeld and Chuang (logical labeling) and Corey et al. (spatial averaging) for the case of quantum computation with nuclear magnetic resonance. We give a different technique called temporal averaging. This method is based on classical randomization, requires no ancilla qubits and can be implemented in nuclear magnetic resonance without using gradient fields. We introduce several temporal averaging algorithms suitable for both high temperature and low temperature bulk quantum computing and analyze the signal to noise behavior of each.

  7. Effective operator formalism for open quantum systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2012-01-01

    We present an effective operator formalism for open quantum systems. Employing perturbation theory and adiabatic elimination of excited states for a weakly driven system, we derive an effective master equation which reduces the evolution to the ground-state dynamics. The effective evolution...

  8. Quantum dust magnetosonic waves with spin and exchange correlation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroof, R.; Qamar, A. [Department of Physics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan); Mushtaq, A. [Department of Physics, Abdul Wali Khan University, Mardan 23200 (Pakistan); National Center for Physics, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2016-01-15

    Dust magnetosonic waves are studied in degenerate dusty plasmas with spin and exchange correlation effects. Using the fluid equations of magnetoplasma with quantum corrections due to the Bohm potential, temperature degeneracy, spin magnetization energy, and exchange correlation, a generalized dispersion relation is derived. Spin effects are incorporated via spin force and macroscopic spin magnetization current. The exchange-correlation potentials are used, based on the adiabatic local-density approximation, and can be described as a function of the electron density. For three different values of angle, the dispersion relation is reduced to three different modes under the low frequency magnetohydrodynamic assumptions. It is found that the effects of quantum corrections in the presence of dust concentration significantly modify the dispersive properties of these modes. The results are useful for understanding numerous collective phenomena in quantum plasmas, such as those in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the cores of white dwarf stars and giant planets) and in plasma-assisted nanotechnology (e.g., quantum diodes, quantum free-electron lasers, etc.)

  9. Quantum Gravity signatures in the Unruh effect

    CERN Document Server

    Alkofer, Natalia; Saueressig, Frank; Versteegen, Fleur

    2016-01-01

    We study quantum gravity signatures emerging from phenomenologically motivated multiscale models, spectral actions, and Causal Set Theory within the detector approach to the Unruh effect. We show that while the Unruh temperature is unaffected, Lorentz-invariant corrections to the two-point function leave a characteristic fingerprint in the induced emission rate of the accelerated detector. Generically, quantum gravity models exhibiting dynamical dimensional reduction exhibit a suppression of the Unruh rate at high energy while the rate is enhanced in Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions. We quantify this behavior by introducing the "Unruh dimension" as the effective spacetime dimension seen by the Unruh effect and show that it is related, though not identical, to the spectral dimension used to characterize spacetime in quantum gravity. We comment on the physical origins of these effects and their relevance for black hole evaporation.

  10. Quantum gravity signatures in the Unruh effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkofer, Natalia; D'Odorico, Giulio; Saueressig, Frank; Versteegen, Fleur

    2016-11-01

    We study quantum gravity signatures emerging from phenomenologically motivated multiscale models, spectral actions, and causal set theory within the detector approach to the Unruh effect. We show that while the Unruh temperature is unaffected, Lorentz-invariant corrections to the two-point function leave a characteristic fingerprint in the induced emission rate of the accelerated detector. Generically, quantum gravity models exhibiting dynamical dimensional reduction exhibit a suppression of the Unruh rate at high energy while the rate is enhanced in Kaluza-Klein theories with compact extra dimensions. We quantify this behavior by introducing the "Unruh dimension" as the effective spacetime dimension seen by the Unruh effect and show that it is related, though not identical, to the spectral dimension used to characterize spacetime in quantum gravity. We comment on the physical origins of these effects and their relevance for black hole evaporation.

  11. Simple computer model for the quantum Zeno effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, D

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a simple model for repeated measurement of a quantum system: the evolution of a free particle, simulated by discretising the particle's position. This model is easily simulated by computer and provides a useful arena to investigate the effects of measurement upon dynamics, in particular the slowing of evolution due to measurement (the `quantum Zeno effect'). The results of this simulation are discussed for two rather different sorts of measurement process, both of which are (simplified forms of) measurements used in previous simulations of position measurement. A number of interesting results due to measurement are found, and the investigation casts some light on previous disagreements about the presence or absence of the Zeno effect.

  12. Toward simulating complex systems with quantum effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenion-Hanrath, Rachel Lynn

    Quantum effects like tunneling, coherence, and zero point energy often play a significant role in phenomena on the scales of atoms and molecules. However, the exact quantum treatment of a system scales exponentially with dimensionality, making it impractical for characterizing reaction rates and mechanisms in complex systems. An ongoing effort in the field of theoretical chemistry and physics is extending scalable, classical trajectory-based simulation methods capable of capturing quantum effects to describe dynamic processes in many-body systems; in the work presented here we explore two such techniques. First, we detail an explicit electron, path integral (PI)-based simulation protocol for predicting the rate of electron transfer in condensed-phase transition metal complex systems. Using a PI representation of the transferring electron and a classical representation of the transition metal complex and solvent atoms, we compute the outer sphere free energy barrier and dynamical recrossing factor of the electron transfer rate while accounting for quantum tunneling and zero point energy effects. We are able to achieve this employing only a single set of force field parameters to describe the system rather than parameterizing along the reaction coordinate. Following our success in describing a simple model system, we discuss our next steps in extending our protocol to technologically relevant materials systems. The latter half focuses on the Mixed Quantum-Classical Initial Value Representation (MQC-IVR) of real-time correlation functions, a semiclassical method which has demonstrated its ability to "tune'' between quantum- and classical-limit correlation functions while maintaining dynamic consistency. Specifically, this is achieved through a parameter that determines the quantumness of individual degrees of freedom. Here, we derive a semiclassical correction term for the MQC-IVR to systematically characterize the error introduced by different choices of simulation

  13. The quantum Hall's effect:A quantum electrodynamic phenomenon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.I. Arbab

    2012-01-01

    We have applied Maxwell's equations to study the physics of quantum Hall's effect.The electromagnetic properties of this system are obtained.The Hall's voltage,VH =2πh2ns/e rn,where ns is the electron number density,for a 2-dimensional system,and h =2πh is the Planck's constant,is found to coincide with the voltage drop across the quantum capacitor.Consideration of the cyclotronic motion of electrons is found to give rise to Hall's resistance.Ohmic resistances in the horizontal and vertical directions have been found to exist before equilibrium state is reached.At a fundamental level,the Hall's effect is found to be equivalent to a resonant LCR circuit with LH =2π m/e2ns and CH =me2/2πh2ns satisfying the resonance condition with resonant frequency equal to the inverse of the scattering (relaxation) time,Ts.The Hall's resistance is found to be RH =√LH/CH.The Hall's resistance may be connected with the impedance that the electron wave experiences when it propagates in the 2-dimeasional gas.

  14. Quantum metrology and estimation of Unruh effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieci; Tian, Zehua; Jing, Jiliang; Fan, Heng

    2014-11-26

    We study the quantum metrology for a pair of entangled Unruh-Dewitt detectors when one of them is accelerated and coupled to a massless scalar field. Comparing with previous schemes, our model requires only local interaction and avoids the use of cavities in the probe state preparation process. We show that the probe state preparation and the interaction between the accelerated detector and the external field have significant effects on the value of quantum Fisher information, correspondingly pose variable ultimate limit of precision in the estimation of Unruh effect. We find that the precision of the estimation can be improved by a larger effective coupling strength and a longer interaction time. Alternatively, the energy gap of the detector has a range that can provide us a better precision. Thus we may adjust those parameters and attain a higher precision in the estimation. We also find that an extremely high acceleration is not required in the quantum metrology process.

  15. Quantum correlations of light due to a room temperature mechanical oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Sudhir, Vivishek; Fedorov, Sergey A; Schuetz, Hendrik; Wilson, Dalziel J; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of laser light to a mechanical oscillator via radiation pressure leads to the emergence of quantum mechanical correlations in the amplitude and phase quadrature of the laser beam. These correlations form a generic non-classical quantum resource which can be employed for quantum enhanced force metrology, and gives rise to ponderomotive squeezing in the limit of strong correlations. To date, this resource has only been observed in a handful of cryogenic cavity optomechanical experiments. Here, we demonstrate the ability to efficiently resolve optomechanical quantum correlations imprinted on an optical laser beam interacting with a room temperature nanomechanical oscillator. Direct measurement of the optical beam in a detuned homodyne detector ("variational readout") at frequencies far from the resonance frequency of the oscillator, reveal quantum correlations at a few percent level. We use these correlations to realize a $7\\%$ quantum-enhancement in thermal force estimation at room temperature. The...

  16. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in real materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayong; Zhao, Bao; Zhou, Tong; Yang, Zhongqin

    2016-11-01

    Under a strong magnetic field, the quantum Hall (QH) effect can be observed in two-dimensional electronic gas systems. If the quantized Hall conductivity is acquired in a system without the need of an external magnetic field, then it will give rise to a new quantum state, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. The QAH state is a novel quantum state that is insulating in the bulk but exhibits unique conducting edge states topologically protected from backscattering and holds great potential for applications in low-power-consumption electronics. The realization of the QAH effect in real materials is of great significance. In this paper, we systematically review the theoretical proposals that have been brought forward to realize the QAH effect in various real material systems or structures, including magnetically doped topological insulators, graphene-based systems, silicene-based systems, two-dimensional organometallic frameworks, quantum wells, and functionalized Sb(111) monolayers, etc. Our paper can help our readers to quickly grasp the recent developments in this field. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11574051), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 14ZR1403400), and Fudan High-end Computing Center, China.

  17. Quantum gravity, effective fields and string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J

    2004-01-01

    We look at the various aspects of treating general relativity as a quantum theory. It is briefly studied how to consistently quantize general relativity as an effective field theory. A key achievement here is the long-range low-energy leading quantum corrections to both the Schwarzschild and Kerr metrics. The leading quantum corrections to the pure gravitational potential between two sources are also calculated, both in the mixed theory of scalar QED and quantum gravity and in the pure gravitational theory. The (Kawai-Lewellen-Tye) string theory gauge/gravity relations is next dealt with. We investigate if the KLT-operator mapping extends to the case of higher derivative effective operators. The KLT-relations are generalized, taking the effective field theory viewpoint, and remarkable tree-level amplitude relations between the field theory operators are derived. Quantum gravity is finally looked at from the the perspective of taking the limit of infinitely many spatial dimensions. It is verified that only a c...

  18. Force on a slow moving impurity due to thermal and quantum fluctuations in a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sykes, Andrew [UNIV OF QUEENSLAND

    2009-01-01

    We study the drag force acting on an impurity moving through a 1D Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of both quantum and thermal fluctuations. We are able to find exact analytical solutions of the partial differential equations to the level of the Bogoliubov approximation. At zero temperature, we find a nonzero force is exerted on the impurity at subcritical velocities, due to the scattering of quantum fluctuations. We make the following explicit assumptions: far from the impurity the system is in a quantum state given by that of a zero (or finite) temperature Bose-Einstein condensate, and the scattering process generates only causally related reflection/transmission. The results raise unanswered questions in the quantum dynamics associated with the formation of persistent currents.

  19. Modified Newton's Law of Gravitation Due to Minimal Length in Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed Farag

    2013-01-01

    A recent theory about the origin of the gravity suggests that the gravity is originally an entropic force. In this work, we discuss the effects of generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) which is proposed by some approaches to quantum gravity such as string theory, black hole physics and doubly special relativity theories (DSR), on the area law of the entropy. This leads to a $\\sqrt{Area}$-type correction to the area law of entropy which imply that the number of bits $N$ is modified. Therefore, we obtain a modified Newton's law of gravitation. Surprisingly, this modification agrees with different sign with the prediction of Randall-Sundrum II model which contains one uncompactified extra dimension. Furthermore, such modification may have observable consequences at length scales much larger than the Planck scale.

  20. Gravitational Waves in Effective Quantum Gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmet, Xavier; Kuntz, Ibere; Mohapatra, Sonali [University of Sussex, Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    In this short paper we investigate quantum gravitational effects on Einstein's equations using Effective Field Theory techniques. We consider the leading order quantum gravitational correction to the wave equation. Besides the usual massless mode, we find a pair of modes with complex masses. These massive particles have a width and could thus lead to a damping of gravitational waves if excited in violent astrophysical processes producing gravitational waves such as e.g. black hole mergers. We discuss the consequences for gravitational wave events such as GW 150914 recently observed by the Advanced LIGO collaboration. (orig.)

  1. Effective constraints of loop quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, M; Kagan, M; Skirzewski, A; Bojowald, Martin; Hernandez, Hector; Kagan, Mikhail; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2006-01-01

    Within a perturbative cosmological regime of loop quantum gravity corrections to effective constraints are computed. This takes into account all inhomogeneous degrees of freedom relevant for scalar metric modes around flat space and results in explicit expressions for modified coefficients and of higher order terms. It also illustrates the role of different scales determining the relative magnitude of corrections. Our results demonstrate that loop quantum gravity has the correct classical limit, at least in its sector of cosmological perturbations around flat space, in the sense of perturbative effective theory.

  2. Quantum and isotope effects in lithium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, Graeme J.; Dunuwille, Mihindra; Martinez-Canales, Miguel; Loa, Ingo; Zhang, Rong; Sinogeikin, Stanislav; Cai, Weizhao; Deemyad, Shanti

    2017-06-01

    The crystal structure of elements at zero pressure and temperature is the most fundamental information in condensed matter physics. For decades it has been believed that lithium, the simplest metallic element, has a complicated ground-state crystal structure. Using synchrotron x-ray diffraction in diamond anvil cells and multiscale simulations with density functional theory and molecular dynamics, we show that the previously accepted martensitic ground state is metastable. The actual ground state is face-centered cubic (fcc). We find that isotopes of lithium, under similar thermal paths, exhibit a considerable difference in martensitic transition temperature. Lithium exhibits nuclear quantum mechanical effects, serving as a metallic intermediate between helium, with its quantum effect-dominated structures, and the higher-mass elements. By disentangling the quantum kinetic complexities, we prove that fcc lithium is the ground state, and we synthesize it by decompression.

  3. Mesoscopic effects in the quantum Hall regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Bhatt; Xin Wan

    2002-02-01

    We report results of a study of (integer) quantum Hall transitions in a single or multiple Landau levels for non-interacting electrons in disordered two-dimensional systems, obtained by projecting a tight-binding Hamiltonian to the corresponding magnetic subbands. In finite-size systems, we find that mesoscopic effects often dominate, leading to apparent non-universal scaling behavior in higher Landau levels. This is because localization length, which grows exponentially with Landau level index, exceeds the system sizes amenable to the numerical study at present. When band mixing between multiple Landau levels is present, mesoscopic effects cause a crossover from a sequence of quantum Hall transitions for weak disorder to classical behavior for strong disorder. This behavior may be of relevance to experimentally observed transitions between quantum Hall states and the insulating phase at low magnetic fields.

  4. Loop quantum gravity as an effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2012-01-01

    As a canonical and generally covariant gauge theory, loop quantum gravity requires special techniques to derive effective actions or equations. If the proper constructions are taken into account, the theory, in spite of considerable ambiguities at the dynamical level, allows for a meaningful phenomenology to be developed, by which it becomes falsifiable. The tradiational problems plaguing canonical quantum-gravity theories, such as the anomaly issue or the problem of time, can be overcome or are irrelevant at the effective level, resulting in consistent means of physical evaluations. This contribution presents aspects of canonical equations and related notions of (deformed) space-time structures and discusses implications in loop quantum gravity, such as signature change at high density from holonomy corrections, and falsifiability thanks to inverse-triad corrections.

  5. A realist interpretation of quantum mechanics based on undecidability due to gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Garcia-Pintos, Luis Pedro [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Igua 4225, CP 11400 Montevideo (Uruguay); Pullin, Jorge, E-mail: pullin@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States)

    2011-07-08

    We summarize several recent developments suggesting that solving the problem of time in quantum gravity leads to a solution of the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. This approach has been informally called 'the Montevideo interpretation'. In particular we discuss why definitions in this approach are not for all practical purposes (fapp) and how the problem of outcomes is resolved.

  6. Quantum effective potential, electron transport and conformons in biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dandoloff, Rossen [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Modelisation, Universite de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95302 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Balakrishnan, Radha [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2005-07-08

    In the Kirchhoff model of a biopolymer, conformation dynamics can be described in terms of solitary waves, for certain special cross-section asymmetries. Applying this to the problem of electron transport, we show that the quantum effective potential arising due to the bends and twists of the polymer enables us to formalize and quantify the concept of a conformon that has been hypothesized in biology. Its connection to the soliton solution of the cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation emerges in a natural fashion.

  7. The Quantum Spin Hall Effect: Theory and Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konig, Markus; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W.; /Wurzburg U.; Hughes, Taylor L.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The search for topologically non-trivial states of matter has become an important goal for condensed matter physics. Recently, a new class of topological insulators has been proposed. These topological insulators have an insulating gap in the bulk, but have topologically protected edge states due to the time reversal symmetry. In two dimensions the helical edge states give rise to the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, in the absence of any external magnetic field. Here we review a recent theory which predicts that the QSH state can be realized in HgTe/CdTe semiconductor quantum wells. By varying the thickness of the quantum well, the band structure changes from a normal to an 'inverted' type at a critical thickness d{sub c}. We present an analytical solution of the helical edge states and explicitly demonstrate their topological stability. We also review the recent experimental observation of the QSH state in HgTe/(Hg,Cd)Te quantum wells. We review both the fabrication of the sample and the experimental setup. For thin quantum wells with well width d{sub QW} < 6.3 nm, the insulating regime shows the conventional behavior of vanishingly small conductance at low temperature. However, for thicker quantum wells (d{sub QW} > 6.3 nm), the nominally insulating regime shows a plateau of residual conductance close to 2e{sup 2}/h. The residual conductance is independent of the sample width, indicating that it is caused by edge states. Furthermore, the residual conductance is destroyed by a small external magnetic field. The quantum phase transition at the critical thickness, d{sub c} = 6.3 nm, is also independently determined from the occurrence of a magnetic field induced insulator to metal transition.

  8. Greenhouse effect due to chlorofluorocarbons - Climatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, V.

    1975-01-01

    The infrared bands of chlorofluorocarbons and chlorocarbons enhance the atmospheric greenhouse effect. This enhancement may lead to an appreciable increase in the global surface temperature if the atmospheric concentrations of these compounds reach values of the order of 2 parts per billion.

  9. Some NUDET effects due to water containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symbalisty, E.M.D.

    1994-07-01

    The effect on the optical and acoustical signals of containing a nominal low yield nuclear device in a sphere of water is studied. The silicon photodiode optical signal is seen to be distorted by a relatively small amount of water. The acoustical signal timing and shape change little.

  10. Magnetic Anistropy due to the Casimir Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Metalidis, G

    2009-01-01

    We consider the Casimir interaction between a ferromagnetic and a non-magnetic mirror, and show how the Casimir effect gives rise to a magnetic anisotropy in the ferromagnetic layer. The anisotropy is out-of-plane if the non-magnetic plate is optically isotropic. If the non-magnetic plate shows a uniaxial optical anisotropy (with optical axis in the plate plane), we find an in-plane magnetic anisotropy. In both cases, the energetically most favorable magnetization orientation is given by the competition between polar, longitudinal and transverse contributions to the magneto-optical Kerr effect, and will therefore depend on the interplate distance. Numerical results will be presented for a magnetic plate made out of iron, and non-magnetic plates of gold (optically isotropic), quartz, calcite and barium titanate (all uniaxially birefringent).

  11. Quantum Hall Effect in Higher Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Karabali, Dimitra; Karabali, Dimitra

    2002-01-01

    Following recent work on the quantum Hall effect on $S^4$, we solve the Landau problem on the complex projective spaces ${\\bf C}P^k$ and discuss quantum Hall states for such spaces. Unlike the case of $S^4$, a finite spatial density can be obtained with a finite number of internal states for each particle. We treat the case of ${\\bf C}P^2$ in some detail considering both Abelian and nonabelian background fields. The wavefunctions are obtained and incompressibility of the Hall states is shown. The case of ${\\bf C}P^3$ is related to the case of $S^4$.

  12. Holographic Butterfly Effect at Quantum Critical Points

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yi; Wu, Jian-Pin

    2016-01-01

    When the Lyapunov exponent $\\lambda_L$ in a quantum chaotic system saturates the bound $\\lambda_L\\leqslant 2\\pi k_BT$, it is proposed that this system has a holographic dual described by a gravity theory. In particular, the butterfly effect as a prominent phenomenon of chaos can ubiquitously exist in a black hole system characterized by a shockwave solution near the horizon. In this letter we propose that the butterfly velocity $v_B$ can be used to diagnose quantum phase transition (QPT) in holographic theories. We provide evidences for this proposal with two holographic models exhibiting metal-insulator transitions (MIT), in which the second derivative of $v_B$ with respect to system parameters characterizes quantum critical points (QCP) with local extremes. We also point out that this proposal can be tested by experiments in the light of recent progress on the measurement of out-of-time-order correlation function (OTOC).

  13. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  14. Nonlinear peltier effect in quantum point contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachek, E. N.; Scherbakov, A. G.; Landman, Uzi

    1998-11-01

    A theoretical analysis of the Peltier effect in two-dimensional quantum point contacts, in field-free conditions and under the influence of applied magnetic fields, is presented. It is shown that in the nonlinear regime (finite applied voltage) new peaks in the Peltier coefficient appear leading to violation of Onsager's relation. Oscillations of the Peltier coefficient in a magnetic field are demonstrated.

  15. Quantum Transfer Energy and Nonlocal Correlation in a Dimer with Time-Dependent Coupling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M.; Berrada, K.; Haddon, Robert C.; Al-Hadeethi, Yas F.; Al-Heniti, Saleh H.; Raffah, Bahaaudin M.

    2017-02-01

    The presence of coherence phenomenon due to the interference of probability amplitude terms, is one of the most important features of quantum mechanics theory. Recent experiments show the presence of quantum processes whose coherence provided over suddenly large interval-time. In particular, photosynthetic mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes provide oscillatory behaviors in quantum mechanics due to quantum coherence. In this work, we investigate the coherent quantum transfer energy for a single-excitation and nonlocal correlation in a dimer system modelled by a two-level atom system with and without time-dependent coupling effect. We analyze and explore the required conditions that are feasible with real experimental realization for optimal transfer of quantum energy and generation of nonlocal quantum correlation. We show that the enhancement of the probability for a single-excitation transfer energy is greatly benefits from the combination of the energy detuning and time-dependent coupling effect. We investigate the presence of quantum correlations in the dimer using the entanglement of formation. We also find that the entanglement between the donor and acceptor is very sensitive to the physical parameters and it can be generated during the coherent energy transfer. On the other hand, we study the dynamical behavior of the quantum variance when performing a measurement on an observable of the density matrix operator. Finally, an interesting relationship between the transfer probability, entanglement and quantum variance is explored during the time evolution in terms of the physical parameters.

  16. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  17. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

  18. Forbidden regimes in the distribution of bipartite quantum correlations due to multiparty entanglement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Asutosh; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar; Prabhu, R.; Sen(De), Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2017-05-01

    Monogamy is a nonclassical property that limits the distribution of quantum correlation among subparts of a multiparty system. We show that monogamy scores for different quantum correlation measures are bounded above by functions of genuine multipartite entanglement for a large majority of pure multiqubit states. The bound is universal for all three-qubit pure states. We derive necessary conditions to characterize the states that violate the bound, which can also be observed by numerical simulation for a small set of states, generated Haar uniformly. The results indicate that genuine multipartite entanglement restricts the distribution of bipartite quantum correlations in a multiparty system.

  19. Quantum Mechanical Effects in Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Eric

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate quantum mechanical effects to various aspects of gravitational collapse. These quantum mechanical effects are implemented in the context of the Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism. The Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism allows us to investigate the time-dependent evolutions of the quantum mechanical effects, which is beyond the scope of the usual methods used to investigate the quantum mechanical corrections of gravitational collapse. Utilizing the time-dependent nature of the Functional Schr\\"odinger formalism, we study the quantization of a spherically symmetric domain wall from the view point of an asymptotic and infalling observer, in the absence of radiation. To build a more realistic picture, we then study the time-dependent nature of the induced radiation during the collapse using a semi-classical approach. Using the domain wall and the induced radiation, we then study the time-dependent evolution of the entropy of the domain wall. Finally we make some remarks about the pos...

  20. Stochasticity effects in quantum radiation reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Neitz, N

    2013-01-01

    When an ultrarelativistic electron beam collides with a sufficiently intense laser pulse, radiation-reaction effects can strongly alter the beam dynamics. In the realm of classical electrodynamics, radiation reaction has a beneficial effect on the electron beam as it tends to reduce its energy spread. Here, we show that when quantum effects become important, radiation reaction induces the opposite effect, i.e., the electron beam spreads out after interacting with the laser pulse. We identify the physical origin of this opposite tendency in the intrinsic stochasticity of photon emission, which becomes substantial in the full quantum regime. Our numerical simulations indicated that the predicted effects of the stochasticity can be measured already with presently available lasers and electron accelerators.

  1. Stochasticity effects in quantum radiation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitz, N; Di Piazza, A

    2013-08-02

    When an ultrarelativistic electron beam collides with a sufficiently intense laser pulse, radiation-reaction effects can strongly alter the beam dynamics. In the realm of classical electrodynamics, radiation reaction has a beneficial effect on the electron beam as it tends to reduce its energy spread. Here we show that when quantum effects become important, radiation reaction induces the opposite effect; i.e., the energy distribution of the electron beam spreads out after interacting with the laser pulse. We identify the physical origin of this opposite tendency in the intrinsic stochasticity of photon emission, which becomes substantial in the quantum regime. Our numerical simulations indicate that the predicted effects of the stochasticity can be measured already with presently available lasers and electron accelerators.

  2. Effective operator formalism for open quantum systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2012-01-01

    We present an effective operator formalism for open quantum systems. Employing perturbation theory and adiabatic elimination of excited states for a weakly driven system, we derive an effective master equation which reduces the evolution to the ground-state dynamics. The effective evolution...... involves a single effective Hamiltonian and one effective Lindblad operator for each naturally occurring decay process. Simple expressions are derived for the effective operators which can be directly applied to reach effective equations of motion for the ground states. We compare our method...

  3. Non-Poissonian quantum jumps of a fluxonium qubit due to quasiparticle excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vool, U; Pop, I M; Sliwa, K; Abdo, B; Wang, C; Brecht, T; Gao, Y Y; Shankar, S; Hatridge, M; Catelani, G; Mirrahimi, M; Frunzio, L; Schoelkopf, R J; Glazman, L I; Devoret, M H

    2014-12-12

    As the energy relaxation time of superconducting qubits steadily improves, nonequilibrium quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap emerge as an increasingly relevant limit for qubit coherence. We measure fluctuations in the number of quasiparticle excitations by continuously monitoring the spontaneous quantum jumps between the states of a fluxonium qubit, in conditions where relaxation is dominated by quasiparticle loss. Resolution on the scale of a single quasiparticle is obtained by performing quantum nondemolition projective measurements within a time interval much shorter than T₁, using a quantum-limited amplifier (Josephson parametric converter). The quantum jump statistics switches between the expected Poisson distribution and a non-Poissonian one, indicating large relative fluctuations in the quasiparticle population, on time scales varying from seconds to hours. This dynamics can be modified controllably by injecting quasiparticles or by seeding quasiparticle-trapping vortices by cooling down in a magnetic field.

  4. Electromagnetically induced transparency due to intervalence band coherence in a GaAs quantum well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mark; Wang, Hailin

    2003-05-15

    We demonstrate electromagnetically induced transparency in the transient optical response in a GaAs quantum well by using the nonradiative coherence between the heavy-hole and the light-hole valence bands.

  5. The Unruh effect interpreted as a quantum noise channel

    CERN Document Server

    Omkar, S; Srikanth, R; Alok, Ashutosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We derive the operator-sum representation for the noise channel that acts on a mode of a free Dirac field, as seen by a relativistically accelerated observer. A modal qubit thus appears as if subjected to quantum noise that degrades quantum information, as observed in the accelerated reference frame. We compare and contrast this noise channel, which arises from the Unruh effect, from a conventional noise due to environmental decoherence. We show that the Unruh channel produces an amplitude damping like effect, associated with zero temperature, even though the Unruh effect is associated with a non-zero temperature. Asymptotically, the Bloch sphere subjected to the channel does not converge to a point, as would be expected by fluctuation-dissipation arguments, but contracts by a finite factor. We note that turning off the drive that generates the acceleration corresponds to a non-completely-positive (NCP) map.

  6. High-order Primordial Perturbations with Quantum Gravitational Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Tao; Kirsten, Klaus; Cleaver, Gerald; Sheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a systematic investigation of high-order primordial perturbations with nonlinear dispersion relations due to quantum gravitational effects in the framework of {\\em uniform asymptotic approximations}. Because of these effects, the equation of motion of the mode function in general has multiple-turning points. After obtaining analytically approximated solutions in different regions, associated with different types of turning points, to any order, we match them to the third one. To this order the errors are less than $0.15\\%$. General expressions of the power spectra of the primordial tensor and scalar perturbations are derived explicitly. We also investigate effects of back-reactions of the quantum gravitational corrections, and make sure that inflation lasts long enough in order to solve underlying problems, such as flatness, horizon and monopole. Various features of the spectra that are observationally relevant are investigated. In particular, under a moderate assumption about the en...

  7. Quantum Correction to Entropy of the Kerr Black Hole due to Rarita-Schwinger Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荆继良

    2003-01-01

    Quantum correction to entropy of the Kerr black hole arising from Rarita-Schwinger fields is studied by using the Newman-Penrose formalism and brick-wall model. It is shown that contribution of spin to the logarithmic term of the quantum correction is dependent on both the square of spin of the particle and the rotation of the black hole. For different values of a/r+, the subleading term can increase or decrease, or cannot affect the entropy.

  8. Non-monotonicity in the quantum-classical transition: Chaos induced by quantum effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kapulkin, A; Kapulkin, Arie; Pattanayak, Arjendu K.

    2007-01-01

    The transition from classical to quantum behavior for chaotic systems is understood to be accompanied by the suppression of chaotic effects as the relative size of $\\hbar$ is increased. We show evidence to the contrary in the behavior of the quantum trajectory dynamics of a dissipative quantum chaotic system, the double-well Duffing oscillator. The classical limit in the case considered has regular behavior, but as the effective $\\hbar$ is increased we see chaotic behavior. This chaos then disappears deeper into the quantum regime, which means that the quantum-classical transition in this case is non-monotonic in $\\hbar$.

  9. Quantum Information Processing using Nonlinear Optical Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Mejling

    of the converted idler depends on the other pump. This allows for temporal-mode-multiplexing. When the effects of nonlinear phase modulation (NPM) are included, the phases of the natural input and output modes are changed, reducing the separability. These effects are to some degree mediated by pre......This PhD thesis treats applications of nonlinear optical effects for quantum information processing. The two main applications are four-wave mixing in the form of Bragg scattering (BS) for quantum-state-preserving frequency conversion, and sum-frequency generation (SFG) in second-order nonlinear...... to obtain a 100 % conversion efficiency is to use multiple stages of frequency conversion, but this setup suffers from the combined effects of NPM. This problem is circumvented by using asymmetrically pumped BS, where one pump is continuous wave. For this setup, NPM is found to only lead to linear phase...

  10. Synchronization effect for uncertain quantum networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Gebremariam, Tesfay; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2017-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for investigating the synchronization effect for uncertain networks with quantum chaotic behaviors in this paper. Through designing a special function to construct Lyapunov function of network and the adaptive laws of uncertain parameters, the synchronization between the uncertain network and the synchronization target can be realized, and the uncertain parameters in state equations of the network nodes are perfectly identified. All the theoretical results are verified by numerical simulations to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed synchronization technique.

  11. Quantum and field effects of oxide heterostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Felix

    , these interfaces are the ones between CaZrO3/SrTiO3 and amorphous-LaAlO3/(La, Sr)MnO3/SrTiO3. The sample preparation section is ended by outlininga patterning strategy for the high-electron mobility interface at amorphous-LaAlO3/(La, Sr)MnO3/SrTiO3. Subsequently, the effects of electrostatic gating is studied...... with a gradual tuning of the interface conductivity. Finally, the so-called quantum Hall effect is demonstrated at the interface between amorphous-LaAlO3/(La, Sr)MnO3/SrTiO3. The manifestation of the quantum Hall effect reveals that the interface conductivity is comprised of several subbands conducting...

  12. Spatially dependent Kondo effect in Quantum Corrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Enrico; Morr, Dirk K.

    2007-03-01

    We study the Kondo screening of a single magnetic impurity placed inside a quantum corral consisting of non-magnetic impurities on the surface of a metallic host system. We show that the spatial structure of the corral's eigenmodes leads to a spatially dependent Kondo effect whose signatures are experimentally measurable spatial variations of the Kondo temperature, TK, and of the critical Kondo coupling, Jcr. Moreover we find that the screening of the magnetic impurity is accompanied by the formation of multiple Kondo resonances with characteristic spatial patterns that provide further experimental signatures of the spatially dependent Kondo effect. Our results demonstrate that quantum corrals provide new possibilities to manipulate and explore the Kondo effect.

  13. Thermopower enhancement in quantum wells with the Rashba effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Lihua [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yang, Jiong; Wang, Shanyu; Wei, Ping; Yang, Jihui, E-mail: jihuiy@uw.edu, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Zhang, Wenqing, E-mail: jihuiy@uw.edu, E-mail: wqzhang@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Chen, Lidong [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2014-11-17

    We theoretically demonstrate that the thermopower in two-dimensional quantum wells (QWs) can be significantly enhanced by its Rashba spin-splitting effect, governed by the one-dimensional density of states in the low Fermi energy region. The thermopower enhancement is due to the lower Fermi level for a given carrier concentration in Rashba QWs, as compared with that in normal two-dimensional systems without the spin-splitting effect. The degenerate approximation directly shows that larger strength of Rashba effect leads to higher thermopower and consequently better thermoelectric performance in QWs.

  14. Effect of magnetic field on an electronic structure and intraband quantum transitions in multishell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holovatsky, V. A.; Voitsekhivska, O. M.; Yakhnevych, M. Ya.

    2017-09-01

    The electron energy spectrum and wave functions in multishell spherical quantum dot, consisting of core and two spherical shells - potential wells separated by thin potential barriers, are obtained in the framework of the effective mass approximation and single band model. The investigations are performed within the matrix method for the nanostructure driven by magnetic field using the complete set of wave functions obtained without the magnetic field. The electron dipole momentum and oscillator strengths of intraband quantum transitions as functions of the magnetic field induction are numerically calculated. In order to increase the sensibility to magnetic field, the geometric parameters of the shells are chosen in such a way that the electron in the ground state is to be located in outer spherical well, but when the magnetic field induction becomes bigger, it moves into the core. It is shown that size of the middle potential well causes the smooth change of the electron location due to the effect of magnetic field, what is displayed on optical properties of nanostructure. The calculations are performed for multishell quantum dot CdSe/ZnS/CdSe/ZnS/CdSe.

  15. Quantum Zeno effects with "pulsed" and "continuous" measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Facchi, P.; Pascazio, S.

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of a quantum system undergoing measurements is investigated. Depending on the features of the interaction Hamiltonian, the decay can be slowed (quantum Zeno effect) or accelerated (inverse quantum Zeno effect), by changing the time interval between successive (pulsed) measurements or, alternatively, by varying the "strength" of the (continuous) measurement.

  16. Effective Hamiltonian approach to periodically perturbed quantum optical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sainz, I. [Centro Universitario de los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Enrique Diaz de Leon, 47460 Lagos de Moreno, Jal. (Mexico)]. E-mail: isa@culagos.udg.mx; Klimov, A.B. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Guadalajara, Revolucion 1500, 44410 Guadalajara, Jal. (Mexico)]. E-mail: klimov@cencar.udg.mx; Saavedra, C. [Center for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)]. E-mail: csaaved@udec.cl

    2006-02-20

    We apply the method of Lie-type transformations to Floquet Hamiltonians for periodically perturbed quantum systems. Some typical examples of driven quantum systems are considered in the framework of this approach and corresponding effective time dependent Hamiltonians are found.

  17. Quantum Effects in Higher-Order Correlators of a Quantum-Dot Spin Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, A.; Li, F.; Müller, K.; Simmet, T.; Ardelt, P.-L.; Finley, J. J.; Sinitsyn, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    We measure time correlators of a spin qubit in an optically active quantum dot beyond the second order. Such higher-order correlators are shown to be directly sensitive to pure quantum effects that cannot be explained within the classical framework. They allow direct determination of ensemble and quantum dephasing times, T2* and T2, using only repeated projective measurements and without the need for coherent spin control. Our method enables studies of purely quantum behavior in solid state systems, including tests of the Leggett-Garg type of inequalities that rule out local hidden variable interpretation of the quantum-dot spin dynamics.

  18. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Pandey; Manoj K Harbola; V Ranjan; Vijay A Singh

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as ‘artificial atoms’ by some, they are much larger (1 100 nm) than real atoms. One can study a variety of manyelectron effects in them, which are otherwise difficult to observe in a real atom. We have treated these effects within the local density approximation (LDA) and the Harbola–Sahni (HS) scheme. HS is free of the selfinteraction error of the LDA. Our calculations have been performed in a three-dimensional quantum dot. We have carried out a study of the size and shape dependence of the level spacing. Scaling laws for the Hubbard ‘’ are established.

  19. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: effective dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corichi, Alejandro; Montoya, Edison

    2017-03-01

    We study solutions to the effective equations for the Bianchi IX class of spacetimes within loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We consider Bianchi IX models whose matter content is a massless scalar field, by numerically solving the loop quantum cosmology effective equations, with and without inverse triad corrections. The solutions are classified using certain geometrically motivated classical observables. We show that both effective theories—with lapse N  =  V and N  =  1—resolve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the positive spatial curvature, there is an infinite number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large field momentum and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k  =  0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII0 phases, which had not been studied before. We comment on the possible implications of these results for a quantum modification to the classical BKL behaviour.

  20. Effective Dynamics of Disordered Quantum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Chahan M.; Gneiting, Clemens; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    We derive general evolution equations describing the ensemble-average quantum dynamics generated by disordered Hamiltonians. The disorder average affects the coherence of the evolution and can be accounted for by suitably tailored effective coupling agents and associated rates that encode the specific statistical properties of the Hamiltonian's eigenvectors and eigenvalues, respectively. Spectral disorder and isotropically disordered eigenvector distributions are considered as paradigmatic test cases.

  1. The pinning effect in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monisha, P. J., E-mail: pjmonisha@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, D V R College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad-502285 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The pinning effect is studied in a Gaussian quantum dot using the improved Wigner-Brillouin perturbation theory (IWBPT) in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. The electron ground state plus one phonon state is degenerate with the electron in the first excited state. The electron-phonon interaction lifts the degeneracy and the first excited states get pinned to the ground state plus one phonon state as we increase the confinement frequency.

  2. Environment-induced effects on quantum chaos decoherence, delocalization and irreversibility

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, B L; Hu, B L; Shiokawa, K

    1997-01-01

    Decoherence in quantum systems which are classically chaotic is studied. It is well-known that a classically chaotic system when quantized loses many prominent chaotic traits. We show that interaction of the quantum system with an environment can under general circumstances quickly diminish quantum coherence and reenact some characteristic classical chaotic behavior. We use the Feynman-Vernon influence functional formalism to study the effect of an ohmic environment at high temperature on two classically-chaotic systems: The linear Arnold cat map (QCM) and the nonlinear quantum kicked rotor (QKR). Features of quantum chaos such as recurrence in QCM and diffusion suppression leading to localization in QKR are destroyed in a short time due to environment-induced decoherence. Decoherence also undermines localization and induces an apparent transition from reversible to irreversible dynamics in quantum chaotic systems.

  3. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  4. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction. PMID:28632165

  5. Fano Effect and Quantum Entanglement in Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2017-06-20

    In this paper, we review the investigation for the light-matter interaction between surface plasmon field in metal nanoparticle (MNP) and the excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs) in hybrid SQD-MNP system under the full quantum description. The exciton-plasmon interaction gives rise to the modified decay rate and the exciton energy shift which are related to the exciton energy by using a quantum transformation method. We illustrate the responses of the hybrid SQD-MNP system to external field, and reveal Fano effect shown in the absorption spectrum. We demonstrate quantum entanglement between two SQD mediated by surface plasmon field. In the absence of a laser field, concurrence of quantum entanglement will disappear after a few ns. If the laser field is present, the steady states appear, so that quantum entanglement produced will reach a steady-state entanglement. Because one of all optical pathways to induce Fano effect refers to the generation of quantum entangled states, It is shown that the concurrence of quantum entanglement can be obtained by observation for Fano effect. In a hybrid system including two MNP and a SQD, because the two Fano quantum interference processes share a segment of all optical pathways, there is correlation between the Fano effects of the two MNP. The investigations for the light-matter interaction in hybrid SQD-MNP system can pave the way for the development of the optical processing devices and quantum information based on the exciton-plasmon interaction.

  6. Effects of anisotropy and Coulomb interactions on quantum transport in a quadruple quantum-dot structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, M. Yu.; Val'kov, V. V.; Aksenov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical investigation of the spectral and transport properties of a quadruple quantum-dot (QQD) structure which is one of the popular low-dimensional systems in the context of fundamental quantum physics study, future electronic applications, and quantum calculations. The density of states, occupation numbers, and conductance of the structure were analyzed using the nonequilibrium Green's functions in the tight-binding approach and the equation-of-motion method. In particular the anisotropy of hopping integrals and on-site electron energies as well as the effects of the finite intra- and interdot Coulomb interactions were investigated. It was found out that the anisotropy of the kinetic processes in the system leads to the Fano-Feshbach asymmetrical peak. We demonstrated that the conductance of the QQD device has a wide insulating band with steep edges separating triple-peak structures if the intradot Coulomb interactions are taken into account. The interdot Coulomb correlations between the central QDs result in the broadening of this band and the occurrence of an additional band with low conductance due to the Fano antiresonances. It was shown that in this case the conductance of the anisotropic QQD device can be dramatically changed by tuning the anisotropy of on-site electron energies.

  7. Dephasing times in quantum dots due to elastic LO phonon-carrier collisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, A. V.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2000-01-01

    Interpretation of experiments on quantum dot (QD) lasers presents a challenge: the phonon bottleneck, which should strongly suppress relaxation and dephasing of the discrete energy states, often seems to be inoperative. We suggest and develop a theory for an intrinsic mechanism for dephasing in Q...

  8. Finiteness due to cellular structure of R[sup N] I. Quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kehagias, A.A. (Inst. of Theoretical Physics, Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Zoupanos, G. (Dept. of Physics, National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece))

    1994-04-01

    We construct a cellular space which has as a continuous limit the Euclidean space R[sup N]. We consider quantum mechanics on this cellular space and we examine in particular an harmonic oscillator and a free particle on the cellular R[sup 1], R[sup 2] respectively. In both cases we find that the energy spectrum is bounded from above. (orig.)

  9. Quantum efficiencies exceeding unity due to impact ionization in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodinski, Sabine; Werner, Jürgen H.; Wittchen, Thomas; Queisser, Hans J.

    1993-10-01

    Absolute measurements demonstrate internal quantum efficiencies in silicon solar cells to exceed unity for photon energies above the first direct band gap and to show distinct spectral features that correspond to specific points in the Brillouin zone. Ultraviolet radiation can generate hot carriers with sufficient energy to cause impact ionization which results in two electron hole pairs per incident photon.

  10. Quantum optical effective-medium theory and transformation quantum optics for metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wubs, Martijn; Amooghorban, Ehsan; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    While typically designed to manipulate classical light, metamaterials have many potential applications for quantum optics as well. We argue why a quantum optical effective-medium theory is needed. We present such a theory for layered metamaterials that is valid for light propagation in all spatial...... directions, thereby generalizing earlier work for one-dimensional propagation. In contrast to classical effective-medium theory there is an additional effective parameter that describes quantum noise. Our results for metamaterials are based on a rather general Lagrangian theory for the quantum...

  11. Secular effects on inflation from one-loop quantum gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrer, J. A.; Espriu, D.

    2008-06-01

    In this Letter we revisit and extend a previous analysis where the possible relevance of quantum gravity effects in a cosmological setup was studied. The object of interest are non-local (logarithmic) terms generated in the effective action of gravity due to the exchange in loops of massless modes (such as photons or the gravitons themselves). We correct one mistake existing in the previous work and discuss the issue in a more general setting in different cosmological scenarios. We obtain the one-loop quantum-corrected evolution equations for the cosmological scale factor up to a given order in a derivative expansion in two particular cases: a matter dominated universe with vanishing cosmological constant, and in a de Sitter universe. We show that the quantum corrections, albeit tiny, may have a secular effect that eventually modifies the expansion rate. For a de Sitter universe they tend to slow down the rate of the expansion, while the effect may be the opposite in a matter dominated universe.

  12. Nonradiative recombination due to Ar implantation induced point defects in GaInN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Torsten; Pietscher, Hans-Georg; Joenen, Holger; Rossow, Uwe; Bremers, Heiko; Hangleiter, Andreas [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany); Menzel, Dirk [Institut fuer Physik der Kondensierten Materie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We quantitatively investigate nonradiative recombination at point defects via temperature dependent time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy on argon implanted MOVPE-grown GaInN/GaN single quantum wells (QW). An implantation dose dependent (doses: 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}) reduction of nonradiative lifetimes from several nanoseconds (unimplanted sample) to less than 100 ps at room temperature is observed. This shortening of nonradiative lifetimes is attributed to nonradiative recombination due to increased implantation induced defect densities. An effective hole capture coefficient can be estimated to about 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} via the measured nonradiative lifetimes and simulated (SRIM) defect densities. The thermal stability of the defects is analyzed using rapid thermal annealing at 800 {sup circle} C in order to recover the crystal from implantation damage. At high temperatures, nonradiative recombination in the barriers becomes dominant: defect density dependent losses with an activation energy equal to half the difference between the GaN band gap and the peak position of the QW luminescence are observed.

  13. Effective evolution equations from quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikter, Niels; Schlein, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    These notes investigate the time evolution of quantum systems, and in particular the rigorous derivation of effective equations approximating the many-body Schrödinger dynamics in certain physically interesting regimes. The focus is primarily on the derivation of time-dependent effective theories (non-equilibrium question) approximating many-body quantum dynamics. The book is divided into seven sections, the first of which briefly reviews the main properties of many-body quantum systems and their time evolution. Section 2 introduces the mean-field regime for bosonic systems and explains how the many-body dynamics can be approximated in this limit using the Hartree equation. Section 3 presents a method, based on the use of coherent states, for rigorously proving the convergence towards the Hartree dynamics, while the fluctuations around the Hartree equation are considered in Section 4. Section 5 focuses on a discussion of a more subtle regime, in which the many-body evolution can be approximated by means of t...

  14. Effects of quantum fluctuations of metric on the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongjia

    2016-09-01

    We consider a model of modified gravity from the nonperturbative quantization of a metric. We obtain the modified gravitational field equations and the modified conservational equations. We apply it to the FLRW spacetime and find that due to the quantum fluctuations a bounce universe can be obtained and a decelerated expansion can also possibly be obtained in a dark energy dominated epoch. We also discuss the effects of quantum fluctuations on inflation parameters (such as slow-roll parameters, spectral index, and the spectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation) and find values of parameters in the comparing the predictions of inflation can also work to drive the current epoch of acceleration. We obtain the constraints on the parameter of the theory from the observation of the big bang nucleosynthesis.

  15. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aavishkar A.; Chowdhury, Debanjan; Sachdev, Subir; Swingle, Brian

    2017-07-01

    We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov) exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z >1 .

  16. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengqin Shi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  17. Noise spectrum of quantum transport through double quantum dots: Renormalization and non-Markovian effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pengqin; Hu, Menghan; Ying, Yaofeng; Jin, Jinshuang

    2016-09-01

    Based on the time-nonlocal particle number-resolved master equation, we investigate the sequential electron transport through the interacting double quantum dots. Our calculations show that there exists the effect of energy renormalization in the dispersion of the bath interaction spectrum and it is sensitive to the the bandwidth of the bath. This effect would strongly affect the stationary current and its zero-frequency shot noise for weak inter-dot coherent coupling strength, but for strong inter-dot coupling regime, it is negligible due to the strong intrinsic Rabi coherent dynamics. Moreover, the possible observable effects of the energy renormalization in the noise spectrum are also investigated through the Rabi coherence signal. Finally, the non-Markovian effect is manifested in the finite-frequency noise spectrum with the appearance of quasisteps, and the magnitude of these quasisteps are modified by the dispersion function.

  18. Nonmonotonous electron mobility due to structurally induced resonant coupling of subband states in an asymmetric double quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, R. K.; Das, S.; Panda, A. K.; Sahu, T., E-mail: tsahu-bu@rediffmail.com [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, National Institute of Science and Technology, Palur Hills, Berhampur-761 008, Odisha (India)

    2015-11-15

    We show that sharp nonmonotic variation of low temperature electron mobility μ can be achieved in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As barrier delta-doped double quantum well structure due to quantum mechanical transfer of subband electron wave functions within the wells. We vary the potential profile of the coupled structure as a function of the doping concentration in order to bring the subbands into resonance such that the subband energy levels anticross and the eigen states of the coupled structure equally share both the wells thereby giving rise to a dip in mobility. When the wells are of equal widths, the dip in mobility occurs under symmetric doping of the side barriers. In case of unequal well widths, the resonance can be obtained by suitable asymmetric variation of the doping concentrations. The dip in mobility becomes sharp and also the wavy nature of mobility takes a rectangular shape by increasing the barrier width. We show that the dip in mobility at resonance is governed by the interface roughness scattering through step like changes in the subband mobilities. It is also gratifying to show that the drop in mobility at the onset of occupation of second subband is substantially supressed through the quantum mechanical transfer of subband wave functions between the wells. Our results can be utilized for performance enhancement of coupled quantum well devices.

  19. Integer quantum Hall effect in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jellal, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.jellal@gmail.com [Saudi Center for Theoretical Physics, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Theoretical Physics Group, Faculty of Sciences, Chouaïb Doukkali University, 24000 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2016-04-08

    We study the quantum Hall effect in a monolayer graphene by using an approach based on thermodynamical properties. This can be done by considering a system of Dirac particles in an electromagnetic field and taking into account of the edges effect as a pseudo-potential varying continuously along the x direction. At low temperature and in the weak electric field limit, we explicitly determine the thermodynamical potential. With this, we derive the particle numbers in terms of the quantized flux and therefore the Hall conductivity immediately follows.

  20. Excitons in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1984-09-01

    Quasiparticles of charge 1/m in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect form excitons, which are collective excitations physically similar to the transverse magnetoplasma oscillations of a Wigner crystal. A variational exciton wavefunction which shows explicitly that the magnetic length is effectively longer for quasiparticles than for electrons is proposed. This wavefunction is used to estimate the dispersion relation of these excitons and the matrix elements to generate them optically out of the ground state. These quantities are then used to describe a type of nonlinear conductivity which may occur in these systems when they are relatively clean.

  1. Possible Effects of Quantum Mechanics Violation Induced by Certain Quantum Gravity on Neutrino Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C H; Li Xue Qian; Liu, Y; Ma, F C; Tao, Z; CHANG, Chao-Hsi; DAI, Wu-Sheng; LI, Xue-Qian; LIU, Yong; MA, Feng-Cai; TAO, Zhi-jian

    1999-01-01

    In this work we tried extensively to apply the EHNS postulation about the quantum mechanics violation effects induced by the quantum gravity of black holes to neutrino oscillations. The possibilities for observing such effects in the neutrino experiments (in progress and/or accessible in the near future) were discussed. Of them, an interesting one was outlined specially.

  2. Possible Quantum Absorber Effects in Cortical Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Uwe

    The Wheeler-Feynman transactional "absorber" approach was proposed originally to account for anomalous resonance coupling between spatio-temporally distant measurement partners in entangled quantum states of so-called Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradoxes, e.g. of spatio-temporal non-locality, quantum teleportation, etc. Applied to quantum brain dynamics, however, this view provides an anticipative resonance coupling model for aspects of cortical synchronization and recurrent visual action control. It is proposed to consider the registered activation patterns of neuronal loops in so-called synfire chains not as a result of retarded brain communication processes, but rather as surface effects of a system of standing waves generated in the depth of visual processing. According to this view, they arise from a counterbalance between the actual input's delayed bottom-up data streams and top-down recurrent information-processing of advanced anticipative signals in a Wheeler-Feynman-type absorber mode. In the framework of a "time-loop" model, findings about mirror neurons in the brain cortex are suggested to be at least partially associated with temporal rather than spatial mirror functions of visual processing, similar to phase conjugate adaptive resonance-coupling in nonlinear optics.

  3. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Strong Measurement Regime of Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    we report the direct observation of theQZE in a superconducting qubit undergoing continuous strongmeasurement with simultaneous qubit driving...New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 053031 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/053031 PAPER Quantum Zeno effect in the strongmeasurement regime of circuit quantum...of quantum jumps between states for a qubit beingmeasured continuously at rate Gm is the same as that for a qubit undergoing discretemeasurements at

  4. Effect of Quantum Point Contact Measurement on Electron Spin State in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Fei-Yun; TU Tao; HAO Xiao-Jie; GUO Guang-Can; GUO Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    We study the time evolution of two electron spin states in a double quantum-dot system, which includes a nearby quantum point contact (QPC) as a measurement device. We find that the QPC measurement induced decoherence is in the microsecond timescale. We also find that the enhanced QPC measurement will trap the system in its initial spin states, which is consistent with the quantum Zeno effect.

  5. Correlation effects in strain-induced quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, R.; DeVittorio, M.; Cingolani, R.; Molinari, E. [Ist. Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia (INFM) and Dipt. di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Univ. Lecce (Italy); Hohenester, U. [INFM and Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. Modena e Reggio E. (Italy); Lipsanen, H.; Tulkki, J. [Optoelectronics Lab. and Lab. of Computational Engineering, Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland); Ahopelto, J. [VTT Electronics (Finland); Uchida, K.; Miura, N. [Inst. for Solid State Physics, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Arakawa, Y. [Inst. of Industrial Science, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-03-08

    We report on Coulomb correlation effects in the luminescence of strain-induced quantum dots. In single dots, under low power excitation, we observe the rising of sharp lines associated to the formation of excitonic molecules. In the grand-ensemble, in magnetic fields up to 45 T, we observe Darwin-Fock states of the dots to merge into a unique Landau level, with a considerable reduction in the total diamagnetic shift due to the enhanced electron-hole correlation caused by the increased degeneracy of the state. (orig.)

  6. Jeans instability with exchange effects in quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, M., E-mail: jamil.gcu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Rasheed, A. [Department of Physics, Government College University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rozina, Ch. [Department of Physics, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Jung, Y.-D. [Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Salimullah, M. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342 (Bangladesh)

    2015-08-15

    Jeans instability is examined in magnetized quantum dusty plasmas using the quantum hydrodynamic model. The quantum effects are considered via exchange-correlation potential, recoil effect, and Fermi degenerate pressure, in addition to thermal effects of plasma species. It is found that the electron exchange and correlation potential have significant effects over the threshold value of wave vector and Jeans instability. The presence of electron exchange and correlation effect shortens the time of dust sound that comparatively stabilizes the self gravitational collapse. The results at quantum scale are helpful in understanding the collapse of the self-gravitating dusty plasma systems.

  7. In-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2013-08-23

    The quantum Hall effect can only be induced by an out-of-plane magnetic field for two-dimensional electron gases, and similarly, the quantum anomalous Hall effect has also usually been considered for systems with only out-of-plane magnetization. In the present work, we predict that the quantum anomalous Hall effect can be induced by in-plane magnetization that is not accompanied by any out-of-plane magnetic field. Two realistic two-dimensional systems, Bi2Te3 thin film with magnetic doping and HgMnTe quantum wells with shear strains, are presented and the general condition for the in-plane magnetization-induced quantum anomalous Hall effect is discussed based on the symmetry analysis. Nonetheless, an experimental setup is proposed to confirm this effect, the observation of which will pave the way to search for the quantum anomalous Hall effect in a wider range of materials.

  8. Effects of quantum coupling on the performance of metal-oxide-semiconductor field transistors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ling-Feng Mao

    2009-02-01

    Based on the analysis of the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation, the effects of quantum coupling between the transverse and the longitudinal components of channel electron motion on the performance of ballistic MOSFETs have been theoretically investigated by self-consistently solving the coupled Schrödinger–Poisson equations with the finite-difference method. The results show that the quantum coupling between the transverse and the longitudinal components of the electron motion can largely affect device performance. It suggests that the quantum coupling effect should be considered for the performance of a ballistic MOSFET due to the high injection velocity of the channel electron.

  9. The local nature of incompressibility of quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirlik, E. M.; Sirt, S.; Kalkan, S. B.; Ofek, N.; Umansky, V.; Siddiki, A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the experimental realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron system, the interrelation between the conductance quantization and the topological properties of the system has been investigated. Assuming that the two-dimensional electron system is described by a Bloch Hamiltonian, system is insulating in the bulk of sample throughout the quantum Hall plateau due to a magnetic field induced energy gap. Meanwhile, the system is conducting at the edges resembling a 2+1 dimensional topological insulator without time-reversal symmetry. Here, by our magneto-transport measurements performed on GaAs/AlGaAs high purity Hall bars with two inner contacts we show that incompressible strips formed at the edges result in Hall quantization, even if the bulk is compressible. Consequently, the relationship between the quantum Hall effect and topological bulk insulator breaks for specific field intervals within the plateaus. The measurement of conducting bulk, strongly challenges all existing single-particle theories. PMID:28071652

  10. The local nature of incompressibility of quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirlik, E. M.; Sirt, S.; Kalkan, S. B.; Ofek, N.; Umansky, V.; Siddiki, A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the experimental realization of the integer quantum Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron system, the interrelation between the conductance quantization and the topological properties of the system has been investigated. Assuming that the two-dimensional electron system is described by a Bloch Hamiltonian, system is insulating in the bulk of sample throughout the quantum Hall plateau due to a magnetic field induced energy gap. Meanwhile, the system is conducting at the edges resembling a 2+1 dimensional topological insulator without time-reversal symmetry. Here, by our magneto-transport measurements performed on GaAs/AlGaAs high purity Hall bars with two inner contacts we show that incompressible strips formed at the edges result in Hall quantization, even if the bulk is compressible. Consequently, the relationship between the quantum Hall effect and topological bulk insulator breaks for specific field intervals within the plateaus. The measurement of conducting bulk, strongly challenges all existing single-particle theories.

  11. Refractive index modulation based on excitonic effects in GaInAs-InP coupled asymmetric quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, Carsten

    1995-01-01

    The effect of excitons in GaInAs-InP coupled asymmetric quantum wells on the refractive index modulation, is analyzed numerically using a model based on the effective mass approximation. It is shown that two coupled quantum wells brought in resonance by an applied electric field will, due...

  12. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  13. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O; Valentí, Roser

    2016-05-17

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions.

  14. Prospect of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall effect in doped kagome lattice Mott insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guterding, Daniel; Jeschke, Harald O.; Valentí, Roser

    2016-01-01

    Electronic states with non-trivial topology host a number of novel phenomena with potential for revolutionizing information technology. The quantum anomalous Hall effect provides spin-polarized dissipation-free transport of electrons, while the quantum spin Hall effect in combination with superconductivity has been proposed as the basis for realizing decoherence-free quantum computing. We introduce a new strategy for realizing these effects, namely by hole and electron doping kagome lattice Mott insulators through, for instance, chemical substitution. As an example, we apply this new approach to the natural mineral herbertsmithite. We prove the feasibility of the proposed modifications by performing ab-initio density functional theory calculations and demonstrate the occurrence of the predicted effects using realistic models. Our results herald a new family of quantum anomalous Hall and quantum spin Hall insulators at affordable energy/temperature scales based on kagome lattices of transition metal ions. PMID:27185665

  15. Space-time curvature due to quantum vacuum fluctuations: An alternative to dark energy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Emilio, E-mail: santose@unican.e [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2010-01-18

    It is pointed out that quantum vacuum fluctuations may give rise to a curvature of space-time equivalent to the curvature currently attributed to dark energy. A simple calculation is made, involving plausible assumptions within the framework of quantized gravity, which suggests that the value of the dark energy density is roughly given by the product of Newton's constant times the quantity m{sup 6}c{sup 4}h{sup -4}, m being a typical mass of elementary particles. The estimate is compatible with observations.

  16. Dynamics of Quantum Entanglement in Reservoir with Memory Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝翔; 沙金巧; 孙坚; 朱士群

    2012-01-01

    The non-Markovian dynamics of quantum entanglement is studied by the Shabani-Lidar master equation when one of entangled quantum systems is coupled to a local reservoir with memory effects. The completely positive reduced dynamical map can be constructed in the Kraus representation. Quantum entanglement decays more slowly in the non-Markovian environment. The decoherence time for quantum entanglement can be markedly increased with the change of the memory kernel. It is found out that the entanglement sudden death between quantum systems and entanglement sudden birth between the system and reservoir occur at different instants.

  17. Quantum Effect in Mesoscopic Open Electron Resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhan-Yuan; ZHANG Xiao-Hong; HAN Ying-Hui

    2008-01-01

    The open electron resonator is a mesoscopic device that has attracted considerable attention due to its remarkable behavior: conductance oscillations. In this paper, using an improved quantum theory to mesoscopic circuits developed recently by Li and Chen, the mesoscopic electron resonator is quantized based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete value. With presentation transformation and unitary transformation, the Schrodinger equation becomes an standard Mathieu equation. Then, the detailed energy spectrum and wave functions in the system are obtained, which will be helpful to the observation of other characters of electron resonator. The average of currents and square of the current are calculated, the results show the existence of the current fluctuation, which causes the noise in the circuits, the influence of inductance to the noise is discussed. With the results achieved, the stability characters of mesoscopic electron resonator are studied firstly, these works would be benefit to the design and control of integrate circuit.

  18. Quantum Zeno effect by general measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Koshino, K

    2004-01-01

    It was predicted that frequently repeated measurements on an unstable state may alter the decay rate of the state. This is called the quantum Zeno effect (QZE) or the anti-Zeno effect (AZE), depending on whether the decay is suppressed or enhanced. In conventional theories of the QZE and AZE, effects of measurements are simply described by the projection postulate, assuming that each measurement is an instantaneous and ideal one. However, real measurements are not instantaneous and ideal. For the QZE and AZE by such general measurements, interesting and surprising features have recently been revealed, which we review in this article. The results are based on the quantum measurement theory, which is also reviewed briefly. As a typical model, we consider a continuous measurement of the decay of an excited atom by a photodetector that detects a photon emitted from the atom upon decay. This measurement is an indirect negative-result one, for which the curiosity of the QZE and AZE is emphasized. It is shown that t...

  19. Quantum spring from the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2010-07-01

    The Casimir effect arises not only in the presence of material boundaries but also in space with nontrivial topology. In this Letter, we choose a topology of the flat (D + 1)-dimensional spacetime, which causes the helix boundary condition for a Hermitian massless scalar field. Especially, Casimir effect for a massless scalar field on the helix boundary condition is investigated in two and three dimensions by using the zeta function techniques. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. When r is large, this force behaves like the Newton's law of universal gravitation in the leading order. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  20. On the Effect of Quantum Noise in a Quantum-Relativistic Prisoner's Dilemma Cellular Automaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón; Situ, Haozhen

    2016-12-01

    The disrupting effect of quantum noise on the dynamics of a spatial quantum relativistic formulation of the iterated prisoner's dilemma game with variable entangling is studied in this work. The game is played in the cellular automata manner, i.e., with local and synchronous interaction. The game is assessed in fair and unfair contests.

  1. Nonideal effects in quantum field-effect directional coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Yue-E; Yan Xiao-Hong; Chen Yuan-Ping

    2006-01-01

    The nonideal effects in a quantum field-effect directional coupler where two quantum wires are coupled through a finite potential barrier are studied by adopting the lattice Green function method. The results show that the electron energy distribution, asymmetric geometry and finite temperature all have obvious influence on the electron transfer of the coupler. Only for the electrons with energies in a certain region, can the complete periodic transfer between two quantum wires take place. The conductance of these electrons as a function of the barrier length and potential height exhibits a fine periodic or quasi-periodic pattern. For the electrons with energies beyond the region, however, the complete periodic transfer does not hold any more since many irregular oscillations are superimposed on the conductance profile. In addition, the finite temperature and asymmetric geometry both can reduce the electron transfer efficiency.

  2. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yu-Min; Yu Zhong-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrodinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail.

  3. Dropout dynamics in pulsed quantum dot lasers due to mode jumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Dudelev, V. V.; Deryagin, A. G.; Novikov, I. I.; Maximov, M. V.; Ustinov, V. M.; Kuchinskii, V. I. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Viktorov, E. A. [National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Optique Nonlinéaire Théorique, Campus Plaine CP 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Abusaa, M. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Arab American University, Jenin, Palestine (Country Unknown); Danckaert, J. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Kolykhalova, E. D. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI,” St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Soboleva, K. K. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. E. [Academic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sibbett, W. [University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Rafailov, E. U. [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Erneux, T. [Optique Nonlinéaire Théorique, Campus Plaine CP 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2015-06-29

    We examine the response of a pulse pumped quantum dot laser both experimentally and numerically. As the maximum of the pump pulse comes closer to the excited-state threshold, the output pulse shape becomes unstable and leads to dropouts. We conjecture that these instabilities result from an increase of the linewidth enhancement factor α as the pump parameter comes close to the excitated state threshold. In order to analyze the dynamical mechanism of the dropout, we consider two cases for which the laser exhibits either a jump to a different single mode or a jump to fast intensity oscillations. The origin of these two instabilities is clarified by a combined analytical and numerical bifurcation diagram of the steady state intensity modes.

  4. Universal quantum constraints on the butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Berenstein, David

    2015-01-01

    Lyapunov exponents play an important role in the evolution of quantum chaotic systems in the semiclassical limit. We conjecture the existence of an upper bound on the Lyapunov exponents that contribute to the quantum motion. This is a universal feature in any quantum system or quantum field theory, including those with a gravity dual, at zero or finite temperature. It has its origin in the finite size of the Hilbert space that is available to an initial quasi-classical configuration. An important consequence of this result is a universal quantum bound on the maximum growth rate of the entanglement entropy.

  5. Time-reversal-breaking induced quantum spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Shao, D. X.; Deng, Ming-Xun; Deng, W. Y.; Sheng, L.

    2017-01-01

    We show that quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect does not occur in a square lattice model due to cancellation of the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling coming from different hopping paths. However, we show that QSH effect can be induced by the presence of staggered magnetic fluxes alternating directions square by square. When the resulting Peierls phase takes a special value , the system has a composite symmetry ΘΡ− with Θ the time-reversal operator and Ρ− transforming the Peierls phase from γ to γ − , which protects the gapless edge states. Once the phase deviates from , the edge states open a gap, as the composite symmetry is broken. We further investigate the effect of a Zeeman field on the QSH state, and find that the edge states remain gapless for . This indicates that the QSH effect is immune to the magnetic perturbation. PMID:28220858

  6. Loop quantum cosmology of Bianchi IX: Effective dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Corichi, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    We study numerically the solutions to the effective equations of Bianchi IX spacetimes within Loop Quantum Cosmology. We consider Bianchi IX models with and without inverse triad corrections whose matter content is a scalar field without mass. The solutions are classified using the classical observables. We show that both effective theories --with lapse N=V and N=1-- solve the big bang singularity and reproduce the classical dynamics far from the bounce. Moreover, due to the spatial compactness, there is an infinity number of bounces and recollapses. We study the limit of large volume and show that both effective theories reproduce the same dynamics, thus recovering general relativity. We implement a procedure to identify amongst the Bianchi IX solutions, those that behave like k=0,1 FLRW as well as Bianchi I, II, and VII_0 models. The effective solutions exhibit Bianchi I phases with Bianchi II transitions and also Bianchi VII_0 phases, which had not been studied before, at the quantum nor effective level. W...

  7. Quantum optical effective-medium theory for layered metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Amooghorban, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    The quantum optics of metamaterials starts with the question whether the same effective-medium theories apply as in classical optics. In general the answer is negative. For active plasmonics but also for some passive metamaterials, we show that an additional effective-medium parameter is indispensable besides the effective index, namely the effective noise-photon distribution. Only with the extra parameter can one predict how well the quantumness of states of light is preserved in the metamaterial. The fact that the effective index alone is not always sufficient and that one additional effective parameter suffices in the quantum optics of metamaterials is both of fundamental and practical interest. Here from a Lagrangian description of the quantum electrodynamics of media with both linear gain and loss, we compute the effective noise-photon distribution for quantum light propagation in arbitrary directions in layered metamaterials, thereby detailing and generalizing our recent work [ E. Amooghorban et al., Ph...

  8. Multidimensional Quantum Tunneling in the Schwinger Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Dumlu, Cesim K

    2015-01-01

    We study the Schwinger effect, in which the external field having a spatio-temporal profile creates electron-positron pairs via multidimensional quantum tunneling. Our treatment is based on Gutzwiller's trace formula for the QED effective action, whose imaginary part is represented by a sum over complex wordlines. The worldlines are multi-periodic, and the periods of motion collectively depend on the strength of spatial and temporal inhomogeneity. We argue that Hamilton's characteristic function that leads to the correct tunneling amplitude must explicitly depend on both periods, and is represented by an average over the internal cycles of motion. We use this averaging method to calculate the pair production rate in an exponentially damped sinusoidal field, where we find that the initial conditions for each family of periodic trajectories lie on a curve in the momentum plane. The ratio of the periods, which may also be referred as the topological index, stays uniform on each curve. Calculation of tunneling am...

  9. Higher (odd dimensional quantum Hall effect and extended dimensional hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Hasebe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate dimensional ladder of higher dimensional quantum Hall effects by exploiting quantum Hall effects on arbitrary odd dimensional spheres. Non-relativistic and relativistic Landau models are analyzed on S2k−1 in the SO(2k−1 monopole background. The total sub-band degeneracy of the odd dimensional lowest Landau level is shown to be equal to the winding number from the base-manifold S2k−1 to the one-dimension higher SO(2k gauge group. Based on the chiral Hopf maps, we clarify the underlying quantum Nambu geometry for odd dimensional quantum Hall effect and the resulting quantum geometry is naturally embedded also in one-dimension higher quantum geometry. An origin of such dimensional ladder connecting even and odd dimensional quantum Hall effects is illuminated from a viewpoint of the spectral flow of Atiyah–Patodi–Singer index theorem in differential topology. We also present a BF topological field theory as an effective field theory in which membranes with different dimensions undergo non-trivial linking in odd dimensional space. Finally, an extended version of the dimensional hierarchy for higher dimensional quantum Hall liquids is proposed, and its relationship to quantum anomaly and D-brane physics is discussed.

  10. Higher (odd) dimensional quantum Hall effect and extended dimensional hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasebe, Kazuki

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate dimensional ladder of higher dimensional quantum Hall effects by exploiting quantum Hall effects on arbitrary odd dimensional spheres. Non-relativistic and relativistic Landau models are analyzed on S 2 k - 1 in the SO (2 k - 1) monopole background. The total sub-band degeneracy of the odd dimensional lowest Landau level is shown to be equal to the winding number from the base-manifold S 2 k - 1 to the one-dimension higher SO (2 k) gauge group. Based on the chiral Hopf maps, we clarify the underlying quantum Nambu geometry for odd dimensional quantum Hall effect and the resulting quantum geometry is naturally embedded also in one-dimension higher quantum geometry. An origin of such dimensional ladder connecting even and odd dimensional quantum Hall effects is illuminated from a viewpoint of the spectral flow of Atiyah-Patodi-Singer index theorem in differential topology. We also present a BF topological field theory as an effective field theory in which membranes with different dimensions undergo non-trivial linking in odd dimensional space. Finally, an extended version of the dimensional hierarchy for higher dimensional quantum Hall liquids is proposed, and its relationship to quantum anomaly and D-brane physics is discussed.

  11. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Quantum Confinement Effect on the Blue Shift in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changiz. Vatankhah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano particles of zinc sulfide (ZnS of face centered cubic (fcc structures were synthesized using sulphur source of soium sulphide and mercaptoethanol respectively via Chemical Bath Deposition method. The synthesized quantum dots were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The average crystallite size calculated from TEM and XRD pattern has been found to in the range 4.6 – 1.9 nm, the pariticles size decreases with the increase of the capping agent concentrations from 0. 001 to 0.7 Mol. The absorption coefficient in the range 325 - 250 nm decreases with increasing capping agent and the particles. ZnS nanoparticles were also derived from time independent Schrodinger equations for ZnS system and calculated the coefficient absorption using the density functional theory (DFT . It is shown that decreasing of ZnS nanosize lead to changes the optical properties and coefficient absorption in the visible region does not occur and the particles act like a transparent material. In this work, the blue shift was observed in absorption-wavelength both theoretical and experimental method due to the quantum confinement effects.

  12. Effective equations for isotropic quantum cosmology including matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2007-01-01

    Effective equations often provide powerful tools to develop a systematic understanding of detailed properties of a quantum system. This is especially helpful in quantum cosmology where several conceptual and technical difficulties associated with the full quantum equations can be avoided in this way. Here, effective equations for Wheeler-DeWitt and loop quantizations of spatially flat, isotropic cosmological models sourced by a massive or interacting scalar are derived and studied. The resulting systems are remarkably different from that given for a free, massless scalar. This has implications for the coherence of evolving states and the realization of a bounce in loop quantum cosmology.

  13. Destruction of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect by Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1985-07-01

    It is suggested that Hall steps in the fractional quantum Hall effect are physically similar to those in the ordinary quantum Hall effect. This proposition leads to a simple scaling diagram containing a new type of fixed point, which is identified with the destruction of the fractional states by disorder. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Bulk Versus Edge in the Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Y. -C.; Lee, D.-H.

    1996-01-01

    The manifestation of the bulk quantum Hall effect on edge is the chiral anomaly. The chiral anomaly {\\it is} the underlying principle of the ``edge approach'' of quantum Hall effect. In that approach, $\\sxy$ should not be taken as the conductance derived from the space-local current-current correlation function of the pure one-dimensional edge problem.

  15. Low-Energy Effective Theories of Quantum Link and Quantum Spin Models

    CERN Document Server

    Schlittgen, B

    2001-01-01

    Quantum spin and quantum link models provide an unconventional regularization of field theory in which classical fields arise via dimensional reduction of discrete variables. This D-theory regularization leads to the same continuum theories as the conventional approach. We show this by deriving the low-energy effective Lagrangians of D-theory models using coherent state path integral techniques. We illustrate our method for the $(2+1)$-d Heisenberg quantum spin model which is the D-theory regularization of the 2-d O(3) model. Similarly, we prove that in the continuum limit a $(2+1)$-d quantum spin model with $SU(N)_L\\times SU(N)_R\\times U(1)_{L=R}$ symmetry is equivalent to the 2-d principal chiral model. Finally, we show that $(4+1)$-d SU(N) quantum link models reduce to ordinary 4-d Yang-Mills theory.

  16. On Quantum Effects in a Theory of Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable. PMID:22413059

  17. On quantum effects in a theory of biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Delgado, M A

    2012-01-01

    We construct a descriptive toy model that considers quantum effects on biological evolution starting from Chaitin's classical framework. There are smart evolution scenarios in which a quantum world is as favorable as classical worlds for evolution to take place. However, in more natural scenarios, the rate of evolution depends on the degree of entanglement present in quantum organisms with respect to classical organisms. If the entanglement is maximal, classical evolution turns out to be more favorable.

  18. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of "clocks"

    CERN Document Server

    Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2016-01-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of "clocks", which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. "Clock" interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  19. Red-shift of the photoluminescent emission peaks of CdTe quantum dots due to the synergistic interaction with carbon quantum dot mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, E.; Zazueta, A.; López-Delgado, R.; Saucedo, E.; Ruelas, R.; Ayón, A.

    2016-11-01

    We report the relatively large red-shift effect observed in down-shifting carbon quantum dots (CQDs) that is anticipated to have a positive impact on the power conversion efficiency of solar cells. Specifically, with an excitation wavelength of 390 nm, CQDs of different sizes, exhibited down-shifted emission peaks centered around 425 nm. However, a solution comprised of a mixture of CQDs of different sizes, was observed to have an emission peak red-shifted to 515 nm. The effect could arise when larger carbon quantum dots capture the photons emitted by their smaller counterparts followed by the subsequent re-emission at longer wavelengths. Furthermore, the red-shift effect was also observed in CdTe QDs when added to a solution with the aforementioned mixture of Carbon QDs. Thus, whereas a solution solely comprised of a collection of CdTe QDs of different sizes, exhibited a down-shifted photoluminescence centered around 555 nm, the peak was observed to be further red-shifted to 580 nm when combined with the solution of CQDs of different sizes. The quantum dot characterization included crystal structure analysis as well as photon absorption and photoluminescence wavelengths. Subsequently, the synthesized QDs were dispersed in a polymeric layer of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) and incorporated on functional and previously characterized solar cells, to quantify their influence in the electrical performance of the photovoltaic structures. We discuss the synthesis and characterization of the produced Carbon and CdTe QDs, as well as the observed improvement in the power conversion efficiency of the fabricated photovoltaic devices.

  20. Current Percolation in Medium with Boundaries under Quantum Hall Effect Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. U. Malakeeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current percolation has been considered in the medium with boundaries under quantum Hall effect conditions. It has been shown that in that case the effective Hall conductivity has a nonzero value due to percolation of the Hall current through the finite number of singular points (in our model these are corners at the phase joints.

  1. Electronic confinement in graphene quantum rings due to substrate-induced mass radial kink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, L. J. P.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Pereira, J. M., Jr.; Farias, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate localized states of a quantum ring confinement in monolayer graphene defined by a circular mass-related potential, which can be induced e.g. by interaction with a substrate that breaks the sublattice symmetry, where a circular line defect provides a change in the sign of the induced mass term along the radial direction. Electronic properties are calculated analytically within the Dirac-Weyl approximation in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical results are also compared with those obtained by the tight-binding approach. Regardless of its sign, a mass term Δ is expected to open a gap for low-energy electrons in Dirac cones in graphene. Both approaches confirm the existence of confined states with energies inside the gap, even when the width of the kink modelling the mass sign transition is infinitely thin. We observe that such energy levels are inversely proportional to the defect line ring radius and independent on the mass kink height. An external magnetic field is demonstrated to lift the valley degeneracy in this system and easily tune the valley index of the ground state in this system, which can be polarized on either K or {{K}\\prime} valleys of the Brillouin zone, depending on the magnetic field intensity. Geometrical changes in the defect line shape are considered by assuming an elliptic line with different eccentricities. Our results suggest that any defect line that is closed in a loop, with any geometry, would produce the same qualitative results as the circular ones, as a manifestation of the topologically protected nature of the ring-like states investigated here.

  2. Casimir effect from macroscopic quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philbin, T G, E-mail: tgp3@st-andrews.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    The canonical quantization of macroscopic electromagnetism was recently presented in (Philbin 2010 New J. Phys. 12 123008). This theory is used here to derive the Casimir effect, by considering the special case of thermal and zero-point fields. The stress-energy-momentum tensor of the canonical theory follows from Noether's theorem, and its electromagnetic part in thermal equilibrium gives the Casimir energy density and stress tensor. The results hold for arbitrary inhomogeneous magnetodielectrics and are obtained from a rigorous quantization of electromagnetism in dispersive, dissipative media. Continuing doubts about the status of the standard Lifshitz theory as a proper quantum treatment of Casimir forces do not apply to the derivation given here. Moreover, the correct expressions for the Casimir energy density and stress tensor inside media follow automatically from the simple restriction to thermal equilibrium, without the need for complicated thermodynamical or mechanical arguments.

  3. Novel interference effects and a new quantum phase in mesoscopic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Singha Deo; A M Jayannavar

    2001-02-01

    Mesoscopic systems have provided an opportunity to study quantum effects beyond the atomic realm. In these systems quantum coherence prevails over the entire sample. We discuss several novel effects related to persistent currents in open systems which do not have analogues in closed systems. Some phenomena arising simultaneously due to two non-classical effects namely, Aharonov–Bohm effect and quantum tunneling are presented. Simple analysis of sharp phase jumps observed in double-slit Aharonov–Bohm experiments is given. Some consequences of parity violation are elaborated. Finally, we briefly describe the dephasing of Aharonov–Bohm oscillations in Aharonov–Bohm ring geometry due to spin-flip scattering in one of the arms. Several experimental manifestations of these phenomena and their applications are given.

  4. Nuclear Quantum Effects on Aqueous Electron Attachment and Redox Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkin, Vladimir V; VandeVondele, Joost

    2017-03-17

    Nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) on the reduction and oxidation properties of small aqueous species (CO2, HO2, and O2) are quantified and rationalized by first-principles molecular dynamics and thermodynamic integration. Vertical electron attachment, or electron affinity, and detachment energies (VEA and VDE) are strongly affected by NQEs, decreasing in absolute value by 0.3 eV going from a classical to a quantum description of the nuclei. The effect is attributed to NQEs that lessen the solvent response upon oxidation/reduction. The reduction of solvent reorganization energy is expected to be general for small solutes in water. In the thermodynamic integral that yields the free energy of oxidation/reduction, these large changes enter with opposite sign, and only a small net effect (0.1 eV) remains. This is not obvious for CO2, where the integrand is strongly influenced by NQEs due to the onset of interaction of the reduced orbital with the conduction band of the liquid during thermodynamic integration. We conclude that NQEs might not have to be included in the computation of redox potentials, unless high accuracy is needed, but are important for VEA and VDE calculations.

  5. Motion and gravity effects in the precision of quantum clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Lindkvist, Joel; Johansson, Göran; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-01-01

    We show that motion and gravity affect the precision of quantum clocks. We consider a localised quantum field as a fundamental model of a quantum clock moving in spacetime and show that its state is modified due to changes in acceleration. By computing the quantum Fisher information we determine how relativistic motion modifies the ultimate bound in the precision of the measurement of time. While in the absence of motion the squeezed vacuum is the ideal state for time estimation, we find that it is highly sensitive to the motion-induced degradation of the quantum Fisher information. We show that coherent states are generally more resilient to this degradation and that in the case of very low initial number of photons, the optimal precision can be even increased by motion. These results can be tested with current technology by using superconducting resonators with tunable boundary conditions.

  6. Formulation of the Relativistic Quantum Hall Effect and "Parity Anomaly"

    CERN Document Server

    Yonaga, Kouki; Shibata, Naokazu

    2016-01-01

    We present a relativistic formulation of the quantum Hall effect on a Riemann sphere. An explicit form of the pseudopotential is derived for the relativistic quantum Hall effect with/without mass term.We clarify particular features of the relativistic quantum Hall states with use of the exact diagonalization study of the pseudopotential Hamiltonian. Physical effects of the mass term to relativistic quantum Hall states are investigated in detail.The mass term acts as an interporating parameter between the relativistic and non-relativistic quantum Hall effects. It is pointed out that the mass term inequivalently affects to many-body physics of the positive and negative Landau levels and brings instability of the Laughlin state of the positive first relativistic Landau level as a consequence of the "parity anomaly".

  7. Quantum effects of massive modes in a cosmological quantum space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Yaser

    2015-01-01

    The quantum theory of a massive, minimally coupled scalar field on an isotropic cosmological quantum space-time is revisited. The interplay between the quantum background and the massive modes of the field, when disregarding their back-reaction effects, gives rise to a theory of quantum field on an effective, dressed space-time whose isotropy may be broken in the direction of the field propagation. On the resulting dressed geometry, evolution of the massive modes, by analyzing the solutions to the corresponding Klein-Gordon equation, is investigated. In particular, by computing the leading order contributions in adiabatic series, an approximate solution for the mode function is obtained. By using the adiabatic regularization, to the fourth order in expansion series, the renormalization of the stress-energy and Hamiltonian of the quantized field is studied. The problem of particle production is studied here in the light of the classical theory of wave propagation on the effective anisotropic background. To the...

  8. Kondo effect in quantum dots and molecular devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lang; LI Hongxiang; HU Wenping; ZHU Daoben

    2005-01-01

    Kondo effect is a very important many-body phenomenon in condensed matter physics,which explains why the resistance increases as the temperature is lowered (usually <10 K) in dilute magnetic alloy, and why the conductance increases as temperature is decreased in quantum dots. This paper simply introduces equilibrium and non- equilibrium Kondo effects in quantum dots together with the Kondo effect in quantum dots with even number of electrons (when the singlet and triplet states are degenerate). Furthermore, Kondo effect in single atom/molecular transistors is introduced, which indicates a new way to study Kondo effect.

  9. Few-body, hyperspherical treatment of the quantum Hall effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooten R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Hall effect arises from the quantum behavior of two-dimensional, strongly-interacting electrons exposed to a strong, perpendicular magnetic field [1, 2]. Conventionally treated from a many-body perspective, we instead treat the system from the few-body perspective using collective coordinates and the hyperspherical adiabatic technique developed originally for atomic systems [3]. The grand angular momentum K from K-harmonic few-body theory, is shown to be an approximate good collective quantum number in this system, and is shown to correlate with known fractional quantum Hall (FQH states at experimentally observed filling factors.

  10. Quantum teleportation of nonclassical wave packets: An effective multimode theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benichi, Hugo; Takeda, Shuntaro; Lee, Noriyuki; Furusawa, Akira [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    We develop a simple and efficient theoretical model to understand the quantum properties of broadband continuous variable quantum teleportation. We show that, if stated properly, the problem of multimode teleportation can be simplified to teleportation of a single effective mode that describes the input state temporal characteristic. Using that model, we show how the finite bandwidth of squeezing and external noise in the classical channel affect the output teleported quantum field. We choose an approach that is especially relevant for the case of non-Gaussian nonclassical quantum states and we finally back-test our model with recent experimental results.

  11. Understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional quantum hall effect state.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wei; Crawford, Matthew; Tallakulam, Madhu; Ross, Anthony Joseph, III

    2010-10-01

    We wish to present in this report experimental results from a one-year Senior Council Tier-1 LDRD project that focused on understanding the physics of a possible non-Abelian fractional quantum Hall effect state. We first give a general introduction to the quantum Hall effect, and then present the experimental results on the edge-state transport in a special fractional quantum Hall effect state at Landau level filling {nu} = 5/2 - a possible non-Abelian quantum Hall state. This state has been at the center of current basic research due to its potential applications in fault-resistant topological quantum computation. We will also describe the semiconductor 'Hall-bar' devices we used in this project. Electron physics in low dimensional systems has been one of the most exciting fields in condensed matter physics for many years. This is especially true of quantum Hall effect (QHE) physics, which has seen its intellectual wealth applied in and has influenced many seemingly unrelated fields, such as the black hole physics, where a fractional QHE-like phase has been identified. Two Nobel prizes have been awarded for discoveries of quantum Hall effects: in 1985 to von Klitzing for the discovery of integer QHE, and in 1998 to Tsui, Stormer, and Laughlin for the discovery of fractional QHE. Today, QH physics remains one of the most vibrant research fields, and many unexpected novel quantum states continue to be discovered and to surprise us, such as utilizing an exotic, non-Abelian FQHE state at {nu} = 5/2 for fault resistant topological computation. Below we give a briefly introduction of the quantum Hall physics.

  12. Quantum-Memory Effects in the Emission of Quantum-Dot Microcavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, C.; Huttner, U.; Mootz, M.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.; Tempel, J.-S.; Aßmann, M.; Bayer, M.; Mintairov, A. M.; Merz, J. L.

    2014-08-01

    The experimentally measured input-output characteristics of optically pumped semiconductor microcavities exhibits unexpected oscillations modifying the fundamentally linear slope in the excitation power regime below lasing. A systematic microscopic analysis reproduces these oscillations, identifying them as a genuine quantum-memory effect, i.e., a photon-density correlation accumulated during the excitation. With the use of projected quantum measurements, it is shown that the input-output oscillations can be controlled and enhanced by an order of magnitude when the quantum fluctuations of the pump are adjusted.

  13. Measuring the effective phonon density of states of a quantum dot in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Kreiner-Møller, Asger

    2013-01-01

    We employ detuning-dependent decay-rate measurements of a quantum dot in a photonic-crystal cavity to study the influence of phonon dephasing in a solid-state quantum-electrodynamics experiment. The experimental data agree with a microscopic non-Markovian model accounting for dephasing from...... longitudinal acoustic phonons, and the analysis explains the difference between nonresonant cavity feeding in different nanocavities. From the comparison between experiment and theory we extract the effective phonon density of states experienced by the quantum dot in the nanocavity. This quantity determines...

  14. Effects of quantum statistical pressure on the Washimi-Karpman magnetization and power radiation in degenerate quantum Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-09-01

    The physical properties of the Washimi-Karpman ponderomotive magnetization are investigated in relativistically degenerate quantum Fermi-Dirac plasmas including the influence of quantum statistical degeneracy pressure. The induced magnetization and power radiation due to the Washimi-Karpman ponderomotive interaction are obtained in Fermi-Dirac plasmas. It is found that the ponderomotive magnetization decreases with an increase of the relativistic degeneracy parameter. It is also shown that the quantum statistical degeneracy pressure effect is more significant in small frequency and large wave number domains than that in large frequency and small wave number domains. In addition, it is found that the ponderomotive power radiation decreases with an increase of the relativistic degeneracy parameter in Fermi-Dirac plasmas. The variations of the Washimi-Karpman magnetization and power radiation due to the physical characteristics of degenerate quantum Fermi-Dirac plasmas are also discussed.

  15. A comprehensive model of gain recovery due to unipolar electron transport after a short optical pulse in quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali Mahabadi, S. E.; Hu, Yue; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman; Carruthers, Thomas F.; Menyuk, Curtis R.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a comprehensive model of gain recovery due to unipolar electron transport after a short optical pulse in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) that takes into account all the participating energy levels, including the continuum, in a device. This work takes into account the incoherent scattering of electrons from one energy level to another and quantum coherent tunneling from an injector level to an active region level or vice versa. In contrast to the prior work that only considered transitions to and from a limited number of bound levels, this work include transitions between all bound levels and between the bound energy levels and the continuum. We simulated an experiment of S. Liu et al., in which 438-pJ femtosecond optical pulses at the device's lasing wavelength were injected into an I n0.653 Ga0.348 As/In0.310 Al0.690 As QCL structure; we found that approximately 1% of the electrons in the bound energy levels will be excited into the continuum by a pulse and that the probability that these electrons will be scattered back into bound energy levels is negligible, ˜10-4 . The gain recovery that is predicted is not consistent with the experiments, indicating that one or more phenomena besides unipolar electron transport in response to a short optical pulse play an important role in the observed gain recovery.

  16. Polaron Energy and Effective Mass in Parabolic Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Ping; LIANG Xi-Xia

    2005-01-01

    @@ The energy and effective mass of a polaron in a parabolic quantum well are studied theoretically by using LLP-like transformations and a variational approach. Numerical results are presented for the polaron energy and effective mass in the GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As parabolic quantum well. The results show that the energy and the effective mass of the polaron both have their maxima in the finite parabolic quantum well but decrease monotonously in the infinite parabolic quantum well with the increasing well width. It is verified that the bulk longitudinal optical phonon mode approximation is an adequate formulation for the electron-phonon coupling in parabolic quantum well structures.

  17. Quantum Zeno effect in atomic spin-exchange collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kominis, I.K. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion 71103 (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology, Heraklion 71110 (Greece)], E-mail: ikominis@iesl.forth.gr

    2008-07-07

    The suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors discovered in 1973 and governing modern atomic magnetometers is here reformulated in terms of quantum measurement theory and the quantum Zeno effect. This provides a new perspective of understanding decoherence in spin-polarized atomic vapors.

  18. Quantum noise memory effect of multiple scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Lodahl, P

    2005-01-01

    We investigate frequency correlations in multiple scattered light that are present in the quantum fluctuations. The memory effect for quantum and classical noise is compared, and found to have markedly different frequency scaling, which was confirmed in a recent experiment. Furthermore, novel mesoscopic correlations are predicted that depend on the photon statistics of the incoming light.

  19. Quantum description of classical apparatus; Zeno effect and decoherence

    CERN Document Server

    Gurvitz, S A

    2003-01-01

    We study the measurement process by treating classical detectors entirely quantum mechanically. Transition to the classical description and the mechanism of decoherence is investigated. We concentrate on influence of continuous measurement on decay of unstable systems (quantum Zeno effect). We discuss the experimental consequences of our results and a role of the projection postulate in a measurement process.

  20. Quantum Zeno effect in atomic spin-exchange collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Kominis, I. K.

    2008-01-01

    The suppression of spin-exchange relaxation in dense alkali-metal vapors discovered in 1973 and governing modern atomic magnetometers is here reformulated in terms of quantum measurement theory and the quantum Zeno effect. This provides a new perspective of understanding decoherence in spin-polarized atomic vapors.

  1. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2011-01-01

    Instantaneous electro-absorption effect in quantum dots, induced by electric field of THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth is demonstrated in THz pump - optical probe experiment. This effect may be promising for Tbit/s wireless transmission systems.......Instantaneous electro-absorption effect in quantum dots, induced by electric field of THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth is demonstrated in THz pump - optical probe experiment. This effect may be promising for Tbit/s wireless transmission systems....

  2. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Lellouch, L; Portelli, A; Szabo, K K; Toth, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  3. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fodor, Z. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Hoelbling, C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Katz, S.D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); MTA-ELTE Lendület Lattice Gauge Theory Research Group, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary); Lellouch, L., E-mail: lellouch@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [CNRS, Aix-Marseille U., U. de Toulon, CPT, UMR 7332, F-13288, Marseille (France); Portelli, A. [School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Szabo, K.K. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52428 Jülich (Germany); Toth, B.C. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2016-04-10

    Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  4. Quantum electrodynamics in finite volume and nonrelativistic effective field theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fodor

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic effects are increasingly being accounted for in lattice quantum chromodynamics computations. Because of their long-range nature, they lead to large finite-size effects over which it is important to gain analytical control. Nonrelativistic effective field theories provide an efficient tool to describe these effects. Here we argue that some care has to be taken when applying these methods to quantum electrodynamics in a finite volume.

  5. Subsecond spin relaxation times in quantum dots at zero applied magnetic field due to a strong electron-nuclear interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulton, R; Greilich, A; Verbin, S Yu; Cherbunin, R V; Auer, T; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M; Merkulov, I A; Stavarache, V; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D

    2007-03-09

    A key to ultralong electron spin memory in quantum dots (QDs) at zero magnetic field is the polarization of the nuclei, such that the electron spin is stabilized along the average nuclear magnetic field. We demonstrate that spin-polarized electrons in n-doped (In,Ga)As/GaAs QDs align the nuclear field via the hyperfine interaction. A feedback onto the electrons occurs, leading to stabilization of their polarization due to formation of a nuclear spin polaron [I. A. Merkulov, Phys. Solid State 40, 930 (1998)]. Spin depolarization of both systems is consequently greatly reduced, and spin memory of the coupled electron-nuclear spin system is retained over 0.3 sec at temperature of 2 K.

  6. Quantum corrections in massive bigravity and new effective composite metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2015-05-01

    We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the interactions between the two metrics of the ghost-free massive bigravity. When considering gravitons running in the loops, we show how the structure of the interactions gets destabilized at the quantum level, exactly in the same way as in its massive gravity limit. A priori one might have expected a better quantum behavior, however, the broken diffeomorphism invariance out of the two initial diffeomorphisms in bigravity has similar consequences at the quantum level as the broken diffeomorphism in massive gravity. From lessons of the generated quantum corrections through matter loops we propose yet other types of effective composite metrics to which the matter fields can couple. Among these new effective metrics there might be one or more that could provide interesting phenomenology and important cosmological implications.

  7. Quantum corrections in massive bigravity and new effective composite metrics

    CERN Document Server

    Heisenberg, Lavinia

    2014-01-01

    We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the interactions between the two metrics of the ghost-free massive bigravity. When considering gravitons running in the loops, we show how the structure of the interactions gets destabilized at the quantum level, exactly in the same way as in its massive gravity limit. A priori one might have expected a better quantum behavior, however the broken diffeomorphism invariance out of the two initial diffeomorphisms in bigravity has similar consequences at the quantum level as the broken diffeomorphism in massive gravity. From lessons of the generated quantum corrections through matter loops we propose yet other types of effective composite metrics to which the matter fields can couple. Among these new effective metrics there might be one or more that could provide interesting phenomenology and important cosmological implications.

  8. Dynamical Lamb effect versus dissipation in superconducting quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting circuits provide a new platform for study of nonstationary cavity QED phenomena. An example of such a phenomenon is the dynamical Lamb effect, which is the parametric excitation of an atom due to nonadiabatic modulation of its Lamb shift. This effect was initially introduced for a natural atom in a varying cavity, while we suggest its realization in a superconducting qubit-cavity system with dynamically tunable coupling. In the present paper, we study the interplay between the dynamical Lamb effect and the energy dissipation, which is unavoidable in realistic systems. We find that despite naive expectations, this interplay can lead to unexpected dynamical regimes. One of the most striking results is that photon generation from vacuum can be strongly enhanced due to qubit relaxation, which opens another channel for such a process. We also show that dissipation in the cavity can increase the qubit excited-state population. Our results can be used for experimental observation and investigation of the dynamical Lamb effect and accompanying quantum effects.

  9. Quantum effects at low-energy atom–molecule interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Deb; A Rakshit; J Hazra; D Chakraborty

    2013-01-01

    The effects of quantum interference in inter-conversion between cold atoms and diatomic molecules are analysed in this study. Within the framework of Fano’s theory, continuum bound anisotropic dressed state formalism of atom–molecule quantum dynamics is presented. This formalism is applicable in photo- and magneto-associative strong-coupling regimes. The significance of Fano effect in ultracold atom–molecule transitions is discussed. Quantum effects at low-energy atom–molecule interface are important for exploring coherent phenomena in hitherto unexplored parameter regimes.

  10. Quantum radiation by electrons in lasers and the Unruh effect

    CERN Document Server

    Schützhold, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the Larmor radiation known from classical electrodynamics, electrons in a laser field may emit pairs of entangled photons -- which is a pure quantum effect. We investigate this quantum effect and discuss why it is suppressed in comparison with the classical Larmor radiation (which is just Thomson backscattering of the laser photons). Further, we provide an intuitive explanation of this process (in a simplified setting) in terms of the Unruh effect.

  11. A Rapid and Cost-Effective Laser Based Synthesis of High Purity Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondall, M A; Qahtan, Talal F; Dastageer, M A; Yamani, Z H; Anjum, D H

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and cost effective method is developed to synthesize high purity cadmium Selenide (CdSe) quantum dots in acetone medium using second harmonic of Nd:YAG nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. The thermal agglomeration due the nanosecond pulse duration of the laser was successfully eliminated by using unfocussed laser beam and thereby providing a favorable conditions for the synthesis of quantum dots having the grain size of 3 nm. The morphological and optical characterizations like XRD, HRTEM, optical absorption of the synthesized CdSe quantum dots, reveal that the material possesses the similar characteristics of the one synthesized through cumbersome wet chemical methods. Relative to the CdSe bulk material, the synthesized CdSe quantum dots showed a blue shift in the measured band gap energy from near infrared spectral region to visible region, making this material very attractive for many solar energy harvesting applications like photo-catalysis and solar cells.

  12. Chromatic effects in beam wander correction for free-space quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto; Fernandez, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Beam wander caused by atmospheric turbulence can significantly degrade the performance of horizontal free-space quantum communication links. Classical beam wander correction techniques cannot be applied due to the stronger requirements of transmitting single photons. One strategy to overcome this limitation consists in using a separate wavelength from that of the quantum signal to analyze the beam wander and use this information for its correction. For this strategy to work adequately, both wavelengths should be affected equally by atmospheric turbulence, i.e. no chromatic effects should be originated from beam wander. In this letter, a series of experiments are performed to prove that this is the case for {\\lambda} ~ 850 nm as the quantum signal and {\\lambda} ~ 1550 nm as the tracking signal of a quantum communication system.

  13. Many-Body Effect in Spin Dephasing in n-Type GaAs Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WENG Ming-Qi; WU Ming-Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ By constructing and numerically solving the kinetic Bloch equations we perform a many-body study of the spin dephasing due to the D'yakonov-Perel' effect in n-type GaAs (100) quantum wells for high temperatures.

  14. Aharonov-Casher effect in quantum ring ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joibari, Fateme K.; Blanter, Ya. M.; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2013-09-01

    We study the transport of electrons through a single-mode quantum ring with electric-field induced Rashba spin-orbit interaction that is subject to an in-plane magnetic field and weakly coupled to electron reservoirs. Modeling a ring array by ensemble averaging over a Gaussian distribution of energy-level positions, we predict slow conductance oscillations as a function of the Rashba interaction and electron density due to spin-orbit interaction induced beating of the spacings between the levels crossed by the Fermi energy. Our results agree with experiments by Nitta c.s. [J. Nitta, J. Takagi, F. Nagasawa, and M. Kohda, J. Phys.: Conference Series1742-659610.1088/1742-6596/302/1/012002 302, 012002 (2011) and Nagasawa (unpublished)], thereby providing an interpretation that differs from the ordinary Aharonov-Casher effect in a single ring.

  15. Quantum-confined Stark effect in band-inverted junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Fernández, A.; Domínguez-Adame, F.

    2017-09-01

    Topological phases of matter are often characterized by interface states, which were already known to occur at the boundary of a band-inverted junction in semiconductor heterostructures. In IV-VI compounds such interface states are properly described by a two-band model, predicting the appearance of a Dirac cone in single junctions. We study the quantum-confined Stark effect of interface states due to an electric field perpendicular to a band-inverted junction. We find a closed expression to obtain the interface dispersion relation at any field strength and show that the Dirac cone widens under an applied bias. Thus, the Fermi velocity can be substantially lowered even at moderate fields, paving the way for tunable band-engineered devices based on band-inverted junctions.

  16. Quantum Butterfly Effect in Weakly Interacting Diffusive Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aavishkar A. Patel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We study scrambling, an avatar of chaos, in a weakly interacting metal in the presence of random potential disorder. It is well known that charge and heat spread via diffusion in such an interacting disordered metal. In contrast, we show within perturbation theory that chaos spreads in a ballistic fashion. The squared anticommutator of the electron-field operators inherits a light-cone-like growth, arising from an interplay of a growth (Lyapunov exponent that scales as the inelastic electron scattering rate and a diffusive piece due to the presence of disorder. In two spatial dimensions, the Lyapunov exponent is universally related at weak coupling to the sheet resistivity. We are able to define an effective temperature-dependent butterfly velocity, a speed limit for the propagation of quantum information that is much slower than microscopic velocities such as the Fermi velocity and that is qualitatively similar to that of a quantum critical system with a dynamical critical exponent z>1.

  17. Detection of Lense-Thirring Effect Due to Earth's Spin

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, I; Vespe, F; Chieppa, F

    1997-01-01

    Rotation of a body, according to Einstein's theory of general relativity, generates a "force" on other matter; in Newton's gravitational theory only the mass of a body produces a force. This phenomenon, due to currents of mass, is known as gravitomagnetism owing to its formal analogies with magnetism due to currents of electric charge. Therefore, according to general relativity, Earth's rotation should influence the motion of its orbiting satellites. Indeed, we analysed the laser ranging observations of the orbits of the satellites LAGEOS and LAGEOS II, using a program developed at NASA/GSFC, and obtained the first direct measurement of the gravitomagnetic orbital perturbation due to the Earth's rotation, known as the Lense-Thirring effect. The accuracy of our measurement is about 25%.

  18. Two Quantum Effects In The Theory Of Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, S P

    2005-01-01

    We will discuss two methods by which the formalism of quantum field theory can be included in calculating the physical effects of gravitation. In the first of these, the consequences of treating general relativity as an effective quantum field theory will be examined. The primary result will be the calculation of the first-order quantum gravity corrections to the β functions of arbitrary Yang-Mills theories. These corrections will effect the high-energy phenomenology of such theories, including the details of coupling constant unification. Following this, we will address the question of how to form effective quantum field theories in classical gravitational backgrounds. We follow the prescription that effective theories should provide a description of experimentally accessible degrees of freedom with all other degrees of freedom integrated out of the theory. We will show that this prescription appears to fail for a scalar field in a black hole background because of an anomaly generated in general cov...

  19. Quantum electrodynamic effects in finite space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobiasch, P.; Walther, H.

    The modifications of various quantum properties due to a discrete structure of the modes of the vacuum electromagnetic field are discussed. In contrast to the usual case of a continuous spectrum of the free space fluctuations, we consider physical systems in a resonator or in a wave guide. It is shown that the relaxation time of the system can be increased ot decreased, by increasing or decreasing the density of modes with respect to the case of unperturbed vacuum. On the other hand, we predict level shifts due to the reduced mass of the electron and deviations from the Lambshift for hydrogen in a wave guide, which can be detected with the presently feasible high resolution spectroscopy. We propose an experimental set-up. Nous discutons les modifications de diverses propriétés quantiques sous l'influence d'une structure de modes discrets du champ électromagnétique dans le vide. En comparaison du cas habituel d'un spectre continu des fluctuations du vide dans l'espace libre, nous considérons ici des systèmes physiques dans un résonateur ou un guide d'ondes. Il est démontré que le temps de relaxation du système peut être prolongé ou raccourci, ceci en augmentant ou diminuant la densité des modes par rapport à sa valeur dans le vide non-perturbé. D'autre part, nous prédisons des déplacements de niveau dus à la masse réduite de l'électron et des déviations du Lamb shift pour des atomes d'hydrogène dans un guide d'ondes, qui peuvent être détectées grâce à la haute résolution accessible actuellement en spectroscopie. Nous présentons un dispositif expérimental.

  20. Pseudo Memory Effects, Majorization and Entropy in Quantum Random Walks

    CERN Document Server

    Bracken, A J; Tsohantjis, I; Bracken, Anthony J.; Ellinas, Demosthenes; Tsohantjis, Ioannis

    2004-01-01

    A quantum random walk on the integers exhibits pseudo memory effects, in that its probability distribution after N steps is determined by reshuffling the first N distributions that arise in a classical random walk with the same initial distribution. In a classical walk, entropy increase can be regarded as a consequence of the majorization ordering of successive distributions. The Lorenz curves of successive distributions for a symmetric quantum walk reveal no majorization ordering in general. Nevertheless, entropy can increase, and computer experiments show that it does so on average. Varying the stages at which the quantum coin system is traced out leads to new quantum walks, including a symmetric walk for which majorization ordering is valid but the spreading rate exceeds that of the usual symmetric quantum walk.

  1. Quantum effects for particles channeling in a bent crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feranchuk, Ilya; San, Nguyen Quang

    2016-09-01

    Quantum mechanical theory for channeling of the relativistic charged particles in the bent crystals is considered in the paper. Quantum effects of under-barrier tunneling are essential when the radius of the curvature is closed to its critical value. In this case the wave functions of the quasi-stationary states corresponding to the particles captured in a channel are presented in the analytical form. The efficiency of channeling of the particles and their angular distribution at the exit crystal surface are calculated. Characteristic experimental parameters for observation the quantum effects are estimated.

  2. Intrinsic Spin Hall Effect Induced by Quantum Phase Transition in HgCdTe Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai; /Beijing, Inst. Semiconductors; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    Spin Hall effect can be induced both by the extrinsic impurity scattering and by the intrinsic spin-orbit coupling in the electronic structure. The HgTe/CdTe quantum well has a quantum phase transition where the electronic structure changes from normal to inverted. We show that the intrinsic spin Hall effect of the conduction band vanishes on the normal side, while it is finite on the inverted side. This difference gives a direct mechanism to experimentally distinguish the intrinsic spin Hall effect from the extrinsic one.

  3. Spontaneous Coherence Effects in Quantum Dots and Quantum Wells Placed in Microcavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaputkina N.E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Bose-Einstein condensation temperature Tc for a system of coupled quantum dots in a microcavity was estimated in function of the confining potential steepness, the external magnetic field strength, and the barrier layer width for indirect excitons. The effect of the magnetic field on Tc was found to be nonmonotonic over a certain range of the control parameters. The reason is the presence of two competing mechanisms accompanying the increase of the magnetic field: (a increase of the magnetoexciton effective mass and (b increase of the effective confining potential steepness for quantum dots.

  4. Unified Drain Current Model of Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons with Uniaxial Strain and Quantum Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EngSiew Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A unified current-voltage I-V model of uniaxial strained armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs incorporating quantum confinement effects is presented in this paper. The I-V model is enhanced by integrating both linear and saturation regions into a unified and precise model of AGNRs. The derivation originates from energy dispersion throughout the entire Brillouin zone of uniaxial strained AGNRs based on the tight-binding approximation. Our results reveal the modification of the energy band gap, carrier density, and drain current upon strain. The effects of quantum confinement were investigated in terms of the quantum capacitance calculated from the broadening density of states. The results show that quantum effect is greatly dependent on the magnitude of applied strain, gate voltage, channel length, and oxide thickness. The discrepancies between the classical calculation and quantum calculation were also measured and it has been found to be as high as 19% drive current loss due to the quantum confinement. Our finding which is in good agreement with the published data provides significant insight into the device performance of uniaxial strained AGNRs in nanoelectronic applications.

  5. Fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, D N; Gu, Zheng-Cheng; Sun, Kai; Sheng, L

    2011-07-12

    It is well known that the topological phenomena with fractional excitations, the fractional quantum Hall effect, will emerge when electrons move in Landau levels. Here we show the theoretical discovery of the fractional quantum Hall effect in the absence of Landau levels in an interacting fermion model. The non-interacting part of our Hamiltonian is the recently proposed topologically non-trivial flat-band model on a checkerboard lattice. In the presence of nearest-neighbouring repulsion, we find that at 1/3 filling, the Fermi-liquid state is unstable towards the fractional quantum Hall effect. At 1/5 filling, however, a next-nearest-neighbouring repulsion is needed for the occurrence of the 1/5 fractional quantum Hall effect when nearest-neighbouring repulsion is not too strong. We demonstrate the characteristic features of these novel states and determine the corresponding phase diagram.

  6. Effects of decoherence and imperfections for quantum algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Pomeransky, A A; Shepelyansky, D L

    2004-01-01

    We study effects of static inter-qubit interactions and random errors in quantum gates on the stability of various quantum algorithms including the Grover quantum search algorithm and the quantum chaos maps. For the Grover algorithm our numerical and analytical results show existence of regular and chaotic phases depending on the static imperfection strength $\\epsilon$. The critical border $\\epsilon_c$ between two phases drops polynomially with the number of qubits $n_q$ as $\\epsilon_c \\sim n_q^{-3/2}$. In the regular phase $(\\epsilon 2^{-n_q/2}$. In the chaotic phase $(\\epsilon > \\epsilon_c)$ the algorithm is completely destroyed. The results for the Grover algorithm are compared with the imperfection effects for quantum algorithms of quantum chaos maps where the universal law for the fidelity decay is given by the Random Matrix Theory (RMT). We also discuss a new gyroscopic quantum error correction method which allows to reduce the effect of static imperfections. In spite of this decay GYQEC allows to obta...

  7. Spacetime effects on satellite-based quantum communications

    CERN Document Server

    Bruschi, David Edward; Fuentes, Ivette; Jennewein, Thomas; Razavi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the effects of space-time curvature on space-based quantum communication protocols. We analyze tasks that require either the exchange of single photons in a certain entanglement distribution protocol or beams of light in a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme. We find that gravity affects the propagation of photons, therefore acting as a noisy channel for the transmission of information. The effects can be measured with current technology.

  8. Jet Extinction from Non-Perturbative Quantum Gravity Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Kilic, Can; Lath, Amitabh; Rose, Keith; Thomas, Scott

    2012-01-01

    The infrared-ultraviolet properties of quantum gravity suggest on very general grounds that hard short distance scattering processes are highly suppressed for center of mass scattering energies beyond the fundamental Planck scale. If this scale is not too far above the electroweak scale, these non-perturbative quantum gravity effects could be manifest as an extinction of high transverse momentum jets at the LHC. To model these effects we implement an Extinction Monte Carlo modification of the...

  9. Interface phonon effect on optical spectra of quantum nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslov, Alexander Yu., E-mail: maslov.ton@mail.ioffe.r [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Polytechnicheskaya st., 26, 194021 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Proshina, Olga V.; Rusina, Anastasia N. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Polytechnicheskaya st., 26, 194021 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-15

    This paper deals with theory of large radius polaron effect in quantum wells, wires and dots. The interaction of charge particles and excitons with both bulk and interface optical phonons is taken into consideration. The analytical expression for polaron binding energy is obtained for different types of nanostructures. It is shown that the contribution of interface phonons to the polaron binding energy may exceed the bulk phonon part. The manifestation of polaron effects in optical spectra of quantum nanostructures is discussed.

  10. Chern-Simons Dynamics and the Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Balachandran, A P

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical developments during the past several years have shown that large scale properties of the Quantum Hall system can be successfully described by effective field theories which use the Chern-Simons interaction. In this article, we first recall certain salient features of the Quantum Hall Effect and their microscopic explanation. We then review one particular approach to their description based on the Chern-Simons Lagrangian and its variants.

  11. Muon anomalous magnetic moment due to the brane stretching effect

    CERN Document Server

    Sawa, K

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of extra dimensions to muon anomalous magnetic moment using a 6-dimensional model. The approach analyzes the extent to which small brane fluctuations influence the magnetic moment. In particular, we assume that the fluctuations are static in time, which add the new potential terms to the schr{\\"o}dinger equation through the induced vierbein. This paper shows that the fluctuations result in the brane stretching effect due to the negative tension. The effect would be a capable of reproducing the appropriate order for the recent BNL measurements of the muon (g-2) deviation.

  12. Quantum optical effective-medium theory and transformation quantum optics for metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubs, Martijn; Amooghorban, Ehsan; Zhang, Jingjing; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2016-09-01

    While typically designed to manipulate classical light, metamaterials have many potential applications for quantum optics as well. We argue why a quantum optical effective-medium theory is needed. We present such a theory for layered metamaterials that is valid for light propagation in all spatial directions, thereby generalizing earlier work for one-dimensional propagation. In contrast to classical effective-medium theory there is an additional effective parameter that describes quantum noise. Our results for metamaterials are based on a rather general Lagrangian theory for the quantum electrodynamics of media with both loss and gain. In the second part of this paper, we present a new application of transformation optics whereby local spontaneous-emission rates of quantum emitters can be designed. This follows from an analysis how electromagnetic Green functions trans- form under coordinate transformations. Spontaneous-emission rates can be either enhanced or suppressed using invisibility cloaks or gradient index lenses. Furthermore, the anisotropic material profile of the cloak enables the directional control of spontaneous emission.

  13. Quantum

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khalili, Jim

    2003-01-01

    In this lively look at quantum science, a physicist takes you on an entertaining and enlightening journey through the basics of subatomic physics. Along the way, he examines the paradox of quantum mechanics--beautifully mathematical in theory but confoundingly unpredictable in the real world. Marvel at the Dual Slit experiment as a tiny atom passes through two separate openings at the same time. Ponder the peculiar communication of quantum particles, which can remain in touch no matter how far apart. Join the genius jewel thief as he carries out a quantum measurement on a diamond without ever touching the object in question. Baffle yourself with the bizzareness of quantum tunneling, the equivalent of traveling partway up a hill, only to disappear then reappear traveling down the opposite side. With its clean, colorful layout and conversational tone, this text will hook you into the conundrum that is quantum mechanics.

  14. Graphene and the universality of the quantum Hall effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzalenchuk, A.; Janssen, T. J.B.M.; Kazakova, O.

    2013-01-01

    The quantum Hall effect allows the standard for resistance to be defined in terms of the elementary charge and Planck's constant alone. The effect comprises the quantization of the Hall resistance in two-dimensional electron systems in rational fractions of RK=h/e2=25812.8074434(84) Ω (Mohr P. J....... et al., Rev. Mod. Phys., 84 (2012) 1527), the resistance quantum. Despite 30 years of research into the quantum Hall effect, the level of precision necessary for metrology, a few parts per billion, has been achieved only in silicon and III-V heterostructure devices. In this lecture we show...... that graphene - a single layer of carbon atoms - beats these well-established semiconductor materials as the system of choice for the realisation of the quantum resistance standard. Here we shall briefly describe graphene technology, discuss the structure and electronic properties of graphene, including...

  15. Quantum Effects in Nanoantennas and Their Applications in Tunability, Mixing, and Rectification

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Pai-Yen

    2015-08-04

    It has been recently shown that optical nanoantennas made of single or paired metallic nanoparticles can efficiently couple the propagating light into and from deeply subwavelength volumes. The strong light-matter interaction mediated by surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures allows for localizing optical fields to a subdiffraction-limited region, thereby enhancing emission of nanoemitters and offering the flexible control of nanofocused radiation. Here we theoretically study the nanodipole antennas with submicroscopic gaps, i.e. a few nanometers, for which there exists linear and high-order nonlinear quantum conductivities due to the photon-assisted tunneling effect. Noticeably, these quantum conductivities induced at the nanogap are enhanced by several orders of magnitude, due to the strongly localized optical fields associated with the plasmonic resonance.In this talk, we will show that by tailoring the geometry of nanoantennas and the quantum well structure, a quantum nanodipole antenna with a gap size of few nanometers can induce linear, high-order quantum conductivities that are considerably enhanced by the surface plasmon resonance. We envisage here a number of intriguing nanophotonic applications of these quantum nanoantennas, including (i) modulatable and switchable radiators and metamaterials, with electronic and all-optical tuning (which is related to the two photon absorption), (ii) optical rectification for detection and energy harvesting of infrared and visible light, which are related to the relevant second-order quantum conductivity, (iii) harmonic sensing for the work function and the optical index of nanoparticle, e.g. DNA and molecules, loaded inside the nanogap, and (iv) high harmonic generation and wave mixing with nonlinear quantum conductivities.

  16. Non-Markovianity during quantum Zeno effect

    CERN Document Server

    Thilagam, A

    2013-01-01

    We examine the Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in the context of non-Markovian dynamics in entangled spin-boson systems in contact with noninteracting reservoirs. We identify enhanced non-Markovian signatures in specific two-qubit partitions of a Bell-like initial state, with results showing that the intra-qubit Zeno effect or anti-Zeno effect occurs in conjunction with inter-qubit non-Markovian dynamics for a range of system parameters. The time domain of effective Zeno or anti-Zeno dynamics is about the same order of magnitude as the non-Markovian time scale of the reservoir correlation dynamics, and changes in decay rate due to the Zeno mechanism appears coordinated with information flow between specific two-qubit partitions. We extend our analysis to examine the Zeno mechanism-non-Markovianity link using the tripartite states arising from a donor-acceptor-sink model of photosynthetic biosystems.

  17. Effects of symmetry breaking in finite quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birman, J.L. [Department of Physics, City College, City University of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Nazmitdinov, R.G. [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca 07122 (Spain); Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Yukalov, V.I., E-mail: yukalov@theor.jinr.ru [Bogolubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The review considers the peculiarities of symmetry breaking and symmetry transformations and the related physical effects in finite quantum systems. Some types of symmetry in finite systems can be broken only asymptotically. However, with a sufficiently large number of particles, crossover transitions become sharp, so that symmetry breaking happens similarly to that in macroscopic systems. This concerns, in particular, global gauge symmetry breaking, related to Bose–Einstein condensation and superconductivity, or isotropy breaking, related to the generation of quantum vortices, and the stratification in multicomponent mixtures. A special type of symmetry transformation, characteristic only for finite systems, is the change of shape symmetry. These phenomena are illustrated by the examples of several typical mesoscopic systems, such as trapped atoms, quantum dots, atomic nuclei, and metallic grains. The specific features of the review are: (i) the emphasis on the peculiarities of the symmetry breaking in finite mesoscopic systems; (ii) the analysis of common properties of physically different finite quantum systems; (iii) the manifestations of symmetry breaking in the spectra of collective excitations in finite quantum systems. The analysis of these features allows for the better understanding of the intimate relation between the type of symmetry and other physical properties of quantum systems. This also makes it possible to predict new effects by employing the analogies between finite quantum systems of different physical nature.

  18. Detecting quantum gravitational effects of loop quantum cosmology in the early universe

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Tao; Cleaver, Gerald; Kirsten, Klaus; Sheng, Qin; Wu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We derive the primordial power spectra and spectral indexes of the density fluctuations and gravitational waves in the framework of loop quantum cosmology (LQC) with holonomy and inverse-volume corrections, by using the uniform asymptotic approximation method to its third-order, at which the upper error bounds are $\\lesssim 0.15\\%$, accurate enough for the current and forthcoming cosmological observations. Then, using the Planck, BAO and SN data we obtain new constraints on quantum gravitational effects from LQC corrections, and find that such effects could be well within the detection of the current and forthcoming experiments.

  19. Macroscopic effect of quantum gravity: graviton, ghost and instanton condensation on horizon scale of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Marochnik, Leonid; Vereshkov, Grigory

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a special class of quantum gravity phenomena that occur on the scale of the Universe as a whole at any stage of its evolution. These phenomena are a direct consequence of the zero rest mass of gravitons, conformal non-invariance of the graviton field, and one-loop finiteness of quantum gravity. The effects are due to graviton-ghost condensates arising from the interference of quantum coherent states. Each of coherent states is a state of gravitons and ghosts of a wavelength of the order of the horizon scale and of different occupation numbers. The state vector of the Universe is a coherent superposition of vectors of different occupation numbers. To substantiate the reliability of macroscopic quantum effects, the formalism of one-loop quantum gravity is discussed in detail. The theory is constructed as follows: Faddeev-Popov path integral in Hamilton gauge -> factorization of classical and quantum variables, allowing the existence of a self-consistent system of equations for gravitons, ghosts and m...

  20. Casimir Effects in Renormalizable Quantum Field Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, N; Weigel, H; Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.; Weigel, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    We review the framework we and our collaborators have developed for the study of one-loop quantum corrections to extended field configurations in renormalizable quantum field theories. We work in the continuum, transforming the standard Casimir sum over modes into a sum over bound states and an integral over scattering states weighted by the density of states. We express the density of states in terms of phase shifts, allowing us to extract divergences by identifying Born approximations to the phase shifts with low order Feynman diagrams. Once isolated in Feynman diagrams, the divergences are canceled against standard counterterms. Thus regulated, the Casimir sum is highly convergent and amenable to numerical computation. Our methods have numerous applications to the theory of solitons, membranes, and quantum field theories in strong external fields or subject to boundary conditions.

  1. Casimir Effects in Renormalizable Quantum Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Noah; Jaffe, Robert L.; Weigel, Herbert

    We present a framework for the study of one-loop quantum corrections to extended field configurations in renormalizable quantum field theories. We work in the continuum, transforming the standard Casimir sum over modes into a sum over bound states and an integral over scattering states weighted by the density of states. We express the density of states in terms of phase shifts, allowing us to extract divergences by identifying Born approximations to the phase shifts with low order Feynman diagrams. Once isolated in Feynman diagrams, the divergences are canceled against standard counterterms. Thus regulated, the Casimir sum is highly convergent and amenable to numerical computation. Our methods have numerous applications to the theory of solitons, membranes, and quantum field theories in strong external fields or subject to boundary conditions.

  2. Reliable Quantum Computers

    CERN Document Server

    Preskill, J

    1997-01-01

    The new field of quantum error correction has developed spectacularly since its origin less than two years ago. Encoded quantum information can be protected from errors that arise due to uncontrolled interactions with the environment. Recovery from errors can work effectively even if occasional mistakes occur during the recovery procedure. Furthermore, encoded quantum information can be processed without serious propagation of errors. Hence, an arbitrarily long quantum computation can be performed reliably, provided that the average probability of error per quantum gate is less than a certain critical value, the accuracy threshold. A quantum computer storing about 10^6 qubits, with a probability of error per quantum gate of order 10^{-6}, would be a formidable factoring engine. Even a smaller, less accurate quantum computer would be able to perform many useful tasks. (This paper is based on a talk presented at the ITP Conference on Quantum Coherence and Decoherence, 15-18 December 1996.)

  3. Quantum and Classical Effects in the Two-Frequency Kicked Rotor with Variable Initial Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Mullins, T G; Sadgrove, M P; Hoogerland, M D; Parkins, A S; Leonhardt, R

    2004-01-01

    We present an investigation into effects exhibited by the two-frequency kicked rotor. Experiments were performed and in addition quantum and classical dynamics were simulated and compared with the experimental results. The experiments involved pulsing the optical standing wave with two pulsing periods of differing frequencies and variable initial phase offset. The ratio of pulsing periods was sampled for rational and irrational values for different experimental runs. In this paper we present these results and examine the measured momentum distributions for the cause of any structures that are seen in the energy as the initial phase offset is changed. Irrational ratios exhibit no significant quantum effects, whereas rational ratios show dynamical localisation (DL) for certain values of the initial phase. However, most of the observed structure is found to be due to classical effects, in particular KAM boundaries, and is therefore not of uniquely quantum origin.

  4. Anode distance effect on field electron emission from carbon nanotubes: a molecular/quantum mechanical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chunshan; Wang, Weiliang; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Li, Zhibing; Chen, Guihua; Peng, Jie

    2009-06-25

    Field electron emission from single-walled (5,5) carbon nanotubes was simulated with a quantum chemistry method, emphasizing the effect of distance between the anode and apex. The emission probability and the field enhancement factor were obtained for different anode-apex separations with two representative applied macroscopic fields. The quantum chemistry simulation was compared to the classical finite element calculation. It was found that the field enhancement factor was overestimated by about a factor 2 in the classical calculation (for the capped carbon nanotube). The effective work function lowering due to the field penetration into the apex has important contribution to the emission probability. A peculiar decrease of the effective work function with the anode-apex separation was found for the capped carbon nanotube, and its quantum mechanical origin is discussed.

  5. Magnetocaloric effect in quantum spin-s chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Honecker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We compute the entropy of antiferromagnetic quantum spin-s chains in an external magnetic field using exact diagonalization and Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The magnetocaloric effect, i. e., temperature variations during adiabatic field changes, can be derived from the isentropes. First, we focus on the example of the spin-s=1 chain and show that one can cool by closing the Haldane gap with a magnetic field. We then move to quantum spin-s chains and demonstrate linear scaling with s close to the saturation field. In passing, we propose a new method to compute many low-lying excited states using the Lanczos recursion.

  6. Effective horizons for quantum communication in a Schwarzschild spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Hosler, Dominic; Kok, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Communication between a free-falling observer and an observer hovering above the Schwarzschild horizon of a black hole suffers from Unruh-Hawking noise, which degrades communication channel capacities. Ignoring time dilation, which affects all channels equally, we show that for bosonic communication using single and dual rail encoding the classical channel capacity reaches a finite value and the quantum channel capacity falls off exponentially. The latter defines an effective horizon, beyond which quantum communication becomes exponentially resource inefficient. The characteristic length scale associated with this quantum horizon depends on the mass of the black hole and the frequency of the communication channel.

  7. General relativistic effects in quantum interference of “clocks”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zych, M.; Pikovski, I.; Costa, F.; Brukner, Č.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics and general relativity have been each successfully tested in numerous experiments. However, the regime where both theories are jointly required to explain physical phenomena remains untested by laboratory experiments, and is also not fully understood by theory. This contribution reviews recent ideas for a new type of experiments: quantum interference of “clocks”, which aim to test novel quantum effects that arise from time dilation. “Clock” interference experiments could be realised with atoms or photons in near future laboratory experiments.

  8. Topological Effects on Quantum Phase Slips in Superfluid Spin Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically investigate effects of quantum fluctuations on superfluid spin transport through easy-plane quantum antiferromagnetic spin chains in the large-spin limit. Quantum fluctuations result in the decaying spin supercurrent by unwinding the magnetic order parameter within the easy plane, which is referred to as phase slips. We show that the topological term in the nonlinear sigma model for the spin chains qualitatively differentiates the decaying rate of the spin supercurrent between the integer versus half-odd-integer spin chains. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which the dependence of the decaying rate on constituent spins can be verified by measuring the nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  9. Quantum Effects of Mesoscopic Inductance and Capacity Coupling Circuits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Xin; AN Zhan-Yuan; SONG Yong-Hua

    2006-01-01

    Using the quantum theory for a mesoscopic circuit based on the discretenes of electric charges, the finitedifference Schrodinger equation of the non-dissipative mesoscopic inductance and capacity coupling circuit is achieved.The Coulomb blockade effect, which is caused by the discreteness of electric charges, is studied. Appropriately choose the components in the circuits, the finite-difference Schrodinger equation can be divided into two Mathieu equations in p representation. With the WKBJ method, the currents quantum fluctuations in the ground states of the two circuits are calculated. The results show that the currents quantum zero-point fluctuations of the two circuits are exist and correlated.

  10. Exchange effects in magnetized quantum plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Trukhanova, Mariya Iv

    2015-01-01

    We apply the many-particle quantum hydrodynamics including the Coulomb exchange interaction to magnetized quantum plasmas. We consider a number of wave phenomenon under influence of the Coulomb exchange interaction. Since the Coulomb exchange interaction affects longitudinal and transverse-longitudinal waves we focus our attention to the Langmuir waves, Trivelpiece-Gould waves, ion-acoustic waves in non-isothermal magnetized plasmas, the dispersion of the longitudinal low-frequency ion-acoustic waves and low-frequencies electromagnetic waves at $T_{e}\\gg T_{i}$ . We obtained the numerical simulation of the dispersion properties of different types of waves.

  11. Quantum-Confinement Effects on Binding Energies and Optical Properties of Excitons in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘晖

    2004-01-01

    Quantum-confinement effects on the binding energy and the linear optical susceptibility of excitons in quantum dots are studied. It is found that the binding energy and the linear optical susceptibility are sensitive to the barrier height and the dot size. For an infinite barrier, the binding energy of excitons decreases monotonically with the increasing dot radius, and the absorption intensity has almost the same amplitude with the increasing photon energy. For a finite barrier, the binding energy has a maximum value with the increasing dot radius, and the absorption intensity damps rapidly with the increasing photon energy. The effective mass ratio is also found to have an influence on the binding energy. The results could be confirmed by future experiments on excitons in quantum dots.

  12. Thermal effects on photon-induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, M O; de Oliveira, E J R; Villas-Bôas, J M; Souza, F M

    2013-04-03

    We theoretically investigate laser induced quantum transport in a single quantum dot attached to electrical contacts. Our approach, based on a nonequilibrium Green function technique, allows us to include thermal effects on the photon-induced quantum transport and excitonic dynamics, enabling the study of non-Markovian effects. By solving a set of coupled integrodifferential equations, involving correlation and propagator functions, we obtain the photocurrent and the dot occupation as a function of time. Two distinct sources of decoherence, namely, incoherent tunneling and thermal fluctuations, are observed in the Rabi oscillations. As temperature increases, a thermally activated Pauli blockade results in a suppression of these oscillations. Additionally, the interplay between photon and thermally induced electron populations results in a switch of the current sign as time evolves and its stationary value can be maximized by tuning the laser intensity.

  13. Effective quantum gravity observables and locally covariant QFT

    CERN Document Server

    Rejzner, Kasia

    2016-01-01

    Perturbative algebraic quantum field theory (pAQFT) is a mathematically rigorous framework that allows to construct models of quantum field theories on a general class of Lorentzian manifolds. Recently this idea has been applied also to perturbative quantum gravity, treated as an effective theory. The difficulty was to find the right notion of observables that would in an appropriate sense be diffeomorphism invariant. In this article I will outline a general framework that allows to quantize theories with local symmetries (this includes infinitesimal diffeomorphism transformations) with the use of the BV (Batalin-Vilkovisky) formalism. This approach has been successfully applied to effective quantum gravity in a recent paper by R. Brunetti, K. Fredenhagen and myself. In the same paper we also proved perturbative background independence of the quantized theory, which is going to be discussed in the present work as well.

  14. Hall effect in quantum critical charge-cluster glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Bollinger, Anthony T; Sun, Yujie; Božović, Ivan

    2016-04-19

    Upon doping, cuprates undergo a quantum phase transition from an insulator to a d-wave superconductor. The nature of this transition and of the insulating state is vividly debated. Here, we study the Hall effect in La2-xSrxCuO4(LSCO) samples doped near the quantum critical point atx∼ 0.06. Dramatic fluctuations in the Hall resistance appear belowTCG∼ 1.5 K and increase as the sample is cooled down further, signaling quantum critical behavior. We explore the doping dependence of this effect in detail, by studying a combinatorial LSCO library in which the Sr content is varied in extremely fine steps,Δx∼ 0.00008. We observe that quantum charge fluctuations wash out when superconductivity emerges but can be restored when the latter is suppressed by applying a magnetic field, showing that the two instabilities compete for the ground state.

  15. Quantum Gravity Effects in Scalar, Vector and Tensor Field Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anindita

    Quantum theory of gravity deals with the physics of the gravitational field at Planck length scale (10-35 m). Even though it is experimentally hard to reach the Planck length scale, on can look for evidence of quantum gravity that is detectable in astrophysics. In this thesis, we try to find effects of loop quantum gravity corrections on observable phenomena. We show that the quantum fluctuation strain for LIGO data would be 10 -125 on the Earth. Th correction is, however, substantial near the black hole horizon. We discuss the effect of this for scalar field propagation followed by vector and tensor fields. For the scalar field, the correction introduces a new asymmetry; for the vector field, we found a new perturbation solution and for the tensor field, we found the corrected Einstein equations which are yet to solve. These will affect phenomena like Hawking radiation, black hole entropy and gravitational waves.

  16. Piezo-Phototronic Effect in a Quantum Well Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Du, Chunhua; Zhou, Yongli; Jiang, Chunyan; Pu, Xiong; Liu, Wei; Hu, Weiguo; Chen, Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-05-24

    With enhancements in the performance of optoelectronic devices, the field of piezo-phototronics has attracted much attention, and several theoretical works have been reported based on semiclassical models. At present, the feature size of optoelectronic devices are rapidly shrinking toward several tens of nanometers, which results in the quantum confinement effect. Starting from the basic piezoelectricity equation, Schrödinger equation, Poisson equation, and Fermi's golden rule, a self-consistent theoretical model is proposed to study the piezo-phototronic effect in the framework of perturbation theory in quantum mechanics. The validity and universality of this model are well-proven with photoluminescence measurements in a single GaN/InGaN quantum well and multiple GaN/InGaN quantum wells. This study provides important insight into the working principle of nanoscale piezo-phototronic devices as well as guidance for the future device design.

  17. Spacetime effects on satellite-based quantum communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Ralph, Timothy C.; Fuentes, Ivette; Jennewein, Thomas; Razavi, Mohsen

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the consequences of space-time being curved on space-based quantum communication protocols. We analyze tasks that require either the exchange of single photons in a certain entanglement distribution protocol or beams of light in a continuous-variable quantum key distribution scheme. We find that gravity affects the propagation of photons, therefore adding additional noise to the channel for the transmission of information. The effects could be measured with current technology.

  18. Noninertial effects on nonrelativistic topological quantum scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, H. F.; Bakke, K.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate noninertial effects on the scattering problem of a nonrelativistic particle in the cosmic string spacetime. By considering the nonrelativistic limit of the Dirac equation we are able to show, in the regime of small rotational frequencies, that the phase shift has two contribution: one related to the noninertial reference frame, and the other, due to the cosmic string conical topology. We also show that both the incident wave and the scattering amplitude are altered as a consequence of the noninertial reference frame and depend on the rotational frequency.

  19. Quantum entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjiivanov, Ludmil

    2015-01-01

    Expository paper providing a historical survey of the gradual transformation of the "philosophical discussions" between Bohr, Einstein and Schr\\"odinger on foundational issues in quantum mechanics into a quantitative prediction of a new quantum effect, its experimental verification and its proposed (and loudly advertised) applications. The basic idea of the 1935 paper of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) was reformulated by David Bohm for a finite dimensional spin system. This allowed John Bell to derive his inequalities that separate the prediction of quantum entanglement from its possible classical interpretation. We reproduce here their later (1971) version, reviewing on the way the generalization (and mathematical derivation) of Heisenberg's uncertainty relations (due to Weyl and Schr\\"odinger) needed for the passage from EPR to Bell. We also provide an improved derivation of the quantum theoretic violation of Bell's inequalities. Soon after the experimental confirmation of the quantum entanglement (culminati...

  20. Proposed Quenching of Phonon-Induced Processes in Photoexcited Quantum Dots due to Electron-Hole Asymmetries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders; Nielsen, Per Kær; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy of a single quantum dot. We also investigate the implications for cavity QED, i.e., a coupled quantum dot-cavity system, and demonstrate that the phonon scattering may be strongly quenched. The quenching is explained by a balancing between the deformation potential...

  1. Effects on vegetable seeds due to non ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acri, G.; Oliva, A.; Falcone, G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Fisica, Cosenza (Italy); Acri, G.; Testagrossa, B.; Vermiglio, G.; Tripepi, M.G. [Universita della Calabria, Dipt. di Ecologia, Cosenza (Italy); Bitonti, M.B.; Chiappetta, A. [Universita di Messina, Dipt. di Protezionistica Ambientale, Sanitaria, Sociale ed Industriale, Messina (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Based on the tightly relationship between light and plants growth and development, the present work aims to obtain some further insight into the effects of non ionizing radiation the photo-autotrophic organisms, due to the relevant implications for both scientific knowledge and economical and social effects. In this context, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the influence of a long-lasting exposition to both RF at 1850 MHz and polarized light source on roots elongation of corn kernels. The radical apparatus was chosen as a sensible parameter and the elongation of the roots was monitored as a function of time. Mitotic index and length of meta-xylem cells were estimated in root apex as an index of cell proliferation and cell expansion activity, respectively. (N.C.)

  2. Quantum dissipative effects in graphene-like mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Fosco, C D; Mazzitelli, F D; Remaggi, M L

    2013-01-01

    We study quantum dissipative effects due to the accelerated motion of a single, imperfect, zero-width mirror. It is assumed that the microscopic degrees of freedom on the mirror are confined to it, like in plasma or graphene sheets. Therefore, the mirror is described by a vacuum polarization tensor $\\Pi_{\\alpha\\beta}$ concentrated on a time-dependent surface. Under certain assumptions about the microscopic model for the mirror, we obtain a rather general expression for the Euclidean effective action, a functional of the time-dependent mirror's position, in terms of two invariants that characterize the tensor $\\Pi_{\\alpha\\beta}$. The final result can be written in terms of the TE and TM reflection coefficients of the mirror, with qualitatively different contributions coming from them. We apply that general expression to derive the imaginary part of the `in-out' effective action, which measures dissipative effects induced by the mirror's motion, in different models, in particular for an accelerated graphene she...

  3. Quantum-Confined Stark Effects in a Single GaN Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong-Hui; WANG Xue-Feng; LI Shu-Shen

    2008-01-01

    Using analytical expressions for the polarization field in GaN quantum dot, and an approximation by separating the potential into a radial and an axial, we investigate theoretically the quantum-confined Stark effects. The electron and hole energy levels and optical transition energies are calculated in the presence of an electric field in different directions. The results show that the electron and hole energy levels and the optical transition energies can cause redshifts for the lateral electric field and blueshifts for the vertical field. The rotational direction of electric field can also change the energy shift.

  4. Quantum-Confined Stark Effect in Ensemble of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-Bing; ZHANG Hui-Chao; ZHANG Jia-Yu; Huaipeng Su; Y.Andrew Wang

    2010-01-01

    @@ The presence of a strong,changing,randomly-oriented,local electric field,which is induced by the photo-ionization that occurs universally in colloidal semiconductor quantum dots(QDs),makes it difficult to observe the quantumconfined Stark effect in ensemble of colloidal QDs.We propose a way to inhibit such a random electric field,and a clear quantum-confined Stark shift is observed directly in close-packed colloidal QDs.Besides the applications in optical switches and modulators,our experimental results indicate how the oscillator strengths of the optical transitions are changed under external electric fields.

  5. Uncertainty Relations and Quantum Effects of Constraints in Chern-Simons Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, M

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that Chern-Simons Theories are in the constrained systems and their total Hamiltonians become identically zero, because of their gauge invariance. While treating the constraints quantum mechanially, it will be expected taht there remain the quantum fluctuations due to the uncertainty principle. Using the projection operator method (POM) and the theory of dynamical constraints, such fluctuation terms are systematically derived in the case of Abelian Chern-Simons theory. It is shown that these terms produce the effective mass in the complex scalar fields coupled to the CS fields.

  6. Computer simulation of quantum effects in Tavis-Cummings model and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhigov, Yuri I.; Skovoroda, Nikita A.; Ladunov, Vitalii Y.

    2016-12-01

    We describe computer methods of simulation of Tavis-Cummings based quantum models, and apply those methods to specific tasks, conductivity measurements of atomic excitations in short chains of optical cavities with two-level atoms, C-Sign optical model, and dark states. For the conductivity measurements, we reproduce the dephasing assisted transport and quantum bottleneck effects and show their relation, and study the "which way?" problem. For the C-Sign optical model, we use the model to find optimal parameters of the system to minimize the error. For dark states, we study their collapse due to dephasing noise.

  7. The quantum Goldilocks effect: on the convergence of timescales in quantum transport

    CERN Document Server

    Lloyd, Seth; Shabani, Alireza; Rabitz, Herschel

    2011-01-01

    Excitonic transport in photosynthesis exhibits a wide range of time scales. Absorption and initial relaxation takes place over tens of femtoseconds. Excitonic lifetimes are on the order of a nanosecond. Hopping rates, energy differences between chromophores, reorganization energies, and decoherence rates correspond to time scales on the order of picoseconds. The functional nature of the divergence of time scales is easily understood: strong coupling to the electromagnetic field over a broad band of frequencies yields rapid absorption, while long excitonic lifetimes increase the amount of energy that makes its way to the reaction center to be converted to chemical energy. The convergence of the remaining time scales to the centerpoint of the overall temporal range is harder to understand. In this paper we argue that the convergence of timescales in photosynthesis can be understood as an example of the `quantum Goldilocks effect': natural selection tends to drive quantum systems to the degree of quantum coheren...

  8. Singularity free gravitational collapse in an effective dynamical quantum spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, R., E-mail: ramon.torres-herrera@upc.edu; Fayos, F., E-mail: f.fayos@upc.edu

    2014-06-02

    We model the gravitational collapse of heavy massive shells including its main quantum corrections. Among these corrections, quantum improvements coming from Quantum Einstein Gravity are taken into account, which provides us with an effective quantum spacetime. Likewise, we consider dynamical Hawking radiation by modeling its back-reaction once the horizons have been generated. Our results point towards a picture of gravitational collapse in which the collapsing shell reaches a minimum non-zero radius (whose value depends on the shell initial conditions) with its mass only slightly reduced. Then, there is always a rebound after which most (or all) of the mass evaporates in the form of Hawking radiation. Since the mass never concentrates in a single point, no singularity appears.

  9. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2016-07-27

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the lights polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity αyx = 0 at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with αyx = e2/2h. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at (±1/2,±3/2,±5/2, ...)e2/h. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK.

  10. Unconventional quantum Hall effect in Floquet topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, M; Vasilopoulos, P; Schwingenschlögl, U

    2016-09-28

    We study an unconventional quantum Hall effect for the surface states of ultrathin Floquet topological insulators in a perpendicular magnetic field. The resulting band structure is modified by photon dressing and the topological property is governed by the low-energy dynamics of a single surface. An exchange of symmetric and antisymmetric surface states occurs by reversing the light's polarization. We find a novel quantum Hall state in which the zeroth Landau level undergoes a phase transition from a trivial insulator state, with Hall conductivity [Formula: see text] at zero Fermi energy, to a Hall insulator state with [Formula: see text]. These findings open new possibilities for experimentally realizing nontrivial quantum states and unusual quantum Hall plateaus at [Formula: see text].

  11. Nonlinear Quantum Hall effects in Rarita-Schwinger gas

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Xi; Wan, Xiangang; Yu, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of higher spin relativistic fermionic materials becomes a new favorite in the study of condensed matter physics. Massive Rarita-Schwinger 3/2-spinor was known owning very exotic properties, such as the superluminal fermionic modes and even being unstable in an external magnetic field. Due to the superluminal modes and the non-trivial constraints on the Rarita-Schwinger gas, we exposit anomalous properties of the Hall effects in (2+1)-dimensions which subvert the well-known quantum Hall paradigms. First, the Hall conductance of a pure Rarita-Schwinger gas is step-like but not plateau-quantized, instead of the linear dependence on the filling factor for a pure spin-1/2 Dirac gas. In reality, the Hall conductance of the Dirac gas is of quantized integer plateaus with the unit $\\frac{e^2}h$ due to the localization away from the Landau level centers. If the general localization rule is applicable to the disordered Rarita-Schwinger gas, the Hall plateaus are also expected to appear but they are nonlinearl...

  12. Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics: The effect of polydispersity

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2012-02-08

    The size-effect tunability of colloidal quantum dots enables facile engineering of the bandgap at the time of nanoparticle synthesis. The dependence of effective bandgap on nanoparticle size also presents a challenge if the size dispersion, hence bandgap variability, is not well-controlled within a given quantum dot solid. The impact of this polydispersity is well-studied in luminescent devices as well as in unipolar electronic transport; however, the requirements on monodispersity have yet to be quantified in photovoltaics. Here we carry out a series of combined experimental and model-based studies aimed at clarifying, and quantifying, the importance of quantum dot monodispersity in photovoltaics. We successfully predict, using a simple model, the dependence of both open-circuit voltage and photoluminescence behavior on the density of small-bandgap (large-diameter) quantum dot inclusions. The model requires inclusion of trap states to explain the experimental data quantitatively. We then explore using this same experimentally tested model the implications of a broadened quantum dot population on device performance. We report that present-day colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic devices with typical inhomogeneous linewidths of 100-150 meV are dominated by surface traps, and it is for this reason that they see marginal benefit from reduction in polydispersity. Upon eliminating surface traps, achieving inhomogeneous broadening of 50 meV or less will lead to device performance that sees very little deleterious impact from polydispersity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Kondo effect in triple quantum dots: interplay between continuous and discrete symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, K. [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel)]. E-mail: kikoin@bgumail.bgu.ac.il; Kuzmenko, T. [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel); Avishai, Y. [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel); Ilse Kats Center for Nano-Technology, Ben-Gurion University, Beer-Sheva, 84105 (Israel)

    2006-05-01

    The physics of Kondo effect and related phenomena in a triangular triple quantum dot (TTQD) is studied. A fascinating property of TTQD is the interplay between continuous SU(2) symmetry in spin space and discrete C{sub 3v} symmetry in real space. We show that this interplay is manifested in strong oscillations of conductance as a function of magnetic flux through TTQD due to interplay between Kondo and Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  14. The Geometry of Quantum Hall Effect: An Effective Action for all Dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Karabali, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    We present a general formula for the topological part of the effective action for quantum Hall systems in higher dimensions, including fluctuations of the gauge field and metric around background fields of a specified topological class. The result is based on a procedure of integrating up from the Dolbeault index density which applies for the degeneracies of Landau levels, combined with some input from the standard descent procedure for anomalies. Features of the topological action in (2+1), (4+1), (6+1) dimensions, including the contribution due to gravitational anomalies, are discussed in some detail.

  15. Peltier effect in strongly driven quantum wires

    OpenAIRE

    Mierzejewski, M.; Crivelli, D.; Prelovsek, P.

    2013-01-01

    We study a microscopic model of a thermocouple device with two connected correlated quantum wires driven by a constant electric field. In such isolated system we follow the time-- and position--dependence of the entropy density using the concept of the reduced density matrix. At weak driving, the initial changes of the entropy at the junctions can be described by the linear Peltier response. At longer times the quasiequilibrium situation is reached with well defined local temperatures which i...

  16. Highly efficient visual detection of trace copper(II) and protein by the quantum photoelectric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Lei, Jianping; Su, Mengqi; Liu, Yueting; Hao, Qing; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-09-17

    This work presented a photocurrent response mechanism of quantum dots (QDs) under illumination with the concept of a quantum photoelectric effect. Upon irradiation, the photoelectron could directly escape from QDs. By using nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) to capture the photoelectron, a new visual system was proposed due to the formation of an insoluble reduction product, purple formazan, which could be used to visualize the quantum photoelectric effect. The interaction of copper(II) with QDs could form trapping sites to interfere with the quantum confinement and thus blocked the escape of photoelectron, leading to a "signal off" visual method for sensitive copper(II) detection. Meanwhile, by using QDs as a signal tag to label antibody, a "signal on" visual method was also proposed for immunoassay of corresponding protein. With meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic-capped CdTe QDs and carcino-embryonic antigen as models, the proposed visual detection methods showed high sensitivity, low detection limit, and wide detectable concentration ranges. The visualization of quantum photoelectric effect could be simply extended for the detection of other targets. This work opens a new visual detection way and provides a highly efficient tool for bioanalysis.

  17. 8 π -periodic dissipationless ac Josephson effect on a quantum spin Hall edge via a quantum magnetic impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Sau, Jay D.

    2017-01-01

    Time-reversal invariance places strong constraints on the properties of the quantum spin Hall edge. One such restriction is the inevitability of dissipation in a Josephson junction between two superconductors formed on such an edge without the presence of interaction. Interactions and spin-conservation breaking are key ingredients for the realization of the dissipationless ac Josephson effect on such quantum spin Hall edges. We present a simple quantum impurity model that allows us to create a dissipationless fractional Josephson effect on a quantum spin Hall edge. We then use this model to substantiate a general argument that shows that any such nondissipative Josephson effect must necessarily be 8 π periodic.

  18. Effects of quantum space time foam in the neutrino sector

    CERN Document Server

    Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, H V; Sarkar, U

    2000-01-01

    We discuss violations of CPT and quantum mechanics due to interactions of neutrinos with space-time quantum foam. Neutrinoless double beta decay and oscillations of neutrinos from astrophysical sources (supernovae, active galactic nuclei) are analysed. It is found that the propagation distance is the crucial quantity entering any bounds on EHNS parameters. Thus, while the bounds from neutrinoless double beta decay are not significant, the data of the supernova 1987a imply a bound being several orders of magnitude more stringent than the ones known from the literature. Even more stringent limits may be obtained from the investigation of neutrino oscillations from active galactic nuclei sources, which have an impressive potential for the search of quantum foam interactions in the neutrino sector.

  19. Thermal effects on quantum communication through spin chains

    CERN Document Server

    Bayat, A; Bayat, Abolfazl; Karimipour, Vahid

    2004-01-01

    We study the effect of thermal fluctuations in a recently proposed protocol for transmission of unknown quantum states through quantum spin chains. We develop a low temperature expansion for general spin chains. We then apply this formalism to study exactly thermal effects on short spin chains of four spins. We show that optimal times for extraction of output states are almost independent of the temperature which lowers only the fidelity of the channel. Moreover we show that thermal effects are smaller in the anti-ferromagnetic chains than the ferromagnetic ones.

  20. One-loop effective action in quantum gravitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rachwal, Leslaw; Codello, Alessandro; Percacci, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We present the formalism of computing one-loop effective action for Quantum Gravitation using non-local heat kernel methods. We found agreement with previous old results. In main part of my presentation I considered the system of E-H gravitation and scalar fields. We were able to derive non......-local quantum effective action up to the second order in heat kernel generalized curvatures. By going to flat spacetime expressions for gravitational form factors are possible to construct and compare with the results from effective field theory for gravity....

  1. Quantum effects in graphene monolayers: Path-integral simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations have been carried out to study the influence of quantum dynamics of carbon atoms on the properties of a single graphene layer. Finite-temperature properties were analyzed in the range from 12 to 2000 K, by using the LCBOPII effective potential. To assess the magnitude of quantum effects in structural and thermodynamic properties of graphene, classical molecular dynamics simulations have been also performed. Particular emphasis has been laid on the atomic vibrations along the out-of-plane direction. Even though quantum effects are present in these vibrational modes, we show that at any finite temperature classical-like motion dominates over quantum delocalization, provided that the system size is large enough. Vibrational modes display an appreciable anharmonicity, as derived from a comparison between kinetic and potential energies of the carbon atoms. Nuclear quantum effects are found to be appreciable in the interatomic distance and layer area at finite temperatures. The thermal expansion coefficient resulting from PIMD simulations vanishes in the zero-temperature limit, in agreement with the third law of thermodynamics.

  2. Focus on quantum effects and noise in biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, G. R.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2011-11-01

    The role of quantum mechanics in biological organisms has been a fundamental question of twentieth-century biology. It is only now, however, with modern experimental techniques, that it is possible to observe quantum mechanical effects in bio-molecular complexes directly. Indeed, recent experiments have provided evidence that quantum effects such as wave-like motion of excitonic energy flow, delocalization and entanglement can be seen even in complex and noisy biological environments (Engel et al 2007 Nature 446 782; Collini et al 2010 Nature 463 644; Panitchayangkoon et al 2010 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107 12766). Motivated by these observations, theoretical work has highlighted the importance of an interplay between environmental noise and quantum coherence in such systems (Mohseni et al 2008 J. Chem. Phys. 129 174106; Plenio and Huelga 2008 New J. Phys. 10 113019; Olaya-Castro et al 2008 Phys. Rev. B 78 085115; Rebentrost et al 2009 New J. Phys. 11 033003; Caruso et al 2009 J. Chem. Phys. 131 105106; Ishizaki and Fleming 2009 J. Chem. Phys. 130 234111). All of this has led to a surge of interest in the exploration of quantum effects in biological systems in order to understand the possible relevance of non-trivial quantum features and to establish a potential link between quantum coherence and biological function. These studies include not only exciton transfer across light harvesting complexes, but also the avian compass (Ritz et al 2000 Biophys. J. 78 707), and the olfactory system (Turin 1996 Chem. Sens. 21 773; Chin et al 2010 New J. Phys. 12 065002). These examples show that the full understanding of the dynamics at bio-molecular length (10 Å) and timescales (sub picosecond) in noisy biological systems can uncover novel phenomena and concepts and hence present a fertile ground for truly multidisciplinary research.

  3. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y3Fe5O12) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  4. Two mode photon bunching effect as witness of quantum criticality in circuit QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a scheme to probe critical phenomena at a quantum phase transition (QPT) using the quantum correlation of two photonic modes simultaneously coupled to a critical system. As an experimentally accessible physical implementation,a circuit QED system is formed by a capacitively coupled Josephson junction qubit array interacting with one superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR). It realizes an Ising chain in the transverse field (ICTF) which interacts with the two magnetic modes propagating in the TLR. We demonstrate that in the vicinity of criticality the originally independent fields tend to display photon bunching effects due to their interaction with the ICTF. Thus,the occurrence of the QPT is reflected by the quantum characteristics of the photonic fields.

  5. Two mode photon bunching effect as witness of quantum criticality in circuit QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI Qing; WANG YingDan; LONG GuiLu; SUN ChangPu

    2009-01-01

    We suggest a scheme to probe critical phenomena at a quantum phase transition (OPT) using the quantum correlation of two photonic modes simultaneously coupled to a critical system. As an experimentally accessible physical implementation, a circuit QED system is formed by a capsciUvely coupled Josephson junction qubit array interacting with one superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR). It realizes an Ising chain in the transverse field (ICTF) which interacts with the two magnetic modes propagating in the TLR. We demonstrate that in the vicinity of criticality the originally independent fields tend to display photon bunching effects due to their interaction with the ICTF. Thus,the occurrence of the QPT is reflected by the quantum characteristics of the photonic fields.

  6. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects.

  7. Quantum diffraction effects on the atomic polarization collision in partially ionized dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Young-Dae, E-mail: ydjung@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, MC 0407, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0407, USA and Department of Applied Physics and Department of Bionanotechnology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction on the electron-atom polarization collision process is investigated in partially ionized dense plasmas. The pseudopotential model and eikonal method are employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and atomic polarizability. The results show that the eikonal phase shift for the electron-hydrogen atom polarization collision decreases with an increase of the electron de Broglie wavelength. It is important to note that the influence of quantum diffraction produces the repulsive part in the electron-atom polarization interaction. It is also found that the quantum diffraction effect enhances the differential eikonal cross section. Additionally, the total eikonal cross section decreases with increasing electron de Broglie wavelength. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the influence of finite size of the de Broglie wavelength and Debye radius are also discussed.

  8. Spin-current Seebeck effect in quantum dot systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Cheng; Sun, Qing-Feng; Xie, X C

    2014-01-29

    We first bring up the concept of the spin-current Seebeck effect based on a recent experiment (Vera-Marun et al 2012 Nature Phys. 8 313), and investigate the spin-current Seebeck effect in quantum dot (QD) systems. Our results show that the spin-current Seebeck coefficient S is sensitive to different polarization states of the QD, and therefore can be used to detect the polarization state of the QD and monitor the transitions between different polarization states of the QD. The intradot Coulomb interaction can greatly enhance S due to the stronger polarization of the QD. By using the parameters for a typical QD whose intradot Coulomb interaction U is one order of magnitude larger than the linewidth Γ, we demonstrate that the maximum value of S can be enhanced by a factor of 80. On the other hand, for a QD whose Coulomb interaction is negligible, we show that one can still obtain a large S by applying an external magnetic field.

  9. Robust quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Chengxi; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2016-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of robust intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that RuI3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ~360 K using Monte-Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most of two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our wor...

  10. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic transition metal halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengxi; Zhou, Jian; Wu, Haiping; Deng, Kaiming; Jena, Puru; Kan, Erjun

    2017-01-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is a novel topological spintronic phenomenon arising from inherent magnetization and spin-orbit coupling. Various theoretical and experimental efforts have been devoted in search of intrinsic QAH insulators. However, up to now, it has only been observed in Cr or V doped (Bi,Sb ) 2T e3 film in experiments with very low working temperature. Based on the successful synthesis of transition metal halides, we use first-principles calculations to predict that the Ru I3 monolayer is an intrinsic ferromagnetic QAH insulator with a topologically nontrivial global band gap of 11 meV. This topologically nontrivial band gap at the Fermi level is due to its crystal symmetry, thus the QAH effect is robust. Its Curie temperature, estimated to be ˜360 K using Monte Carlo simulation, is above room temperature and higher than most two-dimensional ferromagnetic thin films. The inclusion of Hubbard U in the Ru-d electrons does not affect this result. We also discuss the manipulation of its exchange energy and nontrivial band gap by applying in-plane strain. Our work adds an experimentally feasible member to the QAH insulator family, which is expected to have broad applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  11. Influence of non-resonant effects on the dynamics of quantum logic gates at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, G. P.; Bishop, A. R.; Doolen, G. D.; López, G. V.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2001-01-01

    We study numerically the influence of non-resonant effects on the dynamics of a single- π-pulse quantum CONTROL-NOT (CN) gate in a macroscopic ensemble of four-spin molecules at room temperature. The four nuclear spins in each molecule represent a four-qubit register. The qubits are “labeled” by the characteristic frequencies, ωk, ( k=0-3) due to the Zeeman interaction of the nuclear spins with the magnetic field. The qubits interact with each other through an Ising interaction of strength J. The paper examines the feasibility of implementing a single-pulse quantum CN gate in an ensemble of quantum molecules at room temperature. We determine a parameter region, ωk and J, in which a single-pulse quantum CN gate can be implemented at room temperature. We also show that there exist characteristic critical values of parameters, Δ ωcr≡| ωk‧ - ωk| cr and Jcr, such that for JJcr and Δ ωk≡| ωk‧ - ωk|<Δ ωcr, non-resonant effects are sufficient to destroy the dynamics required for quantum logic operations.

  12. Quantum Feynman Ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ketan; Kawai, Ryoichi

    As nanotechnology advances, understanding of the thermodynamic properties of small systems becomes increasingly important. Such systems are found throughout physics, biology, and chemistry manifesting striking properties that are a direct result of their small dimensions where fluctuations become predominant. The standard theory of thermodynamics for macroscopic systems is powerless for such ever fluctuating systems. Furthermore, as small systems are inherently quantum mechanical, influence of quantum effects such as discreteness and quantum entanglement on their thermodynamic properties is of great interest. In particular, the quantum fluctuations due to quantum uncertainty principles may play a significant role. In this talk, we investigate thermodynamic properties of an autonomous quantum heat engine, resembling a quantum version of the Feynman Ratchet, in non-equilibrium condition based on the theory of open quantum systems. The heat engine consists of multiple subsystems individually contacted to different thermal environments.

  13. Quantum chromodynamics effects in electroweak and Higgs physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Frank Petriello

    2012-10-01

    Several examples of the often intricate effects of higher-order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) corrections on predictions for hadron-collider observables, are discussed, using the production of electroweak gauge boson and the Standard Model Higgs boson as examples. Particular attention is given to the interplay of QCD effects and experimental cuts, and to the use of scale variations as estimates of theoretical uncertainties.

  14. Quantum vacuum effects from boundaries of designer potentials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konopka, T.J.

    2009-01-01

    Vacuum energy in quantum field theory, being the sum of zero-point energies of all field modes, is formally infinite but yet, after regularization or renormalization, can give rise to finite observable effects. One way of understanding how these effects arise is to compute the vacuum energy in an id

  15. Dynamical quantum Hall effect in the parameter space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsev, V; Polkovnikov, A

    2012-04-24

    Geometric phases in quantum mechanics play an extraordinary role in broadening our understanding of fundamental significance of geometry in nature. One of the best known examples is the Berry phase [M.V. Berry (1984), Proc. Royal. Soc. London A, 392:45], which naturally emerges in quantum adiabatic evolution. So far the applicability and measurements of the Berry phase were mostly limited to systems of weakly interacting quasi-particles, where interference experiments are feasible. Here we show how one can go beyond this limitation and observe the Berry curvature, and hence the Berry phase, in generic systems as a nonadiabatic response of physical observables to the rate of change of an external parameter. These results can be interpreted as a dynamical quantum Hall effect in a parameter space. The conventional quantum Hall effect is a particular example of the general relation if one views the electric field as a rate of change of the vector potential. We illustrate our findings by analyzing the response of interacting spin chains to a rotating magnetic field. We observe the quantization of this response, which we term the rotational quantum Hall effect.

  16. Photoluminescence study of the effect of strain compensation on InAs/AlAsSb quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhexin; Laghumavarapu, Ramesh B.; Simmonds, Paul J.; Ji, Haiming; Liang, Baolai; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate stacked structures of InAs/AlAsSb/InP quantum dots using temperature- and power-dependent photoluminescence. The band gap of InAs/AlAsSb QDs is 0.73 eV at room temperature, which is close to the ideal case for intermediate band solar cells. As the number of quantum dot layers is increased, the photoluminescence undergoes a blue-shift due to the effects of accumulated compressive strain. This PL red shift can be counteracted using thin layers of AlAs to compensate the strain. We also derive thermal activation energies for this exotic quantum dot system.

  17. Quantum dissipative chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T A

    1993-01-01

    Using the decoherence formalism of Gell-Mann and Hartle, a quantum system is found which is the equivalent of the classical chaotic Duffing oscillator. The similarities and the differences from the classical oscillator are examined; in particular, a new concept of quantum maps is introduced, and alterations in the classical strange attractor due to the presence of scale- dependent quantum effects are studied. Classical quantities such as the Lyapunov exponents and fractal dimension are examined, and quantum analogs are suggested. These results are generalized into a framework for quantum dissipative chaos, and there is a brief discussion of other work in this area.

  18. Analysis of the quantum Zeno effect for quantum control and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Dominy, Jason M; Rezakhani, A T; Lidar, D A

    2012-01-01

    Within quantum information, many methods have been proposed to avoid or correct the deleterious effects of the environment on a system of interest. In this work, expanding on our earlier paper [G. A. Paz-Silva et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 080501 (2012), arXiv:1104.5507], we evaluate the applicability of the quantum Zeno effect as one such method. Using the algebraic structure of stabilizer quantum error correction codes as a unifying framework, two open-loop protocols are described which involve frequent non-projective (i.e., weak) measurement of either the full stabilizer group or a minimal generating set thereof. The effectiveness of the protocols is measured by the distance between the final state under the protocol and the final state of an idealized evolution in which system and environment do not interact. Rigorous bounds on this metric are derived which demonstrate that, under certain assumptions, a Zeno effect may be realized with arbitrarily weak measurements, and that this effect can protect an arb...

  19. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil;

    2011-01-01

    In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal.......In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal....

  20. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil

    2011-01-01

    In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal.......In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electroabsorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by electric field of a THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth. Temporal features as fast as 460 fs were encoded onto an optical probe signal....

  1. Proton Conductivity in Phosphoric Acid: The Role of Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heres, M.; Wang, Y.; Griffin, P. J.; Gainaru, C.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2016-10-01

    Phosphoric acid has one of the highest intrinsic proton conductivities of any known liquids, and the mechanism of this exceptional conductivity remains a puzzle. Our detailed experimental studies discovered a strong isotope effect in the conductivity of phosphoric acids caused by (i) a strong isotope shift of the glass transition temperature and (ii) a significant reduction of the energy barrier by zero-point quantum fluctuations. These results suggest that the high conductivity in phosphoric acids is caused by a very efficient proton transfer mechanism, which is strongly assisted by quantum effects.

  2. Biological effects due to weak magnetic fields on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N.

    In the evolution process, living organisms have experienced the action of the Earth's magnetic field (MF) that is a natural component of our environment. It is known that a galactic MF induction does not exceed 0.1 nT, since investigations of weak magnetic field (WMF) effects on biological systems have attracted attention of biologists due to planning long-term space flights to other planets where the magnetizing force is near 10-5 Oe. However, the role of WMF and its influence on organisms' functioning are still insufficiently investigated. A large number of experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in WMF has found that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during the early terms of germination in comparison with control. The proliferation activity and cell reproduction are reduced in meristem of plant roots under WMF application. The prolongation of total cell reproductive cycle is registered due to the expansion of G phase in1 different plant species as well as of G phase in flax and lentil roots along with2 relative stability of time parameters of other phases of cell cycle. In plant cells exposed to WMF, the decrease in functional activity of genome at early prereplicate period is shown. WMF causes the intensification in the processes of proteins' synthesis and break-up in plant roots. Qualitative and quantitative changes in protein spectrum in growing and differentiated cells of plant roots exposed to WMF are revealed. At ultrastructural level, there are observed such ultrastructural peculiarities as changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells of pea roots exposed to WMF. Mitochondria are the most sensitive organelle to WMF application: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix is electron

  3. Effective and fundamental quantum fields at criticality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherer, Michael

    2010-10-28

    We employ Wetterich's approach to functional renormalization as a suitable method to investigate universal phenomena in non-perturbative quantum field theories both qualitatively and quantitatively. Therefore we derive and investigate flow equations for a class of chiral Yukawa models with and without gauge bosons and reveal fixed-point mechanisms. In four dimensions chiral Yukawa systems serve as toy models for the standard model Higgs sector and show signatures of asymptotically safe fixed points by a balancing of bosonic and fermionic contributions. In the approximations investigated this renders the theory fundamental and solves the triviality problem. Further, we obtain predictions for the Higgs mass and even for the top mass of our toy model. In three dimensions we compute the critical exponents which define new universality classes and provide benchmark values for systems of strongly correlated chiral fermions. In a Yukawa system of non-relativistic two-component fermions a fixed point dominates the renormalization flow giving rise to universality in the BCS-BEC crossover. We push the functional renormalization method to a quantitative level and we compute the critical temperature and the single-particle gap with a considerable precision for the whole crossover. Finally, we provide further evidence for the asymptotic safety scenario in quantum gravity by confirming the existence of an ultraviolet fixed point under inclusion of a curvature-ghost coupling. (orig.)

  4. One order enhancement of detectivity in quaternary capped InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetectors due to vertical coupling of quantum dot layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadi, Hemant; Agarwal, Akshay; Adhikary, Sourav; Agawane, Jay; Mandal, Arjun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Chakrabarti, Subhananda, E-mail: subho@ee.iitb.ac.in [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Pendyala, Naresh Babu; Prajapati, Sachin [Sensor Development Area, Space Applications Centre, ISRO, Ahmedabad 380015 (India)

    2014-09-01

    The spectral and electrical properties of vertically coupled quaternary (InAlGaAs) capped InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector with different capping thicknesses are investigated, and compared with a conventional quaternary capped uncoupled detector. Electronic coupling between quantum dot layers leads to a reduction in the ground state energy level and hence greater electronic confinement, which reduces the dark current and enhances the detectivity. These expectations are confirmed by our experimental results. Most significantly one order enhancement in peak detectivity (from 1.1 × 10{sup 9} cm Hz{sup 1/2}/W to 2.48 × 10{sup 10} cm Hz{sup 1/2}/W) is observed for optimized coupled quantum dot infrared photodetector compared to uncoupled device. The optimal interlayer barrier thickness which gives maximum detectivity is explained in terms of the interplay between electronic coupling and strain buildup in the heterostructure. - Highlights: • Coupled quaternary capped InAs/GaAs quantum dot detector was compared with uncoupled detector. • Photoluminescence spectra of coupled device exhibit multimodal peaks. • Peak detectivity value of coupled device is 2.48 × 10{sup 10} Jones. • Peak detectivity value of uncoupled device is 1.1 × 10{sup 9} Jones. • Enhanced detectivity observed for coupled detector compared with uncoupled device.

  5. Quantum gravity effects in Myers-Perry space-times

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2013-01-01

    We study quantum gravity effects for Myers-Perry black holes assuming that the leading contributions arise from the renormalization group evolution of Newton's coupling. Provided that gravity weakens following the asymptotic safety conjecture, we find that quantum effects lift a degeneracy of higher-dimensional black holes, and dominate over kinematical ones induced by rotation, particularly for small black hole mass, large angular momentum, and higher space-time dimensionality. Quantum-corrected space-times display inner and outer horizons, and show the existence of a black hole of smallest mass in any dimension. Ultra-spinning solutions no longer persist. Thermodynamic properties including temperature, specific heat, the Komar integrals, and aspects of black hole mechanics are studied as well. Observing a softening of the ring singularity, we also discuss the validity of classical energy conditions.

  6. Pseudorelativistic effects on solitons in quantum semiconductor plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunliang; Wang, Xiaodan; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2015-04-01

    A theory for nonlinear excitations in quantum plasmas is presented for narrow-gap semiconductors by considering the combined effects of quantum and pseudorelativity. The system is governed by a coupled Klein-Gordon equation for the collective wave functions of the conduction electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential. This gives a closed system, including the effects of charge separation, quantum tunneling, and pseudorelativity. By choosing the typical parameters of semiconductor InSb, the quasistationary soliton solution, which is a multipeaked dark soliton, is obtained numerically and shows depleted electron densities correlated with a localized potential. The dynamical simulation result shows that the dark soliton is stable and has a multipeaked profile, which is consistent with the quasistationary solution. The present model and results may be useful in understanding the nonlinear properties of semiconductor plasma on an ultrafast time scale.

  7. Pseudorelativistic effects on solitons in quantum semiconductor plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunliang; Wang, Xiaodan; Jiang, Xiangqian

    2015-04-01

    A theory for nonlinear excitations in quantum plasmas is presented for narrow-gap semiconductors by considering the combined effects of quantum and pseudorelativity. The system is governed by a coupled Klein-Gordon equation for the collective wave functions of the conduction electrons and Poisson's equation for the electrostatic potential. This gives a closed system, including the effects of charge separation, quantum tunneling, and pseudorelativity. By choosing the typical parameters of semiconductor InSb, the quasistationary soliton solution, which is a multipeaked dark soliton, is obtained numerically and shows depleted electron densities correlated with a localized potential. The dynamical simulation result shows that the dark soliton is stable and has a multipeaked profile, which is consistent with the quasistationary solution. The present model and results may be useful in understanding the nonlinear properties of semiconductor plasma on an ultrafast time scale.

  8. Random operators disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aizenman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the mathematical theory of disorder effects on quantum spectra and dynamics. Topics covered range from the basic theory of spectra and dynamics of self-adjoint operators through Anderson localization-presented here via the fractional moment method, up to recent results on resonant delocalization. The subject's multifaceted presentation is organized into seventeen chapters, each focused on either a specific mathematical topic or on a demonstration of the theory's relevance to physics, e.g., its implications for the quantum Hall effect. The mathematical chapters include general relations of quantum spectra and dynamics, ergodicity and its implications, methods for establishing spectral and dynamical localization regimes, applications and properties of the Green function, its relation to the eigenfunction correlator, fractional moments of Herglotz-Pick functions, the phase diagram for tree graph operators, resonant delocalization, the spectral statistics conjecture, and rela...

  9. Quantum gravity effects in Myers-Perry space-times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litim, Daniel F.; Nikolakopoulos, Konstantinos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex,Falmer Campus, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-03

    We study quantum gravity effects for Myers-Perry black holes assuming that the leading contributions arise from the renormalization group evolution of Newton’s coupling. Provided that gravity weakens following the asymptotic safety conjecture, we find that quantum effects lift a degeneracy of higher-dimensional black holes, and dominate over kinematical ones induced by rotation, particularly for small black hole mass, large angular momentum, and higher space-time dimensionality. Quantum-corrected space-times display inner and outer horizons, and show the existence of a black hole of smallest mass in any dimension. Ultra-spinning solutions no longer persist. Thermodynamic properties including temperature, specific heat, the Komar integrals, and aspects of black hole mechanics are studied as well. Observing a softening of the ring singularity, we also discuss the validity of classical energy conditions.

  10. High-temperature quantum kinetic effect in silicon nanosandwiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagraev, N. T.; Grigoryev, V. Yu.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Malyarenko, A. M.; Mashkov, V. A.; Romanov, V. V.; Rul, N. I.

    2017-01-01

    The negative-U impurity stripes confining the edge channels of semiconductor quantum wells are shown to allow the effective cooling inside in the process of the spin-dependent transport, with the reduction of the electron-electron interaction. The aforesaid promotes also the creation of composite bosons and fermions by the capture of single magnetic flux quanta on the edge channels under the conditions of low sheet density of carriers, thus opening new opportunities for the registration of the quantum kinetic phenomena in weak magnetic fields at high-temperatures up to the room temperature. As a certain version noted above we present the first findings of the high temperature de Haas-van Alphen, 300 K, quantum Hall, 77 K, effects as well as quantum conductance staircase in the silicon sandwich structure that represents the ultra-narrow, 2 nm, p-type quantum well (Si-QW) confined by the delta barriers heavily doped with boron on the n-type Si (100) surface.

  11. Effects of quantum coherence in metalloprotein electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorner, Ross; Goold, John; Heaney, Libby; Farrow, Tristan; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-09-01

    Many intramolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in biology are mediated by metal centers in proteins. This process is commonly described by a model of diffusive hopping according to the semiclassical theories of Marcus and Hopfield. However, recent studies have raised the possibility that nontrivial quantum mechanical effects play a functioning role in certain biomolecular processes. Here, we investigate the potential effects of quantum coherence in biological ET by extending the semiclassical model to allow for the possibility of quantum coherent phenomena using a quantum master equation based on the Holstein Hamiltonian. We test the model on the structurally defined chain of seven iron-sulfur clusters in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide plus hydrogen:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), a crucial respiratory enzyme and one of the longest chains of metal centers in biology. Using experimental parameters where possible, we find that, in limited circumstances, a small quantum mechanical contribution can provide a marked increase in the ET rate above the semiclassical diffusive-hopping rate. Under typical biological conditions, our model reduces to well-known diffusive behavior.

  12. Hydrostatic pressure effects on the state density and optical transitions in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindez-Ramirez, G; Perez-Merchancano, S T [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Cauca, calle 5 4-70, Popayan (Colombia); Paredes Gutierrez, H [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A. A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Gonzalez, J D, E-mail: jdavid0831@gmail.co [Grupo de Investigacion en teorIa de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Magdalena, A.A. 731, Santa Marta (Colombia)

    2010-09-01

    Using the effective mass approximation and variational method we have computed the effects of hydrostatic pressure on the absorption and photoluminescence spectra in spherical quantum dot GaAs-(Ga, Al) As, considering a finite confinement potential of this particular work we show the optical transitions in quantum of various sizes in the presence of hydrogenic impurities and hydrostatic pressure effects. Our first result describes the spectrum of optical absorption of 500 A QD for different values of hydrostatic pressure P = 0, 20 and 40 Kbar. The absorption peaks are sensitive to the displacement of the impurity center to the edge of the quantum dot and even more when the hydrostatic pressure changes in both cases showing that to the extent that these two effects are stronger quantum dots respond more efficiently. Also this result can be seen in the study of the photoluminescence spectrum as in the case of acceptor impurities consider them more efficiently capture carriers or electrons that pass from the conduction band to the valence band. Density states with randomly distributed impurity show that the additional peaks in the curves of the density of impurity states appear due to the presence of the additional hydrostatic pressure effects.

  13. The spin Hall effect in a quantum gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, M C; Williams, R A; Jiménez-García, K; LeBlanc, L J; Perry, A R; Spielman, I B

    2013-06-13

    Electronic properties such as current flow are generally independent of the electron's spin angular momentum, an internal degree of freedom possessed by quantum particles. The spin Hall effect, first proposed 40 years ago, is an unusual class of phenomena in which flowing particles experience orthogonally directed, spin-dependent forces--analogous to the conventional Lorentz force that gives the Hall effect, but opposite in sign for two spin states. Spin Hall effects have been observed for electrons flowing in spin-orbit-coupled materials such as GaAs and InGaAs (refs 2, 3) and for laser light traversing dielectric junctions. Here we observe the spin Hall effect in a quantum-degenerate Bose gas, and use the resulting spin-dependent Lorentz forces to realize a cold-atom spin transistor. By engineering a spatially inhomogeneous spin-orbit coupling field for our quantum gas, we explicitly introduce and measure the requisite spin-dependent Lorentz forces, finding them to be in excellent agreement with our calculations. This 'atomtronic' transistor behaves as a type of velocity-insensitive adiabatic spin selector, with potential application in devices such as magnetic or inertial sensors. In addition, such techniques for creating and measuring the spin Hall effect are clear prerequisites for engineering topological insulators and detecting their associated quantized spin Hall effects in quantum gases. As implemented, our system realizes a laser-actuated analogue to the archetypal semiconductor spintronic device, the Datta-Das spin transistor.

  14. Specific heat in the second Landau level fractional quantum Hall effect

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, B. A.; Bennaceur, K.; Gaucher, S.; Gervais, G.; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Specific heat has had an important role in the study of superfluidity and superconductivity, and could provide important information on the fractional quantum Hall effect as well. However, tra- ditional measurements of the specific heat of a two-dimensional electron gas are difficult due to the large background contribution of the phonon bath, even at very low temperatures. Here, we report measurements of the specific heat per electron of a single two-dimensional electron gas with no contribu...

  15. The effects of quantum gravity on some thermodynamical quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, A. D.; Shababi, H.; Nozari, K.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, using a deformed algebra [X,P] = iℏ/(1 - α2P2) which is originated from various theories of gravity, we study thermodynamical properties of the classical and extreme relativistic gases in canonical ensembles. In this regards, we exactly calculate the modified partition function, Helmholtz free energy, internal energy, entropy, heat capacity and the thermal pressure which conclude to the familiar form of the equation of state for the ideal gas. The advantage of applying this algebra is not only considering all natural cutoffs but also its structure is similar to the other effective quantum gravity models such as polymer, Snyder and noncommutative space-time frameworks. Moreover, after obtaining some thermodynamical quantities including internal energy and entropy, we conclude at high temperature limits due to the decreasing of the number of microstates, these quantities reach to maximal bounds which do not exist in standard cases and it concludes that at the presence of gravity for both micro-canonic and canonic ensembles, the internal energy and the entropy tend to these upper bounds.

  16. Anisotropic intrinsic spin Hall effect in quantum wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, A W; Akis, R; Ferry, D K

    2011-11-23

    We use numerical simulations to investigate the spin Hall effect in quantum wires in the presence of both Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. We find that the intrinsic spin Hall effect is highly anisotropic with respect to the orientation of the wire, and that the nature of this anisotropy depends strongly on the electron density and the relative strengths of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings. In particular, at low densities, when only one subband of the quantum wire is occupied, the spin Hall effect is strongest for electron momentum along the [N110] axis, which is the opposite of what is expected for the purely 2D case. In addition, when more than one subband is occupied, the strength and anisotropy of the spin Hall effect can vary greatly over relatively small changes in electron density, which makes it difficult to predict which wire orientation will maximize the strength of the spin Hall effect. These results help to illuminate the role of quantum confinement in spin-orbit-coupled systems, and can serve as a guide for future experimental work on the use of quantum wires for spin-Hall-based spintronic applications.

  17. Photonic analogue of quantum spin Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    He, Cheng; Liu, Xiao-ping; Lu, Ming-Hui; Chen, Yulin; Feng, Liang; Chen, Yan-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Symmetry-protected photonic topological insulator exhibiting robust pseudo-spin-dependent transportation, analogous to quantum spin Hall (QSH) phases and topological insulators, are of great importance in fundamental physics. Such transportation robustness is protected by time-reversal symmetry. Since electrons (fermion) and photons (boson) obey different statistics rules and associate with different time-reversal operators (i.e., Tf and Tb, respectively), whether photonic counterpart of Kramers degeneracy is topologically protected by bosonic Tb remains unidentified. Here, we construct the degenerate gapless edge states of two photonic pseudo-spins (left/right circular polarizations) in the band gap of a two-dimensional photonic crystal with strong magneto-electric coupling. We further demonstrated that the topological edge states are in fact protected by Tf rather than commonly believed Tb and their pseudo-spin dependent transportation is robust against Tf invariant impurities, discovering for the first tim...

  18. Observational Selection Effects in Quantum Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Page, Don N

    2007-01-01

    Scientific theories need to be testable by observations, say using Bayes' theorem. A complete theory needs at least the three parts of dynamical laws for specified physical variables, the correct solution of the dynamical laws (boundary conditions), and the connection with observations or experience or conscious perceptions (laws of psycho-physical parallelism). Principles are proposed for Bayesian meta-theories. One framework that obeys these principles is Sensible Quantum Mechanics (SQM), which is discussed. In principle, it allows one to test between single-history and many-worlds theories, and to discuss threats to certain theories from fake universes and Boltzmann brains. The threat of fake universes may be dismissed if one doubts the substrate-independence of consciousness, which seems very implausible in the SQM framework. Boltzmann brains seem more problematic, though there are many conceivable solutions. SQM also suggests the possibility that past steps along our evolutionary ancestry may be so rare ...

  19. Observation of the quantum Hall effect in δ-doped SrTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Y; Takahashi, K S; Bahramy, M S; Kozuka, Y; Maryenko, D; Falson, J; Tsukazaki, A; Tokura, Y; Kawasaki, M

    2016-05-27

    The quantum Hall effect is a macroscopic quantum phenomenon in a two-dimensional electron system. The two-dimensional electron system in SrTiO3 has sparked a great deal of interest, mainly because of the strong electron correlation effects expected from the 3d orbitals. Here we report the observation of the quantum Hall effect in a dilute La-doped SrTiO3-two-dimensional electron system, fabricated by metal organic molecular-beam epitaxy. The quantized Hall plateaus are found to be solely stemming from the low Landau levels with even integer-filling factors, ν=4 and 6 without any contribution from odd ν's. For ν=4, the corresponding plateau disappears on decreasing the carrier density. Such peculiar behaviours are proposed to be due to the crossing between the Landau levels originating from the two subbands composed of d orbitals with different effective masses. Our findings pave a way to explore unprecedented quantum phenomena in d-electron systems.

  20. Emergence of integer quantum Hall effect from chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Chushun; Wang, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytic microscopic theory showing that in a large class of spin-$\\frac{1}{2}$ quasiperiodic quantum kicked rotors, a dynamical analog of the integer quantum Hall effect (IQHE) emerges from an intrinsic chaotic structure. Specifically, the inverse of the Planck's quantum ($h_e$) and the rotor's energy growth rate mimic the `filling fraction' and the `longitudinal conductivity' in conventional IQHE, respectively, and a hidden quantum number is found to mimic the `quantized Hall conductivity'. We show that for an infinite discrete set of critical values of $h_e$, the long-time energy growth rate is universal and of order of unity (`metallic' phase), but otherwise vanishes (`insulating' phase). Moreover, the rotor insulating phases are topological, each of which is characterized by a hidden quantum number. This number exhibits universal behavior for small $h_e$, i.e., it jumps by unity whenever $h_e$ decreases, passing through each critical value. This intriguing phenomenon is not triggered by the...

  1. Metastable States of Josepshon Vortices: Thermal Processes and Quantum Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, A.; Kemp, A.; Koval, Yu.; Ustinov, A. V.; Fistul, M. V.

    2001-03-01

    We experimentally study the dynamics of a single Josephson vortex in a tilted periodic potential. In the presence of a bias current applied uniformly to a long Josephson junction, metastable vortex-states are induced by the interaction of the vortex with an artificially formed inhomogeneity in the junction, or by shaping the junction subject to a small external magnetic field [1]. At high temperatures, we observe the thermal escape of the vortex out of the metastable state. As temperature and damping is reduced, the macroscopic quantum properties of Josephson vortices, such as energy level quantization and quantum tunneling, are expected to manifest themselves [2,3]. We report on our current experimental work to observe these effects. Our interest in this macroscopic quantum system is related to the possibility of using quantum states of Josephson vortices for performing quantum computation. We have suggested that a vortex trapped in a double-well potential in a narrow long junction can be used as a scalable and well-controllable qubit [1]. [1] A. Wallraff et al. , J. Low Temp. Phys. J. Low Temp. Phys. 188, 543 (2000). [2] T. Kato and M. Imada, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 65, 2963 (1996). [3] A. Shnirman, E. Ben-Jacob, and B. Malomed, Phys. Rev. B 56, 14677 (1997).

  2. Quantum Effect in the Mesoscopic RLC Circuits with a Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-Xin; YAN Zhan-Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The research work on the quantum effects in mesoscopic circuits has undergone a rapid development recently, however the whole quantum theory of the mesoscopic circuits should consider the discreteness of the electric charge. In this paper, based on the fundamental fact that the electric charge takes discrete values, the finite-difference Schrodinger equation of.the mesoscopic RLC circuit with a source is achieved. With a unitary transformation, the Schrodinger equation becomes the standard Mathieu equation, then the energy spectrum and the wave functions of the system are obtained. Using the WKBJ method, the average of currents and square of the current are calculated. The results show the existence of the current fluctuation, which causes noise in the circuits. This paper is an application of the whole quantum mesoscopic circuits theory to the fundamental circuits, and the results will shed light on the design of the miniation circuits, especially on the purpose of reducing quantum noise coherent controlling of the mesoscopic quantum states.

  3. Effect of structural disorder on quantum oscillations in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, B. C., E-mail: b.c-camargo@yahoo.com.br; Kopelevich, Y. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp 13083-970, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Usher, A.; Hubbard, S. B. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-18

    We have studied the effect of structural disorder on the de Haas van Alphen and Shubnikov de Haas quantum oscillations measured in natural, Kish, and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples at temperatures down to 30 mK and at magnetic fields up to 14 T. The measurements were performed on different samples characterized by means of x-ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic-force microscopy techniques. Our results reveal a correlation between the amplitude of quantum oscillations and the sample surface roughness.

  4. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  5. Nuclear Quantum Vibrational Effects in Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-23

    We present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a Grueneisen equation of state and a quasiharmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, we derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. We have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of shock compressed water. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or solids.

  6. Effective photon mass and exact translating quantum relativistic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Fernando; Manrique, Marcos Antonio Albarracin

    2016-04-01

    Using a variation of the celebrated Volkov solution, the Klein-Gordon equation for a charged particle is reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations, exactly solvable in specific cases. The new quantum relativistic structures can reveal a localization in the radial direction perpendicular to the wave packet propagation, thanks to a non-vanishing scalar potential. The external electromagnetic field, the particle current density, and the charge density are determined. The stability analysis of the solutions is performed by means of numerical simulations. The results are useful for the description of a charged quantum test particle in the relativistic regime, provided spin effects are not decisive.

  7. The Quantum Hall Effect in Supersymmetric Chern-Simons Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2015-01-01

    In d=2+1 dimensions, there exist gauge theories which are supersymmetric but non-relativistic. We solve the simplest U(1) gauge theory in this class and show that the low-energy physics is that of the fractional quantum Hall effect, with ground states given by the Laughlin wavefunctions. We do this by quantising the vortices and relating them to the quantum Hall matrix model. We further construct coherent state representations of the excitations of vortices. These are quasi-holes. By an explicit computation of the Berry phase, without resorting to a plasma analogy, we show that these excitations have fractional charge and spin.

  8. Integer quantum Hall effect in a triangular-lattice: Disorder effect and scaling behavior of the insulator-plateau transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H. L.; Jiang, C.; Zhai, Z. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate numerically the integer quantum Hall effect in a three-band triangular-lattice model. The three bands own the Chern number C=2,-1,-1, respectively. The lowest topological flat band carrying Chern number C=2, which leads to the Hall plateau σH = 2 (e2 / h) . This Hall plateau is sensitive to the disorder scattering and is rapidly destroyed by the weak disorder. Further increasing the strength of disorder, the gap of density of states always disappears before the vanishing of the corresponding Hall plateau. The scaling behavior of quantum phase transition between an insulator and a quantum Hall plateau is studied. We find that the insulator-plateau transition becomes sharper with increasing the size of system. Due to the different of edge states, the critical energy Ec1 gradually shifts to the center of Hall plateau while Ec2 is unaffected with increasing the disorder strength.

  9. Kondo effect for electron transport through an artificial quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Ke-Wei; Xiong Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    We have calculated the transport properties of electron through an artificial quantum dot by using the numerical renormalization group technique in this paper.We obtain the conductance for the system of a quantum dot which is embedded in a one-dimensional chain in zero and finite temperature cases.The external magnetic field gives rise to a negative magnetoconductance in the zero temperature case.It increases as the external magnetic field increases.We obtain the relation between the coupling coefficient and conductance.If the interaction is big enough to prevent conduction electrons from tunnelling through the dot,the dispersion effect is dominant in this case.In the Kondo temperature regime,we obtain the conductivity of a quantum dot system with Kondo correlation.

  10. A tunable colloidal quantum dot photo field-effect transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Subir

    2011-01-01

    We fabricate and investigate field-effect transistors in which a light-absorbing photogate modulates the flow of current along the channel. The photogate consists of colloidal quantum dots that efficiently transfer photoelectrons to the channel across a charge-separating (type-II) heterointerface, producing a primary and sustained secondary flow that is terminated via electron back-recombination across the interface. We explore colloidal quantum dot sizes corresponding to bandgaps ranging from 730 to 1475 nm and also investigate various stoichiometries of aluminum-doped ZnO (AZO) channel materials. We investigate the role of trap state energies in both the colloidal quantum dot energy film and the AZO channel. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  11. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in magnetic insulator heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Jing; Felser, Claudia; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2015-03-11

    On the basis of ab initio calculations, we predict that a monolayer of Cr-doped (Bi,Sb)2Te3 and GdI2 heterostructure is a quantum anomalous Hall insulator with a nontrivial band gap up to 38 meV. The principle behind our prediction is that the band inversion between two topologically trivial ferromagnetic insulators can result in a nonzero Chern number, which offers a better way to realize the quantum anomalous Hall state without random magnetic doping. In addition, a simple effective model is presented to describe the basic mechanism of spin polarized band inversion in this system. Moreover, we predict that 3D quantum anomalous Hall insulator could be realized in (Bi2/3Cr1/3)2Te3 /GdI2 superlattice.

  12. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2011-01-01

    In a THz pump - optical probe experiment we demonstrate an instantaneous electro-absorption effect in InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots, induced by the electric field of a single-cycle THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth and with free-space peak electric field reaching 220 kV/cm. The transient modulation of QD...

  13. Towards a quantum Hall effect for atoms using electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ericsson, M; Ericsson, Marie; Sjoqvist, Erik

    2002-01-01

    An atomic analogue of Landau quantization based on the Aharonov-Casher (AC) interaction is developed. The effect provides a first step towards an atomic quantum Hall system using electric fields, which may be realized in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  14. Effects of spin-orbit coupling on quantum transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardarson, Jens Hjorleifur

    2008-01-01

    The effect of spin-orbit coupling on various quantum transport phenomena is considered. The main topics discussed are: * How spin-orbit coupling can induce shot noise through trajectory splitting. * How spin-orbit coupling can degrade electron-hole entanglement (created by a tunnel barrier) by mo

  15. Effective action for a quantum scalar field in warped spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff da Silva, J.M.; Mendonca, E.L.; Scatena, E. [Universidade Estadual Paulista ' ' Julio de Mesquita Filho' ' -UNESP, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    We investigate the one-loop corrections, at zero as well as finite temperature, of a scalar field taking place in a braneworld motivated warped background. After to reach a well-defined problem, we calculate the effective action with the corresponding quantum corrections to each case. (orig.)

  16. Growth mechanism and quantum confinement effect of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯孙齐; 俞大鹏; 张洪洲; 白志刚; 丁彧; 杭青岭; 邹英华; 王晶晶

    1999-01-01

    The methods for synthesizing one-dimensional Si nanowires with controlled diameter are introduced. The mechanism for the growth of Si nanowires and the growth model for different morphologies of Si nanowires are described, and the quantum confinement effect of the Si nanowires is presented.

  17. Run-up Variability due to Source Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Tania; Zolezzi, Francesca; Traverso, Chiara; Valfrè, Giulio; Poggi, Pamela; Parker, Eric J.

    2010-05-01

    This paper investigates the variability of tsunami run-up at a specific location due to uncertainty in earthquake source parameters. It is important to quantify this 'inter-event' variability for probabilistic assessments of tsunami hazard. In principal, this aspect of variability could be studied by comparing field observations at a single location from a number of tsunamigenic events caused by the same source. As such an extensive dataset does not exist, we decided to study the inter-event variability through numerical modelling. We attempt to answer the question 'What is the potential variability of tsunami wave run-up at a specific site, for a given magnitude earthquake occurring at a known location'. The uncertainty is expected to arise from the lack of knowledge regarding the specific details of the fault rupture 'source' parameters. The following steps were followed: the statistical distributions of the main earthquake source parameters affecting the tsunami height were established by studying fault plane solutions of known earthquakes; a case study based on a possible tsunami impact on Egypt coast has been set up and simulated, varying the geometrical parameters of the source; simulation results have been analyzed deriving relationships between run-up height and source parameters; using the derived relationships a Monte Carlo simulation has been performed in order to create the necessary dataset to investigate the inter-event variability of the run-up height along the coast; the inter-event variability of the run-up height along the coast has been investigated. Given the distribution of source parameters and their variability, we studied how this variability propagates to the run-up height, using the Cornell 'Multi-grid coupled Tsunami Model' (COMCOT). The case study was based on the large thrust faulting offshore the south-western Greek coast, thought to have been responsible for the infamous 1303 tsunami. Numerical modelling of the event was used to

  18. Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics due to quantum tunneling of phase slips in superconducting Nb nanowire networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trezza, M.; Cirillo, C.; Sabatino, P.; Carapella, G.; Attanasio, C. [CNR-SPIN Salerno and Dipartimento di Fisica “E. R. Caianiello”, Università degli Studi di Salerno, Fisciano I-84084 (Italy); Prischepa, S. L. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, P. Browka 6, Minsk 220013 (Belarus)

    2013-12-16

    We report on the transport properties of an array of N∼30 interconnected Nb nanowires, grown by sputtering on robust porous Si substrates. The analyzed system exhibits a broad resistive transition in zero magnetic field, H, and highly nonlinear V(I) characteristics as a function of H, which can be both consistently described by quantum tunneling of phase slips.

  19. The effects of intense laser field and applied electric and magnetic fields on optical properties of an asymmetric quantum well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Restrepo, R.L., E-mail: pfrire@eia.edu.co [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia-EIA, Envigado (Colombia); Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia-UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Ungan, F.; Kasapoglu, E. [Department of Physics, Cumhuriyet University, 58140 Sivas (Turkey); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonóma del Estado de Morelos, Ave. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Morales, A.L.; Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia-UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-01-15

    This paper presents the results of the theoretical study of the effects of non-resonant intense laser field and electric and magnetic fields on the optical properties (the linear and third-order nonlinear refractive index and absorption coefficients) in an asymmetric quantum well. The electric field and intense laser field are applied along the growth direction of the asymmetric quantum well and the magnetic field is oriented perpendicularly. To calculate the energy and the wave functions of the electron in the asymmetric quantum well, the effective mass approximation and the method of envelope wave function are used. The asymmetric quantum well is constructed by using different aluminium concentrations in both right and left barriers. The confinement in the quantum well is changed drastically by either the effect of electric and magnetic fields or by the application of intense laser field. The optical properties are calculated using the compact density matrix approach. The results show that the effect of the intense laser field competes with the effects of the electric and magnetic fields. Consequently, peak position shifts to lower photon energies due to the effect of the intense laser field and it shifts to higher photon energies by the effects of electric and magnetic fields. In general, it is found that the concentration of aluminum, electric and magnetic fields and intense laser field are external agents that modify the optical responses in the asymmetric quantum well.

  20. Air pollution effects due to deregulation of the electric industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodi, Khojasteh Riaz

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 introduced the concept of open-access into the electric utility industry which allows privately-owned utilities to transmit power produced by non-utility generators and independent power producers (IPPs). In April 1996, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) laid down the final rules (Orders No. 888 & No. 889), which required utilities to open their transmission lines to any power producer and charge them no more than what they pay for the use of their own lines. These rules set the stage for the retail sale of electricity to industrial, commercial and residential utility customers; non-utility generators (Nugs); and power marketers. These statutory, regulatory and administrative changes create for the electric utility industry two different forces that contradict each other. The first is the concept of competition among utility companies; this places a greater emphasis on electric power generation cost control and affects generation/fuel mix selection and demand side management (DSM) activities. The second force, which is converse to the first, is that utilities are major contributors to the air pollution burden in the United States and environmental concerns are forcing them to reduce emissions of air pollutants by using more environmentally friendly fuels and implementing energy saving programs. This study evaluates the impact of deregulation within the investor owned electric utilities and how this deregulation effects air quality by investigating the trend in demand side management programs and generation/fuel mix. A survey was conducted of investor owned utilities and independent power producers. The results of the survey were analyzed by analysis of variance and regression analysis to determine the impact to Air Pollution. An air Quality Impact model was also developed in this study. This model consists of six modules: (1) demand side management and (2) consumption of coal, (3) gas, (4) renewable, (5) oil and (6

  1. Biological effects due to weak magnetic field on plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, N. A.

    2004-01-01

    Throughout the evolution process, Earth's magnetic field (MF, about 50 μT) was a natural component of the environment for living organisms. Biological objects, flying on planned long-term interplanetary missions, would experience much weaker magnetic fields, since galactic MF is known to be 0.1-1 nT. However, the role of weak magnetic fields and their influence on functioning of biological organisms are still insufficiently understood, and is actively studied. Numerous experiments with seedlings of different plant species placed in weak magnetic field have shown that the growth of their primary roots is inhibited during early germination stages in comparison with control. The proliferative activity and cell reproduction in meristem of plant roots are reduced in weak magnetic field. Cell reproductive cycle slows down due to the expansion of G 1 phase in many plant species (and of G 2 phase in flax and lentil roots), while other phases of cell cycle remain relatively stabile. In plant cells exposed to weak magnetic field, the functional activity of genome at early pre-replicate period is shown to decrease. Weak magnetic field causes intensification of protein synthesis and disintegration in plant roots. At ultrastructural level, changes in distribution of condensed chromatin and nucleolus compactization in nuclei, noticeable accumulation of lipid bodies, development of a lytic compartment (vacuoles, cytosegresomes and paramural bodies), and reduction of phytoferritin in plastids in meristem cells were observed in pea roots exposed to weak magnetic field. Mitochondria were found to be very sensitive to weak magnetic field: their size and relative volume in cells increase, matrix becomes electron-transparent, and cristae reduce. Cytochemical studies indicate that cells of plant roots exposed to weak magnetic field show Ca 2+ over-saturation in all organelles and in cytoplasm unlike the control ones. The data presented suggest that prolonged exposures of plants to weak

  2. Valley polarized quantum Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-01-25

    The electronic properties of silicene are distinct from both the conventional two dimensional electron gas and the famous graphene due to strong spin orbit interaction and the buckled structure. Silicene has the potential to overcome limitations encountered for graphene, in particular the zero band gap and weak spin orbit interaction. We demonstrate a valley polarized quantum Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions. We use the Kubo formalism to discuss the Hall conductivity and address the longitudinal conductivity for elastic impurity scattering in the first Born approximation. We show that the combination of an electric field with intrinsic spin orbit interaction leads to quantum phase transitions at the charge neutrality point, providing a tool to experimentally tune the topological state. Silicene constitutes a model system for exploring the spin and valley physics not accessible in graphene due to the small spin orbit interaction.

  3. Composite particle and field theory in atomic quantum Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Bo; Chen Zeng-Bing

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the composite particle description of the atomic quantum Hall (QH) effect. We further give the Chern-Simon-Gross-Pitaevskii (CSGP) effective theory for the atomic Hall liquid, which is the counterpart of Chern-Simon theory in electron Hall effect. What we obtained is equivalent to the Laughlin wavefunction approach.Our results show that in terms of composite particles, the atomic Hall effect is really the same as the electronic QH effect. The CSGP effective theory would shed new light on the atomic QH effect.

  4. Photodynamic antibacterial effect of graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Biljana Z; Milenkovic, Marina M; Dakic, Ivana R; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana M; Milosavljevic, Momir S; Budimir, Milica D; Paunovic, Verica G; Dramicanin, Miroslav D; Markovic, Zoran M; Trajkovic, Vladimir S

    2014-05-01

    Synthesis of new antibacterial agents is becoming increasingly important in light of the emerging antibiotic resistance. In the present study we report that electrochemically produced graphene quantum dots (GQD), a new class of carbon nanoparticles, generate reactive oxygen species when photoexcited (470 nm, 1 W), and kill two strains of pathogenic bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Bacterial killing was demonstrated by the reduction in number of bacterial colonies in a standard plate count method, the increase in propidium iodide uptake confirming the cell membrane damage, as well as by morphological defects visualized by atomic force microscopy. The induction of oxidative stress in bacteria exposed to photoexcited GQD was confirmed by staining with a redox-sensitive fluorochrome dihydrorhodamine 123. Neither GQD nor light exposure alone were able to cause oxidative stress and reduce the viability of bacteria. Importantly, mouse spleen cells were markedly less sensitive in the same experimental conditions, thus indicating a fairly selective antibacterial photodynamic action of GQD.

  5. Effect of quantum therapy on pork quality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin BODNAR; Jozef NAGY; Peter POPELKA; Beáta KOR(E)NEKOV(A); Ján MACANGA; Alena NAGYOVA

    2011-01-01

    In this study the impact of quantum therapy on meat quality of slaughtered pigs was investigated.For this purpose the pigs were treated with different doses of magnet-infrared-laser (MIL) radiation.Animals were divided into four groups according to radiation doses (4096,512,and 64 Hz,and control without application),which were applied in the lumbar area of musculus /ongissimus dorsi (loin) at various time intervals prior to the slaughter (14 d,24 h,and 1 h).Animals were slaughtered and the meat quality was evaluated by determining of pH value (1,3,and 24 h post slaughter),drip loss,colour,and lactic acid and phosphoric acid amounts.MIL therapy can be used in various fields of veterinary medicine as are surgery and orthopaedics,internal medicine,dentistry,pulmonology,gastroenterology,gynaecology,urology,nephrology,and dermatology.The results achieved showed that MIL radiation used in a short period before slaughter (1 h) can cause a change in the meat quality,as reflected by the non-standard development of pH values,increases in drip loss,and changes of meat colour.

  6. Perspectives in Quantum Hall Effects Novel Quantum Liquids in Low-Dimensional Semiconductor Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sarma, Sankar Das

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of the quantized and fractional Quantum Hall Effect phenomena is among the most important physics findings in the latter half of this century. The precise quantization of the electrical resistance involved in the quantized Hall effect phenomena has led to the new definition of the resistance standard and has metrologically affected all of science and technology. This resource consists of contributions from the top researchers in the field who present recent experimental and theoretical developments. Each chapter is self-contained and includes its own set of references guiding rea

  7. Manifestly scale-invariant regularization and quantum effective operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ghilencea, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Scale invariant theories are often used to address the hierarchy problem, however the regularization of their quantum corrections introduces a dimensionful coupling (dimensional regularization) or scale (Pauli-Villars, etc) which break this symmetry explicitly. We show how to avoid this problem and study the implications of a manifestly scale invariant regularization in (classical) scale invariant theories. We use a dilaton-dependent subtraction function $\\mu(\\sigma)$ which after spontaneous breaking of scale symmetry generates the usual DR subtraction scale $\\mu(\\langle\\sigma\\rangle)$. One consequence is that "evanescent" interactions generated by scale invariance of the action in $d=4-2\\epsilon$ (but vanishing in $d=4$), give rise to new, finite quantum corrections. We find a (finite) correction $\\Delta U(\\phi,\\sigma)$ to the one-loop scalar potential for $\\phi$ and $\\sigma$, beyond the Coleman-Weinberg term. $\\Delta U$ is due to an evanescent correction ($\\propto\\epsilon$) to the field-dependent masses (of...

  8. Quantum spin Hall effect in α -Sn /CdTe(001 ) quantum-well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küfner, Sebastian; Matthes, Lars; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    The electronic and topological properties of heterovalent and heterocrystalline α -Sn/CdTe(001) quantum wells (QWs) are studied in dependence on the thickness of α -Sn by means of ab initio calculations. We calculate the topological Z2 invariants of the respective bulk crystals, which identify α -Sn as strong three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs), whereas CdTe is a trivial insulator. We predict the existence of two-dimensional (2D) topological interface states between both materials and show that a topological phase transition from a trivial insulating phase into the quantum spin Hall (QSH) phase in the QW structures occurs at much higher thicknesses than in the HgTe case. The QSH effect is characterized by the localization, dispersion, and spin polarization of the topological interface states. We address the distinction of the 3D and 2D TI characters of the studied QW structures, which is inevitable for an understanding of the underlying quantum state of matter. The 3D TI nature is characterized by two-dimensional topological interface states, while the 2D phase exhibits one-dimensional edge states. The two different state characteristics are often intermixed in the discussion of the topology of 2D QW structures, especially, the comparison of ab initio calculations and experimental transport studies.

  9. Polaronic Effects of an Exciton in a Cylindrical Quantum Wire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui-Qiang; XIE Hong-Jing; GUO Kang-Xian; YU You-Bin; DENG Yong-Qing

    2005-01-01

    The effects of exciton-optical phonon interaction on the binding energy and the total and reduced effective masses of an exciton in a cylindrical quantum wire have been investigated. We adopt a perturbative-PLL [T.D. Lee,F. Low, and D. Pines, Phys. Rev. B90 (1953) 297] technique to construct an effective Hamiltonian and then use a variational solution to deal with the exciton-phonon system. The interactions of exciton with the longitudinal-optical phonon and the surface-optical phonon have been taken into consideration. The numerical calculations for GaAs show that the influences of phonon modes on the exciton in a quasi-one-dimensional quantum wire are considerable and should not be neglected. Moreover the numerical results for heavy- and light-hole exciton are obtained, which show that the polaronic effects on two types of excitons are very different but both depend heavily on the sizes of the wire.

  10. An Experimental Study of the Quantum Efficiency and Topology of Copper Photocathode Due to Plasma Cleaning and Etching

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Denni T; Kirby, Robert

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an experimental research program to the study of the photoemission properties of copper photocathodes as a function of various plasma cleaning/etching parameters. The quantum efficiency, QE, and topology, Ra and Rpp, of Copper Photocathodes, , will be monitored while undergoing plasma cleaning/etching process. We will monitor the QE as a function of time for the various test coupons while we optimize the various plasma processing parameters. In addition, surface topology, will be studied to determine the suitability of the cleaning/etching process to produce an acceptable photoemitter. We propose to use two metrics in the evaluation of the plasma cleaning process as an acceptable cleaning method for metallic photocathodes, Quantum Efficiency versus Wavelength and Surface roughness: Ra and Rpp represent the Average Roughness and Peak to Peak Roughness parameters, respectively.

  11. Super quantum measures on effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yongjian, E-mail: yjxie@snnu.edu.cn; Ren, Fang [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Yang, Aili [College of Science, Xi’an University of Science and Technology, Xi’an 710054 (China)

    2015-10-15

    We give one basis of the space of super quantum measures on finite effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties (RDP for short). Then we prove that the super quantum measures and quantum interference functions on finite effect algebras with the RDP are determined each other. At last, we investigate the relationships between the super quantum measures and the diagonally positive signed measures on finite effect algebras with the RDP in detail.

  12. Quantum mechanical effects of topological origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duru, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    Following a brief review of the original Casimir and Aharonov-Bohm effects, some other effects of similar natures are mentioned. A Casimir interaction between AB fluxes is presented. Possible realizations of the Casimir effects for massive charged fields in solid state structures and a new AB effect for photons are suggested.

  13. Fault-tolerant quantum computation

    CERN Document Server

    Preskill, J

    1997-01-01

    The discovery of quantum error correction has greatly improved the long-term prospects for quantum computing technology. Encoded quantum information can be protected from errors that arise due to uncontrolled interactions with the environment, or due to imperfect implementations of quantum logical operations. Recovery from errors can work effectively even if occasional mistakes occur during the recovery procedure. Furthermore, encoded quantum information can be processed without serious propagation of errors. In principle, an arbitrarily long quantum computation can be performed reliably, provided that the average probability of error per gate is less than a certain critical value, the accuracy threshold. It may be possible to incorporate intrinsic fault tolerance into the design of quantum computing hardware, perhaps by invoking topological Aharonov-Bohm interactions to process quantum information.

  14. Cotunneling Drag Effect in Coulomb-Coupled Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, A. J.; Lim, J. S.; Sánchez, David; López, Rosa; Amasha, S.; Katine, J. A.; Shtrikman, Hadas; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2016-08-01

    In Coulomb drag, a current flowing in one conductor can induce a voltage across an adjacent conductor via the Coulomb interaction. The mechanisms yielding drag effects are not always understood, even though drag effects are sufficiently general to be seen in many low-dimensional systems. In this Letter, we observe Coulomb drag in a Coulomb-coupled double quantum dot and, through both experimental and theoretical arguments, identify cotunneling as essential to obtaining a correct qualitative understanding of the drag behavior.

  15. Spin analogs of superconductivity and integer quantum Hall effect in an array of spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel; Kim, Se Kwon; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by the successful idea of using weakly coupled quantum electronic wires to realize the quantum Hall effects and the quantum spin Hall effects, we theoretically study two systems composed of weakly coupled quantum spin chains within the mean-field approximations, which can exhibit spin analogs of superconductivity and the integer quantum Hall effect. First, a certain bilayer of two arrays of interacting spin chains is mapped, via the Jordan-Wigner transformation, to an attractive Hubbard model that exhibits fermionic superconductivity, which corresponds to spin superconductivity in the original spin Hamiltonian. Secondly, an array of spin-orbit-coupled spin chains in the presence of a suitable external magnetic field is transformed to an array of quantum wires that exhibits the integer quantum Hall effect, which translates into its spin analog in the spin Hamiltonian. The resultant spin superconductivity and spin integer quantum Hall effect can be characterized by their ability to transport spin without any resistance.

  16. Quantum-limit spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ficek, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    This book covers the main ideas, methods, and recent developments of quantum-limit optical spectroscopy and applications to quantum information, resolution spectroscopy, measurements beyond quantum limits, measurement of decoherence, and entanglement. Quantum-limit spectroscopy lies at the frontier of current experimental and theoretical techniques, and is one of the areas of atomic spectroscopy where the quantization of the field is essential to predict and interpret the existing experimental results. Currently, there is an increasing interest in quantum and precision spectroscopy both theoretically and experimentally, due to significant progress in trapping and cooling of single atoms and ions. This progress allows one to explore in the most intimate detail the ways in which light interacts with atoms and to measure spectral properties and quantum effects with high precision. Moreover, it allows one to perform subtle tests of quantum mechanics on the single atom and single photon scale which were hardly eve...

  17. The differential effects of fluency due to repetition and fluency due to color contrast on judgments of truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rita R; Garcia-Marques, Teresa; Mello, Joana

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments contrast the effects of fluency due to repetition and fluency due to color contrast on judgments of truth, after participants learn to associate high levels of fluency with falseness (i.e., a reversal of the fluency-truth link). Experiment 1 shows that the interpretation of fluency as a sign of truth is harder to reverse when learning is promoted with repetition rather than with perceptual fluency. Experiment 2 shows that when color contrast and repetition are manipulated orthogonally, the reversal of the truth effect learned with color contrast does not generalize to repetition. These results suggest specificities in the processing experiences generated by different sources of fluency, and that their influences can be separated in contexts that allow the contrast of their distinctive features. We interpret and discuss these results in light of the research addressing the convergence vs. dissociation of the effects elicited by different fluency sources.

  18. Effect of growth temperature and quantum structure on InAs/GaAs quantum dot solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M H; Kim, H S; Park, S J; Song, J D; Kim, S H; Lee, Y J; Choi, W J; Park, J H

    2014-04-01

    InGaAs-capped InAs quantum dots (QDs) and InAs QDs were adopted for the study of the effects through growth temperature and the band structure of InAs QDs on the performance of GaAs-based QD solar cell. It has been shown that the defects due to low temperature growth resulted in the decrease of Voc, Jsc and external quantum efficiency for GaAs bulk solar cell and QD embedded solar cells. It has been also found that InAs QDs act as defects by trapping photo-generated carries which affect the carrier transport in QD solar cell. The QD solar cell with InGaAs-capped InAs QDs showed higher performance than the QD solar cell with only InAs QDs. Such result has been explained by photo-generated carrier trapping and tunneling through InGaAs QW state in InGaAs-capped InAs QDs.

  19. Nonequilibrium effective field theory for absorbing state phase transitions in driven open quantum spin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Michael; Everest, Benjamin; Marcuzzi, Matteo; Lesanovsky, Igor; Diehl, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Phase transitions to absorbing states are among the simplest examples of critical phenomena out of equilibrium. The characteristic feature of these models is the presence of a fluctuationless configuration which the dynamics cannot leave, which has proved a rather stringent requirement in experiments. Recently, a proposal to seek such transitions in highly tunable systems of cold-atomic gases offers to probe this physics and, at the same time, to investigate the robustness of these transitions to quantum coherent effects. Here, we specifically focus on the interplay between classical and quantum fluctuations in a simple driven open quantum model which, in the classical limit, reproduces a contact process, which is known to undergo a continuous transition in the "directed percolation" universality class. We derive an effective long-wavelength field theory for the present class of open spin systems and show that, due to quantum fluctuations, the nature of the transition changes from second to first order, passing through a bicritical point which appears to belong instead to the "tricritical directed percolation" class.

  20. Memory effects in attenuation and amplification quantum processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-09-01

    With increasing communication rates via quantum channels, memory effects become unavoidable whenever the use rate of the channel is comparable to the typical relaxation time of the channel environment. We introduce a model of a bosonic memory channel, describing correlated noise effects in quantum-optical processes via attenuating or amplifying media. To study such a channel model, we make use of a proper set of collective field variables, which allows us to unravel the memory effects, mapping the n-fold concatenation of the memory channel to a unitarily equivalent, direct product of n single-mode bosonic channels. We hence estimate the channel capacities by relying on known results for the memoryless setting. Our findings show that the model is characterized by two different regimes, in which the cross correlations induced by the noise among different channel uses are either exponentially enhanced or exponentially reduced.

  1. Memory effects in attenuation and amplification quantum processes

    CERN Document Server

    Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    With increasing communication rates via quantum channels, memory effects become unavoidable whenever the use rate of the channel is comparable with the typical relaxation time of the channel environment. We then introduce a model of bosonic memory channel, describing correlated noise effects in quantum optical processes via attenuating or amplifying media. To study such a channel model we make use of a proper set of collective field variables, which allows us to unravel the memory effects, mapping the n-fold concatenation of the memory channel to a, unitarily equivalent, direct product of n single-mode bosonic channels. We hence estimate the channel capacities by relying on known results for the memoryless setting. Our findings show that the model is characterized by two different regimes, in which the cross-correlations induced by the noise among different channel uses are either exponentially enhanced or exponentially reduced.

  2. Quantum Gravity Effects On Charged Micro Black Holes Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasvandi, N; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdullah, W A T Wan

    2016-01-01

    The charged black hole thermodynamics is corrected in terms of the quantum gravity effects. Most of the quantum gravity theories support the idea that near the Planck scale, the standard Heisenberg uncertainty principle should be reformulated by the so-called Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP) which provides a perturbation framework to perform required modifications of the black hole quantities. In this paper, we consider the effects of the minimal length and maximal momentum as GUP type I and the minimal length, minimal momentum, and maximal momentum as GUP type II on thermodynamics of the charged TeV-scale black holes. We also generalized our study to the universe with the extra dimensions based on the ADD model. In this framework, the effect of the electrical charge on thermodynamics of the black hole and existence of the charged black hole remnants as a potential candidate for the dark matter particles are discussed.

  3. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  4. Field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device integrated photodiode, quantum well modulator and transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.A.B.; Feuer, M.D.; Chang, T.Y.; Shunk, S.C.; Henry, J.E.; Burrows, D.J.; Chemla, D.S.

    1989-03-01

    The authors propose and demonstrate the integration of a photodiode, a quantum-confined Stark effect quantum well optical modulator and a metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MESFET), to make a field-effect transistor self-electrooptic effect device. This integration allows optical inputs and outputs on the surface of a GaAs-integrated circuit chip, compatible with standard MESFET processing. As an illustration of feasibility, the authors demonstrate optical signal amplification with a single MESFET.

  5. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Shailendra K., E-mail: phd1211512@iiti.ac.in; Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh [Material Research Laboratory, Discipline of Physics & MSEG, Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Madhya Pradesh-452017 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  6. The effect of axial ligands on the quantum yield of singlet oxygen of new silicon phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Huafei; Zhang, Xuemei; Yu, Xinxin; Pan, Sujuan; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    The singlet oxygen (1O2) production abilitity is an important factor to assess their potential as effective of photosensitizers. In this paper, the 1O2 production rate, production rate constant and quantum yield of silicon(IV) phthalocyanine axially bearing 1-3 generation dendritic substituents were evaluated by a high performance liquid chromatographic method. The results show that the 1O2 production rate and production rate constant of these compounds increase gradually with dendritic generations increase. And the 1O2 quantum yield of silicon(IV) phthalocyanine with first generation dendritic ligand was the highest. This may be due to the isolation effect of the dendritic ligands on the phthalocyanine core. The parameters of the observed 1O2 production properties will provide valuable data for these dendrimer phthalocyanines as promising photosensitizer in PDT application.

  7. On high-speed cross-gain modulation without pattern effects in quantum dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, A.V.; Mørk, Jesper; Tromborg, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    In the regime with maximum linear gain in a quantum dot (QD) semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), instantaneous gain modulation by change of the photon density is possible due to spectral hole burning effects. This, in turn, leads to the opportunity of ultrafast cross-gain modulation (XGM...

  8. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  9. Influence of quantum-confined Stark effect on optical properties within trench defects in InGaN quantum wells with different indium content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaitkevičius, A., E-mail: augustas.vaitkevicius@gmail.com; Mickevičius, J.; Dobrovolskas, D.; Tamulaitis, G. [Semiconductor Physics Department and Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Sauletekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Tuna, Ö.; Giesen, C.; Heuken, M. [AIXTRON SE, Kaiserstr. 98, 52134 Herzogenrath (Germany)

    2014-06-07

    The trench defects in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures are studied using confocal photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A strong blueshift (up to ∼280 meV) and an intensity increase (by up to a factor of 700) of the emission are demonstrated for regions enclosed by trench loops. The influence of the difference in the well width inside and outside the trench loops observed by transmission electron microscopy, the compositional pulling effect, the strain relaxation inside the loop, and corresponding reduction in the built-in field on the PL band peak position and intensity were estimated. The competition of these effects is mainly governed by the width of the quantum wells in the structure. It is shown that the PL band blueshift observed within the trench defect loops in the InGaN structures with wide quantum wells is mainly caused by the reduction in efficiency of the quantum-confined Stark effect due to strain relaxation.

  10. Evolution of an Atom Impeded by Measurement The Quantum Zeno Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wunderlich, C; Toschek, P E; Wunderlich, Chr.; Balzer, Chr.

    2001-01-01

    A quantum system being observed evolves more slowly. This `'quantum Zeno effect'' is reviewed with respect to a previous attempt of demonstration, and to subsequent criticism of the significance of the findings. A recent experiment on an {\\it individual} cold trapped ion has been capable of revealing the micro-state of this quantum system, such that the effect of measurement is indeed discriminated from dephasing of the quantum state by either the meter or the environment.

  11. Observation of the Quantum Zeno Effect on a Single Solid State Spin

    CERN Document Server

    Wolters, Janik; Schoenfeld, Rolf Simon; Benson, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    The quantum Zeno effect, i.e. the inhibition of coherent quantum dynamics by projective measurements is one of the most intriguing predictions of quantum mechanics. Here we experimentally demonstrate the quantum Zeno effect by inhibiting the microwave driven coherent spin dynamics between two ground state spin levels of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond nano-crystals. Our experiments are supported by a detailed analysis of the population dynamics via a semi-classical model.

  12. Micromechanical measurement of beating patterns in the quantum oscillatory chemical potential of InGaAs quantum wells due to spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herzog, Florian, E-mail: Florian.Herzog@ph.tum.de; Wilde, Marc A., E-mail: mwilde@ph.tum.de [Lehrstuhl für Physik funktionaler Schichtsysteme, Physik Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); Heyn, Christian [Institut für Nanostruktur- und Festkörperphysik, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstr. 11, D-20355 Hamburg (Germany); Hardtdegen, Hilde; Schäpers, Thomas [Peter Grünberg Institut (PGI-9) and JARA-FIT Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Grundler, Dirk [Lehrstuhl für Physik funktionaler Schichtsysteme, Physik Department, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); Laboratory of Nanoscale Magnetic Materials and Magnonics (LMGN), Institute of Materials, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-08-31

    The quantum oscillatory magnetization M(B) and chemical potential μ(B) of a two-dimensional (2D) electron system provide important and complementary information about its ground state energy at low temperature T. We developed a technique that provides both quantities in the same cool-down process via a decoupled static operation and resonant excitation of a micromechanical cantilever. On InGaAs/InP heterostructures, we observed beating patterns in both M(B) and μ(B) attributed to spin-orbit interaction. A significantly enhanced sensitivity in μ enabled us to extract Rashba and Dresselhaus parameters with high accuracy. The technique is powerful for detailed investigations on the electronic properties of 2D materials.

  13. Validation of a numerical simulation to study the decoherence of quantum OAM entanglement due to atmospheric turbulence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hamadou Ibrahim, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Hamadou Ibrahim_2011.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1676 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Hamadou Ibrahim_2011.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Why.... Evolution equation for quantum entanglement. Nature Phys., 4(4):99, 2008. C [(I ? $)|????|] = C [(I ? $)|????|]C (|??), |?? = (1/2)1/2 (|1?A| ? 1?B + | ? 1?A|1?B) . . . Initial state: |?AB? = (w)1/2|1?A| ? 1?B + (1? w)1/2| ? 1?A|1?B , |?outAB ? = (1...

  14. Multiple lobes in the far-field distribution of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers due to self-interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Röben, B., E-mail: roeben@pdi-berlin.de; Wienold, M.; Schrottke, L.; Grahn, H. T. [Paul-Drude-Institut für Festkörperelektronik, Leibniz-Institut im Forschungsverbund Berlin e. V., Hausvogteiplatz 5–7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    The far-field distribution of the emission intensity of terahertz (THz) quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs) frequently exhibits multiple lobes instead of a single-lobed Gaussian distribution. We show that such multiple lobes can result from self-interference related to the typically large beam divergence of THz QCLs and the presence of an inevitable cryogenic operation environment including optical windows. We develop a quantitative model to reproduce the multiple lobes. We also demonstrate how a single-lobed far-field distribution can be achieved.

  15. Electron interaction and spin effects in quantum wires, quantum dots and quantum point contacts: a first-principles mean-field approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zozoulenko, I V; Ihnatsenka, S [Solid State Electronics, Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Linkoeping University, 60174 Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2008-04-23

    We have developed a mean-field first-principles approach for studying electronic and transport properties of low dimensional lateral structures in the integer quantum Hall regime. The electron interactions and spin effects are included within the spin density functional theory in the local density approximation where the conductance, the density, the effective potentials and the band structure are calculated on the basis of the Green's function technique. In this paper we present a systematic review of the major results obtained on the energetics, spin polarization, effective g factor, magnetosubband and edge state structure of split-gate and cleaved-edge overgrown quantum wires as well as on the conductance of quantum point contacts (QPCs) and open quantum dots. In particular, we discuss how the spin-resolved subband structure, the current densities, the confining potentials, as well as the spin polarization of the electron and current densities in quantum wires and antidots evolve when an applied magnetic field varies. We also discuss the role of the electron interaction and spin effects in the conductance of open systems focusing our attention on the 0.7 conductance anomaly in the QPCs. Special emphasis is given to the effect of the electron interaction on the conductance oscillations and their statistics in open quantum dots as well as to interpretation of the related experiments on the ultralow temperature saturation of the coherence time in open dots.

  16. Covariant effective action for a Galilean invariant quantum Hall system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geracie, Michael; Prabhu, Kartik; Roberts, Matthew M.

    2016-09-01

    We construct effective field theories for gapped quantum Hall systems coupled to background geometries with local Galilean invariance i.e. Bargmann spacetimes. Along with an electromagnetic field, these backgrounds include the effects of curved Galilean spacetimes, including torsion and a gravitational field, allowing us to study charge, energy, stress and mass currents within a unified framework. A shift symmetry specific to single constituent theories constraints the effective action to couple to an effective background gauge field and spin connection that is solved for by a self-consistent equation, providing a manifestly covariant extension of Hoyos and Son's improvement terms to arbitrary order in m.

  17. Effective approach to non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, David M

    2015-01-01

    Boundary conditions on non-relativistic wavefunctions are generally not completely constrained by the basic precepts of quantum mechanics, so understanding the set of possible self-adjoint extensions of the Hamiltonian is required. For real physical systems, non-trivial self-adjoint extensions have been used to model contact potentials when those interactions are expected a priori. However, they must be incorporated into the effective description of any quantum mechanical system in order to capture possible short-distance physics that does not decouple in the low energy limit. Here, an approach is described wherein an artificial boundary is inserted at an intermediate scale on which boundary conditions may encode short-distance effects that are hidden behind the boundary. Using this approach, an analysis is performed of the free particle, harmonic oscillator, and Coulomb potential in three dimensions. Requiring measurable quantities, such as spectra and cross sections, to be independent of this artificial bou...

  18. Quantum Reality, Complex Numbers and the Meteorological Butterfly Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, T N

    2004-01-01

    A not-too-technical version of the paper: "A Granular Permutation-based Representation of Complex Numbers and Quaternions: Elements of a Realistic Quantum Theory" - Proc. Roy. Soc.A (2004) 460, 1039-1055. The phrase "meteorological butterfly effect" is introduced to illustrate, not the familiar loss of predictability in low-dimensional chaos, but the much less familiar and much more radical paradigm of the finite-time predictability horizon, associated with upscale transfer of uncertainty in certain multi-scale systems (such as the 3D atmosphere). The meteorological butterfly effect is then used to provide a novel reinterpretation of complex algebra in terms of a family of self-similar permutation operators. Finally, a realistic deterministic reformulation of the foundations of quantum theory is given using this reinterpretation of complex numbers. Despite determinism, this reformulation has the emergent property of counterfactual indefiniteness.

  19. Deformed Calogero-Sutherland model and fractional quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atai, Farrokh; Langmann, Edwin

    2017-01-01

    The deformed Calogero-Sutherland (CS) model is a quantum integrable system with arbitrary numbers of two types of particles and reducing to the standard CS model in special cases. We show that a known collective field description of the CS model, which is based on conformal field theory (CFT), is actually a collective field description of the deformed CS model. This provides a natural application of the deformed CS model in Wen's effective field theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), with the two kinds of particles corresponding to electrons and quasi-hole excitations. In particular, we use known mathematical results about super-Jack polynomials to obtain simple explicit formulas for the orthonormal CFT basis proposed by van Elburg and Schoutens in the context of the FQHE.

  20. Quantum spin/valley Hall effect and topological insulator phase transitions in silicene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-04-26

    We present a theoretical realization of quantum spin and quantum valley Hall effects in silicene. We show that combination of an electric field and intrinsic spin-orbit interaction leads to quantum phase transitions at the charge neutrality point. This phase transition from a two dimensional topological insulator to a trivial insulating state is accompanied by a quenching of the quantum spin Hall effect and the onset of a quantum valley Hall effect, providing a tool to experimentally tune the topological state of silicene. In contrast to graphene and other conventional topological insulators, the proposed effects in silicene are accessible to experiments.

  1. Quantum Goos-Hanchen effect in graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Beenakker, C. W. J.; Sepkhanov, R. A.; Akhmerov, A. R.; Tworzydlo, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Goos-Hanchen (GH) effect is an interference effect on total internal reflection at an interface, resulting in a shift sigma of the reflected beam along the interface. We show that the GH effect at a p-n interface in graphene depends on the pseudospin (sublattice) degree of freedom of the massless Dirac fermions, and find a sign change of sigma at angle of incidence alpha*=arcsin[sin alpha_c]^1/2 determined by the critical angle alpha_c for total reflection. In an n-doped channel with p-do...

  2. Quantum mechanical solver for confined heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verreck, Devin, E-mail: devin.verreck@imec.be; Groeseneken, Guido [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Electrical Engineering, KU Leuven, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Departement of Physics, Universiteit Antwerpen, 2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Verhulst, Anne S.; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron [imec, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vandenberghe, William G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFET) are promising candidates for low-power applications in future technology nodes, as they are predicted to offer high on-currents, combined with a sub-60 mV/dec subthreshold swing. However, the effects of important quantum mechanical phenomena like size confinement at the heterojunction are not well understood, due to the theoretical and computational difficulties in modeling realistic heterostructures. We therefore present a ballistic quantum transport formalism, combining a novel envelope function approach for semiconductor heterostructures with the multiband quantum transmitting boundary method, which we extend to 2D potentials. We demonstrate an implementation of a 2-band version of the formalism and apply it to study confinement in realistic heterostructure diodes and p-n-i-n HTFETs. For the diodes, both transmission probabilities and current densities are found to decrease with stronger confinement. For the p-n-i-n HTFETs, the improved gate control is found to counteract the deterioration due to confinement.

  3. Quantized Thermal Transport in the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, C. L.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze thermal transport in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE), employing a Luttinger liquid model of edge states. Impurity mediated inter-channel scattering events are incorporated in a hydrodynamic description of heat and charge transport. The thermal Hall conductance, $K_H$, is shown to provide a new and universal characterization of the FQHE state, and reveals non-trivial information about the edge structure. The Lorenz ratio between thermal and electrical Hall conductances {\\i...

  4. Suppression of Dielectronic Recombination Due to Finite Density Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolić, D; Korista, K T; Ferland, G J; Badnell, N R

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a general model for determining density-dependent effective dielectronic recombination (DR) rate coefficients in order to explore finite-density effects on the ionization balance of plasmas. Our model consists of multiplying by a suppression factor those highly-accurate total zero-density DR rate coefficients which have been produced from state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and which have been benchmarked by experiment. The suppression factor is based-upon earlier detailed collision-radiative calculations which were made for a wide range of ions at various densities and temperatures, but used a simplified treatment of DR. A general suppression formula is then developed as a function of isoelectronic sequence, charge, density, and temperature. These density-dependent effective DR rate coefficients are then used in the plasma simulation code Cloudy to compute ionization balance curves for both collisionally ionized and photoionized plasmas at very low (ne = 1 cm^-3) and finite (ne=10^10 ...

  5. Cryptographic Protocols under Quantum Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Lunemann, Carolin

    2011-01-01

    The realm of this thesis is cryptographic protocol theory in the quantum world. We study the security of quantum and classical protocols against adversaries that are assumed to exploit quantum effects to their advantage. Security in the quantum world means that quantum computation does not jeopardize the assumption, underlying the protocol construction. But moreover, we encounter additional setbacks in the security proofs, which are mostly due to the fact that some well-known classical proof techniques are forbidden by certain properties of a quantum environment. Interestingly, we can exploit some of the very same properties to the benefit of quantum cryptography. Thus, this work lies right at the heart of the conflict between highly potential effects but likewise rather demanding conditions in the quantum world.

  6. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  7. numerical solutions of some parametric effects due to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr A.B.Ahmed

    Keywords: Parametric Effect, Electromagnetic Wave Scattering,. Infinite Circular ... M. G. 1965) and (Alexopoulos, N.G et al, 1974). The scattering from an .... (7). On substitution into (6) and dividing through by. )()()(. ),,(. zZ. rR zr. ϕ. ϕ ψ. Φ. =.

  8. Reynolds number effects on mixing due to topological chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Spencer A.; Warrier, Sangeeta [Department of Physics, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts 01075 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Topological chaos has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate fluid mixing. While this theory can guarantee a lower bound on the stretching rate of certain material lines, it does not indicate what fraction of the fluid actually participates in this minimally mandated mixing. Indeed, the area in which effective mixing takes place depends on physical parameters such as the Reynolds number. To help clarify this dependency, we numerically simulate the effects of a batch stirring device on a 2D incompressible Newtonian fluid in the laminar regime. In particular, we calculate the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for three different stirring protocols, one topologically complex (pseudo-Anosov) and two simple (finite-order), over a range of viscosities. After extracting appropriate measures indicative of both the amount of mixing and the area of effective mixing from the FTLE field, we see a clearly defined Reynolds number range in which the relative efficacy of the pseudo-Anosov protocol over the finite-order protocols justifies the application of topological chaos. More unexpectedly, we see that while the measures of effective mixing area increase with increasing Reynolds number for the finite-order protocols, they actually exhibit non-monotonic behavior for the pseudo-Anosov protocol.

  9. Ageing effects on image sensors due to terrestrial cosmic radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nampoothiri, G.G.; Horemans, M.L.R.; Theuwissen, A.J.P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the “ageing” effect on image sensors introduced by neutrons present in natural (terrestrial) cosmic environment. The results obtained at sea level are corroborated for the first time with accelerated neutron beam tests and for various image sensor operation conditions. The results reveal

  10. Quantum size effects in the volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles investigated by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. W.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, G. H.; Kim, Kwang S.

    2006-04-01

    Quantum size effects in volume plasmon excitation of bismuth nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 5to500nm have been studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The Bi nanoparticles were prepared by reducing Bi3+ with sodium borohydride in the presence of poly(vinylpyrroldone). The volume plasmon energy and its peak width increase with decreasing nanoparticle diameter, due to the quantum size effect. For the particles with diameter less than 40nm, the increase of the volume plasmon energy is proportional to the inverse square of the nanoparticle diameter, confirming the semimetal to semiconductor transition in Bi nanoparticles.

  11. Reynolds number effects on mixing due to topological chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Spencer A

    2016-01-01

    Topological chaos has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate fluid mixing. While this theory can guarantee a lower bound on the stretching rate of certain material lines, it does not indicate what fraction of the fluid actually participates in this minimally mandated mixing. Indeed, the area in which effective mixing takes place depends on physical parameters such as the Reynolds number. To help clarify this dependency, we numerically simulate the effects of a batch stirring device on a 2D incompressible Newtonian fluid in the laminar regime. In particular, we calculate the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field for three different stirring protocols, one topologically complex (pseudo-Anosov) and two simple (finite-order), over a range of viscosities. After extracting appropriate measures indicative of both the amount of mixing and the area of effective mixing from the FTLE field, we see a clearly defined Reynolds number range in which the relative efficacy of the pseudo-Anosov protocol over the finite...

  12. Growth variation effects in SiGe-based quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valavanis, A.; Ikonić, Z.; Kelsall, R. W.

    2009-05-01

    Epitaxial growth of SiGe quantum cascade (QC) lasers has thus far proved difficult, and nonabrupt Ge profiles are known to exist. We model the resulting barrier degradation by simulating annealing in pairs of quantum wells (QWs). Using a semiclassical charge transport model, we calculate the changes in scattering rates and transition energy between the lowest pair of subbands. We compare results for each of the possible material configurations for SiGe QC lasers. The effects are most severe in n-type (001) Si-rich systems due to the large effective electron mass, and in p-type systems due to the coexistence of light holes and heavy holes. The lower effective mass and conduction band offset of (111) oriented systems minimizes the transition energy variation, and a large interdiffusion length (Ld = 1.49 nm) is tolerated with respect to the scattering rate. Ge-rich systems are shown to give the best tolerance with respect to subband separation (Ld = 3.31 nm), due also to their low effective mass.

  13. Noninertial effects on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Luis B. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao, Departamento de Fisica, Sao Luis, MA (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    The noninertial effect of rotating frames on the quantum dynamics of scalar bosons embedded in the background of a cosmic string is considered. In this work, scalar bosons are described by the Duffin-Kemmer-Petiau (DKP) formalism. Considering the DKP oscillator in this background the combined effects of a rotating frames and cosmic string on the equation of motion, energy spectrum, and DKP spinor are analyzed and discussed in detail. Additionally, the effect of rotating frames on the scalar bosons' localization is studied. (orig.)

  14. Quark confinement and the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-Jun; GENG Wen-Tong

    2008-01-01

    Working in the physics of Wilson factor and Aharonov-Bohm effect,we find in the fluxtubequark system the topology of a baryon consisting of three heavy flavor quarks resembles that of the fractional quantum Hall effect(FQHE)in condensed matter.This similarity yields the result that the constituent quarks of baryon have the"filling factor"1/3.thus the previous conjecture that quark confinement is a correlation effect is confirmed.Moreover,by deriving a Hamiltonian of the system analogous to that of FQHE,we predict an energy gap for the ground state of a heavy three-quark system.

  15. Increased upconversion quantum yield in photonic structures due to local field enhancement and modification of the local density of states--a simulation-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herter, Barbara; Wolf, Sebastian; Fischer, Stefan; Gutmann, Johannes; Bläsi, Benedikt; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph

    2013-09-09

    In upconversion processes, two or more low-energy photons are converted into one higher-energy photon. Besides other applications, upconversion has the potential to decrease sub-band-gap losses in silicon solar cells. Unfortunately, upconverting materials known today show quantum yields, which are too low for this application. In order to improve the upconversion quantum yield, two parameters can be tuned using photonic structures: first, the irradiance can be increased within the structure. This is beneficial, as upconversion is a non-linear process. Second, the rates of the radiative transitions between ionic states within the upconverter material can be altered due to a varied local density of photonic states. In this paper, we present a theoretical model of the impact of a photonic structure on upconversion and test this model in a simulation based analysis of the upconverter material β -NaYF(4):20% Er(3+) within a dielectric waveguide structure. The simulation combines a finite-difference time-domain simulation model that describes the variations of the irradiance and the change of the local density of photonic states within a photonic structure, with a rate equation model of the upconversion processes. We find that averaged over the investigated structure the upconversion luminescence is increased by a factor of 3.3, and the upconversion quantum yield can be improved in average by a factor of 1.8 compared to the case without the structure for an initial irradiance of 200 Wm(-2).

  16. Sudden Transition between Quantum Correlation and Classical Correlation: the Effect of Interaction between Subsystems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jun-Yan; WANG Lin-Cheng; YI Xue-Xi

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative environment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems. The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist. The entanglements are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.%@@ We study the quantum discord dynamics of a bipartite composite system in the presence of a dissipative envi- ronment and investigate the effect of the interaction between the two subsystems.The results show that the interaction can influence the sudden transition between the quantum correlation and the classical correlation and for the maximally mixed marginals initial states, the sudden transition regime will always exist.The entangle- ments are also discussed in comparison to the quantum discord in describing the quantum correlations.

  17. Understanding quantum phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, Lincoln

    2010-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) offer wonderful examples of the radical macroscopic effects inherent in quantum physics: phase changes between different forms of matter driven by quantum rather than thermal fluctuations, typically at very low temperatures. QPTs provide new insight into outstanding problems such as high-temperature superconductivity and display fundamental aspects of quantum theory, such as strong correlations and entanglement. Over the last two decades, our understanding of QPTs has increased tremendously due to a plethora of experimental examples, powerful new numerical meth

  18. Adding quantum effects to the semi-classical molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Simulating the molecular dynamics (MD) using classical or semi-classical trajectories provides important details for the understanding of many chemical reactions, protein folding, drug design, and solvation effects. MD simulations using trajectories have achieved great successes in the computer simulations of various systems, but it is difficult to incorporate quantum effects in a robust way. Therefore, improving quantum wavepacket dynamics and incorporating nonadiabatic transitions and quantum effects into classical and semi-classical molecular dynamics is critical as well as challenging. In this paper, we present a MD scheme in which a new set of equations of motion (EOM) are proposed to effectively propagate nuclear trajectories while conserving quantum mechanical energy which is critical for describing quantum effects like tunneling. The new quantum EOM is tested on a one-state one-dimensional and a two-state two-dimensional model nonadiabatic systems. The global quantum force experienced by each trajecto...

  19. Effective spacetime understanding emergence in effective field theory and quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Crowther, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the notion that quantum gravity may represent the "breakdown" of spacetime at extremely high energy scales. If spacetime does not exist at the fundamental level, then it has to be considered "emergent", in other words an effective structure, valid at low energy scales. The author develops a conception of emergence appropriate to effective theories in physics, and shows how it applies (or could apply) in various approaches to quantum gravity, including condensed matter approaches, discrete approaches, and loop quantum gravity.

  20. Geodesic completeness and the lack of strong singularities in effective loop quantum Kantowski-Sachs spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Sahil; Singh, Parampreet

    2016-12-01

    Resolution of singularities in the Kantowski-Sachs model due to non-perturbative quantum gravity effects is investigated. Using the effective spacetime description for the improved dynamics version of loop quantum Kantowski-Sachs spacetimes, we show that even though expansion and shear scalars are universally bounded, there can exist events where curvature invariants can diverge. However, such events can occur only for very exotic equations of state when pressure or derivatives of energy density with respect to triads become infinite at a finite energy density. In all other cases curvature invariants are proved to remain finite for any evolution in finite proper time. We find the novel result that all strong singularities are resolved for arbitrary matter. Weak singularities pertaining to above potential curvature divergence events can exist. The effective spacetime is found to be geodesically complete for particle and null geodesics in finite time evolution. Our results add to a growing evidence for generic resolution of strong singularities using effective dynamics in loop quantum cosmology by generalizing earlier results on isotropic and Bianchi-I spacetimes.

  1. Unruh effect and macroscopic quantum interference

    CERN Document Server

    Steane, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the influence of Unruh radiation on matter-wave interferometry experiments using neutral objects modeled as dielectric spheres. The Unruh effect leads to a loss of coherence through momentum diffusion. This is a fundamental source of decoherence that affects all objects having electromagnetic interactions. However, the effect is not large enough to prevent the observation of interference for objects of any size, even when the path separation is larger than the size of the object. When the acceleration in the interferometer arms is large, inertial tidal forces will disrupt the material integrity of the interfering objects before the Unruh decoherence of the centre of mass motion is sufficient to prevent observable interference.

  2. Kondo Effect at a Quantum Critical Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazashvili, Revaz; Coleman, Piers

    1998-03-01

    The Kondo effect in a metal on the verge of a zero-temperature magnetic instability provides a fascinating example of interference between local and long-range correlations. (A. I. Larkin and V. I. Mel'nikov, Sov. Phys. JETP 34, 656 (1972)) (P. Coleman and A. M. Tsvelik, cond-mat/9707003) (A. Sengupta, cond-mat/9707316) We discuss possible consequences of this interference, including the breakdown of the Fermi liquid state.

  3. The God effect quantum entanglement, science’s strangest phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Clegg, Brian

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon that Einstein thought too spooky and strange to be true What is entanglement? It's a connection between quantum particles, the building blocks of the universe. Once two particles are entangled, a change to one of them is reflected---instantly---in the other, be they in the same lab or light-years apart. So counterintuitive is this phenomenon and its implications that Einstein himself called it "spooky" and thought that it would lead to the downfall of quantum theory. Yet scientists have since discovered that quantum entanglement, the "God Effect," was one of Einstein's few---and perhaps one of his greatest---mistakes. What does it mean? The possibilities offered by a fuller understanding of the nature of entanglement read like something out of science fiction: communications devices that could span the stars, codes that cannot be broken, computers that dwarf today's machines in speed and power, teleportation, and more. In The God Effect, veteran science writer Brian Clegg has written an ex...

  4. Scattering approach to quantum transport and many body effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichard, Jean-Louis; Freyn, Axel

    2010-12-01

    We review a series of works discussing how the scattering approach to quantum transport developed by Landauer and Buttiker for one body elastic scatterers can be extended to the case where electron-electron interactions act inside the scattering region and give rise to many body scattering. Firstly, we give an exact numerical result showing that at zero temperature a many body scatterer behaves as an effective one body scatterer, with an interaction dependent transmission. Secondly, we underline that this effective scatterer depends on the presence of external scatterers put in its vicinity. The implications of this non local scattering are illustrated studying the conductance of a quantum point contact where electrons interact with a scanning gate microscope. Thirdly, using the numerical renormalization group developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem, we study a double dot spinless model with an inter-dot interaction U and inter-dot hopping td, coupled to leads by hopping terms tc. We show that the quantum conductance as a function of td is given by a universal function, independently of the values of U and tc, if one measures td in units of a characteristic scale τ(U,tc). Mapping the double dot system without spin onto a single dot Anderson model with spin and magnetic field, we show that τ(U,tc) = 2TK, where TK is the Kondo temperature of the Anderson model.

  5. An effective Hamiltonian approach to quantum random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debajyoti; Paul, Niladri; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ghosh, Tarun Kanti

    2017-03-01

    In this article we present an effective Hamiltonian approach for discrete time quantum random walk. A form of the Hamiltonian for one-dimensional quantum walk has been prescribed, utilizing the fact that Hamiltonians are generators of time translations. Then an attempt has been made to generalize the techniques to higher dimensions. We find that the Hamiltonian can be written as the sum of a Weyl Hamiltonian and a Dirac comb potential. The time evolution operator obtained from this prescribed Hamiltonian is in complete agreement with that of the standard approach. But in higher dimension we find that the time evolution operator is additive, instead of being multiplicative (see Chandrashekar, Sci. Rep. 3, 2829 (18)). We showed that in the case of two-step walk, the time evolution operator effectively can have multiplicative form. In the case of a square lattice, quantum walk has been studied computationally for different coins and the results for both the additive and the multiplicative approaches have been compared. Using the graphene Hamiltonian, the walk has been studied on a graphene lattice and we conclude the preference of additive approach over the multiplicative one.

  6. Nambu-Goldstone Effective Theory of Information at Quantum Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia; Gomez, Cesar; Wintergerst, Nico

    2015-01-01

    We establish a fundamental connection between quantum criticality of a many-body system, such as Bose-Einstein condensates, and its capacity of information-storage and processing. For deriving the effective theory of modes in the vicinity of the quantum critical point we develop a new method by mapping a Bose-Einstein condensate of $N$-particles onto a sigma model with a continuous global (pseudo)symmetry that mixes bosons of different momenta. The Bogolyubov modes of the condensate are mapped onto the Goldstone modes of the sigma model, which become gapless at the critical point. These gapless Goldstone modes are the quantum carriers of information and entropy. Analyzing their effective theory, we observe the information-processing properties strikingly similar to the ones predicted by the black hole portrait. The energy cost per qubit of information-storage vanishes in the large-$N$ limit and the total information-storage capacity increases with $N$ either exponentially or as a power law. The longevity of i...

  7. About empty waves, their effect, and the quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wechsler, Sofia

    2010-01-01

    When a quantum object -- a particle as we call it in a non-rigorous way -- is described by a multi-branched wave- function, with the corresponding wave-packets occupying separated regions of the time-space, a frequently asked question is whether the quantum object is actually contained in only one of these wave-packets. If the answer is positive, then the other wave-packets are called in literature empty waves. The wave-packet containing the object is called a full wave, and is the only one that would produce a recording in a detector. A question immediately arising is whether the empty waves may also have an observable effect. Different works were dedicated to the elucidation of this question. None of them proved that the hypothesis of full/empty waves is correct - it may be that the Nature is indeed non-deterministic and the quantum object is not confined to one region of the space-time. All the works that proved that the empty waves have an effect, in fact, proved that if there exist full and empty waves, ...

  8. Cancer proliferation and therapy: the Warburg effect and quantum metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuszynski Jack A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cancer cells, in contrast to normal differentiated cells, rely on aerobic glycolysis instead of oxidative phosphorylation to generate metabolic energy, a phenomenon called the Warburg effect. Model Quantum metabolism is an analytic theory of metabolic regulation which exploits the methodology of quantum mechanics to derive allometric rules relating cellular metabolic rate and cell size. This theory explains differences in the metabolic rates of cells utilizing OxPhos and cells utilizing glycolysis. This article appeals to an analytic relation between metabolic rate and evolutionary entropy - a demographic measure of Darwinian fitness - to: (a provide an evolutionary rationale for the Warburg effect, and (b propose methods based on entropic principles of natural selection for regulating the incidence of OxPhos and glycolysis in cancer cells. Conclusion The regulatory interventions proposed on the basis of quantum metabolism have applications in therapeutic strategies to combat cancer. These procedures, based on metabolic regulation, are non-invasive, and complement the standard therapeutic methods involving radiation and chemotherapy

  9. Quantum backreaction (Casimir) effect. II. Scalar and electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Herdegen, A

    2005-01-01

    Casimir effect in most general terms may be understood as a backreaction of a quantum system causing an adiabatic change of the external conditions under which it is placed. This paper is the second installment of a work scrutinizing this effect with the use of algebraic methods in quantum theory. The general scheme worked out in the first part is applied here to the discussion of particular models. We consider models of the quantum scalar field subject to external interaction with ``softened'' Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on two parallel planes. We show that the case of electromagnetic field with softened perfect conductor conditions on the planes may be reduced to the other two. The ``softening'' is implemented on the level of the dynamics, and is not imposed ad hoc, as is usual in most treatments, on the level of observables. We calculate formulas for the backreaction energy in these models. We find that the common belief that for electromagnetic field the backreaction force tends to the strict...

  10. An effective Hamiltonian approach to quantum random walk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DEBAJYOTI SARKAR; NILADRI PAUL; KAUSHIK BHATTACHARYA; TARUN KANTI GHOSH

    2017-03-01

    In this article we present an effective Hamiltonian approach for discrete time quantum random walk. A form of the Hamiltonian for one-dimensional quantum walk has been prescribed, utilizing the fact that Hamiltoniansare generators of time translations. Then an attempt has been made to generalize the techniques to higher dimensions. We find that the Hamiltonian can be written as the sum of a Weyl Hamiltonian and a Dirac comb potential. The time evolution operator obtained from this prescribed Hamiltonian is in complete agreement with that of the standard approach. But in higher dimension we find that the time evolution operator is additive, instead of being multiplicative (see Chandrashekar, $\\it{Sci. Rep}$. 3, 2829 (2013)). We showed that in the case of two-step walk, the time evolution operator effectively can have multiplicative form. In the case of a square lattice, quantum walk has been studied computationally for different coins and the results for both the additive and the multiplicative approaches have been compared. Using the graphene Hamiltonian, the walk has been studied on a graphene lattice and we conclude the preference of additive approach over the multiplicative one.

  11. Impact of nonlinear effective interactions on GFT quantum gravity condensates

    CERN Document Server

    Pithis, Andreas G A; Tomov, Petar

    2016-01-01

    We present the numerical analysis of effectively interacting Group Field Theory (GFT) models in the context of the GFT quantum gravity condensate analogue of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for real Bose-Einstein condensates including combinatorially local interaction terms. Thus we go beyond the usually considered construction for free models. More precisely, considering such interactions in a weak regime, we find solutions for which the expectation value of the number operator N is finite, as in the free case. When tuning the interaction to the strongly nonlinear regime, however, we obtain solutions for which N grows and eventually blows up, which is reminiscent of what one observes for real Bose-Einstein condensates, where a strong interaction regime can only be realized at high density. This behaviour suggests the breakdown of the Bogoliubov ansatz for quantum gravity condensates and the need for non-Fock representations to describe the system when the condensate constituents are strongly correlated. Furthe...

  12. Matrix method analysis of quantum Hall effect device connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortolano, M.; Callegaro, L.

    2012-02-01

    The modelling of electrical connections of single, or several, multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices is relevant for electrical metrology: it is known, in fact, that certain particular connections allow (i) the realization of multiples or fractions of the quantized resistance, or (ii) the rejection of stray impedances, so that the configuration maintains the status of quantum standard. Ricketts-Kemeny and Delahaye equivalent circuits are known to be accurate models of the QHE: however, the numerical or analytical solution of electrical networks including these equivalent circuits can be difficult. In this paper, we introduce a method of analysis based on the representation of a QHE device by means of the indefinite admittance matrix: external connections are then represented with another matrix, easily written by inspection. Some examples, including the solution of double- and triple-series connections, are shown.

  13. Matrix method analysis of quantum Hall effect device connections

    CERN Document Server

    Ortolano, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The modelling of electrical connections of single, or several, multiterminal quantum Hall effect (QHE) devices is relevant for electrical metrology: it is known, in fact, that certain particular connections allow i) the realization of multiples or fractions of the quantised resistance, or ii) the rejection of stray impedances, so that the configuration maintains the status of quantum standard. Ricketts-Kemeny and Delahaye equivalent circuits are known to be accurate models of the QHE: however, the numerical or analytical solution of electrical networks including these equivalent circuits can be difficult. In this paper, we introduce a method of analysis based on the representation of a QHE device by means of the \\emph{indefinite admittance matrix}: external connections are then represented with another matrix, easily written by inspection. Some examples, including the solution of double- and triple-series connections, are shown.

  14. Towards Experimental Tests of Quantum Effects in Cytoskeletal Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Miller, J H; Nawarathna, D; Skoulakis, E M C; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E; Kolomenskij, A A; Schüssler, H A; Luduena, R F; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Mershin, Andreas; Sanabria, Hugo; Miller, John H.; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthna; Skoulakis, Efthimios M.C.; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Kolomenskii, Alexadre A.; Schuessler, Hans A.; Luduena, Richard F.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2005-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that fabrication of novel biomaterials through molecular self-assembly is going to play a significant role in material science and possibly the information technology of the future. Tubulin, microtubules (MTs) and the cytoskeleton are dynamic, self-assembling systems and we asked whether their structure and function contain the clues on how to fabricate biomolecular information processing devices. Here we review our neurobiological studies of transgenic Drosophila that strongly suggest the microtubular cytoskeleton is near the 'front lines' of intracellular information manipulation and storage. We also establish that spectroscopic techniques such as refractometry, surface plasmon resonance sensing and dielectric spectroscopy, coupled with molecular dynamic simulations and (quantum) electrodynamic analytical theory are useful tools in the study of the electrodynamic and possible quantum effects in cytoskeletal proteins. Implicit in our driving question is the possibility that...

  15. Quantum Hall effect in epitaxial graphene with permanent magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, F. D.; Cazimajou, T.; Sekine, Y.; Hibino, H.; Irie, H.; Glattli, D. C.; Kumada, N.; Roulleau, P.

    2016-12-01

    We have observed the well-kown quantum Hall effect (QHE) in epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide (SiC) by using, for the first time, only commercial NdFeB permanent magnets at low temperature. The relatively large and homogeneous magnetic field generated by the magnets, together with the high quality of the epitaxial graphene films, enables the formation of well-developed quantum Hall states at Landau level filling factors v = ±2, commonly observed with superconducting electro-magnets. Furthermore, the chirality of the QHE edge channels can be changed by a top gate. These results demonstrate that basic QHE physics are experimentally accessible in graphene for a fraction of the price of conventional setups using superconducting magnets, which greatly increases the potential of the QHE in graphene for research and applications.

  16. Understanding boundary effects in quantum state tomography - One qubit case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Takanori; Turner, Peter S.; Murao, Mio

    2014-12-01

    For classical and quantum estimation with finite data sets, the estimation error can deviate significantly from its asymptotic (large data set) behavior. In quantum state tomography, a major reason for this is the existence of a boundary in the parameter space imposed by constraints, such as the positive semidefiniteness of density matrices. Intuitively, we should be able to reduce the estimation error by using our knowledge of these constraints. This intuition is correct for maximumlikelihood estimators, but the size of the reduction has not been evaluated quantitatively. In this proceeding, we evaluate the improvement in one qubit state tomography by using mathematical tools in classical statistical estimation theory. In particular, we show that the effect of the reduction decreases exponentially with respect to the number of data sets when the true state is mixed, and it remains at arbitrarily large data set when the true state is pure.

  17. Probing quantum gravity effects in black holes at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alberghi, G L; Galli, D; Gregori, D; Tronconi, A; Vagnoni, V

    2006-01-01

    We study modifications of the Hawking emission in the evaporation of miniature black holes possibly produced in accelerators when their mass approaches the fundamental scale of gravity, set to 1 TeV according to some extra dimension models. Back-reaction and quantum gravity corrections are modelled by employing modified relations between the black hole mass and temperature. We release the assumption that black holes explode at 1 TeV or leave a remnant, and let them evaporate to much smaller masses. We have implemented such modified decay processes into an existing micro-black hole event generator, performing a study of the decay products in order to search for phenomenological evidence of quantum gravity effects.

  18. Massive Dirac fermions and the zero field quantum Hall effect

    CERN Document Server

    Raya, Alfredo

    2008-01-01

    Through an explicit calculation for a Lagrangian in quantum electrodynamics in (2+1)-space--time dimensions (QED$_3$), making use of the relativistic Kubo formula, we demonstrate that the filling factor accompanying the quantized electrical conductivity for massive Dirac fermions of a single species in two spatial dimensions is a half (in natural units) when time reversal and parity symmetries of the Lagrangian are explicitly broken by the fermion mass term. We then discuss the most general form of the QED$_3$ Lagrangian, both for irreducible and reducible representations of the Dirac matrices in the plane, with emphasis on the appearance of a Chern-Simons term. We also identify the value of the filling factor with a zero field quantum Hall effect (QHE).

  19. Massive Dirac fermions and the zero field quantum Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, Alfredo; Reyes, Edward D.

    2008-09-01

    Through an explicit calculation for a Lagrangian in quantum electrodynamics in (2+1)-spacetime dimensions (QED3), making use of the relativistic Kubo formula, we demonstrate that the filling factor accompanying the quantized electrical conductivity for massive Dirac fermions of a single species in two spatial dimensions is a half (in natural units) when time reversal and parity symmetries of the Lagrangian are explicitly broken by the fermion mass term. We then discuss the most general form of the QED3 Lagrangian, for both irreducible and reducible representations of the Dirac matrices in the plane, with emphasis on the appearance of a Chern-Simons term. We also identify the value of the filling factor with a zero field quantum Hall effect (QHE).

  20. Holographic butterfly effect and diffusion in quantum critical region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yi; Xian, Zhuo-Yu

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the butterfly effect and charge diffusion near the quantum phase transition in holographic approach. We argue that their criticality is controlled by the holographic scaling geometry with deformations induced by a relevant operator at finite temperature. Specifically, in the quantum critical region controlled by a single fixed point, the butterfly velocity decreases when deviating from the critical point. While, in the non-critical region, the behavior of the butterfly velocity depends on the specific phase at low temperature. Moreover, in the holographic Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, the universal behavior of the butterfly velocity is absent. Finally, the tendency of our holographic results matches with the numerical results of Bose-Hubbard model. A comparison between our result and that in the O( N ) nonlinear sigma model is also given.

  1. Quantum-size effects and thermal response of anti-Kramer-Pesch vortex core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yajiang; Hong-Yu, Wu; Peeters, F. M.; Shanenko, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    Since the 1960's it has been well known that the basic superconductive quantities can exhibit oscillations as functions of the thickness (diameter) in superconducting nanofilms (nanowires) due to the size quantization of the electronic spectrum. However, very little is known about the effects of quantum confinement on the microscopic properties of vortices. Based on a numerical solution to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations, we study the quantum-size oscillations of the vortex core resulting from the sequential interchange of the Kramer-Pesch and anti-Kramer-Pesch regimes with changing nanocylinder radius. The physics behind the anti-Kramer-Pesch anomaly is displayed by utilizing a semi-analytical Anderson approximate solution. We also demonstrate that the anti-Kramer-Pesch vortex core is robust against thermal smearing and results in a distinctive two-maxima structure in the local density of states, which can be used to identify the existence of the anti-Kramer-Pesch vortex.

  2. Photon antibunching and nonlinear effects for a quantum dot coupled to a semiconductor cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, F.; Whittaker, D. M.

    2010-09-01

    The models presented simulate pumping techniques that can be used on modern semiconductor devices which are capable of coupling a quantum dot and cavity mode in order to determine a more efficient method of producing a single-photon emitter while taking into consideration typical parameters which are achievable given today’s standards of coupling strength. Cavity quantum electrodynamics are incorporated in the calculations as we compare various pumping schemes for the system that either use on-resonant laser excitation or nonresonant excitation due to a wetting layer. In particular, we look to study how antibunching effects change for each method as the cavity finesse is increased toward the strong coupling regime. Experimentally these studies are equivalent to nonlinear pump-probe measurements, where a strong pump, either resonant or nonresonant, is used to excite the coupled system, and the resulting state is characterized using a weak, resonant probe beam.

  3. Enhanced Quantum Confined Stark Effect in a mesoporous hybrid multifunctional system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, M.; Deb, P.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Kostka, A.

    2014-06-01

    Quantum Confined Stark Effect in hybrid of CdTe quantum dot with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in both nonporous and mesoporous silica matrix has been realized. The observed QCSE is due to the local electric field induced by charge dispersion at SiO2/polar solvent interface. Enhanced Stark shift of 89.5 meV is observed in case of mesoporous hybrid structure and the corresponding local electric field has been evaluated as 4.38×104 V/cm. The enhancement is assumed to be caused by greater density of charge in the mesoporous hybrid. The conjugation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in this tailored hybrid microstructure has not imparted any alteration to the Stark shift, but has added multifunctional attribute. The present study on the local electric field induced enhanced QCSE with wavelength modulation towards red end paves the way of developing magneto-fluorescent hybrid systems for biomedical imaging application.

  4. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-16

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  5. Nonlinear thermokinetic phenomena due to the Seebeck effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2014-07-22

    We propose a novel mechanism to produce nonlinear thermokinetic vortex flows around a circular cylinder with ideally high thermal conductivity in an electrolyte. That is, the nonlinear thermokinetic slip velocity, which is proportional to the square of the temperature gradient [∇(T)0(2)], is derived based on the electrolyte Seebeck effect, heat conduction equation, and Helmholtz–Smoluchowski formula. Different from conventional linear thermokinetic theory, our theory predicts that the inversion of the temperature gradient does not change the direction of the thermokinetic flows and thus a Janus particle using this phenomenon can move to the both hotter and colder regions in a temperature gradient field by changing the direction of its dielectric end. Our findings bridge the gap between the electro- and thermo-kinetic phenomena and provide an integrated physical viewpoint for the interface science.

  6. Ballistic anomalies in solid rocket motors due to migration effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröbster, M.; Schmucker, R. H.

    Double base and composite propellants are generally used for rocket motors, whereby double base propellants basically consist of nitrocellulose plasticized with an explosive plasticizer, mostly nitroglycerine, and in some cases with an additional inert plasticizer and ballistic additives. Composite propellants consist of an oxidizer like ammonium perchlorate and of aluminum, binder and plasticizer and often contain liquid or solid burning rate catalysts. A common feature of both propellants is that they contain smaller or larger amounts of chemically unbonded liquid species which tend to migrate. If these propellants loose part of the plasticizer by migration into the insulation layer, not only will there be a change in mechanical propellant properties but also the bond between propellant and insulation may degrade. However, depending on the severity of these effects, the change in the ballistic properties of the propellant grain caused by plasticizer migration may be of even more importance. In the past, most emphasis was placed on the behaviour of end-burning configurations. However, more recent theoretical and experimental studies revealed that not only for end-burning grain configurations but also for internal burning configurations there is a common effect which is responsible for ballistic anomalies: migration of liquid species from the propellant into the insulation. By using a plasticizer equilibrated insulation in an internal burning configuration the liquid species migration and thus the previously observed ballistic anomalies are avoided. Using this approach for end-burning configurations provides similar positive results. The various factors affecting plasticizer migration are studied and discussed, and several methods to prevent liquid species migration are described as well as methods to obtain plasticizer resistant insulations.

  7. Quantum mechanics of effective potential at a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatin, Alexander

    In this thesis we study the nonuniform electron density system at a metal-vacuum interface via the corresponding local effective potential confining the electrons, the metal being represented by the jellium and structureless pseudopotential models. The study is performed within conventional Kohn-Sham (KS) density-functional theory and its recently derived quantum-mechanical interpretation. In the latter, properties are determined in terms of the separate electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion and the correlation contribution to the kinetc energy. We have derived the exact analytical structure, valid for self-consistent orbitals, of the KS theory exchange potential in the classically forbidden region. This structure is image-potential-like of the form -alphasb{KS,x}(beta)chi where the parameter betasp2 is the ratio of the surface barrier height to the metal Fermi energy. For a Wigner-Seitz radius of rsb{s} = 4.1, which is approximately that for which jellium metal is stable, the decay coefficient is precisely 1/4. Over the metallic range of densities rsb{s} = 2-6, the coefficient ranges from 0.195 to 0.274. Thus, if the asymptotic structure of the KS exchange-correlation potential is the image potential, then this structure is due principally to KS exchange effects, the KS correlation contribution being an order of magnitude smaller. These results, then lead to the concept of an 'image' charge localized to the surface region for asymptotic positions of the electron. We have further derived the exact analytical structure in the vacuum of the Slater exchange potential, and of the Pauli-correlation and correlation-kinetic components of the KS exchange potential. These structures are all image-potential-like, decaying respectively as -alphasb{S}(beta)chi,\\ -alphasb{W}(beta)chi and alphasbsp{tsb{c}}{(1)}(beta)/chi. The Pauli-correlation component constitutes the major fraction of the KS exchange potential asymptotically, but there

  8. Effect of phase noise on quantum correlations in Bose-Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrini, G.; Minguzzi, A.; Hekking, F. W. J. [Universite Grenoble 1 and CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses UMR5493, B.P. 166, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Spehner, D. [Universite Grenoble 1 and CNRS, Laboratoire de Physique et Modelisation des Milieux Condenses UMR5493, B.P. 166, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Universite Grenoble 1 and CNRS, Institut Fourier UMR5582, B.P. 74, F-38402 Saint Martin d' Heres (France)

    2011-10-15

    In a two-mode Bose-Josephson junction the dynamics induced by a sudden quench of the tunnel amplitude leads to the periodic formation of entangled states. For instance, squeezed states are formed at short times and macroscopic superpositions of phase states at later times. In atom interferometry, the two modes of the junction play the role of the two arms of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer; use of multiparticle entangled states allows the enhancement of phase sensitivity with respect to that obtained from uncorrelated atoms. Decoherence due to the presence of noise degrades quantum correlations between atoms, thus reducing phase sensitivity. We consider decoherence due to stochastic fluctuations of the energies of the two modes of the junction. We analyze its effect on squeezed states and macroscopic superpositions and calculate the squeezing parameter and the quantum Fisher information during the quenched dynamics. The latter quantity measures the amount of quantum correlations useful in interferometry. For moderate noise intensities, we show that it increases on time scales beyond the squeezing regime. This suggests multicomponent superpositions of phase states as interesting candidates for high-precision atom interferometry.

  9. Avoiding Quantum Chaos in Quantum Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Izrailev, F M; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2001-01-01

    We study a one-dimensional chain of nuclear $1/2-$spins in an external time-dependent magnetic field. This model is considered as a possible candidate for experimental realization of quantum computation. According to the general theory of interacting particles, one of the most dangerous effects is quantum chaos which can destroy the stability of quantum operations. According to the standard viewpoint, the threshold for the onset of quantum chaos due to an interaction between spins (qubits) strongly decreases with an increase of the number of qubits. Contrary to this opinion, we show that the presence of a magnetic field gradient helps to avoid quantum chaos which turns out to disappear with an increase of the number of qubits. We give analytical estimates which explain this effect, together with numerical data supporting

  10. Effective production of orbital quantum entanglement in chaotic quantum dots with nonideal contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E. H.; Almeida, F. A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We study orbital entanglement production in a chaotic quantum dot with two-channel leads by varying the opacity of the contacts in the unitary and orthogonal Wigner-Dyson ensembles. We computed the occurrence probability of entangled states (squared norm) and its concurrence (entanglement level). We also define an entanglement production factor to properly evaluate the entanglement behavior in the system considering effective aspects. The results are numerically obtained through (i) integrations over random matrix ensembles (exact results) for the scenario of one contact ideally fixed and (ii) random matrix simulations for arbitrary contact opacities (sampling). Those outcomes are in mutual agreement and indicate that the optimum effective production of orbital entanglement is achieved when both contacts are ideal and the time-reversal symmetry is broken.

  11. The effect of electric field on an on-center hydrogenic impurity spherical quantum dot GaAs/AlAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abdollahi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  In this research, the effect of the uniform electric field on the ground-state of a centered hydrogenic donor impurity in a GaAs/AlAs spherical quantum dot was studied using infinite potential model. In presence of strong electric field, due to the stark effect (perturbing electric field, the ground state energy would increase linearly. In presence of weak electric fields, the normalized binding energy was calculated by using perturbation method with effective mass approximation. This energy was investigated with respect to electric field strength. Studies show the proper choice of radius of quantum dot and electric field will clearly influence the normalized binding energy. The resulting influence may be used to calculate the small changes in quantum dot radius and thus detect different electric field strengths .

  12. The theta parameter in loop quantum gravity: effects on quantum geometry and black hole entropy

    CERN Document Server

    Rezende, Danilo Jimenez

    2007-01-01

    The precise analog of the theta-quantization ambiguity of Yang-Mills theory exists for the real SU(2) connection formulation of general relativity. As in the former case theta labels representations of large gauge transformations, which are super-selection sectors in loop quantum gravity. We show that unless theta=0, the (kinematical) geometric operators such as area and volume are not well defined on spin network states. More precisely the intersection of their domain with the dense set Cyl in the kinematical Hilbert space H of loop quantum gravity is empty. The absence of a well defined notion of area operator acting on spin network states seems at first in conflict with the expected finite black hole entropy. However, we show that the black hole (isolated) horizon area--which in contrast to kinematical area is a (Dirac) physical observable--is indeed well defined, and quantized so that the black hole entropy is proportional to the area. The effect of theta is negligible in the semiclassical limit where pro...

  13. Field effect in the quantum Hall regime of a high mobility graphene wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barraud, C., E-mail: cbarraud@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Choi, T.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K. [Solid State Physics Laboratory, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); Butti, P.; Shorubalko, I. [Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Science and Technologies, EMPA Elect. Metrol. Reliabil. Lab., CH-8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan)

    2014-08-21

    In graphene-based electronic devices like in transistors, the field effect applied thanks to a gate electrode allows tuning the charge density in the graphene layer and passing continuously from the electron to the hole doped regime across the Dirac point. Homogeneous doping is crucial to understand electrical measurements and for the operation of future graphene-based electronic devices. However, recently theoretical and experimental studies highlighted the role of the electrostatic edge due to fringing electrostatic field lines at the graphene edges [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008); F. T. Vasko and I. V. Zozoulenko, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 092115 (2010)]. This effect originates from the particular geometric design of the samples. A direct consequence is a charge accumulation at the graphene edges giving a value for the density, which deviates from the simple picture of a plate capacitor and also varies along the width of the graphene sample. Entering the quantum Hall regime would, in principle, allow probing this accumulation thanks to the extreme sensitivity of this quantum effect to charge density and the charge distribution. Moreover, the presence of an additional and counter-propagating edge channel has been predicted [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008)] giving a fundamental aspect to this technological issue. In this article, we investigate this effect by tuning a high mobility graphene wire into the quantum Hall regime in which charge carriers probe the electrostatic potential at high magnetic field close to the edges. We observe a slight deviation to the linear shift of the quantum Hall plateaus with magnetic field and we study its evolution for different filling factors, which correspond to different probed regions in real space. We discuss the possible origins of this effect including an increase of the charge density towards the edges.

  14. Field effect in the quantum Hall regime of a high mobility graphene wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraud, C.; Choi, T.; Butti, P.; Shorubalko, I.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2014-08-01

    In graphene-based electronic devices like in transistors, the field effect applied thanks to a gate electrode allows tuning the charge density in the graphene layer and passing continuously from the electron to the hole doped regime across the Dirac point. Homogeneous doping is crucial to understand electrical measurements and for the operation of future graphene-based electronic devices. However, recently theoretical and experimental studies highlighted the role of the electrostatic edge due to fringing electrostatic field lines at the graphene edges [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008); F. T. Vasko and I. V. Zozoulenko, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 092115 (2010)]. This effect originates from the particular geometric design of the samples. A direct consequence is a charge accumulation at the graphene edges giving a value for the density, which deviates from the simple picture of a plate capacitor and also varies along the width of the graphene sample. Entering the quantum Hall regime would, in principle, allow probing this accumulation thanks to the extreme sensitivity of this quantum effect to charge density and the charge distribution. Moreover, the presence of an additional and counter-propagating edge channel has been predicted [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008)] giving a fundamental aspect to this technological issue. In this article, we investigate this effect by tuning a high mobility graphene wire into the quantum Hall regime in which charge carriers probe the electrostatic potential at high magnetic field close to the edges. We observe a slight deviation to the linear shift of the quantum Hall plateaus with magnetic field and we study its evolution for different filling factors, which correspond to different probed regions in real space. We discuss the possible origins of this effect including an increase of the charge density towards the edges.

  15. Nonlocal memory effects in the dynamics of open quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2011-01-01

    We study a model of two entangled photons interacting locally with two dephasing environments. It is shown that initial correlations between the local environments can generate a nonlocal quantum process from a local interaction Hamiltonian. While the global dynamics of the two-photon polarization state exhibits strong memory effects, the induced local dynamics of either of the two photons is found to be Markovian. A direct connection between the degree of memory effects and the amount of correlations in the initial environmental state is derived. The results demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, enlarging an open system can change the dynamics from Markovian to non-Markovian.

  16. Strong quantum confinement effects in thin zinc selenide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoutas, S.; Poulopoulos, P.; Karoutsos, V.; Angelakeris, M.; Flevaris, N. K.

    2006-01-01

    Thin Zinc Selenide films in the thickness range 3-50 nm have been prepared on high quality glass substrates by e-beam evaporation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Optical absorption spectroscopy experiments reveal a systematically increasing blue shift of the effective bandgap energy as the film thickness decreases, reaching a maximum value of 0.32 eV for the thinner film. The experimental results, which indicate the presence of strong quantum confinement effects, are fairly well described by theoretical calculations based on the potential morphing method, using as a confining potential the finite square well potential with height of the barriers equal to 5 eV.

  17. Antiresonance Effect in Electronic Tunnelling through a One-Dimensional Quantum Dot Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Pu-Nan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Electronic tunnelling through a one-dimensional quantum dot chain is theoretically studied, when two leads couple to the individual component quantum dots of the chain arbitrarily. If there are some dangling quantum dots in the chain outside the leads, the electron tunnelling through the quantum dot chain is wholly forbidden while the energy of the incident electron is just equal to the molecular energy levels of the dangling quantum dots,which is known as the antiresonance effect. In addition, the influence of electron interaction on the antiresonance effect is discussed within the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  18. Squeezed State Effects on Continuous Variable Quantum Erasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Peter; Kasisomayajula, Vijay; Russo, Onofrio

    2008-03-01

    Experimental verification of complementarity using quantum erasing for the continuous variable (CV) infinite dimensional Hilbert space has been considered. [1] The complemetary pair is that of the canonically conjugate amplitude and phase quadratures of light. The amplitude quadrature is labeled to a squeezed meter signal by quantum nondemolition (QND) [2] entanglement coupling. [3] Knowledge of which eigenstate (WE) can be obtained by measuring this amplitude in the meter state, and can thereafter be `lost' by measuring the quadrature phase of the meter, thus restoring the quadrature phase of the signal beam in a process known as quantum erasure. [4] The coupling, i.e. the labeling of the signal state to the meter state, is implemented with a beam splitter coupled to the squeezed light meter beam. [4] We investigate the effects of using the unitary squeeze operator S(z)=exp.5ex1 -.1em/ -.15em.25ex2 (z*a^2 - za^+2) where z = re^i(squeezing angle) on selected coherent states under certain conditions. [5,6] [1] U. L. Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 100403 (2004). [2] V. B. Braginsky et al., Science 209, 547 (1980). [3] R. Bruckmeimer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 43 (1997). [4] P. Grangier et al., Nature 396, 537 (1998). [5] C. M. Caves, Phys. Rev. D 23, 1693 (1981). [6] D. Stoler, Phys. Rev. D. 1, 3217 (1970), D. Stoler, Phys. Rev. D. 4, 1925 (1971). .

  19. Effective potential for moment-method simulation of quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriman, A. M.; Zhou, J.-R.; Kluksdahl, N. C.; Choi, H. H.; Ferry, D. K.

    1989-12-01

    In the simulation of submicron devices, complete quantum descriptions can be extremely computationally intensive, and reduced descriptions are desirable. One such description utilizes a few low-order moments of the momentum distribution that are defined by the Wigner function. Two major difficulties occur in applying this moment method: (i) An independent calculation is required to find quantum mechanically accurate initial conditions. (ii) For a system in a mixed state, the hierarchy of time evolution equations for the moments does not close. We describe an approach to solve these problems. The initial distribution is determined in equilibrium by means of a new effective potential, chosen for its ability to treat the sharp potential features which occur in heterostructures. It accurately describes barrier penetration and repulsion, as well as quantum broadening of the momentum distribution. The moment equation hierarchy is closed at the level of the second-moment time evolution equation, using a closure that is exact for a shifted Fermi distribution. Band-bending is included by simultaneous self-consistent determination of all the moments.

  20. Edge states and integer quantum Hall effect in topological insulator thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song-Bo; Lu, Hai-Zhou; Shen, Shun-Qing

    2015-08-25

    The integer quantum Hall effect is a topological state of quantum matter in two dimensions, and has recently been observed in three-dimensional topological insulator thin films. Here we study the Landau levels and edge states of surface Dirac fermions in topological insulators under strong magnetic field. We examine the formation of the quantum plateaux of the Hall conductance and find two different patterns, in one pattern the filling number covers all integers while only odd integers in the other. We focus on the quantum plateau closest to zero energy and demonstrate the breakdown of the quantum spin Hall effect resulting from structure inversion asymmetry. The phase diagrams of the quantum Hall states are presented as functions of magnetic field, gate voltage and chemical potential. This work establishes an intuitive picture of the edge states to understand the integer quantum Hall effect for Dirac electrons in topological insulator thin films.

  1. Quantum Fisher information of the GHZ state due to classical phase noise lasers under non-Markovian environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zou, Jian; Yang, Zi-Yi; Li, Longwu; Li, Hai; Shao, Bin

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of N-qubit GHZ state quantum Fisher information (QFI) under phase noise lasers (PNLs) driving is investigated in terms of non-Markovian master equation. We first investigate the non-Markovian dynamics of the QFI of N-qubit GHZ state and show that when the ratio of the PNL rate and the system-environment coupling strength is very small, the oscillations of the QFIs decay slower which corresponds to the non-Markovian region; yet when it becomes large, the QFIs monotonously decay which corresponds to the Markovian region. When the atom number N increases, QFIs in both regions decay faster. We further find that the QFI flow disappears suddenly followed by a sudden birth depending on the ratio of the PNL rate and the system-environment coupling strength and the atom number N, which unveil a fundamental connection between the non-Markovian behaviors and the parameters of system-environment couplings. We discuss two optimal positive operator-valued measures (POVMs) for two different strategies of our model and find the condition of the optimal measurement. At last, we consider the QFI of two atoms with qubit-qubit interaction under random telegraph noises (RTNs).

  2. Quantum Confinement Effects in Strained SiGe/Si Multiple Quantum Wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Strained SiGe/Si multiple quantum wells (MQWs) were grown by cold-wall ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV/CVD). Photoluminescence measurement was performed to study the exciton energies of strained Si0.84 Ge0.16/Si MQWs with SiGe well widths ranging from 4.2nm to 25.4nm. The confinement energy of 43meV is found in the Si0.84Ge0.16/Si MQWs with well width of 4.2nm. The confinement energy was calculated by solving the problem of a particle confined in a single finite rectangular poteintial well using one band effect mass model. Experimental and theoretical confinement energies are in good agreement

  3. Effect of quantum corrections on Rayleigh-Taylor instability and internal waves in strongly coupled magnetized viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Ramprasad

    2016-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability is recently investigated is strongly coupled plasma looking to its importance in dense stellar systems and Inertial Confinement Fusion [1-3]. In the present work, the effect of quantum corrections are studied on Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability and internal wave propagation in a strongly coupled, magnetized, viscoelastic fluid. The modified generalized hydrodynamic model is used to derive the analytical dispersion relation. The internal wave mode and dispersion relation are modified due to the presence of quantum corrections and viscoelastic effects. We observe that strong coupling effects and quantum corrections significantly modifies the dispersion characteristics. The dispersion relation is also discussed in weakly coupled (hydrodynamic) and strongly coupled (kinetic) limits. The explicit expression of R-T instability criterion is derived which is influenced by shear velocity and quantum corrections. Numerical calculations are performed in astrophysical and experimental relevance and it is examined that both the shear and quantum effects suppresses the growth rate of R-T instability. The possible application of the work is discussed in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) to discuss the suppression of R-T instability under considered situation. References: [1] R. P. Prajapati, Phys. Plasmas 23, 022106 (2016). [2] K. Avinash and A. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 22, 083707 (2015). [3] A. Das and P. Kaw, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014) 062102.

  4. Optomechanics of Nanoparticles: Effect of Quantum Fluctuations in Levitating EM Field on Cavity-assisted and Cavity-less Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jazayeri, Amir M

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanics of nanoparticles purports to reach the quantum regime, but experimental evidence suggests otherwise. We believe that the discrepancy is due to the omission of the deleterious effects of the EM field levitating the particle. This letter focuses on quantum fluctuations in the levitating field. In a cavity-assisted system, they lead to fluctuations in the gradient force, and encourage escape of the particle. In a feedback system, they lead to the detector shot noise besides fluctuations in the gradient force and radiation pressure, and render the system very vulnerable to the thermal noise of the feedback circuit.

  5. Routes towards the experimental observation of the large fluctuations due to chaos-assisted tunneling effects with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubertrand, R.; Billy, J.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Georgeot, B.; Lemarié, G.

    2016-10-01

    In the presence of a complex classical dynamics associated with a mixed phase space, a quantum wave function can tunnel between two stable islands through the chaotic sea, an effect that has no classical counterpart. This phenomenon, referred to as chaos-assisted tunneling, is characterized by large fluctuations of the tunneling rate when a parameter is varied. To date, the full extent of this effect as well as the associated statistical distribution have never been observed in a quantum system. Here, we analyze the possibility of characterizing these effects accurately in a cold-atom experiment. Using realistic values of the parameters of an experimental setup, we examine through analytical estimates and extensive numerical simulations a specific system that can be implemented with cold atoms, the atomic modulated pendulum. We assess the efficiency of three possible routes to observe in detail chaos-assisted tunneling properties. Our main conclusion is that due to the fragility of the symmetry between positive and negative momenta as a function of quasimomentum, it is very challenging to use tunneling between classical islands centered on fixed points with opposite momentum. We show that it is more promising to use islands symmetric in position space, and characterize the regime where it could be done. The proposed experiment could be realized with current state-of-the-art technology.

  6. Specific Heat of Hollow Nanosphere Coupled to Substrate: Quantum Size Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    With the help of the elastic wave theory, in the perturbed approximation the density-of-states for vibrational modes and the specific heat axe studied for different hollow Si nanospheres, coupled with a semi-infinite substrate. We find that the modes of such coupled hollow spheres are significantly broadened and shifted toward low frequencies. The specific heat of the coupled hollow nanosphere is bigger than an isolated one due to the coupling interaction and quantum size effects. The predicted coupling and size enhancements on specific heat are probed in thermal experiments.

  7. Symmetry and size effects on energy and entanglement of an exciton in coupled quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Man; Bai Yan-Kui; An Xing-Tao; Liu Jian-Jun

    2013-01-01

    We study theoretically the essential properties of an exciton in vertically coupled Gaussian quantum dots in the presence of an extemal magnetic field.The ground state energy of a heavy-hole exciton is split into four energy levels due to the Zeeman effect.For the symmetrical system,the entanglement entropy of the exciton state can reach a value of 1.However,for a system with broken symmetry,it is close to zero.Our results are in good agreement with previous studies.

  8. Relativistic effects on the modulational instability of electron plasma waves in quantum plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Basudev Ghosh; Swarniv Chandra; Sailendra Nath Paul

    2012-05-01

    Relativistic effects on the linear and nonlinear properties of electron plasma waves are investigated using the one-dimensional quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) model for a twocomponent electron–ion dense quantum plasma. Using standard perturbation technique, a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) containing both relativistic and quantum effects has been derived. This equation has been used to discuss the modulational instability of the wave. Through numerical calculations it is shown that relativistic effects significantly change the linear dispersion character of the wave. Unlike quantum effects, relativistic effects are shown to reduce the instability growth rate of electron plasma waves.

  9. Graviton, ghost and instanton condensation on horizon scale of the Universe. Dark energy as a macroscopic effect of quantum gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Marochnik, Leonid; Vereshkov, Grigory

    2008-01-01

    We show that cosmological acceleration, Dark Energy (DE) effect is a consequence of the zero rest mass, conformal non-invariance of gravitons, and 1-loop finiteness of quantum gravity (QG). The effect is due to graviton-ghost condensates arising from the interference of quantum coherent states. The theory is constructed as follows: De Witt-Faddeev-Popov gauged path integral -> factorization of classical and quantum variables -> transition to the 1-loop approximation -> choice of ghost sector, satisfying 1-loop finiteness of the theory off the mass shell. The Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirckwood-Yvon (BBGKY) chain for the spectral function of gravitons renormalized by ghosts is used to build a theory of gravitons in the isotropic Universe. We found three exact solutions of the equations that describe virtual graviton and ghost condensates as well as condensates of instanton fluctuations. Exact solutions correspond to various condensates with different graviton-ghost compositions. The formalism of the BBGKY chain ta...

  10. Interaction effects in a microscopic quantum wire model with strong spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, G. W.; Ganahl, M.; Schuricht, D.; Evertz, H. G.; Andergassen, S.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of strong interactions on the spectral properties of quantum wires with strong Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction in a magnetic field, using a combination of matrix product state and bosonization techniques. Quantum wires with strong Rashba SO interaction and magnetic field exhibit a partial gap in one-half of the conducting modes. Such systems have attracted wide-spread experimental and theoretical attention due to their unusual physical properties, among which are spin-dependent transport, or a topological superconducting phase when under the proximity effect of an s-wave superconductor. As a microscopic model for the quantum wire we study an extended Hubbard model with SO interaction and Zeeman field. We obtain spin resolved spectral densities from the real-time evolution of excitations, and calculate the phase diagram. We find that interactions increase the pseudo gap at k = 0 and thus also enhance the Majorana-supporting phase and stabilize the helical spin order. Furthermore, we calculate the optical conductivity and compare it with the low energy spiral Luttinger liquid result, obtained from field theoretical calculations. With interactions, the optical conductivity is dominated by an excotic excitation of a bound soliton-antisoliton pair known as a breather state. We visualize the oscillating motion of the breather state, which could provide the route to their experimental detection in e.g. cold atom experiments.

  11. Exponential speed-up with a single bit of quantum information: Testing the quantum butterfly effect

    CERN Document Server

    Poulin, D; Laflamme, R; Ollivier, H; Poulin, David; Blume-Kohout, Robin; Laflamme, Raymond; Ollivier, Harold

    2003-01-01

    We present an efficient quantum algorithm to measure the average fidelity decay of a quantum map under perturbation using a single bit of quantum information. Our algorithm scales only as the complexity of the map under investigation, so for those maps admitting an efficient gate decomposition, it provides an exponential speed up over known classical procedures. Fidelity decay is important in the study of complex dynamical systems, where it is conjectured to be a signature of quantum chaos. Our result also illustrates the role of chaos in the process of decoherence.

  12. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, Ross H., E-mail: r.mckenzie@uq.edu.au; Bekker, Christiaan [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072 (Australia); Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G. [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2014-05-07

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X–H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O–H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 − 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X–H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  13. Effect of quantum nuclear motion on hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Bekker, Christiaan; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2014-05-01

    This work considers how the properties of hydrogen bonded complexes, X-H⋯Y, are modified by the quantum motion of the shared proton. Using a simple two-diabatic state model Hamiltonian, the analysis of the symmetric case, where the donor (X) and acceptor (Y) have the same proton affinity, is carried out. For quantitative comparisons, a parametrization specific to the O-H⋯O complexes is used. The vibrational energy levels of the one-dimensional ground state adiabatic potential of the model are used to make quantitative comparisons with a vast body of condensed phase data, spanning a donor-acceptor separation (R) range of about 2.4 - 3.0 Å, i.e., from strong to weak hydrogen bonds. The position of the proton (which determines the X-H bond length) and its longitudinal vibrational frequency, along with the isotope effects in both are described quantitatively. An analysis of the secondary geometric isotope effect, using a simple extension of the two-state model, yields an improved agreement of the predicted variation with R of frequency isotope effects. The role of bending modes is also considered: their quantum effects compete with those of the stretching mode for weak to moderate H-bond strengths. In spite of the economy in the parametrization of the model used, it offers key insights into the defining features of H-bonds, and semi-quantitatively captures several trends.

  14. Quantum effects on compressional Alfven waves in compensated semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, M. R. [Department of Electronics and Communications Engineering, East West University, Aftabnagar, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh)

    2015-03-15

    Amplitude modulation of a compressional Alfven wave in compensated electron-hole semiconductor plasmas is considered in the quantum magnetohydrodynamic regime in this paper. The important ingredients of this study are the inclusion of the particle degeneracy pressure, exchange-correlation potential, and the quantum diffraction effects via the Bohm potential in the momentum balance equations of the charge carriers. A modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the evolution of the slowly varying amplitude of the compressional Alfven wave by employing the standard reductive perturbation technique. Typical values of the parameters for GaAs, GaSb, and GaN semiconductors are considered in analyzing the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave. Detailed analysis of the modulation instability in the long-wavelength regime is presented. For typical parameter ranges of the semiconductor plasmas and at the long-wavelength regime, it is found that the wave is modulationally unstable above a certain critical wavenumber. Effects of the exchange-correlation potential and the Bohm potential in the wave dynamics are also studied. It is found that the effect of the Bohm potential may be neglected in comparison with the effect of the exchange-correlation potential in the linear and nonlinear dispersions of the compressional Alfven wave.

  15. Horava-Lifshitz Gravity and Effective Theory of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chaolun

    2014-01-01

    We show that Horava-Lifshitz gravity theory can be employed as a covariant framework to build an effective field theory for the fractional quantum Hall effect that respects all the spacetime symmetries such as non-relativistic diffeomorphism invariance and anisotropic Weyl invariance as well as the gauge symmetry. The key to this formalism is a set of correspondence relations that maps all the field degrees of freedom in the Horava-Lifshitz gravity theory to external background (source) fields among others in the effective action of the quantum Hall effect, according to their symmetry transformation properties. We originally derive the map as a holographic dictionary, but its form is independent of the existence of holographic duality. This paves the way for the application of Horava-Lifshitz holography on fractional quantum Hall effect. Using the simplest holographic Chern-Simons model, we compute the low energy effective action at leading orders and show that it captures universal electromagnetic and geomet...

  16. Accelerated nuclear quantum effects sampling with open path integrals

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzola, Guglielmo

    2016-01-01

    We numericaly demonstrate that, in double well models, the autocorrelation time of open path integral Monte Carlo simulations can be much smaller compared to standard ones using ring polymers. We also provide an intuitive explanation based on the role of instantons as transition states of the path integral pseudodynamics. Therefore we propose that, in all cases when the ground state approximation to the finite temperature partition function holds, open path integral simulations can be used to accelerate the sampling in realistic simulations aimed to explore nuclear quantum effects.

  17. Vortex equations governing the fractional quantum Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Luciano, E-mail: lmedina@nyu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    An existence theory is established for a coupled non-linear elliptic system, known as “vortex equations,” describing the fractional quantum Hall effect in 2-dimensional double-layered electron systems. Via variational methods, we prove the existence and uniqueness of multiple vortices over a doubly periodic domain and the full plane. In the doubly periodic situation, explicit sufficient and necessary conditions are obtained that relate the size of the domain and the vortex numbers. For the full plane case, existence is established for all finite-energy solutions and exponential decay estimates are proved. Quantization phenomena of the magnetic flux are found in both cases.

  18. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A., E-mail: elembaj@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Tan, S. G. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Siu, Z. B. [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research A*STAR, DSI Building, 5 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore, Singapore 117608 (Singapore); NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  19. $W_{\\infty}$ algebra in the integer quantum Hall effects

    OpenAIRE

    Azuma, Hiroo

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the $W_{\\infty}$ algebra in the integer quantum Hall effects. Defining the simplest vacuum, the Dirac sea, we evaluate the central extension for this algebra. A new algebra which contains the central extension is called the $W_{1+\\infty}$ algebra. We show that this $W_{1+\\infty}$ algebra is an origin of the Kac-Moody algebra which determines the behavior of edge states of the system. We discuss the relation between the $W_{1+\\infty}$ algebra and the incompressibility of the int...

  20. Exploring the importance of quantum effects in nucleation: The archetypical Nen case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unn-Toc, Wesley; Halberstadt, Nadine; Meier, Christoph; Mella, Massimo

    2012-07-01

    The effect of quantum mechanics (QM) on the details of the nucleation process is explored employing Ne clusters as test cases due to their semi-quantal nature. In particular, we investigate the impact of quantum mechanics on both condensation and dissociation rates in the framework of the microcanonical ensemble. Using both classical trajectories and two semi-quantal approaches (zero point averaged dynamics, ZPAD, and Gaussian-based time dependent Hartree, G-TDH) to model cluster and collision dynamics, we simulate the dissociation and monomer capture for Ne8 as a function of the cluster internal energy, impact parameter and collision speed. The results for the capture probability Ps(b) as a function of the impact parameter suggest that classical trajectories always underestimate capture probabilities with respect to ZPAD, albeit at most by 15%-20% in the cases we studied. They also do so in some important situations when using G-TDH. More interestingly, dissociation rates kdiss are grossly overestimated by classical mechanics, at least by one order of magnitude. We interpret both behaviours as mainly due to the reduced amount of kinetic energy available to a quantum cluster for a chosen total internal energy. We also find that the decrease in monomer dissociation energy due to zero point energy effects plays a key role in defining dissociation rates. In fact, semi-quantal and classical results for kdiss seem to follow a common "corresponding states" behaviour when the proper definition of internal and dissociation energies are used in a transition state model estimation of the evaporation rate constants.